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Sample records for bankart lesions heal

  1. Arthroscopic Repair of a Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Poehling-Monaghan, Kirsten L.; Krych, Aaron J.; Dahm, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior bony defects of the glenoid rim, particularly those associated with instability, are often a frustrating challenge for arthroscopists because of the defects' inaccessibility from standard portals. This challenge is enhanced when the lesion is chronic and fibrous malunion of the fragment makes mobilization difficult. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of the relatively uncommon chronic posterior bony Bankart lesion. By use of lateral positioning and a standard anterior viewing portal and posterior working portal, as well as a strategically placed posterolateral accessory portal, the lesion is first freed from its malreduced position and ultimately repaired using suture anchor fixation of the bony fragment along with its associated labrum directly to the remaining glenoid rim. This technique, facilitated by precise portal placement, results in satisfactory fragment reduction, appropriate capsular tension, and restoration of anatomy. PMID:26870644

  2. Arthroscopic Bankart repair with the Suretac device. Part I: Clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Warner, J J; Miller, M D; Marks, P; Fu, F H

    1995-02-01

    Although arthroscopic Bankart repair has become an accepted surgical stabilization technique for anterior shoulder instability, the failure rate remains unacceptably high. Little information is available concerning healing of the Bankart repair. The purpose of this article is to clarify this issue by analyzing a cohort of 15 patients who underwent a "second-look" arthroscopy to evaluate and treat pain or recurrent instability following arthroscopic Bankart repair with the Suretac device (Acufex Microsurgical, Mansfield, MA). "Second-look" arthroscopy was performed at an average of 9 months following the index surgical procedure. The reasons for this second surgery were recurrent instability in 7, pain in 6, and pain and stiffness in 2. In the 7 patients with recurrent instability, the Bankart repair was found to be completely healed in 3 (43%), partially healed in 1 (14%), and had recurred in 3 (43%); however, 6 of 7 were observed to have lax capsular tissue. In 4 of these cases, retrospective review of the index surgical procedure showed that a technical error had been made during the repair. Two cases had biopsy of the repair site on "second-look" at 6 to 8 months, and this showed residual polyglyconate polymer debris surrounded by a histiocytic infiltrate. In the remaining 8 cases with stable shoulders, the Bankart repair had completely healed in 5 cases (62.5%) and partially healed in 3 cases (37.5%). The higher failure rate with this approach compared with open approaches appears to result from improper patient selection and errors in surgical technique. There is some question concerning healing strength of the Bankart repair, although complete healing of the Bankart does not seem to be a prerequesite for shoulder stability. Success of the procedure might be expected to improve by selecting only patients with unidirectional, posttraumatic, anterior instability who are found to have a discrete Bankart lesion and well-developed ligamentous tissue. PMID:7727007

  3. Functional outcome and the structural integrity of arthroscopic Bankart repair: a prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W; Pinto, Clinton; Poon, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Background Recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations are common in young patients with Bankart lesions. Arthroscopic repair is an established treatment; however, recurrent instability occurs in up to 35% of patients. It is unclear whether recurrence is the result of a failure of the surgical repair to heal or a repeat injury. The aim of the present pilot study was to assess radiographic healing of Bankart lesions 6 months post surgical repair and identify any correlations between radiographic findings and subsequent recurrent dislocations. Methods Eighteen patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair for recurrent instability. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrograms were obtained both pre-operatively and 6 months postoperatively. Standard T1 and T2 views were obtained along with an abduction and external rotation (ABER) view. Patients were followed for a minimum of 4 years for the risk of recurrence, and functional outcomes were obtained, including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Subjective Shoulder Scale, Ontario Shoulder Instability Index, Oxford Shoulder Instability Score and 12-Item Short Form Health Survey. Scores were correlated with pre-operative and postoperative MR findings. Results Six of 18 patients developed recurrent instability. We could not identify correlations between reconstructed labrum (labral bumper) position, failure at suture sites and ABER findings with recurrent instability or functional outcome. Paradoxically, there was a nonstatistically significant trend for patients with no clefts between the labrum and the glenoid at any points along the repair to have worse outcomes than patients with partial or complete clefts. Conclusions In our pilot study, MR arthrogram was used to evaluate the labrum in detail 6 months postoperatively. Despite its proven ability to detect labral lesions, we were unable to demonstrate any features on postoperative MR arthrogram that predicted either functional outcome or recurrent instability. At 6 months

  4. Results of Arthroscopic Bankart Lesion Repair in Patients with Post-Traumatic Anterior Instability of the Shoulder and a Non-Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesion with a Suture Anchor after a Minimum of 6-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Szyluk, Karol; Jasiński, Andrzej; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Mielnik, Michał; Koczy, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Background Shoulder instability is an important clinical problem. Arthroscopic surgery is an established treatment modality in shoulder instability, but it continues to be associated with a high rate of recurrences and complications. The purpose of the study was to analyze late outcomes of arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesions in patients with post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability and non-engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, with special focus on the incidence and causes of recurrences and complications. Material/Methods We investigated 92 patients (92 shoulders) who underwent surgery on account of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability. The duration of follow-up ranged from 6 to 12.5 years (mean: 8.2 years). All patients were operated on in the lateral decubitus position using FASTak 2.8-mm suture anchors (FASTak, Arthrex, Naples, Florida). Treatment outcomes were evaluated using the Rowe and University of California at Los Angeles rating system (UCLA). Results According to Rowe scores, there were 71 (81.5%) excellent, 12 (12.6%) good, 5 (5.3%) satisfactory, and 2 (2.1%) poor results. Rowe scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00) post-surgery, to a mean of 90 (range: 25–100). Treatment outcomes measured as UCLA scores improved in a statistically significant manner (p=0.00), reaching post-operative levels of 12–35 (mean: 33.5). There were 9 recurrences, 1 case of axillary nerve praxia, and 1 case of anchor loosening. Conclusions With rigorous criteria for qualifying patients for surgery, arthroscopic treatment of post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability produces good outcomes and low recurrence and complication rates irrespective of the number of previous dislocations, age, or sex. PMID:26256225

  5. Evaluation of vernier acuity near healed retinal laser lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, Elmar T.

    1997-05-01

    Seven Cynomolgus fasciculata who had graded laser lesions placed in own eye 6 years previously were evaluated for their vernier acuity by electrophysiologic recording techniques. In these experiments, 95 percent contrast vernier acuity targets were presented at high luminance levels to anesthetized primates. Visual evoked potentials were recorded by conventional means form scalp electrodes through hospital grade amplifiers. All animal testing was performed under IACUC approved protocols. The single q-switched pulses form a neodymium-YAG laser had produced lesions of 4 types: no visible change, minimal visible lesions, 'white dot' lesions and 'red dot' lesions in the eye at the time of placement. Single exposures had been made in four locations: 5 degrees superior, inferior and temporal to the fovea, and one foveally. Vernier recording proved somewhat successful in smaller animals with less than contained retinal hemorrhage lesions in the fovea. Initial analyses demonstrated a significant decrease of the pattern response signal/noise in the experimental eye overall, and an apparent relative loss of vernier signal in some lesioned eyes. Animals with the more severe lesions have somewhat degraded small patten responses and no recordable vernier response. Apparent lesser losses produced less effect.

  6. Evaluation of retinal laser lesion healing by perimetric electroretinography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, Elmar T.

    1996-04-01

    Eight Cynomolgus fasciculata who had graded laser lesions placed in one eye 6 years previously were evaluated by a stimulation and electrophysiologic recording technique to produce maps of retinal function. All animal testing was performed under IACUC approved protocols. The single q-switched pulses from a neodymium-YAG laser produced lesions of 4 types: no visible change, minimal visible lesions, `white dot' lesions (localized circumscribed retinal blanching) and `red dot' lesions (contained retinal hemorrhage) in the eye at the time of placement. Single exposures had been made in four locations: 5 degrees superior, inferior and temporal to the fovea, and one foveally. The multifocal (perimetric) electroretinogram was recorded from specialized contact lenses through hospital grade amplifiers. Initial analyses gave field maps that demonstrated apparent relative loss of function in some lesion sites. However, these losses were variable and occasionally patchy (i.e. disconnected areas of low signal). Repeated examinations of the same retinal areas showed high variability, even with 15 minute acquisition times and no apparent gaze drift. Apparent losses did not appear to correlate with visible retinal changes at the lesion site. Further research is needed to determine the biological substrate for this variability in response topography.

  7. Spontaneous Healing of Mycobacterium ulcerans Lesions in the Guinea Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Gomes, Rita; Marcq, Elly; Trigo, Gabriela; Gonçalves, Carine M.; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Castro, António G.; Pedrosa, Jorge; Fraga, Alexandra G.

    2015-01-01

    Buruli Ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans infection. BU is characterized by a wide range of clinical forms, including non-ulcerative cutaneous lesions that can evolve into severe ulcers if left untreated. Nevertheless, spontaneous healing has been reported to occur, although knowledge on this process is scarce both in naturally infected humans and experimental models of infection. Animal models are useful since they mimic different spectrums of human BU disease and have the potential to elucidate the pathogenic/protective pathway(s) involved in disease/healing. In this time-lapsed study, we characterized the guinea pig, an animal model of resistance to M. ulcerans, focusing on the macroscopic, microbiological and histological evolution throughout the entire experimental infectious process. Subcutaneous infection of guinea pigs with a virulent strain of M. ulcerans led to early localized swelling, which evolved into small well defined ulcers. These macroscopic observations correlated with the presence of necrosis, acute inflammatory infiltrate and an abundant bacterial load. By the end of the infectious process when ulcerative lesions healed, M. ulcerans viability decreased and the subcutaneous tissue organization returned to its normal state after a process of continuous healing characterized by tissue granulation and reepethelialization. In conclusion, we show that the experimental M. ulcerans infection of the guinea pig mimics the process of spontaneous healing described in BU patients, displaying the potential to uncover correlates of protection against BU, which can ultimately contribute to the development of new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26625302

  8. Spontaneous Healing of Mycobacterium ulcerans Lesions in the Guinea Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Silva-Gomes, Rita; Marcq, Elly; Trigo, Gabriela; Gonçalves, Carine M; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Castro, António G; Pedrosa, Jorge; Fraga, Alexandra G

    2015-12-01

    Buruli Ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans infection. BU is characterized by a wide range of clinical forms, including non-ulcerative cutaneous lesions that can evolve into severe ulcers if left untreated. Nevertheless, spontaneous healing has been reported to occur, although knowledge on this process is scarce both in naturally infected humans and experimental models of infection. Animal models are useful since they mimic different spectrums of human BU disease and have the potential to elucidate the pathogenic/protective pathway(s) involved in disease/healing. In this time-lapsed study, we characterized the guinea pig, an animal model of resistance to M. ulcerans, focusing on the macroscopic, microbiological and histological evolution throughout the entire experimental infectious process. Subcutaneous infection of guinea pigs with a virulent strain of M. ulcerans led to early localized swelling, which evolved into small well defined ulcers. These macroscopic observations correlated with the presence of necrosis, acute inflammatory infiltrate and an abundant bacterial load. By the end of the infectious process when ulcerative lesions healed, M. ulcerans viability decreased and the subcutaneous tissue organization returned to its normal state after a process of continuous healing characterized by tissue granulation and reepethelialization. In conclusion, we show that the experimental M. ulcerans infection of the guinea pig mimics the process of spontaneous healing described in BU patients, displaying the potential to uncover correlates of protection against BU, which can ultimately contribute to the development of new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26625302

  9. Skeletal Lesions in Human Tuberculosis May Sometimes Heal: An Aid to Palaeopathological Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Kara L.; Link, Karl; Rühli, Frank; Henneberg, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    In three to five percent of active cases of tuberculosis, skeletal lesions develop. Typically, these occur on the vertebrae and are destructive in nature. In this paper, we examined cases of skeletal tuberculosis from a skeletal collection (Galler Collection) with focus on the manifestation of bony changes due to tuberculosis in various body regions in association with antibiotic introduction. This skeletal collection was created in 1925–1977 by a pathologist at the University Hospital in Zürich, Ernst Galler. It includes the remains of 2426 individuals with documented clinical histories as well as autopsies. It contained 29 cases of skeletal tuberculosis lesions. We observed natural healing of vertebral lesions through several processes including fusion of vertebrae, bone deposition and fusion of posterior elements. In these cases, we observed a higher frequency and proportion of bone deposition and fusion of posterior vertebral elements where pharmacological agents were used. There were also four cases of artificial healing through surgically induced posterior spinal fusion. With the introduction of pharmaceutical treatments, the number of individuals with multiple tuberculous foci decreased from 80% to 25% when compared to individuals who did not receive any drug therapy. Investigation of comorbidities showed that pneumonia, pleuritis and being underweight were consistently present, even with pharmaceutical treatment. Our results have applications in palaeopathological diagnoses where healing and consequent bone deposition may complicate differential diagnoses. PMID:23638146

  10. Outcomes after Arthroscopic Bankart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Tyler James; Vega, Jose F.; Siqueira, Marcelo BP; Gelber, Jonathan David; Cagle, Robert; Saluan, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The shoulder is the most common joint dislocation effecting roughly 2% of the general population. Males are effected to a higher degree that females at a ratio of 3:1.1-2 The young, athletic population make up the largest portion of shoulder instability, and treated nonoperatively have a recurrent dislocation rate approaching 50%.3-5 Owens et. al recently published a cohort looking at 45 college athletes with an in season shoulder instability event. 73% of athletes returned to play in season. Only 36% of athletes completed the season without re-injury and 64% of athletes had a recurrent instability event.6 It is unknown how the outcomes of those who go on to have a recurrent dislocation in season are effected versus those who have a stabilization procedure after a first time dislocation. The objective of the current study is to report the postoperative outcomes of first time dislocators versus patients with recurrent dislocations prior to surgery. Methods: CPT codes were used to identify patients who had arthroscopic Bankart repair between 2003-2013. 439 patients aged 16-30 years were identified across 8 fellowship trained surgical practices. The first phase of the study was a retrospective chart review to obtain patient demographics, number of reported preoperative dislocations, review imaging, and number of anchors placed. Patients were identified as first time dislocators or as recurrent dislocators when they had more than one dislocation prior to surgical intervention. The second phase consisted of a survey to obtain a simple shoulder test score, whether they returned to sport, postoperative instability events and further surgery on the shoulder. Postoperative instability was defined as a subluxation or dislocation reported by the patient survey in the postoperative period. Of the 439 patients identified, 296 were excluded for revision surgery, open repair, posterior instability, multidirectional instability, HAGL lesion, labral tears involving the

  11. Healing of a large periapical lesion using triple antibiotic paste and intracanal aspiration in nonsurgical endodontic retreatment

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Jaidev Singh; Amita; Saini, Suresh Kumar; Bedi, Harmandeep Singh; Ratol, Sukhmilap Singh; Gill, Bobbin

    2014-01-01

    A patient with a large periapical lesion in relation to the maxillary right central and lateral incisors is presented here. During the conservative root canal treatment, aspiration of the fluid was done through the root canal, followed by placement of triple antibiotic paste for two weeks. Complete periapical healing was observed at the 24-month recall. This report confirms that for treatment of a large periapical lesion it is not always necessary to do surgical treatment and even cyst-like periapical lesions heal following conservative endodontic therapy. PMID:25565747

  12. Botulinum toxin type A in the healing of chronic lesion following bilateral spasticity of gluteus muscle.

    PubMed

    Cigna, Emanuele; Maruccia, Michele; Fanelli, Benedetta; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2014-08-01

    Use of botulinum toxin is expanding as the clinical studies demonstrate new potential therapeutic applications. In rehabilitation, botulinum toxin is above all used as adjunct therapy for the treatment of spasticity, but it may prove useful for other atypical clinical situations. A 17-year-old man had a sub-arachnoid haemorrhage following the rupture of cerebral aneurism. The patient presented gluteus maximus and medius bilaterally spasticity that produced a chronic lesion in the intergluteal cleft, a flexed wrist and a flexed elbow. As treatment for this spasticity, a total of 100 U botulinum toxin type A were injected into the glutei muscles. This treatment allowed for application of topical medication and subsequently, chronic lesion healing. Botulinum toxin A may be an important therapeutic aid for clinicians faced with treating persistent pathological conditions caused by spasticity. PMID:23078619

  13. [Idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia complicated by transitory cystic lesion in the healing stage].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Hachisuka, H; Akusawa, H; Chin, T; Kayama, Y; Nomura, Y; Horie, T

    1999-11-01

    A 21-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because chest X-ray films disclosed infiltrative shadows indicative of Mycoplasma pneumonia. He experienced fever and dry cough for 2 weeks. Chest X-ray findings showed ground-glass shadows in the lower fields of both lungs. The patient was not responsive to antibiotic therapy (PAPM/BP 1 g/day and CLDM 1,200 mg/day); dyspnea advanced rapidly and spikes of fever persisted. On hospital day 5, chest computed tomographic (CT) films disclosed interstitial shadows in all lower lung fields with dense infiltration. A transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) was performed on day 7, and TBLB specimens demonstrated infiltration of mononuclear cells in alveolar septa and organizing exudate in alveolar ducts with polypoid granulation tissue. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid findings revealed an increase in the total cell count and the percentage of lymphocytes. The CD 4/CD 8 ratio was normal. The findings of other laboratory tests ruled out drug-induced lung disease, infectious disease, and collagen disease. Idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia (BOOP) was diagnosed. Corticosteroid therapy (methyl prednisolone: 500 mg/day) was started. After 2 weeks of treatment (prednisolone: 30 mg/day), the dyspnea and fever disappeared. Chest CT films showed that the interstitial shadows had largely resolved, but that a large cystic lesion had formed rapidly in the right lower lung field (right S 6). To the best of our knowledge, no cases of BOOP complicated by cystic lesions in the healing stage have been reported to date. We speculated that polypoid granulation in a bronchiole had given rise to a check-valve mechanism. After 2 months of treatment (prednisolone: 15 mg/day), the cystic lesion disappeared. We concluded that the bronchiolar lesion of polypoid granulation had resolved in response to therapy, thus facilitating air-way communication and the release of air from the cyst. PMID:18217316

  14. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    PubMed

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-12-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. PMID:24750379

  15. Healing

    PubMed Central

    Ventres, William B.

    2016-01-01

    My personal ethos of healing is an expression of the belief that I can and do act to heal patients while I attend to the traditional goals of medicine. The 7 supporting principles that inform my ethos are dignity, authenticity, integrity, transparency, solidarity, generosity, and resiliency. I invite others, including medical students, residents, and practicing physicians, to reflect and discover their own ethos of healing and the principles that guide their professional growth. A short digital documentary accompanies this essay for use as a reflective prompt to encourage personal and professional development. PMID:26755787

  16. Healing.

    PubMed

    Ventres, William B

    2016-01-01

    My personal ethos of healing is an expression of the belief that I can and do act to heal patients while I attend to the traditional goals of medicine. The 7 supporting principles that inform my ethos are dignity, authenticity, integrity, transparency, solidarity, generosity, and resiliency. I invite others, including medical students, residents, and practicing physicians, to reflect and discover their own ethos of healing and the principles that guide their professional growth. A short digital documentary accompanies this essay for use as a reflective prompt to encourage personal and professional development. PMID:26755787

  17. Concept of healing of recurrent shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Donato

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the main surgical techniques applied in the treatment of anterior recurrent shoulder dislocation, aiming the achievement of the normality of articulate movements. This was obtained by combining distinct surgical procedures, which allowed the recovery of a complete functional capacity of the shoulder, without jeopardizing the normality of movement, something that has not been recorded in the case of the tense sutures of the surgical procedures of Putti-Platt, Bankart, Latarjet, Dickson-O'Dell and others. The careful review of the methods applied supports the conclusion that recurrent shoulder dislocation can be cured, since cure has been obtained in 97% of the treated cases. However, some degree of limitation in the shoulder movement has been observed in most of the treated cases. Our main goal was to achieve a complete shoulder functional recovery, by treating simultaneously all of the anatomical-pathological lesions, without considering the so-called essential lesions. The period of post-operatory immobilization only last for the healing of soft parts; this takes place in a position of neutral shoulder rotation, since the use of vascular bone graft eliminates the need for long time immobilization, due to the shoulder stabilization provided by rigid fixation of the coracoid at the glenoid edge, as in the Latarjet's technique. Our procedure, used since 1959, comprises the association of several techniques, which has permitted shoulder healing without movement limitation. That was because of the tension reduction in the sutures of the subescapularis, capsule, and coracobraquialis muscles. PMID:26229839

  18. Effect of Resiquimod 0.01% Gel on Lesion Healing and Viral Shedding When Applied to Genital Herpes Lesions▿

    PubMed Central

    Fife, Kenneth H.; Meng, Tze-Chiang; Ferris, Daron G.; Liu, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Resiquimod, a Toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist developed as a topical treatment to decrease recurrences of anogenital herpes, induces proinflammatory cytokines that may delay lesion healing. Adults with frequently recurring anogenital herpes were randomized within 24 h of onset of a recurrence to vehicle or resiquimod 0.01% gel two times per week for 3 weeks. Subjects underwent daily lesion assessments and sampling for herpes simplex virus DNA PCR for 21 days or until investigator-determined healing of lesion(s). Eighty-two subjects with a mean age of 39 ± 10.5 years and a median of seven recurrences per year were enrolled in the study. The qualifying recurrence was positive by PCR for herpes simplex virus in 68% of subjects. No difference was observed between the vehicle (39 subjects) and resiquimod (43 subjects) groups with respect to time to healing (median of 7.0 days versus median of 6.5 days, respectively; Cox proportional hazard model ratio of 1.229; 95% confidence interval, 0.778 to 1.942; P = 0.376). The distributions of maximum severity scores for any investigator-assessed local skin signs and for subject-assessed local symptoms were similar between treatment groups (P = 0.807 and P = 0.103, respectively). For subjects with at least one positive PCR result, no difference was observed for time to cessation of viral shedding (median of 7 days versus median of 5 days for vehicle and resiquimod groups, respectively; Cox proportional hazard model ratio of 1.471; 95% confidence interval, 0.786 to 2.754; P = 0.227). Application of resiquimod 0.01% two times per week for 3 weeks did not delay the healing of genital herpes lesions or reduce acute viral shedding. PMID:18039918

  19. Stress decreases, while central nucleus amygdala lesions increase, IL-8 and MIP-1alpha gene expression during tissue healing in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Kalin, Ned H; Shelton, Steven E; Engeland, Christopher G; Haraldsson, H Magnus; Marucha, Phillip T

    2006-11-01

    Stress impairs healing and in part this effect is thought to be mediated by glucocorticoids. However, the brain systems that underlie the effects of stress on healing remain to be determined. Since the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) plays a role in mediating an individual's behavioral and physiological reactivity to stress, we investigated, in rhesus monkeys, whether selective lesions of the CeA altered the gene expression of chemokines (IL-8 and MIP-1alpha) that are associated with early dermal healing. We used rhesus monkeys because they provide an excellent animal model to investigate brain mechanisms relevant to human stress, anxiety, and psychopathology. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity was assessed in the monkeys prior to the wound healing experiment demonstrating that the CeA lesions reduce HPA activity. In the healing experiment, stress decreased IL-8 and MIP-1alpha gene expression in both CeA lesioned and non-lesioned animals. Conversely, the CeA lesions increased the tissue expression of IL-8 and MIP-1alpha mRNA prior to and after stress exposure. These results demonstrate that in primates the CeA is a key brain region involved in the regulation of processes associated with wound healing. Because of brain and behavioral similarities between rhesus monkeys and humans, these results are particularly relevant to understanding brain mechanisms that influence healing in humans. PMID:16574374

  20. Effects of low intensity laser irradiation during healing of infected skin lesions in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaum, Ethne L.; Lilge, Lothar; Mazzulli, Tony; Pritzker, Kenneth P.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of low intensity laser therapy (LILT) on healing of infected skin wounds in the rat. Methods: Wounds on the dorsum of Sprague-Dawley rats (14 per group) were inoculated or sham-inoculated with P. aeruginosa. Wounds were irradiated or sham-irradiated three times weekly from Day 1-19 using 635nm or 808nm diode lasers at radiant exposure of 1 or 20 J/cm2 delivered in continuous wave (CW) or at an intensity modulation frequency of 3800Hz. Wound area and bacterial growth were evaluated three times weekly. Results: CW 808 nm (1 and 20 J/cm2) irradiation generally delayed healing in acute wounds. However, from Day 10 onwards CW 808 nm (1 J/cm2 and 20 J/cm2) and 808 nm 3800 Hz (1 J/cm2) irradiation improved healing in inoculated wounds. Healing in acute wounds improved using 635 nm irradiation at low radiant exposure (1 J/cm2); however, using 635 nm irradiation at high radiant exposure (20 J/cm2) delayed healing. Bacterial balance in wounds was significantly altered using 635 nm (20 J/cm2) and CW 808 nm irradiation (1 and 20 J/cm2). Conclusion: Clearing wounds of normal flora was not associated with improved healing. Proliferation of staphylococcal species in wounds was associated with delayed healing.

  1. Effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate on the healing of extraction sockets with a periapical lesion: A pilot study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji-Youn; Yon, Jeyoung; Lee, Jung-Seok; Lee, In-Kyeong; Yang, Cheryl; Kim, Min-Soo; Choi, Seong-Ho; Jung, Ui-Won

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the healing process of extraction sockets with a periapical lesion following immediate graft with collagenated bovine bone mineral (CBBM) soaked with epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Following induction of periapical lesions in premolars in five dogs, treatment of extraction sockets was divided into three groups: control (no treatment) and two test groups, CBBM with or without EGCG. 3D reconstruction and superimposition of the digital images were used to measure the dimensional changes in alveolar ridge. Histologic specimen was evaluated in all groups. The horizontal ridge widths at 4-mm level were wider in both test groups (3.3 ± 1.7 mm in CBBM; 3.0 ± 1.7 mm in CBBM+EGCG) than in the control group (1.7 ± 2.4 mm). Fibrosis and limited new bone formation were observed in the apical regions of test groups; however, the extent of fibrosis was less in the CBBM+EGCG group. Within the limitations of this study, it was conjectured that adjunctive use of EGCG with CBBM can be a candidate biomaterial in grafting of extraction socket with periapical lesion. Bone regeneration at the coronal region of the CBBM grafted socket might not be influenced by the presence of a periapical lesion. PMID:25045081

  2. Accelerated reepithelialization by triterpenes: proof of concept in the healing of surgical skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Metelmann, Hans-Robert; Brandner, Johanna M; Schumann, Hauke; Bross, Felix; Fimmers, Rolf; Böttger, Kerstin; Scheffler, Armin; Podmelle, Fred

    2015-01-01

    The acceleration of wound healing is a major surgical concern. A triterpene extract from birch bark (Betulae cortex) experimentally enhances keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and accelerates wound healing ex vivo. We conducted an open, blind-evaluated, controlled, prospective, randomized (1:1) phase II clinical trial in patients requiring split-thickness skin graft transplantation at two university hospitals in Germany. Donor sites on the upper legs were covered with a moist silicone-coated dressing. Oleogel-S10 ointment containing 10% birch bark extract was randomly applied to the distal or proximal half of the wound, with the other half serving as an intraindividual control, for 14 days after the skin graft surgery. The primary efficacy variable was faster reepithelialization as determined from macrophotographs by independent, blinded experts. Twenty-four patients were randomized and completed the trial. After the 14-day test period, the planned interim analysis revealed a highly significant (p < 0.0001) superiority of Oleogel-S10 in the primary efficacy variable and the trial was terminated early due to ethical concerns. The treatment side was also better reepithelialized and more similar to normal skin after 3 months. In conclusion, Oleogel-S10 significantly accelerated reepithelialization at split-thickness skin graft donor sites. Treatment with Oleogel-S10 was safe and well tolerated. PMID:25034442

  3. Minimally invasive clinical approach in indirect pulp therapy and healing of deep carious lesions.

    PubMed

    Opal, S; Garg, S; Dhindsa, A; Taluja, T

    2014-01-01

    Indirect pulp treatment is a conservative vital pulp procedure performed in deep carious lesion approximating the pulp, but without signs or symptoms of pulp degeneration. Removing the carious biomass along with sealing the residual caries from extrinsic substrate and oral bacteria makes residual caries after the first excavation less active. This allows time for pulpo dentinal complex to form tertiary dentine so that at the second excavation, there is less likelihood of pulpal exposure. It has also been suggested that by changing the cavity environment from an active lesion into a more slowly progressing lesion, will be accompanied by more regular tubular tertiary dentin formation. The success of this approach has been demonstrated by various randomized controlled studies comparing conventional treatment of such lesions with stepwise excavation. These results are echoed at clinical, radiographic, macroscopic, microscopic and ultrastructural level during follow up visits. This study reviews promising concepts and rationale of minimally invasive indirect pulp therapy technique where conventional wisdom of caries removal is challenged PMID:25095310

  4. Platelet lysate and chondroitin sulfate loaded contact lenses to heal corneal lesions.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Giuseppina; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Rossi, Silvia; Delfino, Alessio; Riva, Federica; Icaro Cornaglia, Antonia; Marrubini, Giorgio; Musitelli, Giorgio; Del Fante, Claudia; Perotti, Cesare; Caramella, Carla; Ferrari, Franca

    2016-07-25

    Hemoderivative tear substitutes contain various ephiteliotrophic factors, such as growth factors (GF), involved in ocular surface homeostasis without immunogenic properties. The aim of the present work was the loading of platelet lysate into contact lenses to improve the precorneal permanence of platelet lysate growth factors on the ocular surface to enhance the treatment of corneal lesions. To this purpose, chondroitin sulfate, a sulfated glycosaminoglycan, which is normally present in the extracellular matrix, was associated with platelet lysate. In fact, chondroitin sulfate is capable of electrostatic interaction with positively charged growth factors, in particular, with bFGF, IGF, VEGF, PDGF and TGF-β, resulting in their stabilization and reduced degradation in solution. In the present work, various types of commercially available contact lenses have been loaded with chondroitin sulfate or chondroitin sulfate in association with platelet lysate to achieve a release of growth factors directly onto the corneal surface lesions. One type of contact lenses (PureVision(®)) showed in vitro good proliferation properties towards corneal cells and were able to enhance cut closure in cornea constructs. PMID:27234702

  5. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 cream improves burn-wound healing and attenuates burn-gastric lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Mikus, D; Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Petricevic, A; Aralica, G; Druzijancic, N; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Pigac, B; Perovic, D; Kolombo, M; Kokic, N; Mikus, S; Duplancic, B; Fattorini, I; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Prkacin, I; Konjevoda, P; Stambuk, N; Anic, T

    2001-12-01

    The effects of the gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 were investigated when administered topically or systemically in burned mice. This agent is known to have a beneficial effect in a variety of models of gastrointestinal lesions, as well as on wound or fracture healing. Deep partial skin thickness burns (1.5x1.5 cm) covering 20% of total body area, were induced under anesthesia on the back of mice by controlled burning and gastric lesions were assessed 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days following injury. The first application of BPC 157 was immediately following burning, and thereafter, once daily, until 24 h before sacrifice. In the initial experiments, exposure to direct flame for 5 s, the BPC 157 was applied at 10 microg or 10 ng/kg b.w. intraperitoneally (i.p.) by injection or alternatively, topically, at the burn, as a thin layer of cream (50 microg of BPC 157 dissolved in 2 ml of distilled water was mixed with 50 g of commercial neutral cream (also used as local vehicle-control)), while silver sulfadiazine 1% cream was a standard agent acting locally. Others received no local medication: they were treated i.p. by injection of distilled water (distilled water-control) or left without any medication (control). In subsequent experiments involving deeper burns (direct flame for 7 s), BPC 157 creams (50 microg, 5 microg, 500 ng, 50 ng or 5 ng of BPC 157 dissolved in 2 ml of distilled water was mixed with 50 g of commercial neutral cream), or vehicle as a thin layer of cream, were applied topically, at the burn. Compared with untreated controls, in both experiments, in the BPC 157 cream-treated mice all parameters of burn healing were improved throughout the experiment: less edema was observed and inflammatory cell numbers decreased. Less necrosis was seen with an increased number of capillaries along with an advanced formation of dermal reticulin and collagen fibers. An increased number of preserved follicles were observed. Two weeks after injury, BPC 157 cream

  6. Slow release delivery of rioprostil by an osmotic pump inhibits the formation of acute aspirin-induced gastric lesions in dogs and accelerates the healing of chronic lesions without incidence of side effects.

    PubMed

    Katz, L B; Shriver, D A

    1989-10-01

    Rioprostil, a primary alcohol prostaglandin E1 analog, inhibits gastric acid secretion and prevents gastric lesions induced by a variety of irritants in experimental animals. Because rioprostil is relatively short-acting, it would be of significant benefit clinically if its duration of action could be extended to allow once daily dosing. This investigation demonstrates that when administered via an osmotically driven pump (Osmet, Alza Corp.), rioprostil prevents the acute effects of aspirin on the gastric mucosa of dogs, accelerates the healing of aspirin-induced gastric lesions, and heals preexisting aspirin-induced gastric lesions during chronic administration of aspiring. The potency of rioprostil against acute gastric lesion formation was greatest when delivered from a 24-hr release pump (ED50 = 0.77 micrograms/kg/24 hr) and was 37 times greater than when administered as a single oral bolus. In addition, this activity occurred at doses which had little or no gastric antisecretory activity in betazole-stimulated Heidenhain pouch dogs. When delivered from a 24-hr pump, rioprostil (100 micrograms/kg/24 hr) healed preexisting aspirin-induced gastric lesions within 8 days after removal of aspirin, or after 15 days during continued daily aspirin administration. Additional studies determined that administration of rioprostil at doses of 720, 1440, or 2160 micrograms/kg/24 hr (935-2805 times the gastroprotective ED50 in 24 hr pumps) was well tolerated, with only slight, transient increases in body temperature, softening of the stools, and mild sedation at the highest dose. Administration of rioprostil daily for 5 days at 960 micrograms/kg/24 hr from 24-hr release pumps was also well tolerated by all dogs with no evidence of any accumulation of effect of rioprostil. In summary, administration of rioprostil via an osmotic pump increases its potency and duration of action against the gastric lesion-inducing effect of aspirin, and maintains a wide ratio of safety. PMID

  7. A comparison of the effect of triamcinolone ointment and mouthwash with or without zinc on the healing process of aphthous stomatitis lesions.

    PubMed

    Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Taghavi Zenooz, Ali; Sohrabi, Azin; Gholizadeh, Narges; Bahramian, Ayla; Jamali, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common ulcerative diseases of the oral mucosa. Definitive etiology of RAS has not been conclusively established. There is no certain treatment for aphthous stomatitis but some drugs such as steroids are commonly used for the treatment of RAS. Regarding the effect of zinc on the healing process of epithelial layer and cell division, in this research the effect of triamcinolone (with orabase) in combination with a zinc-containing mouthwash and triamcinolone alone on the healing process of RAS lesions was assessed. Methods. The present study consisted of 20 patients diagnosed with RAS. The patients were instructed to rinse the mouth-wash or placebo three times a day and triamcinolone ointment twice a day for two weeks. The largest dimension of the ulcer was measured by a digital caliper and the severity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS). Number, size, duration, ulcer-free period and pain of the lesions were evaluated twice a week for twomonths. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 using Mann-Whitney U test and t-test. Results . A decrease was seen in the mean pain severity score (P = 0.631) and the size of the lesions but it was not statistically significant (P = 0.739). Also the difference between the number of lesions (P = 0.739), duration and ulcer-free period (P = 0.873) were not statistically significant. Conclusion. Zinc mouthwash seems to be as effective on wound healing process as typical treatment modalities for RAS. PMID:27429724

  8. A comparison of the effect of triamcinolone ointment and mouthwash with or without zinc on the healing process of aphthous stomatitis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Taghavi Zenooz, Ali; Sohrabi, Azin; Gholizadeh, Narges; Bahramian, Ayla; Jamali, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common ulcerative diseases of the oral mucosa. Definitive etiology of RAS has not been conclusively established. There is no certain treatment for aphthous stomatitis but some drugs such as steroids are commonly used for the treatment of RAS. Regarding the effect of zinc on the healing process of epithelial layer and cell division, in this research the effect of triamcinolone (with orabase) in combination with a zinc-containing mouthwash and triamcinolone alone on the healing process of RAS lesions was assessed. Methods. The present study consisted of 20 patients diagnosed with RAS. The patients were instructed to rinse the mouth-wash or placebo three times a day and triamcinolone ointment twice a day for two weeks. The largest dimension of the ulcer was measured by a digital caliper and the severity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS). Number, size, duration, ulcer-free period and pain of the lesions were evaluated twice a week for twomonths. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 using Mann-Whitney U test and t-test. Results. A decrease was seen in the mean pain severity score (P = 0.631) and the size of the lesions but it was not statistically significant (P = 0.739). Also the difference between the number of lesions (P = 0.739), duration and ulcer-free period (P = 0.873) were not statistically significant. Conclusion. Zinc mouthwash seems to be as effective on wound healing process as typical treatment modalities for RAS. PMID:27429724

  9. Probing the immune and healing response of murine intestinal mucosa by time-lapse 2-photon microscopy of laser-induced lesions with real-time dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina; Klinger, Antje; Freidank, Sebastian; Linz, Norbert; Eckert, Sebastian; Hüttmann, Gereon; Gebert, Andreas; Vogel, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Gut mucosa is an important interface between body and environment. Immune response and healing processes of murine small intestinal mucosa were investigated by intravital time-lapse two-photon excited autofluorescence microscopy of the response to localized laser-induced damage. Epithelial lesions were created by 355-nm, 500-ps pulses from a microchip laser that produced minute cavitation bubbles. Size and dynamics of these bubbles were monitored using a novel interferometric backscattering technique with 80 nm resolution. Small bubbles (< 2.5 µm maximum radius) merely resulted in autofluorescence loss of the target cell. Larger bubbles (7-25 µm) affected several cells and provoked immigration of immune cells (polymorphonuclear leucocytes). Damaged cells were expelled into the lumen, and the epithelium healed within 2 hours by stretching and migration of adjacent epithelial cells. PMID:25360369

  10. Infliximab Preferentially Induces Clinical Remission and Mucosal Healing in Short Course Crohn's Disease with Luminal Lesions through Balancing Abnormal Immune Response in Gut Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lijuan; Yang, Xuehua; Xia, Lu; Zhong, Jie; Ge, Wensong; Wu, Jianxin; Liu, Hongchun; Liu, Fei; Liu, Zhanju

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of infliximab (IFX) in treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) patients. 106 CD patients were undergoing treatment with IFX from five hospitals in Shanghai, China. Clinical remission to IFX induction therapy was defined as Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) < 150. Clinical response was assessed by a decrease in CDAI ≥ 70, and the failure as a CDAI was not significantly changed or increased. Ten weeks after therapy, 61 (57.5%) patients achieved clinical remission, 17 (16.0%) had clinical response, and the remaining 28 (26.4%) were failed. In remission group, significant changes were observed in CDAI, the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD), and serum indexes. Patients with short disease duration (22.2 ± 23.2 months) and luminal lesions showed better effects compared to those with long disease duration (71.0 ± 58.2 months) or stricturing and penetrating lesions. IFX markedly downregulated Th1/Th17-mediated immune response but promoted IL-25 production in intestinal mucosa from remission group. No serious adverse events occurred to terminate treatment. Taken together, our studies demonstrated that IFX is efficacious and safe in inducing clinical remission, promoting mucosal healing, and downregulating Th1/Th17-mediated immune response in short course CD patients with luminal lesions. PMID:25873771

  11. Functional outcome after open and arthroscopic Bankart repair for traumatic shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Both open and arthroscopic Bankart repair are established procedures in the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. While the open procedure is still considered as the "golden standard" functional outcome is supposed to be better in the arthroscopic procedure. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the functional outcome between open and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Materials and methods In 199 patients a Bankart procedure with suture anchors was performed, either arthroscopically in presence of an detached, but not elongated capsulolabral complex (40) or open (159). After a median time of 31 months (12 to 67 months) 174 patients were contacted and agreed to follow-up, 135 after open and 39 after arthroscopic Bankart procedure. Results Re-dislocations occurred in 8% after open and 15% after arthroscopic Bankart procedure. After open surgery 4 of the 11 re-dislocations occurred after a new adequate trauma and 1 of the 6 re-dislocations after arthroscopic surgery. Re-dislocations after arthroscopic procedure occured earlier than after open Bankart repair. An external rotation lag of 20° or more was observed more often (16%) after open than after arthroscopic surgery (3%). The Rowe score demonstrated "good" or "excellent" functional results in 87% after open and in 80% patients after arthroscopic treatment. Conclusion In this retrospective investigation the open Bankart procedure demonstrated good functional results. The arthroscopic treatment without capsular shift resulted in a better range of motion, but showed a tendency towards more frequently and earlier recurrence of instability. Sensitive patient selection for arthroscopic Bankart repair is recommended especially in patients with more than five dislocations. PMID:19258206

  12. Anatomic and Biomechanical Comparison of Traditional Bankart Repair With Bone Tunnels and Bankart Repair Utilizing Suture Anchors

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Christopher H.; Charette, Ryan; Cavanaugh, Zachary; Shea, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditional Bankart repair using bone tunnels has a reported failure rate between 0% and 5% in long-term studies. Arthroscopic Bankart repair using suture anchors has become more popular; however, reported failure rates have been cited between 4% and 18%. There have been no satisfactory explanations for the differences in these outcomes. Hypothesis: Bone tunnels will provide increased coverage of the native labral footprint and demonstrate greater load to failure and stiffness and decreased cyclic displacement in biomechanical testing. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-two fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were used. For footprint analysis, the labral footprint area was marked and measured using a Microscribe technique in 6 specimens. A 3-suture anchor repair was performed, and the area of the uncovered footprint was measured. This was repeated with traditional bone tunnel repair. For the biomechanical analysis, 8 paired specimens were randomly assigned to bone tunnel or suture anchor repair with the contralateral specimen assigned to the other technique. Each specimen underwent cyclic loading (5-25 N, 1 Hz, 100 cycles) and load to failure (15 mm/min). Displacement was measured using a digitized video recording system. Results: Bankart repair with bone tunnels provided significantly more coverage of the native labral footprint than repair with suture anchors (100% vs 27%, P < .001). Repair with bone tunnels (21.9 ± 8.7 N/mm) showed significantly greater stiffness than suture anchor repair (17.1 ± 3.5 N/mm, P = .032). Mean load to failure and gap formation after cyclic loading were not statistically different between bone tunnel (259 ± 76.8 N, 0.209 ± 0.064 mm) and suture anchor repairs (221.5 ± 59.0 N [P = .071], 0.161 ± 0.51 mm [P = .100]). Conclusion: Bankart repair with bone tunnels completely covered the footprint anatomy while suture anchor repair covered less than 30% of the native footprint. Repair using bone tunnels

  13. Superior Labrum Anterior Posterior Lesions and Associated Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Beyzadeoglu, Tahsin; Circi, Esra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP) lesions often cause shoulder pain, dysfunction, and instability. Professional athletes require a high level of shoulder function for competition and overhead activities. Purpose: To evaluate elite athletes who had arthroscopic surgery for common shoulder pathologies and SLAP lesions with a follow-up of more than 3 years. The associated intra-articular pathologies and return to play were documented. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Thirty-five shoulders in 34 elite athletes (4 women and 30 men; mean age, 25 years [range, 18-32 years]) had arthroscopic repair of SLAP lesions and accompanying Bankart or rotator cuff tears between January 2008 and November 2011. The documentation included patient symptoms, physical examination, radiological analysis with radiographs, and magnetic resonance imaging. Shoulder function was evaluated preoperatively and at follow-up using American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Kerlan Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) scores. The mean follow-up was 52 months. Results: Isolated SLAP lesions were seen in 17.1% of patients, SLAP lesions and partial cuff tear occurred in 25.7%, associated Bankart lesions in 37.1%, full-thickness rotator cuff tears in 8.6%, Bankart and posterior labrum lesions in 8.6%, and Bankart and full-thickness rotator cuff tears in 2.9%. Return to play was a mean 6.4 ± 1.5 months. The mean postoperative ASES and KJOC scores were 89.6 ± 4.6 and 80.9 ± 6.8, respectively, compared with preoperative scores of 64.0 ± 7.2 and 50.5 ± 10.3 (t test, P < .01). Conclusion: The majority (88.2%) of professional athletes returned to their preinjury levels. SLAP lesions may frequently occur with Bankart lesions and rotator cuff tears. A high rate of return to sport at the same level of athletic performance can be achieved by anatomic repair and effective rehabilitation. PMID:26665050

  14. Clinical and radiographical evaluation of the healing of large periapical lesions using triple antibiotic paste, photo activated disinfection and calcium hydroxide when used as root canal disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Varughese, Jolly M.; Thomas, Kunjamma; Abraham, Aby; James, Elizabeth P.; Maroli, Ramesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate clinically and radio graphically, the healing following nonsurgical treatment of periapical lesions when Photo Activated Disinfection(PAD), triple antibiotic paste and calcium hydroxide was used as root canal disinfectant. Material and Methods: Sixty patients (20 for PAD, 20 for triple antibiotic paste, 20 for calcium hydroxide) with periapical lesions in the maxillary and mandibular anterior region were selected from the outpatient section of the Department of Conservative Dentistry & Endodontics, Govt. Dental College, Kozhikode to participate in this study. The patients were selected with a preoperative score of 4 or 5. There were no significant differences for the PAI Scores between the three groups at the start of the experiment .Intracanal disinfection was done in the three groups followed by obturation. The patients recalled at 3,6,12,18 months interval. Results: At 18 months follow up 15 % of cases failed in calcium hydroxide group,5% in triple antibiotic paste and no failure cases were seen in PAD group. Success criteria were divided into strict and loose, while the former had statistically significant p value the latter did not. Kruskal-Wallis Test showed an increased mean value for PDT and a significant change in p value. Bonferroni post hoc test was done to compare if there is any significant change between groups. Only significant change was found between calcium hydroxide and photoactivated disinfection . Conclusion: PAD was more effective intracanal disinfectant at 6,12 and 18 months. Key words:Calcium, hydroxide, photo activated disinfection, triple antibiotic paste, root canal disinfection PMID:25136422

  15. Comparison of Bristow procedure and Bankart arthroscopic method as the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Zarezade, Abolghasem; Dehghani, Mohammad; Rozati, Ali Reza; Banadaki, Hossein Saeid; Shekarchizade, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anterior shoulder dislocation is the most common major joint dislocation. In patients with recurrent shoulder dislocation, surgical intervention is necessary. In this study, two methods of treatment, Bankart arthroscopic method and open Bristow procedure, were compared. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial survey had been done in the orthopedic department of Alzahra and Kashani hospitals of Isfahan during 2008-2011. Patients with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation who were candidates for surgical treatment were randomly divided into two groups, one treated by Bankart arthroscopic technique and the other treated by Bristow method. All the patients were assessed after the surgery using the criteria of ROWE, CONSTANT, UCLA, and ASES. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Six patients (16.22%) had inappropriate condition with ROWE score (score less than 75); of them, one had been treated with Bristow and five with Bankart (5.26 vs. 27.78). Nine patients (24.32%) had appropriate condition, which included six from Bristow group and three treated by Bankart technique (31.58 vs. 16.67). Finally, 22 patients (59.46%) showed great improvement with this score, which included 12 from Bristow and 10 from Bankart groups (63.16 vs. 55.56). According to Fisher's exact test, there were no significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.15). Conclusion: The two mentioned techniques did not differ significantly, although some parameters such as level of performance, pain intensity, use of analgesics, and range of internal rotation showed more improvement in Bristow procedure. Therefore, if there is no contraindication for Bristow procedure, it is preferred to use this method. PMID:25590034

  16. Talar Dome Lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... be helpful in reducing the pain and inflammation. Physical therapy . Range-of-motion and strengthening exercises are beneficial once the lesion is adequately healed. Physical therapy may also include techniques to reduce pain and ...

  17. Arsenic exposure at low-to-moderate levels and skin lesions, arsenic metabolism, neurological functions, and biomarkers for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases: Review of recent findings from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Gamble, Mary; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Argos, Maria; Graziano, Joseph H.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2009-09-01

    The contamination of groundwater by arsenic in Bangladesh is a major public health concern affecting 35-75 million people. Although it is evident that high levels (> 300 {mu}g/L) of arsenic exposure from drinking water are related to adverse health outcomes, health effects of arsenic exposure at low-to-moderate levels (10-300 {mu}g/L) are not well understood. We established the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) with more than 20,000 men and women in Araihazar, Bangladesh, to prospectively investigate the health effects of arsenic predominately at low-to-moderate levels (0.1 to 864 {mu}g/L, mean 99 {mu}g/L) of arsenic exposure. Findings to date suggest adverse effects of low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure on the risk of pre-malignant skin lesions, high blood pressure, neurological dysfunctions, and all-cause and chronic disease mortality. In addition, the data also indicate that the risk of skin lesion due to arsenic exposure is modifiable by nutritional factors, such as folate and selenium status, lifestyle factors, including cigarette smoking and body mass index, and genetic polymorphisms in genes related to arsenic metabolism. The analyses of biomarkers for respiratory and cardiovascular functions support that there may be adverse effects of arsenic on these outcomes and call for confirmation in large studies. A unique strength of the HEALS is the availability of outcome data collected prospectively and data on detailed individual-level arsenic exposure estimated using water, blood and repeated urine samples. Future prospective analyses of clinical endpoints and related host susceptibility will enhance our knowledge on the health effects of low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure, elucidate disease mechanisms, and give directions for prevention.

  18. Magnet Healing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finegold, Leonard

    2000-03-01

    Many people are convinced that static magnets—applied to their skin—will heal ills, and many businesses sell such magnets. The biophysics of such healing was reviewed [1] together with the general biophysics of static fields. Birds and insects do use the earth’s magnetic field for navigation. While insect and frog egg development can clearly be influenced by high fields (7 T and 17 T respectively), there is no experimental evidence that small magnetic fields (of less than 0.5 T) might heal, and much evidence that they cannot heal. A puzzle to the physics community is: How to show laypersons that simple magnets (very probably) do not heal, however attractive that idea might be. [1] L. Finegold, The Physics of "Alternative Medicine": Magnet Therapy, The Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine 3:26-33 (1999).

  19. Archetypal healing.

    PubMed

    Jones, D; Churchill, J E

    1994-01-01

    With emphasis on healing versus curing, the authors draw from a wide assortment of treatment methods for psychospiritual relief of pain in the terminally ill. These archetypal methods include: life-review therapy; ministry of presence; clinical hypnosis; myths, symbols, rituals, and community; creative therapies. In life-review therapy, the ill person shares his/her life story with the provider much like the healing rituals of the ancient storyteller did in his community. In the ministry of presence, the caregiver focuses on sharing his vulnerability, not his professional skills. Clinical hypnosis emphasizes the naturalness and simplicity of accessing the unconscious along with problem areas of the hypnoclinician. Myths, symbols, rituals, and community serve as nurturing agents in the intervention of pain, while creative therapies such as music, drama, crafts, and art continue to be powerful healing instruments. Archetypal healing produces relief of pain in the caregiver, as well as the ill, with emphasis on healing versus curing. PMID:8117487

  20. Wound healing for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Zitelli, J

    1987-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex sequence of events, beginning with tissue injury, mediated by inflammation, and ending long after reepithelialization is complete. Research and controlled clinical experience have provided a better understanding so that clinicians can influence the events of healing to decrease pain, control bleeding, infection, and cosmetic result as well as speed the time for complete healing. The following is a summary of guidelines for the management of wound healing: (1) wound creation; wounds should be created with minimal necrosis of tissue in order to prevent delays in healing. Electrosurgical, cryosurgical, and laser surgical wounds heal more slowly than wounds created by scalpel excision or curettage. Electro-coagulation should be used sparingly in sutured wounds. Large lesions are best treated in a single stage rather than in divided treatments since the rate of wound healing is not proportional to the area but instead to the logarithm of the area. Thus, the total healing time is much shorter if done in a single treatment session. (2) use of drugs; corticosteroids given before or within three days of wounding in dose of prednisone 40 mg or greater will inhibit wound healing. Vitamin A topically or systemically may reverse this inhibition. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are more important for their effects on platelet function and bleeding than on wound healing. (3) wound dressings; the use of occlusive dressings to promote moist wound healing is the most significant advance in wound management. Occlusive dressings shorten the time for healing, decrease pain, reduce wound contamination, and improve the cosmetic result. (4) control of wound contraction and scar formation; at the time of wound formation, guiding sutures may be helpful in wound healing by secondary intention in order to control the direction of wound contraction and prevent distortion. Intralesional steroids may be useful for hypertrophic scars and keloids

  1. SLAP lesions: a treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Brockmeyer, Matthias; Tompkins, Marc; Kohn, Dieter M; Lorbach, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Tears of the superior labrum involving the biceps anchor are a common entity, especially in athletes, and may highly impair shoulder function. If conservative treatment fails, successful arthroscopic repair of symptomatic SLAP lesions has been described in the literature particularly for young athletes. However, the results in throwing athletes are less successful with a significant amount of patients who will not regain their pre-injury level of performance. The clinical results of SLAP repairs in middle-aged and older patients are mixed, with worse results and higher revision rates as compared to younger patients. In this population, tenotomy or tenodesis of the biceps tendon is a viable alternative to SLAP repairs in order to improve clinical outcomes. The present article introduces a treatment algorithm for SLAP lesions based upon the recent literature as well as the authors' clinical experience. The type of lesion, age of patient, concomitant lesions, and functional requirements, as well as sport activity level of the patient, need to be considered. Moreover, normal variations and degenerative changes in the SLAP complex have to be distinguished from "true" SLAP lesions in order to improve results and avoid overtreatment. The suggestion for a treatment algorithm includes: type I: conservative treatment or arthroscopic debridement, type II: SLAP repair or biceps tenotomy/tenodesis, type III: resection of the instable bucket-handle tear, type IV: SLAP repair (biceps tenotomy/tenodesis if >50 % of biceps tendon is affected), type V: Bankart repair and SLAP repair, type VI: resection of the flap and SLAP repair, and type VII: refixation of the anterosuperior labrum and SLAP repair. PMID:26818554

  2. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... heal through natural scar formation. continue The Healing Process Before healing begins, the body gears up to ... dry at all times to help the healing process. As the body does its healing work on ...

  3. PREVALENCE OF LESIONS ASSOCIATED WITH TRAUMATIC RECURRENT SHOULDER DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Carrazzone, Oreste Lemos; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara; Ambra, Luiz Felipe Morlin; Neto, Nicola Archetti; Matsumoto, Marcelo Hide; Belloti, João Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of lesions associated with traumatic anterior shoulder instability and the relationships between the prevalence of these lesions and the number of episodes and time since symptoms started. Method: Fifty-seven patients aged 18 to 40 years, with traumatic anterior shoulder instability, more than one episode of shoulder dislocation and at least six months since the first dislocation, who required surgery to treat the instability, were selected. Arthroscopic inspection was performed on all the patients to assess any associated lesions. Results: The prevalence of lesions was assessed, and Bankart lesions were the most prevalent, followed by Hill-Sachs lesions, while rotator cuff injuries were the least prevalent. There was no correlation from comparison between the number of episodes of dislocation and the prevalence of associated lesions. On the other hand, in relation to the time since symptoms started, the patients who had had symptoms for longer times had fewer Hill-Sachs lesions. Conclusion: It was not possible to affirm that, in patients with chronic shoulder instability, the numbers of associated lesions increased with the time since symptoms started, or with the number of episodes of dislocation. PMID:27027020

  4. How wounds heal

    MedlinePlus

    ... How puncture wounds heal; How burns heal; How pressure sores heal; How lacerations heal ... bleed. For example, burns, some puncture wounds, and pressure sores don't bleed. Once the scab forms, your ...

  5. Imaging inflammatory acne: lesion detection and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cula, Gabriela O.; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-02-01

    It is known that effectiveness of acne treatment increases when the lesions are detected earlier, before they could progress into mature wound-like lesions, which lead to scarring and discoloration. However, little is known about the evolution of acne from early signs until after the lesion heals. In this work we computationally characterize the evolution of inflammatory acne lesions, based on analyzing cross-polarized images that document acne-prone facial skin over time. Taking skin images over time, and being able to follow skin features in these images present serious challenges, due to change in the appearance of skin, difficulty in repositioning the subject, involuntary movement such as breathing. A computational technique for automatic detection of lesions by separating the background normal skin from the acne lesions, based on fitting Gaussian distributions to the intensity histograms, is presented. In order to track and quantify the evolution of lesions, in terms of the degree of progress or regress, we designed a study to capture facial skin images from an acne-prone young individual, followed over the course of 3 different time points. Based on the behavior of the lesions between two consecutive time points, the automatically detected lesions are classified in four categories: new lesions, resolved lesions (i.e. lesions that disappear completely), lesions that are progressing, and lesions that are regressing (i.e. lesions in the process of healing). The classification our methods achieve correlates well with visual inspection of a trained human grader.

  6. Identification and management of chronic shoulder pain in the presence of an MRA-confirmed humeral avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) lesion

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, Arif; McLeod, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present the assessment and conservative management of chronic shoulder pain in the presence of a humeral avulsion of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (HAGL) lesion in an active individual. Clinical Features: A 47 year-old female office-worker with constant, deep, right shoulder pain with occasional clicking and catching claimed to have “tore something” in her right shoulder five years ago while performing reverse bicep curls. A physical exam led to differential diagnoses of a Superior Labrum Anterior to Posterior (SLAP) lesion, Bankart lesion, and bicipital tendinopathy. A Magnetic Resonance Arthrogram revealed a HAGL lesion. Intervention and Outcome: A conservative chiropractic treatment plan in addition to physical therapy was initiated. The patient reported 75% improvement in symptoms after 4 treatments over a four-week duration. Summary: This case demonstrates the successful implementation of a conservative plan of management suggesting that the treatment provided to this patient should be considered and attempted prior to arthroscopic surgery. PMID:27385837

  7. Superior labral anterior posterior lesions of the shoulder: Current diagnostic and therapeutic standards

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Dominik; Schöffl, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment of superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) lesion becomes more and more frequent which is the consequence of evolving progress in both, imaging and surgical technique as well as implants. The first classification of SLAP lesions was described in 1990, a subdivision in four types existed. The rising comprehension of pathology and pathophysiology in SLAP lesions contributed to increase the types in SLAP classification to ten. Concerning the causative mechanism of SLAP lesions, acute trauma has to be differed from chronic degeneration. Overhead athletes tend to develop a glenohumeral internal rotation deficit which forms the basis for two controversial discussed potential mechanisms of pathophysiology in SLAP lesions: Internal impingement and peel-back mechanism. Clinical examination often remains unspecific whereas soft tissue imaging such as direct or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography has technically improved and is regarded to be indispensable in detection of SLAP lesions. Concomitant pathologies as Bankart lesions, rotator cuff tears or perilabral cysts should be taken into consideration when planning a personalized therapeutic strategy. In addition, normal variants such as sublabral recess, sublabral hole, Buford complex and other less common variants have to be distinguished. The most frequent SLAP type II needs a sophisticated approach when surgical teatment comes into consideration. While SLAP repair is considered to be the standard operative option, overhead athletes benefit from a biceps tenodesis because improved patient-reported satisfaction and higher rate of return to pre-injury level of sports has been reported. PMID:26495243

  8. What is esoteric healing?

    PubMed

    Settersten, Lori

    2011-06-01

    Esoteric Healing is a type of energy healing that originated from the teachings of Djwhal Khul and Alice Bailey first published in the early 1950s. Esoteric Healing instructors and practitioners are located in more than 19 countries throughout the world. Nurses and nurse practitioners as well as other health professionals (e.g., psychologists and physicians) have integrated Esoteric Healing into their current practice and/or have a separate practice in Esoteric Healing. According to Dochterman and Bulechek, the nursing diagnosis "energy field, disturbed" is defined as a "disruption in the flow of energy surrounding a person's being." Esoteric Healing is proposed to assist a person in balancing her or his flow of energy. In this article, Esoteric Healing is defined, and the components of the energy field according to the teachings of Esoteric Healing are differentiated. The basic Esoteric Healing treatment procedure, treatment protocols, and indications for when Esoteric Healing may be an appropriate healing modality option are described. Finally, research on Esoteric Healing is addressed. PMID:20966434

  9. Gene therapy for bone healing

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical problems in bone healing include large segmental defects, nonunion and delayed union of fractures, and spinal fusions. Gene-transfer technologies have the potential to aid healing by permitting the local delivery and sustained expression of osteogenic gene products within osseous lesions. Key questions for such an approach include the choice of transgene, vector and gene-transfer strategy. Most experimental data have been obtained using cDNAs encoding osteogenic growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), BMP-4 and BMP-7, in conjunction with both nonviral and viral vectors using in vivo and ex vivo delivery strategies. Proof of principle has been convincingly demonstrated in small-animal models. Relatively few studies have used large animals, but the results so far are encouraging. Once a reliable method has been developed, it will be necessary to perform detailed pharmacological and toxicological studies, as well as satisfy other demands of the regulatory bodies, before human clinical trials can be initiated. Such studies are very expensive and often protracted. Thus, progress in developing a clinically useful gene therapy for bone healing is determined not only by scientific considerations, but also by financial constraints and the ambient regulatory environment. PMID:20569532

  10. Clinical Features of Spontaneous Partial Healing During Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection.

    PubMed

    Marion, Estelle; Chauty, Annick; Kempf, Marie; Le Corre, Yannick; Delneste, Yves; Croue, Anne; Marsollier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing skin disease leading to extensive cutaneous and subcutaneous destruction and functional limitations. Spontaneous healing in the absence of medical treatment occurs in rare cases, but this has not been well described in the literature. Methods.  In a retrospective case study in an area of Benin where this disease is highly endemic, we selected 26 Buruli ulcer patients presenting features of spontaneous healing from a cohort of 545 Buruli ulcer patients treated between 2010 and 2013. Results.  The 26 patients studied had a median age of 13.5 years and were predominantly male (1.4:1). Three groups of patients were defined on the basis of their spontaneous healing characteristics. The first group (12 patients) consisted of patients with an ulcer of more than 1 year's duration showing signs of healing. The second (13 patients) group contained patients with an active Buruli ulcer lesion some distance away from a first lesion that had healed spontaneously. Finally, the third group contained a single patient displaying complete healing of lesions from a nodule, without treatment and with no relapse. Conclusions.  We defined several features of spontaneous healing in Buruli ulcer patients and highlighted the difficulties associated with diagnosis and medical management. Delays in consultation contributed to the high proportion of patients with permanent sequelae and a risk of squamous cell carcinoma. Early detection and antibiotic treatment are the best ways to reduce impairments. PMID:26925431

  11. Clinical Features of Spontaneous Partial Healing During Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Estelle; Chauty, Annick; Kempf, Marie; Le Corre, Yannick; Delneste, Yves; Croue, Anne; Marsollier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing skin disease leading to extensive cutaneous and subcutaneous destruction and functional limitations. Spontaneous healing in the absence of medical treatment occurs in rare cases, but this has not been well described in the literature. Methods. In a retrospective case study in an area of Benin where this disease is highly endemic, we selected 26 Buruli ulcer patients presenting features of spontaneous healing from a cohort of 545 Buruli ulcer patients treated between 2010 and 2013. Results. The 26 patients studied had a median age of 13.5 years and were predominantly male (1.4:1). Three groups of patients were defined on the basis of their spontaneous healing characteristics. The first group (12 patients) consisted of patients with an ulcer of more than 1 year′s duration showing signs of healing. The second (13 patients) group contained patients with an active Buruli ulcer lesion some distance away from a first lesion that had healed spontaneously. Finally, the third group contained a single patient displaying complete healing of lesions from a nodule, without treatment and with no relapse. Conclusions. We defined several features of spontaneous healing in Buruli ulcer patients and highlighted the difficulties associated with diagnosis and medical management. Delays in consultation contributed to the high proportion of patients with permanent sequelae and a risk of squamous cell carcinoma. Early detection and antibiotic treatment are the best ways to reduce impairments. PMID:26925431

  12. Nonsurgical management of periapical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marina; de Ataide, Ida

    2010-01-01

    Periapical lesions develop as sequelae to pulp disease. They often occur without any episode of acute pain and are discovered on routine radiographic examination. The incidence of cysts within periapical lesions varies between 6 and 55%. The occurrence of periapical granulomas ranges between 9.3 and 87.1%, and of abscesses between 28.7 and 70.07%. It is accepted that all inflammatory periapical lesions should be initially treated with conservative nonsurgical procedures. Studies have reported a success rate of up to 85% after endodontic treatment of teeth with periapical lesions. A review of literature was performed by using electronic and hand searching methods for the nonsurgical management of periapical lesions. Various methods can be used in the nonsurgical management of periapical lesions: the conservative root canal treatment, decompression technique, active nonsurgical decompression technique, aspiration-irrigation technique, method using calcium hydroxide, Lesion Sterilization and Repair Therapy, and the Apexum procedure. Monitoring the healing of periapical lesions is essential through periodic follow-up examinations. PMID:21217952

  13. Promogran and complex surgical lesions: a case report.

    PubMed

    Guarnera, G; Restuccia, A

    2004-06-01

    Surgical excision of a venous malformation on a young girl's thigh left a large and deep ulcerative wound. Treatment of the lesion with Promogran dressings suited this patient's specific needs and produced substantial healing within five weeks. PMID:15214142

  14. The healing Buddha.

    PubMed

    Chen, Thomas S N; Chen, Peter S Y

    2004-11-01

    The iconography of the healing Buddha embraces two healing traditions, symbolized by the healing stone lapis lazuli from Central Asia and by the myrobalan fruit from the ayurvedic medicine of ancient India. The first mention of the healing Buddha is in Buddhist texts of the first century BC, and the earliest extant icons date from the fourth century AD. This suggests the cult of the healing Buddha was a relatively late development in the history of Buddhism. Worshippers sought his help in alleviating spiritual, mental and physical suffering, as well as for medical cures. In China followers believed he was also a cosmic Buddha, to whom one appealed for longevity and protection from disasters. This form of faith-based healing remains vibrant in China, Japan and Tibet to this day. PMID:15486623

  15. Use of a topical emulsion for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L; Jorizzo, Joseph L; Kircik, Leon H

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of skin trauma following removal of actinic keratoses and skin cancer lesions and following radiation therapy for breast cancer is an often under-treated problem compared to the primary condition. However, skin trauma can cause patients significant discomfort, pain, and loss of quality of life. Palliative treatments such as lotions and ointments may help soothe the skin trauma, but helping the healing process is the best way to treat the wound and relieve patients of their discomfort. In clinical trials, the use of Biafine, a topical emulsion, promoted wound healing following these clinical situations by increasing the number of macrophages recruited to a wound and thus enhancing healing. This topical emulsion has also been proven to be soothing for the patient. This review will discuss the molecular mechanisms of wound healing and the uses of Biafine in the treatment of skin damage caused by procedures for various conditions such as actinic keratosis, skin cancer lesions, and radiation dermatitis. PMID:18338743

  16. Authenticity and healing.

    PubMed

    McGee, Michael D

    2014-06-01

    Caring and compassion cannot be faked. These are not actions we perform mechanically but states of being that flow from within to make healing connection with others in need. To be authentically healing requires that we live authentic lives. This paper describes what it means to be authentic from a psychospiritual perspective, discusses the components of authentic caring and ends with an exploration of ways to cultivate the authenticity of our lives in general and in our efforts to heal others. PMID:24526471

  17. Self-healing materials.

    PubMed

    Hager, Martin D; Greil, Peter; Leyens, Christoph; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2010-12-14

    Self-healing materials are able to partially or completely heal damage inflicted on them, e.g., crack formation; it is anticipated that the original functionality can be restored. This article covers the design and generic principles of self-healing materials through a wide range of different material classes including metals, ceramics, concrete, and polymers. Recent key developments and future challenges in the field of self-healing materials are summarised, and generic, fundamental material-independent principles and mechanism are discussed and evaluated. PMID:20839257

  18. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds. PMID:20139336

  19. Self Healing Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    We introduce the concept of self-healing in the field of complex networks modelling; in particular, self-healing capabilities are implemented through distributed communication protocols that exploit redundant links to recover the connectivity of the system. Self-healing is a crucial in implementing the next generation of smart grids allowing to ensure a high quality of service to the users. We then map our self-healing procedure in a percolation problem and analyse the interplay between redundancies and topology in improving the resilience of networked infrastructures to multiple failures. We find exact results both for planar lattices and for random lattices, hinting the role of duality in the design of resilient networks. Finally, we introduce a cavity method approach to study the recovery of connectivity after damage in self-healing networks. CNR-PNR National Project ``Crisis-Lab,'' EU HOME/2013/CIPS/AG/4000005013 project CI2C and EU FET project MULTIPLEX nr.317532.

  20. Contrasting Lesion Dynamics of White Syndrome among the scleractinian corals Porites spp

    PubMed Central

    Lozada-Misa, Paula; Kerr, Alexander; Raymundo, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    White syndrome (WS) is currently the most prevalent disease of scleractinian corals in the Indo-Pacific region, with an ability to exist in both epizootic and enzootic states. Here, we present results of an examination of WS lesion dynamics and show that potentially associated traits of host morphology (i.e., branching vs. massive), lesion size, and tissue deposition rate influence disease severity and recovery. Lesion healing rate was positively correlated with initial lesion size in both morphologies, but the rate at which lesions healed differed between morphologies. New lesions in branching Porites cylindrica appeared less frequently, were smaller and healed more quickly, but were more abundant than in closely-related massive Porites sp(p). The positive association between lesion size and healing rate was partly explained by geometry; branching limited lesion maximum size, and larger lesion margins contained more polyps producing new tissue, resulting in faster healing. However, massive colonies deposited tissue more slowly than branching colonies, resulting in slower recovery and more persistent lesions. Corallite size and density did not differ between species and did not, therefore, influence healing rate. We demonstrated multiple modes of pathogen transmission, which may be influenced by the greater potential for pathogen entrainment in branching vs. massive morphologies. We suggest that attributes such as colony morphology and species-specific growth rates require consideration as we expand our understanding of disease dynamics in colonial organisms such as coral. PMID:26120844

  1. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  2. Healing Childhood Trauma Worldwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuban, Caelan

    2012-01-01

    Millions of the world's children are exposed to traumatic events and relationships every day. Whatever the cause, this overwhelming stress produces a host of unsettling symptoms and reactions. The author highlights six practical principles that undergird healing interventions.

  3. Saliva and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Brand, Henk S; Veerman, Enno C I

    2013-01-01

    Wounds in the oral cavity heal faster and with less scarring than wounds in other parts of the body. One of the factors implicated in this phenomenon is the presence of saliva, which promotes the healing of oral wounds in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, which improves the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. Furthermore, saliva contains a variety of proteins that play a role in the various stages of the intraoral wound healing. Tissue factor, present in salivary exosomes, accelerates the clotting of blood dramatically. The subsequent proliferation of epithelial cells is promoted by growth factors in saliva, especially epidermal growth factor. The importance of secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor is demonstrated by the observation that in the absence of this salivary protein, oral wound healing is considerably delayed. Members of the salivary histatin family promote wound closure in vitro by enhancing cell spreading and cell migration. Cell proliferation is not enhanced by histatin. Cyclization of histatin increased its biological activity approximately 1,000-fold compared to linear histatin. These studies suggest that histatins could potentially be used for the development of new wound healing medications. PMID:23878824

  4. Metalloproteinases and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Matthew P.; Martins, Vera L.C.; O'Toole, Edel A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are present in both acute and chronic wounds. They play a pivotal role, with their inhibitors, in regulating extracellular matrix degradation and deposition that is essential for wound reepithelialization. The excess protease activity can lead to a chronic nonhealing wound. The timed expression and activation of MMPs in response to wounding are vital for successful wound healing. MMPs are grouped into eight families and display extensive homology within these families. This homology leads in part to the initial failure of MMP inhibitors in clinical trials and the development of alternative methods for modulating the MMP activity. MMP-knockout mouse models display altered wound healing responses, but these are often subtle phenotypic changes indicating the overlapping MMP substrate specificity and inter-MMP compensation. Recent Advances: Recent research has identified several new MMP modulators, including photodynamic therapy, protease-absorbing dressing, microRNA regulation, signaling molecules, and peptides. Critical Issues: Wound healing requires the controlled activity of MMPs at all stages of the wound healing process. The loss of MMP regulation is a characteristic of chronic wounds and contributes to the failure to heal. Future Directions: Further research into how MMPs are regulated should allow the development of novel treatments for wound healing. PMID:25945285

  5. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR TRAUMATIC ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY USING SUTURING OF THE LESION AT THE OPENED MARGIN OF THE GLENOID CAVITY

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Duarte, Clodoaldo; Botelho, Vinícius; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical results from patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability that was treated surgically through arthroscopic viewing, using bioabsorbable anchors and a technique for remove the cartilage of the anterior glenoid rim for repairing a Bankart lesion. Method: Between March 2006 and October 2008, 27 shoulders in 27 patients with a diagnosis of traumatic anterior shoulder instability were operated. The patients’ mean age was 28 years and they had had between two and 25 previous episodes of dislocation. The patients were predominantly male (24; 89%). The minimum length of follow-up was 24 months and the mean was 36 months. None of the patients had previously undergone surgery on the affected shoulder or had any significant bone lesion at the glenoid margin. The postoperative clinical assessment was done using the Rowe scale. To measure the preoperative and postoperative joint range of motion, we used the method described by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Results: According to the Rowe criteria, 25 patients (93%) achieved excellent results and two (7%) had poor results. None of the patients presented good or fair results. Twenty-three patients were satisfied with the results obtained (85%), and returned to their activities without limitations, while four patients (15%) had some degree of limitation. There was recurrence of instability in two patients (7%). Conclusion: Treatment of traumatic anterior shoulder instability through arthroscopic viewing using a technique for remove the cartilage of the anterior glenoid rim for repairing a Bankart lesion provided excellent results for 93% of the patients operated. PMID:27042640

  6. Shoulder arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... repair; SLAP lesion; Acromioplasty; Bankart repair; Bankart lesion; Shoulder repair; Shoulder surgery; Rotator cuff repair ... their tendons that form a cuff over the shoulder joint. These muscles and tendons hold the arm ...

  7. [Foot lesions].

    PubMed

    Stelzner, C; Schellong, S; Wollina, U; Machetanz, J; Unger, L

    2013-11-01

    The foot is the target organ of a variety of internal diseases. Of upmost importance is the diabetic foot syndrome (DFS). Its complex pathophysiology is driven by the diabetic neuropathy, a vastly worsening effect is contributed by infection and ischemia. Seemingly localised lesions have the potential for phlegmone and septicaemia if not diagnosed and drained early. The acral lesions of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) have unique features as well. However, their life-threatening potential is lower than that of DFS even if the limb is critical. Notably, isolated foot lesions with a mere venous cause may arise from insufficient perforator veins; the accompanying areas of haemosiderosis will lead the diagnostic path. Cholesterol embolization (blue toe syndrome, trash foot) elicits a unique clinical picture and will become more frequent with increasing numbers of catheter-based procedures. Finally, descriptions are given of podagra and of foot mycosis as disease entities not linked to perfusion. The present review focuses on the depiction of disease and its diagnosis, leaving therapeutic considerations untouched. PMID:24114468

  8. Healing responses following cryothermic and hyperthermic tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwin, Braden L.; Coad, James E.

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive, thermally ablative, interventional technologies have been changing the practice of medicine since before the turn of the 20th century. More recently, cryothermic and hyperthermic therapies have expanded in terms of their spectrum of thermal generators, modes for controlling and monitoring the treatment zone and both benign and malignant medical applications. The final tissue, and hence clinical outcome, of a thermal ablation is determined by the summation of direct primary (thermal) and secondary (apoptosis, ischemia, free radical, inflammation, wound healing, etc.) injury followed by possible cellular regeneration and scar formation. The initial thermal lesion can be broadly divided into two major zones of cellular death: 1) the complete ablation zone closer to the thermal source and 2) the peripheral transition zone with a decreasing gradient of cell death. While not applicable to cryotherapy, hyperthermic complete ablation zones are subdivided into two zones: 1) thermal or heat fixation and 2) coagulative necrosis. It is important to clearly differentiate these tissue zones because of their substantially different healing responses. Therefore, the development of clinically successful thermal therapies requires an understanding of tissue healing responses. The healing responses can be affected by a number of additional factors such as the tissue's anatomy, organ specific healing differences, blood supply, protein vs. lipid content, and other factors. Thus, effective biomedical instrument development requires both an understanding of thermal cell injury/death and the body's subsequent healing responses. This paper provides a general overview of the healing pathways that follow thermal tissue treatment.

  9. Wound healing in urology.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment. PMID:25500273

  10. Identification of Biomarkers for Footpad Dermatitis Development and Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juxing; Tellez, Guillermo; Escobar, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Footpad dermatitis (FPD) is a type of skin inflammation that causes necrotic lesions on the plantar surface of the footpads in commercial poultry, with significant animal welfare, and economic implications. To identify biomarkers for FPD development and wound healing, a battery cage trial was conducted in which a paper sheet was put on the bottom of cages to hold feces to induce FPD of broilers. Day-of-hatch Ross 308 male broiler chicks were fed a corn-soybean meal diet and assigned to 3 treatments with 8 cages per treatment and 11 birds per cage. Cages without paper sheets were used as a negative control (NEG). Cages with paper sheets during the entire growth period (d 0-30) were used as a positive control (POS) to continually induce FPD. Cages with paper sheets during d 0-13 and without paper sheets during d 14-30 were used to examine the dynamic of FPD development and lesion wound healing (LWH). Footpad lesions were scored to grade (G) 1-5 with no lesion in G1 and most severe lesion in G5. Covering with paper sheets in POS and LWH induced 99% incidence of G3 footpads on d 13. Removing paper sheets from LWH healed footpad lesions by d 30. One representative bird, with lesions most close to pen average lesion score, was chosen to collect footpad skin samples for biomarker analysis. Total collagen protein and mRNA levels of tenascin X (TNX), type I α1 collagen (COL1A1), type III α1 collagen (COL3A1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3), and integrin α1 (ITGA1) mRNA levels were decreased (P < 0.05), while mRNA levels of tenascin C (TNC), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), IL-1β, and the ratio of MMP2 to all TIMP were increased (P < 0.03) in G3 footpads in POS and LWH compared to G1 footpads in NEG on d 14. These parameters continued to worsen with development of more severe lesions in POS. After paper sheets were removed (i.e., LWH), levels of these parameters gradually or rapidly

  11. Identification of Biomarkers for Footpad Dermatitis Development and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juxing; Tellez, Guillermo; Escobar, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Footpad dermatitis (FPD) is a type of skin inflammation that causes necrotic lesions on the plantar surface of the footpads in commercial poultry, with significant animal welfare, and economic implications. To identify biomarkers for FPD development and wound healing, a battery cage trial was conducted in which a paper sheet was put on the bottom of cages to hold feces to induce FPD of broilers. Day-of-hatch Ross 308 male broiler chicks were fed a corn–soybean meal diet and assigned to 3 treatments with 8 cages per treatment and 11 birds per cage. Cages without paper sheets were used as a negative control (NEG). Cages with paper sheets during the entire growth period (d 0–30) were used as a positive control (POS) to continually induce FPD. Cages with paper sheets during d 0–13 and without paper sheets during d 14–30 were used to examine the dynamic of FPD development and lesion wound healing (LWH). Footpad lesions were scored to grade (G) 1–5 with no lesion in G1 and most severe lesion in G5. Covering with paper sheets in POS and LWH induced 99% incidence of G3 footpads on d 13. Removing paper sheets from LWH healed footpad lesions by d 30. One representative bird, with lesions most close to pen average lesion score, was chosen to collect footpad skin samples for biomarker analysis. Total collagen protein and mRNA levels of tenascin X (TNX), type I α1 collagen (COL1A1), type III α1 collagen (COL3A1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3), and integrin α1 (ITGA1) mRNA levels were decreased (P < 0.05), while mRNA levels of tenascin C (TNC), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), IL-1β, and the ratio of MMP2 to all TIMP were increased (P < 0.03) in G3 footpads in POS and LWH compared to G1 footpads in NEG on d 14. These parameters continued to worsen with development of more severe lesions in POS. After paper sheets were removed (i.e., LWH), levels of these parameters gradually

  12. Spirituality, healing and medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, D

    1991-01-01

    The natural science base of modern medicine influences the way in which medicine is delivered and may ignore the spiritual factors associated with illness. The history of spirituality in healing presented here reflects the growth of scientific knowledge, demands for religious renewal, and the shift in the understanding of the concept of health within a broader cultural context. General practitioners have been willing to entertain the idea of spiritual healing and include it in their daily practice, or referral network. Recognizing patients' beliefs in the face of suffering is an important factor in health care practice. PMID:1777299

  13. The Fragility of Healing.

    PubMed

    Mattingly, Cheryl; Lawlor, Mary

    2001-03-01

    This article explores a paradox-the simultaneous cultivation and suppression of "healing dramas" by pediatric rehabilitation therapists. Dramatic moments are defined as ones in which the routine exercises and treatment activities of therapeutic practice are transformed into narrative plots. These improvisational plots involve multiple characters, risks, suspense, and above all, a heightened sense that something is at stake. Experience itself becomes the focus of attention for the patient. Based upon ethnographic research in Chicago and Los Angeles, this article offers an anatomy of two such moments, investigating not only how healing dramas are constructed between patients and healers but how and why institutional discourses and practices invite their abandonment. PMID:20930950

  14. Advances and Perspectives on Tissue Repair and Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; de Sousa, Ana Paula C.; Aciole, Jouber M. S.; Soares, Luiz G. P.

    2011-08-01

    Wound healing involves local and systemic responses that reflect the etiology of the lesion, type of tissue, systemic condition and others. Despite being essentially the same for different wounds, the pattern of healing may change due to intrinsic and/or extrinsic factors. The type of tissue has also to be considered. Several therapeutic approaches have been used to improve healing including phototherapies such as Laser, LEDs and Lamps. Their effects on soft and mineralized tissues are well reported. The choice of appropriated parameters is essential for the results of the treatment and includes wavelength, power density, energy, duration and frequency of application and others. We studied the effects of different types of light on the healing of both soft and mineralized tissues using different models. We found that the use of Laser and polarized light are effective on improving the healing of diabetic and undernourished animals. We also found that Laser light is capable of improving the healing of drug-induced impairment and on increasing the survival rate of flaps on both diabetic and non-diabetic animals. We have also studied and shown the influence of the laser parameters on the healing of surgical and laser wounds. Lately we verified the positive effect of LEDs on healing. We used Laser/LED light for improving bone healing in conditions such as in dental implants, autologous grafts, biomaterials and fractures. From these reports and our own experience we have no doubt whatsoever that the use of phototherapies, carried out with appropriate parameters, promotes quicker tissue repair.

  15. Educators Healing Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quisenberry, Nancy L., Ed.; McIntyre, D. John, Ed.

    This book presents a collection of essays on racism and the role of teachers in healing racism. There are three sections with nine papers. After an "Introduction" (D. John McIntyre), Section 1, "Historical Perspectives," includes: (1) "Racism in Education" (Gwendolyn Duhon Boudreaux, Rose Duhon-Sells, Alice Duhon-Ross, and Halloway C. Sells); and…

  16. Phytochemicals in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Sharad, Shashwat; Maheshwari, Radha K.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Traditional therapies, including the use of dietary components for wound healing and skin regeneration, are very common in Asian countries such as China and India. The increasing evidence of health-protective benefits of phytochemicals, components derived from plants is generating a lot of interest, warranting further scientific evaluation and mechanistic studies. Recent Advances: Phytochemicals are non-nutritive substances present in plants, and some of them have the potential to provide better tissue remodeling when applied on wounds and to also act as proangiogenic agents during wound healing. Critical Issues: In this review, we briefly discuss the current understanding, important molecular targets, and mechanism of action(s) of some of the phytochemicals such as curcumin, picroliv, and arnebin-1. We also broadly review the multiple pathways that these phytochemicals regulate to enhance wound repair and skin regeneration. Future Directions: Recent experimental data on the effects of phytochemicals on wound healing and skin regeneration establish the potential clinical utility of plant-based compounds. Additional research in order to better understand the exact mechanism and potential targets of phytochemicals in skin regeneration is needed. Human studies a2nd clinical trials are pivotal to fully understand the benefits of phytochemicals in wound healing and skin regeneration. PMID:27134766

  17. Native American Healing Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman, Tarrell A. A.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous healing practices among Native Americans have been documented in the United States since colonisation. Cultural encapsulation has deterred the acknowledgement of Native American medicinal practices as a precursor to folk medicine and many herbal remedies, which have greatly influenced modern medicine. Understanding Native American…

  18. Healing Racism: Education's Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutstein, Nathan, Ed.; Morgan, Michael, Ed.

    The 16 essays in this collection address how to lessen the effects of racism through classroom education by emphasizing the oneness of humanity and the relatedness of all human beings. These selections offer advice about healing racism from the early grades through secondary education. The essays are: (1) "Racism as a Disease" (John Woodall); (2)…

  19. Indigenous Healing Legacies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taliman, Valerie

    2001-01-01

    On a tour of Cuba, Native scholars from North and South America reconnected with the "extinct" Taino people and shared their knowledge of traditional healing herbs. Western science is just beginning to validate the tremendous knowledge base that indigenous healers have developed--most indigenous medicinal knowledge is useful for finding new…

  20. Healing Magazine, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBiase, Miriam H., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This newly designed volume of "Healing Magazine" features practical, clinical information aimed at sharing current work in children's mental health. The first issue shares information on guiding children through times of trauma, particularly after the events of September 11th. Two articles provide information on debriefing after trauma and talking…

  1. The arts as healing.

    PubMed

    Kivnick, H Q; Erikson, J M

    1983-10-01

    The relationship between artistic involvement and individual mental health is considered, and the concept of "healing" is differentiated from that of "therapy." Seven properties of art experience are identified which, when developed, have contributed to patients' recovery from mental illness. Implications of these properties for clinical programs, and the related value of art experience for non-patients, are discussed. PMID:6638153

  2. Healing Invisible Wounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual abuse, war,…

  3. Nutritional aspects of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ayello, E A; Thomas, D R; Litchford, M A

    1999-01-01

    Proper nutrition is essential to prevent the development of pressure ulcers and to support adequate and timely wound healing. Additionally, research and clinical observation suggest nutrients play a major role in wound healing. How the nutrients Vitamin A, Vitamin C, zinc, calories, protein, and fluids are used in wound healing and recommendations regarding use of supplements are discussed in this article. PMID:10855131

  4. Healing of Chronic Wounds through Systemic Effects of Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañedo, L.; Trigos, I.; García-Cantú, R.; Godina-Nava, J. J.; Serrano, G.

    2002-08-01

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF) were configured to interact with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). These ELF were applied in the arm to five patients with chronic wounds resistant to medical and surgical treatment. Wound healing began in all patients during the first two weeks after ELF exposure permiting their previously unresponsive chronic wounds to function as internal controls. All lesions were cured or healed >70% in less than four months. Systemic effects were explained by ELF activation of PBMC and their transportation through the blood to the affected site. This therapy is effective in selected patients with chronic wounds.

  5. Can we improve radiological analysis of osseous lesions in chronic anterior shoulder instability?

    PubMed

    Charousset, C; Beauthier, V; Bellaïche, L; Guillin, R; Brassart, N; Thomazeau, H

    2010-12-01

    Osseous lesions of the glenoid cavity and humeral head are predictive of recurrence after Bankart arthroscopic procedures. The objective of this study was to analyze, for each glenoid and humeral defect plain x-ray criteria of the Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS), two aspects: inter- and intraobserver reliability of their qualitative and quantitative assessment and correlations between positive criteria and their quantitative measurement. Thirty-one medical files were retained for evaluation of the glenoid and 26 for humeral notch assessment. The yes or no response for the ISIS criterion was completed by its quantitative measurement using the Griffiths and Sugaya CT methods for the glenoid and the P/R index calculation on plain x-rays with internal rotation for the Hill-Sachs lesion. Three observers provided two consecutive readings for each criterion. The analysis of the glenoid radiological criterion of the ISIS seems sufficiently reproducible for daily practice. When the evaluation is positive, bone loss is greater than 15%, without a maximum value established. In this study, the analysis of the ISIS humeral notch criterion was not reproducible. It can be improved using the P/R index and should be completed by CT imaging. PMID:21035420

  6. The Fragility of Healing

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, Cheryl; Lawlor, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This article explores a paradox—the simultaneous cultivation and suppression of “healing dramas” by pediatric rehabilitation therapists. Dramatic moments are defined as ones in which the routine exercises and treatment activities of therapeutic practice are transformed into narrative plots. These improvisational plots involve multiple characters, risks, suspense, and above all, a heightened sense that something is at stake. Experience itself becomes the focus of attention for the patient. Based upon ethnographic research in Chicago and Los Angeles, this article offers an anatomy of two such moments, investigating not only how healing dramas are constructed between patients and healers but how and why institutional discourses and practices invite their abandonment. PMID:20930950

  7. [Healing with art?].

    PubMed

    Kühlmann, A Y R Rosalie; Jeekel, J Hans; Pierik, E G J M Robert

    2015-01-01

    Music and other forms of art are increasingly being integrated into hospitals. As well as the aesthetic value of art, more and more attention is being paid to its contribution to the healing of the patient. Scientific research indicates the possible benefits of specific art in healthcare facilities. Using this knowledge of the role and employability of surroundings and art in the healing of patients may be complementary to the high quality of care in the Netherlands. By means of proper, methodologically correct research, it is possible to investigate the use of different aspects of the patient's environment as simple, safe and low-cost measures in improving health and well-being of patients. PMID:26530121

  8. Wound healing in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tisi, Alessandra; Angelini, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    Copper amine oxidases (CuAO) and flavin-containing amine oxidases (PAO) are hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-producing enzymes responsible for the oxidative de-amination of polyamines. Currently, a key role has been ascribed to apoplastic amine oxidases in plants, i.e., to behave as H2O2-delivering systems in the cell wall during cell growth and differentiation as well as in the context of host-pathogen interactions. Indeed, H2O2 is the co-substrate for the peroxidase-driven reactions during cell-wall maturation and a key signalling molecule in defence mechanisms. We recently demonstrated the involvement of an apoplastic PAO in the wound-healing process of the Zea mays mesocotyl. Experimental evidence indicated a similar role for an apoplastic PAO in Nicotiana tabacum. In this addendum we suggest that a CuAO activity is also involved in this healing event. PMID:19704660

  9. Can Faith Heal?

    PubMed Central

    White, Norman F.

    1984-01-01

    Belief in the healing power of faith is widespread, and is receiving new support because of the holistic health movement. However, reports of faith healing are uncommon and always involve changes in symptoms rather than in disease. Unanticipated remissions probably occur more frequently than they are reported, but often they may be ascribed to misdiagnosis or to the fact that disease progresses more slowly than expected or even regresses in some patients. When they are sick, patients are more likely to pray and to seek spiritual assistance, and such improvements in their health may thus seem to result from faith. Faith—especially an uncritical acceptance of medical authority—sometimes has negative effects. Patients' unquestioning compliance is not trust; it is an abdication of personal responsibility. Physicians also must maintain a healthy skepticism so that they do not accept all medical explanations without questioning them. PMID:21283499

  10. Self-healing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A three dimensional structure fabricated from a self-healing polymeric material, comprising poly(ester amides) obtained from ethylene glycol, azelaic acid and 1,1-aminoundecanoic acid, wherein polymeric material has a melt index above 2.5 g/10 min. as determined by ASTM D1238 at 190.degree. C. and 2.16kg, impact resistance and ductility sufficient to resist cracking and brittle fracture upon impact by a 9 mm bullet fired at a temperature of about 29.degree. C. at subsonic speed in a range from about 800 feet/sec to about 1000 feet/sec. It has been determined that the important factors necessary for self-healing behavior of polymers include sufficient impact strength, control of the degree of crystallinity, low melting point and the ability to instantly melt at impacted area.

  11. Understanding traditional African healing

    PubMed Central

    MOKGOBI, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional African healing has been in existence for many centuries yet many people still seem not to understand how it relates to God and religion/spirituality. Some people seem to believe that traditional healers worship the ancestors and not God. It is therefore the aim of this paper to clarify this relationship by discussing a chain of communication between the worshipers and the Almighty God. Other aspects of traditional healing namely types of traditional healers, training of traditional healers as well as the role of traditional healers in their communities are discussed. In conclusion, the services of traditional healers go far beyond the uses of herbs for physical illnesses. Traditional healers serve many roles which include but not limited to custodians of the traditional African religion and customs, educators about culture, counselors, social workers and psychologists. PMID:26594664

  12. Femoral Strength after Induced Lesions in Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Belill, Kathryn A; Settle, Timothy L; Angel, C Roselina; Kim, Seon-Woo; Rothwell, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Rats are a common model for the study of bone healing, with the cranium, femur, and tibia being the bones studied most frequently. This study examines noncritical-sized lesions that would allow rats to continue to bear weight without the need for fixation but that are sufficiently large to enable characterization of the healing process. We compared the femoral bone strength associated with 3 lesion sizes selected for use in future studies. Sprague–Dawley rats (age, 10 to 16 wk) were used to assess the ultimate breaking strength, stress, and break force of normal, unmanipulated femurs. We then created lesions of 3 different sizes in the mid- to distal diaphysis of the left and right femurs and characterized the associated decreases in bone strength. Femurs (n= 85) for this study were collected through tissue sharing from rats used in other acute surgical procedures and were tested by using a 3-point bending flexural materials-testing machine. Our hypothesis was that, as a model for bone healing, 3 induced lesions of different sizes would show incremental and proportional decreases in femoral strength, with the intermediate-sized (1.5-mm) lesion demonstrating a decrease of 20% to 40%. A lesion of 1.5 mm yielded a decrease in strength of 17% for both the left and right femurs. The strength of left femurs carrying intermediate lesions was significantly less than that of control, uninjured femur bones. In addition to providing validation for our own future bone-healing project, these data are a useful baseline for other investigators studying bone healing in a rat femur model. PMID:24956210

  13. Self-healing minefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolader, Glenn E.; Rogers, John; Batteh, Jad

    2004-07-01

    The Self Healing Minefield (SHM) is comprised of a networked system of mobile anti-tank landmines. When the mines detect a breach, each calculates an appropriate response, and some fire small rockets to "hop" into the breach path, healing the breach. The purpose of the SHM is to expand the capabilities of traditional obstacles and provide an effective anti-tank obstacle that does not require Anti-Personnel (AP) submunitions. The DARPA/ATO sponsored program started in June 2000 and culminated in a full 100-unit demonstration at Fort Leonard Wood, MO in April 2003. That program went from "a concept" to a prototype system demonstration in approximately 21 months and to a full tactically significant demonstration in approximately 33 months. Significant accomplishments included the following: (1) Demonstration of a working, scalable (order of a hundred nodes), ad hoc, self-healing RF network. (2) Demonstration of an innovative distributed time synchronization scheme that does not rely on GPS. (3) Demonstration of a non-GPS based, self-mapping, relative geolocation system. (4) Development of an innovative distributed safe, arm, and fire system that allows for independent firing of eight rockets within a single node. (5) Development of a small rocket design with a novel geometry that meets the propulsion requirements.

  14. Healing as appreciating wholeness.

    PubMed

    Cowling, W R

    2000-03-01

    The "clinicalization" of human experience by the health care disciplines has been instrumental in denying important facets of human life and not fully accounting for the essence and wholeness of experience. A unitary conceptualization of healing as appreciating wholeness is proposed. Appreciating is actualized through a praxis approach used for research and practice--unitary pattern appreciation--created to bring the theoretical principles of unitary science into practical reality. It is essentially a praxis for exploration of the wholeness within human/environmental pattern. Healing is conceptualized as the realization, knowledge, and appreciation of the inherent wholeness in life that elucidates prospects of clarified understanding and opportunities for action. The essential features of the process of pattern appreciation are a synoptic stance toward pattern information, a participatory engagement with people in the exploration of wholeness, and the transformative nature of the process that illuminates the possibilities in wholeness. A case demonstrates the nature of the unitary pattern appreciation process and its healing qualities. PMID:10711802

  15. The Advantages of Traditional Chumash Healing

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Chumash healing has been practiced in California for ∼13 000 years. Chumash healers treat their patients with prayer, laughter, dreaming, phytotherapy, aromatherapy, healing ceremonies and other techniques. Healing involves first healing the spirit, then healing the body. Chumash people still maintain their unique identity. Chumash Healers still practice the ancient healing arts in California. This lecture is a brief introduction to Chumash Healing. PMID:15841273

  16. Morphea Developing at the Site of Healed Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Tae Woo; Park, Sang Hoon; Kang, Yoo Seok; Lee, Un Ha; Jang, Sang Jai

    2011-01-01

    Wolf's isotopic response describes the occurrence of a new, unrelated disease that appears at the same location as a previously healed skin disease, and the most common primary skin disease of this phenomenon is herpes zoster. Several cutaneous lesions have been described to occur at the site of healed herpes zoster, and granulomatous dermatitis and granuloma annulare have been reported to be the most common second diseases. The pathogenesis of the isotopic response is still unclear. Morphea can develop at the site of regressed herpes zoster and a few such cases have been reported. We present here an additional case of morphea that developed at the site of previously healed herpes zoster, and we review the relevant literature. PMID:21747631

  17. Oesophageal function before, during, and after healing of erosive oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, F; Ferrarini, F; Longanesi, A; Angeloni, M; Ragazzini, M; Miglioli, M; Barbara, L

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the relationship between oesophageal motor abnormalities and oesophagitis, we carried out four hour studies of oesophageal motility and 24 hour pH measurements in fasting and fed conditions in eight patients before, during (pH only), and after medical healing of erosive oesophagitis. Gastrooesophageal acid reflux decreased (ns) during the treatment, but tended to return to basal values at the end. Oesophageal body motility was unchanged after healing, while the lower oesophageal sphincter basal tone was significantly increased at the end of the study in the postcibal period. The results suggest that the impairment of the sphincter tone in reflux oesophagitis is secondary to the presence of the oesophageal lesions. Macroscopic healing is not paralleled by improved major pathogenic factors of the disease, however--that is, acid reflux and oesophageal body motility. PMID:3345925

  18. Rapid self-healing hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Ameya; Zhang, Chao; Arman, Bedri; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Mashelkar, Raghunath A.; Lele, Ashish K.; Tauber, Michael J.; Arya, Gaurav; Varghese, Shyni

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic materials that are capable of autonomous healing upon damage are being developed at a rapid pace because of their many potential applications. Despite these advancements, achieving self-healing in permanently cross-linked hydrogels has remained elusive because of the presence of water and irreversible cross-links. Here, we demonstrate that permanently cross-linked hydrogels can be engineered to exhibit self-healing in an aqueous environment. We achieve this feature by arming the hydrogel network with flexible-pendant side chains carrying an optimal balance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that allows the side chains to mediate hydrogen bonds across the hydrogel interfaces with minimal steric hindrance and hydrophobic collapse. The self-healing reported here is rapid, occurring within seconds of the insertion of a crack into the hydrogel or juxtaposition of two separate hydrogel pieces. The healing is reversible and can be switched on and off via changes in pH, allowing external control over the healing process. Moreover, the hydrogels can sustain multiple cycles of healing and separation without compromising their mechanical properties and healing kinetics. Beyond revealing how secondary interactions could be harnessed to introduce new functions to chemically cross-linked polymeric systems, we also demonstrate various potential applications of such easy-to-synthesize, smart, self-healing hydrogels. PMID:22392977

  19. [Healing "booster" dressings].

    PubMed

    Fromantin, Isabelle; Téot, Luc; Meaume, Sylvie

    2011-09-01

    The relationship between the dressing and the wound is vital to clinical effectiveness. The more-or-less standard wound-surface coverings have been replaced with initial dressings, referred to as modern dressings, which contain an oily and sticky compound. They provide a moist medium by applying the basic mechanistic principles (liquid absorption and release). Other types of products and techniques modify the behaviour of wound cells by acting directly through irritation, biochemical stimulation or genetic modification of the cells, which accelerates the healing process. PMID:22003786

  20. The guided tissue regeneration principle in endodontic surgery: one-year postoperative results of large periapical lesions.

    PubMed

    Pecora, G; Kim, S; Celletti, R; Davarpanah, M

    1995-01-01

    Twenty patients with large endodontic lesions, which failed to respond to conventional endodontic therapy, were selected for this study. The lesions had a radiographic diameter of at least 10 mm, were removed by periradicular surgery, before retrofilling the apices with either super EBA or dessicated zinc oxide-eugenol. In 10 test sites large e-PTFE membranes (Gortex) were placed to cover the lesions, while at the control sites the lesions were not covered before resuturing. Radio-graphic analysis of the lesions at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months revealed that lesions covered with the membranes healed quicker than the control lesions, and that the quality and quantity of the regenerated bone was superior when membranes were used. Results of the study indicate that guided tissue regeneration (GTR) principles can be effectively applied to the healing of large periapical lesions, especially in through-and-through lesions. PMID:7642328

  1. Words that heal.

    PubMed

    Spurio, Maria Grazia

    2015-09-01

    The value of words in the healing process runs constant to the path of therapeutic treatment, the net of exchanges and relationships between brain chemistry and the right words in order to heal is subtle and intricate. Psychotherapy, a treatment with words, is shown to be a treatment that directly affects the brain and that is able to change it stably, even in its anatomical structure and function. According to Kandel (1999), a leading living scientist and Nobel Prize winner for medicine and physiology, American neurologist and psychiatrist, psychotherapy is a real cure, a biological treatment, as it produces behavioral changes through new words and new experiences. The article offers a brief overview of the use of the fantasy of argument, since the time of the classical rethoric of the sophists up to the new rethoric, to illustrate how the structure of the speech, and the dialectic ability of opposing different thoughts, closely resembles the way of thinking. Consequently the choice of words can be considered an instrument of great impact that is inserted in the stream of thoughts that determines the attitude of a person, and therefore, his/her actions. This happens whenever you communicate voluntarily, and not simply when interacting. The right choice of words remains a turning point in all of our relationships, not only in therapeutic situations, but in every other social relationship in life, family or friends. PMID:26417732

  2. Integrins in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, Leeni; Heino, Jyrki; Häkkinen, Lari; Larjava, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Regulation of cell adhesions during tissue repair is fundamentally important for cell migration, proliferation, and protein production. All cells interact with extracellular matrix proteins with cell surface integrin receptors that convey signals from the environment into the nucleus, regulating gene expression and cell behavior. Integrins also interact with a variety of other proteins, such as growth factors, their receptors, and proteolytic enzymes. Re-epithelialization and granulation tissue formation are crucially dependent on the temporospatial function of multiple integrins. This review explains how integrins function in wound repair. Recent Advances: Certain integrins can activate latent transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) that modulates wound inflammation and granulation tissue formation. Dysregulation of TGF-β1 function is associated with scarring and fibrotic disorders. Therefore, these integrins represent targets for therapeutic intervention in fibrosis. Critical Issues: Integrins have multifaceted functions and extensive crosstalk with other cell surface receptors and molecules. Moreover, in aberrant healing, integrins may assume different functions, further increasing the complexity of their functionality. Discovering and understanding the role that integrins play in wound healing provides an opportunity to identify the mechanisms for medical conditions, such as excessive scarring, chronic wounds, and even cancer. Future Directions: Integrin functions in acute and chronic wounds should be further addressed in models better mimicking human wounds. Application of any products in acute or chronic wounds will potentially alter integrin functions that need to be carefully considered in the design. PMID:25493210

  3. [When and which treatment for scapho-lunate ligament lesions?].

    PubMed

    Papaloïzos, Michaël

    2014-07-01

    The lesions of the scapholunate ligament are some of the most frequently encountered in the wrist. Left untreated, the complete rupture of the ligament is followed by degenerative arthritis according to a well-defined pattern of progression through the wrist, eventually leading to multifocal arthrosis, a condition described as scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC wrist). The scapholunate lesions are classified in stages according to the degree of the lesion established by imaging studies or arthroscopy and to the chronicity of the lesion. Both together essentially determine the healing potential and the prognosis, which rapidly decrease after six weeks from the initial trauma, thus indicating the importance of recognizing the acute or subacute lesion and directing the patient to the hand surgeon early enough. The therapeutic options are notably reduced and often of palliative nature in case of chronic lesions with secondary changes in the wrist mechanics or cartilage damage. PMID:24972517

  4. Our Pathway toward Healing Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honour, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Robert Honour, Training and Staff Development Manager, at the Fairfax, Virginia, Department of Family Services (DFS), reports on the outcome of "Healing Racism" training at his organization. Participants in "Healing Racism Institutes" are transforming relationships and creating an organizational culture that…

  5. Self-healing biomaterials(3)

    PubMed Central

    Brochu, Alice B. W.; Craig, Stephen L.; Reichert, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to introduce the biomaterials community to the emerging field of self-healing materials, and also to suggest how one could utilize and modify self-healing approaches to develop new classes of biomaterials. A brief discussion of the in vivo mechanical loading and resultant failures experienced by biomedical implants is followed by presentation of the self-healing methods for combating mechanical failure. If conventional composite materials that retard failure may be considered zeroth generation self-healing materials, then taxonomically-speaking, first generation self-healing materials describe approaches that “halt” and “fill” damage, whereas second generation self-healing materials strive to “fully restore” the pre-failed material structure. In spite of limited commercial use to date, primarily because the technical details have not been suitably optimized, it is likely from a practical standpoint that first generation approaches will be the first to be employed commercially, whereas second generation approaches may take longer to implement. For self-healing biomaterials the optimization of technical considerations is further compounded by the additional constraints of toxicity and biocompatibility, necessitating inclusion of separate discussions of design criteria for self-healing biomaterials. PMID:21171168

  6. The Healing Power of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith Anthos, Jeannette

    2004-01-01

    This teacher believes that art has the power to heal, or at least aid in the healing process. After the terrorist attacks on 9/11, her students needed some way to express the injustice they felt. They discussed the attacks, and had some free drawing to release it from their system. They even did some patriotic-themed projects to boost their…

  7. Self-Healing Laminate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiermann, Brett A. (Inventor); Keller, Michael W. (Inventor); White, Scott R. (Inventor); Sottos, Nancy R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A laminate material may include a first flexible layer, and a self-healing composite layer in contact with the first flexible layer. The composite layer includes an elastomer matrix, a plurality of first capsules including a polymerizer, and a corresponding activator for the polymerizer. The laminate material may self-heal when subjected to a puncture or a tear.

  8. Synthetic Self-Healing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, Mollie

    2014-06-02

    Given enough time, pressure, temperature fluctuation, and stress any material will fail. Currently, synthesized materials make up a large part of our everyday lives, and are used in a number of important applications such as; space travel, under water devices, precise instrumentation, transportation, and infrastructure. Structural failure of these material scan lead to expensive and dangerous consequences. In an attempt to prolong the life spans of specific materials and reduce efforts put into repairing them, biologically inspired, self-healing systems have been extensively investigated. The current review explores recent advances in three methods of synthesized self-healing: capsule based, vascular, and intrinsic. Ideally, self-healing materials require no human intervention to promote healing, are capable of surviving all the steps of polymer processing, and heal the same location repeatedly. Only the vascular method holds up to all of these idealities.

  9. Radiotherapy and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Devalia, Haresh L; Mansfield, Lucy

    2008-03-01

    This review article discusses basic radiation physics and effects of radiation on wounds. It examines various postulated hypothesis on the role of circulatory decrease and radiation-induced direct cellular damage. The new concept related to the radiation pathogenesis proposes that there is a cascade of cytokines initiated immediately after the radiation. Sustained activation of myofibroblasts in the wound accounts for its chronicity. Recent advances highlight that transforming growth factor beta1 is the master switch in pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis. This articles overviews its role and summarises the available evidences related to radiation damage. The goal of this article was to provide its modern understanding, as future research will concentrate on antagonising the effects of cytokines to promote wound healing. PMID:18081782

  10. Accelerated healing of cutaneous leishmaniasis in non-healing BALB/c mice using water soluble amphotericin B-polymethacrylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Corware, Karina; Harris, Debra; Teo, Ian; Rogers, Matthew; Naresh, Kikkeri; Müller, Ingrid; Shaunak, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a neglected tropical disease that causes prominent skin scaring. No water soluble, non-toxic, short course and low cost treatment exists. We developed a new water soluble amphotericin B-polymethacrylic acid (AmB-PMA) using established and scalable chemistries. AmB-PMA was stable for 9 months during storage. In vitro, it was effective against Leishmania spp. promastigotes and amastigote infected macrophages. It was also less toxic and more effective than deoxycholate-AmB, and similar to liposomal AmB. Its in vivo activity was determined in both early and established CL lesion models of Leishmania major infection in genetically susceptible non-healing BALB/c mice. Intradermal AmB-PMA at a total dose of 18 mg of AmB/kg body weight led to rapid parasite killing and lesion healing. No toxicity was seen. No parasite relapse occurred after 80 days follow-up. Histological studies confirmed rapid parasite clearance from macrophages followed by accelerated fibroblast mediated tissue repair, regeneration and cure of the infection. Quantitative mRNA studies of the CL lesions showed that accelerated healing was associated with increased Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Interferon-γ, and reduced Interleukin-10. These results suggest that a cost-effective AmB-PMA could be used to pharmacologically treat and immunotherapeutically accelerate the healing of CL lesions. PMID:21807409

  11. The effect of hyaluronic acid (Cicatridine) on healing and regeneration of the uterine cervix and vagina and vulvar dystrophy therapy.

    PubMed

    Markowska, J; Madry, R; Markowska, A

    2011-01-01

    Procedures aimed at the treatment of precancerous lesions and ectopia on the uterine cervix are frequently linked to lesions of anatomical structures. The application of hyaluronic acid (Cicatridine vaginal ovules) promotes accelerated healing of the uterine cervix and acquisition of a normal shape in the uterine cervix canal. Local application of hyaluronic acid in the vagina following radiotherapy due to cancer in the uterine cervix or endometrium favourably affects the healing of post-irradiation lesions in the vagina and improves quality of life. Over 90% of patients responded positively to the application of hyaluronic acid in the form of a cream on dystrophic lesions in the vulva. Hyaluronic acid aids the healing process of post-procedural wounds in the uterine cervix, following radiotherapy applied due to cancer of the uterine cervix, endometrium and in vulvar dystrophy. PMID:21446328

  12. Progress in corneal wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ljubimov, Alexander V; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-11-01

    Corneal wound healing is a complex process involving cell death, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many similarities are observed in the healing processes of corneal epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells, as well as cell-specific differences. Corneal epithelial healing largely depends on limbal stem cells and remodeling of the basement membrane. During stromal healing, keratocytes get transformed to motile and contractile myofibroblasts largely due to activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) system. Endothelial cells heal mostly by migration and spreading, with cell proliferation playing a secondary role. In the last decade, many aspects of wound healing process in different parts of the cornea have been elucidated, and some new therapeutic approaches have emerged. The concept of limbal stem cells received rigorous experimental corroboration, with new markers uncovered and new treatment options including gene and microRNA therapy tested in experimental systems. Transplantation of limbal stem cell-enriched cultures for efficient re-epithelialization in stem cell deficiency and corneal injuries has become reality in clinical setting. Mediators and course of events during stromal healing have been detailed, and new treatment regimens including gene (decorin) and stem cell therapy for excessive healing have been designed. This is a very important advance given the popularity of various refractive surgeries entailing stromal wound healing. Successful surgical ways of replacing the diseased endothelium have been clinically tested, and new approaches to accelerate endothelial healing and suppress endothelial-mesenchymal transformation have been proposed including Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor eye drops and gene therapy to activate TGF-β inhibitor SMAD7. Promising new technologies with potential for corneal wound healing manipulation including microRNA, induced pluripotent stem cells to generate corneal

  13. [Fascial healing and wound failure].

    PubMed

    Fackeldey, V; Höer, J; Klinge, U

    2004-05-01

    The difficulties of acute or delayed failure of fascial healing after laparotomies are of great socioeconomic relevance. Despite a plurality of publications in the last decades, the incidence of burst abdomen (1-3%) and incisional hernia (10-15%) remained unchanged. The generally accepted cause is a multifactorial event with a large number of influencing factors. Therefore, only interdisciplinary cooperations are a match for the scientific complexity of this topic. A still underestimated problem is the description of wound healing factors influencing the microclimate in fascial healing. New aspects of pharmacotherapy and better understanding of collagen synthesis and dynamics of closure tension might improve the clinical situation in the future. PMID:15071734

  14. Healing history? Aboriginal healing, historical trauma, and personal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Waldram, James B

    2014-06-01

    What can an exploration of contemporary Aboriginal healing programs such as those offered in Canadian prisons and urban clinics tell us about the importance of history in understanding social and psychological pathology, and more significantly the salience of the concept of "historical trauma"? The form of Aboriginal "healing" that has emerged in recent decades to become dominant in many parts of the country is itself a reflection of historical processes and efforts to ameliorate the consequences of what is today often termed "historical trauma." In other words, contemporary notions of "healing" and the social, cultural, medical, and psychological disruption and distress caused by colonialism and captured in the term "historical trauma" have coevolved in an interdependent manner. I also argue that there is a tension between the attribution of this distress to both specific (e.g., residential schools) and generalized (e.g., colonialism) historical factors, as evident in the "historical trauma" concept, and the prevailing emphasis in many healing programs to encourage the individual to take personal responsibility for their situation and avoid attributing blame to other factors. I conclude that "historical trauma" represents an idiom of distress that captures a variety of historical and contemporary phenomena and which provides a language for expressing distress that is gaining currency, at least among scholars, and that the contemporary Aboriginal healing movement represents an effort to deal with the absence or failure of both "traditional" Aboriginal healing and government-sponsored medical and psychological services to adequately deal with this distress of colonialism. PMID:23788570

  15. Vascularity Visualized by Doppler Sonography as a Predictor of Healing Potential of the OCD of the Humeral Capitellum

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Yoshikazu; Morihara, Toru; Kotoura, Yoshihiro; Sukenari, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Ryuhei; Kabuto, Yukichi; Onishi, Okihiro; MInami, Masataka; Tsujihara, Takashi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The significance of vascularity visualized by Doppler sonography in osteochondritis dissecance (OCD) lesion of the humeral capitellum is unclear. The objectives of this study were twofold: 1) to evaluate the relationship between Doppler ultrasound (US) signals observed in OCD lesion of the humeral capitellum and X-ray stage; 2) to determine if the presence of Doppler US signals in OCD lesion of the humeral capitellum could be the predictor of healing potential. Methods: Fifty patients with OCD of the humeral capitellum treated conservatively were enrolled in this study. During the conservative treatment period, Doppler sonography was performed on affected elbow to assess the presence of vascularity in the OCD lesion (Figure 1), and radiographic examination were evaluated on the same day to determine the X-ray stage (stage I: radiolucent stage, stage II: fragmentation stage, and stage III: loose body stage) of the OCD lesion (Figure 2). Radiographic examination of the elbow was examined after 6 weeks to evaluate the healing of the lesion. If the size of the lesion decreased or new bone formations were observed around the fragments, the healing of the lesion was considered to be improve. The χ2 test was used to determine if the presence of Doppler US signals were related to X-ray stage and the improvement of the healing. P < 0.05 was considered significant for all statistical analyses. Results: The Doppler US signals in OCD lesions were positive in 23 patients and negative in 27 patients. Of these patients, 19 were X-ray stage I, 17 were stage II, and 9 were stage III. The healing of OCD lesions improved in 78.2% for the positive Doppler US signal group, but only 18.5% for the negative Doppler US signal group (Figure 3). The presence of the Doppler US signal was significantly related to the improvement of healing (P = 0.00002). The Doppler US signal were positive in 78.9% for stage I, 36.4% for stage II, and 0.0% for stage III (Figure 4). The presence of

  16. Methyl methacrylate as a healing agent for self-healing cementitious materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tittelboom, K.; Adesanya, K.; Dubruel, P.; Van Puyvelde, P.; De Belie, N.

    2011-12-01

    Different types of healing agents have already been tested on their efficiency for use in self-healing cementitious materials. Generally, commercial healing agents are used while their properties are adjusted for manual crack repair and not for autonomous crack healing. Consequently, the amount of regain in properties due to self-healing of cracks is limited. In this research, a methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based healing agent was developed specifically for use in self-healing cementitious materials. Various parameters were optimized including the viscosity, curing time, strength, etc. After the desired properties were obtained, the healing agent was encapsulated and screened for its self-healing efficiency. The decrease in water permeability due to autonomous crack healing using MMA as a healing agent was similar to the results obtained for manually healed cracks. First results seem promising: however, further research needs to be undertaken in order to obtain an optimal healing agent ready for use in practice.

  17. Factors affecting rotator cuff healing.

    PubMed

    Mall, Nathan A; Tanaka, Miho J; Choi, Luke S; Paletta, George A

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have noted that increasing age is a significant factor for diminished rotator cuff healing, while biomechanical studies have suggested the reason for this may be an inferior healing environment in older patients. Larger tears and fatty infiltration or atrophy negatively affect rotator cuff healing. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, double-row repairs, performing a concomitant acromioplasty, and the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) do not demonstrate an improvement in structural healing over mini-open rotator cuff repairs, single-row repairs, not performing an acromioplasty, or not using PRP. There is conflicting evidence to support postoperative rehabilitation protocols using early motion over immobilization following rotator cuff repair. PMID:24806015

  18. Wound Healing Devices Brief Vignettes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Caesar A.; Hare, Marc A.; Perdrizet, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The demand for wound care therapies is increasing. New wound care products and devices are marketed at a dizzying rate. Practitioners must make informed decisions about the use of medical devices for wound healing therapy. This paper provides updated evidence and recommendations based on a review of recent publications. Recent Advances: The published literature on the use of medical devices for wound healing continues to support the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative pressure wound therapy, and most recently electrical stimulation. Critical Issue: To inform wound healing practitioners of the evidence for or against the use of medical devices for wound healing. This information will aid the practitioner in deciding which technology should be accepted or rejected for clinical use. Future Directions: To produce high quality, randomized controlled trials or acquire outcome-based registry databases to further test and improve the knowledge base as it relates to the use of medical devices in wound care. PMID:27076996

  19. Self-Healing Wire Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A self-healing system for an insulation material initiates a self-repair process by rupturing a plurality of microcapsules disposed on the insulation material. When the plurality of microcapsules are ruptured, reactants within the plurality of microcapsules react to form a replacement polymer in a break of the insulation material. This self-healing system has the ability to repair multiple breaks in a length of insulation material without exhausting the repair properties of the material.

  20. Cryotherapy for treatment of oral lesions.

    PubMed

    Farah, C S; Savage, N W

    2006-03-01

    Cryotherapy is the deliberate destruction of tissue by application of extreme cold. It is well received by patients due to a relative lack of discomfort, the absence of bleeding and minimal to no scarring after healing. It has many applications in oral medicine and clinical oral pathology, and is extremely usefu in patients for whom surgery is contra-indicated due to either age or medical history. In this paper we outline the principles, mechanisms of action, and current applications of cryotherapy in the treatment of oral lesions, and present some clinical cases. PMID:16669469

  1. Nutritional support for wound healing.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Douglas; Miller, Alan L

    2003-11-01

    Healing of wounds, whether from accidental injury or surgical intervention, involves the activity of an intricate network of blood cells, tissue types, cytokines, and growth factors. This results in increased cellular activity, which causes an intensified metabolic demand for nutrients. Nutritional deficiencies can impede wound healing, and several nutritional factors required for wound repair may improve healing time and wound outcome. Vitamin A is required for epithelial and bone formation, cellular differentiation, and immune function. Vitamin C is necessary for collagen formation, proper immune function, and as a tissue antioxidant. Vitamin E is the major lipid-soluble antioxidant in the skin; however, the effect of vitamin E on surgical wounds is inconclusive. Bromelain reduces edema, bruising, pain, and healing time following trauma and surgical procedures. Glucosamine appears to be the rate-limiting substrate for hyaluronic acid production in the wound. Adequate dietary protein is absolutely essential for proper wound healing, and tissue levels of the amino acids arginine and glutamine may influence wound repair and immune function. The botanical medicines Centella asiatica and Aloe vera have been used for decades, both topically and internally, to enhance wound repair, and scientific studies are now beginning to validate efficacy and explore mechanisms of action for these botanicals. To promote wound healing in the shortest time possible, with minimal pain, discomfort, and scarring to the patient, it is important to explore nutritional and botanical influences on wound outcome. PMID:14653765

  2. Blockade of glucocorticoid receptors improves cutaneous wound healing in stressed mice.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Taís Fontoura; de Castro Pires, Taiza; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2016-02-01

    Stress is an important condition of modern life. The successful wound healing requires the execution of three major overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling, and stress can disturb this process. Chronic stress impairs wound healing through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and the glucocorticoids (GCs) hormones have been shown to delay wound closure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a GC receptor antagonist (RU486) treatment on cutaneous healing in chronically stressed mice. Male mice were submitted to rotational stress, whereas control animals were not subjected to stress. Stressed and control animals were treated with RU486. A full-thickness excisional lesion was generated, and seven days later, lesions were recovered. The RU486 treatment improves wound healing since contraction takes place earlier in RU486-treated in comparison to non-treated mice, and the RU486 treatment also improves the angiogenesis in Stress+RU486 mice when compared to stressed animals. The Stress+RU486 group showed a decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration and in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression; meanwhile, there was an increase in myofibroblasts quantity. In conclusion, blockade of GC receptors with RU486 partially ameliorates stress-impaired wound healing, suggesting that stress inhibits healing through more than one functional pathway. PMID:26515142

  3. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  4. Wound healing delays in α-Klotho-deficient mice that have skin appearance similar to that in aged humans - Study of delayed wound healing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Makoto; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Ken; Kayama, Musashi; Sato, Noriyuki; Yotsuyanagi, Takatoshi

    2016-05-13

    Skin atrophy and delayed wound healing are observed in aged humans; however, the molecular mechanism are still elusive. The aim of this study was to analyze the molecular mechanisms of delayed wound healing by aging using α-Klotho-deficient (kl/kl) mice, which have phenotypes similar to those of aged humans. The kl/kl mice showed delayed wound healing and impaired granulation formation compared with those in wild-type (WT) mice. The skin graft experiments revealed that delayed wound healing depends on humoral factors, but not on kl/kl skin tissue. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines related to acute inflammation including IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were higher in wound lesions of kl/kl mice compared with the levels in WT mice by RT-PCR analysis. LPS-induced TNF-α production model using spleen cells revealed that TNF-α production was significantly increased in the presence of FGF23. Thus, higher levels of FGF23 in kl/kl mouse may have a role to increase TNF-α production in would lesion independently of α-Klotho protein, and impair granulation formation and delay wound healing. PMID:27037022

  5. Use of ethnoveterinary remedies in the management of foot and mouth disease lesions in a diary herd.

    PubMed

    Gakuya, D W; Mulei, C M; Wekesa, S B

    2011-01-01

    An outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) affecting 95 (57.2%) out of 166 cattle occurred in a medium-scale dairy farm in Kikuyu district, Kenya. Ethnoveterinary remedies of natural Soda ash solution (97% sodium bicarbonate), honey and finger millet flour were used to manage the FMD lesions. The lesions were washed with soda ash solution to remove the necrotic tissue after which raw honey and finger millet flour were applied to the cleaned lesions. The lesions were examined daily and those with necrotic material washed again with the Soda ash solution. Honey and finger millet flour were applied daily for three days. There was rapid healing of the lesions with the animals resuming feeding after three days. The fast healing of the lesions vindicates the use of these cheap, locally available and easy to apply products in the management of FMD lesions. However, more studies are needed to evaluate further their potencies. PMID:22238498

  6. A simple surgical treatment for bovine digital dermatitis-associated white line lesions and sole ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kofler, J; Glonegger-Reichert, J; Dietrich, J; Sykora, S; Tichy, A; Brandt, S

    2015-05-01

    Non-healing white line disease (nhWLD) and sole ulcers (nhSU) are seen increasingly in herds endemically affected with bovine digital dermatitis (BDD). In 35 cows with 42 nhWLD or nhSU lesions, the healing process was monitored for up to 28 or 38 days following extensive debridement of loose horn and infected corium under regional anaesthesia, and topical application of tetracycline spray with bandaging. By 28 days, 27/42 (64%) nhWLD and nhSU were completely covered by a new horn layer and this increased to 30/42 (71%) that had healed by 38 days. Lesion sizes on day 0 correlated with clinical healing within the study period. In view of this satisfying therapeutic result, the terms nhWLD and nhSU are proposed for BDD-associated white line disease (BDD-WLD) and BDD-associated sole ulcers (BDD-SU), respectively. PMID:25920757

  7. Traditional Therapies for Skin Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rúben F.; Bártolo, Paulo J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The regeneration of healthy and functional skin remains a huge challenge due to its multilayer structure and the presence of different cell types within the extracellular matrix in an organized way. Despite recent advances in wound care products, traditional therapies based on natural origin compounds, such as plant extracts, honey, and larvae, are interesting alternatives. These therapies offer new possibilities for the treatment of skin diseases, enhancing the access to the healthcare, and allowing overcoming some limitations associated to the modern products and therapies, such as the high costs, the long manufacturing times, and the increase in the bacterial resistance. This article gives a general overview about the recent advances in traditional therapies for skin wound healing, focusing on the therapeutic activity, action mechanisms, and clinical trials of the most commonly used natural compounds. New insights in the combination of traditional products with modern treatments and future challenges in the field are also highlighted. Recent Advances: Natural compounds have been used in skin wound care for many years due to their therapeutic activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and cell-stimulating properties. The clinical efficacy of these compounds has been investigated through in vitro and in vivo trials using both animal models and humans. Besides the important progress regarding the development of novel extraction methods, purification procedures, quality control assessment, and treatment protocols, the exact mechanisms of action, side effects, and safety of these compounds need further research. Critical Issues: The repair of skin lesions is one of the most complex biological processes in humans, occurring throughout an orchestrated cascade of overlapping biochemical and cellular events. To stimulate the regeneration process and prevent the wound to fail the healing, traditional therapies and natural products have been used

  8. Hindlimb unloading alters ligament healing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenzano, Paolo P.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Dwyer, Kelley W.; Turner, Joanne; Vailas, Arthur C.; Vanderby, Ray Jr

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading inhibits healing in fibrous connective tissue such as ligament. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing, and hindlimb-suspended healing. Ambulatory and suspended animals underwent surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments, whereas sham surgeries were performed on control animals. After 3 or 7 wk, mechanical and/or morphological properties were measured in ligament, muscle, and bone. During mechanical testing, most suspended ligaments failed in the scar region, indicating the greatest impairment was to ligament and not to bone-ligament insertion. Ligament testing revealed significant reductions in maximum force, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and low-load properties in suspended animals. In addition, femoral mineral density, femoral strength, gastrocnemius mass, and tibialis anterior mass were significantly reduced. Microscopy revealed abnormal scar formation and cell distribution in suspended ligaments with extracellular matrix discontinuities and voids between misaligned, but well-formed, collagen fiber bundles. Hence, stress levels from ambulation appear unnecessary for formation of fiber bundles yet required for collagen to form structurally competent continuous fibers. Results support our hypothesis that hindlimb unloading impairs healing of fibrous connective tissue. In addition, this study provides compelling morphological evidence explaining the altered structure-function relationship in load-deprived healing connective tissue.

  9. Acupoints Initiate the Healing Process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: As an important modality of Traditional Chinese Medicine, acupuncture has been widely accepted by the Western world in the past 4 decades because of this modality's efficacy and safety. A vast amount of acupuncture research has been done. However, the mechanisms of acupuncture actions are still elusive. It is believed that the effects of acupuncture treatment begin from the moment of needle insertion. Methods: This review focuses on the acupuncture points and the three major reactions at the acupuncture points when needling is performed. These initial reactions may be the beginning of the healing process that initiates downstream effects through neuronal and humoral pathways. In addition to the physical reactions, this article also discusses the possibility of the effects of acupuncture on the healing process through a holistic pathway. Conclusions: Needling is the first step of traditional acupuncture therapy. Needling reactions— neuronal, biophysical, and biochemical—are the beginning of healing. The messengers of the three reactions involved may include neurotransmitters, cytokines, hormones, and inflammatory factors. Healing may be potentiated through these messengers in neuronal and humoral pathways. The reactions manifest as erythema and De Qi—both of which are common phenomena used as positive signs in acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture may also play a role in the healing process through the holistic pathway, which needs further study. PMID:25352943

  10. Amyloidogenesis in Healing Wound

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Ken; Brownstein, Martin H.

    1972-01-01

    Clinically and histologically typical skin lesions of macular and lichenoid amyloidoses were biopsied. Rebiopsies were performed after 2 to 16 weeks, and the sequence of amyloid reproduction in granulation tissue was followed. Initially, medium electron-dense proteinaceous substance with fine filaments was produced within or in close relation to the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum of fibroblasts and subsequently discharged. Typical amyloid filaments emerged within and in the vicinity of this substance. A significant number of collagen fibrils were admixed in the centers of some amyloid islands. Predominantly amorphous amyloid substance was seen in contact with the basal laminae. No plasma cells were observed in foci of amyloid. Nonepithelialized wounds did not contain amyloid. It was suggested that, in the primary skin amyloidoses, abnormal dermal fibroblasts produce amyloid precursors under the influence of the epidermis. ImagesFig 9Fig 10Fig 4Fig 5Fig 11Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 1Fig 2Fig 8Fig 3 PMID:5049430

  11. Chemokines and diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Oscar; Torres, Francis M; Shireman, Paula K

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines are critical for white blood cell recruitment to injured tissues and play an important role in normal wound healing processes. In contrast, impaired wound healing in diabetic patients is accompanied by decreased early inflammatory cell infiltration but persistence of neutrophils and macrophages in the chronic, nonhealing wounds. These changes in inflammatory cell recruitment occur in conjunction with alterations in chemokine and growth factor expression. In addition to leukocyte trafficking, many different cell types, including endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and keratinocytes, produce and respond to chemokines, and these interactions are altered in diabetic wounds. Thus, the chemokine system may have both direct and inflammatory-mediated effects on many different aspects of diabetic wound healing. The potential roles of chemokines and inflammatory or immune cells in nonhealing diabetic wounds, including impairments in growth factor expression, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix formation, and reepithelialization, are examined. PMID:18053419

  12. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects. PMID:24650524

  13. Factors That Impair Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kristin; Hamm, Rose L.

    2014-01-01

    The body's response to tissue injury in a healthy individual is an intricate, sequential physiologic process that results in timely healing with full re-epithelialization, resolution of drainage, and return of function to the affected tissue. Chronic wounds, however, do not follow this sequence of events and can challenge the most experienced clinician if the underlying factors that are impairing wound healing are not identified. The purpose of this article is to present recent information about factors that impair wound healing with the underlying pathophysiological mechanism that interferes with the response to tissue injury. These factors include co-morbidities (diabetes, obesity, protein energy malnutrition), medications (steroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs, anti-rejection medications), oncology interventions (radiation, chemotherapy), and life style habits (smoking, alcohol abuse). Successful treatment of any chronic wound depends upon identification and management of the factors for each individual. PMID:26199879

  14. Fracture healing and lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, J Patrick; Manigrasso, Michaele B; Kim, Brian D; Subramanian, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Lipid mediators regulate bone regeneration during fracture healing. Prostaglandins and leukotrienes are well-known lipid mediators that regulate inflammation and are synthesized from the Ω-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid. Cyclooxygenase (COX-1 or COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyze the initial enzymatic steps in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes, respectively. Inhibition or genetic ablation of COX-2 activity impairs fracture healing in animal models. Genetic ablation of COX-1 does not affect the fracture callus strength in mice, suggesting that COX-2 activity is primarily responsible for regulating fracture healing. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is performed clinically to reduce heterotopic ossification, although clinical evidence that NSAID treatment impairs fracture healing remains controversial. In contrast, inhibition or genetic ablation of 5-LO activity accelerates fracture healing in animal models. Even though prostaglandins and leukotrienes regulate inflammation, loss of COX-2 or 5-LO activity appears to primarily affect chondrogenesis during fracture healing. Prostaglandin or prostaglandin analog treatment, prostaglandin-specific synthase inhibition and prostaglandin or leukotriene receptor antagonism also affect callus chondrogenesis. Unlike the Ω-6-derived lipid mediators, lipid mediators derived from Ω-3 fatty acids, such as resolvin E1 (RvE1), have anti-inflammatory activity. In vivo, RvE1 can inhibit osteoclastogenesis and limit bone resorption. Although Ω-6 and Ω-3 lipid mediators have clear-cut effects on inflammation, the role of these lipid mediators in bone regeneration is more complex, with apparent effects on callus chondrogenesis and bone remodeling. PMID:24795811

  15. Toward a theology of healing.

    PubMed

    Studer, J N

    1982-12-01

    A sense of magic has always permeated our theology of healing. Consider the following theses: 1. By the very nature of material creation, however mysteriously it was initiated and is sustained, the power of God to influence material creation is restricted to the immanent (from within) and indirect; 2. God does not arbitrarily, in the case of two persons who have "identical" illnesses, decide the recovery of one and the death of the other. Rather, his love bears equally on all. This study will defend these theses and show that they are foundational and integral, to a theology of primarily physical healing. PMID:24310077

  16. [Wound healing in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Eming, S A; Wlaschek, M; Scharffetter-Kochanek, K

    2016-02-01

    Restoration of tissue integrity is essential for host defense and protection of the organism. The efficacy and quality of skin repair varies significantly over a person's lifetime. Whereas prenatal wound healing is characterized by regeneration and scarless healing, scarring, fibrosis, and loss of function are features of postnatal repair. In fact, aging is the prominent risk factor for chronic wounds, skin fragility, infections, comorbidities, and decreased quality of life. Current strategies for restoration of tissue integrity and wound therapy are not sufficient and require further investigation of the underlying pathomechanisms and the development of causal-based concepts. PMID:26728073

  17. Self healing of defected graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jianhui; Shi, Tuwan; Cai, Tuocheng; Wu, Xiaosong; Yu, Dapeng; Xu, Tao; Sun, Litao

    2013-03-11

    For electronics applications, defects in graphene are usually undesirable because of their ability to scatter charge carriers, thereby reduce the carrier mobility. It would be extremely useful if the damage can be repaired. In this work, we employ Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electrical measurements to study defects in graphene introduced by argon plasma bombardment. We have found that majority of these defects can be cured by a simple thermal annealing process. The self-healing is attributed to recombination of mobile carbon adatoms with vacancies. With increasing level of plasma induced damage, the self-healing becomes less effective.

  18. Ghost cell lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K. M. K.; Balachander, N.

    2015-01-01

    Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms. PMID:26015694

  19. [Surprising white lesions].

    PubMed

    Nolte, J W; van der Waal, I

    2011-09-01

    A 46-year-old man appeared with white lesions of the oral cavity. A previously taken biopsy revealed no classifying diagnosis and treatment with mouth rinse produced no improvement. A new biopsy was taken, on which the pathologist performed additional tests. This resulted in the diagnosis 'syphilis'. The patient was treated with benzylpenicillin and the oral white lesions disappeared. Although nowadays syphilis is rare, special attention is required when noticing these kinds of lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:21957637

  20. Self Healing Coating/Film Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summerfield, Burton; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Calle, Luz; Williams, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been developing self healing materials and technologies. This project seeks to further develop self healing functionality in thin films for applications such as corrosion protective coatings, inflatable structures, space suit materials, and electrical wire insulation.

  1. A mimic of self-healing juvenile cutaneous mucinosis?

    PubMed

    Williams, Charles A; Merkel, Kimberly L

    2014-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy presented with a chronic history of atypical papular mucinosis consisting of multiple subcutaneous nodules and confluent papular skin lesions. He initially presented at age 2 years with the rapid onset of numerous subcutaneous nodular lesions that completely resolved over a period of years. Clinical and histologic evidence, together with his clinical course, were suggestive of self-healing juvenile cutaneous mucinosis (SHJCM), but a few years later, during childhood, he experienced a recurrence of the subcutaneous nodules involving the limbs, trunk, and face, in addition to new findings of multiple flesh-colored papules coalescing into plaques on his neck and back. Although his early childhood course and histologic picture were suggestive of SHJCM, the progressive nature of his disorder is not like that seen in SHJCM and appears different from other reported disorders involving cutaneous mucinosis. PMID:25233809

  2. VAC therapy to promote wound healing after surgical revascularisation for critical lower limb ischaemia.

    PubMed

    De Caridi, Giovanni; Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Pipitò, Narayana; Spinelli, Francesco; Grande, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; de Franciscis, Stefano; Serra, Raffaele

    2016-06-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a new emerging non-invasive system in wound care, which speeds up wound healing by causing vacuum, improving tissue perfusion and suctioning the exudates, and facilitating the removal of bacteria from the wound. The application of sub-atmospheric pressure on the lesions seems to alter the cytoskeleton of the cells on the wound bed, triggering a cascade of intracellular signals that increase the rate of cell division and subsequent formation of granulation tissue. The aim of this study is to analyse the results of VAC therapy used as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of foot wounds in patients affected by critical limb ischaemia (CLI) (Rutherford 6 class) after distal surgical revascularisation, to promote and accelerate the healing of ulcers. Twenty-nine patients (20 males, 9 females; mean age 68·4) affected by CLI of Rutherford 6 class, after surgical revascularisation of the lower limb, underwent VAC therapy in order to speed up wound healing. Complete wound healing was achieved in 19 patients (65·51%), in an average period of 45·4 ± 25·6 days. VAC therapy is a valid aid, after surgical revascularisation, to achieve rapid healing of foot lesions in patients with CLI. PMID:24872149

  3. Impact of healing touch with healing harp on inpatient acute care pain: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Valerie; Nowak, Emily Witrak; Schommer, Barb; Briggs, Tami; Fehrer, Amy; Wax, Gary

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the concomitant use of 2 complementary and alternative medicine modalities, Healing Harp and Healing Touch, to reduce pain, anxiety, and nausea in the postoperative patient population. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of using concomitant Healing Touch and Healing Harp to significantly reduce moderate to severe pain and anxiety in this patient population. Further research is warranted. PMID:24722611

  4. Healing, healthcare, missions, the church.

    PubMed

    Jarlsberg, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Churches throughout history have modeled ministry on Jesus' life of reaching out, teaching, preaching, and healing. Kampala Baptist Church (KBC) in Uganda is one such church that works to care spiritually and physically for their community. Partnering with local healthcare providers and short- and long-term healthcare missionaries, the church is transforming lives. Read about KBC and explore healthcare missions ministry. PMID:24592600

  5. Skin substitutes and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Auger, F A; Lacroix, D; Germain, L

    2009-01-01

    Medical science has vastly improved on the means and methods available for the treatment of wounds in the clinic. The production and use of various types of skin substitutes has led to dramatic improvements in the odds of survival for severely burned patients, but they have also shown promise for many other applications, including cases involving chronic wounds that are not life threatening. Nowadays, more than 20 products are commercially available, more are undergoing clinical trials and a large number of new models are being investigated in various research laboratories worldwide. Many of the current products do not contain any living cells and vary in their capacity to harness the innate capacity of the body to heal itself. Others include living cells, of allogeneic or autologous origin, and are often referred to as 'cellular therapy' or 'tissue-engineered' products. Modifications and improvements are currently investigated that aim at improving the healing potential of those products through the use of recombinant growth factors and additional features such as microvascularization. Fundamental research into wound healing and scar-free regeneration raises the hope that we will eventually be able to restore almost completely the appearance and function of skin after the healing of wounds. PMID:19188757

  6. Autonomic healing of polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sottos, N. R.; Geubelle, P. H.; Moore, J. S.; Kessler, M. R.; Sriram, S. R.; Brown, E. N.; Viswanathan, S.

    2001-02-01

    Structural polymers are susceptible to damage in the form of cracks, which form deep within the structure where detection is difficult and repair is almost impossible. Cracking leads to mechanical degradation of fibre-reinforced polymer composites; in microelectronic polymeric components it can also lead to electrical failure. Microcracking induced by thermal and mechanical fatigue is also a long-standing problem in polymer adhesives. Regardless of the application, once cracks have formed within polymeric materials, the integrity of the structure is significantly compromised. Experiments exploring the concept of self-repair have been previously reported, but the only successful crack-healing methods that have been reported so far require some form of manual intervention. Here we report a structural polymeric material with the ability to autonomically heal cracks. The material incorporates a microencapsulated healing agent that is released upon crack intrusion. Polymerization of the healing agent is then triggered by contact with an embedded catalyst, bonding the crack faces. Our fracture experiments yield as much as 75% recovery in toughness, and we expect that our approach will be applicable to other brittle materials systems (including ceramics and glasses).

  7. Healing Magazine, Volume 8, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    This volume of "Healing Magazine" features practical, clinical information aimed at sharing current work in children's mental health. The first issue contains articles on intervention for self-injurious behavior, providing school-based grief groups, effectively using time-out as a parenting tool, and KidsPeace's suicide prevention program. The…

  8. Comparative study of laser and LED systems of low intensity applied to tendon healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, J. L. N.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Parizotto, N. A.

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Low-intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) and Light Emitting Diode Therapy (LEDT) of low intensity on the treatment of lesioned Achilles tendon of rats. The experimental model consisted of a partial mechanical lesion on the right Achilles tendon deep portion of 90 rats. One hour after the lesion, the injured animals received applications of laser/LED (685, 830/630, 880 nm), and the same procedure was repeated at 24-h intervals, for 10 days. The healing process and deposition of collagen were evaluated based on a polarization microscopy analysis of the alignment and organization of collagen bundles, through the birefringence (optical retardation-OR). The results showed a real efficiency of treatments based on LEDT and confirmed that LILT seems to be effective on healing process. Although absence of coherence of LED light, tendon healing treatment with this feature was satisfactory and can certainly replace treatments based on laser light applications. Applications of infrared laser at 830 nm and LED 880 nm were more efficient when the aim is a good organization, aggregation, and alignment of the collagen bundles on tendon healing. However, more research is needed for a safety and more efficient determination of a protocol with LED.

  9. B-1 cells modulate the kinetics of wound-healing process in mice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, H C; Popi, A F; Bachi, A L L; Nonogaki, S; Lopes, J D; Mariano, M

    2010-03-01

    Wound healing is a complex phenomenon whose mechanisms are not fully understood. Although inflammatory cells are recruited to the site of the lesion there are no reports concerning the participation of B lymphocytes in tissue repair. As demonstrated in our laboratory, B-1 cells migrate to a non-specific inflammatory focus and differentiate into a phagocyte. It has been reported that BALB/Xid mice are deficient in B-1 cells. Using this model, here we report that BALB/Xid mice have an increased inflammatory response, a delayed wound-healing process, a prominent neutrophilic infiltration of the lesion, and an increased neovascularization of the lesion as compared with BALB/c and BALB/Xid reconstituted with B-1 cells. The infiltration of B-1 cells into the wound was demonstrated. As B-1 cells secret and use interleukin 10 (IL-10) as an autocrine growth factor, the possible participation of this interleukin in the kinetics of wound healing was investigated. Results show that C57/BL6 IL-10 KO mice had an increased inflammatory response when compared with C57/BL6 and C57/BL6 IL-10 KO mice reconstituted with B-1 cells, thus suggesting that the observed effects of B-1 cells in the healing process is mediated by this interleukin. However, the mechanisms by which IL-10 influence these phenomena remain to be uncovered. PMID:19457571

  10. Use of ultrasound, color Doppler imaging and radiography to monitor periapical healing after endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Tikku, Aseem P; Kumar, Sunil; Loomba, Kapil; Chandra, Anil; Verma, Promila; Aggarwal, Renu

    2010-09-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of ultrasound, color Doppler imaging and conventional radiography in monitoring the post-surgical healing of periapical lesions of endodontic origin. Fifteen patients who underwent periapical surgery for endodontic pathology were randomly selected. In all patients, periapical lesions were evaluated preoperatively using ultrasound, color Doppler imaging and conventional radiography, to analyze characteristics such as size, shape and dimensions. On radiographic evaluation, dimensions were measured in the superoinferior and mesiodistal direction using image-analysis software. Ultrasound evaluation was used to measure the changes in shape and dimensions on the anteroposterior, superoinferior, and mesiodistal planes. Color Doppler imaging was used to detect the blood-flow velocity. Postoperative healing was monitored in all patients at 1 week and 6 months by using ultrasound and color Doppler imaging, together with conventional radiography. The findings were then analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of the 3 imaging techniques. At 6 months, ultrasound and color Doppler imaging were significantly better than conventional radiography in detecting changes in the healing of hard tissue at the surgical site (P < 0.004). This study demonstrates that ultrasound and color Doppler imaging have the potential to supplement conventional radiography in monitoring the post-surgical healing of periapical lesions of endodontic origin. PMID:20881334

  11. Art and Healing for Native American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufrene, Phoebe M.; Coleman, Victoria D.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses elements of Native American Indian healing process and significance of arts in therapy. Until recently, most traditional healing practices were illegal in the United States. It is imperative that counselors and educators become aware of the role of arts in Native healing. Implications for counselors and educators are highlighted. (CRR)

  12. Preinvasive lesions

    Cancer.gov

    This definition is for allocation of lesions with preinvasive/borderline properties. It is currently aimed at newly identified neoplasms, which may be similar to those described in humans. In mouse pathology, many adenomas may be preinvasive/borderline lesions. However, their inclusion in the preinvasive category can be justified only upon development of better diagnostic criteria.

  13. Noninfectious penile lesions.

    PubMed

    Teichman, Joel M H; Sea, Jason; Thompson, Ian M; Elston, Dirk M

    2010-01-15

    Family physicians commonly diagnose and manage penile cutaneous lesions. Noninfectious lesions may be classified as inflammatory and papulosquamous (e.g., psoriasis, lichen sclerosus, angiokeratomas, lichen nitidus, lichen planus), or as neoplastic (e.g., carcinoma in situ, invasive squamous cell carcinoma). The clinical presentation and appearance of the lesions guide the diagnosis. Psoriasis presents as red or salmon-colored plaques with overlying scales, often with systemic lesions. Lichen sclerosus presents as a phimotic, hypopigmented prepuce or glans penis with a cellophane-like texture. Angiokeratomas are typically asymptomatic, well-circumscribed, red or blue papules, whereas lichen nitidus usually produces asymptomatic pinhead-sized, hypopigmented papules. The lesions of lichen planus are pruritic, violaceous, polygonal papules that are typically systemic. Carcinoma in situ should be suspected if the patient has velvety red or keratotic plaques of the glans penis or prepuce, whereas invasive squamous cell carcinoma presents as a painless lump, ulcer, or fungating irregular mass. Some benign lesions, such as psoriasis and lichen planus, can mimic carcinoma in situ or squamous cell carcinoma. Biopsy is indicated if the diagnosis is in doubt or neoplasm cannot be excluded. The management of benign penile lesions usually involves observation or topical corticosteroids; however, neoplastic lesions generally require surgery. PMID:20082512

  14. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  15. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  16. Extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, James; Galea, Samuel; Galea, Joseph; Schembri, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old man on warfarin for aortic valve replacement presented with recurrent episodes of melaena. An initial oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) was normal, as were red cell scanning and colonoscopy. It was a third OGD that revealed the cause of the melaena—a vascular lesion in the duodenum, at the junction between D1 and D2. An extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion was diagnosed, and the lesion was injected with epinephrine and tattooed. Over the following months, episodes of bleeding recurred despite further attempts at injection. Percutaneous radiologically assisted embolisation of the gastroduodenal artery, and eventually duodenotomy and oversuturing of the lesion were performed to no avail. The patient has undergone over 10 endoscopies, and has received over 70 units of packed red cells to date, since his initial presentation 6 years ago. Attempts to stop the bleeding permanently have been difficult, highlighting the complexity of managing such a lesion. PMID:25216921

  17. [The pretended healing of scrofula by the king's touch].

    PubMed

    Duarte, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    From the 11th century up to the beginning of the 19th century a healing rite was performed by the kings of France and England. They were considered to have a hereditary divine power to cure with their hand the scrofula, a tuberculous lymphadenitis that affects mainly cervical lymph nodes. The rite took place regularly over groups of scrofulous patients and a wide audience. The belief in that miraculous power was based on the fact that kings had been annointed and crowned in a religious ceremony, thus acquiring a priestly nature together with their temporal power. The monarchs of France and England would have stimulated their subjects' credulity to strengthen their power over the feudal lords, specially when a change of dynasty took place. Scrofula may have been chosen due to a high incidence, with an evolution that may mimick healing, and also because the concept of scrofula may have included other lesions with episodes of spontaneous remission. The available historical data and the current knowledge of tuberculous lymphadenitis do not support the belief of massive miraculous healings by the king's touch. PMID:25327201

  18. [Wound healing by homeopathic silica dilutions in mice].

    PubMed

    Oberbaum, M; Markovits, R; Weisman, Z; Kalinkevits, A; Bentwich, Z

    1992-08-01

    Highly diluted solutions of silica are widely used in homeopathic medicine to treat lesions such as chronic wounds, ulcers, and abscesses. We tested the therapeutic effects of homeopathic dilutions of silica on induced chronic wounds. Holes were made in the ears of mice by dental wire, which then remained hanging from the ear to cause persistent mechanical irritation. In each experiment 3 or 4 groups of 10 mice each were treated by adding homeopathic dilutions of silica (10(-10), 10(-60), 10(-400)) and of saline (10(-10), respectively, to the drinking water of the mice for 4-20 days. The size of the wound holes was measured every second day (grades 0-4) and/or by an objective image analysis system. The results showed that in 7/11 experiments the ear holes of the silica-treated animals were significantly smaller (p less than 0.05-0.001) and healed faster than in those treated with saline. Also the therapeutic effect increased progressively with increase in dilution of the silica (10(-10) less than 10(-60) less than 10(-400)). These results show that homeopathic dilutions of silica (even well beyond Avogadro's number) clearly have a therapeutic effect on wound healing and that our experimental model for studying wound healing is a very useful tool for such studies. PMID:1325402

  19. Tobacco smoking and surgical healing of oral tissues: a review.

    PubMed

    Balaji, S M

    2008-01-01

    It is believed that the crew of Columbus had introduced tobacco from the 'American India' to the rest of the world, and tobacco was attributed as a medicinal plant. It was often used to avert hunger during long hours of work. But in reality, tobacco causes various ill effects including pre-malignant lesions and cancers. This article aims at reviewing the literature pertaining to the effect of tobacco smoking upon the outcome of various surgical procedures performed in the oral cavity. Tobacco affects postoperative wound healing following surgical and nonsurgical tooth extractions, routine maxillofacial surgeries, implants, and periodontal therapies. In an experimental study, bone regeneration after distraction osteogenesis was found to be negatively affected by smoking. Thus, tobacco, a peripheral vasoconstrictor, along with its products like nicotine increases platelet adhesiveness, raises the risk of microvascular occlusion, and causes tissue ischemia. Smoking tobacco is also associated with catecholamines release resulting in vasoconstriction and decreased tissue perfusion. Smoking is believed to suppress the innate and host immune responses, affecting the function of neutrophils--the prime line of defense against infection. Thus, the association between smoking and delayed healing of oral tissues following surgeries is evident. Dental surgeons should stress on the ill effects of tobacco upon the routine postoperative healing to smoker patients and should aid them to become tobacco-free. PMID:19075440

  20. Healing texts and healing techniques in indigenous Balinese medicine.

    PubMed

    McCauley, A P

    1988-01-01

    Case histories of three prominent Balinese healers illustrate various ways that indigenous medical texts are used in healing. Most healers employ mantras, spells and inscriptions from the texts because they believe them to have innate power which can heal. A smaller group of healers are literate in the archaic language used in the palm-leaf medical manuscripts. However, their use of these manuscripts often differs from the literal and unambiguous way that Westerners read medical documents. An examination of Balinese medical manuscripts, in the context of the conventions of Balinese literature, demonstrates the use of these texts to align the body with the macrocosm and to reaffirm the beliefs of the ancestors. PMID:3227378

  1. Effect of ranitidine on healing of experimentally induced gastric ulcers in ponies.

    PubMed

    MacAllister, C G; Sangiah, S

    1993-07-01

    Thirty young ponies were examined endoscopically for evidence of gastric ulceration. Seven ponies had noninduced gastric ulcers present at the initial examination and were eliminated from the study. In an attempt to induce gastric ulcers experimentally, flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg of body weight, IM, q 8 h) was administered for 7 days to the 23 ponies with endoscopically normal gastric mucosa. During the 7 days of flunixin administration, 11 ponies developed gastric ulcers that were appropriate for study. The 11 ponies were randomly allotted to 2 groups. Group-A (n = 5) and group-B (n = 6) ponies received ranitidine (4.4 mg/kg, PO, q 8 h) and corn syrup, respectively, until ulcers healed or for a maximum of 40 days. General anesthesia was induced every 3 to 5 days for visual evaluation of ulcer healing by use of a video endoscope. The earliest complete healing of gastric lesions observed in a corn syrup-treated pony was at 17 days. At 40 days, 3 of 5 and 3 of 6 ponies of the ranitidine and corn syrup-treated groups, respectively, had healed ulcers. Results of this study indicate that: noninduced gastric ulcers may be common in young ponies, flunixin meglumine may be effective in inducing gastric ulcers for gastric healing studies in young ponies, and ranitidine (4.4 mg/kg, q 8 h) is not significantly effective in accelerating healing of experimentally induced gastric ulcers in ponies under conditions of this study. PMID:8368605

  2. Clinical Application of 810nm Diode Laser to Remove Gingival Hyperplasic Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Azari-Marhabi, Saranaz; Alirezaei, Somayeh; Asnaashari, Nikoo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Several treatment options have been introduced for removal of gingival hyperplasic lesions, but using diode lasers have many advantages such as less bleeding, time saving, better shaping, improved healing and less complication for the patients. Case: A 15-year-old girl with multiple fibroma-like lesions in the oral cavity, who had a medical history of tuberous sclerosis, was selected for gingivoplasty treatment with 810nm diode laser. Result: A perfect shaping was obtained after removal of the whole lesion in one session and no recurrence was observed in 6 months. Conclusion: Using laser in the treatment of oral lesions leads to excellent wound healing along with excellent functional results. PMID:25606315

  3. Nonsurgical management of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marina; de Ataide, Ida

    2015-01-01

    Immature nonvital teeth can often be associated with periapical lesions. Presence of external inflammatory resorption can complicate the treatment plan. A 21-year-old female patient presented with a large periapical lesion in relation to teeth 11 and 12. Tooth 11 was an immature tooth undergoing external inflammatory resorption. Aspiration through the root canal was carried out to evacuate the purulent fluid in the periapical lesion. Triple antibiotic paste was then placed as an intracanal medicament for a period of 2 weeks, followed by calcium hydroxide therapy for a period of 2 months. Mineral trioxide aggregate was then placed as an apical barrier to a thickness of about 4 mm. Obturation of the remainder of the canal space was done after 48 h. Complete periapical healing was evident after 1 year and 6 months. Nonsurgical healing of a large periapical lesion associated with an immature tooth displaying external inflammatory resorption can be successfully achieved. PMID:26180425

  4. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  5. Oral Lesions in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  6. Retinal lesions in septicemia.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Barnea, Y; Geyer, O; Siegman-Igra, Y

    1993-12-15

    We explored the association between septicemia and specific retinal lesions in a prospective controlled study. Hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, or Roth's spots were found in 24 of 101 septicemic patients (24%), compared to four of 99 age- and gender-matched control patients (4%) (P = .0002). There was no significant association between types of organisms or focus of infection and the presence of specific lesions. Histologic examination of affected eyes disclosed cytoid bodies in the nerve fiber layer without inflammation. A definite association between septicemia and retinal lesions was found and indicates the need for routine ophthalmoscopy in septicemic patients. PMID:8250076

  7. Fracture healing: mechanisms and interventions

    PubMed Central

    Einhorn, Thomas A.; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.

    2015-01-01

    Fractures are the most common large-organ, traumatic injuries to humans. The repair of bone fractures is a postnatal regenerative process that recapitulates many of the ontological events of embryonic skeletal development. Although fracture repair usually restores the damaged skeletal organ to its pre-injury cellular composition, structure and biomechanical function, about 10% of fractures will not heal normally. This article reviews the developmental progression of fracture healing at the tissue, cellular and molecular levels. Innate and adaptive immune processes are discussed as a component of the injury response, as are environmental factors, such as the extent of injury to the bone and surrounding tissue, fixation and the contribution of vascular tissues. We also present strategies for fracture treatment that have been tested in animal models and in clinical trials or case series. The biophysical and biological basis of the molecular actions of various therapeutic approaches, including recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins and parathyroid hormone therapy, are also discussed. PMID:25266456

  8. Thyroid Hormone and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Safer, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    Although thyroid hormone is one of the most potent stimulators of growth and metabolic rate, the potential to use thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology has never been subject to rigorous investigation. A number of investigators have demonstrated intriguing therapeutic potential for topical thyroid hormone. Topical T3 has accelerated wound healing and hair growth in rodents. Topical T4 has been used to treat xerosis in humans. It is clear that the use of thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology may be of large consequence and merits further study. This is a review of the literature regarding thyroid hormone action on skin along with skin manifestations of thyroid disease. The paper is intended to provide a context for recent findings of direct thyroid hormone action on cutaneous cells in vitro and in vivo which may portend the use of thyroid hormone to promote wound healing. PMID:23577275

  9. Self-healing fuse development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, N. D.; Kinsinger, R. E.; Harris, L. P.

    1973-01-01

    The mercury-filled self-healing fuses developed for this program afford very good protection from circuit faults with rapid reclosure. Fuse performance and design parameters have been characterized. Life tests indicate a capability of 500 fuse operations. Fuse ratings are 150 v at 5, 15, 25 and 50 circuit A. A series of sample fuses using alumina and beryllia insulation have been furnished to NASA for circuit evaluation.

  10. Fracture healing in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Wing Hoi; Miclau, Theodore; Chow, Simon Kwoon-Ho; Yang, Frank F; Alt, Volker

    2016-06-01

    As the world population rises, osteoporotic fracture is an emerging global threat to the well-being of elderly patients. The process of fracture healing by intramembranous ossification or/and endochondral ossification involve many well-orchestrated events including the signaling, recruitment and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) during the early phase; formation of a hard callus and extracellular matrix, angiogenesis and revascularization during the mid-phase; and finally callus remodeling at the late phase of fracture healing. Through clinical and animal research, many of these factors are shown to be impaired in osteoporotic bone. Animal studies related to post-menopausal estrogen deficient osteoporosis (type I) have shown healing to be prolonged with decreased levels of MSCs and decreased levels of angiogenesis. Moreover, the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) was shown to be delayed in ovariectomy-induced osteoporotic fracture. This might be related to the observed difference in mechanical sensitivity between normal and osteoporotic bones, which requires further experiments to elucidate. In mice fracture models related to senile osteoporosis (type II), it was observed that chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation were impaired; and that transplantation of juvenile bone marrow would result in enhanced callus formation. Other factors related to angiogenesis and vasculogenesis have also been noted to be impaired in aged models, affecting the degradation of cartilaginous matrixes and vascular invasion; the result is changes in matrix composition and growth factors concentrations that ultimately impairs healing during age-related osteoporosis. Most osteoporotic related fractures occur at metaphyseal sites clinically, and reports have indicated that differences exist between diaphyseal and metaphyseal fractures. An animal model that satisfies three main criteria (metaphyseal region, plate fixation, osteoporosis) is suggested for future research for

  11. Bixin action in the healing process of rats mouth wounds.

    PubMed

    Piva, Renata Machado; Johann, Aline Cristina Batista Rodrigues; Costa, Camila Kocler; Miguel, Obdulio Gomez; Rosa, Edvaldo Ribeiro; de Azevedo-Alanis, Luciana Reis; Trevilatto, Paula Cristina; Ignacio, Sergio Aparecido; Bettega, Patrícia Vida Cassi; Gregio, Ana Maria Trindade

    2013-01-01

    Oral lesions that manifest as ulcer lesions are quite common and can cause discomfort to the patient. Searching for drugs to accelerate the healing of these lesions is nonstop process. Bixin is a molecule found in annatto (urucum) seeds and is considered a viable therapeutic option to treat such lesions due to its anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and healing properties. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of the bixin solution in the ulcer healing process in the oral mucosa of rats. Ulcers were induced with punches of 0.5 cm in the middle of the dorsum of the tongue of 64 Wistar rats. The animals were randomly divided into 8 groups, in which 4 groups were treated with saline solution, while the other 4 were treated with the bixin solution. The animals were sacrificed in the periods 2, 7, 14, and 21 days after the beginning of the treatment. The species were histologically processed and stained with hematoxylin/eosin and picrosirius. Fibroblasts, reepithelialization, and wound contraction could be observed, as could the quantification of neutrophils, macrophages, plasma cells, lymphocytes, and mature and immature collagen. On the seventh day, the experimental group, when compared to the control group, presented a higher proliferation of fibroblasts, more advanced reepithelialization, and a higher contraction in the wounds. A reduction in the average number of neutrophils in the experimental group, when compared to the control group, could be observed in all periods (p=0.000). Up to two days, the total collagen area was higher (p=0.044) in the experimental group (4139.60±3047.51t han in the control group (1564.81±918.47). The deposition of mature collagen, on the 14(th) day, was higher (p=0.048) in the experimental group (5802.40±3578.18) than in the control group (1737.26±1439.97). The results found in the present study indicate that the bixin solution inhibits the acute inflammatory response with a minor average number of neutrophils and

  12. Modeling of anisotropic wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero, C.; Javierre, E.; García-Aznar, J. M.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.; Menzel, A.

    2015-06-01

    Biological soft tissues exhibit non-linear complex properties, the quantification of which presents a challenge. Nevertheless, these properties, such as skin anisotropy, highly influence different processes that occur in soft tissues, for instance wound healing, and thus its correct identification and quantification is crucial to understand them. Experimental and computational works are required in order to find the most precise model to replicate the tissues' properties. In this work, we present a wound healing model focused on the proliferative stage that includes angiogenesis and wound contraction in three dimensions and which relies on the accurate representation of the mechanical behavior of the skin. Thus, an anisotropic hyperelastic model has been considered to analyze the effect of collagen fibers on the healing evolution of an ellipsoidal wound. The implemented model accounts for the contribution of the ground matrix and two mechanically equivalent families of fibers. Simulation results show the evolution of the cellular and chemical species in the wound and the wound volume evolution. Moreover, the local strain directions depend on the relative wound orientation with respect to the fibers.

  13. Arsenic Exposure and Oral Cavity Lesions in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Emdadul H.; Melkonian, Stephanie; Poudel, Krishna C.; Yasuoka, Junko; Otsuka, Keiko; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Parvez, Faruque; Slavkovich, Vesna; Graziano, Joseph H.; Ahsan, Habibul; Jimba, Masamine

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship between arsenic exposure and oral cavity lesions among an arsenic-exposed population in Bangladesh. Methods We carried out an analysis utilizing the baseline data of the Health Effects of Arsenic Exposure Longitudinal Study (HEALS). HEALS is an ongoing population-based cohort study to investigate health outcomes associated with arsenic exposure via drinking water in Araihazar, Bangladesh. We used multinomial regression models to estimate the risk of oral cavity lesions. Results Participants with high urinary arsenic levels (286.1–5000.0μg/g) were more likely to develop arsenical lesions of the gums [multinomial odds ratio (M-OR 2.90; 95% CI= 1.11–7.54)], and tongue (M-OR 2.79; 95% CI= 1.51– 5.15), compared with those of urinary arsenic levels of 7.0–134.0μg/g. Conclusions Higher level of arsenic exposure was positively associated with increased arsenical lesions of the gums and tongue. PMID:23201591

  14. Hypervascular liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Aya; Maturen, Katherine E; Tye, Grace A; Liu, Yueyi I; Parti, Naveen N; Desser, Terry S

    2009-10-01

    Hypervascular hepatocellular lesions include both benign and malignant etiologies. In the benign category, focal nodular hyperplasia and adenoma are typically hypervascular. In addition, some regenerative nodules in cirrhosis may be hypervascular. Malignant hypervascular primary hepatocellular lesions include hepatocellular carcinoma, fibrolamellar carcinoma, and peripheral cholangiocarcinoma. Vascular liver lesions often appear hypervascular because they tend to follow the enhancement of the blood pool; these include hemangiomas, arteriovenous malformations, angiosarcomas, and peliosis. While most gastrointestinal malignancies that metastasize to the liver will appear hypovascular on arterial and portal-venous phase imaging, certain cancers such as metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (including pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, carcinoid, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors) tend to produce hypervascular metastases due to the greater recruitment of arterial blood supply. Finally, rare hepatic lesions such as glomus tumor and inflammatory pseudotumor may have a hypervascular appearance. PMID:19842564

  15. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  16. Evaluation of Parotid Lesions.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Edward C; Mallen-St Clair, Jon; St John, Maie A

    2016-04-01

    The differential diagnosis of a parotid lesion is broad, and the otolaryngologist must consider inflammatory, neoplastic, autoimmune, traumatic, infectious, or congenital causes. A comprehensive history and physical examination, in conjunction with judicious use of radiographic imaging (MRI, computed tomography, ultrasonography, nuclear medicine studies), laboratory studies, and pathologic analysis (fine-needle aspiration, core biopsy, incisional biopsy), facilitates making an accurate diagnosis. This article reviews the key history and physical elements and adjunctive diagnostic tools available for working up parotid lesions. PMID:26902978

  17. Multiple Osteolytic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vinayachandran, Divya; Sankarapandian, Sathasivasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Several systemic diseases initially present with various oral manifestations. Investigation of these oral symptoms may at times lead to the diagnosis of grave underlying life-threatening conditions. We present one such case, where the patient manifested with gross enlargement of the mandible, along with lesions in the lower limbs. These lesions were the initial manifestation and on further investigations the patient was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. PMID:24516769

  18. Petrous Apex Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Ronald G.; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Mann, Wolf J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to detail our experience in treating 69 patients over the past 6 years with pathologic processes involving the petrous apex. These included 25 (36%) primary petrous apex lesions, 40 (58%) lesions that involved the petrous apex by direct invasion from an adjacent region, and four (6%) lesions that were the result of metastatic spread from a distant site. Although lesions of the petrous apex are uncommon, they may present significant morbidity to the patient. The symptoms elicited by these lesions are usually vague and nonlocalizing in the early stages but may progress to include multiple cranial neuropathies. Successful results are contingent on early diagnosis, which requires a high index of suspicion and use of appropriate imaging modalities. Thorough preoperative assessment with use of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and carotid arteriography is essential to plan the surgical approach. We present this collection of patients in order to aid in the further preoperative characterization of the differences in primary and secondary lesions of the petrous apex. PMID:17170919

  19. Colorectal Subepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Most of subepithelial lesion (SEL) being identified was accidentally discovered as small bulging lesion covered with normal mucosa from endoscopic screening. The type of treatment and prognosis vary depending on the type of tumor, it would be crucial to perform an accurate differential diagnosis. Since the differentiation of SEL relied on the indirect findings observed from the mucosal surface using an endoscopy only in the past, it was able to confirm the presence of lesion only but difficult to identify complex detailed nature of the lesion. However, after the endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) was introduced, it became possible to identify extrinsic compression, and size of intramural tumors, internal properties and contour so that it gets possible to have differential diagnosis of lesions and prediction on the lesion whether it is malignant or benign. In addition, the use of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration and EUS-guided core biopsy made it possible to make histological differential diagnosis. This study intended to investigate endoscopic and EUS findings, histological diagnosis, treatment regimen and impression of colorectal SELs. PMID:26240803

  20. Diode laser treatment and clinical management of multiple oral lesions in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Favia, G; Tempesta, A; Limongelli, L; Suppressa, P; Sabbà, C; Maiorano, E

    2016-05-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is rare, and characterised by vascular dysplasia that leads to various symptoms including visceral arteriovenous malformations and mucocutaneous telangiectatic lesions. Our aim was to describe the clinical features and options for the treatment of multiple oral lesions, and to illustrate the efficacy of the diode laser in the treatment of early (<2mm) and advanced lesions (2mm or more). We report 24 patients with 1200 oral telangiectatic lesions, which were often associated with regular bleeding (from monthly to daily), superinfection, pain, and swelling, and treated with multiple sessions of laser according to the number and size of the lesions. Early lesions were treated with a single laser impulse in ultrapulsed mode, and advanced lesions with repeated laser impulses in pulsed mode (t-on 200ms/t-off 500ms), at a power of 8W. Early lesions healed completely after laser photocoagulation with no operative or postoperative complications, while advanced lesions improved with a remarkable reduction in size but more discomfort. Protective occlusal plates were sometimes used to reduce the incidence of new lesions caused by dental trauma. The treatment of oral telangiectatic lesions is still being debated, and it is important to improve quality of life for patients. Diode laser surgery could be an effective treatment for oral lesions in those with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. PMID:26360009

  1. Interrelationship between Periapical Lesion and Systemic Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Hajime; Hirai, Kimito; Martins, Christine Men; Furusho, Hisako; Battaglino, Ricardo; Hashimoto, Koshi

    2016-01-01

    Periapical periodontitis, also known as periapical lesion, is a common dental disease, along with periodontitis (gum disease). Periapical periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease, caused by endodontic infection, and its development is regulated by the host immune/inflammatory response. Metabolic disorders, which are largely dependent on life style such as eating habits, have been interpreted as a “metabolically-triggered” low-grade systemic inflammation and may interact with periapical periodontitis by triggering immune modulation. The host immune system is therefore considered the common fundamental mechanism of both disease conditions. An elevated inflammatory state caused by metabolic disorders can impact the clinical outcome of periapical lesions and interfere with wound healing after endodontic treatment. Although additional well-designed clinical studies are needed, periapical lesions appear to affect insulin sensitivity and exacerbate non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Immune regulatory cytokines produced by various cell types, including immune cells and adipose tissue, play an important role in this interrelationship. PMID:26881444

  2. [Scapholunate lesions and instabilities--how to recognize and treat them?].

    PubMed

    Papaloïzos, Michaël

    2015-06-01

    The lesions of the scapholunate ligament are some of the most frequently encountered in the wrist. Left untreated, the complete rupture of the ligament is followed by degenerative arthritis according to a well-defined pattern of progression through the wrist, eventually leading to multifocal arthrosis, a condition described as scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC wrist). The scapholunate lesions are classified in stages according to the degree of the lesion established by imaging studies or arthroscopy and to the chronicity of the lesion. Both together essentially determine the healing potential and the prognosis, which rapidly decrease after six weeks from the initial trauma, thus indicating the importance of recognizing the acute or subacute lesion and directing the patient to the hand surgeon early enough. The therapeutic options are notably reduced and often of palliative nature in case of chronic lesions with secondary changes in the wrist mechanics or cartilage damage. PMID:26211287

  3. MTA resorption and periradicular healing in an open-apex incisor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Ehsani, Sara

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes the periradicular healing and resorption of an unintentional extrusion of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in an open-apex central incisor. A 22-year old female with a symptomatic open-apex right maxillary central incisor associated with a periradicular lesion was referred for evaluation and treatment. After chemomechanical debridement, the apical third of the root canal was filled with MTA to create an apical plug. Postoperative radiographs showed the extrusion of MTA into the periradicular lesion. The tooth was then restored with a post and crown. At the 2-year follow-up, the tooth was asymptomatic and radiographs revealed complete healing of the periradicular area. At the 7-year follow-up, complete resorption of the extruded MTA was evident. The results of this case study indicate that complete resorption of extruded MTA is possible in the long term; however, the extrusion of MTA in open-apex tooth should still be avoided. PMID:23960529

  4. Effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma in healing necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum ulcers.

    PubMed

    Motolese, A; Vignati, F; Antelmi, A; Saturni, V

    2015-01-01

    Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum (NLD) is a chronic condition, which is characterized by single or multiple lesions on the legs, and occurs in 0.3% of patients with diabetes. Recently, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used in several clinical settings to promote sustained healing and better outcome. We propose the use of PRP for the treatment of NLD-associated recalcitrant wounds. In this study, 15 patients were treated with homologous PRP; all showed marked enhancement in wound healing without any adverse effects. After PRP application, advanced dressings were used until closure of the lesion was obtained, which was complete for all our patients. We therefore propose the use of PRP for recalcitrant wounds in patients with NLD. PMID:25266162

  5. Towards integration of traditional healing and western healing: Is this a remote possibility?

    PubMed Central

    Mokgobi, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    There is a shortage of Western-trained health care personnel in state hospitals and clinics in South Africa. However, traditional healers are in abundance in both the urban and rural areas of South Africa. Some health care interest groups and individual researchers have called for integration of traditional healing and Western biomedicine in South Africa. The South African government seems to support the idea of integrating the two health care systems. The current paper offers a critical discussion of this issue. The paper discusses pertinent issues such as the demand for traditional healing, possible integration of traditional healing and Western healing as well as anticipated hindrances to integration of traditional healing and Western healing. Finally, the paper discusses dilemmas posed by non-integration of traditional healing and Western healing. In conclusion, the potential to integrate the two health care systems remains a complex possibility which might take years to achieve. PMID:26594665

  6. [Wound-healing effect of carbopol hydrogels in rats with alloxan diabetes model].

    PubMed

    Zinov'ev, E V; Ivakhniuk, G K; Dadaian, K A; Lagvilava, T O

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 0.5% hydrogels of acrylic polymers (carbopol), antibiotic ointment based on polyethylene oxides (levomekol), silver-containing creams (dermazin and argosulfan), silver sulfadiazine ointment with epidermal growth factor (ebermin), and wound-covering fabric of antibacterial cellulose with poviargol and zero-valent silver (aquacell-Ag) on skin repair processes have been evaluated in comparative experiments on rats. The wound-healing effects were characterized by the time of cleansing and epithelization, rate of suppuration, index of healing, and skin impedance under conditions of necrotic skin lesions on the background of diabetes. It is established that local application of carbopol hydrogels modified by electric (frequency-modulated) signal with antiseptics (poviargol) and nanostructural components (natural fullerene complex) shortens the period of wound cleansing from detritus on the background of decompensated diabetes by 3.6 days (p > 0.05), accelerates healing by 8.4 days (p < 0.05), reduces the frequency of suppuration by 23.3% (p < 0.05), exhibits strong bactericidal effect against wound infections by pathogens, and restores tissue impedance. Thus, hydrogels based on low-crosslinked acrylic polymers are a promising basis of wound-healing formulations for the treatment of necrotic lesions on the background of diabetic foot syndrome. PMID:24649598

  7. The Role of Oxygen during Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chuanyong; Saless, Neema; Wang, Xiaodong; Sinha, Arjun; Decker, Sebastian; Kazakia, Galateia; Hou, Huagang; Williams, Benjamin; Swartz, Harold M.; Hunt, Thomas K.; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph S.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen affects the activity of multiple skeletogenic cells and is involved in many processes that are important for fracture healing. However, the role of oxygen in fracture healing has not been fully studied. Here we systematically examine the effects of oxygen tension on fracture healing and test the ability of hyperoxia to rescue healing defects in a mouse model of ischemic fracture healing. Mice with tibia fracture were housed in custom-built gas chambers and groups breathed a constant atmosphere of 13% oxygen (hypoxia), 21% oxygen (normoxia), or 50% oxygen (hyperoxia). The influx of inflammatory cells to the fracture site, stem cell differentiation, tissue vascularization, and fracture healing were analyzed. In addition, the efficacy of hyperoxia (50% breathing oxygen) as a treatment regimen for fracture nonunion was tested. Hypoxic animals had decreased tissue vascularity, decreased bone formation, and delayed callus remodeling. Hyperoxia increased tissue vascularization, altered fracture healing in un-complicated fractures, and improved bone repair in ischemia-induced delayed fracture union. However, neither hypoxia nor hyperoxia significantly altered chondrogenesis or osteogenesis during early stages of fracture healing, and infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils was not affected by environmental oxygen after bone injury. In conclusion, our results indicate that environmental oxygen levels affect tissue vascularization and fracture healing, and that providing oxygen to patients with fractures accompanied by ischemia may be beneficial. PMID:23063782

  8. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  9. The local immune response in ulcerative lesions of Buruli disease

    PubMed Central

    Kiszewski, A E; Becerril, E; Aguilar, L D; Kader, I T A; Myers, W; Portaels, F; Hernàndez Pando, R

    2006-01-01

    Buruli disease (BU) is a progressive necrotic and ulcerative disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. BU is considered the third most common mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy. Three clinical stages of the cutaneous lesions have been described in BU: pre-ulcerative, ulcerative and healed lesions. In this study we used immunohistochemistry and automated morphometry to determine the percentage of macrophages and of CD4/CD8 lymphocytes and their expression of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Expression of these cytokines was correlated with the inflammatory response evaluated by histopathology. All the studied BU ulcerative cases showed extensive necrosis and chronic inflammation. The most important feature was the presence or absence of granulomas co-existing with a mixed pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance. When granulomas were present significantly higher expression of IFN-γ was seen, whereas in ulcerative lesions without granulomas there was increased expression of IL-10 and significantly higher bacillary counts. These features correlated with the chronicity of the lesions; longer-lasting lesions showed granulomas. Thus, granulomas were absent from relatively early ulcerative lesions, which contained more bacilli and little IFN-γ, suggesting that at this stage of the disease strong suppression of the protective cellular immune response facilitates proliferation of bacilli. PMID:16487243

  10. Healing in the irradiated wound

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.H.; Rudolph, R. )

    1990-07-01

    Poor or nonhealing of irradiated wounds has been attributed to progressive obliterative endarteritis. Permanently damaged fibroblasts may also play an important part in poor healing. Regardless of the cause, the key to management of irradiated skin is careful attention to prevent its breakdown and conservative, but adequate, treatment when wounds are minor. When wounds become larger and are painful, complete excision of the wound or ulcer is called for and coverage should be provided by a well-vascularized nonparasitic distant flap.16 references.

  11. Self-healing fuse development.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, N. D.

    1972-01-01

    The self-healing fuse is a very fast acting current overload protective device which opens and recloses in a few milliseconds. The fuse confines a mercury column in an insulated channel and returns the mercury to the channel after firing. Ratings 5 to 50 A at 600 peak volts are possible with a life of hundreds of cycles. Compared to conventional fuses, much less fault current energy fires the fuse by heating the mercury to boiling temperature. Next an arc discharge develops while explosive forces expel the liquid mercury from the channel. Then the high impedance arc either extinguishes immediately, or operates for a few milliseconds, until a switch opens the circuit.

  12. Healing through Interdependence: The Role of Connecting in First Nations Healing Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Rod M.

    1997-01-01

    Utilized the Critical Incident Technique to explore the facilitation of healing for First Nations people. Results indicate that healing was facilitated through practices such as connecting to family, community, spirituality, and nature. Examines healing approaches that helped people achieve interdependence to illustrate the importance of…

  13. Integrating Counselling, Psychotherapy and Healing: An Inquiry into Counsellors and Psychotherapists Whose Work Includes Healing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, William

    1997-01-01

    A qualitative study of 30 counselors or psychotherapists revealed numerous themes. These major themes include the following: transition by the practitioner toward the use of healing; the taboo over talking about spiritual and healing experiences; the nature of healing as distinct from therapy; supervision difficulties; and the concept of spiritual…

  14. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different treatment interventions. Practical Implication. Periodontic-endodontic lesions can be successfully treated if dental professionals follow a concerted treatment protocol that integrates endodontic and periodontic specialties. General dentists can be the gatekeepers in managing these cases. PMID:27418983

  15. Carcinogenic Parasite Secretes Growth Factor That Accelerates Wound Healing and Potentially Promotes Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Smout, Michael J; Sotillo, Javier; Laha, Thewarach; Papatpremsiri, Atiroch; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Pimenta, Rafael N; Chan, Lai Yue; Johnson, Michael S; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Giacomin, Paul R; Moran, Corey S; Golledge, Jonathan; Daly, Norelle; Sripa, Banchob; Mulvenna, Jason P; Brindley, Paul J; Loukas, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Infection with the human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini induces cancer of the bile ducts, cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Injury from feeding activities of this parasite within the human biliary tree causes extensive lesions, wounds that undergo protracted cycles of healing, and re-injury over years of chronic infection. We show that O. viverrini secreted proteins accelerated wound resolution in human cholangiocytes, an outcome that was compromised following silencing of expression of the fluke-derived gene encoding the granulin-like growth factor, Ov-GRN-1. Recombinant Ov-GRN-1 induced angiogenesis and accelerated mouse wound healing. Ov-GRN-1 was internalized by human cholangiocytes and induced gene and protein expression changes associated with wound healing and cancer pathways. Given the notable but seemingly paradoxical properties of liver fluke granulin in promoting not only wound healing but also a carcinogenic microenvironment, Ov-GRN-1 likely holds marked potential as a therapeutic wound-healing agent and as a vaccine against an infection-induced cancer of major public health significance in the developing world. PMID:26485648

  16. Carcinogenic Parasite Secretes Growth Factor That Accelerates Wound Healing and Potentially Promotes Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Smout, Michael J.; Sotillo, Javier; Laha, Thewarach; Papatpremsiri, Atiroch; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Pimenta, Rafael N.; Chan, Lai Yue; Johnson, Michael S.; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Giacomin, Paul R.; Moran, Corey S.; Golledge, Jonathan; Daly, Norelle; Sripa, Banchob; Mulvenna, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Infection with the human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini induces cancer of the bile ducts, cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Injury from feeding activities of this parasite within the human biliary tree causes extensive lesions, wounds that undergo protracted cycles of healing, and re-injury over years of chronic infection. We show that O. viverrini secreted proteins accelerated wound resolution in human cholangiocytes, an outcome that was compromised following silencing of expression of the fluke-derived gene encoding the granulin-like growth factor, Ov-GRN-1. Recombinant Ov-GRN-1 induced angiogenesis and accelerated mouse wound healing. Ov-GRN-1 was internalized by human cholangiocytes and induced gene and protein expression changes associated with wound healing and cancer pathways. Given the notable but seemingly paradoxical properties of liver fluke granulin in promoting not only wound healing but also a carcinogenic microenvironment, Ov-GRN-1 likely holds marked potential as a therapeutic wound-healing agent and as a vaccine against an infection-induced cancer of major public health significance in the developing world. PMID:26485648

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen and wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Sourabh; Vishwanath, Guruswamy

    2012-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is the use of 100% oxygen at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure. Today several approved applications and indications exist for HBOT. HBOT has been successfully used as adjunctive therapy for wound healing. Non-healing wounds such as diabetic and vascular insufficiency ulcers have been one major area of study for hyperbaric physicians where use of HBOT as an adjunct has been approved for use by way of various studies and trials. HBOT is also indicated for infected wounds like clostridial myonecrosis, necrotising soft tissue infections, Fournier's gangrene, as also for traumatic wounds, crush injury, compartment syndrome, compromised skin grafts and flaps and thermal burns. Another major area of application of HBOT is radiation-induced wounds, specifically osteoradionecrosis of mandible, radiation cystitis and radiation proctitis. With the increase in availability of chambers across the country, and with increasing number of studies proving the benefits of adjunctive use for various kinds of wounds and other indications, HBOT should be considered in these situations as an essential part of the overall management strategy for the treating surgeon. PMID:23162231

  18. Bioinspired Self-Healing Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksay, Ilhan

    2005-03-01

    Synthetic materials are designed to satisfy only one or two functions, but biologically produced ones are multifunctional and have properties (e.g., self-replicating, self-healing) that have yet to be introduced into man-made materials. The objective of this lecture will be to provide an understanding of the important processes for controlling materials properties through nano- and microstructural design and processing with the goal of attaining multifunctionality. A case study will be on the possibility of producing structural materials with self-healing characteristics. In an effort to mimic self-repair functions of living systems, we have been working with self-assembling complex fluids that respond to fields generated by the defects and deposit materials at the site of the defect. Presently, the techniques are limited to certain materials systems as coatings or thin films. We partially mimic the process of blood clotting as a process of colloidal aggregation at a defect site. We show that under the influence of an electrical field, colloidal particles detect a defect and aggregate at the defect site to form a protective layer. The basis of this process is the electrohdrodynamic flow generated by the inhomogeneities. We then make this a permanent protective layer through the electrodeposition of a metal binder in the interstitials of the colloidal aggregate.

  19. Tomographic Errors From Wavefront Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malcolm, A. E.; Trampert, J.

    2008-12-01

    Despite recent advances in full-waveform modeling ray theory is still, for good reasons, the preferred method in global tomography. It is well known that ray theory is most accurate for anomalies that are large compared to the wavelength. Exactly what errors result from the failure of this assumption is less well understood, in spite of the fact that anomalies found in the Earth from ray-based tomography methods are often outside the regime in which ray theory is known to be valid. Using the spectral element method, we have computed exact delay times and compared them to ray-theoretical traveltimes for two classic anomalies, one large and disk-shaped near the core mantle boundary, and the other a plume-like structure extending throughout the mantle. Wavefront healing is apparent in the traveltime anomalies generated by these structures; its effects are strongly asymmetric between P and S arrivals due to wavelength differences and source directionality. Simple computations in two dimensions allow us to develop the intuition necessary to understand how diffractions around the anomalies explain these results. When inverting the exact travel time anomalies with ray theory we expect wavefront healing to have a strong influence on the resulting structures. We anticipate that the asymmetry will be of particular importance in anomalies in the bulk velocity structure.

  20. Self-Healing Polymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournilhac, Francois

    2012-02-01

    Supramolecular chemistry teaches us to control non-covalent interactions between organic molecules, particularly through the use of optimized building blocks able to establish several hydrogen bonds in parallel. This discipline has emerged as a powerful tool in the design of new materials through the concept of supramolecular polymers. One of the fascinating aspects of such materials is the possibility of controlling the structure, adding functionalities, adjusting the macroscopic properties of and taking profit of the non-trivial dynamics associated to the reversibility of H-bond links. Applications of these compounds may include adhesives, coatings, rheology additives, high performance materials, etc. However, the synthesis of such polymers at the industrial scale still remains a challenge. Our first ambition is to design supramolecular polymers with original properties, the second ambition is to devise simple and environmentally friendly methods for their industrial production. In our endeavours to create novel supramolecular networks with rubbery elasticity, self-healing ability and as little as possible creep, the strategy to prolongate the relaxation time and in the same time, keep the system flexible was to synthesize rather than a single molecule, an assembly of randomly branched H-bonding oligomers. We propose a strategy to obtain through a facile one-pot synthesis a large variety of supramolecular materials that can behave as differently as associating low-viscosity liquids, semi-crystalline or amorphous thermoplastics, viscoelastic melts or self-healing rubbers.

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Sourabh; Vishwanath, Guruswamy

    2012-05-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is the use of 100% oxygen at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure. Today several approved applications and indications exist for HBOT. HBOT has been successfully used as adjunctive therapy for wound healing. Non-healing wounds such as diabetic and vascular insufficiency ulcers have been one major area of study for hyperbaric physicians where use of HBOT as an adjunct has been approved for use by way of various studies and trials. HBOT is also indicated for infected wounds like clostridial myonecrosis, necrotising soft tissue infections, Fournier's gangrene, as also for traumatic wounds, crush injury, compartment syndrome, compromised skin grafts and flaps and thermal burns. Another major area of application of HBOT is radiation-induced wounds, specifically osteoradionecrosis of mandible, radiation cystitis and radiation proctitis. With the increase in availability of chambers across the country, and with increasing number of studies proving the benefits of adjunctive use for various kinds of wounds and other indications, HBOT should be considered in these situations as an essential part of the overall management strategy for the treating surgeon. PMID:23162231

  2. The use of aminoguanidine, a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, to evaluate the role of nitric oxide on periapical healing

    PubMed Central

    Farhad, Ali Reza; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad; Nejad, Parnian Alavi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the many chemical mediators involved in inflammatory processes. In addition to periapical inflammation, NO can have a role in periapical healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of aminoguanidine (AG) as a selective inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) on the degree of healing response of periapical lesions of the canine teeth of cats. Methods: In this interventional experimental study, the root canals of 48 cat canine teeth were infected with cat dental plaque and sealed. After induction of periapical lesions, root canal therapy (RCT) was performed. On the day of RCT phase, the cats were administered either AG (experimental group) or normal saline (control group), which was continued on a daily basis until the day of sacrifice. Four canine teeth in one cat served as negative and positive controls. The animals were sacrificed 6 weeks after RCT. The healing response of the periapical zones was analyzed histologically. The mean scores of healing for the two groups were compared using Mann–Whitney U test. Results: The mean scores of healing for the AG group (2.45±0.508) were significantly higher than those of the control group (2±0.510) (P<0.05). Conclusion: The use of an iNOS selective inhibitor such as AG can accelerate the healing process in periapical lesions. PMID:22135691

  3. Therapeutic effects of Zataria Multiflora essential oil on recurrent oral aphthous lesion

    PubMed Central

    Babaee, Neda; Baradaran, Mahmoud; Mohamadi, Hossein; Nooribayat, Shaghayegh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aphthous lesions are one of the most common diseases of the oral cavity. They can cause severe pain, and there is no definite treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of Zataria multiflora (ZM, a thyme-like plant) essential oil for the control and treatment of aphthous lesions. Materials and Methods: This Triple blind clinical trial study was performed on 28 patients who were divided into two groups (eight men and six women in each group) and given ZM or placebo (control). The healing time, pain intensity, and aphthous zone diameter were recorded for each patient and followed for 6-month. Data were analyzed using Mann–Whitney and Friedman tests (P < 0.05). Results: After 6-month of follow-up, 4 patients in the placebo group and 6 patients in the ZM group suffered from recurrent aphthous lesions. The average complete healing time and duration of burning sensation were significantly lower in the ZM group (P < 0.05). Significant difference was observed between the two groups with regard to the diameter of lesions and halo of the lesions (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, ZM shortened the healing period compared to placebo. PMID:26604960

  4. "Healing is a Done Deal": Temporality and Metabolic Healing Among Evangelical Christians in Samoa.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on fieldwork in independent Samoa, in this article, I analyze the temporal dimensions of evangelical Christian healing of metabolic disorders. I explore how those suffering with metabolic disorders draw from multiple time-based notions of healing, drawing attention to the limits of biomedicine in contrast with the effectiveness of Divine healing. By simultaneously engaging evangelical and biomedical temporalities, I argue that evangelical Christians create wellness despite sickness and, in turn, re-signify chronic suffering as a long-term process of Christian healing. Positioning biomedical temporality and evangelical temporality as parallel yet distinctive ways of practicing healing, therefore, influences health care choices. PMID:26436693

  5. Histological study of wound healing in rats following He-Ne and GaAlAs laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Martha S.; Zezell, Denise M.; Maldonado, Edison P.; Viera, Nilson D., Jr.; Carbone, Karin; Pellegrini, Cleusa M. R.; Zorn, Telma M. T.

    1998-12-01

    The influence of low-intensity linearly polarized visible ((lambda) equals 632.8 nm) and near infrared ((lambda) equals 797 nm) laser radiation on healing of skin wounds was compared histologically. Three round lesions measuring about 6 mm in diameter were created at the end of the spinal column of 20 rats divided in two groups of 10 animals by burning the rat back skin with liquid nitrogen. Lesions #1 and #2 were illuminated using He-Ne or GaAlAs laser radiation. The laser polarization was aligned with the rat spinal direction in lesion #1, lesion #2 with the perpendicular relative orientation and lesion #3 was not irradiated (control). The animals were irradiated with a total dose of 1 J/cm2 on day 3, 8, 11 and 14. After each irradiation, two rats from each group were killed to obtain morphological information. On day 17 the last rats were killed. The irradiated lesions presented a significant acceleration on the wound repair compared to the control. The results showed that the relative orientation of the electric field has an essential role on the healing process if exposure is visible light. On the other hand, no morphological difference was observed between illuminated lesions by near infrared radiation with respect to polarization orientation.

  6. Recurrent acute thermal lesion induces esophageal hyperproliferative premalignant lesions in mice esophagus.

    PubMed

    Rapozo, D C M; Blanco, T C M; Reis, B B; Gonzaga, I M; Valverde, P; Canetti, C; Barja-Fidalgo, C; Simao, T A; Albano, R M; Kruel, C D P; Ribeiro Pinto, L F

    2016-04-01

    Hot beverage consumption is a risk factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, but the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. We developed an experimental mouse model to understand the mechanism of thermal lesion to esophageal carcinogenesis. Female BALB/c mice were treated by gavage with water at different temperatures three times a week and nitrosamines in the drinking water. Water at 70°C, but not at lower temperatures, initially induced an esophageal necrosis that healed and became resistant to necrosis after further administrations. However, when 70°C water was associated with N-nitrosodiethylamine at doses above 1ppm, there was interference in epithelial regeneration, allowing recurrent thermal injury and inflammation. Recurrent thermal injury resulted in hyper proliferative premalignant lesions being induced earlier (at 4weeks) and at a higher frequency (4-fold increase at 16weeks) when compared to mice treated with NDEA only. Ki-67 immunostaining revealed that recurrent thermal injury induced basal cell proliferation resulting in the expansion of epithelial basal cells, confirmed by the increase in cytokeratin 14 positive cells with concomitant reduction of differentiated cytokeratin 5 positive cells. We conclude that recurrent thermal lesion may act as a tumor promoter though a strong proliferation stimulus of esophageal epithelial basal cells. PMID:26899552

  7. Genital lesions following bestiality.

    PubMed

    Mittal, A; Shenoi, S D; Kumar, K B; Sharma, P V

    2000-01-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with painful genital lesions with history of bestiality and abnor-mal sexual behaviour. Examination revealed multiple irregular tender ulcers and erosions, with phimosis and left sided tender inguinal adenopathy. VDRL, TPHA, HIV-ELISA were negative. He was treated with ciprofloxacin 500mg b.d. along with saline compresses with complete resolution. PMID:20877040

  8. Holistic nurses' stories of personal healing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marlaine C; Zahourek, Rothlyn; Hines, Mary Enzman; Engebretson, Joan; Wardell, Diane Wind

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to uncover the nature, experiences, and meaning of personal healing for holistic nurses through their narrative accounts. The study employed a qualitative descriptive design with methods of narrative and story inquiry. Participants were nurse attendees at an American Holistic Nurses' Association conference who volunteered for the study. They were invited to share a story about healing self or another. Twenty-five stories were collected; seven were about personal healing, and these are the focus of this analysis. Data were analyzed using a hybrid approach from narrative and story inquiry methods. Eleven themes were clustered under three story segments. The themes within the Call to the Healing Encounter are the following: recognition of the need to resolve a personal or health crisis, knowledge of or engagement in self-care practices, and reliance on intuitive knowing. Themes under the Experience of Healing are the following: connections; profound sensations, perceptions, and events; awareness of the reciprocal nature of healing; inner resolution: forgiveness, awakening, and acceptance; use of multiple holistic approaches; and witnessing manifestations of healing. The themes for Insights are the following: gratitude and appreciation and ongoing journey. A metastory synthesizing the themes is presented, and findings are related to existing literature on healing. PMID:23463813

  9. Aboriginal Healing Foundation Annual Report, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboriginal Healing Foundation, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The Aboriginal Healing Foundation (AHF) is a nonprofit organization established in 1998 with funding from the Canadian Government. Its mission is to support Aboriginal people in building sustainable healing processes that address the legacy of physical and sexual abuse in the residential school system, including intergenerational impacts. AHF…

  10. Self-healing cable for extreme environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, Dryver R. (Inventor); Tolmie, Bernard R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Self-healing cable apparatus and methods disclosed. The self-healing cable has a central core surrounded by an adaptive cover that can extend over the entire length of the self-healing cable or just one or more portions of the self-healing cable. The adaptive cover includes an axially and/or radially compressible-expandable (C/E) foam layer that maintains its properties over a wide range of environmental conditions. A tape layer surrounds the C/E layer and is applied so that it surrounds and axially and/or radially compresses the C/E layer. When the self-healing cable is subjected to a damaging force that causes a breach in the outer jacket and the tape layer, the corresponding localized axially and/or radially compressed portion of the C/E foam layer expands into the breach to form a corresponding localized self-healed region. The self-healing cable is manufacturable with present-day commercial self-healing cable manufacturing tools.

  11. The Meaning Of Healing: Transcending Suffering

    PubMed Central

    Egnew, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE Medicine is traditionally considered a healing profession, but it has neither an operational definition of healing nor an explanation of its mechanisms beyond the physiological processes related to curing. The objective of this study was to determine a definition of healing that operationalizes its mechanisms and thereby identifies those repeatable actions that reliably assist physicians to promote holistic healing. METHODS This study was a qualitative inquiry consisting of in-depth, open-ended, semistructured interviews with Drs. Eric J. Cassell, Carl A. Hammerschlag, Thomas S. Inui, Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, Cicely Saunders, Bernard S. Siegel, and G. Gayle Stephens. Their perceptions regarding the definition and mechanisms of healing were subjected to grounded theory content analysis. RESULTS Healing was associated with themes of wholeness, narrative, and spirituality. Healing is an intensely personal, subjective experience involving a reconciliation of the meaning an individual ascribes to distressing events with his or her perception of wholeness as a person. CONCLUSIONS Healing may be operationally defined as the personal experience of the transcendence of suffering. Physicians can enhance their abilities as healers by recognizing, diagnosing, minimizing, and relieving suffering, as well as helping patients transcend suffering. PMID:15928230

  12. Engineered Biopolymeric Scaffolds for Chronic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Laura E.; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Skin regeneration requires the coordinated integration of concomitant biological and molecular events in the extracellular wound environment during overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and matrix remodeling. This process is highly efficient during normal wound healing. However, chronic wounds fail to progress through the ordered and reparative wound healing process and are unable to heal, requiring long-term treatment at high costs. There are many advanced skin substitutes, which mostly comprise bioactive dressings containing mammalian derived matrix components, and/or human cells, in clinical use. However, it is presently hypothesized that no treatment significantly outperforms the others. To address this unmet challenge, recent research has focused on developing innovative acellular biopolymeric scaffolds as more efficacious wound healing therapies. These biomaterial-based skin substitutes are precisely engineered and fine-tuned to recapitulate aspects of the wound healing milieu and target specific events in the wound healing cascade to facilitate complete skin repair with restored function and tissue integrity. This mini-review will provide a brief overview of chronic wound healing and current skin substitute treatment strategies while focusing on recent engineering approaches that regenerate skin using synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds. We discuss key polymeric scaffold design criteria, including degradation, biocompatibility, and microstructure, and how they translate to inductive microenvironments that stimulate cell infiltration and vascularization to enhance chronic wound healing. As healthcare moves toward precision medicine-based strategies, the potential and therapeutic implications of synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds as tunable treatment modalities for chronic wounds will be considered. PMID:27547189

  13. Wound Healing in PatientsWith Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Wyatt G.; Naidu, Deepak K.; Wheeler, Chad K.; Barkoe, David; Mentis, Marni; Salas, R. Emerick; Smith, David J.; Robson, Martin C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The treatment of patients with cancer has advanced into a complex, multimodal approach incorporating surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Managing wounds in this population is complicated by tumor biology, the patient's disease state, and additional comorbidities, some of which may be iatrogenic. Radiation therapy, frequently employed for local-regional control of disease following surgical resection, has quantifiable negative healing effects due to local tissue fibrosis and vascular effects. Chemotherapeutic agents, either administered alone or as combination therapy with surgery and radiation, may have detrimental effects on the rapidly dividing tissues of healing wounds. Overall nutritional status, often diminished in patients with cancer, is an important aspect to the ability of patients to heal after surgical procedures and/or treatment regimens. Methods: An extensive literature search was performed to gather pertinent information on the topic of wound healing in patients with cancer. The effects that surgical procedures, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and nutritional deficits play in wound healing in these patients were reviewed and collated. Results: The current knowledge and treatment of these aspects of wound healing in cancer patients are discussed, and observations and recommendations for optimal wound healing results are considered. Conclusion: Although wound healing may proceed in a relatively unimpeded manner for many patients with cancer, there is a potential for wound failure due to the nature and effects of the oncologic disease process and its treatments. PMID:18264518

  14. Advocacy and Indigenous Methods of Healing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sue, Derald Wing

    Most counselors have had very little experience with indigenous methods of healing. Indigenous healing can be defined as helping beliefs and practices that originate over extended time within a culture that are not transported from other regions, and that are designed for treating the inhabitants of a given group. Most counselors would find great…

  15. Marjolin's ulcers in the post-burned lesions and scars.

    PubMed

    Saaiq, Muhammad; Ashraf, Bushra

    2014-10-16

    Marjolin's ulcer (MU) represents malignant degeneration that typically ensues over a period of time in the post-burned lesions and scars or any other chronic wound. This review highlights various facets of the presentation and management of MUs that originate from post-burned lesions. The incidence of MUs in such lesions is reported to be 0.77%-2%. This malignancy characteristically develops in the areas of full thickness skin burns that had been allowed for weeks to months to heal spontaneously by secondary intention, or burn wounds which never healed completely over years and the unstable post-burned scars. In the majority of cases, the MU is a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The MUs contribute to an overall 2% of all SCCs and 0.03% of all basal cell carcinomas of the skin. Clinically MUs present in two major morphologic forms. The commoner form is the flat, indurated, ulcerative variety while the less common form is the exophytic papillary variety. Lower limbs represent the most frequently affected body parts. Surgical resection of the primary tumor with 2-4 cm horizontal clearance margin, nodal clearance and radiotherapy constitute the cornerstones of effective oncologic management. Despite best efforts, the overall mortality is reported to be 21%. PMID:25325060

  16. Effect of using miscible and immiscible healing agent on solid state self-healing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makenan, Siti Mastura; Jamil, Mohd Suzeren Md.

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the effect of using various healing agent which are miscible; poly(bisphenol-A-co-epichlorohydrin), and immiscible; poly(ethylene-co-acetate) and poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid), on self-healing resin system. The specimens were analysed by Fourier-transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA), and izod test. Optical image of the sample morphology was observed using optical microscope. Healing efficiencies (HE) were evaluated using izod test. The concept of healing recovery was proved based on the use of miscible and immiscible healing agent. From the results, it can be concluded that the healable resin with miscible healing agent has the highest HE within the third healing cycle.

  17. Photobiomodulation in promoting wound healing: a review.

    PubMed

    Kuffler, Damien P

    2016-01-01

    Despite diverse methods being applied to induce wound healing, many wounds remain recalcitrant to all treatments. Photobiomodulation involves inducing wound healing by illuminating wounds with light emitting diodes or lasers. While used on different animal models, in vitro, and clinically, wound healing is induced by many different wavelengths and powers with no optimal set of parameters yet being identified. While data suggest that simultaneous multiple wavelength illumination is more efficacious than single wavelengths, the optimal single and multiple wavelengths must be better defined to induce more reliable and extensive healing of different wound types. This review focuses on studies in which specific wavelengths induce wound healing and on their mechanisms of action. PMID:26681143

  18. Self Healing Composite for Aircraft's Structural Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teoh, S. H.; Chia, H. Y.; Lee, M. S.; Nasyitah, A. J. N.; Luqman, H. B. S. M.; Nurhidayah, S.; Tan, Willy. C. K.

    When one cuts himself, it is amazing to watch how quickly the body acts to mend the wound. Immediately, the body works to pull the skin around the cut back together. The concept of repair by bleeding of enclosed functional agents serves as the biomimetic inspiration of synthetic self repair systems. Such synthetic self repair systems are based on advancement in polymeric materials; the process of human thrombosis is the inspiration for the application of self healing fibres within the composite materials. Results based on flexural 3 point bend test on the prepared samples have shown that the doubled layer healed hollow fibre laminate subjected to a healing regime of 3 weeks has a healed strength increase of 27% compared to the damaged baseline laminate. These results gave us confidence that there is a great potential to adopt such self healing mechanism on actual composite parts like in aircraft's composite structures.

  19. Why Cancer Patients Seek Islamic Healing.

    PubMed

    Suhami, Norhasmilia; Muhamad, Mazanah Bt; Krauss, Steven Eric

    2016-10-01

    Islamic healing is frequently referred to as the treatment of choice by many Muslim cancer patients in Malaysia. Despite its widespread use, there is limited information relating to patients' healing preferences. With rising cancer rates in the country, this issue has become a concern to public health policy makers. The purpose of this study was to understand why cancer patients seek Islamic healing. This qualitative study utilized in-depth interviews with 18 cancer patients. The findings indicate three main reasons: (1) recommendations from family, friends and doctors; (2) belief in Islamic healing and (3) the perceived ineffectiveness and dissatisfaction with conventional treatments. Islamic healing will likely continue to be popular complementary cancer treatment in Malaysia as it is grounded in strong cultural and religious beliefs. PMID:26391242

  20. Tuned Aperture Computed Tomography to Evaluate Osseous Healing

    PubMed Central

    Nair, M.K.; Seyedain, A.; Agarwall, S.; Webber, R.L.; Nair, U.P.; Piesco, N.P.; Mooney, M.P.; Grondahl, H.-G.

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of osseous healing is a challenging task, requiring expensive advanced imaging modalities. To improve diagnostic osseous imaging, we undertook this prospective study to explore the potential of Tuned Aperture Computed Tomography®. Eighty defects in 20 rabbit mandibles, randomly carrying an osteoblast suspension or a polymer matrix or a combination thereof or no treatment, were imaged at 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks post-surgery. TACT slices, iteratively restored TACT, and conventional digital radiographs were evaluated. Mean-gray-value distribution within regions of interest was correlated with histomorphometric data. Lesions treated with osteoblast/polymer-matrix delivery systems demonstrated the highest mean gray-value, while the diagnostic efficacy of TACT-IR was significantly better than that of other imaging modalities (p < 0.001). Thus, TACT is an accurate imaging modality for non-destructive quantification of osseous dynamics. PMID:11597021

  1. Benefits of oral and topical administration of ROQUETTE Chlorella sp. on skin inflammation and wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Lucas, Sophie; Bisson, Jean-Francois; Duffaud, Anais; Nejdi, Amine; Guerin-Deremaux, Laetitia; Baert, Blandine; Saniez-Degrave, Marie-Helene; Rozan, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The human body is constantly exposed to the risk of traumatic lesions. Chlorella is a green microalgae enriched with nutrients, vitamins, minerals and chlorophyll. In some communities, Chlorella is a traditional medicinal plant used for the management of inflammation-related diseases. ROQUETTE Chlorella sp. (RCs) was investigated by oral administration (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) and cutaneous application (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0%) to evaluate its impact in two dermatological disorder models in mice: skin inflammation and wound healing. For skin inflammation, it was administered during 14 days starting one week before the induction of chronic skin inflammation by repeated cutaneous application of 12-Otetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). For wound healing the microalgae was administered by topical application after scarification of the skin until complete wound healing. Results indicated that oral and topical administrations of the two higher doses of RCs had significant effects on macroscopic score of skin inflammation with an efficient effect on microscopic score with cutaneous application. The microalgae had also efficient effect on healing process and duration of wound healing for both administration routes and particularly at the two highest doses of RCs. These findings suggest that administration of RCs by both oral and topical routes appeared to have beneficial effects on skin lesions. PMID:24965517

  2. Hyperoxia, Endothelial Progenitor Cell Mobilization, and Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Diabetic foot disease is a major health problem, which affects 15% of the 200 million patients with diabetes worldwide. Diminished peripheral blood flow and decreased local neovascularization are critical factors that contribute to the delayed or nonhealing wounds in these patients. The correction of impaired local angiogenesis may be a key component in developing therapeutic protocols for treating chronic wounds of the lower extremity and diabetic foot ulcers. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are the key cellular effectors of postnatal neovascularization and play a central role in wound healing, but their circulating and wound-level numbers are decreased in diabetes, implicating an abnormality in EPC mobilization and homing mechanisms. The deficiency in EPC mobilization is presumably due to impairment of eNOS-NO cascade in bone marrow (BM). Hyperoxia, induced by a clinically relevant hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) protocol, can significantly enhance the mobilization of EPCs from the BM into peripheral blood. However, increased circulating EPCs failed to reach to wound tissues. This is partly a result of downregulated production of SDF-1α in local wound lesions with diabetes. Administration of exogenous SDF-1α into wounds reversed the EPC homing impairment and, with hyperoxia, synergistically enhanced EPC mobilization, homing, neovascularization, and wound healing. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 10, 1869–1882. PMID:18627349

  3. Gene Therapy and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Eming, Sabine A.; Krieg, Thomas; Davidson, Jeffrey M

    2007-01-01

    Wound repair involves the sequential interaction of various cell types, extracellular matrix molecules, and soluble mediators. During the past 10 years, much new information on signals controlling wound cell behavior has emerged. This knowledge has led to a number of novel_therapeutic strategies. In particular, the local delivery of pluripotent growth factor molecules to the injured tissue has been intensively investigated over the past decade. Limited success of clinical trails indicates that a crucial aspect of the growth factor wound-healing strategy is the effective delivery of these polypeptides to the wound site. A molecular approach in which genetically modified cells synthesize and deliver the desired growth factor in regulated fashion has been used to overcome the limitations associated with the (topical) application of recombinant growth factor proteins. We have summarized the molecular and cellular basis of repair mechanisms and their failure, and we give an overview of techniques and studies applied to gene transfer in tissue repair. PMID:17276205

  4. Epidemiologic survey in Swiss group-housed breeding rabbits: extent of lesions and potential risk factors.

    PubMed

    Andrist, Claude A; van den Borne, Bart H P; Bigler, Lotti M; Buchwalder, Theres; Roth, Beatrice A

    2013-02-01

    In Switzerland, group-housing for breeding rabbit does is not explicitly required by law, but label programmes, as well as the general public and animal welfare groups, are advocating it. Although group-housing is of great benefit to the gregariously living rabbits, the establishment of a social hierarchy within the group might lead to stress and lesions. In the present epidemiological study, lesions were scored twice on 30% of the breeding does on all 28 commercial Swiss farms with group-housed breeding does. Additionally, a detailed questionnaire was filled out with all producers to determine risk factors potentially associated with lesions. Data were analysed using hierarchical proportional odds models. About 33% of the does examined had lesions, including wounds that were almost healed and small scratches. Severe lesions were counted on 9% of the animals. Differences between seasons in lesions score were identified, with the extent of lesions being higher in summer than in spring. Fewer lesions occurred on farms on which mastitis was more common. More lesions were found on farms where the does were isolated between littering and artificial insemination than on farms without isolation. According to the producers, most of the aggression occurred directly after the isolation phase when the does were regrouped again. We conclude that lesions in group-housed breeding does might be reduced by appropriate reproductive management. PMID:22901704

  5. Advanced MRI and staging of multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Absinta, Martina; Sati, Pascal; Reich, Daniel S

    2016-06-01

    Over the past few decades, MRI-based visualization of demyelinated CNS lesions has become pivotal to the diagnosis and monitoring of multiple sclerosis (MS). In this Review, we outline current efforts to correlate imaging findings with the pathology of lesion development in MS, and the pitfalls that are being encountered in this research. Multimodal imaging at high and ultra-high magnetic field strengths is yielding biologically relevant insights into the pathophysiology of blood-brain barrier dynamics and both active and chronic inflammation, as well as mechanisms of lesion healing and remyelination. Here, we parallel the results in humans with advances in imaging of a primate model of MS - experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the common marmoset - in which demyelinated lesions resemble their human counterparts far more closely than do EAE lesions in the rodent. This approach holds promise for the identification of innovative biological markers, and for next-generation clinical trials that will focus more on tissue protection and repair. PMID:27125632

  6. Cryosurgery as an effective alternative for treatment of oral lesions in children.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Karla Mayra; Moraes, Paulo de Camargo; Oliveira, Luciana Butini; Thomaz, Luiz Alexandre; Junqueira, José Luiz Cintra; Bönecker, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Children can exhibit a wide variety of oral pathologies, such as oral lesions, bone lesions, tumors, cysts and cutaneous lesions. Different techniques have been described for the treatment of these lesions, but all of them are invasive. This paper presents a series of cases that demonstrate the clinical efficacy of cryosurgery as an alternative to invasive surgical treatments of the most common oral lesions in children. This technique has been well tolerated by patients due to the absence of anesthesia, rapid healing and minimal bleeding. Cryotherapy has many applications in oral medicine and is an extremely useful alternative in patients to whom surgery is contraindicated due to age or medical history. It is a simple procedure to perform, minimally invasive, low-cost and very effective in pediatric dentistry clinic. PMID:25250502

  7. Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 promotes corneal epithelial defects healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Lazić, Ratimir; Gabrić, Nikica; Dekaris, Iva; Bosnar, Damir; Boban-Blagaić, Alenka; Sikirić, Predrag

    2005-06-01

    We evaluated the role of human gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in corneal epithelial defects healing in rats. 48 rats, in 4 groups (N=12). Total debridement of corneal epithelium preformed unilaterally and lesions stained and photographed. Animals medicated as follows: distilled water (control group) or BPC 157 2 pg/ml, 2 ng/ml, 2 microg/ml, 2 drops/rat eye started immediately after injury induction, every 8 hours up to 40 hours (i.e., at 0, 8, 16, 24, 32, 40 h). Lesions were photographed before application or sacrifice (at 48 h). Defect area was analyzed using a special program. Through 48 hour period a steady recovery is noted in controls. Recovery was markedly accelerated in eyes on microg- or ng-topical regimen of BPC 157 (p < 0.05). Of note, unlike control lesion present also after 48 h, these lesions disappeared already following 40 h (microg) or 48 h (ng) post-injury. BPC 157 was shown to be effective in promoting corneal defects healing in rats. Results were dose dependent. PMID:16117343

  8. Demyelinative chiamal lesions.

    PubMed

    Spector, R H; Glaser, J S; Schatz, N J

    1980-12-01

    To clarify the clinical syndrome of demyelinative chiasmal involvement, six case histories were analyzed and the literature was reviewed. This entitity is characterized by especial predilection for women in the third to fifth decades; visual deficites of a chiasmal pattern that may be modest to marked, with a generallly good prognosis for functional recovery; and other signs and symptoms, not necessarily severe, of scattered lesions of the neuraxis. Neuroradiological studies, especially laminography of the sellar area and computerized tomography, must be employed to rule out a suprasellar mass lesion. The efficacy of systemic corticosteroid therapy is moot, but it seems reasonable to use such agents during acute stages, especially where vision is severely reduced on both sides. PMID:7447764

  9. Propranolol improves cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Romana-Souza, Bruna; Nascimento, Adriana P; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2009-06-01

    Sympathetic nerve failure has been proposed as a contributing factor in impaired cutaneous wound healing in diabetes mellitus. Nevertheless, no studies have shown whether beta-adrenoceptor blockade through beta-blocker (e.g., propranolol) administration may alter healing of diabetic cutaneous lesions. This study evaluated macro- and microscopically the effects of propranolol administration on cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Acute diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin 14 days before wounding. Animals were treated with propranolol (50 mg/kg) dissolved in drinking water; controls received water only. Administration of beta-receptor antagonist began 1 day before wounding and was continued daily until euthanasia. A full-thickness excisional lesion (1 cm(2)) was created. The wound area was measured weekly and the animals were killed 14 days after wounding. Lesions and adjacent skin were formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded. Sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Sirius red, and toluidine blue, and immunostained for CD-68, alpha-smooth muscle actin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. The wound area was significantly smaller in the propranolol-treated group than in the control group 7 and 14 days after wounding. Inflammatory cell numbers and metalloproteinase-9 levels were reduced in the propranolol-treated group compared to the control group 14 days after wounding. Cell proliferation, mast cell number, collagen deposition, blood vessel density, and nitric oxide levels were increased in the propranolol-treated group compared to the control group 14 days after wounding. Propranolol administration improves cutaneous wound healing of hyperglycemic diabetic rats by reducing the local inflammatory response and improving subsequent phases of the repair process. PMID:19344703

  10. Managing pressure ulcers and moisture lesions with new hydrocolloid technology.

    PubMed

    Linthwaite, Adele; Bethell, Elaine

    In efforts to reduce the number of avoidable pressure ulcers in a large trust, a number of initiatives have taken place to increase staff awareness about the importance of preventing and treating pressure ulcers and moisture lesions. New documentation, the use of the 'Think Pink' folders and a social media campaign have all proved successful in seeing the number of avoidable pressure ulcers reported within the trust reduce. As part of this initiative an evaluation took place of a new hydrocolloid dressing. This proved effective at reducing healing times, reducing dressing spend and facilitating regular inspection of the affected areas. PMID:27126753

  11. Novel lesion detection aids.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, K W; Longbottom, C; Ellwood, R; Lussi, A

    2009-01-01

    Several non-invasive and novel aids for the detection of (and in some cases monitoring of) caries lesions have been introduced in the field of 'caries diagnostics' over the last 15 years. This chapter focusses on those available to dentists at the time of writing; continuing research is bound to lead to further developments in the coming years. Laser fluorescence is based on measurements of back-scattered fluorescence of a 655-nm light source. It enhances occlusal and (potentially) approximal lesion detection and enables semi-quantitative caries monitoring. Systematic reviews have identified false-positive results as a limitation. Quantitative light-induced fluorescence is another sensitive method to quantitatively detect and measure mineral loss both in enamel and some dentine lesions; again, the trade-offs with lower specificity when compared with clinical visual detection must be considered. Subtraction radiography is based on the principle of digitally superimposing two radiographs with exactly the same projection geometry. This method is applicable for approximal surfaces and occlusal caries involving dentine but is not yet widely available. Electrical caries measurements gather either site-specific or surface-specific information of teeth and tooth structure. Fixed-frequency devices perform best for occlusal dentine caries but the method has also shown promise for lesions in enamel and other tooth surfaces with multi-frequency approaches. All methods require further research and further validation in well-designed clinical trials. In the future, they could have useful applications in clinical practice as part of a personalized, comprehensive caries management system. PMID:19494675

  12. Mast Cells Regulate Wound Healing in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tellechea, Ana; Leal, Ermelindo C; Kafanas, Antonios; Auster, Michael E; Kuchibhotla, Sarada; Ostrovsky, Yana; Tecilazich, Francesco; Baltzis, Dimitrios; Zheng, Yongjun; Carvalho, Eugénia; Zabolotny, Janice M; Weng, Zuyi; Petra, Anastasia; Patel, Arti; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Theoharides, Theoharis C; Veves, Aristidis

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a severe complication of diabetes that lacks effective treatment. Mast cells (MCs) contribute to wound healing, but their role in diabetes skin complications is poorly understood. Here we show that the number of degranulated MCs is increased in unwounded forearm and foot skin of patients with diabetes and in unwounded dorsal skin of diabetic mice (P < 0.05). Conversely, postwounding MC degranulation increases in nondiabetic mice, but not in diabetic mice. Pretreatment with the MC degranulation inhibitor disodium cromoglycate rescues diabetes-associated wound-healing impairment in mice and shifts macrophages to the regenerative M2 phenotype (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, nondiabetic and diabetic mice deficient in MCs have delayed wound healing compared with their wild-type (WT) controls, implying that some MC mediator is needed for proper healing. MCs are a major source of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse skin, but the level of VEGF is reduced in diabetic mouse skin, and its release from human MCs is reduced in hyperglycemic conditions. Topical treatment with the MC trigger substance P does not affect wound healing in MC-deficient mice, but improves it in WT mice. In conclusion, the presence of nondegranulated MCs in unwounded skin is required for proper wound healing, and therapies inhibiting MC degranulation could improve wound healing in diabetes. PMID:27207516

  13. Biomarkers for wound healing and their evaluation.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Maheshwari, A; Chandra, A

    2016-01-01

    A biological marker (biomarker) is a substance used as an indicator of biological state. Advances in genomics, proteomics and molecular pathology have generated many candidate biomarkers with potential clinical value. Research has identified several cellular events and mediators associated with wound healing that can serve as biomarkers. Macrophages, neutrophils, fibroblasts and platelets release cytokines molecules including TNF-α, interleukins (ILs) and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) holds the greatest importance. As a result, various white cells and connective tissue cells release both matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Studies have demonstrated that IL-1, IL-6, and MMPs, levels above normal, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio are often present in non-healing wounds. Clinical examination of wounds for these mediators could predict which wounds will heal and which will not, suggesting use of these chemicals as biomarkers of wound healing. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will alleviate the recuperating process of chronic, non-healing wounds. Finding a specific biomarker for wound healing status would be a breakthrough in this field and helping treat impaired wound healing. PMID:26762498

  14. Spirit, Mind and Body in Chumash Healing

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of the spirit and mind in health and well-being among Chumash people. Prayer was the first step in healing since prayer invites the participation of God. Initiation practices are discussed that encouraged young people to develop the maturity and spiritual strength to become productive members of society. Pictographs were used in healing usually not only as a relaxation therapy, but also as a mode of education. A supportive environment was an important factor in Chumash health care, since the support of friends helps, comforts and relieves anxiety that is detrimental to healing. PMID:16322802

  15. Impression Testing of Self-Healing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Huber, Amy

    2005-01-01

    As part of the BIOSANT program (biologically-inspired smart nanotechnology), scientists at NASA-Langley have identified a "self-healing" plastic that spontaneously closes the hole left by the passage of a bullet. To understand and generalize the phenomenon in question, the mechanical properties responsible for this ability are being explored. Low-rate impression testing was chosen to characterize post-yield material properties, and it turned out that materials that heal following ballistic puncture also show up to 80% healing of the low-rate impression. Preliminary results on the effects of temperature and rate of puncture are presented.

  16. Potential benefits of pentoxifylline on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Motahareh; Khalili, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    In this review, potential benefits of pentoxifylline (PTX) on wound healing have been evaluated. All available experimental and clinical studies examined effects of PTX on wound healing have been included. No time limitation was considered and all studies up to writing the manuscript were included. Administration of oral or parenteral PTX showed beneficial effects on the healing of colorectal anastomosis, post burn scar, radiation-induced skin/soft tissue injury, venous ulcers, recurrent aphthous stomatitis and cutaneous/mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. Data regarding effect of PTX on skin flap survival are conflicting. Only few evidences support promising effects of PTX in pressure ulcer, skin developing injury and burn. PMID:26558813

  17. Bioelectrical impedance assessment of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lukaski, Henry C; Moore, Micheal

    2012-01-01

    Objective assessment of wound healing is fundamental to evaluate therapeutic and nutritional interventions and to identify complications. Despite availability of many techniques to monitor wounds, there is a need for a safe, practical, accurate, and effective method. A new method is localized bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) that noninvasively provides information describing cellular changes that occur during healing and signal complications to wound healing. This article describes the theory and application of localized BIA and provides examples of its use among patients with lower leg wounds. This promising method may afford clinicians a novel technique for routine monitoring of interventions and surveillance of wounds. PMID:22401341

  18. Improving diagnosis of atraumatic splenic lesions, part I: nonneoplastic lesions.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zina J; Oh, Sarah K; Chernyak, Victoria; Flusberg, Milana; Rozenblit, Alla M; Kaul, Bindu; Stein, Marjorie W; Mazzariol, Fernanda S

    2016-01-01

    Focal atraumatic splenic lesions often pose a diagnostic challenge on cross-sectional imaging. They can be categorized based on etiology as nonneoplastic (reviewed in Part I), benign neoplastic, and malignant neoplastic lesions. Lesions can also be characterized based on prevalence as common, uncommon, and rare. Familiarity with pertinent clinical parameters, etiology, pathology, prevalence, and ancillary features such as splenomegaly, concomitant hepatic involvement, and extrasplenic findings, in addition to knowledge of imaging spectra of these lesions, can improve diagnostic confidence. Since the nonneoplastic lesions are usually easily recognized, it is critical that the radiologist identifies them avoiding unnecessary work up. PMID:27317223

  19. [Focal connatal acquired brain damage--sonographic study of the course of healing].

    PubMed

    Franek, A

    1985-06-01

    A case of a perinatal acquired focal brain lesion is reported, and the process of resorption and healing demonstrated by ultrasound. Within four weeks a cortical area of increased echogenicity was resorbed. After two months, the resulting porencephalic cyst had been transformed into glial tissue of very high echogenicity. The neurologic development of two children with such glial focus was good. These cases demonstrate that porencephalic cysts are not always the final state after resorption of a focal brain lesion. They are no reliable prognostic indicator of poor neurological outcome. Traumatic and complicated delivery, asphyxia and coagulopathy are conditions which have been found several times in connection with a focal brain lesion. In contrast to periventricular injury, prematurity does not seem to be a factor of higher risk. PMID:3895372

  20. Regression of nodular liver lesions in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kozic, D; Svetel, M; Petrovic, I; Sener, R N; Kostic, V S

    2006-09-01

    Long-term follow-up abdominal imaging studies have not been reported previously in patients with the hepatic form of Wilson's disease (WD). This paper reports the case of a 35-year-old woman with symptoms dating back several months and with multiple, nodular liver lesions. The lesions were hyperdense on non-enhanced computed tomography and hypointense on T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. A diagnosis of WD was established several weeks after her admission to hospital, and chelating treatment was commenced promptly. No abnormalities were found on follow-up MR examinations of the abdomen and brain 4.5 years later. These imaging features suggest that so long as WD is diagnosed in the initial stages, liver nodules can regress with time and complete healing can be achieved with continuous decoppering treatment. PMID:16950693

  1. Light attenuation in rat skin following low level laser therapy on burn healing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira Silva, Daniela Fátima; Simões Ribeiro, Martha

    2010-04-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is commonly used to accelerate wound healing. Besides, the technique of imaging the light distribution inside biological tissues permits us to understand several effects about light-tissue interaction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative attenuation coefficient of the light intensity in healthy and burned skin rats during cutaneous repair following LLLT or not. Two burns about 6mm in diameter were cryogenerated using liquid N2 on the back of 15 rats. Lesion L was irradiated by a He-Ne laser (λ= 632.8nm) and fluence 1.0J/cm2; Lesion C was control and received sham irradiation. A healthy skin area (H) was also analyzed. The lesions were irradiated at days 3, 7, 10 and 14 post-burning. The animals were euthanized at days 3, 10 and 31 and skin samples were carefully removed and placed between two microscope slides, spaced by z= 1mm. A laser beam irradiated the sandwiched tissue from epidermis to dermis. A CCD camera was placed orthogonal to the beam path and it photographed the distribution of the scattered light. The light decay occurred according to the Beer's Law. Significance was accepted at p <0.01 by using t-Student test. Our results show that the light decay along any direction was close to an exponential. Burned skin samples presented decay significantly faster than healthy skin samples. Besides, attenuation coefficient changed during burning healing comparing treated and control lesions. These findings suggest that the relative attenuation coefficient is a suitable parameter to optimize LLLT during wound healing.

  2. 42 CFR 60.61 - Responsibilities of a HEAL school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Responsibilities of a HEAL school. 60.61 Section 60... EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM The School § 60.61 Responsibilities of a HEAL school. (a) A HEAL school is required to carry out the following activities for each HEAL applicant or borrower: (1) Conduct...

  3. 42 CFR 60.61 - Responsibilities of a HEAL school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Responsibilities of a HEAL school. 60.61 Section 60... EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM The School § 60.61 Responsibilities of a HEAL school. (a) A HEAL school is required to carry out the following activities for each HEAL applicant or borrower: (1) Conduct...

  4. Molecular Imaging of Healing After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Naresh, Nivedita K; Ben-Mordechai, Tamar; Leor, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The progression from acute myocardial infarction (MI) to heart failure continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Potential new therapies for improved infarct healing such as stem cells, gene therapy, and tissue engineering are being investigated. Noninvasive imaging plays a central role in the evaluation of MI and infarct healing, both clinically and in preclinical research. Traditionally, imaging has been used to assess cardiac structure, function, perfusion, and viability. However, new imaging methods can be used to assess biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. We review molecular imaging techniques for evaluating the biology of infarct healing and repair. Specifically, we cover recent advances in imaging the various phases of MI and infarct healing such as apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix deposition, and scar formation. Significant progress has been made in preclinical molecular imaging, and future challenges include translation of these methods to clinical practice. PMID:21869911

  5. Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL Past Issues / Fall 2007 ... a peak flow meter. Photo courtesy of MCAN Asthma, a reality of daily life for more than ...

  6. Current wound healing procedures and potential care

    PubMed Central

    Dreifke, Michael B.; Jayasuriya, Amil A.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting micro RNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage micro environment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection – all in the hopes of early detection of complications. PMID:25579968

  7. Esoteric healing traditions: a conceptual overview.

    PubMed

    Levin, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents, for the first time, a comprehensive scholarly examination of the history and principles of major traditions of esoteric healing. After a brief conceptual overview of esoteric religion and healing, summaries are provided of eight major esoteric traditions, including descriptions of beliefs and practices related to health, healing, and medicine. These include what are termed the kabbalistic tradition, the mystery school tradition, the gnostic tradition, the brotherhoods tradition, the Eastern mystical tradition, the Western mystical tradition, the shamanic tradition, and the new age tradition. Next, commonalities across these traditions are summarized with respect to beliefs and practices related to anatomy and physiology; nosology and etiology; pathophysiology; and therapeutic modalities. Finally, the implications of this survey of esoteric healing are discussed for clinicians, biomedical researchers, and medical educators. PMID:18316053

  8. Self-healing networks: redundancy and structure.

    PubMed

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the concept of self-healing in the field of complex networks modelling; in particular, self-healing capabilities are implemented through distributed communication protocols that exploit redundant links to recover the connectivity of the system. We then analyze the effect of the level of redundancy on the resilience to multiple failures; in particular, we measure the fraction of nodes still served for increasing levels of network damages. Finally, we study the effects of redundancy under different connectivity patterns-from planar grids, to small-world, up to scale-free networks-on healing performances. Small-world topologies show that introducing some long-range connections in planar grids greatly enhances the resilience to multiple failures with performances comparable to the case of the most resilient (and least realistic) scale-free structures. Obvious applications of self-healing are in the important field of infrastructural networks like gas, power, water, oil distribution systems. PMID:24533065

  9. Self healing nature of bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debroy, Sanghamitra; Pavan Kumar Miriyala, V.; Vijaya Sekhar, K.; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh; Acharyya, Amit

    2016-08-01

    The phenomenon of self healing of cracks in bilayer graphene sheet has been studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The bilayer graphene sheet was subjected to uniaxial tensile load resulting in initiation and propagation of cracks on exceeding the ultimate tensile strength. Subsequently, all forces acting on the sheet were removed and sheet was relaxed. The cracks formed in the graphene sheet healed without any external aid within 0.4 ps The phenomenon of self healing of the cracks in graphene sheet was found to be independent of the length of the crack, but occurred for critical crack opening distance less than 5 Å for AA stacked sheet and 13 Å for AB stacked bilayer graphene sheet. Self healing was observed for both AB (mixed stacking of armchair and zigzag graphene sheet) and AA (both sheets of similar orientation i.e. either armchair-armchair or zigzag-zigzag) stacking of bilayer graphene sheet.

  10. Self-healing cable apparatus and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, Dryver (Inventor); Esser, Brian (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Self-healing cable apparatus and methods are disclosed. The cable has a central core surrounded by an adaptive cover that can extend over the entire length of the cable or just one or more portions of the cable. The adaptive cover includes a protective layer having an initial damage resistance, and a reactive layer. When the cable is subjected to a localized damaging force, the reactive layer responds by creating a corresponding localized self-healed region. The self-healed region provides the cable with enhanced damage resistance as compared to the cable's initial damage resistance. Embodiments of the invention utilize conventional epoxies or foaming materials in the reactive layer that are released to form the self-healed region when the damaging force reaches the reactive layer.

  11. Enzymetically regulating the self-healing of protein hydrogels with high healing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuzhou; Luo, Quan; Qiao, Shanpeng; Wang, Liang; Dong, Zeyuan; Xu, Jiayun; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-08-25

    Enzyme-mediated self-healing of dynamic covalent bond-driven protein hydrogels was realized by the synergy of two enzymes, glucose oxidase (GOX) and catalase (CAT). The reversible covalent attachment of glutaraldehyde to lysine residues of GOX, CAT, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) led to the formation and functionalization of the self-healing protein hydrogel system. The enzyme-mediated protein hydrogels exhibit excellent self-healing properties with 100% recovery. The self-healing process was reversible and effective with an external glucose stimulus at room temperature. PMID:25044612

  12. Healing times and prediction of wound healing in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Zimny, S; Pfohl, M

    2005-02-01

    Time line of wound healing and prediction of healing times in diabetic foot ulcers is an important issue. Usually, the percentage of wounds healed within a defined period is used for characterization of wound healing. R=sqrtA/pi (R, radius; A, planimetric wound area; pi, constant 3.14), and the wound radius reduction was 0.39 mm/week which was previously established. The initial average wound area was 96.9+/-13.1 mm2 (mean+/-SEM), and 3.61+/-1.6 mm 2 after ten weeks with an average healing time of 75.9 (95 %-CI 71-81) days. Using the equation mentioned above and the calculated weekly wound radius reduction, the predicted healing time in the test group was 86.9 (95 %-CI 73-101) days. The predicted and the observed healing times were significantly correlated with each other (r=0.55, p=0.0002). Providing standard care, the time needed for wound healing can reliably be predicted in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers. This may be a useful tool in daily clinical practice to predict wound healing and recognize ulcers who do not respond adequately to the treatment. PMID:15772900

  13. Cystic Lesions of the Mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Daniel; Suby-Long, Thomas; Restrepo, Carlos S

    2016-06-01

    Cystic lesions are commonly seen in the mediastinum, and they may arise from virtually any organ. The vast majority of these lesions are benign and result in no symptoms. When large, cysts may produce symptoms related to compression of adjacent structures. The most common mediastinal cysts are pericardial and foregut duplication cysts. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance are routinely used to evaluate these lesions. Although computed tomography offers superior spatial resolution, magnetic resonance is useful in differentiating cysts that contain proteinaceous material from solid lesions. Occasionally, cysts arise from solid lesions, such as thymoma or teratoma. Although cysts are alike in appearance, location helps narrowing the differential diagnoses. PMID:27261346

  14. [Multifocal Vitelliform Retinal Lesion].

    PubMed

    Streicher, T; Špirková, J; Ilavská, M

    2015-06-01

    The authors present retrospective follow up of patient with bilateral multifocal vitelliform retinal lesion during the 18 years period. At this time, spontaneous improvement of objective picture on retina and subjective visual troubles was observed. It is probable, that this case is a part of the same symptom complex as a variant of Best´s hereditary disease. This conclusion was based on initial stadium of phenotypical expressivity and additional evaluations. The course and outcomes of visual functions were different. The hereditary transmission was not confirmed. PMID:26201364

  15. Impact of Lesion Location on the Progression of Osteoarthritis in a Rat Knee Model

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, Derrick M.; Harrison, Ryan K.; Siston, Robert A.; Agarwal, Sudha; Flanigan, David C.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate how surgically created acute full-thickness cartilage defects of similar size and location created on the medial versus lateral femoral condyle influence progression of spontaneous cartilage lesions in a rat model. Full-thickness cartilage defects of 1 mm were surgically created on the medial or lateral femoral condyles on the right leg of 20 rats (n =10/group). Ten rats served as controls. Spontaneous lesion progression on the ipsilateral and contralateral surfaces was examined using a high-resolution digital camera along with H&E and Safranin-O staining. Chondral defects were scored grossly and histologically. Control femur displayed no cartilage disruption. Surgically treated knees exhibited created and spontaneous cartilage defects with no evidence of healing unless subchondral bone was penetrated. Ipsilateral spontaneous lesions on the lateral condyle were significantly more severe on average (p =0.009) compared to medial lesions on gross examination. Histological examination found contralateral lesions on the lateral surface following surgically created medial lesions to be more severe (p =0.057) compared to contralateral lesions. A trend toward more susceptible chondral damage to the lateral condyle was observed following acute lesion creation on either medial or lateral condyles. Mechanisms behind this pattern of spontaneous lesion development are unclear, requring further investigation. PMID:25376614

  16. Ultraviolet light and hyperpigmentation in healing wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemer, D.R.; Spira, M.

    1983-10-01

    The concept of permanent hyperpigmentation in wounds following ultraviolet light exposure during the postoperative period has found a place in plastic surgical literature but has not been documented. This study evaluates the effect of ultraviolet light on healing wounds in paraplegics. It failed to confirm permanent alteration in pigmentation response to ultraviolet exposure and suggests that other factors are of greater importance in the development of hyperpigmentation in the healing wound.

  17. Ultrasonic monitoring of bone fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Protopappas, Vasilios C; Vavva, Maria G; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound has attracted significant interest in the evaluation of bone fracture healing. Animal and clinical studies have demonstrated that the propagation velocity across fractured bones can be used as an indicator of healing. Researchers have recently employed computational methods for modeling wave propagation in bones, aiming to gain insight into the underlying mechanisms of wave propagation and to further enhance the monitoring capabilities of ultrasound. In this paper, we review the relevant literature and present the current status of knowledge. PMID:18599412

  18. Systems-based approaches toward wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Buganza-Tepole, Adrian; Kuhl, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing in the pediatric patient is of utmost clinical and social importance, since hypertrophic scarring can have aesthetic and psychological sequelae, from early childhood to late adolescence. Wound healing is a well-orchestrated reparative response affecting the damaged tissue at the cellular, tissue, organ, and system scales. While tremendous progress has been made towards understanding wound healing at the individual temporal and spatial scales, its effects across the scales remain severely understudied and poorly understood. Here we discuss the critical need for systems-based computational modeling of wound healing across the scales, from short-term to long-term and from small to large. We illustrate the state of the art in systems modeling by means of three key signaling mechanisms: oxygen tension regulating angiogenesis and revascularization; TGF-β kinetics controlling collagen deposition; and mechanical stretch stimulating cellular mitosis and extracellular matrix remodeling. The complex network of biochemical and biomechanical signaling mechanisms and the multi-scale character of the healing process make systems modeling an integral tool in exploring personalized strategies for wound repair. A better mechanistic understanding of wound healing in the pediatric patient could open new avenues in treating children with skin disorders such as birth defects, skin cancer, wounds, and burn injuries. PMID:23314298

  19. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Kobbe, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Campbell, Graeme C.; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Bergmann, Christian; Kadyrov, Mamed; Fischer, Horst; Glüer, Christian C.; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Pufe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes). Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α) were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing. PMID:26106256

  20. Thrombomodulin Promotes Corneal Epithelial Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Hsun; I, Ching-Chang; Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang; Hsu, Yun-Yan; Lee, Fang-Tzu; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the role of thrombomodulin (TM) in corneal epithelial wound healing, and to investigate whether recombinant TM epidermal growth factor-like domain plus serine/threonine-rich domain (rTMD23) has therapeutic potential in corneal epithelial wound healing. Methods TM localization and expression in the murine cornea were examined by immunofluorescence staining. TM expression after injury was also studied. The effect of rTMD23 on corneal wound healing was evaluated by in vitro and in vivo assays. Results TM was expressed in the cornea in normal adult mice. TM expression increased in the early phase of wound healing and decreased after wound recovery. In the in vitro study, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) induced TM expression in murine corneal epithelial cells by mediating E26 transformation-specific sequence-1 (Ets-1) via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. The administration of rTMD23 increased the rate of corneal epithelial wound healing. Conclusions TM expression in corneal epithelium was modulated during the corneal wound healing process, and may be regulated by PDGF-BB. In addition, rTMD23 has therapeutic potential in corneal injury. PMID:25816372

  1. Self-healing coatings containing microcapsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Liao, Le-ping; Wang, Si-jie; Li, Wu-jun

    2012-01-01

    Effectiveness of epoxy resin filled microcapsules was investigated for healing of cracks generated in coatings. Microcapsules were prepared by in situ polymerization of urea-formaldehyde resin to form shell over epoxy resin droplets. Characteristics of these capsules were studied by 3D measuring laser microscope, particle size analyzer, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) to investigate their surface morphology, size distribution, chemical structure and thermal stability, respectively. The results indicate that microcapsules containing epoxy resins can be synthesized successfully. The size is around 100 μm. The rough outer surface of microcapsule is composed of agglomerated urea-formaldehyde nanoparticles. The size and surface morphology of microcapsule can be controlled by selecting different processing parameters. The microcapsules basically exhibit good storage stability at room temperature, and they are chemically stable before the heating temperature is up to approximately 200 °C. The model system of self-healing coating consists of epoxy resin matrix, 10 wt% microencapsulated healing agent, 2 wt% catalyst solution. The self-healing function of this coating system is evaluated through self-healing testing of damaged and healed coated steel samples.

  2. Ritual healing and mental health in India.

    PubMed

    Sax, William

    2014-12-01

    Ritual healing is very widespread in the Indian state of Uttarakhand, and is by far the most common option for those with serious behavioral disturbances. Although ritual healing thus accounts for a very large part of the actual health care system, the state and its regulatory agencies have, for the most part, been structurally blind to its existence. A decade of research on in this region, along with a number of shorter research trips to healing shrines and specialists elsewhere in the subcontinent, and a thorough study of the literature, suggest that such techniques are often therapeutically effective. However, several considerations suggest that ritual healing may not be usefully combined with mainstream "Western" psychiatry: (a) psychiatry is deeply influenced by the ideology of individualism, which is incompatible with South Asian understandings of the person; (b) social asymmetries between religious healers and health professionals are too great to allow a truly respectful relationship between them; and (c) neither the science of psychiatry nor the regulatory apparatus of the state can or will acknowledge the validity of "ritual therapy"--and even if they did so, regulation would most likely destroy what is most valuable about ritual healing. This suggests that it is best if the state maintain its structural blindness to ritual healing. PMID:24572292

  3. The role of mechanobiology in tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Killian, Megan L; Cavinatto, Leonardo; Galatz, Leesa M; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical cues affect tendon healing, homeostasis, and development in a variety of settings. Alterations in the mechanical environment are known to result in changes in the expression of extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors, transcription factors, and cytokines that can alter tendon structure and cell viability. Loss of muscle force in utero or in the immediate postnatal period delays tendon and enthesis development. The response of healing tendons to mechanical load varies depending on anatomic location. Flexor tendons require motion to prevent adhesion formation, yet excessive force results in gap formation and subsequent weakening of the repair. Excessive motion in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction causes accumulation of macrophages, which are detrimental to tendon graft healing. Complete removal of load is detrimental to rotator cuff healing; yet, large forces are also harmful. Controlled loading can enhance healing in most settings; however, a fine balance must be reached between loads that are too low (leading to a catabolic state) and too high (leading to microdamage). This review will summarize existing knowledge of the mechanobiology of tendon development, homeostasis, and healing. PMID:22244066

  4. Effect of Cigarette Smoke on Wound Healing of the Septal Mucosa of the Rat.

    PubMed

    Trombitas, Veronica; Nagy, Alina; Berce, Cristian; Tabaran, Flaviu; Albu, Silviu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis. Proper wound healing following endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is influenced by several factors, like cigarette smoke (CS) exposure. This study aims to assess the influence of cigarette smoke on the healing of induced septal mucosal lesion in rats. Methods. Unilateral nasal wounds were created by means of the interdental brush in seventy-four-week-old male rats. Animals were randomly divided into two groups: control group and CS exposure group, each comprising 35 animals, divided into five groups (n = 7). Animals were sacrificed in groups of seven on day 2 and then on days 5, 14, and 28 and finally on day 42 following wound induction. Results. Histological analysis of mucosal specimens shows important changes at the CS exposure group. Starting with the infiltrates of neutrophils, eosinophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes, the histological changes were continued with the Goblet cell proliferation, ciliated cells loss, fibrosis, and epithelial and subepithelial hypertrophy. Conclusion. In this experimental model of nasal wound healing we demonstrated the deleterious effects of chronic CS exposure. The adverse effects of CS exposure are firstly a postponement of the healing process and secondly the persistence of inflammation which becomes chronic. PMID:27042668

  5. Clinical factors affecting pathological fracture and healing of unicameral bone cysts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Unicameral bone cyst (UBC) is the most common benign lytic bone lesion seen in children. The aim of this study is to investigate clinical factors affecting pathological fracture and healing of UBC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 155 UBC patients who consulted Nagoya musculoskeletal oncology group hospitals in Japan. Sixty of the 155 patients had pathological fracture at presentation. Of 141 patients with follow-up periods exceeding 6 months, 77 were followed conservatively and 64 treated by surgery. Results The fracture risk was significantly higher in the humerus than other bones. In multivariate analysis, ballooning of bone, cyst in long bone, male sex, thin cortical thickness and multilocular cyst were significant adverse prognostic factors for pathological fractures at presentation. The healing rates were 30% and 83% with observation and surgery, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that fracture at presentation and history of biopsy were good prognostic factors for healing of UBC in patients under observation. Conclusion The present results suggest that mechanical disruption of UBC such as fracture and biopsy promotes healing, and thus watchful waiting is indicated in these patients, whereas patients with poor prognostic factors for fractures should be considered for surgery. PMID:24884661

  6. Effect of Cigarette Smoke on Wound Healing of the Septal Mucosa of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Trombitas, Veronica; Nagy, Alina; Berce, Cristian; Tabaran, Flaviu; Albu, Silviu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis. Proper wound healing following endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is influenced by several factors, like cigarette smoke (CS) exposure. This study aims to assess the influence of cigarette smoke on the healing of induced septal mucosal lesion in rats. Methods. Unilateral nasal wounds were created by means of the interdental brush in seventy-four-week-old male rats. Animals were randomly divided into two groups: control group and CS exposure group, each comprising 35 animals, divided into five groups (n = 7). Animals were sacrificed in groups of seven on day 2 and then on days 5, 14, and 28 and finally on day 42 following wound induction. Results. Histological analysis of mucosal specimens shows important changes at the CS exposure group. Starting with the infiltrates of neutrophils, eosinophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes, the histological changes were continued with the Goblet cell proliferation, ciliated cells loss, fibrosis, and epithelial and subepithelial hypertrophy. Conclusion. In this experimental model of nasal wound healing we demonstrated the deleterious effects of chronic CS exposure. The adverse effects of CS exposure are firstly a postponement of the healing process and secondly the persistence of inflammation which becomes chronic. PMID:27042668

  7. In Vivo Hypobaric Hypoxia Performed During the Remodeling Process Accelerates Bone Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Marjorie; Collombet, Jean-Marc; Frasca, Sophie; Begot, Laurent; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Le Bousse-Kerdilès, Marie-Caroline

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of respiratory hypobaric hypoxia on femoral bone-defect repair in mice because hypoxia is believed to influence both mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) and hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, a process involved in the bone-healing mechanism. To mimic conditions of non-weight-bearing limb immobilization in patients suffering from bone trauma, our hypoxic mouse model was further subjected to hind-limb unloading. A hole was drilled in the right femur of adult male C57/BL6J mice. Four days after surgery, mice were subjected to hind-limb unloading for 1 week. Seven days after surgery, mice were either housed for 4 days in a hypobaric room (FiO2 at 10%) or kept under normoxic conditions. Unsuspended control mice were housed in either hypobaric or normoxic conditions. Animals were sacrificed on postsurgery day 11 to allow for collection of both contralateral and lesioned femurs, blood, and spleen. As assessed by microtomography, delayed hypoxia enhanced bone-healing efficiency by increasing the closing of the cortical defect and the newly synthesized bone volume in the cavity by +55% and +35%, respectively. Proteome analysis and histomorphometric data suggested that bone-repair improvement likely results from the acceleration of the natural bone-healing process rather than from extended mobilization of MSC-derived osteoprogenitors. Hind-limb unloading had hardly any effect beyond delayed hypoxia-enhanced bone-healing efficiency. PMID:24944208

  8. Chemokines in Wound Healing and as Potential Therapeutic Targets for Reducing Cutaneous Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Peter Adam; Greaves, Nicholas Stuart; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Cutaneous scarring is an almost inevitable end point of adult human wound healing. It is associated with significant morbidity, both physical and psychological. Pathological scarring, including hypertrophic and keloid scars, can be particularly debilitating. Manipulation of the chemokine system may lead to effective therapies for problematic lesions. Recent Advances: Rapid advancement in the understanding of chemokines and their receptors has led to exciting developments in the world of therapeutics. Modulation of their function has led to clinically effective treatments for conditions as diverse as human immunodeficiency virus and inflammatory bowel disease. Potential methods of targeting chemokines include monoclonal antibodies, small-molecule antagonists, interference with glycosaminoglycan binding and the use of synthetic truncated chemokines. Early work has shown promising results on scar development and appearance when the chemokine system is manipulated. Critical Issues: Chemokines are implicated in all stages of wound healing leading to the development of a cutaneous scar. An understanding of entirely regenerative wound healing in the developing fetus and how the expression of chemokines and their receptors change during the transition to the adult phenotype is central to addressing pathological scarring in adults. Future Directions: As our understanding of chemokine/receptor interactions and scar formation evolves it has become apparent that effective therapies will need to mirror the complexities in these diverse biological processes. It is likely that sophisticated treatments that sequentially influence multiple ligand/receptor interactions throughout all stages of wound healing will be required to deliver viable treatment options. PMID:26543682

  9. Curbing Inflammation in Skin Wound Healing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rosique, Rodrigo G.; Rosique, Marina J.; Farina Junior, Jayme A.

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex regulated process that results in skin scar formation in postnatal mammals. Chronic wounds are major medical problems that can confer devastating consequences. Currently, there are no treatments to prevent scarring. In the early fetus wounds heal without scarring and the healing process is characterized by relatively less inflammation compared to adults; therefore, research aimed at reducing the inflammatory process related to wound healing might speed healing and improve the final scar appearance. PMID:26356299

  10. The effects of growth factors on skeletal muscle lesions

    PubMed Central

    GIGANTE, ANTONIO; CIANFORLINI, MARCO; MANZOTTI, SANDRA; ULISSE, SERENA

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries are common causes of severe long-term pain and physical disability, accounting for up to 55% of all sports injuries. The phases of the healing process after direct or indirect muscle injury are complex but clearly defined processes comprising well-coordinated steps: degeneration, inflammation, regeneration, and fibrosis. Despite this frequent occurrence and the presence of a body of data on the pathophysiology of muscle injuries, none of the treatment strategies adopted to date have been shown to be really effective in strictly controlled trials. Most current muscle injury treatments are based on limited experimental and clinical data and/or were only empirically tested. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a promising alternative approach based on the ability of autologous growth factors (GFs) to accelerate tissue healing, improve muscular regeneration, increase neovascularization and reduce fibrosis, allowing rapid recovery after muscle lesions. Thus, further experimental studies that include the quantification of specific GFs released by PRP, as well as additional data on angiogenesis, myogenesis and functional recovery are needed to ultimately validate the hypothesis of PRP efficacy in the treatment of muscle lesions and open the way for its wide clinical application. PMID:25606531

  11. Management of Cyst-like Periapical Lesions by Orthograde Decompression and Long-term Calcium Hydroxide/Chlorhexidine Intracanal Dressing: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Santos Soares, Suelleng Maria Cunha; Brito-Júnior, Manoel; de Souza, Flávia Kelly; Zastrow, Eduardo Von; Cunha, Carla Oliveira da; Silveira, Frank Ferreira; Nunes, Eduardo; César, Carlos Augusto Santos; Glória, José Cristiano Ramos; Soares, Janir Alves

    2016-07-01

    Cyst-like periapical lesions should be treated initially with conservative nonsurgical procedures. In this case series, we describe the clinical and radiographic outcomes of large cyst-like lesions that were treated by orthograde decompression and long-term intracanal use of calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] mixed with 2% chlorhexidine digluconate. Ten cases of cyst-like periapical lesions involving 15 teeth from 10 patients were selected. Maximal radiographic diameters of the lesions ranged from 11 to 28 mm. Nonsurgical procedures were performed, including apical patency, orthograde puncture of cyst-like exudates, chemomechanical preparation, and placement of intracanal Ca(OH)2/CHX dressings, which were periodically replaced during 6-10 months. The root canals were then filled with gutta-percha and sealer. The follow-up periods ranged from 6 to 24 months, and the outcome was classified as healed, healing, or failure. Nine lesions drained copious exudates after canal patency. One lesion only drained bloody serous exudate after periapical overinstrumentation. In 9 patients, intracanal exudation ceased in the first follow-up visit. At the 24-month follow-up, 6 lesions (60.0%) had healed, and 3 lesions (30.0%) were healing, with the corresponding patients being without clinical signs or symptoms. The case of treatment failure was submitted to surgical treatment. Microscopically, the lesion appeared to be an apical cyst with exuberant extraradicular bacterial biofilms attached to the sectioned root apex. This case series supports the use of nonsurgical methods to resolve larger cyst-like periapical lesions. PMID:27325458

  12. Lap shear strength and healing capability of self-healing adhesive containing epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, Habibah; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Ming-Qiu

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a self-healing polymeric adhesive formulation with epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules. Epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules were dispersed into a commercialize two-part epoxy adhesive for developing self-healing epoxy adhesive. The influence of different content of microcapsules on the shear strength and healing capability of epoxy adhesive were investigated using single-lap-joints with average thickness of adhesive layer of about 180 µm. This self-healing adhesive was used in bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys adherents after mechanical and alkaline cleaning surface treatment. The adhesion strength was measured and presented as function of microcapsules loading. The results indicated that the virgin lap shear strength was increased by about 26% with addition of 3 wt% of self-healing microcapsules. 12% to 28% recovery of the shear strength is achieved after self-healing depending on the microcapsules content. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study fracture surface of the joints. The self-healing adhesives exhibit recovery of both cohesion and adhesion properties with room temperature healing.

  13. Healing and the Arts: A Powerful Metaphor for Teaching about Healing and for Teaching Medical Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirridge, Marjorie S.; Martin, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    For several years an interdisciplinary course called "Healing and the Arts" has been offered to undergraduates and medical students in a BA/MD program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Its stated purpose is to give students a theoretical and practical understanding of how the arts can be a healing force in people's lives.…

  14. Rapid identification of slow healing wounds.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kenneth; Covington, Scott; Sen, Chandan K; Januszyk, Michael; Kirsner, Robert S; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Shah, Nigam H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic nonhealing wounds have a prevalence of 2% in the United States, and cost an estimated $50 billion annually. Accurate stratification of wounds for risk of slow healing may help guide treatment and referral decisions. We have applied modern machine learning methods and feature engineering to develop a predictive model for delayed wound healing that uses information collected during routine care in outpatient wound care centers. Patient and wound data was collected at 68 outpatient wound care centers operated by Healogics Inc. in 26 states between 2009 and 2013. The dataset included basic demographic information on 59,953 patients, as well as both quantitative and categorical information on 180,696 wounds. Wounds were split into training and test sets by randomly assigning patients to training and test sets. Wounds were considered delayed with respect to healing time if they took more than 15 weeks to heal after presentation at a wound care center. Eleven percent of wounds in this dataset met this criterion. Prognostic models were developed on training data available in the first week of care to predict delayed healing wounds. A held out subset of the training set was used for model selection, and the final model was evaluated on the test set to evaluate discriminative power and calibration. The model achieved an area under the curve of 0.842 (95% confidence interval 0.834-0.847) for the delayed healing outcome and a Brier reliability score of 0.00018. Early, accurate prediction of delayed healing wounds can improve patient care by allowing clinicians to increase the aggressiveness of intervention in patients most at risk. PMID:26606167

  15. The Analysis of Factors Associated with Progression of Isolated Terminal Ileal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Fangbin, Zhang; Weiwei, Hao; Wugan, Zhao; Cong, Zheng; Yanjun, Chu; Feng, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the factors associated with the progression of isolated terminal ileal lesions (ITILs) at colonoscopy in Chinese patients. Methods Patients diagnosed with ITILs were enrolled. The ileoscopy was performed by two experienced gastroenterologists every 52 weeks. A logistic regression analysis was used to elucidate the factors associated with Crohn's disease (CD) and mucosal healing. A log rank test was used to assess the differences of the cumulative proportion of CD and mucosal healing in different groups at different times. Results (1) A total of 34 patients were included and no patient had taken nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in the last 6 months; eight (23.5%) patients had a clinical diagnosis of CD, 14 (41.2%) patients achieved mucosal healing, and 12 (35.3%) patients showed no significant changes in the lesions at last follow-up. (2) The logistic regression analysis showed that only abdominal pain was a factor in the ITIL disease outcomes. (3) The cumulative proportion of CD in the abdominal pain group after 3 years was statistically higher than that in the non-abdominal pain group (42.7% vs. 6.2%, χ2 = 10.129, P = 0.001). However, the cumulative proportion of mucosal healing in the non-abdominal pain group was statistically higher than that in the abdominal pain group (73.3% vs. 5.6%, χ2 = 5.225, P = 0.022). (4) The numbers of lesions observed on the initial colonoscopy exams and the initial histologic findings were not related to the ITIL disease outcomes. Conclusions Clinical symptoms may be related to ITIL disease outcomes. Patients with abdominal pain had a high likelihood of CD, whereas those without abdominal pain had a high likelihood of mucosal healing. PMID:24625578

  16. Experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis. V. Protective immunity in subclinical and self-healing infection in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Preston, P M; Dumonde, D C

    1976-01-01

    This study shows how infection of CBA mice with L. tropica can be manipulated so as to mimic the principal features of both subclinical and self-healing cutaneous leishmaniasis in man. CBA mice were infected with graded inocula of L. tropica promastigotes. The pattern of primary infection was found to be dependent on dose of infecting organisms: mice given low dose inocula (10(2), 10(3)) developed subclinical infections; those given high dose inocula (10(4), 10(5), 10(6)) developed overt, clinical lesions. Size and duration of lesions, and antibody production were directly proportional to dose; delayed hypersensitivity responses were inversely proportional to dose. Protective immunity to challenge infection was induced by both subclinical and clinical infection; and was manifest both during and after the healing stages of primary lesions. Protective immunity was also induced by artificial immunization with sonicated promastigotes in adjuvants but was only manifest if the challenge dose was not too large. The course of challenge infections differed depending on the method of immunization, i.e. whether by infection or artificial immunization. Lymphoid cells from immune CBA mice conferred protection on recipient syngeneic CBA mice against challenge infection; serum from immune mice did not, but suspension of immune peritoneal cells in immune serum enhanced their protective capacity. The experimental induction of protective immunity by low-dose infection, without a clinical allergic response at the site of inoculation, is of importance in designing an immunoprophylactic approach to human leishmaniasis. PMID:1261086

  17. American Muslim Perceptions of Healing: Key Agents in Healing, and Their Roles

    PubMed Central

    Padela, Aasim I.; Killawi, Amal; Forman, Jane; DeMonner, Sonya; Heisler, Michele

    2015-01-01

    American Muslims represent a growing and diverse community. Efforts at promoting cultural competence, enhancing cross-cultural communication skills, and improving community health must account for the religio-cultural frame through which American Muslims view healing. Using a community-based participatory research model, we conducted 13 focus groups at area mosques in southeast Michigan to explore American Muslim views on healing and to identify the primary agents, and their roles, within the healing process. Participants shared a God-centric view of healing. Healing was accessed through direct means such as supplication and recitation of the Qur'an, or indirectly through human agents including imams, health care practitioners, family, friends, and community. Human agents served integral roles, influencing spiritual, psychological, and physical health. Additional research into how religiosity, health care systems, and community factors influence health-care-seeking behaviors is warranted. PMID:22393065

  18. Andersson lesion in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dhakad, Urmila; Das, Siddharth K

    2013-01-01

    A middle-aged male patient developed acute back pain and a lumbar vertebral lesion following trivial physical trauma. The lesion was considered as tuberculous on vertebral x-rays and MRI. After biopsy of the lesion and spinal fixation, the patient was kept on empirical antituberculous treatment (ATT) to which he did not respond. On re-evaluation he was diagnosed to have an Andersson lesion in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). ATT was stopped and he was successfully managed by rest, steroids, methotrexate and sulfasalazine. A careful look at the patient's plain x-ray spine and awareness about the lesion can avoid misdiagnosis of this characteristic vertebral lesion found in AS. PMID:23559648

  19. Conservative treatment of patients with periapical lesions associated with extraoral sinus tracts.

    PubMed

    Soares, Janir Alves; de Carvalho, Fabíola Bastos; Pappen, Fernanda Geraldes; Araújo, Gustavo Sivieri; de Pontes Lima, Regina K; Rodrigues, Vivian M Tellaroli; de Toledo Leonardo, Renato

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the clinical courses of three cases with extra-oral sinus tract formation, from diagnosis and treatment to short-term follow-up and evaluation. All teeth involved had periradicular radiolucent areas noted on radiographic examination and extra-oral sinus tracts appearing on the chin with exudation and unpleasant aesthetic appearance. The adopted treatment protocol included treating the sinus tract surface simultaneously with the root canal therapy. After root canal shaping using 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution, calcium hydroxide-based pastes associated with different vehicles were inserted into the root canal for 4 months, and were changed monthly. All the sinus tracts healed in 7 to 10 days. The apical lesions were completely repaired in a maximum period of 24 months. The treatment adopted provided a complete healing of the periapical lesions in a short follow-up period. Surgical repair of the cutaneous sinus tract was therefore unnecessary. PMID:18076581

  20. Comparative analysis between Chamomilla recutita and corticosteroids on wound healing. An in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Martins, Manoela Domingues; Marques, Márcia Martins; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Pavesi, Vanessa Christina Santos; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos

    2009-02-01

    The comparison of chamomile and corticosteroids for treating ulcers was done in vitro and in vivo. The experimental groups were: control; chamomile recutita; triamcinolone acetonide and clobetasol propionate. For the in vitro study the cell viability of fibroblasts cultured for 24 h in media conditioned by the substances was obtained by the MTT reduction analysis. For the in vivo study, 125 male rats were submitted to experimental ulcers treated or not (control) by the substances tested. At 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days later 5 animals of each group were sacrificed. The lesions were analyzed by means of clinical observation and histological wound-healing grading. Data were compared by ANOVA (p healing 9 days before the other groups. Complete repaired lesions were observed after 5 days of treatment only in the chamomile group. Animals treated with chamomile presented significantly faster wound healing in comparison to those treated with corticosteroids. Based on the conditions of this study, we concluded that chamomile in comparison to corticosteroids promotes faster wound healing process. PMID:18803230

  1. Corticosteroid-impairment of healing and gastric pentadecapeptide BPC-157 creams in burned mice.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Mise, S; Staresinic, M; Bedekovic, V; Zarkovic, N; Borovic, S; Gjurasin, M; Boban-Blagaic, A; Batelja, L; Rucman, R; Anic, T

    2003-06-01

    The amelioration of corticosteroid-impairment of healing by a stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC-157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M(w) 1419, currently in early clinical trials for inflammatory bowel disease) was studied in thermally injured mice. Its effects on corticosteroid impaired healing of deep partial skin thickness burns, and burn-gastric lesions were investigated. Male NMRI-Hannover mice (sacrificed at 1-3,7,14 and 21 days following burning 20% of total burn area at the back (open flame for 7s) received intraperitoneally (per kg bw) 6alpha-methylprednisolone (Depo-medrol, 1.0 or 10.0mg), or an equal volume of saline (5.0 ml), once daily, first application 30 min after injury, last 24h before sacrifice. The injury was subsequently treated by topical application of a thin layer of pentadecapeptide BPC-157 cream at three different levels a neutral cream of no treatment. Pentadecapeptide BPC-157 consistently improved given burn healing (both microscopical and tensionmetry assessment), and counteracted corticosteroid-impairment of burn healing. In burn-gastric lesions investigation of the effects of BPC showed an anti-ulcer effect of its own in burned non-corticosteroid-treated mice and potentiated the anti-ulcer effect observed in 6alpha-methylprednisolone-treated mice. Pentadecapeptide BPC-157 inhibited corticosteroid immunosuppression. In vitro, in spleenic cells assessment, animals (sacrificed at day 21) treated with 6alpha-methylprednisolone 1mg showed decreased reactivity to nitrogen in comparison with control, healthy animals, while the addition of BPC-157 (1 microg/g cream) returned cell reactivity to values noted in control healthy animals. PMID:12781609

  2. Focal lesions in normal liver.

    PubMed

    Semelka, Richard C; Martin, Diego R; Balci, N Cem

    2005-10-01

    A variety of lesions occur in the normal liver. This review will describe the most common benign, malignant, and infectious lesions. Illustration will be made of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the most common of these. Due to the high accuracy for liver lesion detection and characterization, and the intrinsic safety of the modality, MR should be considered the primary imaging tool to investigate liver diseases. PMID:16174062

  3. Fracture and healing cycles in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallee, Yan; Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jeremie; Kendrick, Jackie; von Aulock, Felix

    2014-05-01

    The repeated occurrence of fracture and healing occurs in a variety of geological, biological, metallurgical and engineering processes. In geology, it is most common in active tectonic regions, earthquake settings and volcanic conduits, where healing is thought to be intrinsically related to diffusional processes, aided by catalytic fluids. In this study, cycles of compression, healing by contact and tension are performed on standard soda-lime silicate liquids at high temperatures (500 to 700 ° C; i.e., in the diffusive regime of the viscoelastic body). The flat ends of two cylinders are brought in contact at relatively low strain rates (10-3 s-1) until a target normal stress is reached (1, 2.5, 5 and 10 MPa). The specimens are then held in contact whilst the normal stress is left to viscously dissipate for a different portion of Maxwell's relaxation timescale for the liquid (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160, 320) in order to achieve different degrees of fracture healing. Strength recovery is assessed by subjecting the healed sample to a rapid tension event at 10-1 s-1 (to ensure a purely brittle response). We note that healing becomes efficient when allowed to operate for at least 5 times the relaxation timescale of the material. From this point onward, we observe an exponential increase in strength as a function of healing time. A small component of heat is generated during failure, monitored using a high-speed infrared thermographic camera. We find that fracture-healing dynamics has similarities with sintering, whereby the kinetics of the process is viscosity and diffusion dependent. Here we aim to expand this definition with normal applied stress constraints and link fracture and healing cycles to seismic swarms. Seismicity is perceived as a first order constraint on the mechanics of magma ascent and facilitates assessment of the real-time rheological state of magma in conduits. The processes presented here may be equally applicable to the strength

  4. Effects of shear load on frictional healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, K. L.; Marone, C.

    2014-12-01

    During the seismic cycle of repeated earthquake failure, faults regain strength in a process known as frictional healing. Laboratory studies have played a central role in illuminating the processes of frictional healing and fault re-strengthening. These studies have also provided the foundation for laboratory-derived friction constitutive laws, which have been used extensively to model earthquake dynamics. We conducted laboratory experiments to assess the affect of shear load on frictional healing. Frictional healing is quantified during slide-hold-slide (SHS) tests, which serve as a simple laboratory analog for the seismic cycle in which earthquakes (slide) are followed by interseismic quiescence (hold). We studied bare surfaces of Westerly granite and layers of Westerly granite gouge (thickness of 3 mm) at normal stresses from 4-25 MPa, relative humidity of 40-60%, and loading and unloading velocities of 10-300 μm/s. During the hold period of SHS tests, shear stress on the sample was partially removed to investigate the effects of shear load on frictional healing and to isolate time- and slip-dependent effects on fault healing. Preliminary results are consistent with existing works and indicate that frictional healing increases with the logarithm of hold time and decreases with normalized shear stress τ/τf during the hold. During SHS tests with hold periods of 100 seconds, healing values ranged from (0.013-0.014) for τ/τf = 1 to (0.059-0.063) for τ/τf = 0, where τ is the shear stress during the hold period and τf is the shear stress during steady frictional sliding. Experiments on bare rock surfaces and with natural and synthetic fault gouge materials are in progress. Conventional SHS tests (i.e. τ/τf = 1) are adequately described by the rate and state friction laws. However, previous experiments in granular quartz suggest that zero-stress SHS tests are not well characterized by either the Dieterich or Ruina state evolution laws. We are investigating

  5. Surgical Management of Mandibular Central Incisors with Dumbbell Shaped Periapical Lesion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Patil, Jayaprakash D.; Jayaprakash, Thumu; Chaitanya, C. H. Krishna; Kalluru, Rama S.

    2014-01-01

    Dental traumatic injuries may affect the teeth and alveolar bone directly or indirectly. Pulpal necrosis and chronic and apical periodontitis with cystic changes are the most common sequelae of the dental traumatic injuries, if the teeth are not treated immediately. This case report focuses on the conventional and surgical management of mandibular central incisors. A twenty-four-year-old male patient presented with pain in the mandibular central incisors. Radiographic examination revealed mandibular central incisors with dumbbell shaped periapical lesion. After root canal treatment, parendodontic surgery was performed for mandibular central incisors. After one-year recall examination, the teeth were asymptomatic and periapical lesion had healed. PMID:25105031

  6. Pigmented Lesion of Buccal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  7. Stress-induced cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1992-05-01

    The increasing occurrence of dental lesions at the cervical surfaces requires more knowledge of the causes of the process. Acidic and abrasive mechanisms have clearly been documented as causes but the stress theory by Lee and Eakle is still controversial. This report describes several incidences of possible stress-induced lesions according to the characteristics described by Lee and Eakle. The occurrences of subgingival lesions lend credence to the stress-induction theory by exclusion of other superimposing etiologic factors. With the current concepts, a perceptive approach to the treatment of cervical lesions can be executed. PMID:1527763

  8. Pigmented lesion of buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  9. Creep healing of fractures in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Costin, L. S.; Wawersik, W. R.

    1980-08-01

    Fracture and healing experiments were performed on specimens of bedded salt from the Salado formation, southeastern New Mexico. Short rod specimens (100 mm in diameter) were loaded to failure in tension. During each test, a crack was initiated along the axis of the specimen. The fracture toughness of the salt was determined from the resulting load-crack opening displacement record. After the test, each specimen was pieced back together, jacketed and placed in a pressure vessel under hydrostatic pressure for several days. The confining pressure (10 to 35 MPa), temperature (22 to 100/sup 0/C) and healing time (4 to 8 days) were varied to determine the effect of each on the healing process. Upon removal from the pressure vessel, each sample was retested and the toughness of the healed fracture was determined. Results show that the salt specimens regained 70 to 80% of their original strength under all conditions except at the lowest temperature and pressure where specimens regained only 20 to 30% of their original strength. It is suspected that the primary mechanism involved is creep of asperities along the fracture surface which forms an interlocking network. Thus, the healing pressure is probably the most significant variable.

  10. Nutrient support of the healing wound.

    PubMed

    Meyer, N A; Muller, M J; Herndon, D N

    1994-05-01

    Wound healing is a series of complex physicochemical interactions that require various micronutrients at every step. In the critically ill or severely injured patient, wound healing is impaired by the protein-catabolic, hypermetabolic response to stress. The hypothalamus responds to cytokine stimulation by increasing the thermoregulatory set-point and by augmenting elaboration of stress hormones (catecholamines, cortisol, and glucagon). In turn, the stress hormones induce thermogenic futile substrate cycling, lipolysis, and proteolysis. Increased glucose production results at the expense of skeletal muscle degradation, producing amino acid substrate for hepatic gluconeogenesis. Nutritional support of the hypermetabolic state is an essential part of ensuring efficient wound healing in these patients. Protein catabolism cannot be reversed by increased amino acid availability alone, due partly to a defect in amino acid transport. This defect can be reversed by anabolic agents, such as growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1. Growth hormone treatment dramatically improves wound healing in severely burned children. Supplementation with protein and vitamins, specifically arginine and vitamins A, B, and C, provides optimum nutrient support of the healing wound. PMID:7922445

  11. Mechanoregulation of Wound Healing and Skin Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rosińczuk, Joanna; Taradaj, Jakub; Dymarek, Robert; Sopel, Mirosław

    2016-01-01

    Basic and clinical studies on mechanobiology of cells and tissues point to the importance of mechanical forces in the process of skin regeneration and wound healing. These studies result in the development of new therapies that use mechanical force which supports effective healing. A better understanding of mechanobiology will make it possible to develop biomaterials with appropriate physical and chemical properties used to treat poorly healing wounds. In addition, it will make it possible to design devices precisely controlling wound mechanics and to individualize a therapy depending on the type, size, and anatomical location of the wound in specific patients, which will increase the clinical efficiency of the therapy. Linking mechanobiology with the science of biomaterials and nanotechnology will enable in the near future precise interference in abnormal cell signaling responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and restoration of the biological balance. The objective of this study is to point to the importance of mechanobiology in regeneration of skin damage and wound healing. The study describes the influence of rigidity of extracellular matrix and special restrictions on cell physiology. The study also defines how and what mechanical changes influence tissue regeneration and wound healing. The influence of mechanical signals in the process of proliferation, differentiation, and skin regeneration is tagged in the study. PMID:27413744

  12. Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Gaurav; LaFontaine, Javier; Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K.; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction. PMID:24049559

  13. Curcumin as a wound healing agent.

    PubMed

    Akbik, Dania; Ghadiri, Maliheh; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2014-10-22

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a popular Indian spice that has been used for centuries in herbal medicines for the treatment of a variety of ailments such as rheumatism, diabetic ulcers, anorexia, cough and sinusitis. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is the main curcuminoid present in turmeric and responsible for its yellow color. Curcumin has been shown to possess significant anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-mutagenic, anti-coagulant and anti-infective effects. Curcumin has also been shown to have significant wound healing properties. It acts on various stages of the natural wound healing process to hasten healing. This review summarizes and discusses recently published papers on the effects of curcumin on skin wound healing. The highlighted studies in the review provide evidence of the ability of curcumin to reduce the body's natural response to cutaneous wounds such as inflammation and oxidation. The recent literature on the wound healing properties of curcumin also provides evidence for its ability to enhance granulation tissue formation, collagen deposition, tissue remodeling and wound contraction. It has become evident that optimizing the topical application of curcumin through altering its formulation is essential to ensure the maximum therapeutical effects of curcumin on skin wounds. PMID:25200875

  14. The effects of smoking on fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Sloan, A; Hussain, I; Maqsood, M; Eremin, O; El-Sheemy, M

    2010-04-01

    Tobacco smoking is the single most avoidable cause of premature death worldwide. In fracture healing, it has been found to be a contributory factor to delayed union, and smokers are significantly disadvantaged, as healing times are often prolonged. The orthopaedic surgeon is likely to be knowledgeable about the detrimental effects of smoking on healing bones, as the problem has been known for some time. Smoking adversely affects bone mineral density, lumbar disc degeneration, the incidences of hip fractures and the dynamics of bone and wound healing. Clinical trials and demographic studies have been more widespread than biochemical analyses, and have reported poor prognosis for fracture patients who smoke. Scientific research has elucidated some of the negative impacts of tobacco use and investigations involving several animal models in cellular and humoral analyses have shown damage caused by various toxicological processes. Cessation of the habit perioperatively, therefore, is routinely advised to improve outcomes for patients. The current review describes some of the consequences of tobacco smoking in fracture healing. PMID:20303894

  15. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Giles T. S.; Mills, Stuart J.; Cowin, Allison J.; Smith, Louise E.

    2015-01-01

    Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials. PMID:26137471

  16. Augmentation of tendon-to-bone healing.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Fu, Freddie H; Wolf, Megan R; Ochi, Mitsuo; Jazrawi, Laith M; Doral, M Nedim; Lubowitz, James H; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-03-19

    Tendon-to-bone healing is vital to the ultimate success of the various surgical procedures performed to repair injured tendons. Achieving tendon-to-bone healing that is functionally and biologically similar to native anatomy can be challenging because of the limited regeneration capacity of the tendon-bone interface. Orthopaedic basic-science research strategies aiming to augment tendon-to-bone healing include the use of osteoinductive growth factors, platelet-rich plasma, gene therapy, enveloping the grafts with periosteum, osteoconductive materials, cell-based therapies, biodegradable scaffolds, and biomimetic patches. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and extracorporeal shockwave treatment may affect tendon-to-bone healing by means of mechanical forces that stimulate biological cascades at the insertion site. Application of various loading methods and immobilization times influence the stress forces acting on the recently repaired tendon-to-bone attachment, which eventually may change the biological dynamics of the interface. Other approaches, such as the use of coated sutures and interference screws, aim to deliver biological factors while achieving mechanical stability by means of various fixators. Controlled Level-I human trials are required to confirm the promising results from in vitro or animal research studies elucidating the mechanisms underlying tendon-to-bone healing and to translate these results into clinical practice. PMID:24647509

  17. Histopathological Changes and Clinical Responses of Buruli Ulcer Plaque Lesions during Chemotherapy: A Role for Surgical Removal of Necrotic Tissue?

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Luc Valère; Dossou, Ange Dodji; Barogui, Yves Thierry; Johnson, Roch Christian; Pluschke, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is a necrotizing skin disease usually starting with a subcutaneous nodule or plaque, which may ulcerate and progress, if untreated, over months and years. During the currently recommended antibiotic treatment with rifampicin/streptomycin plaque lesions tend to ulcerate, often associated with retarded wound healing and prolonged hospital stays. Methodology/Principal Findings Included in this study were twelve laboratory reconfirmed, HIV negative BU patients presenting with plaque lesions at the CDTUB in Allada, Benin. Punch biopsies for histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis were taken before start of treatment and after four to five weeks of treatment. Where excision or wound debridement was clinically indicated, the removed tissue was also analyzed. Based on clinical judgment, nine of the twelve patients enrolled in this study received limited surgical excision seven to 39 days after completion of chemotherapy, followed by skin grafting. Lesions of three patients healed without further intervention. Before treatment, plaque lesions were characterized by a destroyed subcutis with extensive necrosis without major signs of infiltration. After completion of antibiotic treatment partial infiltration of the affected tissue was observed, but large necrotic areas remained unchanged. Conclusion/Significance Our histopathological analyses show that ulceration of plaque lesions during antibiotic treatment do not represent a failure to respond to antimycobacterial treatment. Based on our results we suggest formal testing in a controlled clinical trial setting whether limited surgical excision of necrotic tissue favours wound healing and can reduce the duration of hospital stays. PMID:21980547

  18. [The healing process of local lesions. Heterocollagen (Pancol) in the treatment of wounds].

    PubMed

    Ionescu, A; Chiotan, N

    1978-01-01

    Pancol is a drug used for dressing wounds, its activity sharply differing from that of other agents used for local treatment of wounds. It has an activating, regulating effect, permitting the natural processes to develop, without altering them. The results, often spectacular under clinical conditions, are explained by histologic-microscopic investigations. The multiple aspects of its effect, the complexity of the local biological phenomena to which an equivalent complexity in the action of the Pancol corresponds, demands competence and experience in its application. PMID:740963

  19. [Magical and religious healing in Byzantium].

    PubMed

    Józsa, László

    2010-01-01

    Religious and magical ways of healing have been known and practiced since the very beginning of human history. In the present article, the Byzantine philosophical, cultural, historical and "methodological" aspects of this way of healing are discussed. The article outlines the development of magic healing in Byzantium from the 4th to the 15th century. During this period magical therapy included the cult of patron saints--listed by the author--and pleading for divine intervention as well. The activity of "anargyroi" and the use of magical objects and amulets is also discussed in detail. Exorcism was also a part of religious therapy both against psychical and somatical diseases. In early Christianity, and especially in Byzantium the devil or other demons were also supposed to cause various somatical or psychical illnesses by "intrusion" or "internalisation," i.e. by possession or obsession of their victims. PMID:21661260

  20. [Actin in the wound healing process].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dorota; Popow-Woźniak, Agnieszka; Raźnikiewicz, Linda; Malicka-Błaszkiewicz, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Wound healing is an important biological process of crucial value for organisms survival and retention of its proper functions. The recognition of molecular mechanisms of these phenomenon is still under investigation. The transition of mesenchymal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is a key point in wound healing. The contraction ability of myofibroblast enables the shrinkage of a wound and closes its edges. Alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), one of six actin isoforms, is a marker of compeletely differentiated myofibroblast. The regulation of differentiation process depends on many growth factors (especially TGF beta 1), the level of active thymosin beta 4, extracellular matrix proteins--including fibronectin, and also on specificity of microenvironment. Thymosin beta 4 is responsible for maintenance of pool of monomeric actin and actin filaments depolymerization. It can also act as a transcription factor, migration stimulator and immunomodulator, so this protein deserves for more attention in wound healing research field. PMID:19824469

  1. Vision, healing brush, and fiber bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Todor

    2005-03-01

    The Healing Brush is a tool introduced for the first time in Adobe Photoshop (2002) that removes defects in images by seamless cloning (gradient domain fusion). The Healing Brush algorithms are built on a new mathematical approach that uses Fibre Bundles and Connections to model the representation of images in the visual system. Our mathematical results are derived from first principles of human vision, related to adaptation transforms of von Kries type and Retinex theory. In this paper we present the new result of Healing in arbitrary color space. In addition to supporting image repair and seamless cloning, our approach also produces the exact solution to the problem of high dynamic range compression of17 and can be applied to other image processing algorithms.

  2. Scarless wound healing: chasing the holy grail.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Graham G; Maan, Zeshaan N; Wong, Victor W; Duscher, Dominik; Hu, Michael S; Zielins, Elizabeth R; Wearda, Taylor; Muhonen, Ethan; McArdle, Adrian; Tevlin, Ruth; Atashroo, David A; Senarath-Yapa, Kshemendra; Lorenz, H Peter; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T

    2015-03-01

    Over 100 million patients acquire scars in the industrialized world each year, primarily as a result of elective operations. Although undefined, the global incidence of scarring is even larger, extending to significant numbers of burn and other trauma-related wounds. Scars have the potential to exert a profound psychological and physical impact on the individual. Beyond aesthetic considerations and potential disfigurement, scarring can result in restriction of movement and reduced quality of life. The formation of a scar following skin injury is a consequence of wound healing occurring through reparative rather than regenerative mechanisms. In this article, the authors review the basic stages of wound healing; differences between adult and fetal wound healing; various mechanical, genetic, and pharmacologic strategies to reduce scarring; and the biology of skin stem/progenitor cells that may hold the key to scarless regeneration. PMID:25719706

  3. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jumaat Mohd. Yussof; Omar, Effat; Pai, Dinker R.; Sood, Suneet

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs) and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth factors initiate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation. Inflammation is followed by the proliferation of fibroblasts, which lay down the extracellular matrix. Simultaneously, various white cells and other connective tissue cells release both the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of these metalloproteinases (TIMPs). MMPs remove damaged structural proteins such as collagen, while the fibroblasts lay down fresh extracellular matrix proteins. Fluid collected from acute, healing wounds contains growth factors, and stimulates fibroblast proliferation, but fluid collected from chronic, nonhealing wounds does not. Fibroblasts from chronic wounds do not respond to chronic wound fluid, probably because the fibroblasts of these wounds have lost the receptors that respond to cytokines and growth factors. Nonhealing wounds contain high levels of IL1, IL6, and MMPs, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio. Clinical examination of wounds inconsistently predicts which wounds will heal when procedures like secondary closure are planned. Surgeons therefore hope that these chemicals can be used as biomarkers of wounds which have impaired ability to heal. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will help the healing of chronic, nonhealing wounds. PMID:23162220

  4. Fortuitously discovered liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Sharma, Malay; Gibson, Robert N; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Jenssen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The fortuitously discovered liver lesion is a common problem. Consensus might be expected in terms of its work-up, and yet there is none. This stems in part from the fact that there is no preventive campaign involving the early detection of liver tumors other than for patients with known liver cirrhosis and oncological patients. The work-up (detection and differential diagnosis) of liver tumors comprises theoretical considerations, history, physical examination, laboratory tests, standard ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound techniques, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as image-guided biopsy. CEUS techniques have proved to be the most pertinent method; these techniques became part of the clinical routine about 10 years ago in Europe and Asia and are used for a variety of indications in daily clinical practice. CEUS is in many cases the first and also decisive technical intervention for detecting and characterizing liver tumors. This development is reflected in many CEUS guidelines, e.g., in the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) guidelines 2004, 2008 and 2012 as well as the recently published World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology-EFSUMB guidelines 2012. This article sets out considerations for making a structured work-up of incidental liver tumors feasible. PMID:23745019

  5. Mechanics of the healed meniscus in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Newman, A P; Anderson, D R; Daniels, A U; Dales, M C

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of the intact canine stifle joint was studied, using a surgical model of meniscal injury and repair. Thirty-eight animals were divided into five study groups: Group S received only a sham arthrotomy (without a meniscal incision), Groups P13 and P26 received peripheral medial meniscal incisions, and Groups R13 and R26 received radial medial meniscus incisions. All meniscal incisions were repaired anatomically with absorbable suture. Groups P13 and R13 were sacrificed at 13 weeks following surgery and Groups P26 and R26 at 26 weeks. Following sacrifice, the joints were subjected to gross and histologic examination, and structural and material properties testing. All meniscal repairs healed, and the peripheral repairs were virtually invisible, with no articular damage. The radial repairs healed with 3 to 5 mm wide fibrovascular scars, and several joints demonstrated articular erosions. The radial repair tissue contained unorganized collagen bundles and ground substance deficient in mucopolysaccharides. Groups S, P13 and P26 demonstrated no statistically significant differences between test and control limbs in compressive force-displacement behavior, input energy (EI), and ratio of dissipated to input energy (ED/EI). There were significant test-control differences in the load-displacement characteristics of Groups R13 (P less than 0.05) and R26 (P less than 0.05), with the repaired joint stiffer than the control. EI decreased 26% in Group R13 (not significant) and 34% in Group R26 (P less than 0.05), while the ratio ED/EI increased from 27% to 44% in Group R13 (not significant) and from 31% to 38% in Group R26 (P less than 0.05). Medial compartment contact area did not change significantly in either peripheral repair group, but decreased by 25% in Group R13 (P less than 0.05) and by 13% in Group R26 (P less than 0.05). Yield stress, maximum stress, and Young's modulus decreased significantly (P less than 0.05) relative to the controls in

  6. Cystic lesions of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Ralph H.; Fukushima, Noriyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Summary In contrast to the relatively uniform pathology and the unyielding dismal outcome associated with infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, cystic lesions have a broad spectrum of gross and microscopic pathologies, and a range of clinical outcomes. The common cystic lesions of the pancreas are reviewed with emphasis on practical tips for distinguishing between the main entities. PMID:20953247

  7. Hamartomatous tongue lesions in children.

    PubMed

    Kreiger, Portia A; Ernst, Linda M; Elden, Lisa M; Kazahaya, Ken; Alawi, Faizan; Russo, Pierre A

    2007-08-01

    The incidence and spectrum of tongue lesions in children, in particular tongue hamartomas, is relatively unknown. We report a retrospective review of all tongue lesions seen at a major tertiary care children's hospital over an 18-year period with an emphasis on describing tongue hamartomas. A total of 135 tongue lesions were identified. Vascular/lymphatic lesions (36/135) were the most common followed by mucus extravasation phenomenon (22/135). Interestingly, hamartomatous lesions (18/135) were the third most common lesion category identified. Lingual hamartomas were predominantly submucosal in location and were classified histologically by tissue composition as follows: neurovascular (2/18), smooth muscle predominant (5/18), fat predominant (1/18), and smooth muscle and fat containing (10/18). All 5 smooth muscle predominant hamartomas also contained vasculature, and 1 case additionally contained salivary gland tissue. The single fat predominant hamartoma additionally contained vessels and salivary gland. The final 10 hamartomas contained varying amounts of both smooth muscle and fat, and also admixed combinations of vessels, nerves, and salivary glands. Two of these 10 cases additionally contained foci of choristomatous elements, including cutaneous adnexal structures and cartilage. Most patients with hamartomatous lesions were young, 2 years or less. Eight cases were congenital in origin. Females outnumbered males by 2:1. The majority of lesions (16/18) were dorsal in location, and 4 patients had a syndromic association, all oral-facial-digital syndrome. PMID:17667541

  8. Healing mysteries in a Vietnamese village.

    PubMed

    Tick, Edward

    2007-01-01

    The front lines of health and healing today are everywhere around our country and the world, where individuals, societies, and ecosystems are at risk. On these lines and often unheralded, courageous healers and communities utilize traditional, scientific, humanistic, communal, holistic, and spiritual resources to address our most pressing global health issues. FIELD REPORTS offers reports from these front lines about significant health crises, concerns, and healing approaches that occur beyond our usual horizon of vision. Our concern is for world health. We seek to hoist flags of hope. PMID:17362851

  9. Acceleration Of Wound Healing Ny Photodynamic Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R.; Trauner, Kenneth

    2000-08-22

    Disclosed is a method for accelerating wound healing in a mammal. The method includes identifying an unhealed wound site or partially-healed wound site in a mammal; administering a photosensitizer to the mammal; waiting for a time period wherein the photosensitizer reaches an effective tissue concentration at the wound site; and photoactivating the photosensitizer at the wound site. The dose of photodynamic therapy is selected to stimulate the production of one or more growth factor by cells at the wound site, without causing tissue destruction.

  10. Multifunctional composites: Healing, heating and electromagnetic integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaisted, Thomas Anthony John

    2007-12-01

    Multifunctional materials, in the context of this research, integrate other functions into materials that foremost have outstanding structural integrity. Details of the integration of electromagnetic, heating, and healing functionalities into fiber-reinforced polymer composites are presented. As a result of fiber/wire integration through textile braiding and weaving, the dielectric constant of a composite may be tuned from negative to positive values. These wires are further leveraged to uniformly heat the composite through resistive heating. A healing functionality is introduced by utilizing a polymer matrix with the ability to heal internal cracking through thermally-reversible covalent bonds based on Diels-Alder cycloaddition. The Double Cleavage Drilled Compression (DCDC) specimen is applied to study the fracture and healing characteristics of the neat polymer. This method allows for quantitative evaluation of incremental crack growth, and ensures that the cracked sample remains in one piece after the test, improving the ability to re-align the fracture surfaces prior to healing. Initially, the fracture strength of PMMA is studied with various DCDC geometries to develop a model of the propagation of a crack within this type of specimen. Applied to the healable polymer (2MEP4F), repeated fracture-healing cycles demonstrate that treatment at temperatures between 85 to 95°C results in full fracture toughness recovery and no dimensional changes due to creep. The fracture toughness after each fracturing and healing cycle has been calculated, using the model, to yield a fracture toughness of about 0.71 MPa·m1/2 for this material at room temperature. Glass and carbon fiber-reinforced composites have been fabricated with the 2MEP4F polymer, and the ability of this polymer to heal microcracks in fiber-reinforced composites is demonstrated. Microcracks have been introduced into the composites by cryogenic cycling in liquid nitrogen, causing a reduction in the storage

  11. microRNA and Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Jaideep; Sen, Chandan K

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules which play pivotal roles in wound healing. The increased expression of certain genes and expression of some others represent a key component of the wound biology and are largely under the regulation of naturally occurring miRNAs. Understanding the dysregulated miRNAs in chronic wound biology will therefore enable the development of newer therapies. This chapter focuses on the miRNAs that can be potentially targeted for improving skin wound healing and the challenges in miRNA therapy, including considerations in miRNA target identification and delivery. PMID:26663189

  12. Radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) of the nonpalpable breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Zgajnar, J; Hocevar, M; Frkovic-Grazio, S; Hertl, K; Schweiger, E; Besic, N

    2004-01-01

    Standard localization techniques of the nonpalpable breast lesions (guide wire, carbon, skin marking) have several disadvantages. Radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) was recently proposed as a better alternative resulting in wider surgical margins and lower average specimen weight. The aim of our study was to compare ROLL to our previously published series of the standard guidewire localization, performed at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana. ROLL was performed in 110 nonpalpable breast lesions. Human serum albumin macroaggregats, marked with 1.8-5.5 MBq 99mTc was injected in the nonpalpable lesion. During surgery the radioactive breast tissue was excised using hand held gamma probe. Nonpalpable breast lesions were excised in all 110 patients. The definitive histology revealed 32 invasive carcinomas, 19 DCIS, 5 LCIS in and 54 benign breast lesions. Mean specimen weight was 40 g which is less in comparison to 53 g of the guidewire series (p=0.002). Surgical margins were clear in 36/51 (70%) invasive breast cancer or DCIS patients and close or involved in 15/51 (30%) patients. Compared to the guidewire series, where 41/92 (44%) margins were clear and 51/92 (56%) were close or involved, the difference was statistically significant (p=0.005). ROLL proved to be superior to guidewire localization in our series, allowing excision of the nonpalpable breast lesion with wider surgical margins despite lower average specimen weight. PMID:15640944

  13. In vivo analysis of wound healing by optical methods

    PubMed Central

    Alborova, Alena; Lademann, Jürgen; Kramer, Axel; Richter, Heike; Patzelt, Alexa; Sterry, Wolfram; Koch, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of wound healing is important for the therapy control and for the development of drugs stimulating the healing process. Wounds cause damage to the skin barrier. A damaged stratum corneum leads to an increased water loss through the skin barrier. The standard measuring procedure for characterization of wound healing is the measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL). The disadvantage of this method is that it can be easily disturbed by the perspiration of the volunteers and by topically applied substances, for instance wound healing creams. In the study presented, in vivo laser scanning microscopy and optical coherent tomography were compared concerning the application for their analysis of wound healing processes. The laser scanning microscopy allows the analysis of the healing process on a cellular level. The course of wound healing determined by laser scanning microscopy was correlated with numerical values, allowing the numerical characterization of the wound healing process. PMID:20204112

  14. HEALing Higher Education: An Innovative Approach to Preparing HSI Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter is a case study of the Higher Education Administration and Leadership (HEAL) program at Adams State University. HEAL focuses on preparing the next generation of leaders at the nation's Hispanic-serving institutions.

  15. Multiphase design of autonomic self-healing thermoplastic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yulin; Kushner, Aaron M.; Williams, Gregory A.; Guan, Zhibin

    2012-06-01

    The development of polymers that can spontaneously repair themselves after mechanical damage would significantly improve the safety, lifetime, energy efficiency and environmental impact of man-made materials. Most approaches to self-healing materials require the input of external energy, healing agents, solvent or plasticizer. Despite intense research in this area, the synthesis of a stiff material with intrinsic self-healing ability remains a key challenge. Here, we show a design of multiphase supramolecular thermoplastic elastomers that combine high modulus and toughness with spontaneous healing capability. The designed hydrogen-bonding brush polymers self-assemble into a hard-soft microphase-separated system, combining the enhanced stiffness and toughness of nanocomposites with the self-healing capability of dynamic supramolecular assemblies. In contrast to previous self-healing polymers, this new system spontaneously self-heals as a single-component solid material at ambient conditions, without the need for any external stimulus, healing agent, plasticizer or solvent.

  16. Dentition and lesion history.

    PubMed

    Eggertsson, H; Ferreira-Zandona, A

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries is a process that typically keeps recurring throughout life, and the consequences are too often seen as irreversible damage to the dentition. At various stages of life, different parts of the dentition are affected, and the effects continue to be seen in the dentition long after the events took place. They bear witness to previous occurrences of this process throughout the lifetime of an individual. This chapter reviews the linkage between the caries process and the dental caries lesion history of the human dentition. The prevalence and distribution of the caries burden are very variable and closely tied to cultural aspects. In the primary dentition, income and education have been found to be inversely associated with: (1) any early childhood caries and (2) the maxillary incisor caries pattern. A positive association between these caries patterns and minority ethnicity/race status was also identified. These patterns are different from those of the permanent dentition. Well-documented changes in caries prevalence have been observed throughout history, most closely tied to availability and amount of refined sugar consumed. Changes in caries rates are also well documented in the 20th century, mainly with the advent of fluoride in several forms, first as a steep decline and recently as being relatively unchanged. It is likely that there will be dramatic changes in the rates and distribution of dental caries in the future, due to changes in behavioural factors and therapeutic measures. The description drawn is based on the dental caries pattern experienced in modern western societies. PMID:19494678

  17. Spectrum of prostatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostate gland of male reproductive system is about the size of walnut and surrounds the urethra. Most frequently encountered diseases affecting prostate are Prostatitis, Benign prostatic hyperplasia and Prostatic cancer .Our objective of study was to evaluate the spectrum and correlation of prostatic lesions with presenting complaints of patient. Methods It was a cross-sectional study conducted in Pathology Department of Dow Medical College, Dow University of Health Sciences during the period of 1st January 2010 to December 2012. Pathology department of Dow Medical College collected specimens from both Civil Hospital and Lyari General Hospital Karachi, Pakistan. Specimens were taken through transurethral resection of prostate (TURP), simple prostatectomy and radical prostatectomy. A questionnaire was made and information including name, age, ward name of hospital, laboratory number, clinical diagnosis and symptoms were noted in it. Data was entered and analyzed through SPSS 19. Result During the targeted months, 48 prostatic specimens were received with a mean age of 65.7 + -7.6 years. Common presenting complains were urinary retention in 23(47.9%) patients, followed by dribbling in 12(25%). Out of 48 patients, 42 have Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and 6 have Prostatic Adenocarcinoma. Both Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Prostatic Adenocarcinoma were more prevalent in the age group of 60-70 years. Conclusion Frequency of prostatic cancer is on the rise and measures should be taken for its early detection. Screening protocols and awareness programs need to be introduced. Screening programs should be focused on level of androgens and molecular pathogenesis. PMID:24063260

  18. Predictive value of intracutaneous xenon clearance for healing of amputation and cutaneous ulcer sites

    SciTech Connect

    Silberstein, E.B.; Thomas, S.; Cline, J.; Kempczinski, R.; Gottesman, L.

    1983-04-01

    A previously reported technique for the assessment of skin blood flow in the lower extremities of patients with ischemic lesions was evaluated using intracutaeous xenon clearance. The radioisotope was injected above and below both the ankle and the knee and flow was measured using a gamma camera with a low-energy collimator, 88-keV photopeak, and a 20% window. Healing was more frequent when skin blood flow was equal to or greater than 2.4 ml/min/100 g (38/39 patients) than when flow was less than 2.4 ml/min/100 g (4/7 patients). The authors conclude that this technique can be used to help determine the appropriate site for amputation in lower limb ischemic lesions.

  19. Predictive value of intracutaneous xenon clearance for healing of amputation and cutaneous ulcer sites

    SciTech Connect

    Silberstein, E.B.; Thomas, S.; Cline, J.; Kempczinski, R.; Gottesman, L.

    1983-04-01

    A previously reported technique for the assessment of skin blood flow in the lower extremities of patients with ischemic lesions was evaluated using intracutaneous xenon clearance. The radioisotope was injected above and below both the ankle and the knee and flow was measured using a gamma camera with a low-energy collimator, 88-keV photopeak, and a 20% window. Healing was more frequent when skin blood flow was equal to or greater than 2.4 ml/min/100 g (38/39 patients) than when flow was less than 2.4 ml/min/100 g (4/7 patients). The authors conclude that this technique can be used to help determine the appropriate site for amputation in lower limb ischemic lesions.

  20. Inflammation and impaired wound healing after zotarolimus-eluting stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Shuichi; Abe, Shichiro; Taguchi, Isao; Masawa, Nobuhide; Inoue, Katsumi; Inoue, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    An 86-year-old man died suddenly 5 months after implantation of a zotarolimus-eluting stent. Two zotarolimus-eluting stents were placed to treat a highly calcified diffuse lesion in the proximal-to-mid right coronary artery. The lesion was fully covered by the two stents, and intravascular ultrasound showed complete stent apposition. However, an X-ray at autopsy showed that the proximal stent was fractured. Although we thought that thrombotic occlusion at the fracture site might have caused his sudden death, no thrombus was present. In addition, in the other sites where the stents were optimally dilated, there was stent malapposition and peri-strut inflammation including macrophage infiltration, giant cells, polymer phagocytosis, and neovascularization in the neointima. Even with a second-generation drug-eluting stent, such as the zotarolimus-eluting stent, wound healing may be impaired at the stent-injured vessel site. PMID:22356902

  1. Effect of low intensity helium-neon (HeNe) laser irradiation on experimental paracoccidioidomycotic wound healing dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria Carolina; Gameiro, Jacy; Nagib, Patrícia Resende Alo; Brito, Vânia Nieto; Vasconcellos, Elza da Costa Cruz; Verinaud, Liana

    2009-01-01

    The effect of HeNe laser on the extracellular matrix deposition, chemokine expression and angiogenesis in experimental paracoccidioidomycotic lesions was investigated. At days 7, 8 and 9 postinfection the wound of each animal was treated with a 632.8 nm HeNe laser at a dose of 3 J cm(-2). At day 10 postinfection, the wounds were examined by using histologic and immunohistochemical methods. Results revealed that laser-treated lesions were lesser extensive than untreated ones, and composed mainly by macrophages and lymphocytes. High IL-1beta expression was shown in the untreated group whereas in laser-treated animals the expression was scarce. On the other hand, the expression of CXCL-10 was found to be reduced in untreated animals and quite intensive and well distributed in the laser-treated ones. Also, untreated lesions presented vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in a small area near the center of the lesion and high immunoreactivity for hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), whereas laser-treated lesions expressed VEGF surrounding blood vessels and little immunoreactivity for HIF-1. Laser-treated lesions presented much more reticular fibers and collagen deposition when compared with the untreated lesion. Our results show that laser was efficient in minimizing the local effects observed in paracoccidioidomycosis and can be an efficient tool in the treatment of this infection, accelerating the healing process. PMID:18764901

  2. The Oneness of Humankind: Healing Racism Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Sharon E.

    2010-01-01

    The guiding principle behind the healing of racism is the Oneness of Humankind. This is not an old concept warmed over. It is knowledge about our collective capacity to reach deep into the human spirit and solve the most complex challenges of our time. The compound problem of race and other issues such as poverty only can be resolved with the…

  3. Acceleration of cutaneous wound healing by brassinosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Debora; Rathinasabapathy, Thirumurugan; Schmidt, Barbara; Shakarjian, Michael P.; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Raskin, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids are plant growth hormones involved in cell growth, division and differentiation. Their effects in animals are largely unknown, although recent studies showed the anabolic properties of brassinosteroids possibly mediated through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway. Here we examined biological activity of homobrassinolide (HB) and its synthetic analogues on in vitro proliferation and migration assays in murine fibroblast and primary keratinocyte cell culture. HB stimulated fibroblast proliferation and migration, and weakly induced keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. The effects of topical HB administration on progression of wound closure were further tested in the mouse model of cutaneous wound healing. C57BL/6J mice were given a full thickness dermal wound, and the rate of wound closure was assessed daily for 10 d alongside adenosine receptor agonist CGS-21680 as a positive control. Topical application of brassinosteroid significantly reduced wound size and accelerated wound healing in treated animals. mRNA levels of TGF-β and ICAM-1 were significantly lower, while TNF-α was nearly suppressed in the wounds from treated mice. Our data suggest that topical brassinosteroids accelerate wound healing by positively modulating inflammatory and re-epithelialization phases of the wound-repair process, in partby enhancing Akt signaling in the skin at the edges of the wound and enhancing migration of fibroblasts in a wounded area. Targeting this signaling pathway with brassinosteroids may represent a promising approach to the therapy of delayed wound healing. PMID:23937635

  4. Signals Involved in Tuber Wound-Healing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The induction and regulation of wound-healing (WH) processes in potato tubers and other vegetables are of great nutritional and economic importance. The rapid accumulation of waxes to restrict water vapor loss and formation of suberin barriers to block infection are crucial components of WH. Recen...

  5. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  6. Boundary crossing in epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Eileen; Tzlil, Shelly; Tirrell, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The processes of wound healing and collective cell migration have been studied for decades. Intensive research has been devoted to understanding the mechanisms involved in wound healing, but the role of cell-substrate interactions is still not thoroughly understood. Here we probe the role of cell-substrate interactions by examining in vitro the healing of monolayers of human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells cultured on artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) proteins. We find that the rate of wound healing is dependent on the concentration of fibronectin-derived (RGD) cell-adhesion ligands in the aECM substrate. The wound closure rate varies nearly sixfold on the substrates examined, despite the fact that the rates of migration and proliferation of individual cells show little sensitivity to the RGD concentration (which varies 40-fold). To explain this apparent contradiction, we study collective migration by means of a dynamic Monte Carlo simulation. The cells in the simulation spread, retract, and proliferate with probabilities obtained from a simple phenomenological model. The results indicate that the overall wound closure rate is determined primarily by the rate at which cells cross the boundary between the aECM protein and the matrix deposited under the cell sheet. PMID:20974917

  7. Healing the Hidden Wounds of Racial Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Kenneth V.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines racial trauma and highlights strategies for healing and transformation to support the disproportionate number of children and youth of color who fail in school and become trapped in the pipelines of treatment, social service, and justice systems. The difficulty in meeting the needs of these children and youth is failing to…

  8. Diagnosis and distress in Navajo healing.

    PubMed

    Csordas, Thomas J; Storck, Michael J; Strauss, Milton

    2008-08-01

    In contemporary Navajo society, traditional Navajo ceremonies, Native American Church prayer meetings, and Navajo Christian faith healing are all highly sought-after resources in the everyday pursuit of health and well-being. What is the nature of affliction among patients who turn to such forms of religious healing? Are these patients typically afflicted with psychiatric disorder? In this article we discuss 84 Navajo patients who participated in the Navajo Healing Project during a period in which they consulted one of these forms of healing. We present diagnostic results obtained from the Structured Clinical Interview for DSMIV (SCID) administered to these patients. We then present an ethnographically augmented analysis comparing the research diagnosis obtained via the SCID with a clinical diagnosis, with the diagnosis given by religious healers, and with the understanding of their own distress on the part of patients. These analyses demonstrate how a cultural approach contributes to the basic science and clinical understandings of affliction as well as to discussion of the advantages and limitations of DSM categories as descriptors of distress and disorder. PMID:18974670

  9. Growing Healing One Garden at a Time.

    PubMed

    Ashman, Julann

    2016-01-01

    Evidence exists regarding the effect of horticultural therapy on improving human well-being, including promotion of overall health and quality of life, physical strength, and cardiac function. This article shares how a nurse created a healing garden at Lourdes Hospital, where she works. Resource information about therapeutic gardens is included. PMID:26817369

  10. Practices in Wound Healing Studies of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Rupesh; Jain, Nitika; Pathak, Raghvendra; Sandhu, Sardul Singh

    2011-01-01

    Wounds are the result of injuries to the skin that disrupt the other soft tissue. Healing of a wound is a complex and protracted process of tissue repair and remodeling in response to injury. Various plant products have been used in treatment of wounds over the years. Wound healing herbal extracts promote blood clotting, fight infection, and accelerate the healing of wounds. Phytoconstituents derived from plants need to be identified and screened for antimicrobial activity for management of wounds. The in vitro assays are useful, quick, and relatively inexpensive. Small animals provide a multitude of model choices for various human wound conditions. The study must be conducted after obtaining approval of the Ethics Committee and according to the guidelines for care and use of animals. The prepared formulations of herbal extract can be evaluated by various physicopharmaceutical parameters. The wound healing efficacies of various herbal extracts have been evaluated in excision, incision, dead space, and burn wound models. In vitro and in vivo assays are stepping stones to well-controlled clinical trials of herbal extracts. PMID:21716711

  11. Healing in the Sámi North

    PubMed Central

    Stabbursvik, Ellen Anne Buljo

    2010-01-01

    There is a special emphasis today on integrating traditional healing within health services. However, most areas in which there is a system of traditional healing have undergone colonization and a number of pressures suppressing tradition for hundreds of years. The question arises as to how one can understand today’s tradition in light of earlier traditions. This article is based on material collected in Sámi areas of Finnmark and Nord-Troms Norway; it compares local healing traditions with what is known of earlier shamanic traditions in the area. The study is based on 27 interviews among healers and their patients. The findings suggest that although local healing traditions among the Sámi in northern Norway have undergone major transformations during the last several hundred years, they may be considered an extension of a long-standing tradition with deep roots in the region. Of special interest are also the new forms tradition may take in today’s changing global society. PMID:20862528

  12. Healing Voids In Interconnections In Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, Edward F.; Lawton, Russell A.; Gavin, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    Unusual heat treatment heals voids in aluminum interconnections on integrated circuits (IC's). Treatment consists of heating IC to temperature between 200 degrees C and 400 degrees C, holding it at that temperature, and then plunging IC immediately into liquid nitrogen. Typical holding time at evaluated temperature is 30 minutes.

  13. Biomechanics and Wound Healing in the Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Dupps, William J.; Wilson, Steven E.

    2009-01-01

    The biomechanical and wound healing properties of the cornea undermine the predictability and stability of refractive surgery and contribute to discrepancies between attempted and achieved visual outcomes after LASIK, surface ablation and other keratorefractive procedures. Furthermore, patients predisposed to biomechanical failure or abnormal wound healing can experience serious complications such as keratectasia or clinically significant corneal haze, and more effective means for the identification of such patients prior to surgery are needed. In this review, we describe the cornea as a complex structural composite material with pronounced anisotropy and heterogeneity, summarize current understanding of major biomechanical and reparative pathways that contribute to the corneal response to laser vision correction, and review the role of these processes in ectasia, intraocular pressure measurement artifact, diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) and corneal haze. The current understanding of differences in the corneal response after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), LASIK and femtosecond-assisted LASIK are reviewed. Surgical and disease models that integrate corneal geometric data, substructural anatomy, elastic and viscoelastic material properties and wound healing behavior have the potential to improve clinical outcomes and minimize complications but depend on the identification of preoperative predictors of biomechanical and wound healing responses in individual patients. PMID:16720023

  14. Walking with Madhu: Healing Ped/agogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, T. Francene

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, the author responds to Madhu Prakash's piece on friendship gardens and healing our "Mother" through Prakash's central question, "How to birth a world in which many worlds flourish and complement each other in their wild, divine diversity; all equally enjoying Ahimsa flourishing and happiness?" Coming…

  15. Placenta Growth Factor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cianfarani, Francesca; Zambruno, Giovanna; Brogelli, Laura; Sera, Francesco; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Failla, Cristina Maria; Napolitano, Monica; Odorisio, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Reduced microcirculation and diminished expression of growth factors contribute to wound healing impairment in diabetes. Placenta growth factor (PlGF), an angiogenic mediator promoting pathophysiological neovascularization, is expressed during cutaneous wound healing and improves wound closure by enhancing angiogenesis. By using streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, we here demonstrate that PlGF induction is strongly reduced in diabetic wounds. Diabetic transgenic mice overexpressing PlGF in the skin displayed accelerated wound closure compared with diabetic wild-type littermates. Moreover, diabetic wound treatment with an adenovirus vector expressing the human PlGF gene (AdCMV.PlGF) significantly accelerated the healing process compared with wounds treated with a control vector. The analysis of treated wounds showed that PlGF gene transfer improved granulation tissue formation, maturation, and vascularization, as well as monocytes/macrophages local recruitment. Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels were increased in AdCMV.PlGF-treated wounds, possibly enhancing PlGF-mediated effects. Finally, PlGF treatment stimulated cultured dermal fibroblast migration, pointing to a direct role of PlGF in accelerating granulation tissue maturation. In conclusion, our data indicate that reduced PlGF expression contributes to impaired wound healing in diabetes and that PlGF gene transfer to diabetic wounds exerts therapeutic activity by promoting different aspects of the repair process. PMID:17003476

  16. The Ntu Approach to Health and Healing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory W. Henry; Harper, Kevin W.

    2001-01-01

    Ntu is a pluralistic approach to psychotherapy. Framed in an Afrocentric understanding of the world, Ntu is a multifaceted, continually evolving way of conceptualizing human behavior that treats families using ancient Eastern principles of healing, New Age conceptualizations of the mind-body relationship, an Afrocentric world view, and…

  17. Functionalized silk biomaterials for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gil, Eun Seok; Panilaitis, Bruce; Bellas, Evangelia; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Silk protein-biomaterial wound dressings with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and silver sulfadiazine were studied with a cutaneous excisional mouse wound model. Three different material designs and two different drug incorporation techniques were studied to compare wound healing responses. Material formats included silk films, lamellar porous silk films and electrospun silk nanofibers, each studied with the silk matrix alone and with drug loading or drug coatings on the silk matrices. Changes in wound size and histological assessments of wound tissues showed that the functionalized silk biomaterial wound dressings increased wound healing rate, including reepithelialization, dermis proliferation, collagen synthesis and reduced scar formation, when compared to air-permeable Tegaderm tape (3M) (- control) and a commercial wound dressing, Tegaderm Hydrocolloid dressing (3M) (+ control). All silk biomaterials were effective for wound healing, while the lamellar porous films and electrospun nanofibers and the incorporation of EGF/silver sulfadiazine, via drug loading or coating, provided the most rapid wound healing responses. This systematic approach to evaluating functionalized silk biomaterial wound dressings demonstrates a useful strategy to select formulations for further study towards new treatment options for chronic wounds. PMID:23184644

  18. Inhibition of Midkine Augments Osteoporotic Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Haffner-Luntzer, Melanie; Kemmler, Julia; Heidler, Verena; Prystaz, Katja; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael; Kovtun, Anna; Rapp, Anna E.; Ignatius, Anita; Liedert, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    The heparin-binding growth and differentiation factor midkine (Mdk) is proposed to negatively regulate osteoblast activity and bone formation in the adult skeleton. As Mdk-deficient mice were protected from ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss, this factor may also play a role in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis. We have previously demonstrated that Mdk negatively influences bone regeneration during fracture healing. Here, we investigated whether the inhibition of Mdk using an Mdk-antibody (Mdk-Ab) improves compromised bone healing in osteoporotic OVX-mice. Using a standardized femur osteotomy model, we demonstrated that Mdk serum levels were significantly enhanced after fracture in both non-OVX and OVX-mice, however, the increase was considerably greater in osteoporotic mice. Systemic treatment with the Mdk-Ab significantly improved bone healing in osteoporotic mice by increasing bone formation in the fracture callus. On the molecular level, we demonstrated that the OVX-induced reduction of the osteoanabolic beta-catenin signaling in the bony callus was abolished by Mdk-Ab treatment. Furthermore, the injection of the Mdk-Ab increased trabecular bone mass in the skeleton of the osteoporotic mice. These results implicate that antagonizing Mdk may be useful for the therapy of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture-healing complications. PMID:27410432

  19. Immunohistological study of lesions induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Gemmell, E; Bird, P S; Bowman, J J; Xu, L; Polak, B; Walsh, L J; Seymour, G J

    1997-10-01

    A previous study used a mouse model to demonstrate protection after challenge with Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277. In the present study, this same model was used to determine the phenotype of cells recruited into the lesions during the course of the protective immune response after immunization with this periodontal pathogen. BALB/c mice were immunized with 100 micrograms of P. gingivalis outer membrane antigens per mouse weekly for 3 weeks followed by challenge with live organisms 3 weeks after the final immunization. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections showed inflammatory infiltrates in all lesions from control (immunized with adjuvant only) and immunized mice. The lesions developed central necrotic cores surrounded by neutrophils, phagocytic macrophages and lymphocytes. Neutrophils were the predominant cells in the lesions 1 day after challenge with significantly more in immunized than control mice. Acid phosphatase and nonspecific esterase-positive macrophages were detected at day 4 and became the predominant cells in the healing lesions. CD4- and CD8-positive T-cells were present from day 1, and while numbers increased over time, there were no significant differences in control or immunized mice. When mice were depleted of CD4 or CD8 cells prior to immunization with P. gingivalis, fewer neutrophils were found in the lesions 1 day after challenge compared with undepleted immunized mice. Acid phosphatase and nonspecific esterase-positive macrophages were not affected by T-cell depletion. The results suggest that the P. gingivalis-induced lesion in immunized BALB/c mice is consistent with a strong innate immune response involving the recruitment of neutrophils in the first instance which may be under the control of T cells. This is followed by the infiltration of phagocytic macrophages which are involved in the healing process and do not appear to be regulated by T cells. PMID:9467382

  20. Simple Bone Cyst of Metacarpal: Rare Lesion with Unique Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Sandeep; Shah, Kunal; Shyam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Simple bone cyst or unicameral bone cyst (UBC) are benign cystic lesions commonly found in femur and humerus. However hand is a very rare site of occurrence. Treatment described for UBC of hand commonly involves curettage and bone grafting. Case Report: A 7 year old right hand dominant girl presented to us with chief complaints of pain and swelling in right 4th metacarpal since 2 month. On imaging, plain radiographs of right hand showed expansile lytic lesion on Metaphyseal-diaphyseal region of 4th metacarpal with pathological fracture. MRI showed cystic lesions with internal loculations and fluid-fluid levels (Fig 2). There was minimal soft tissue extension. We performed aspiration which showed serosanguinous fluid with haemorrhagic tinge. With the diagnosis of unicameral bone cyst in mind we performed and closed intramedullary nail with k wire. The cyst healed up completely within 2 months. There was no recurrence at 18 month follow up. Conclusion: In conclusion simple bone cyst is very rare in metacarpal bone. However it should be considered as important differential since it warrants simple treatment and extensive procedures should be avoided. PMID:27298987

  1. Low regeneration of lesions produced by coring in Orbicella faveolata

    PubMed Central

    Jordán-Garza, Adán Guillermo; Jordán-Dahlgren, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The extraction of tissue-skeleton cores from coral colonies is a common procedure to study diverse aspects of their biology, water quality or to obtain environmental proxies. Coral species preferred for such studies in Caribbean reefs belong to the genera Orbicella. The long term effects of coring in the coral colony are seldom evaluated and in many Caribbean countries this practice is not regulated. We monitored 50 lesions produced on Orbicella faveolata colonies by the extraction of two centimeter-diameter cores to determine if they were able to heal after a four year period. At the end of the study 4% of the lesions underwent full regeneration, 52% underwent partial regeneration, 14% suffered additional tissue loss but remained surrounded by live tissue, and 30% merged with dead areas of the colonies. Given the low capacity of Orbicella faveolata to regenerate tissue-skeleton lesions, studies that use coring should be regulated and mitigation actions, such as using less destructive techniques and remediation measures after extraction, should be conducted to facilitate tissue regeneration. PMID:27004146

  2. In vivo confocal imaging of epidermal cell migration and dermal changes post nonablative fractional resurfacing: study of the wound healing process with corroborated histopathologic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpp, Oliver F.; Bedi, Vikramaditya P.; Wyatt, Danica; Lac, Diana; Rahman, Zakia; Chan, Kin F.

    2009-03-01

    In vivo wound healing response post nonablative fractional laser treatment is evaluated. Seven healthy subjects receive treatments with a Fraxel re:store™ laser system on the forearm with pulse energies ranging from 10 to 70 mJ. The treatment sites are imaged at 1-h increments up to 40 h using confocal microscope z-stacks using 10-μm-depth spacing. At least five individual microscopic treatment zones are imaged per subject, time point, and treatment energy. Images are analyzed for tissue structure and morphology to classify each lesion as healed or not healed, depending on epidermal re-epithelialization at each time point and treatment energy. Probit analysis is used to statistically determine the ED50 and ED84 probabilities for a positive dose response (healed lesion) as a function of treatment energy. Confocal observations reveal epidermal keratinocyte migration patterns confirmed with histological analysis using hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) staining at 10 mJ at 0, 7, 16, and 24-h post-treatment. Results indicate that more time is required to conclude re-epithelialization with larger lesion sizes (all less than 500 μm) corresponding to higher treatment energies. For the entire pulse energy range tested, epidermal re-epithelialization concludes between 10 to 22-h post-treatment for ED50 and 13 to 28 h for ED84.

  3. Is frictional healing slip-dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.; Rubin, A. M.; Ryan, K. L.; Riviere, J. V.; Marone, C.

    2015-12-01

    Frictional re-strengthening of bare rock surfaces at very low stresses and near zero slip rate, as observed in the laboratory, is traditionally interpreted as showing support for purely time-dependent healing as embodied in the Aging law. However, while slide-hold-slide experiments on bare surfaces do show an apparent (purely) time-dependent increase in the static friction upon reslide, we show that the stress minima attained during the preceding holds show a strong slip-dependence which contradict the Aging law. A velocity strengthening Slip law explains such data much better. We also show that, large velocity step decreases, which drive the system far below steady state just like long holds, clearly support the slip-dependent response of the Slip law over the time-dependent healing contained in the Aging law. But, while time-dependent healing has an intuitive physical picture in terms of growth of the 'real contact area' with time, it is more difficult to ascribe one to slip-dependent healing. Here, we explore the possibility that the slip-dependence arises out of an interplay between contact `quality' and `quantity' at the scale of the asperity contacts. First, to further study the slip-dependence of healing, we carry out large velocity step decreases and sequences of long slide-hold-slides on both bare rock and gouge. Secondly, to probe the micro-mechanical origins of healing, we complement our mechanical data with amplitudes and travel time data of ultrasonic P- and S- waves transmitted across the sliding interface. While ultrasonic P-wave transmissivity has been used as a proxy for 'real contact area' in friction experiments by Nagata et al. (2012, 2014) before, the simultaneous use of P- and S-phases in our experiments is designed specifically to probe contact rheology. Initial results show strong correlations between changes in friction, transmitted wave amplitudes and travel times in response to changes in slip rate. We also observe important differences

  4. Cold temperature delays wound healing in postharvest sugarbeet roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storage temperature affects the rate and extent of wound-healing in a number of root and tuber crops. The effect of storage temperature on wound-healing in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots, however, is largely unknown. Wound-healing of sugarbeet roots was investigated using surface-abraded roots s...

  5. An Assessment of Self-Healing Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Several reviews and books have been written concerning self-healing polymers over the last few years. These have focused primarily on the types of self-healing materials being studied, with minor emphasis given to composite properties. The purpose of this review is to assess the self-healing ability of these materials when utilized in fiber reinforced composites

  6. Creating optimal healing environments in a health care setting.

    PubMed

    Zborowsky, Terri; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2008-03-01

    As evidence about the benefits of healing environments accumulates, health care organizations are starting to incorporate features into hospital design that reduce stress and promote healing. This article discusses some of the research supporting healing design and provides examples of how it is being used in new construction and renovations. PMID:18438085

  7. Bodyfaith and the Mind's Heart: Educational Healing for Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Sally Naylor

    1997-01-01

    Maintains that reimagining God through metaphors that counter patriarchy can become a liberating and transformational pathway for a healing community. Proposes two metaphorical constructions, "bodyfaith" and "the mind's heart," to act as tools to imagine a healing agenda within education. Considers the role of educational healing within a…

  8. Treatment of Large Periapical Cyst Like Lesion: A Noninvasive Approach: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Neha; Gothi, Rajat; Sood, Niti

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Periapical lesions develop as sequelae to pulp disease. Periapical radiolucent areas are generally diagnosed either during routine dental radiographic examination or following acute toothache. Various methods can be used in the nonsurgical management of periapical lesions: the conservative root canal treatment, decompression technique, active nonsurgical decompression technique, aspiration-irrigation technique, method using calcium hydroxide, lesion sterilization and repair therapy and the apexum procedure. Monitoring the healing of periapical lesions is essential through periodic follow-up examinations. The ultimate goal of endodontic therapy should be to return the involved teeth to a state of health and function without surgical intervention. All inflammatory periapical lesions should be initially treated with conservative nonsurgical procedures. Surgical intervention is recommended only after nonsurgical techniques have failed. Besides, surgery has many drawbacks, which limit its use in the management of periapical lesions. How to cite this article: Sood N, Maheshwari N, Gothi R, Sood N. Treatment of Large Periapical Cyst Like Lesion: A Noninvasive Approach: A Report of Two Cases. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):133-137. PMID:26379382

  9. Treatment of Large Periapical Cyst Like Lesion: A Noninvasive Approach: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Sood, Nikhil; Maheshwari, Neha; Gothi, Rajat; Sood, Niti

    2015-01-01

    Periapical lesions develop as sequelae to pulp disease. Periapical radiolucent areas are generally diagnosed either during routine dental radiographic examination or following acute toothache. Various methods can be used in the nonsurgical management of periapical lesions: the conservative root canal treatment, decompression technique, active nonsurgical decompression technique, aspiration-irrigation technique, method using calcium hydroxide, lesion sterilization and repair therapy and the apexum procedure. Monitoring the healing of periapical lesions is essential through periodic follow-up examinations. The ultimate goal of endodontic therapy should be to return the involved teeth to a state of health and function without surgical intervention. All inflammatory periapical lesions should be initially treated with conservative nonsurgical procedures. Surgical intervention is recommended only after nonsurgical techniques have failed. Besides, surgery has many drawbacks, which limit its use in the management of periapical lesions. How to cite this article: Sood N, Maheshwari N, Gothi R, Sood N. Treatment of Large Periapical Cyst Like Lesion: A Noninvasive Approach: A Report of Two Cases. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):133-137. PMID:26379382

  10. Assessment of the effect of phenytoin on cutaneous healing from excision of melanocytic nevi on the face and on the back

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Topical phenytoin is a powerful skin wounds healing and it may be useful in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical phenytoin 0.5%, by comparing it with cream (control) in wounds resulting from excision of two melanocytic nevi in the same patient. Our purpose was also to assess if phenytoin had better therapeutic and cosmetic outcomes when compared with cream (control). Methods This study evaluated 100 patients with skin wounds from excision of melanocytic nevi. 50 patients with lesions on the face and 50 patients with lesions on the back, totalizing 200 lesions excised with modified punch. The resulting superficial skin wounds had the same diameter and depth, and second intention healing followed. Patients were followed for 60 days. Student's t-test, Mann Whitney nonparametric test, analysis of variance, LSD test, Shapiro-Wilks test and Fisher test were used to analyze the results, depending on the nature of the variables being studied. Results Phenytoin showed better therapeutic and cosmetic results, by healing faster, with more intense epithelization in wounds in comparison with cream (control). Phenytoin showed a statistically significant difference regarding the following parameters (p < 0.05): wounded area and healing time. Phenytoin application resulted in a smaller area and a shorter healing time. Also the intensity of exudates, bleeding, and the epithelization were more intense in phenytoin-treated wounds. Regarding the shape and thickness of the scar, injuries treated with phenytoin had round and flat shaped scars in most of the cases. Considering patient's gender and phototype, female patients presented smaller wounds and scar areas; and phototype I had the largest scar areas. Contact eczema was an adverse reaction in 7 injuries located on the back caused by cream (control) and hypoallergenic tape. Conclusions Phenytoin showed better therapeutic and cosmetic results compared with cream (control

  11. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-01-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5. PMID:24324319

  12. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  13. The Presence of Oxygen in Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Howard M; Grant, Anthony; Ditata, James

    2016-08-01

    Oxygen must be tightly governed in all phases of wound healing to produce viable granulation tissue. This idea of tight regulation has yet to be disputed; however, the role of oxygen at the cellular and molecular levels still is not fully understood as it pertains to its place in healing wounds. In an attempt to better understand the dynamics of oxygen on living tissue and its potential role as a therapy in wound healing, a substantial literature review of the role of oxygen in wound healing was performed and the following key points were extrapolated: 1) During energy metabolism, oxygen is needed for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase as it produces high-energy phosphates that are needed for many cellular functions, 2) oxygen is also involved in the hydroxylation of proline and lysine into procollagen, which leads to collagen maturation, 3) in angiogenesis, hypoxia is required to start the process of wound healing, but it has been shown that if oxygen is administered it can accelerate and sustain vessel growth, 4) the antimicrobial action of oxygen occurs when nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-linked oxygenase acts as a catalyst for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a superoxide ion which kills bacteria, and 5) the level of evidence is moderate for the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for diabetic foot ulcers, crush injuries, and soft-tissue infections. The authors hypothesized that HBOT would be beneficial to arterial insufficiency wounds and other ailments, but at this time further study is needed before HBOT would be indicated. PMID:27560469

  14. Enhancing resilience of interdependent networks by healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stippinger, Marcell; Kertész, János

    2014-12-01

    Interdependent networks are characterized by two kinds of interactions: The usual connectivity links within each network and the dependency links coupling nodes of different networks. Due to the latter links such networks are known to suffer from cascading failures and catastrophic breakdowns. When modeling these phenomena, usually one assumes that a fraction of nodes gets damaged in one of the networks, which is followed possibly by a cascade of failures. In real life the initiating failures do not occur at once and effort is made to replace the ties eliminated due to the failing nodes. Here we study a dynamic extension of the model of interdependent networks and introduce the possibility of link formation with a probability w, called healing, to bridge non-functioning nodes and enhance network resilience. A single random node is removed, which may initiate an avalanche. After each removal step healing starts resulting in a new topology. Then a new node fails and the process continues until the giant component disappears either in a catastrophic breakdown or in a smooth transition. Simulation results are presented for square lattices as starting networks under random attacks of constant intensity. We find that the shift in the position of the breakdown has a power-law scaling as a function of the healing probability with an exponent close to 1. Below a critical healing probability, catastrophic cascades form and the average degree of surviving nodes decreases monotonically, while above this value there are no macroscopic cascades and the average degree has first an increasing character and decreases only at the very late stage of the process. These findings facilitate to plan intervention in case of crisis situation by describing the efficiency of healing efforts needed to suppress cascading failures.

  15. Primed Mesenchymal Stem Cells Alter Healing and Improve Rat Medial Collateral Ligament Healing

    PubMed Central

    Saether, Erin E.; Chamberlain, Connie S.; Aktas, Erdem; Leiferman, Ellen M.; Brickson, Stacey L.; Vanderby, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can improve tissue healing. It is possible, however, that priming MSCs prior to implantation can further enhance their therapeutic benefit. This study was then performed to test whether priming MSCs to be more anti-inflammatory would enhance healing in a rat ligament model, i.e. a medial collateral ligament (MCL). MSCs were primed for 48 hours using polyinosinic acid and polycytidylic acid (Poly (I:C)) at a concentration of 1µg/ml. Rat MCLs were surgically transected and administered 1×106 cells in a carrier solution at the time of injury. A series of healing metrics were analyzed at days 4 and 14 post-injury in the ligaments that received primed MSCs, unprimed MSCs, or no cells (controls). Applying primed MSCs beneficially altered healing by affecting endothelialization, type 2 macrophage presence, apoptosis, procollagen 1α, and IL-1Ra levels. When analyzing MSC localization, both primed and unprimed MSCs co-localized with endothelial cells and pericytes suggesting a supportive role in angiogenesis. Priming MSCs prior to implantation altered key ligament healing events, resulted in a more anti-inflammatory environment, and improved healing. PMID:26530282

  16. Effects of mouse genotype on bone wound healing and irradiation-induced delay of healing.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Julie; Mizuno, Shuichi; Kung, Jason; Goff, Julie; Epperly, Michael; Dixon, Tracy; Wang, Hong; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    We tested the effects of mouse genotype (C57BL/6NHsd, NOD/SCID, SAMR1, and SAMP6) and ionizing irradiation on bone wound healing. Unicortical wounds were made in the proximal tibiae, and the time course of spontaneous healing and effects of irradiation were monitored radiographically and histologically. There was reproducible healing beginning with intramedullary osteogenesis, subsequent bone resorption by osteoclasts, gradual bridging of the cortical wound, and re-population of medullary hematopoietic cells. The most rapid wound closure was noted in SAMR1 mice, followed by SAMP6, C57BL/6NHsd, and NOD/SCID. Ionizing irradiation (20 Gy) to the leg significantly delayed bone wound healing in mice of all four genotypes. Mice with genetically-determined predisposition to early osteopenia (SAMP6) or with immune deficiency (NOD/SCID) had impairments in bone wound healing. These mouse models should be valuable for determining the effects of irradiation on bone healing and also for the design and testing of novel bone growth-enhancing drugs and mitigators of ionizing irradiation. PMID:24632972

  17. A continuum thermo-inelastic model for damage and healing in self-healing glass materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2014-07-08

    Self-healing glass, a recent advancement in the class of smart sealing materials, has attracted great attention from both research and industrial communities because of its unique capability of repairing itself at elevated temperatures. However, further development and optimization of this material rely on a more fundamental and thorough understanding of its essential thermo-mechanical response characteristics, which is also pivotal in predicting the coupling and interactions between the nonlinear stress and temperature dependent damage and healing behaviors. In the current study, a continuum three-dimensional thermo-inelastic damage-healing constitutive framework has been developed for the compliant self-healing glass material. The important feature of the present model is that various phenomena governing the mechanical degradation and recovery process, i.e. the nucleation, growth, and healing of the cracks and pores, are described with distinct mechanism-driven kinetics, where the healing constitutive relations are propagated from lower-length scale simulations. The proposed formulations are implemented into finite element analyses and the effects of various loading conditions and material properties on the material’s mechanical resistance are investigated.

  18. Desmoglein 3-Dependent Signaling Regulates Keratinocyte Migration and Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Rötzer, Vera; Hartlieb, Eva; Winkler, Julia; Walter, Elias; Schlipp, Angela; Sardy, Miklós; Spindler, Volker; Waschke, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The desmosomal transmembrane adhesion molecules desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) and desmocollin 3 (Dsc3) are required for strong keratinocyte cohesion. Recently, we have shown that Dsg3 associates with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and suppresses its activity. Here, we further investigated the role of Dsg3-dependent control of p38MAPK function. Dsg3-deficient mice display recurrent spontaneously healing skin erosions. In lesional and perilesional biopsies, p38MAPK activation was detectable compared with control animals. This led us to speculate that Dsg3 regulates wound repair in a p38MAPK-dependent manner. Indeed, scratch-wounded keratinocyte monolayers exhibited p38MAPK activation and loss of Dsg3 in cells lining the wound edge. Human keratinocytes after silencing of Dsg3 as well as primary cells isolated from Dsg3 knockout animals exhibited accelerated migration, which was further corroborated in an ex vivo skin outgrowth assay. Importantly, migration was efficiently blocked by inhibition of p38MAPK, indicating that p38MAPK mediates the effects observed upon loss of Dsg3. In line with this, we show that levels of active p38MAPK associated with Dsc3 are increased in Dsg3-deficient cells. These data indicate that Dsg3 controls a switch from an adhesive to a migratory keratinocyte phenotype via p38MAPK inhibition. Thus, loss of Dsg3 adhesion may foster wound closure by allowing p38MAPK-dependent migration. PMID:26763450

  19. Effect of helium-neon and infrared laser irradiation on wound healing in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, B.; McCarthy, R.J.; Ivankovich, A.D.; Forde, D.E.; Overfield, M.; Bapna, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the biostimulating effects of helium-neon laser radiation (HeNe; 632.8 nm), pulsed infrared laser radiation (IR; 904 nm), and the two combined on skin wound healing in New Zealand white rabbits. Seventy-two rabbits received either (1) no exposure, (2) 1.65 J/cm2 HeNe, (3) 8.25 J/cm2 pulsed IR, or (4) both HeNe and IR together to one of two dorsal full-thickness skin wounds, daily, for 21 days. Wound areas were measured photographically at periodic intervals. Tissue samples were analyzed for tensile strength, and histology was done to measure epidermal thickness and cross-sectional collagen area. Significant differences were found in the tensile strength of all laser-treated groups (both the irradiated and nonirradiated lesion) compared to group 1. No differences were found in the rate of wound healing or collagen area. Epidermal growth was greater in the HeNe-lased area compared to unexposed tissue, but the difference was not significant. Thus, laser irradiation at 632.8 nm and 904 nm alone or in combination increased tensile strength during wound healing and may have released tissue factors into the systemic circulation that increased tensile strength on the opposite side as well.

  20. Avocado/soybean unsaponifiables: a novel regulator of cutaneous wound healing, modelling and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Mohammadalipour, Adel; Moshiri, Ali; Tabandeh, Mohammad R

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the effects of avocado/soybean unsaponifiables (ASU) on the healing response of cutaneous wound defect in rats. Sixty male rats were randomly divided into three groups including control, vehicle and treatment (n = 20 in each group). A 2 × 2 cm(2) wound defect was made on the dorsum. The control, vehicle and treatment groups were treated daily with topical application of saline, cream and cream/ASU for 10 days, respectively. The wounds were monitored daily. The animals were euthanised at 10, 20 and 30 days post injury (D). The dry matter, hydroxyproline, collagen, n-acetyl glucosamine (NAGLA) and n-acetyl galactosamine (NAGAA) contents of the skin samples were measured and the histopathological and biomechanical characteristics of the samples were investigated. Statistics of P < 0·05 was considered significant. Treatment significantly increased tissue glycosaminoglycans and collagen contents at various stages of wound healing compared to controls. Treatment modulated inflammation, improved fibroplasia and produced high amounts of scar tissue at short term. At long term, treatment reduced the scar tissue size and increased the quality and rate of wound contraction and reepithelisation compared to controls. The treated lesions were more cosmetically pleasing and had significantly higher biomechanical characteristics than controls. ASU was effective in rat wound healing. PMID:24321012

  1. Hydroxyapatite crystals as a bone graft substitute in benign lytic lesions of bone

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Praganesh; Keshav, Kumar; Singh, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bone grafts are required to fill a cavity created after curettage of benign lytic lesions of the bone. To avoid the problems associated at donor site with autologous bone graft, we require allograft or bone graft substitutes. We evaluated the healing of lytic lesions after hydroxyapatite (HA) grafting by serial radiographs. Materials and Methods: Forty cases of benign lytic lesions of bone were managed by simple curettage and grafting using HA blocks. Commercially available HA of bovine origin (Surgiwear Ltd., Shahjahanpur, India) was used for this purpose. Mean duration of followup was 34.8 months (range 12–84 months). Mean patient age was 19.05 years (range 3–55 years). Radiological staging of graft incorporation was done as per criteria of Irwin et al. 2001. Results: In our series, two cases were in stage I. A total of 11 cases were in stage II and 27 were in stage III. Graft incorporation was radiologically complete by 15 months. Clinical recovery was observed before radiological healing. The average time taken to return to preoperative function was 3 months. Recurrence was observed in giant cell tumor (n = 3) and chondromyxoid fibroma (n = 1). There was no incidence of graft rejection, collapse, growth plate disturbances or antigenic response. Conclusions: We conclude that calcium HA is biologically acceptable bone graft substitute in the management of benign lytic lesions of bone. PMID:26806973

  2. MRI of Focal Liver Lesions.

    PubMed

    Albiin, Nils

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, MRI has more advantages than ultrasound, computed tomography, CT, positron emission tomography, PET, or any other imaging modality in diagnosing focal hepatic masses. With a combination of basic T1 and T2 weighted sequences, diffusion weighted imaging, DWI, and hepatobiliary gadolinium contrast agents, that is gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) and gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB), most liver lesions can be adequately diagnosed. Benign lesions, as cyst, hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia, FNH or adenoma, can be distinguished from malignant lesions. In a non-cirrhotic liver, the most common malignant lesions are metastases which may be hypovascular or hypervascular. In the cirrhotic liver hepatocellular carcinoma, HCC, is of considerable importance. Besides, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and other less common malignancies has to be assessed. In this review, the techniques and typical MRI features are presented as well as the new algorithm issued by American Association for the Study of the Liver Diseases (AASLD). PMID:23049491

  3. Electrocautery for Precancerous Anal Lesions

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  4. Benign Pediatric Salivary Gland Lesions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Eric R; Ord, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Salivary gland lesions are rare in pediatric patients. In addition, the types of salivary gland tumors are different in their distribution in specific sites in the major and minor salivary glands in children compared with adults. This article reviews benign neoplastic and nonneoplastic salivary gland disorders in pediatric patients to help clinicians to develop an orderly differential diagnosis that will lead to expedient treatment of pediatric patients with salivary gland lesions. PMID:26614702

  5. Acute Inflammation Loci Are Involved in Wound Healing in the Mouse Ear Punch Model

    PubMed Central

    Canhamero, Tatiane; Garcia, Ludmila Valino; De Franco, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Molecular biology techniques are being used to aid in determining the mechanisms responsible for tissue repair without scar formation. Wound healing is genetically determined, but there have been few studies that examine the genes responsible for tissue regeneration in mammals. Research using genetic mapping is extremely important for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the different phases of tissue regeneration. This process is complex, but an early inflammatory phase appears to influence lesion closure, and the present study demonstrates that acute inflammation loci influence tissue regeneration in mice in a positive manner. Recent Advances: Mapping studies of quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been undertaken in recent years to examine candidate genes that participate in the regeneration phenotype. Our laboratory has identified inflammation modifier QTL for wound healing. Mouse lines selected for the maximum (AIRmax) or minimum (AIRmin) acute inflammatory reactivity (AIR) have been used to study not only the tissue repair but also the impact of the genetic control of inflammation on susceptibility to autoimmune, neoplasic, and infectious diseases. Murphy Roths Large and AIRmax mice are exclusive in their complete epimorphic regeneration, although middle-aged inbred mice may also be capable of healing. Critical Issues: Inflammatory reactions have traditionally been described in the literature as negative factors in the process of skin injury closure. Inflammation is exacerbated due to the early release of mediators or the intense release of factors that cause cell proliferation after injury. The initial release of these factors as well as the clean-up of the lesion microenvironment are both crucial for following events. In addition, the activation and repression of some genes related to the regeneration phenotype may modulate lesion closure, demonstrating the significance of genetic studies to better understand the mechanisms

  6. Pineal lesions: a multidisciplinary challenge.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Manfred; Emami, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    The pineal region is a complex anatomical compartment, harbouring the pineal gland surrounded by the quadrigeminal plate and the confluents of the internal cerebral veins to form the vein of Galen. The complexity of lesions in that region, however, goes far beyond the pineal parenchyma proper. Originating in the pineal gland, there are not only benign cysts but also numerous different tumour types. In addition, lesions such as tectal gliomas, tentorial meningiomas and choroid plexus papillomas arise from the surrounding structures, occupying that regions. Furthermore, the area has an affinity for metastatic lesions. Vascular lesions complete the spectrum mainly as small tectal arteriovenous malformations or cavernous haemangiomas.Taken together, there is a wide spectrum of lesions, many unique to that region, which call for a multidisciplinary approach. The limited access and anatomical complexity have generated a spectrum of anatomical approaches and raised the interest for neuroendoscopic approaches. Equally complex is the spectrum of treatment modalities such as microsurgery as the main option but stereotactic radiosurgery as an alternative or adjuvant to surgery for selected cases, radiation as for germinoma (see below) and or combinatorial chemotherapy, which may need to precede any other ablative technique as constituents.In this context, we review the current literature and our own series to obtain a snapshot sentiment of how to approach pineal lesions, how to interrelate alternative/competing concepts and review the recent technological advances. PMID:25411146

  7. Hearing disorders in brainstem lesions.

    PubMed

    Celesia, Gastone G

    2015-01-01

    Auditory processing can be disrupted by brainstem lesions. It is estimated that approximately 57% of brainstem lesions are associated with auditory disorders. However diseases of the brainstem usually involve many structures, producing a plethora of other neurologic deficits, often relegating "auditory symptoms in the background." Lesions below or within the cochlear nuclei result in ipsilateral auditory-processing abnormalities detected in routine testing; disorders rostral to the cochlear nuclei may result in bilateral abnormalities or may be silent. Lesions in the superior olivary complex and trapezoid body show a mixture of ipsilateral, contralateral, and bilateral abnormalities, whereas lesions of the lateral lemniscus, inferior colliculus, and medial geniculate body do not affect peripheral auditory processing and result in predominantly subtle contralateral abnormalities that may be missed by routine auditory testing. In these cases psychophysical methods developed for the evaluation of central auditory function should be employed (e.g., dichotic listening, interaural time perception, sound localization). The extensive connections of the auditory brainstem nuclei not only are responsible for binaural interaction but also assure redundancy in the system. This redundancy may explain why small brainstem lesions are sometimes clinically silent. Any disorder of the brainstem (e.g., neoplasms, vascular disorders, infections, trauma, demyelinating disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, malformations) that involves the auditory pathways and/or centers may produce hearing abnormalities. PMID:25726288

  8. Unusual lesions of the mediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Shamsuddin, Fatima; Khadilkar, Urmila N; Saha, Debarshi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To study unusual lesions in the mediastinum, which do not originate from the thymus, lymph nodes, neural tissues or germ cells, and tissues that normally engender pathologic lesions in the mediastinum. Materials and Methods: Of the 65 cases seen, 12 unusual lesion were encountered in a 5½ year period from 2006 to 2011. Results: Two cases of nodular colloid goiter and one each of the mediastinal cyst, undifferentiated carcinoma, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) affected the anterosuperior mediastinum. In the middle mediastinum, one case each of the mesothelioma, malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), solitary fibrous tumor (SFT), and pleomorphic sarcoma (PS) was seen. One case of meningeal melanocytoma (Mme) and primary pleural liposarcoma (PL) involved the posterior mediastinum. Persistent disease was seen in LCH after 2 years. Of all the cases with malignant lesions, only the patient with SCC was alive after 1 year. Conclusion: The cases of primary and SCC, LCH, melanocytoma, liposarcoma and PS, and GIST are unexpected and very rarely have paradigms in the mediastinum. Radiologic impression and knowledge of the compartment where these lesions arose from hardly assisted in arriving at a definitive opinion as the lesions were not typical of this location. A high index of suspicion and the immunohistochemical profile facilitated the final diagnosis. PMID:26664161

  9. Simulation of spiculated breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Alrehily, Faisal; Pinto, R. Ferrari; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wells, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials are a promising new approach increasingly used for the evaluation and comparison of breast imaging modalities. A key component in such an assessment paradigm is the use of simulated pathology, in particular, simulation of lesions. Breast mass lesions can be generally classified into two categories based on their appearance; nonspiculated masses and spiculated masses. In our previous work, we have successfully simulated non-spiculated masses using a fractal growth process known as diffusion limited aggregation. In this new work, we have extended the DLA model to simulate spiculated lesions by using features extracted from patient DBT images containing spiculated lesions. The features extracted included spicule length, width, curvature and distribution. This information was used to simulate realistic looking spicules which were attached to the surface of a DLA mass to produce a spiculated mass. A batch of simulated spiculated masses was inserted into normal patient images and presented to an experienced radiologist for review. The study yielded promising results with the radiologist rating 60% of simulated lesions in 2D and 50% of simulated lesions in DBT as realistic.

  10. DNA lesions: A thermodynamic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, G.E.; Breslauer, K.J.

    1994-12-31

    The studies described in this paper are part of an overall program project entitled {open_quotes}The Chemistry and Biology of Exocyclic DNA Adducts and Oxidative DNA Damage.{close_quotes}. Initially, all the project leaders discuss and agree on biologically interesting lesions to target for study. Then begins the process of developing the chemistry required to synthesize modified nucleosides that either correspond to or model the damage sites of interest. Such modified nucleotides then are incorporated into oligonucleotides that are hybridized to their complements, thereby forming lesion-containing duplex structures. In any given duplex, the identity of the lesion-opposing nucleoside on the complementary strand is systematically altered, thereby allowing us to evaluate the impact on duplex properties of the identity of the base opposite the lesion. For comparative purposes, the undamaged parent Watson-Crick duplex also is synthesized. Such families of DNA duplexes are then sent for independent physiochemical characterizations. Armed with an extensive body of biophysical data, one then searches for correlations between the physiochemical influences of the lesions on duplex properties and the biological consequences of each lesion. At this stage, our approach is highly empirical. Ultimately, we hope that our studies will reveal correlations between physiochemical properties and biological consequences such that we will develop predictive powers and gain insight into the mechanisms of recognition, repair, and mutagenesis.

  11. A comprehensive review of advanced biopolymeric wound healing systems.

    PubMed

    Mayet, Naeema; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Lomas K; Tyagi, Charu; Du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2014-08-01

    Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process that involves the mediation of many initiators effective during the healing process such as cytokines, macrophages and fibroblasts. In addition, the defence mechanism of the body undergoes a step-by-step but continuous process known as the wound healing cascade to ensure optimal healing. Thus, when designing a wound healing system or dressing, it is pivotal that key factors such as optimal gaseous exchange, a moist wound environment, prevention of microbial activity and absorption of exudates are considered. A variety of wound dressings are available, however, not all meet the specific requirements of an ideal wound healing system to consider every aspect within the wound healing cascade. Recent research has focussed on the development of smart polymeric materials. Combining biopolymers that are crucial for wound healing may provide opportunities to synthesise matrices that are inductive to cells and that stimulate and trigger target cell responses crucial to the wound healing process. This review therefore outlines the processes involved in skin regeneration, optimal management and care required for wound treatment. It also assimilates, explores and discusses wound healing drug-delivery systems and nanotechnologies utilised for enhanced wound healing applications. PMID:24985412

  12. Analysis of internal crack healing mechanism under rolling deformation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haitao; Ai, Zhengrong; Yu, Hailiang; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Xianghua

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental method, called the 'hole filling method', is proposed to simulate the healing of internal cracks in rolled workpieces. Based on the experimental results, the evolution in the microstructure, in terms of diffusion, nucleation and recrystallisation were used to analyze the crack healing mechanism. We also validated the phenomenon of segmented healing. Internal crack healing involves plastic deformation, heat transfer and an increase in the free energy introduced by the cracks. It is proposed that internal cracks heal better under high plastic deformation followed by slow cooling after rolling. Crack healing is controlled by diffusion of atoms from the matrix to the crack surface, and also by the nucleation and growth of ferrite grain on the crack surface. The diffusion mechanism is used to explain the source of material needed for crack healing. The recrystallisation mechanism is used to explain grain nucleation and growth, accompanied by atomic migration to the crack surface. PMID:25003518

  13. Analysis of Internal Crack Healing Mechanism under Rolling Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haitao; Ai, Zhengrong; Yu, Hailiang; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Xianghua

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental method, called the ‘hole filling method’, is proposed to simulate the healing of internal cracks in rolled workpieces. Based on the experimental results, the evolution in the microstructure, in terms of diffusion, nucleation and recrystallisation were used to analyze the crack healing mechanism. We also validated the phenomenon of segmented healing. Internal crack healing involves plastic deformation, heat transfer and an increase in the free energy introduced by the cracks. It is proposed that internal cracks heal better under high plastic deformation followed by slow cooling after rolling. Crack healing is controlled by diffusion of atoms from the matrix to the crack surface, and also by the nucleation and growth of ferrite grain on the crack surface. The diffusion mechanism is used to explain the source of material needed for crack healing. The recrystallisation mechanism is used to explain grain nucleation and growth, accompanied by atomic migration to the crack surface. PMID:25003518

  14. The Role of Neuromediators and Innervation in Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Mohammed; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2016-06-15

    The skin is densely innervated with an intricate network of cutaneous nerves, neuromediators and specific receptors which influence a variety of physiological and disease processes. There is emerging evidence that cutaneous innervation may play an important role in mediating wound healing. This review aims to comprehensively examine the evidence that signifies the role of innervation during the overlapping stages of cutaneous wound healing. Numerous neuropeptides that are secreted by the sensory and autonomic nerve fibres play an essential part during the distinct phases of wound healing. Delayed wound healing in diabetes and fetal cutaneous regeneration following wounding further highlights the pivotal role skin innervation and its associated neuromediators play in wound healing. Understanding the mechanisms via which cutaneous innervation modulates wound healing in both the adult and fetus will provide opportunities to develop therapeutic devices which could manipulate skin innervation to aid wound healing. PMID:26676806

  15. Closing microvascular lesions with fibrin sealant-attached muscle pads.

    PubMed

    Fehm, Nando Percy; Vatankhah, Bijan; Dittmar, Michael S; Tevetoglu, Yesim; Retzl, Gerald; Horn, Markus

    2005-01-01

    Fibrin sealants are used in a variety of surgical procedures, mainly for purposes of hemostasis and assisted wound healing. The combined use of fibrin sealant and autologous muscle pads for hemostasis was not reported previously. Arterial incisions in the common carotid artery in rats were closed by the combined application of fibrin sealant and an autologous muscle pad. Postsurgical vessel patency and degree of stenosis were evaluated by color duplex sonography, computed tomography angiography, and postmortem histology. The combined application of muscle pad and fibrin sealant and achievement of hemostasis was feasible in all animals. Seventy-eight percent of animals showed no or only slight postsurgical vessel stenosis. Our method is simple and quick to perform, showing a high potential for hemostasis in microvascular lesions. Therefore, it might be used in future experimental studies for conservation of vessel patency after arterial catheterization and in experimental or clinical vascular surgery. PMID:16184526

  16. Surgical management of premalignant lesions of the oral cavity with the CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A L; Frame, J W

    1996-01-01

    The management of patients with premalignant and malignant lesions of the oral cavity can present problems. The potentially invasive nature of premalignant lesions together with their large extent influences the treatment. The common modalities of treatment of these lesions are surgical excision, cryotherapy, electrosurgery and radiotherapy. Recently, CO2 laser surgery has become available. Less pain, little bleeding, minimal post-operative edema, reduced risk of infection, and low recurrence rates were advantages observed following CO2 laser surgery in the mouth when compared to other modalities of treatment. Healing following CO2 laser surgery progressed well with little postoperative scarring and re-epithelialization was complete after 4-6 weeks. The newly formed epithelium appeared normal and was soft on palpation. PMID:9206362

  17. Fractal analyses of osseous healing using Tuned Aperture Computed Tomography images

    PubMed Central

    Seyedain, Ali; Webber, Richard L.; Nair, Umadevi P.; Piesco, Nicholas P.; Agarwal, Sudha; Mooney, Mark P.; Gröndahl, Hans-Göran

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate osseous healing in mandibular defects using fractal analyses on conventional radiographs and tuned aperture computed tomography (TACT; OrthoTACT, Instrumentarium Imaging, Helsinki, Finland) images. Eighty test sites on the inferior margins of rabbit mandibles were subject to lesion induction and treated with one of the following: no treatment (controls); osteoblasts only; polymer matrix only; or osteoblast-polymer matrix (OPM) combination. Images were acquired using conventional radiography and TACT, including unprocessed TACT (TACT-U) and iteratively restored TACT (TACT-IR). Healing was followed up over time and images acquired at 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks post-surgery. Fractal dimension (FD) was computed within regions of interest in the defects using the TACT workbench. Results were analyzed for effects produced by imaging modality, treatment modality, time after surgery and lesion location. Histomorphometric data were available to assess ground truth. Significant differences (p < 0.0001) were noted based on imaging modality with TACT-IR recording the highest mean fractal dimension (MFD), followed by TACT-U and conventional images, in that order. Sites treated with OPM recorded the highest MFDs among all treatment modalities (p < 0.0001). The highest MFD based on time was recorded at 3 weeks and differed significantly with 12 weeks (p < 0.035). Correlation of FD with results of histomorphometric data was high (r = 0.79; p < 0.001). The FD computed on TACT-IR showed the highest correlation with histomorphometric data, thus establishing the fact TACT is a more efficient and accurate imaging modality for quantification of osseous changes within healing bony defects. PMID:11519567

  18. Can transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation improve achilles tendon healing in rats?

    PubMed Central

    Folha, Roberta A. C.; Pinfildi, Carlos E.; Liebano, Richard E.; Rampazo, Érika P.; Pereira, Raphael N.; Ferreira, Lydia M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tendon injury is one of the most frequent injuries in sports activities. TENS is a physical agent used in the treatment of pain but its influence on the tendon's healing process is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of TENS on the healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. METHOD: Sixty Wistar rats were submitted to a partial rupture of the Achilles tendon by direct trauma and randomized into six groups (TENS or Sham stimulation) and the time of evaluation (7, 14, and 21 days post-injury). Burst TENS was applied for 30 minutes, 6 days, 100 Hz frequency, 2 Hz burst frequency, 200 µs pulse duration, and 300 ms pulse train duration. Microscopic analyses were performed to quantify the blood vessels and mast cells, birefringence to quantify collagen fiber alignment, and immunohistochemistry to quantify types I and III collagen fibers. RESULTS: A significant interaction was observed for collagen type I (p=0.020) where the TENS group presented lower percentage in 14 days after the lesion (p=0.33). The main group effect showed that the TENS group presented worse collagen fiber alignment (p=0.001) and lower percentage of collagen III (p=0.001) and the main time effect (p=0.001) showed decreased percentage of collagen III at 7 days (p=0.001) and 14 days (p=0.001) after lesion when compared to 21 days. CONCLUSIONS: Burst TENS inhibited collagen I and III production and impaired its alignment during healing of partial rupture of the Achilles tendon in rats. PMID:26647744

  19. Histological patterns in healing chronic wounds using Cochliomyia macellaria (Diptera: Calliphoridae) larvae and other therapeutic measures.

    PubMed

    de Masiero, Franciéle Souza; Nassu, Mariana Prado; Soares, Mauro Pereira; Thyssen, Patricia Jacqueline

    2015-08-01

    The healing process occurs due to the interaction of cellular, molecular, and biochemical events. Regarding lesions difficult to heal, especially in immunocompromised patients, monitoring and intervention to promote healing is a constant focus of research. Another aggravating factor is the increase in the number of reported cases of microbial resistance, indicating that various dressings and drugs have been increasingly inefficient. Larval therapy (LT) involves the application of sterile fly larvae on chronic and/or infected wounds, and it is an area emerging as an alternative therapy. Before the 1940s, the LT was widely used, but fell into disuse after the appearance of antibiotics. High cost and the development of resistance by certain groups of pathogenic bacteria to these drugs encouraged the resurgence of LT, currently used in approximately 20 countries and more recently in Brazil. However, many mechanisms of action of the larvae in this system remain poorly understood. Thus, the aim of the study was to investigate histopathological findings and to evaluate possible mechanisms of action of dipteran larvae during tissue repair. Lesions were induced in 24 male Wistar rats, to evaluate the effect of the type of treatment applied. The animals were divided into four groups: larval therapy (LT), LT associated with foam dressing with silver release (LTSIL), mechanical debridement and silver foam dressing (DEBSIL), and no treatment (CONT). Skin samples were collected for histopathological analysis. In LT, inflammatory response and angiogenesis were abundant; in LTSIL, inflammatory response with neutrophil infiltration was observed; in DEBSIL, scarce inflammatory response, small numbers of macrophages and lymphocytes, and bacterial colonization in depth; and in CONT, there was bacterial colonization in deeper tissues. The observed histological events show that the larvae had an important role in promoting the inflammatory response in the wound bed, drawing the

  20. Polydimethylsiloxane-based self-healing composite and coating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Soo Hyoun

    This thesis describes the science and technology of a new class of autonomic polymeric materials which mimic some of the functionalities of biological materials. Specifically, we demonstrate an autonomic self-healing polymer system which can heal damage in both coatings and bulk materials. The new self-healing system we developed greatly extends the capability of self-healing polymers by introducing tin catalyzed polycondensation of hydroxyl end-functionalited polydimethylsiloxane and polydiethoxysiloxane based chemistries. The components in this system are widely available and comparatively low in cost, and the healing chemistry also remains stable in humid or wet environments. These achievements significantly increase the probability that self-healing could be extended not only to polymer composites but also to coatings and thin films in harsh environments. We demonstrate the bulk self-healing property of a polymer composite composed of a phase-separated PDMS healing agent and a microencapsulated organotin catalyst by chemical and mechanical testing. Another significant research focus is on self-healing polymer coatings which prevent corrosion of a metal substrate after deep scratch damage. The anti-corrosion properties of the self-healing polymer on metal substrates are investigated by corrosion resistance and electrochemical tests. Even after scratch damage into the substrate, the coating is able to heal, while control samples which do not include all the necessary healing components reveal rapid corrosion propagation. This self-healing coating solution can be easily applied to most substrate materials, and is compatible with most common polymer matrices. Self-healing has the potential to extend the lifetime and increase the reliability of thermosetting polymers used in a wide variety of applications ranging from microelectronics to aerospace.

  1. OCD Lesions Of The Patella And Trochlea In Children

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Dennis E.; Yen, Yi-Meng; Simoni, Michael; Miller, Patricia; Micheli, Lyle J.; Kocher, Mininder S.; Heyworth, Benton E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this report is to evaluate the functional outcomes of surgical management of OCD lesions of the patella and trochlea in children. Secondary aims include elucidating predictors for higher functional outcomes, determining complication rates, surgical satisfaction and ability to return to sports. Methods: Patients age ≤ 18 years who were surgically treated for OCD of the patellar or trochlea were identified. Charts were queried to record patient/lesion data, surgical procedure, results and complications. Pre- and postoperative imaging was reviewed. Patients were asked to complete a follow-up athletic questionnaire and a Pediatric International Knee Documentation Committee (Pedi-IKDC) score. Statistical analysis was conducted to look for predictors for reoperation, residual pain, ability to return to sports and lower Pedi-IKDC scores. Results: Twenty-six children (9 female, 17 male, 3 bilateral) were identified. Mean age was 14.7 (range: 9-18), 21/29 (72%) had open physes, and median follow-up was 3.8 years (range: 1-9 years). The most common location was the trochlea (17/29, 59%). Twenty-two lesions (76%) underwent transarticular drilling (n=14) or drilling with fixation (8), while 7 underwent excision and marrow stimulation. Four patients (14%) required unplanned re-operation. Internal fixation was predictive of reoperation (OR= 8.7, 95% CI= 2.8-26.9, P=0.04). At final follow up, 14 knees (48%) were pain-free, 14 (48%) had mild residual pain. Female gender was predictive of residual pain (OR= 9, 95% CI= 2-56, P=0.02). Twenty-two patients (85%) returned to sports. Longer duration of preoperative pain negatively impacted return to sports (OR= 0.32, 95% CI= 0.05-0.97, P=0.04). On postoperative imaging, the lesion appeared completely healed in 5 cases (42%) and partially healed in 12 cases (58%). All 15 survey respondents were satisfied with surgery. The mean Pedi-IKDC score was 82.4 ± 17.8 (range: 40.2 -100). Conclusion: Surgical treatment

  2. Method of healing diabetic forefoot ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, J P; Le Quesne, L P

    1983-01-01

    Six diabetic patients with neuropathic ulceration of the sole of the foot (seven feet, eight ulcers) were treated by the application of a below knee walking plaster with a rubber rocker. All the ulcers healed with this treatment, greatly reducing the usual period of hospital inpatient stay. After healing, study of the forces acting on the sole of the foot showed that these ulcers occur at the site of maximal horizontal shear force and confirmed that they occur at the site of maximal vertical force. This treatment is highly effective for neuropathic ulcers of the sole not affecting bone or complicated by deep sepsis. There may be a high rate of recurrence, however, reflecting inadequacy of methods of protecting damaged neuropathic feet. PMID:6401552

  3. Skin wound healing and phytomedicine: a review.

    PubMed

    Pazyar, Nader; Yaghoobi, Reza; Rafiee, Esmail; Mehrabian, Abolfath; Feily, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Skin integrity is restored by a physiological process aimed at repairing the damaged tissues. The healing process proceeds in four phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and remodeling. Phytomedicine presents remedies, which possess significant pharmacological effects. It is popular amongst the general population in regions all over the world. Phytotherapeutic agents have been largely used for cutaneous wound healing. These include Aloe vera, mimosa, grape vine, Echinacea, chamomile, ginseng, green tea, jojoba, tea tree oil, rosemary, lemon, soybean, comfrey, papaya, oat, garlic, ginkgo, olive oil and ocimum. Phytotherapy may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention on cutaneous wounds. This article provides a review of the common beneficial medicinal plants in the management of skin wounds with an attempt to explain their mechanisms. PMID:24993834

  4. Assisted self-healing in ripped graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Blaeckberg, L.; Sjoestrand, H.; Klintenberg, M.; Ringbom, A.

    2010-11-15

    A monolayer of sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon (graphene) is a material with great technological promise because of, for example, its transport, electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. In this work noble gas diffusion through ripped graphene sheets is explored. The motivation is improved detection systems used worldwide to verify compliance of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. It is demonstrated that even ripped graphene sheets and/or nonoverlapping graphene flakes inhibit noble gas diffusion. The latter has been shown for He and Xe where an infinitely long rip was constructed to have Stone-Wales edges. It is also shown that the ripped graphene layer self-heal in an alternating pentagon, hexagon, heptagon (5-6-7) and 7-6-5 pattern perpendicular to the rip. Moreover, the noble gas (He and Xe) assists in the healing process of wider rips.

  5. Anti-inflammatory and wound healing potential of cashew apple juice (Anacardium occidentale L.) in mice.

    PubMed

    da Silveira Vasconcelos, Mirele; Gomes-Rochette, Neuza F; de Oliveira, Maria Liduína M; Nunes-Pinheiro, Diana Célia S; Tomé, Adriana R; Maia de Sousa, Francisco Yuri; Pinheiro, Francisco Geraldo M; Moura, Carlos Farley H; Miranda, Maria Raquel A; Mota, Erika Freitas; de Melo, Dirce Fernandes

    2015-12-01

    Cashew apple is a tropical pseudofruit consumed as juice due to its excellent nutritional and sensory properties. In spite of being well known for its important antioxidant properties, the cashew apple has not been thoroughly investigated for its therapeutic potential. Thereby, this study evaluated the antioxidant capacity, anti-inflammatory, and wound-healing activities of cashew apple juice. Juices from ripe and immature cashew apples were analyzed for antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and wound-healing properties. Those were evaluated in murine models of xylene-induced ear edema and wound excision. Swiss mice were treated with cashew juice by gavage. Edema thickness was measured and skin lesions were analyzed by planimetry and histology. Both antioxidant content and total antioxidant activity were higher in ripe cashew apple juice (RCAJ) than in unripe cashew apple juice (UNCAJ). The UNCAJ presented the main anti-inflammatory activity by a significant inhibition of ear edema (66.5%) when compared to RCAJ (10%). Moreover, UNCAJ also showed the best result for wound contraction (86.31%) compared to RCAJ (67.54%). Despite of higher antioxidant capacity, RCAJ did not promote better anti-inflammatory, and healing responses, which may be explained by the fact that treatment increased antioxidants level leading to a redox "imbalance" turning down the inflammatory response modulation exerted by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The results suggest that UNCAJ presents a greater therapeutic activity due to a synergistic effect of its phytochemical components, which improve the immunological mechanisms as well as an optimal balance between ROS and antioxidants leading to a better wound healing process. PMID:25819683

  6. Noninvasive differential diagnosis of dental periapical lesions in cone-beam CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Kazunori; Rysavy, Steven; Flores, Arturo; Linguraru, Marius George

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: This paper proposes a novel application of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) to an everyday clinical dental challenge: the noninvasive differential diagnosis of periapical lesions between periapical cysts and granulomas. A histological biopsy is the most reliable method currently available for this differential diagnosis; however, this invasive procedure prevents the lesions from healing noninvasively despite a report that they may heal without surgical treatment. A CAD using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) offers an alternative noninvasive diagnostic tool which helps to avoid potentially unnecessary surgery and to investigate the unknown healing process and rate for the lesions. Methods: The proposed semiautomatic solution combines graph-based random walks segmentation with machine learning-based boosted classifiers and offers a robust clinical tool with minimal user interaction. As part of this CAD framework, the authors provide two novel technical contributions: (1) probabilistic extension of the random walks segmentation with likelihood ratio test and (2) LDA-AdaBoost: a new integration of weighted linear discriminant analysis to AdaBoost. Results: A dataset of 28 CBCT scans is used to validate the approach and compare it with other popular segmentation and classification methods. The results show the effectiveness of the proposed method with 94.1% correct classification rate and an improvement of the performance by comparison with the Simon’s state-of-the-art method by 17.6%. The authors also compare classification performances with two independent ground-truth sets from the histopathology and CBCT diagnoses provided by endodontic experts. Conclusions: Experimental results of the authors show that the proposed CAD system behaves in clearer agreement with the CBCT ground-truth than with histopathology, supporting the Simon’s conjecture that CBCT diagnosis can be as accurate as histopathology for differentiating the periapical lesions.

  7. Role of Wnt signaling in fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huiyun; Duan, Jing; Ning, Dandan; Li, Jingbao; Liu, Ruofei; Yang, Ruixin; Jiang, Jean X.; Shang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is well known to play major roles in skeletal development and homeostasis. In certain aspects, fracture repair mimics the process of bone embryonic development. Thus, the importance of Wnt signaling in fracture healing has become more apparent in recent years. Here, we summarize recent research progress in the area, which may be conducive to the development of Wnt-based therapeutic strategies for bone repair. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(12): 666-672] PMID:25301020

  8. Tendon, tendon healing, hyperlipidemia and statins

    PubMed Central

    Esenkaya, Irfan; Unay, Koray

    2011-01-01

    Summary Both hyperlipidemia and metabolic syndrome have adverse effect on tendon structure. Atorvastatin is most widely used antihyperlipidemic drug. Statins have adverse effects on the tendon. Many studies have analyzed the relationship between atorvastatin and skeletal muscles. Atorvastatin administered after the surgical repair of a ruptured tendon appears to affect revascularization, collagenization, inflammatory cell infiltration, and collagen construction. Therefore, further investigations on the effects of atorvastatin on tendon healing are needed. PMID:23738266

  9. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  10. Self-Healing, Inflatable, Rigidizable Shelter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haight, Andrea; Gosau, Jan-Michael; Dixit, Anshu; Gleeson, Dan

    2012-01-01

    An inflatable, rigidizable shelter system was developed based on Rigi dization on Command (ROC) technology incorporating not only the requ ired low-stowage volume and lightweight character achieved from an i nflatable/rigidizable system, but also a self-healing foam system inc orporated between the rigidizable layers of the final structure to m inimize the damage caused by any punctures to the structure.

  11. Combined nitric oxide-releasing poly(vinyl alcohol) film/F127 hydrogel for accelerating wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schanuel, Fernanda Seabra; Raggio Santos, Karen Slis; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; de Oliveira, Marcelo G

    2015-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) releasing biomaterials represent a potential strategy for use as active wound dressings capable of accelerating wound healing. Topical NO-releasing poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) films and Pluronic F127 hydrogels (F127) have already exhibited effective skin vasodilation and wound healing actions. In this study, we functionalized PVA films with SNO groups via esterification with a mixture of mercaptosucinic acid (MSA) and thiolactic acid (TLA) followed by S-nitrosation of the SH moieties. These films were combined with an underlying layer of poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide), i.e., PEO-PPO-PEO (Pluronic F127) hydrogel and used for the topical treatment of skin lesions in an animal model. The mixed esterification of PVA with MSA and TLA led to chemically crosslinked PVA-SNO films with a high swelling capacity capable of spontaneously releasing NO. Real time NO-release measurements revealed that the hydrogel layer reduces the initial NO burst from the PVA-SNO films. We demonstrate that the combination of PVA-SNO films with F127 hydrogel accelerates wound contraction, decreases wound gap and cellular density and accelerates the inflammatory phase of the lesion. These results were reflected in an increase in myofibroblastic differentiation and collagen type III expression in the cicatricial tissue. Therefore, PVA-SNO films combined with F127 hydrogel may represent a new approach for active wound dressings capable of accelerating wound healing. PMID:25907598

  12. Triterpenes with healing activity: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Agra, Lais C; Ferro, Jamylle N S; Barbosa, Fabiano T; Barreto, Emiliano

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this review was to systematically evaluate the literature on the efficacy of triterpenes for wound healing. We searched for original studies in the Medline, SCIDIRECT and LILACS databases published from 1910 to 2013. For each study, the title, abstract and full article were evaluated by two reviewers. We identified 2181 studies; however, after application of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, only 12 studies were subjected to further review. In surgical wounds, the triterpenes induced a reduction in time to closure, and this effect was reported in virtually all wound types. Triterpenes also modulate the production of ROS in the wound microenvironment, accelerating the process of tissue repair. Triterpenes may also induce cell migration, cell proliferation and collagen deposition. Although the pharmacological effects of triterpenes are well characterized, little is known about their effects in cells involved in healing, such as keratinocytes and fibroblasts. In addition, the lack of studies on the risks associated with the therapeutic use of triterpenes is worrisome. Our study reveals that triterpenes seem to favor wound healing; however, toxicological studies with these compounds are required. Taken together, these findings show that the triterpenes are a class of molecules with significant promise that leads for the development of new drugs to treat skin injury. PMID:25893368

  13. BPC 157's effect on healing.

    PubMed

    Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P; Grabarevic, Z; Zoricic, I; Hanzevacki, M; Ljubanovic, D; Coric, V; Konjevoda, P; Petek, M; Rucman, R; Turkovic, B; Perovic, D; Mikus, D; Jandrijevic, S; Medvidovic, M; Tadic, T; Romac, B; Kos, J; Peric, J; Kolega, Z

    1997-01-01

    The 15 amino acid agent BPC 157, showing a wide range of organoprotective action in different experimental models, was used in our experiments in order to establish its influence on different elements connected with the healing process. Elements thought to be of greatest importance in the process of healing are formation of granulation tissue, angiogenesis and production of collagen. In our work we tested the influence of BPC 157 on: granulation tissue and collagen formation, on angiogenesis as well as on tensile strength development, using three experimental rat models: 1) skin incisional wounds; 2) colon-colon anastomoses; and 3) angiogenesis model with synthetic sponge implantation. The specimens were histologically assessed for collagen, reticulin and blood vessels using scoring and morphometry. In all experiments significant differences between BPC 157-treated animals and controls were found, showing a strong, promoting involvement of BPC in the healing process. It is worth noting that these effects were achieved by different routes of application, including intragastric and local, making BPC 157 a potentially useful therapeutic agent. PMID:9403790

  14. Local Erythropoietin Injection in Tibiofibular Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshi, Hooman; Kazemian, Gholamhossein; Emami, Mohammad; Nemati, Ali; Karimi Yarandi, Hossein; Safdari, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    Background Erythropoietin (EPO), in addition to its function as an erythropoiesis regulator has a regenerative activity on some nonhematopoietic tissues. Animal studies have suggested a role for erythropoietin in bone healing. Objectives The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of local EPO injection in healing of tibiofibular fractures. Materials and Methods In a prospective double blind study, 60 patients with tibiofibular fracture were divided to equal EPO or placebo groups, randomly. Patients received local injection of either EPO or a placebo to the site of fracture two weeks after surgical fixation. Patients were followed by clinical and radiographic examination to determine the union rate. The period of fracture union and incidence of nonunion were compared between the two groups. Results The demographic data and types of fractures were similar in the both groups. The mean duration of the fracture union was 2.1 weeks shorter in those treated with EPO (P = 0.01). Nonunion was observed in 6 patients of the control group and 2 receiving EPO (P = 0.02). No patient experienced any adverse effect from local EPO injections. Conclusions EPO injection into the site of tibiofibular fractures may possibly accelerate healing. PMID:24350133

  15. Biological aspects of rotator cuff healing

    PubMed Central

    Wildemann, Britt; Klatte, Franka

    2011-01-01

    Summary Tendon tears of the rotator cuff show a high prevalence in today’s population. Patients suffer from permanent pain and disability, and surgical reconstruction may be the only possibility for abatement. The complex process of tendon-bone healing leads to mechanically inferior scar-tissue, which often results in retears or non-healing. In the current literature, factors such as patients age, sex and fatty muscle infiltration are highly correlated to the presence of rotator cuff tears and the incidence of retears. To improve the tendon tissue quality after surgical reconstructions biologically based strategies with use of growth factors arouse more and more interest in the last years. However, to optimize the treatment of rotator cuff tears the biological background of tears and retears must be investigated in more detail. This article will elucidate different aspects that have an impact on rotator cuff healing and give a brief insight in tendon/ligament cell culture and animal studies focusing on growth factor treatments. PMID:23738265

  16. Epithelialization in Wound Healing: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Pastar, Irena; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie C.; Ramirez, Horacio; Nusbaum, Aron G.; Sawaya, Andrew; Patel, Shailee B.; Khalid, Laiqua; Isseroff, Rivkah R.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Keratinocytes, a major cellular component of the epidermis, are responsible for restoring the epidermis after injury through a process termed epithelialization. This review will focus on the pivotal role of keratinocytes in epithelialization, including cellular processes and mechanisms of their regulation during re-epithelialization, and their cross talk with other cell types participating in wound healing. Recent Advances: Discoveries in epidermal stem cells, keratinocyte immune function, and the role of the epidermis as an independent neuroendocrine organ will be reviewed. Novel mechanisms of gene expression regulation important for re-epithelialization, including microRNAs and histone modifications, will also be discussed. Critical Issues: Epithelialization is an essential component of wound healing used as a defining parameter of a successful wound closure. A wound cannot be considered healed in the absence of re-epithelialization. The epithelialization process is impaired in all types of chronic wounds. Future Directions: A comprehensive understanding of the epithelialization process will ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to promote wound closure. PMID:25032064

  17. Mucopolysaccharides from psyllium involved in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, W; Das, P K; Middelkoop, E; Verschoor, J; Storey, L; Regnier, C

    2001-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharides derived from the husk of psyllium (Plantago ovata) have properties beneficial for wound cleansing and wound healing. Recent studies indicate that these mucopolysaccharides also limit scar formation. Our in vitro and in vivo studies aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved, e.g., fluid absorption, bacterial adherence and in vitro stimulatory effects on macrophages, which are pivotal in wound healing. The mucopolysaccharides contained in a sachet (Askina Cavity) or in a hydrocolloid mixture (Askina Hydro) were found to have a gradual and sustained absorbency over a period of 7 days, amounting to 4-6 times their weight in water. The swelling index was 9 mm after 312 h. Adherence of wound bacteria to the mucopolysaccharides started after 2 h and was more pronounced after 3 h. Semiquantitative measurements of bacterial adherence used centrifugation and subsequent optical density determinations of supernatant. These confirmed the strong adherence potential of psyllium particles. Lactic acid dehydrogenase staining of pretreated cultured human skin explants did not reveal toxicity of the mucopolysaccharides derived from psyllium husk. Langerhans' cell migration from the epidermis was negligible and interleukin-1 beta expression in the explants was not significant, supporting the very low allergenic potential of psyllium. The characteristics of mucopolysaccharide granulate derived from psyllium husk in Askina Cavity and Askina Hydro related to fluid absorption, bacterial adherence, biocompatibility, stimulation of macrophages, irritancy response and allergenicity showed an optimal profile, supporting the good clinical performance of wound healing products containing psyllium husk. PMID:11951574

  18. Proteoglycans in Normal and Healing Skin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Margaret Mary; Melrose, James

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Proteoglycans have a distinct spatial localization in normal skin and are essential for the correct structural development, organization, hydration, and functional properties of this tissue. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is no longer considered to be just an inert supportive material but is a source of directive, spatial and temporal, contextual information to the cells via components such as the proteoglycans. There is a pressing need to improve our understanding of how these important molecules functionally interact with other matrix structures, cells and cellular mediators in normal skin and during wound healing. Recent Advances: New antibodies to glycosaminoglycan side chain components of skin proteoglycans have facilitated the elucidation of detailed localization patterns within skin. Other studies have revealed important proliferative activities of proteinase-generated fragments of proteoglycans and other ECM components (matricryptins). Knockout mice have further established the functional importance of skin proteoglycans in the assembly and homeostasis of the normal skin ECM. Critical Issues: Our comprehension of the molecular and structural complexity of skin as a complex, dynamic, constantly renewing, layered connective tissue is incomplete. The impact of changes in proteoglycans on skin pathology and the wound healing process is recognized as an important area of pathobiology and is an area of intense investigation. Future Directions: Advanced technology is allowing the development of new artificial skins. Recent knowledge on skin proteoglycans can be used to incorporate these molecules into useful adjunct therapies for wound healing and for maintenance of optimal tissue homeostasis in aging skin. PMID:25785238

  19. Snake and staff symbolism, and healing.

    PubMed

    Retief, F P; Cilliers, L

    2002-07-01

    Since time immemorial the snake has been venerated as an enigmatic creature with supernatural powers. As a snake and staff symbol it is also traditionally associated with the healing arts, either as the single-snake emblem of Asklepios, or as the double-snake emblem (caduceus) of Hermes. The mythological basis for this symbolism is reviewed. The Asklepian emblem has been associated with health care since the 5th century BC, when Asklepios became accepted by the Greeks as the god of healing. Whether he was also an historical figure as healer in earlier ages is less certain. The origin of the double-snake emblem is shrouded in the mists of antiquity. In classical times it became the herald's wand of Hermes, messenger of the gods who guided departed souls to the underworld, and was seen as protector of travellers, shepherds and merchants. In the latter capacity Hermes also conveyed a negative connotation as protector of thieves. During the Middle Ages the caduceus became a symbol of the healing sciences (pharmacy and alchemy in particular), and today, although mythologically incorrect, it is in common usage in the health care field. PMID:12197200

  20. Effect of methotrexate on fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Koichiro; Mark, Hans; Zachrisson, Peter; Rydevik, Björn; Byröd, Gunnar; Kikuchi, Shin-Ichi; Konno, Shin-Ichi; Sekiguchi, Miho

    2011-01-01

    Low doses of methotrexate (MTX) are safe and effective for treating adult and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. However, because this powerful anti-inflammatory drug might negatively influence the healing of wounds and fractures, MTX administration is often stopped during surgical procedures. The present study assesses the effects of low- and high-dose MTX on early inflammatory processes and bone healing in an experimental model of fracture. Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to low- and high-dose MTX and control groups. A femur was cut using a reciprocating saw and a 2-mm fracture gap was made using a fixator. One or four weeks thereafter, macrophages were immunostained and new bone formation was histomorphometrically measured. Significantly less new bone was formed in the high-dose MTX, than in the control group (p< 0.01), whereas bone formation did not significantly differ between the low-dose MTX and control groups. These results suggested that a low dose of MTX does not affect the early process of endochondral bone formation during fracture healing, whereas a high dose might delay the progress of new periosteal bone formation. Although more macrophages were found in the groups treated with MTX, their impact on surrounding inflammatory processes remains unclear. PMID:21701078

  1. Healing from incest: resurrecting the buried self.

    PubMed

    Godbey, J K; Hutchinson, S A

    1996-10-01

    Writers on the incest experience estimate conservatively that 10% to 30% of all girls and 30% of all boys have had at least one childhood experience of incest. Incest is emotionally devastating to a child as it involves betrayal, and the irretrievable loss of trust in the adults in the child's life. Little is written about the healing processes of incest survivors. The purpose of this study was to generate a substantive grounded theory that provides an explanatory schema for understanding the healing process of adult female incest survivors. The sample consisted of 10 adult women who had a history of incest and who volunteered to participate in in-depth interviews. Data were analyzed using grounded theory techniques. Data analysis revealed that these women had buried an integral part of the self because of the trauma of incest; The healing process required resurrecting the buried self through a series of seven phases. The model generated from this research provides a heuristic for nurse therapists that assists in assessing and counseling incest survivors. PMID:8897713

  2. Wound Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Graham, John S.; Chilcott, Robert P.; Rice, Paul; Milner, Stephen M.; Hurst, Charles G.; Maliner, Beverly I.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating chemical warfare agent that primarily affects the eyes, skin, and airways. Sulfur mustard injuries can take several months to heal, necessitate lengthy hospitalizations, and result in significant cosmetic and/or functional deficits. Historically, blister aspiration and/or deroofing (epidermal removal), physical debridement, irrigation, topical antibiotics, and sterile dressings have been the main courses of action in the medical management of cutaneous sulfur mustard injuries. Current treatment strategy consists of symptomatic management and is designed to relieve symptoms, prevent infections, and promote healing. There are currently no standardized or optimized methods of casualty management that prevent or minimize deficits and provide for speedy wound healing. Several laboratories are actively searching for improved therapies for cutaneous vesicant injury, with the aim of returning damaged skin to optimal appearance and normal function in the shortest time. Improved treatment will result in a better cosmetic and functional outcome for the patient, and will enable the casualty to return to normal activities sooner. This editorial gives brief overviews of sulfur mustard use, its toxicity, concepts for medical countermeasures, current treatments, and strategies for the development of improved therapies. PMID:16921406

  3. MRI of anterior cruciate ligament healing

    SciTech Connect

    Ihara, Hidetoshi; Miwa, Megumi; Deya, Keizo; Torisu, Kenji

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate using MRI the natural healing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) when treated conservatively by early protective motion. Consecutive acute complete intraligamentous ruptures of the ACL in 50 cases that were allowed to heal without surgery were evaluated before and after 3 month treatment by MRI, arthroscopy, and stress radiographs. Twenty-nine of the 50 patients were also reevaluated 11 months from the initial injury, of which 7 were reevaluated again 24 months from the initial injury by MRI. The MR appearance of the treated ACL was categorized into four grades depending on homogeneity, straight band, and size. MR assessment of the ACL after 3 month treatment demonstrated a well defined normal-sized straight band in 37 cases (74%). There was a significant relationship between the 3 and 11 month MR evaluations (r. = 0.801, p < 0.0001). There were also significant relationships between the MR and arthroscopic evaluations (r, = 0.455, p < 0.005) and between the MR and stress radiographic evaluations (r, = 0.348, p < 0.025) after the 3 month treatment. MRI can demonstrate ACL healing when treated conservatively with early protective mobilization. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. A Consideration of the Perspectives of Healing Practitioners on Research Into Energy Healing

    PubMed Central

    Bruyere, Rosalyn L.; Weintrub, Ken; Dieppe, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Energy healing is a complex intervention with the purpose of enhancing wholeness within the client. Approaches to complex interventions require thoughtful utilization of a wide range of research methods. In order to advance the research in this field, we sought to understand the healing practitioners' point of view by reviewing qualitative literature, research reviews, and commentary written by and about practitioners. Further, we conducted a brief survey among healers, asking their opinions on types and topics of research in this field. Emerging from this inquiry is an overview of the healers' state required for successful healing, the importance of the clients' contribution, the heterogeneity of the process of healing, and the importance of choosing appropriate outcomes to reflect the goal of wholeness. Beyond attending to measurement of these nuanced aspects, we propose utilization of research designs appropriate for complex interventions, more use of qualitative research techniques, consideration of large data registries, and adoption of the perspectives of realist research. An important gap identified was the overall lack of understanding of the clients' experience and contribution to the healing encounter. PMID:26665045

  5. [Focal liver lesion, incidental finding].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Jenssen, C

    2012-10-01

    The differential diagnosis of incidentally found Focal Liver Lesions (FLL) is complex. Screening procedures so far are only defined for patients with liver cirrhosis. Characterization of a FLL begins as soon as it is detected. Taking patients history and thorough clinical examination are essential. An imaging procedure that is used to detect liver masses should also allow the examiner to determine whether the lesion is benign or malignant. Conventional B-mode US and colour Doppler imaging are effective at detecting and characterizing typical liver cysts and calcifications. Laboratory data, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and imaging guided liver biopsy are complementary methods.Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) is a well established diagnostic imaging technique for a variety of indications and applications. One of the most important applications is in the liver where it is frequently a first-line technique for the detection and diagnosis (characterization) of focal liver lesions (FLL). In this setting the accurate differentiation of benign from malignant lesions is critical to ensure the patient undergoes the appropriate therapeutic option. This has been documented in recently published guidelines, in particular in terms of the enhancement patterns of the most common FLL hemangioma, focal nodular hyperplasia hepatocellular adenoma and their differentiation from malignant lesions. In this article the role of CEUS in the characterization of incidentally found FLL is described. PMID:23033169

  6. Skin lesions in returning travellers.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Juszczak, Dariusz; Jerzemowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Skin lesions, apart from diarrhoeas, fever of unknown origin, and respiratory tract infections belong to the most frequent medical problems in travellers returned from tropical and subtropical destinations, accounting more than 10% of reported cases. Most dermatoses have their clinical onset during travel, although some of them can occur after return. Travel-related dermatological problems can have a wide spectrum of clinical picture, from macular, popular or nodular rash, linear and migratory lesions, to plaques, vesicles, bullae, erosions or ulcers. Skin conditions in returning travellers may be of infectious and non-infectious aetiologies. Infectious lesions may be originally tropical (e.g. dengue, chikungunya, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, myiasis, tungiasis, loiasis), although the majority are cosmopolitan (arthropod bites, sunburns, allergic rashes). The evaluation of skin lesions depends on many factors, including immune status of patients, use of medicines, exposure on health hazards (fauna, flora, risky behaviours), as well as the time, duration and location of travel. As the number of travellers to tropical and subtropical destinations has been continuously rising, the number of skin illnesses has also been increasing. This means that specialists in travel medicine need to extend their knowledge of epidemiology, clinical features and diagnosis of travel-related health problems including skin lesions in returning travellers. PMID:26394319

  7. Hypoxia in Leishmania major skin lesions impairs the NO-dependent leishmanicidal activity of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mahnke, Alexander; Meier, Robert J; Schatz, Valentin; Hofmann, Julian; Castiglione, Kirstin; Schleicher, Ulrike; Wolfbeis, Otto S; Bogdan, Christian; Jantsch, Jonathan

    2014-09-01

    Cure of infections with Leishmania major is critically dependent on the ability of macrophages to induce the type 2 nitic oxide (NO) synthase (NOS2) that produces high levels of NO in the presence of ample oxygen. Therefore, we analyzed the oxygen levels found in leishmanial skin lesions and their effect on the NOS2-dependent leishmanicidal activity of macrophages (MΦ). When L. major skin lesions of self-healing C57BL/6 mice reached their maximum size, the infected tissue displayed low oxygen levels (pO2∼21 Torr). MΦ activated under these oxygen tensions failed to produce sufficient amounts of NO to clear L. major. Nos2-deficient and hypoxic wild-type macrophages displayed a similar phenotype. Killing was restored when MΦ were reoxygenated or exposed to a NO donor. The resolution of the lesion in C57BL/6 mice was paralleled by an increase of lesional pO2. When mice were kept under normobaric hypoxia, this caused a persistent suppression of the lesional pO2 and a concurrent increase of the parasite load. In Nos2-deficient mice, there was no effect of atmospheric hypoxia. Low oxygen levels found at leishmanial skin lesions impaired the NOS2-dependent leishmanicidal activity of MΦ. Hence, tissue oxygenation represents an underestimated local milieu factor that participates in the persistence of Leishmania. PMID:24583949

  8. Secondary Bacterial Infections of Buruli Ulcer Lesions Before and After Chemotherapy with Streptomycin and Rifampicin

    PubMed Central

    Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Kpeli, Grace S.; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Asan-Ampah, Kobina; Quenin-Fosu, Kwabena; Owusu-Mireku, Evelyn; Paintsil, Albert; Lamptey, Isaac; Anku, Benjamin; Kwakye-Maclean, Cynthia; Newman, Mercy; Pluschke, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans is a chronic necrotizing skin disease. It usually starts with a subcutaneous nodule or plaque containing large clusters of extracellular acid-fast bacilli. Surrounding tissue is destroyed by the cytotoxic macrolide toxin mycolactone produced by microcolonies of M. ulcerans. Skin covering the destroyed subcutaneous fat and soft tissue may eventually break down leading to the formation of large ulcers that progress, if untreated, over months and years. Here we have analyzed the bacterial flora of BU lesions of three different groups of patients before, during and after daily treatment with streptomycin and rifampicin for eight weeks (SR8) and determined drug resistance of the bacteria isolated from the lesions. Before SR8 treatment, more than 60% of the examined BU lesions were infected with other bacteria, with Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most prominent ones. During treatment, 65% of all lesions were still infected, mainly with P. aeruginosa. After completion of SR8 treatment, still more than 75% of lesions clinically suspected to be infected were microbiologically confirmed as infected, mainly with P. aeruginosa or Proteus miriabilis. Drug susceptibility tests revealed especially for S. aureus a high frequency of resistance to the first line drugs used in Ghana. Our results show that secondary infection of BU lesions is common. This could lead to delayed healing and should therefore be further investigated. PMID:23658847

  9. Clinical and radiographic features of contagious ovine digital dermatitis and a novel lesion grading system.

    PubMed

    Angell, J W; Blundell, R; Grove-White, D H; Duncan, J S

    2015-05-23

    Contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD) is an infectious foot disease of sheep causing severe lameness. Diagnosis is currently made using broad anecdotal descriptions. The aim of this study was to systematically and formally describe the clinical presentation of the disease in terms of (1) a lesion grading system; (2) associated radiographic changes and (3) severity of associated lameness. A five-point lesion grading system was developed and applied to 908 sheep affected by CODD from six farms. Sheep with lesions typical of each grade were euthanased and their feet radiographed. Radiographic abnormalities including soft tissue and bony changes were evident in feet with lesions graded 2-5. In order to quantify the welfare impact of CODD, all the 908 sheep were locomotion scored. Five hundred and eighty-five (64.5% (95% CI 61.4% to 67.6%)) were lame. The locomotion score for affected sheep increased with worsening pathological changes. Once healing had begun the locomotion score decreased. In conclusion the five-point grading system may be used to clinically describe stages of CODD lesions. The radiographic changes revealed examples of deeper pathological changes and there was a strong association between the lesion grading system and locomotion score in affected sheep. PMID:25861825

  10. Arsenic Exposure, Dietary Patterns, and Skin Lesion Risk in Bangladesh: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Brandon L.; Argos, Maria; Chen, Yu; Melkonian, Stephanie; Parvez, Faruque; Islam, Tariqul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Hasan, Rabiul; Rathouz, Paul J.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2011-01-01

    Dietary factors are believed to modulate arsenic toxicity, potentially influencing risk of arsenical skin lesions. The authors evaluated associations among dietary patterns, arsenic exposure, and skin lesion risk using baseline food frequency questionnaire data collected in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Araihazar, Bangladesh (2000–2009). They identified dietary patterns and estimated dietary pattern scores using factor analysis. Scores were tested for association with incident skin lesion risk and interaction with water arsenic exposure by using ∼6 years of follow-up data (814 events among 9,677 individuals) and discrete time hazards models (adjusting for key covariates). The authors identified 3 clear dietary patterns: the “gourd and root,” “vegetable,” and “animal protein” patterns. The gourd and root pattern score was inversely associated with skin lesion risk (Ptrend = 0.001), with hazard ratios of 0.86, 0.73, and 0.69 for the second, third, and fourth highest quartiles. Furthermore, the association between water arsenic and skin lesion incidence was stronger among participants with low gourd and root scores (multiplicative Pinteraction < 0.001; additive Pinteraction = 0.05). The vegetable pattern and animal protein pattern showed similar but weaker associations and interactions. Eating a diet rich in gourds and root vegetables and increasing dietary diversity may reduce arsenical skin lesion risk in Bangladesh. PMID:21178101

  11. E2F1 Hinders Skin Wound Healing by Repressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Expression, Neovascularization, and Macrophage Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ning; Wang, Haiping; Deng, Pei; Xu, Yi; Feng, Youping; Zeng, Hong; Yang, Hongxia; Hou, Kai; Wang, Andrew; Parthasarathy, Keshav; Goyal, Samaksh; Qin, Gangjian; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Refractory surface of wound and dermal chronic ulcer are largely attributed to poor neovascularization. We have previously shown that E2F1 suppresses VEGF expression in the ischemic heart, and that genetic deletion of E2F1 leads to better cardiac recovery. However, whether E2F1 has a role in dermal wound healing is currently not known. Methods and Results Skin wounds were surgically induced in E2F1-null (E2F1–/–) mice and WT littermates. E2F1–/– displayed an accelerated wound healing including wound closure, dermal thickening and collagen deposition, which was associated with an increased endothelial cell proliferation and greater vessel density in the border zone of the wound. Furthermore, more macrophages were recruited to the skin lesions and the level of VEGF expression was markedly higher in E2F1–/– than in WT mice. Conclusions E2F1 hinders skin wound healing by suppressing VEGF expression, neovascularization, and macrophage recruitment. Strategies that target E2F1 may enhance wound healing. PMID:27490344

  12. Mindfulness and healing intention: concepts, practice, and research evaluation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the role of the health care professional in creating an optimal healing environment (OHE), with a special focus on which inner state and way of being in the world can create a healing intention. A core thesis is that every healing effort and every healing intention starts within the health care professional. An accepting, mindful, and warm-hearted relationship with self is primary to any healing intention. Important concepts to develop such an attitude are mindfulness, love, compassion, and awareness. The concept of a healing attitude toward the self is described, as is the mirror principle that states there is symmetry between someone's relationship with the outer world and his or her inner world. The mindfulness concept is outlined through a set of mental and heart qualities. Mindfulness is strongly related to compassion, and it is compassion that serves as a source for all healing intentionality. Compassion connects the suffering of the patient with the healer's own suffering, and this emotional connection instantiates a healing relationship. The power and importance of mindfulness and compassion for healing are explored along the Frank model of nonspecific therapeutic components. This is the approach whereby a health care professional can elicit self-healing powers in patients through his or her inner attitudes. Finally, a research program and some hypotheses on how to implement and research this specific approach toward the creation of an OHE are outlined. PMID:15630818

  13. Temporal Healing in Rat Achilles Tendon: Ultrasound Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Connie S.; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E.; Okotie, Gregory; Brounts, Sabrina H.; Baer, Geoffrey S.; Vanderby, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether a new ultrasound-based technique correlates with mechanical and biological metrics that describe the tendon healing. Achilles tendons in 32 rats were unilaterally transected and allowed to heal without repair. At 7, 9, 14, or 29 days post-injury, tendons were collected and examined for healing via ultrasound image analysis, mechanical testing, and immunohistochemistry. Consistent with previous studies, we observe that the healing tendons are mechanically inferior (ultimate stress, ultimate load, and normalized stiffness) and biologically altered (cellular and ECM factors) compared to contralateral controls with an incomplete recovery over healing time. Unique to this study, we report: 1) Echo intensity (defined by gray-scale brightness in the ultrasound image) in the healing tissue is related to stress and normalized stiffness. 2) Elongation to failure is relatively constant so that tissue normalized stiffness is linearly correlated with ultimate stress. Together, 1 and 2 suggest a method to quantify mechanical compromise in healing tendons. 3) The amount and type of collagen in healing tendons associates with their strength and normalized stiffness as well as their ultrasound echo intensity. 4) A significant increase of periostin in the healing tissues suggests an important but unexplored role for this ECM protein in tendon healing. PMID:23149902

  14. Brain lesions and eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Uher, R; Treasure, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relation between lesions of various brain structures and the development of eating disorders and thus inform the neurobiological research on the aetiology of these mental illnesses. Method: We systematically reviewed 54 previously published case reports of eating disorders with brain damage. Lesion location, presence of typical psychopathology, and evidence suggestive of causal association were recorded. Results: Although simple changes in appetite and eating behaviour occur with hypothalamic and brain stem lesions, more complex syndromes, including characteristic psychopathology of eating disorders, are associated with right frontal and temporal lobe damage. Conclusions: These findings challenge the traditional view that eating disorders are linked to hypothalamic disturbance and suggest a major role of frontotemporal circuits with right hemispheric predominance in the pathogenesis. PMID:15897510

  15. Oral Lesions and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Castellarin, P.; Pozzato, G.; Tirelli, G.; Di Lenarda, R.; Biasotto, M.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disorders are heterogeneous malignancy characterized by the expansion of a lymphoid clone more or less differentiated. At the level of the oral cavity, the lymphoproliferative disorder can occur in various ways, most commonly as lymphoid lesions with extranodal externalization, but sometimes, oral lesions may represent a localization of a disease spread. With regard to the primary localizations of lymphoproliferative disorders, a careful examination of the head and neck, oral, and oropharyngeal area is necessary in order to identify suspicious lesions, and their early detection results in a better prognosis for the patient. Numerous complications have been described and frequently found at oral level, due to pathology or different therapeutic strategies. These complications require precise diagnosis and measures to oral health care. In all this, oral pathologists, as well as dental practitioners, have a central role in the treatment and long-term monitoring of these patients. PMID:20871659

  16. Renal lesions of nondomestic felids.

    PubMed

    Newkirk, K M; Newman, S J; White, L A; Rohrbach, B W; Ramsay, E C

    2011-05-01

    To comprehensively evaluate the occurrence of renal lesions in a variety of nondomestic felids, necropsy cases from 1978 to 2008 were reviewed from a municipal zoo and a large cat sanctuary for those in which the kidneys were examined histologically. Seventy exotic felids were identified (25 tigers, 18 lions, 6 cougars, 5 leopards, 3 snow leopards, 3 clouded leopards, 3 Canadian lynx, 2 ocelots, 2 bobcats, 2 cheetahs, 1 jaguar), and their histologic renal lesions were evaluated and compared. The most common lesion was tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN); 36 of 70 (51%) cats were affected to some degree. Lymphocytic interstitial nephritis was the most common lesion in the tigers (9 of 25, 36%) and was rarely seen in other species. Although the renal pelvis was not available for all cats, 28 of 47 (60%) had some degree of lymphocytic pyelitis. There was no significant association between the presence of pyelitis and that of TIN. Only 1 cat had pyelonephritis. Renal papillary necrosis was present in 13 of 70 (19%) cats and was significantly associated with historical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment (odds ratio, 7.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.9 to 26.8). Only 1 cat (lion) had amyloid accumulation, and it was restricted to the corticomedullary junction. Primary glomerular lesions were absent in all cats. Intraepithelial pigment was identified in many of the cats but was not correlated with severity of TIN. Despite several previous reports describing primary glomerular disease or renal amyloidosis in exotic felids, these lesions were rare to absent in this population. PMID:20876911

  17. Can Small Lesions Induce Language Reorganization as Large Lesions Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maestu, Fernando; Saldana, Cristobal; Amo, Carlos; Gonzalez-Hidalgo, Mercedes; Fernandez, Alberto; Fernandez, Santiago; Mata, Pedro; Papanicolaou, Andrew; Ortiz, Tomas

    2004-01-01

    Shift of the cortical mechanisms of language from the usually dominant left to the non-dominant right hemisphere has been demonstrated in the presence of large brain lesions. Here, we report a similar phenomenon in a patient with a cavernoma over the anterolateral superior temporal gyrus associated with epilepsy. Language mapping was performed by…

  18. Lesion detectability in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Robert M.; Boswell, Jonathan S.; Myers, Kyle J.; Peter, Guillaume

    2001-06-01

    The usefulness of Fourier-based measures of imaging performance has come into question for the evaluation of digital imaging systems. Figures of merit such as detective quantum efficiency are relevant for linear, shift-invariant systems with stationary noise. However, no digital imaging system is shift invariant, and realistic images do not satisfy the stationarity condition. Our methods for task- based evaluation of imaging systems, based on lesion detectability, do not require such assumptions. We have computed the performance of Hotelling and nonprewhitening matched-filter observers for the task of lesion detection in digital radiography.

  19. Cutaneous lesions of the nose

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose. This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon. In this review, we focus on those skin diseases on the nose where surgery or laser therapy is considered a possible treatment option or that can be surgically evaluated. PMID:20525327

  20. BLACK LESIONS OF THE SKIN

    PubMed Central

    Becker, S. William

    1958-01-01

    Benign melanocytic lesions include lentigo, ephelid (freckle), pigmented nevus, sacral spot, blue nevus, and combined nevus and blue nevus. Malignant melanocytic lesions are melanomas, which arise from melanocytes at the epidermodermal junction, or, rarely, from blue nevi. They usually originate in brown plaques known as lentigo maligna, in pigmented nevi, or in normal skin. Melanoma is diagnosed clinically in less than 50 per cent of instances. Biopsy is therefore of great importance, since practically all melanoma can be cured by adequate early resection. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8. PMID:13511215

  1. Apraxia in deep cerebral lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, E; Coletti, A; Orlando, G; Tredici, G

    1983-01-01

    In a series of 50 patients with cerebrovascular lesions (demonstrated with CT scan), seven patients had lesions located in the basal ganglia and/or thalamus. All these seven patients were apractic. Ideomotor apraxia was present in all patients; five also had constructional apraxia, and one had bucco-facial apraxia. None of the patients had utilisation apraxia. These observations indicated that apraxia is not only a "high cerebral (cortical) function", but may depend also on the integrity of subcortical circuits and structures. PMID:6619888

  2. Localized lesions in secondary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Dar, Nasser Rashid; Raza, Naeem

    2008-05-01

    The clinical manifestations of secondary syphilis are variable and can mimic many skin diseases, mostly being generalized and symmetrical in distribution. Localized lesions of secondary syphilis are rarely seen in dermatology clinics. We report an unusual presentation wherein a patient had localized lesions over face and soles only. There is a need for increased awareness on the part of physicians to recognize new patterns of syphilitic infection, together with a willingness to consider the diagnosis of syphilis in patients with unusual clinical features. PMID:18541087

  3. Intakes of Several Nutrients Are Associated with Incidence of Arsenic-Related Keratotic Skin Lesions in Bangladesh12

    PubMed Central

    Melkonian, Stephanie; Argos, Maria; Chen, Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Pierce, Brandon; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Ahsan, Habibul

    2012-01-01

    Risk of skin lesions due to chronic arsenic exposure can be further affected by nutrient intake. We prospectively evaluated the association of nutrient intake and gender with incident skin lesions using data from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Araihazar, Bangladesh. Discrete time hazard models were used to estimate these effects in stratified analyses based on skin lesion severity. Overall, we observed significant associations between low intakes of various nutrients (retinol, calcium, fiber, folate, iron, riboflavin, thiamin, and vitamins A, C, and E) and skin lesion incidence, particularly for keratotic skin lesions. Associations for vitamins C and E showed significant linear trends. Gender-specific analyses revealed an inverse association between the lowest quartile of nutrient intake and keratotic skin lesion incidence for retinol equivalents, calcium, folate, iron, and fiber among women. Interactions by gender were observed for retinol equivalents (P-interaction = 0.03), calcium (P-interaction = 0.04), vitamin A (P-interaction = 0.03), and riboflavin (P-interaction = 0.04) with the incidence of keratotic skin lesions. Understanding differential susceptibility to skin lesion incidence based on nutrient intake will help researchers develop targeted interventions to prevent health consequences of arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh and beyond. PMID:23077185

  4. Segmented molecular design of self-healing proteinaceous materials

    PubMed Central

    Sariola, Veikko; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Jung, Huihun; Çetinkaya, Murat; Pacheco, Carlos; Sitti, Metin; Demirel, Melik C.

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical assembly of self-healing adhesive proteins creates strong and robust structural and interfacial materials, but understanding of the molecular design and structure–property relationships of structural proteins remains unclear. Elucidating this relationship would allow rational design of next generation genetically engineered self-healing structural proteins. Here we report a general self-healing and -assembly strategy based on a multiphase recombinant protein based material. Segmented structure of the protein shows soft glycine- and tyrosine-rich segments with self-healing capability and hard beta-sheet segments. The soft segments are strongly plasticized by water, lowering the self-healing temperature close to body temperature. The hard segments self-assemble into nanoconfined domains to reinforce the material. The healing strength scales sublinearly with contact time, which associates with diffusion and wetting of autohesion. The finding suggests that recombinant structural proteins from heterologous expression have potential as strong and repairable engineering materials. PMID:26323335

  5. Segmented molecular design of self-healing proteinaceous materials.

    PubMed

    Sariola, Veikko; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Jung, Huihun; Çetinkaya, Murat; Pacheco, Carlos; Sitti, Metin; Demirel, Melik C

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical assembly of self-healing adhesive proteins creates strong and robust structural and interfacial materials, but understanding of the molecular design and structure-property relationships of structural proteins remains unclear. Elucidating this relationship would allow rational design of next generation genetically engineered self-healing structural proteins. Here we report a general self-healing and -assembly strategy based on a multiphase recombinant protein based material. Segmented structure of the protein shows soft glycine- and tyrosine-rich segments with self-healing capability and hard beta-sheet segments. The soft segments are strongly plasticized by water, lowering the self-healing temperature close to body temperature. The hard segments self-assemble into nanoconfined domains to reinforce the material. The healing strength scales sublinearly with contact time, which associates with diffusion and wetting of autohesion. The finding suggests that recombinant structural proteins from heterologous expression have potential as strong and repairable engineering materials. PMID:26323335

  6. Segmented molecular design of self-healing proteinaceous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sariola, Veikko; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Jung, Huihun; Çetinkaya, Murat; Pacheco, Carlos; Sitti, Metin; Demirel, Melik C.

    2015-09-01

    Hierarchical assembly of self-healing adhesive proteins creates strong and robust structural and interfacial materials, but understanding of the molecular design and structure-property relationships of structural proteins remains unclear. Elucidating this relationship would allow rational design of next generation genetically engineered self-healing structural proteins. Here we report a general self-healing and -assembly strategy based on a multiphase recombinant protein based material. Segmented structure of the protein shows soft glycine- and tyrosine-rich segments with self-healing capability and hard beta-sheet segments. The soft segments are strongly plasticized by water, lowering the self-healing temperature close to body temperature. The hard segments self-assemble into nanoconfined domains to reinforce the material. The healing strength scales sublinearly with contact time, which associates with diffusion and wetting of autohesion. The finding suggests that recombinant structural proteins from heterologous expression have potential as strong and repairable engineering materials.

  7. Inflammatory mediators and modulators released in organ culture from rabbit skin lesions produced in vivo by sulfur mustard. III. Electrophoretic protein fractions, trypsin-inhibitory capacity, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, and alpha 1- and alpha 2-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors of culture fluids and serum.

    PubMed Central

    Harada, S.; Dannenberg, A. M.; Vogt, R. F.; Myrick, J. E.; Tanaka, F.; Redding, L. C.; Merkhofer, R. M.; Pula, P. J.; Scott, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    This is the third report in a series on the inflammatory mediators and modulators released in organ culture from skin lesions of various ages, which were produced in vivo in rabbits by the military vesicant, sulfur mustard (SM). It describes the electrophoretic protein fractions and trypsin-inhibitory capacities of the various culture fluids and the amounts of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors in these fluids. With one-dimensional electrophoresis, the albumin and beta-globulin fractions of protein in culture fluids varied little with the development and healing of the SM lesions. These fractions proportionally resembled the corresponding fractions found in serum. The alpha 1-globulin fraction was proportionally smaller than the corresponding fractions of serum as the lesions healed. The alpha 2-globulin fraction was proportionally smaller than the corresponding fractions of serum at all stages of lesion development and healing. The gamma-globulin fraction was proportionally larger as the lesions healed. With two-dimensional electrophoresis, about 68%, 46%, and 35% of the protein spots in culture fluids from representative 1-day and 6-day SM lesions and normal skin, respectively, matched those from serum. In each case, the large, diffuse, serum albumin spot represented about two-thirds of the protein present. Thus, gravimetrically, in normal skin and in both developing and healing lesions, the extracellular proteins were 80-90% of serum origin. The trypsin-inhibitory capacity (TIC) per milligram protein in the culture fluids of healing lesions was markedly less than the TIC per milligram protein in the fluids of peak lesions. This decrease correlates well with the decrease found in the alpha 1-globulin fraction, which contains alpha 1-antiproteinase (alpha 1-PI) (and alpha 1-macroglobulin [alpha 1M] in rabbits). The alpha 1PI and the alpha 1M-alpha 2M proteinase inhibitors were identified in the culture fluids by means of

  8. Bacterial profile and bone healing in rats receiving cancer therapeutic doses of bisphosphonates and corticosteroids: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Z; do Nascimento, C; El-Hakim, M; Henderson, J E; de Albuquerque Junior, R F

    2016-09-01

    The microbial aetiology of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) remains undefined. This study investigated the oral microbiota and socket healing after zoledronic acid (ZA) and dexamethasone (DX) administration. Fourteen rats assigned randomly to experimental (n=8) and control (n=6) groups were injected with ZA+DX or saline, respectively, for 3 weeks prior to and 9 weeks after the extraction of left first upper and lower molars. Whole genomic DNA probes of 38 bacterial species and five Candida species were hybridized to DNA extracted from biofilm samples on exposed bone and adjacent teeth. Only experimental rats exhibited exposed bone at euthanasia. All BRONJ-like lesions were colonized by Staphylococcus pasteuri, Streptococcus parasanguinis, and Streptococcus mitis. A significant correlation was observed between the mean proportions of species colonizing BRONJ-like lesions and the teeth of experimental rats (r=0.818, P<0.001). Significant differences were seen in several species colonizing the teeth of control rats compared to experimental rats (P<0.05). Micro-computed tomography analyses revealed higher residual bone in mandibular (P=0.001) and maxillary (P=0.108) tooth sockets of experimental rats. BRONJ-like lesions were colonized mainly by non-pathogenic bacteria. ZA+DX administered to rats at doses equivalent to those given to cancer patients resulted in changes to the oral biofilm and impaired bone healing following tooth extraction. PMID:26780925

  9. 42 CFR 60.1 - What is the HEAL program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What is the HEAL program? 60.1 Section 60.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM General Program Description § 60.1 What is the HEAL program? (a) The Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL) program is a program...

  10. Identification and Functional Analysis of Healing Regulators in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Fernández, Carmen; Tamirisa, Srividya; Prada, Federico; Chernomoretz, Ariel; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Blanco, Enrique; Martín-Blanco, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is an essential homeostatic mechanism that maintains the epithelial barrier integrity after tissue damage. Although we know the overall steps in wound healing, many of the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Genetically amenable systems, such as wound healing in Drosophila imaginal discs, do not model all aspects of the repair process. However, they do allow the less understood aspects of the healing response to be explored, e.g., which signal(s) are responsible for initiating tissue remodeling? How is sealing of the epithelia achieved? Or, what inhibitory cues cancel the healing machinery upon completion? Answering these and other questions first requires the identification and functional analysis of wound specific genes. A variety of different microarray analyses of murine and humans have identified characteristic profiles of gene expression at the wound site, however, very few functional studies in healing regulation have been carried out. We developed an experimentally controlled method that is healing-permissive and that allows live imaging and biochemical analysis of cultured imaginal discs. We performed comparative genome-wide profiling between Drosophila imaginal cells actively involved in healing versus their non-engaged siblings. Sets of potential wound-specific genes were subsequently identified. Importantly, besides identifying and categorizing new genes, we functionally tested many of their gene products by genetic interference and overexpression in healing assays. This non-saturated analysis defines a relevant set of genes whose changes in expression level are functionally significant for proper tissue repair. Amongst these we identified the TCP1 chaperonin complex as a key regulator of the actin cytoskeleton essential for the wound healing response. There is promise that our newly identified wound-healing genes will guide future work in the more complex mammalian wound healing response. PMID:25647511

  11. 42 CFR 60.1 - What is the HEAL program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What is the HEAL program? 60.1 Section 60.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM General Program Description § 60.1 What is the HEAL program? (a) The Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL) program is a program...

  12. 42 CFR 60.1 - What is the HEAL program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the HEAL program? 60.1 Section 60.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM General Program Description § 60.1 What is the HEAL program? (a) The Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL) program is a program...

  13. Introduction: women, health, and healing in early modern Europe.

    PubMed

    Fissell, Mary Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Women played substantial roles in health and healing in medieval and early-modern Europe. They have been undercounted in studies that rely upon occupational labels, but when we look at caregiving and bodywork, we can see women providing a broad range of services. Although women often healed in domestic settings, neither female patients nor practitioners should be considered in isolation from larger market forces that shaped men's healing work. PMID:18344583

  14. [Arthroscopic management of recent or chronic lesions of triangular fibrocartilage complex of the wrist].

    PubMed

    Fontès, D

    2006-11-01

    Lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage complex of the wrist (TFCC) have perfectly been dismembered by Andrew Palmer and have largely benefited from progress of arthroscopy of the wrist. One distinguishes thus traumatic lesions (class 1) individualized according to their localization, central (1-A), ulnar (1-B), radial (1-D) or distal (1-C). Central lesions are classically associated to a positive ulnar variance. The clinical symptomatology evokes a meniscal like syndrome of the wrist. In case of failure of the medical treatment, it will be necessary to propose a surgical procedure guided by histopathology of the triangular complex. Thus, ulnar peripheral richly vascularized lesions (1-B) could therefore potentially heal and will have to benefit by an attempt of surgical reattachment (arthroscopic technique of Whipple, Poehling or other techniques) or by an osteosynthesis in case of fracture on the basis on the ulnar styloid process. Central fibrocartilage lesions (1-A) or radial avulsions (1-D) are less vascularized and have therefore little probability to heal; they will benefit then ideally from the endoscopic debridement of unstable flaps of the central portion of TFCC. No immobilization is required and rehabilitation is immediately undertaken. Less frequent class 1-C lesions justify in our practice a simple arthroscopic regularization, alone complete ruptures could have necessitate a direct suture. Class 2 degenerative lesions are graduated (A to E) according to evolution of the chondromalacia of the ulnar head and carpal bone, perforation of the central disc and lunotriquetral ligament degeneration. They are usually associated with a constitutional or an acquired ulnar plus variance syndrome, for example after a distal radius fracture malunion. The clinical symptomatology needs to differentiate them from the simple frequent physiological perforations after the age of 50 years. Arthroscopy will allow to regularize unstable non-vascularized lesions and to

  15. [Arthroscopic management of recent or chronic lesions of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Fontès, D

    2006-11-01

    Lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage complex of the wrist (TFCC) have perfectly been dismembered by Andrew Palmer and have largely benefited from progress of arthroscopy of the wrist. One distinguishes thus traumatic lesions (class 1) individualized according to their localization, central (1-A), ulnar (1-B), radial (1-D) or distal (1-C). Central lesions are classically associated to a positive ulnar variance. The clinical symptomatology evokes a meniscal like syndrome of the wrist. In case of failure of the medical treatment, it will be necessary to propose a surgical procedure guided by histopathology of the triangular complex. Thus, ulnar peripheral richly vascularized lesions (1-B) could therefore potentially heal and will have to benefit by an attempt of surgical reattachment (arthroscopic technique of Whipple, Poehling or other techniques) or by an osteosynthesis in case of fracture on the basis on the ulnar styloid process. Central fibrocartilage lesions (1-A) or radial avulsions (1-D) are less vascularized and have therefore little probability to heal; they will benefit then ideally from the endoscopic debridement of unstable flaps of the central portion of TFCC. No immobilization is required and rehabilitation is immediately undertaken. Less frequent class 1-C lesions justify in our practice a simple arthroscopic regularization, alone complete ruptures could have necessitate a direct suture. Class 2 degenerative lesions are graduated (A to E) according to evolution of the chondromalacia of the ulnar head and carpal bone, perforation of the central disc and lunotriquetral ligament degeneration. They are usually associated with a constitutional or an acquired ulnar plus variance syndrome, for example after a distal radius fracture malunion. The clinical symptomatology needs to differentiate them from the simple frequent physiological perforations after the age of 50 years. Arthroscopy will allow to regularize unstable non-vascularized lesions and to

  16. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases. PMID:26675058

  17. Neuromuscular lesions in restrained rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mendlowski, B

    1975-01-01

    Ten of 16 rabbits restrained 6 h daily for 35 days developed focal to diffuse degeneration of the sciatic nerves. Very small necrotic areas also were found in the skeletal muscles of seven of 16 rabbits, but the muscle lesions did not correlate with the nerve changes. PMID:180647

  18. Cystic lesions of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Dimitrios K.

    2016-01-01

    Different types of benign or malignant cystic lesions can be observed in the pancreas. Pancreatic cystic lesions are classified under pathology terms into simple retention cysts, pseudocysts and cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasm is a frequent type of cystic neoplasm and has a malignant potential. Serous cystadenoma follows in frequency and is usually benign. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are the most commonly resected cystic pancreatic neoplasms characterized by dilated segments of the main pancreatic duct and/or side branches, the wall of which is covered by mucus secreting cells. These neoplasms can occupy the pancreatic head or any part of the organ. Solid pseudopapillary tumor is rare, has a low tendency for malignancy, and is usually located in the pancreatic body or tail. Endoscopic ultrasound with the use of fine-needle aspiration and cytology permits discrimination of those lesions. In this review, the main characteristics of those lesions are presented, as well as recommendations regarding their follow up and management according to recent guidelines. PMID:27065727

  19. Cystic lesions of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Dimitrios K

    2016-01-01

    Different types of benign or malignant cystic lesions can be observed in the pancreas. Pancreatic cystic lesions are classified under pathology terms into simple retention cysts, pseudocysts and cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasm is a frequent type of cystic neoplasm and has a malignant potential. Serous cystadenoma follows in frequency and is usually benign. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are the most commonly resected cystic pancreatic neoplasms characterized by dilated segments of the main pancreatic duct and/or side branches, the wall of which is covered by mucus secreting cells. These neoplasms can occupy the pancreatic head or any part of the organ. Solid pseudopapillary tumor is rare, has a low tendency for malignancy, and is usually located in the pancreatic body or tail. Endoscopic ultrasound with the use of fine-needle aspiration and cytology permits discrimination of those lesions. In this review, the main characteristics of those lesions are presented, as well as recommendations regarding their follow up and management according to recent guidelines. PMID:27065727

  20. Odontogenic lesions in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qi-Gen; Shi, Shuang; Sun, Chang-Fu

    2014-05-01

    The purpose was to evaluate our 20-year experience of pediatric odontogenic lesions. Pediatric patients with a diagnosis of odontogenic lesion were identified. Three hundred ten patients were odontogenic; dentigerous cyst was seen in 62.0% of the cases. Most (70.2%) of them occurred in mixed dentition period, and it had a male preponderance. Odontogenic keratocystic tumor occurred in the permanent dentition period. It had an equal site distribution. Odontoma was seen in 20.0% of the cases. Its site of predilection was the mandible. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor. Most of the cases occurred in the permanent dentition period. It affected the male and female equally. Calcifying epithelioma odontogenic tumor was seen in 11.8% of the cases. All the lesions occurred in the primary dentition period. It had no sex or site preponderance. Myxoma was seen in 3.6% of the cases. It was most common in the permanent dentition period, and it was more frequent in the male. Iliac crest bone graft was successfully performed in 28 patients, postoperative infection occurred in 2 patients, and no donor-site dysfunctions were reported. The observed differences in lesion type and distribution in this study compared with previous researches may be attributable to genetic and geographic variation in the populations studied. Iliac crest bone graft was suggested for pediatric mandible reconstruction. PMID:24785745

  1. Molecular imaging of cerebrovascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, Nohra; Jabbour, Pascal; Magnotta, Vincent; Hasan, David

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation is a key component in the pathogenesis of cerebrovascular lesions. Two agents have emerged as promising possibilities for imaging cerebrovascular lesions. These agents are ferumoxytol and myeloperoxidase (MPO)-specific paramagnetic magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Ferumoxytol is an iron oxide nanoparticle coated by a carbohydrate shell that is used in MRI studies as an inflammatory marker as it is cleared by macrophages. Ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI allows noninvasive assessment of the inflammatory status of cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations and, possibly, may differentiate "unstable" lesions that require early intervention from "stable" lesions that can be safely observed. Several pilot studies have also suggested that MPO-specific paramagnetic MR contrast agent, di-5-hydroxytryptamide of gadopentetate dimeglumine, may allow imaging of inflammation in the wall of saccular aneurysms in animal models. However, studies in human subjects have yet to be performed. In this paper, we review current data regarding ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI and MPO-specific paramagnetic MR contrast agent and discuss current and future applications. PMID:24323714

  2. Evaluation of conventional therapeutic methods versus maggot therapy in the evolution of healing of tegumental injuries in Wistar rats with and without diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Masiero, Franciéle Souza; Thyssen, Patricia Jacqueline

    2016-06-01

    Larval therapy consists on the application of sterilized carrion flies larvae, reared in laboratory, on acute, chronic, and/or infected wounds in order to promote healing. Conventional methods for treating injuries include mechanical debridement or silver-based dressings; however, they are not always effective for wound healing. Larval therapy is a feasible and safe treatment for therapeutic application and, in many cases, the only and the most recommended alternative for difficult healing injuries. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the competence of Cochliomyia macellaria F. (Diptera: Calliphoridae) as a suitable species for therapeutic application and evaluate time and effectiveness of the types of treatments most commonly used to treat integumental injuries. C. macellaria eggs were obtained from colonies established in laboratory and sterilized prior to application. Twenty-five larvae were applied for each centimeter squared of lesion. Lesions were induced in 24 Wistar rats; type 1 diabetes mellitus was induced in 12 of them. Animals were divided in four groups with three individuals each, being denominated: larval therapy, larval therapy associated with foam dressing with silver release, mechanical debridement with foam dressing silver and control group, without treatment. All treatments were applied once and held for 24 h. Medical application of larvae was found to be safe, as only dead tissue was removed, and efficient to accelerate healing process when compared to other treatments. PMID:26976407

  3. Full-thickness skin wound healing using autologous keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts with fibrin: bilayered versus single-layered substitute.

    PubMed

    Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj; Rameli, Mohd Adha bin P; Low, Kiat Cheong; Law, Jia Xian; Chua, Kien Hui; Latiff, Mazlyzam Bin Abdul; Saim, Aminuddin Bin

    2014-04-01

    Split-skin grafting (SSG) is the gold standard treatment for full-thickness skin defects. For certain patients, however, an extensive skin lesion resulted in inadequacies of the donor site. Tissue engineering offers an alternative approach by using a very small portion of an individual's skin to harvest cells for propagation and biomaterials to support the cells for implantation. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of autologous bilayered tissue-engineered skin (BTES) and single-layer tissue-engineered skin composed of only keratinocytes (SLTES-K) or fibroblasts (SLTES-F) as alternatives for full-thickness wound healing in a sheep model. Full-thickness skin biopsies were harvested from adult sheep. Isolated fibroblasts were cultured using medium Ham's F12: Dulbecco modified Eagle medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, whereas the keratinocytes were cultured using Define Keratinocytes Serum Free Medium. The BTES, SLTES-K, and SLTES-F were constructed using autologous fibrin as a biomaterial. Eight full-thickness wounds were created on the dorsum of the body of the sheep. On 4 wounds, polyvinyl chloride rings were used as chambers to prevent cell migration at the edge. The wounds were observed at days 7, 14, and 21. After 3 weeks of implantation, the sheep were euthanized and the skins were harvested. The excised tissues were fixed in formalin for histological examination via hematoxylin-eosin, Masson trichrome, and elastin van Gieson staining. The results showed that BTES, SLTES-K, and SLTES-F promote wound healing in nonchambered and chambered wounds, and BTES demonstrated the best healing potential. In conclusion, BTES proved to be an effective tissue-engineered construct that can promote the healing of full-thickness skin lesions. With the support of further clinical trials, this procedure could be an alternative to SSG for patients with partial- and full-thickness burns. PMID:24637651

  4. Healing of a surgically created partial detachment of the posterior cruciate ligament using marrow stimulation: an experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rodkey, William G; Arnoczky, Steven P; Steadman, J Richard

    2006-01-01

    The inability of intra-articular (cruciate) ligaments to generate a substantive reparative response may preclude the primary surgical repair of such lesions. A marrow stimulation technique that provides access to a fibrin scaffold, cytokines, and mesenchymal stem cells has been shown to be successful in generating a repair response in articular cartilage. We hypothesized that a similar approach may be effective in initiating and supporting a healing response in cruciate ligament injuries. The ability to treat cruciate ligament injuries by primary repair may have significant advantages over the more extensive reconstructive procedures currently advocated. Bilateral subtotal (75% of width) lacerations were made in the proximal aspect of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in 10 adult mongrel dogs. A marrow stimulation technique in which small holes were made through the femoral origin of the PCL into the marrow cavity immediately adjacent to the lesion was performed in one limb. The contralateral limb served as the non-stimulated control. Twelve weeks after surgery the extent of healing and the histological character of the repair tissue in both groups were compared. Marrow stimulation resulted in a statistically significant (P<.05) improvement in the healing of subtotal lacerations made in the PCL. The marrow-stimulated repair tissue was more cellular and had a more organized extracellular matrix than the repair tissue in the non-stimulated group. Our hypothesis was confirmed. Marrow stimulation can induce a "healing response" in intra-articular (cruciate) ligaments. This technique may have clinical applications in primary surgical repair of these structures. PMID:16468489

  5. Selected applications of Er:YAG and CO2 lasers for treatment of benign neoplasms and tumorous lesions in the mouth

    PubMed Central

    Andrysiak, Piotr; Sidorowicz, Krzysztof; Witmanowski, Henryk; Hędzelek, Wiesław; Sokalski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Benign neoplasms and hyperplastic tumorous lesions are common oral pathologies. These lesions require to be surgically removed by conventional surgery, laser, or electrosurgery. Surgical treatment aims at complete removal of pathological lesions and ensuring proper healing of the tissues to minimize the risk of lesion recurrence. Aim To present possible applications of Er:YAG and CO2 lasers in removal of benign neoplasms and tumorous lesions developing on oral mucosa as well as to specify indications and limitations of these two methods. Material and methods Temperature-induced injuries due to laser light application, possibility of post-operative histopathological evaluation of the removed tissue, efficacy of the cut and coagulation, healing process and completeness of laser surgeries give rise to our special concern. Results The main asset of the CO2 laser comparing to Er:YAG laser is an effective coagulation while thermal injury to the tissues is its limitation, especially with multiple passage of the beam and too high power applied. Er:YAG laser application does not exclude histopathological examination of the removed lesion tissue which is its advantage over CO2 laser. Conclusions Still, insufficient coagulation is a limitation ofits use in the case of richly vascularized lesions. PMID:26759541

  6. Creating a healing community: the role for physicians and nurses.

    PubMed

    Nickens, Wayne; Patchell, Beverly

    2005-01-01

    Most of what is written and said about healing is focused on the individual and their personal pursuit of the experience of being healed. The Healing Community shifts that focus to a larger perspective. Indigenous people have recognized the importance of community for centuries, identifying the worst possible consequence for behavior as banishment or exile from their community, not death. In the holistic view, life and death are seen as being on a continuum that occurs within a community, with all being valued. It is time to release our self-imposed and society endorsed exile from what truly heals our relationship with a greater Power and each other. PMID:16028451

  7. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing. PMID:26611923

  8. Chemokine Involvement in Fetal and Adult Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Swathi; Watson, Carey L.; Ranjan, Rajeev; King, Alice; Bollyky, Paul L.; Keswani, Sundeep G.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Fetal wounds heal with a regenerative phenotype that is indistinguishable from surrounding skin with restored skin integrity. Compared to this benchmark, all postnatal wound healing is impaired and characterized by scar formation. The biologic basis of the fetal regenerative phenotype can serve as a roadmap to recapitulating regenerative repair in adult wounds. Reduced leukocyte infiltration, likely mediated, in part, through changes in the chemokine milieu, is a fundamental feature of fetal wound healing. Recent Advances: The contributions of chemokines to wound healing are a topic of active investigation. Recent discoveries have opened the possibility of targeting chemokines therapeutically to treat disease processes and improve healing capability, including the possibility of achieving a scarless phenotype in postnatal wounds. Critical Issues: Successful wound healing is a complex process, in which there is a significant interplay between multiple cell types, signaling molecules, growth factors, and extracellular matrix. Chemokines play a crucial role in this interplay and have been shown to have different effects in various stages of the healing process. Understanding how these chemokines are locally produced and regulated during wound healing and how the chemokine milieu differs in fetal versus postnatal wounds may help us identify ways in which we can target chemokine pathways. Future Directions: Further studies on the role of chemokines and their role in the healing process will greatly advance the potential for using these molecules as therapeutic targets. PMID:26543680

  9. Inflammation and Neuropeptides: The Connection in Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Leena; Nabzdyk, Christoph; Andersen, Nicholas D; LoGerfo, Frank W; Veves, Aristidis

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the interaction between neuropeptides and inflammatory mediators as it pertains to diabetic wound healing. Abnormal wound healing is a major complication of both type I and type II diabetes and is the most frequent cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputation. Wound healing requires the orchestrated integration of complex biological and molecular events. Inflammation, proliferation and migration of cells followed by angiogenesis and re-epithelization are essential phases of wound healing. The link between wound healing and the nervous system is clinically apparent as peripheral neuropathy is reported in 30–50% of diabetic patients and is the most common and sensitive predictor of foot ulceration. The bidirectional connection between the nervous and the immune systems and the role it plays in wound healing has emerged as one of the focal features of the wound healing dogma. The mediators of this connection include neuropeptides and the cytokines released from different cells including immune and cutaneous cells. Therefore, to develop successful wound healing therapies, it is vital to understand in depth the signaling pathways in the neuro-immune axis and their implication in diabetic wound healing. PMID:19138453

  10. Healing from Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Theoretical Model

    PubMed Central

    Draucker, Claire Burke; Martsolf, Donna S.; Roller, Cynthia; Knapik, Gregory; Ross, Ratchneewan; Stidham, Andrea Warner

    2014-01-01

    Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is a prevalent social and healthcare problem. The processes by which individuals heal from CSA are not clearly understood. The purpose of this study was to develop a theoretical model to describe how adults heal from CSA. Community recruitment for an on-going, broader project on sexual violence throughout the lifespan, referred to as the Sexual Violence Study, yielded a subsample of 48 women and 47 men who had experienced CSA. During semi-structured, open-ended interviews, they were asked to describe their experiences with healing from CSA and other victimization throughout their lives. Constructivist grounded theory methods were used with these data to develop constructs and hypotheses about healing. For the Sexual Violence Study, frameworks were developed to describe the participants' life patterns, parenting experiences, disclosures about sexual violence, spirituality, and altruism. Several analytic techniques were used to synthesize the findings of these frameworks to develop an overarching theoretical model that describes healing from CSA. The model includes four stages of healing, five domains of functioning, and six enabling factors that facilitate movement from one stage to the next. The findings indicate that healing is a complex and dynamic trajectory. The model can be used to alert clinicians to a variety of processes and enabling factors that facilitate healing in several domains and to guide discussions on important issues related to healing from CSA. PMID:21812546

  11. The Topical Effect of Grape Seed Extract 2% Cream on Surgery Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Hemmati, Ali Asghar; foroozan, Maryam; Houshmand, Gholamreza; Moosavi, Zahra Beigom; Bahadoram, Mohammad; Maram, Nader Shakiba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reducing the wound healing time is crucial in wound as it lowers the chance of infection and decreases complications and cost. Grape seed extract has the ability to release endothelial growth factor and its topical application results in contraction and closure of the skin wound. Furthermore, it possesses antioxidant and antibacterial properties. In several studies it has been proved effective in animals. Therefore, due to low side effects and recognition of herbal medicine, we decided to evaluate the effect of grape seed extract 2% herbal cream on human skin lesions. Materials: This study is a double blind clinical trial conducted on two groups of treatment and placebo. Surgery was performed on skin lesions such as skin tags and moles which were found on the neck, trunk and limbs (except for face). After enrollment and obtaining informed consent from participants, they were randomized into two groups of treatment and placebo. Excision of the lesions was done by surgical scissors. The lesions got restored by secondary intention method. After the first day of treatment, the patients were visited on the 3rd, 7th, 10th, 14th, and 21st day. Grape seed extract cream 2% was produced and coded by the Faculty of Pharmacy, Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences. In order to compare the two groups, T-test was used. For time assessing, analysis of variance with repeated measures was employed. Results: The results showed complete repair of wounds averagely on day 8 for the treatment group and on day 14 for the placebo group, which was clearly significant in terms of statistical difference (p=0.00). Conclusion: Proanthocyanidins in grape seed extract trigger the release of vascular endothelial growth factor and its topical application causes wound contraction and closure. Curing skin lesions with grape seed extract caused proliferation areas with protected boundaries in epithelium, increased cell density and increased deposition of connective tissue at the wound site

  12. An infrared illuminator for a healing bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharekar, Madhu A.; Crowley, Edward

    2011-05-01

    Bio-stimulation by a light is called the Light Therapy (LT) and an Infrared Illuminator (IRI) provides the human sleeping in a Healing Bed (HB) continuously a dose of the IR radiation. General specifications for the IRI given below and its data are discussed in the paper. (1) Use of 60" wide by 80" long queen size bed. (2) A LED providing 1.5 mw at 1550 nm is selected. (3) 60 LED are mounted in series and parallel on a chip and this chip is mounted on top of the HB.

  13. Regenerative materials that facilitate wound healing.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Gerit; Wallin, Kelly; Tenenhaus, Mayer

    2012-07-01

    Wounds and damaged tissue become problematic when the tissue repair process does not proceed in a normal manner. Standard treatment of wounds entails topical dressings and devices in conjunction with good wound care practices. Good practices adequately support healing in most patients. Difficult, chronic, or recalcitrant wounds may require the use of more advanced technologies. Wounds that are full thickness or present with the absence of a matrix, may particularly benefit from regenerative materials. This article focuses on the use of cellular and acellular materials as well as chemical constructs to support granulation, tissue repair, and wound closure. PMID:22732374

  14. Postoperative exposure of bioresorbable GTR membranes: effect on healing results.

    PubMed

    Christgau, M; Bader, N; Schmalz, G; Hiller, K A; Wenzel, A

    1997-09-01

    The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of postoperative exposure of two different bioresorbable membranes on the guided tissue regeneration (GTR) healing results compared to nonexposed sites. In each of 25 patients one pair of contralateral intrabony lesions was treated either with polylactic acid (PLA) or polyglactin 910 (PG-910) membranes. Postoperative exposure occurred in 9 PLA and 13 PG-910 sites. Standardized clinical [papillary bleeding index (PBI), gingival recession (REC), probing pocket depth (PPD), probing attachment level (PAL)] and radiographic examinations (digital subtraction radiography) were performed immediately before (baseline) and 6 and 12 months postoperatively (p.o.). Subgingival bacterial samples from surgical sites were evaluated by culture at baseline, 6 weeks, and 6 and 12 months p.o. Six months after surgery the changes (delta) of REC were significantly (P < or = 0.05) greater in exposed than in nonexposed sites, independently of the membrane material (median): exposed sites, delta REC = -1 mm; nonexposed sites, delta REC = 0.0 mm. However, 12 months p.o. no significant differences were found due to a decrease in the initial recessions in exposed sites. Although a higher percentage of exposed than nonexposed sites harbored periodontal pathogens 6 weeks p.o. at the gingiva-faced membrane surface, membrane exposure did not have a significant negative effect on delta PPD, delta PAL, or radiographic bone density changes 6 and 12 months p.o. Both membranes showed significant gains in PAL and bone density in both exposed and nonexposed sites. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that with consistent infection control the postoperative exposure of PLA and PG-910 membranes has no significant negative effect on the regeneration outcome, although higher initial gingival recessions must be expected than in the nonexposed sites. However, in exposed sites plaque and infection control were clearly impeded by the rough, exposed

  15. Healing Circles: An Ethnographic Study of the Interactions Among Health and Healing Practitioners From Multiple Disciplines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Healing circle” is a term that has been employed by a group of Northern California integrative medicine researchers as we embarked on an 8-year ethnographic study. As a clinical medical anthropologist and registered nurse specializing in integrative practice and behavioral health, I undertook this study with colleagues from various health disciplines. PMID:25105070

  16. Focal accumulation of an apolipoprotein B-based synthetic oligopeptide in the healing rabbit arterial wall

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, I.L.; Lees, R.S.; Chang, M.Y.; Lees, A.M. )

    1990-02-01

    The functions of surface-accessible domains of apolipoprotein (apo) B, the protein moiety of low density lipoprotein (LDL), are unknown, aside from the LDL receptor-binding domain, which lies toward the carboxyl-terminal end of apoB. Since LDL accumulation in arterial lesions does not depend on recognition of LDLs by a cell-surface receptor, we synthesized an oligopeptide with the sequence of the trypsin-accessible domain of apoB that lies closest to the amino-terminal end of the protein and compared its biological activity to that of another synthetic oligopeptide with the sequence of the heparin- and apoB/apoE receptor-binding domains of apoE. (Tyrosine was added at the amino-terminal end of each peptide to facilitate radiolabeling.) The 18-amino acid apoB-based peptide included residues 1000-1016 of apoB, for which no function has been previously described. In radioautographs, the 125I-labeled peptide accumulated focally at the healing edges of regenerating endothelial islands in the balloon-catheter deendothelialized rabbit aorta. In contrast, the 21-residue apoE-based peptide, which included residues 129-148 of apoE, accumulated diffusely and uniformly throughout the deendothelialized areas of the aorta. The data show that focal binding of the apoB-based peptide can delineate arterial lesions and suggest that this arterial wall-binding domain of apoB mediates accumulation of LDLs in arterial lesions.

  17. Hock lesions and free-stall design.

    PubMed

    Weary, D M; Taszkun, I

    2000-04-01

    We compared the prevalence and severity of skin lesions on the hocks of lactating dairy cows in southern British Columbia, comparing 20 farms using three common bedding surfaces: sawdust, sand, and geotextile mattresses. Skin lesions were scored at five positions on the hock. For each position we noted if the lesion showed inflammatory attributes, and then assigned a severity score. Of the 1752 lactating cows scored, 1267 cows (73%) had at least one hock lesion. Of those cows with lesions, 87% had lesions on both legs, 76% had lesions on more than one location on the hock, and 78% had a lesion of at least moderate severity (i.e., evidence of skin breakage or an area of hair loss >10 cm2). Lesions were most prevalent on farms that used geotextile mattresses (91% of cows) and least common on farms that used sand (24% of cows). Moreover, lesions on cows from farms using mattresses were more numerous and more severe than those on cows from sand-bedded farms. The prevalence and severity of lesions on farms using sawdust was intermediate. Lesions also varied in relation to location on the hock. For farms using geotextile mattresses, lesions were more common and more severe on the lateral surfaces of both the tuber calcis and the tarsal joint. On farms using sawdust, lesions were common on the dorsal surface of the tuber calcis and the lateral surfaces of both the tuber calcis and the tarsal joint. Lesions were rare on all five positions for cows from sand-bedded farms. Among the 10 farms sampled using sawdust, we found a significant negative relationship between the length of the stall and severity of lesions. For cows with lesions, the number and severity of lesions increased with age. PMID:10791785

  18. Importance of luminal and mucosal zinc in the mechanism of experimental gastric ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Opoka, W; Adamek, D; Plonka, M; Reczynski, W; Bas, B; Drozdowicz, D; Jagielski, P; Sliwowski, Z; Adamski, P; Brzozowski, T

    2010-10-01

    Zinc has been reported to exert a gastroprotective action against various experimental gastric lesions suggesting that this trace element is involved in the integrity of the gastric mucosa. Compounds containing zinc, such as polaprezinc, were developed in Japan and used as an antiulcer drugs in the treatment of human peptic ulcer disease. However, the precise mechanism of Zn(2+) containing compounds and their effects on mucosal integrity, gastroprotection and ulcer healing remain unclear. We have determined the efficacy of zinc hydroaspartate, a compound containing Zn(2+), in the mechanism of gastric secretion and ulcer healing in rats with chronic gastric ulcers induced by acetic acid (initial ulcer area = 28 mm(2)). Rats with gastric ulcers were randomized into two groups: A) with gastric fistulas (GF) and B) without gastric fistulas and received a daily treatment with zinc hydroaspartate (32-130 mg/kg-d i.g.) for 3, 7 and 14 days. At the termination of each treatment, the area of gastric ulcers were examined by planimetry, the gastric blood flow (GBF) at ulcer margin was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry and H(2)-gas clearance methods. The venous blood was withdrawn for a measurement of plasma gastrin levels by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The concentration of Zn(2+) in the gastric juice and mucosa at the ulcer margin were determined by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) methods and the gastric biopsy samples were taken for histopathological assessment of the quality of ulcer healing. The ulcers healed gradually, with the ulcer area in the vehicle control rats being diminished by 15%, 48% and 78% upon ulcer induction at 3, 7 and 14 days, respectively. Zinc hydroaspartate dose-dependently inhibited the area of gastric ulcer, the dose reducing this area by 50% (ID(50)) being about 60 mg/kg-d. The mucosal concentration of Zn(2+) significantly was unchanged from the baseline immediately after ulcer

  19. Development of self-healing polymers via amine-epoxy chemistry: II. Systematic evaluation of self-healing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He; Yang, Jinglei

    2014-06-01

    Part I of this study (H Zhang and J Yang 2014 Smart Mater. Struct. 23 065003) reported the preparation and characterization of epoxy microcapsules (EP-capsules) and amine loaded hollow glass bubbles (AM-HGBs), and the modeling of a two-part self-healing system. In part II, the self-healing performance of this material system is systematically investigated. Various factors including the ratio, the total concentration and the size of the two carriers are studied as well as the healing temperature and the post heat treatment process. The best healing performance is obtained at a ratio of 1:3 of EP-capsules to AM-HGBs. It is observed that a higher concentration of larger carriers, together with a higher healing temperature, enables better healing behavior. Healing efficiency of up to 93% is obtained in these systems. In addition, post heat treatment decreases the healing efficiency due to stoichiometric mismatch of healing agents caused by leakage of amine in the HGBs at elevated temperature.

  20. Solid state self-healing system: Effects of using PDGEBA, PVC and PVA as linear healing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhamad, Noor Nabilah; Jamil, Mohd. Suzeren Md.; Abdullah, Shahrum

    2014-09-01

    The solid state self-healing system was obtained by employing a thermosetting epoxy resin, into which a thermoplastic is dissolved. In this study, the effect of healing efficiency was investigated by using different thermoplastic polymers which are poly(bisphenol-A-co-epichlorohydrin), polyvinyl chloride and polyvinyl alcohol as healing agents. Healing was achieved by heating the fractured resins to a specific temperature i.e. above their glass transition temperature (Tg) which obtained from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) to mobilize the polymeric chains of the healing agent. The curing reaction in the epoxy resins were characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Izod impact test was been performed to demonstrate self-healing of the different specimens. Under test, it was found that healable resin with PDGEBA has highest healing efficiency followed by PVC and PVA, with 63%, 35% and 18% of average percentage healing efficiencies respectively. These results are due to the different solubility parameters of the thermoset/network and thermoplastic polymer which led to the phase separation. Morphological studies prove the fracture-healing process and morphological properties of the resins.

  1. Gene gun transferring-bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) gene enhanced bone fracture healing in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenju; Wei, Haifeng; Xia, Chunmei; Zhu, Xiaomeng; Hou, Guozhu; Xu, Feng; Song, Xinghua; Zhan, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Transferring the bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) genes into the tissues or cells can improve the bone healing of the fracture has been widely accepted. We evaluated the efficiency of using gene gun to transfer the BMP-2 gene thereby affected the healing of a fractured bone. Methods: The vector coding for BMP-2 was constructed by a non-replicating encephalo-myocarditis virus (ECMV)-based vector. The segmental bone defect (1.5 cm) model was created by a wire-saw at the middle part of the radius bone of the New Zealand white rabbits. Then either BMP-2 gene or control vector without BMP-2 gene was injected into the tissues around the fracture site. Healing of the defects was monitored radiographically for 9 weeks, bone consolidation was determined by the Lane-Sandhu score pre- and post-operatively, which can evaluated bone formation, bone connect and bone plasticity. Results: The radiographic score and bone consolidation rates were significantly higher in animals injected with BMP-2 gene group as compared with control vector-injected animals (P<0.05). The control group still showed no radiological signs of stable healing. Western-blot and RT-PCR showed BMP-2 expression was significant increase in the tissues around the site of osseous lesions in comparison with the control vector-injected animals (P<0.05). Conclusions: Our results suggested that BMP-2 gene transferred by gene gun could increase the expression of BMP-2 protein and improved the bone callus formation therefore shortened the time of bone defect healing. PMID:26884910

  2. Nonoperative biological treatment approach for partial Achilles tendon lesion.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Presti, Mirco Lo; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2010-02-01

    Tendon injuries, especially those of the Achilles tendon, are major concerns in sports medicine. The clinical presentation can be acute or chronic and the pathologic findings can range from peritendonitis to full-thickness tendon rupture. Nonsurgical treatment is not always successful; in particular, significant partial ruptures seem to respond poorly to conservative measures and do not improve with time. Surgery is most often considered the favored treatment option for this kind of lesion to obtain pain relief and full functionality with long-standing effects.This article describes a case of a partial tear of the Achilles tendon in a 34-year-old competitive athlete where surgical treatment was avoided in favor of a new biological approach. We applied autologous platelet growth factors through multiple platelet-rich plasma injections; approximately 6.5 billion platelets were injected into the lesion 3 times, 7 days apart. The treatment with platelet-rich plasma and a progressive rehabilitation program allowed the patient to play for 20 minutes in a basketball game 64 days after the trauma and in a full game 75 days after the trauma. To date, 18 months later, he has participated regularly in all the season's games and received no further treatment for his tendon.The fast tissue repair, confirmed by magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging, allowed a swift return to full functionality and competitive sports activity, suggesting a possible role of platelet growth factors in promoting rapid tendon healing with high-quality tissue. This biological approach may represent a less-invasive therapeutic option even in cases where severe tendon lesions are candidates for surgical treatment. PMID:20192152

  3. A novel hypothesis: the application of platelet-rich plasma can promote the clinical healing of white-white meniscal tears.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li-Cheng; Gao, Shu-Guang; Xu, Mai; Jiang, Wei; Tian, Jian; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2012-08-01

    The white-white tears (meniscus lesion completely in the avascular zone) are without blood supply and theoretically cannot heal. Basal research has demonstrated that menisci are unquestionably important in load bearing, load redistribution, shock absorption, joint lubrication and the stabilization of the knee joint. It has been proven that partial or all-meniscusectomy results in an accelerated degeneration of cartilage and an increased rate of early osteoarthritis. Knee surgeons must face the difficult decision of removing or, if possible, retaining the meniscus; if it is possible to retain the meniscus, surgeons must address the difficulties of meniscal healing. Some preliminary approaches have progressed to improve meniscal healing. However, the problem of promoting meniscal healing in the avascular area has not yet been resolved. The demanding nature of the approach as well as its low utility and efficacy has impeded the progress of these enhancement techniques. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a platelet concentration derived from autologous blood. In recent years, PRP has been used widely in preclinical and clinical applications for bone regeneration and wound healing. Therefore, we hypothesize that the application of platelet-rich plasma for white-white meniscal tears will be a simple and novel technique of high utility in knee surgery. PMID:22847210

  4. Granuloma faciale with extrafacial lesions.

    PubMed

    Rossiello, Luigi; Palla, Marco; Aiello, Francesco Saviero; Baroni, Adone; Satriano, Rocco Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with a 7-year history of gradually enlarging plaques on his face and trunk. The first lesions had developed on both sides of the forehead and the left cheekbone (Figure 1). Four years later similar lesions appeared on his neck and back. He presented a histologic report of a biopsy specimen from a facial plaque performed 5 years earlier that was diagnostic for granuloma faciale. He had different treatments such as topical steroids and cryotherapy without improvement. The appearance of new lesions on his trunk and the gradual enlarging of the old lesions convinced the patient to seek further treatment. Physical examination revealed dusky, violaceous plaques and papules, 0.5 to 2 cm, well-circumscribed, slightly elevated, and located on the face and trunk, with mild pruritus (Figure 1 and Figure 2). Laboratory investigations, including complete blood cell count, VDRL test, antinuclear antibody test, biochemical parameters, and chest x-ray, did not reveal any abnormalities. A skin biopsy taken from the upper part of the back showed similar features to the facial lesion, detected 5 years before, revealing a dense, polymorphous infiltrate involving mid and deep dermis and displaying a diffuse and perivascular pattern (Figure 3A). A narrow grenz zone of normal collagen was consistently observed between dermal infiltrate and epidermis as well as around the pilosebaceous follicles (Figure 3A). The infiltrate mainly consisted of eosinophils and lymphocytes, but neutrophils (often displaying leukocytoclasis), macrophages, and plasma cells were also present (Figures 3B, 3C). Some mast cells were also identified by staining with toluidine blue (Figure 3D). Perivascular infiltrates were often seen, sometimes penetrating vessel walls and in association with leukocytoclasis. Hyalinization of vessel walls, extravasation of red blood cells around capillaries, and nuclear dust were also noted. The epidermis did not show any remarkable change except for

  5. Study on wound healing activity of Punica granatum peel.

    PubMed

    Murthy, K N Chidambara; Reddy, Vittal K; Veigas, Jyothi M; Murthy, Uma D

    2004-01-01

    The methanolic extract of dried pomegranate (Punica granatum) peels showed the presence of a high content of phenolic compounds (44.0%) along with other constituents. This extract was formulated as a 10% (wt/wt) water-soluble gel and was studied for its wound healing property against an excision wound on the skin of Wistar rats. The activity was compared with that of a commercial topical antibacterial applicant. The wound healing activity was assessed by measuring the percent contraction in skin and estimation of collagen content in terms of hydroxyproline content. Healed skin was also subjected to histopathological studies to examine the microscopic changes. The animals treated with 2.5% gel showed moderate healing (55.8% and 40.8% healing compared with negative and positive controls, respectively), whereas the group treated with 5.0% gel showed good healing (59.5% and 44.5% healing compared with negative and positive controls, respectively). The amount of hydroxyproline increased by twofold in the group treated with 5.0% gel. Histopathological studies also supported the wound healing on application of the gels. The group of rats that received 5.0% gel showed complete healing after 10 days, whereas in rats treated with 2.5% gel, healing was observed on day 12, in contrast to the positive control animals receiving the blank gel, which took 16-18 days for complete healing. The results of this study may be extended to different types of wounds so that the formulation could be exploited to develop it as a topical dermatological formulation. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the extract showed the presence of gallic acid and catechin as major components. PMID:15298776

  6. Wound Healing in Potato Tuber Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Borchert, R.; McChesney, J. D.; Watson, D.

    1974-01-01

    Several aspects of wound healing in tuber tissue of potato (Solanum tuberosum var. Kennebec), known to require protein synthesis, are inhibited by 2,4-dichlorobenzyltributylphosphonium chloride (Phosphon D). Cell division was completely blocked by 60 μm Phosphon and markedly reduced by concentrations as low as 3 μm. When applied at the time of wounding, 0.25mm Phosphon completely prevented the wound-induced respiratory increase. Application at 15 hours after wounding arrested respiration at the rate present at that time. The same concentrations of Phosphon inhibited auxin-induced cell expansion of the tissue, protein synthesis as measured by the incorporation of leucine-14C into the trichloroacetic acid-insoluble fraction of tissue disks, and the appearance of wound-induced peroxidase isozymes. None of these inhibitory effects of Phosphon could be prevented or reversed by the application of gibberellic acid. All wound-induced processes inhibited by Phosphon are also inhibited by cycloheximide. It is suggested that inhibitory effects of Phosphon on wound healing in potato and on other developmental processes in excised plant tissues which cannot be reversed by gibberellin are due to interference with protein synthesis. PMID:16658674

  7. Fracture healing in the elderly: A review.

    PubMed

    Foulke, Bradley A; Kendal, Adrian R; Murray, David W; Pandit, Hemant

    2016-10-01

    Older patients are commonly at a higher risk of experiencing a bone fracture. Complications during fracture healing, including delayed union and non-union, can arise as a result of a multitude of patient and treatment factors. This review describes those factors which contribute to a greater risk of delayed union and non-union with particular reference to the elderly population and discusses therapies that may enhance the fracture healing process in the hope of reducing the incidence of delayed union and non-union. Increasing age does seem to increase the risk of delayed union or non-union. In addition, smoking and the treatment of post-fracture pain with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) put the patient at the greatest risk, while ultrasound therapy appears to be a non-invasive, effective treatment option to reduce the risk of delayed union or non-union. The use of growth factors and of stem cells and the role of surgery are also discussed. PMID:27621238

  8. The Epigenetic Regulation of Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christopher J; Mardaryev, Andrei N; Sharov, Andrey A; Fessing, Michael Y; Botchkarev, Vladimir A

    2014-07-01

    Significance: Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms are essential for epidermal homeostasis and contribute to the pathogenesis of many skin diseases, including skin cancer and psoriasis. However, while the epigenetic regulation of epidermal homeostasis is now becoming active area of research, the epigenetic mechanisms controlling the wound healing response remain relatively untouched. Recent Advances: Substantial progress achieved within the last two decades in understanding epigenetic mechanisms controlling gene expression allowed defining several levels, including covalent DNA and histone modifications, ATP-dependent and higher-order chromatin chromatin remodeling, as well as noncoding RNA- and microRNA-dependent regulation. Research pertained over the last few years suggests that epigenetic regulatory mechanisms play a pivotal role in the regulation of skin regeneration and control an execution of reparative gene expression programs in both skin epithelium and mesenchyme. Critical Issues: Epigenetic regulators appear to be inherently involved in the processes of skin repair, and are able to dynamically regulate keratinocyte proliferation, differentiation, and migration, together with influencing dermal regeneration and neoangiogenesis. This is achieved through a series of complex regulatory mechanisms that are able to both stimulate and repress gene activation to transiently alter cellular phenotype and behavior, and interact with growth factor activity. Future Directions: Understanding the molecular basis of epigenetic regulation is a priority as it represents potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of both acute and chronic skin conditions. Future research is, therefore, imperative to help distinguish epigenetic modulating drugs that can be used to improve wound healing. PMID:25032066

  9. Quantifying cell behaviors during embryonic wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashburn, David; Ma, Xiaoyan; Crews, Sarah; Lynch, Holley; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2011-03-01

    During embryogenesis, internal forces induce motions in cells leading to widespread motion in tissues. We previously developed laser hole-drilling as a consistent, repeatable way to probe such epithelial mechanics. The initial recoil (less than 30s) gives information about physical properties (elasticity, force) of cells surrounding the wound, but the long-term healing process (tens of minutes) shows how cells adjust their behavior in response to stimuli. To study this biofeedback in many cells through time, we developed tools to quantify statistics of individual cells. By combining watershed segmentation with a powerful and efficient user interaction system, we overcome problems that arise in any automatic segmentation from poor image quality. We analyzed cell area, perimeter, aspect ratio, and orientation relative to wound for a wide variety of laser cuts in dorsal closure. We quantified statistics for different regions as well, i.e. cells near to and distant from the wound. Regional differences give a distribution of wound-induced changes, whose spatial localization provides clues into the physical/chemical signals that modulate the wound healing response. Supported by the Human Frontier Science Program (RGP0021/2007 C).

  10. Mechanoregulation of Angiogenesis in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Lancerotto, Luca; Orgill, Dennis P.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Mechanical forces are important regulators of cell and tissue function. Endothelial cells proliferate in response to tissue stretch and the mechanical properties of the environment direct capillary sprouting and growth. As the vascular network is a key factor in physiology and disease, control of the vascularity by means of mechanical forces could lead to the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. Recent Advances: Increased understanding of mechanobiology has stimulated translational research and allowed the development and optimization of clinical devices that exploit mechanical forces for the treatment of diseases, in particular in the field of wound healing. Stretching in distraction osteogenesis and tissue expansion induces neogenesis of well-vascularized tissues. In micro-deformational wound therapy, micro-mechanical distortions of the wound bed stimulate cell proliferation and angiogenesis by stretching resident cells to improve healing of difficult wounds. Relief from tension antagonizes proliferation and angiogenesis in primarily closed wounds allowing for better scar quality. Critical Issues: The integration of mechanobiology into traditional cell biology and pathophysiology in general is not yet complete and further research is needed to fill existing gaps, in particular in the complexity of in vivo conditions. Future Directions: Still largely unexplored approaches based on mechanical perturbation of the micro-/macro-environment can be devised to overcome the limits of current strategies in a broad spectrum of clinical conditions. PMID:25302137

  11. Hansen's Oral Life Histories and Healing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Lee

    2013-08-01

    The individual oral statement is human story based on experience. The personal experience forms unconsciousness which appears in a form of oral statement by ego that doesn't want to lose existence. Thus, the process which exposes a tormented hearts is the objectification of oneself. Through this step, oral person attains a healing. If this sort of individual oral is accrued, the undeserved personal affairs could be a history. In case of Hansen's disease patient, She could escape from negative understanding about herself and the world. Furthermore, She kept formating her values about meaningful life and future oriented value. Also, She wants to keep a record of her life. She comes to know that what she denied is actually what she should surmount over oral statement. As a result, She could attains a healing for oneself through oral statement. The oral statement made her look into she's problems. Therefore, oral statement is a self-realization. Through this, person could know what the problem is and solution. This research is about only one person, so there is need for more cases and studies. If this sort of individual oral statement is accrued, there could be a curative narration. This can suggest an curative alternative when we suffer from problem of life. The merit of this research is rendering this possibility. PMID:24005645

  12. Walking with Madhu: healing ped/agogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, T. Francene

    2015-03-01

    In this essay, the author responds to Madhu Prakash's piece on friendship gardens and healing our "Mother" through Prakash's central question, How to birth a world in which many worlds flourish and complement each other in their wild, divine diversity; all equally enjoying Ahimsa flourishing and happiness? Coming from the standpoint of schooling, education, and teacher preparation, the author works to reground the descriptors of "pre-service" and "in-service" from a technical discourse to an ecological one, where the notion of service becomes expansive and pedagogical. Illustrated is how people in community are building gardens and working with soil in a way that is restorative for more-than human relationships, illuminating the deep ways gardens heal and nourish. This is especially important as we emerge from the wake of Cold War numbness, where gardens enable and empower continued societal growth from ideological mindset of "against" to an increasing ability to look at the discord inside of our own communities/selves and move to growing "with." Working with soil not only opens us to relationship and hospitality with one another, but also inspires peace with the earth.

  13. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, Joseph C.; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by Rochal Industries. The scientists/engineers at Rochal have participated in commercializing products in the field of ophthalmology, including rigid gas permeable contact lenses, soft hydrogel contact lenses, silicone hydrogel contact lenses, contact lens care solutions and cleaners, intraocular lens materials, intraocular controlled drug delivery, topical/intraocular anesthesia, and in the field of wound care, as non-stinging, spray-on liquid bandages to protect skin from moisture and body fluids and medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Current areas of entrepreneurial activity at Rochal Industries pertain to the development of new classes of biomaterials for wound healing, primarily in regard to microbial infection, chronic wound care, burn injuries and surgical procedures, with emphasis on innovation in product creation, which include cell-compatible substrates/scaffolds for wound healing, antimicrobial materials for opportunistic pathogens and biofilm reduction, necrotic wound debridement, scar remediation, treatment of diabetic ulcers, amelioration of pressure ulcers, amelioration of neuropathic pain and adjuvants for skin tissue substitutes. PMID:27047680

  14. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Joseph C; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E

    2016-06-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by Rochal Industries. The scientists/engineers at Rochal have participated in commercializing products in the field of ophthalmology, including rigid gas permeable contact lenses, soft hydrogel contact lenses, silicone hydrogel contact lenses, contact lens care solutions and cleaners, intraocular lens materials, intraocular controlled drug delivery, topical/intraocular anesthesia, and in the field of wound care, as non-stinging, spray-on liquid bandages to protect skin from moisture and body fluids and medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Current areas of entrepreneurial activity at Rochal Industries pertain to the development of new classes of biomaterials for wound healing, primarily in regard to microbial infection, chronic wound care, burn injuries and surgical procedures, with emphasis on innovation in product creation, which include cell-compatible substrates/scaffolds for wound healing, antimicrobial materials for opportunistic pathogens and biofilm reduction, necrotic wound debridement, scar remediation, treatment of diabetic ulcers, amelioration of pressure ulcers, amelioration of neuropathic pain and adjuvants for skin tissue substitutes. PMID:27047680

  15. Effect of medicinal plants on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Budovsky, Arie; Yarmolinsky, Ludmila; Ben-Shabat, Shimon

    2015-01-01

    In the United States alone, chronic wounds affect 6.5 million patients. It is expected that the number of chronic wounds will increase worldwide due to the increase in age-related conditions and pathologies such as diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases. An estimated excess of US$25 billion is spent annually on treatment of chronic wounds, and the burden is rapidly growing due to increasing healthcare costs, an aging population, and a sharp rise in the incidence of diabetes and obesity worldwide. While current therapeutic agents have generally inadequate efficacy and number of serious adverse effects, the medicinal plants have been used in medicine since ancient times and are well known for their abilities to promote wound healing and prevent infection without grave side effects. Thus, herbal therapy may be an alternative strategy for treatment of wounds. The purpose of this review is to provide the verified data on the medicinal plants of the world flora with wound healing activity including the biologically active substances belonging to these herbal preparations and describe in detail the various cellular and molecular mechanisms of their actions. PMID:25703533

  16. Enhancing spontaneous stem cell healing (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MAGUIRE, GREG; FRIEDMAN, PETER

    2014-01-01

    Adult stem cells are distributed throughout the human body and are responsible to a great extent for the body’s ability to maintain and heal itself. Accumulating data since the 1990s regarding stem cells have demonstrated that the beneficial effects of stem cells are not restricted to their ability to differentiate and are more likely due to their ability to release a multitude of molecules. Recent studies indicated that ≤80% of the therapeutic benefit of adult stem cells is manifested by the stem cell released molecules (SRM) rather than the differentiation of the stem cells into mature tissue. Stem cells may release potent combinations of factors that modulate the molecular composition of the cellular milieu to evoke a multitude of responses from neighboring cells. A multitude of pathways are involved in cellular and tissue function and, when the body is in a state of disease or trauma, a multitude of pathways are involved in the underlying mechanisms of that disease or trauma. Therefore, stem cells represent a natural systems-based biological factory for the production and release of a multitude of molecules that interact with the system of biomolecular circuits underlying disease or tissue damage. Currently, efforts are aimed at defining, stimulating, enhancing and harnessing SRM mechanisms, in order to develop systems-based methods for tissue regeneration, develop drugs/biologics or other therapeutics and enhance the release of SRM into the body for natural healing through proper dietary, exercise and other lifestyle strategies. PMID:24649089

  17. THE RECOGNITION AND TREATMENT OF SUPERIOR LABRAL (SLAP) LESIONS IN THE OVERHEAD ATHLETE

    PubMed Central

    Macrina, Leonard C.; Cain, E. Lyle; Dugas, Jeffrey R.; Andrews, James R.

    2013-01-01

    The overhead athlete presents with a unique profile that may predispose them to specific pathology. Injury to the superior aspect of the glenoid labrum (SLAP lesions) poses a significant challenge to the rehabilitation specialist due to the complex nature and wide variety of etiological factors associated with these lesions. A thorough clinical evaluation and proper identification of the extent of labral injury is important in order to determine the most appropriate non‐operative and/or surgical management. Postoperative rehabilitation is based on the specific surgical procedure that has been performed, as well as the extent, location, and mechanism of labral pathology and associated lesions. Emphasis is placed on protecting the healing labrum while gradually restoring range of motion, strength, and dynamic stability of the glenohumeral joint. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the anatomy and pathomechanics of SLAP lesions and review specific clinical examination techniques used to identify these lesions in the overhead athlete. Furthermore, a review of the current surgical management and postoperative rehabilitation guidelines is provided. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:24175139

  18. Brain lesions affect penile reflexes.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, E P; Arjomand, J; Breedlove, S M

    1993-03-01

    Electrolytic lesions of several potential brain afferents to the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB) affect the display of penile reflexes. Ablation of the median and pontine raphe areas significantly potentiates the expression of cups and flips. Animals with a bilateral lesion of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus have a shorter latency to the first erection but otherwise display normal reflex behavior. Although bilateral destruction of the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN) completely eliminated penile reflex activity, it also caused significant motor impairment thus clouding conclusions concerning the normal role of the LVN in penile reflex behavior. These and other results support the hypothesis that these brain regions which project to the SNB region normally modulate spinal reflex behavior of the rat penis. PMID:8440513

  19. Cytologic diagnosis of pulmonary lesions.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Esther Diana; Mulè, Antonino; Maggiore, Claudia; Miraglia, Antonella; Lauriola, Libero; Vecchio, Fabio Maria; Fadda, Guido

    2004-01-01

    The major types of cytologic preparations used in most laboratories to detect the lesions of the lower respiratory tract (LRT) are examined. These methods include sputum, bronchial washing, bronchial brushing, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). Sputum represents the simplest and most cost-effective sampling method even though fiberoptic bronchoscopy and radiologic guided FNAB are superseding it as the first diagnostic choice in most cases. There are advantages and disadvantages associated with each technique:bronchial brushing and FNABs tend to preserve both the cellular details and their architectural arrangement whereas sputum and bronchial washing often cause a variable degree of cellular degeneration and fragmentation. As a result, most pulmonary lesions may be detected and correctly diagnosed if multiple techniques are used to acquire diagnostic material. CT-guided FNAB represents the most effective method to achieve a correct diagnosis in pulmonary tumors. PMID:15852720

  20. Are parenchymal AVMs congenital lesions?

    PubMed

    Morales-Valero, Saul F; Bortolotti, Carlo; Sturiale, Carmelo; Sturiale, Carmelo L; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    A long-held dogma in neurosurgery is that parenchymal arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are congenital. However, there is no strong evidence supporting this theory. An increasing number of documented cases of de novo formation of parenchymal AVMs cast doubt on their congenital nature and suggest that indeed the majority of these lesions may form after birth. Further evidence suggesting the postnatal development of parenchymal AVMs comes from the exceedingly rare diagnosis of these lesions in utero despite the widespread availability of high-resolution imaging modalities such as ultrasound and fetal MRI. The exact mechanism of AVM formation has yet to be elucidated, but most likely involves genetic susceptibility and environmental triggering factors. In this review, the authors report 2 cases of de novo AVM formation and analyze the evidence suggesting that they represent an acquired condition. PMID:25175439

  1. Meatoplasty keloid: a rare lesion treated with an unusual surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Shine, N P; Lew, K

    2006-07-01

    Keloid scarring is a benign hyperproliferation of fibrous tissue occurring at a wound healing site. Keloid formation related to the ear is generally the result of ear-piercing, mainly causing cosmetic disfigurement. We present an unusual case of keloid formation at a previous meatoplasty incision scar in a 10-year-old Caucasian with a modified radical mastoid cavity. This lesion prevented the cavity from self-cleaning and obstructed microscopic evaluation of the cavity. Treatment was successfully performed by surgical excision, with closure of the defect using supra-keloid skin flaps, followed by serial steroid injection therapy. PMID:16834807

  2. Periodontal repair of periapical lesions: the borderland between pulpal and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Gold, S I; Moskow, B S

    1987-05-01

    A series of cases demonstrating the destruction of periapical periodontal structures, without pulpal involvement has been presented. Treatment using both surgery and antibiotics resulted in extensive healing without any concommitant endodontic therapy. The results suggest that lesions affecting the apical periodontium are either periodontal or pulpal in origin. Careful diagnosis allows the maintenance of pulp vitality in cases where apical destruction has a source other than an infected pulp. The commonly held belief that lateral and accessory canals are a significant source of pulpal contamination from deep periodontal pockets has been questioned. PMID:3475293

  3. Lymphoproliferative lesions of the skin

    PubMed Central

    Cerroni, L

    2006-01-01

    Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders is one of the most difficult areas in dermatopathology, and biopsies are often taken to rule out a cutaneous lymphoma in patients with “unclear” or “therapy‐resistant” skin lesions. Histopathological features alone often enable a given case to be classified to a diagnostic group (eg, epidermotropic lymphomas), but seldom allow a definitive diagnosis to be made. Performing several biopsies from morphologically different lesions is suggested, especially in patients with suspicion of mycosis fungoides. Immunohistochemistry is often crucial for proper classification of the cases, but in some instances is not helpful (eg, early lesions of mycosis fungoides). Although molecular techniques provide new, powerful tools for diagnosing cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders, results of molecular methods should always be interpreted with the clinicopathological features, keeping in mind the possibility of false positivity and false negativity. In many cases, a definitive diagnosis can be made only on careful correlation of the clinical with the histopathological, immunophenotypical and molecular features. PMID:16873563

  4. Imaging of skull base lesions.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Hillary R; Curtin, Hugh D

    2016-01-01

    Skull base imaging requires a thorough knowledge of the complex anatomy of this region, including the numerous fissures and foramina and the major neurovascular structures that traverse them. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play complementary roles in imaging of the skull base. MR is the preferred modality for evaluation of the soft tissues, the cranial nerves, and the medullary spaces of bone, while CT is preferred for demonstrating thin cortical bone structure. The anatomic location and origin of a lesion as well as the specific CT and MR findings can often narrow the differential diagnosis to a short list of possibilities. However, the primary role of the imaging specialist in evaluating the skull base is usually to define the extent of the lesion and determine its relationship to vital neurovascular structures. Technologic advances in imaging and radiation therapy, as well as surgical technique, have allowed for more aggressive approaches and improved outcomes, further emphasizing the importance of precise preoperative mapping of skull base lesions via imaging. Tumors arising from and affecting the cranial nerves at the skull base are considered here. PMID:27432686

  5. Eye lesions in pet birds.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S S; Park, J H; Hirai, K; Itakura, C

    1993-03-01

    Amongst eye lesions in birds that died in quarantine, cataracts were the most common disorders (37/241, 15.4%), being prevalent in the annular pads of cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus), Amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva aestiva) and budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus). The incidence in male birds was more than twice that in females. Deposition of crystals, mostly in the cornea, was the second most frequent lesion (21/293, 8.7%), mainly found in cockatiels, parakeets (Psittacula krameri manillensis), Amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva aestiva), budgerigars and finches (Poephila gouldiae gouldiae). These corneal crystals were negative to PAS and Kossa's stains. Six parakeets (Psittacula krameri manillensis) had calcium salts deposited in the inner plexiform layer of the retina and occasionally in the iris and ciliary body. Neither inflammation nor neo-vascularization was observed when cataracts, corneal crystalline deposition, and retinal and ciliary calcification were present. Intranuclear inclusion bodies typical for papovavirus infection were found in the eyelids of six budgerigars (2.5%). Similar inclusions were simultaneously found in the pars ciliaris retinae (4, 1.7%), inner plexiform of retina (1, 0.4%) and anterior epithelium of the cornea (1, 0.4%). Other lesions such as candidial endophthalmitis, conjunctival cryptosporidiosis, corneal dystrophy, keratitis, corneal perforation and iridocyclitis, were occasional findings. PMID:18671000

  6. [Infected lesions of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Vitale, Mario; Zeppa, Pio; Esposito, Isabella; Esposito, Silvano

    2012-01-01

    The diabetic foot lesions are the result of a complex set of factors including peripheral neuropathy, trauma, joint deformities and perfusion abnormalities. The foot becomes vulnerable and insensitive to minor injuries caused by excessive pressure, mechanically or minimum thermal insults that can determine the primum movens of a foot ulcer. Due to the trauma, the subcutaneous tissues are exposed to bacterial colonization. Therefore, the wound can develop an infection. So, the first step in the treatment of the lesion is the evaluation of tissue damage, in order to guide therapy and prognosis. Wagner's classification, used by over 25 years, is still one of the best known systems of lesion classification; however, it is giving way to the most recent Texas's classification. However, in both systems infection have a minority role. Therefore, the Infectious Diseases Society of America has developed a classification system that divides infections in mild, moderate and severe. The purpose of this classification is to recognize the severe patients because they require immediate hospitalization, parenteral antibiotic therapy and specific instrumental examinations. PMID:22982693

  7. Automatic segmentation of psoriasis lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Yang; Shi, Chenbo; Wang, Li; Shu, Chang

    2014-10-01

    The automatic segmentation of psoriatic lesions is widely researched these years. It is an important step in Computer-aid methods of calculating PASI for estimation of lesions. Currently those algorithms can only handle single erythema or only deal with scaling segmentation. In practice, scaling and erythema are often mixed together. In order to get the segmentation of lesions area - this paper proposes an algorithm based on Random forests with color and texture features. The algorithm has three steps. The first step, the polarized light is applied based on the skin's Tyndall-effect in the imaging to eliminate the reflection and Lab color space are used for fitting the human perception. The second step, sliding window and its sub windows are used to get textural feature and color feature. In this step, a feature of image roughness has been defined, so that scaling can be easily separated from normal skin. In the end, Random forests will be used to ensure the generalization ability of the algorithm. This algorithm can give reliable segmentation results even the image has different lighting conditions, skin types. In the data set offered by Union Hospital, more than 90% images can be segmented accurately.

  8. Its the Little Things. Women, Trauma, and Strategies for Healing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenius, Vanja M. K.; Veysey, Bonita M.

    2005-01-01

    Women recover and heal from traumatic violent experiences in many different ways. This study, which is part of the Franklin County Women and Violence Project, explores the healing experiences of 18 women who have histories of violence, substance abuse, and involvement in the mental health and/or substance abuse treatment system. Ethnographic…

  9. 42 CFR 60.38 - Assignment of a HEAL loan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Assignment of a HEAL loan. 60.38 Section 60.38 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION... precludes the buyer of a HEAL loan from obtaining a warranty from the seller covering certain...

  10. 42 CFR 60.38 - Assignment of a HEAL loan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assignment of a HEAL loan. 60.38 Section 60.38 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION... precludes the buyer of a HEAL loan from obtaining a warranty from the seller covering certain...

  11. Skin-set and wound-healing/suberization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The physiology and biochemistry of resistance and susceptibility to tuber skinning/excoriation wounds and wound-healing are of global importance because of the magnitude of the resulting food and financial losses. This work is intended to concisely describe skin-set and wound-healing including their...

  12. Self-healing concrete by use of microencapsulated bacterial spores

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.Y.; Soens, H.; Verstraete, W.; De Belie, N.

    2014-02-15

    Microcapsules were applied to encapsulate bacterial spores for self-healing concrete. The viability of encapsulated spores and the influence of microcapsules on mortar specimens were investigated first. Breakage of the microcapsules upon cracking was verified by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Self-healing capacity was evaluated by crack healing ratio and the water permeability. The results indicated that the healing ratio in the specimens with bio-microcapsules was higher (48%–80%) than in those without bacteria (18%–50%). The maximum crack width healed in the specimens of the bacteria series was 970 μm, about 4 times that of the non-bacteria series (max 250 μm). The overall water permeability in the bacteria series was about 10 times lower than that in non-bacteria series. Wet–dry cycles were found to stimulate self-healing in mortar specimens with encapsulated bacteria. No self-healing was observed in all specimens stored at 95%RH, indicating that the presence of liquid water is an essential component for self-healing.

  13. Potato tuber wounding induces responses associated with various healing processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wounding induces an avalanche of biological responses involved in the healing and protection of internal tuber tissues exposed by mechanical damage and seed cutting. Collectively, our studies have framed a portrait of the mechanisms and regulation of potato tuber wound-healing, but much more is req...

  14. Hyperbaric Oxygen, Vasculogenic Stem Cells, and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Fosen, Katina M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress is recognized as playing a role in stem cell mobilization from peripheral sites and also cell function. Recent Advances: This review focuses on the impact of hyperoxia on vasculogenic stem cells and elements of wound healing. Critical Issues: Components of the wound-healing process in which oxidative stress has a positive impact on the various cells involved in wound healing are highlighted. A slightly different view of wound-healing physiology is adopted by departing from the often used notion of sequential stages: hemostatic, inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling and instead organizes the cascade of wound healing as overlapping events or waves pertaining to reactive oxygen species, lactate, and nitric oxide. This was done because hyperoxia has effects of a number of cell signaling events that converge to influence cell recruitment/chemotaxis and gene regulation/protein synthesis responses which mediate wound healing. Future Directions: Our alternative perspective of the stages of wound healing eases recognition of the multiple sites where oxidative stress has an impact on wound healing. This aids the focus on mechanistic events and the interplay among various cell types and biochemical processes. It also highlights the areas where additional research is needed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1634–1647. PMID:24730726

  15. Self-healing graphene-based composites with sensing capabilities.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, Eleonora; Barg, Suelen; Ni, Na; Rocha, Victoria G; Saiz, Eduardo

    2015-08-26

    A self-healing composite is fabricated by confining a supramolecular polymer in a graphene network. The network provides electrical conductivity. Upon damage, the polymer is released and flows to reform the material. Healing is repeatable and autonomous. The composite is sensitive to pressure and flexion and recovers its mechanical and electrical properties even when rejoining cut surfaces after long exposure times. PMID:26178801

  16. Is spiritual healing a valid and effective therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, R D; Scofield, A M

    1995-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evidence supporting the reality of healing as a scientifically-attested phenomenon, the techniques and mechanisms of healing and the potential value of this therapy if it were developed and integrated into the medical services. The need for further extensive research is indicated and strategies for such research are suggested. PMID:7745566

  17. Mucosal healing in inflammatory bowel diseases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Neurath, Markus F; Travis, Simon P L

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies have identified mucosal healing on endoscopy as a key prognostic parameter in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), thus highlighting the role of endoscopy for monitoring of disease activity in IBD. In fact, mucosal healing has emerged as a key treatment goal in IBD that predicts sustained clinical remission and resection-free survival of patients. The structural basis of mucosal healing is an intact barrier function of the gut epithelium that prevents translocation of commensal bacteria into the mucosa and submucosa with subsequent immune cell activation. Thus, mucosal healing should be considered as an initial event in the suppression of inflammation of deeper layers of the bowel wall, rather than as a sign of complete healing of gut inflammation. In this systematic review, the clinical studies on mucosal healing are summarised and the effects of anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive drugs such as 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, azathioprine, ciclosporin and anti-TNF antibodies (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, infliximab) on mucosal healing are discussed. Finally, the implications of mucosal healing for subsequent clinical management in patients with IBD are highlighted. PMID:22842618

  18. 42 CFR 60.35 - HEAL loan collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... other internal collection agents; (2) Immediately notifying an appropriate consumer credit reporting... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false HEAL loan collection. 60.35 Section 60.35 Public... LOAN PROGRAM The Lender and Holder § 60.35 HEAL loan collection. A lender or holder must exercise...

  19. 42 CFR 60.35 - HEAL loan collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... other internal collection agents; (2) Immediately notifying an appropriate consumer credit reporting... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false HEAL loan collection. 60.35 Section 60.35 Public... LOAN PROGRAM The Lender and Holder § 60.35 HEAL loan collection. A lender or holder must exercise...

  20. 42 CFR 60.35 - HEAL loan collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... other internal collection agents; (2) Immediately notifying an appropriate consumer credit reporting... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false HEAL loan collection. 60.35 Section 60.35 Public... LOAN PROGRAM The Lender and Holder § 60.35 HEAL loan collection. A lender or holder must exercise...