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1

The Fakability of BarOn's Emotional Quotient Inventory Short Form: Catch Me if You Can  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the fakability of the Emotional Quotient Inventory Short Form (EQ-i:S), a mixed-model emotional intelligence test developed by Bar-On (2002). A sample of 229 undergraduate students from a southeastern university com- pleted a battery of selection and assessment measures in both an honest and faking good condition. When responded to honestly, the EQ-i:S is predicted by The Big

W. Lee Grubb III; Michael A. McDaniel

2007-01-01

2

The Fakability of BarOn's Emotional Quotient Inventory Short Form: Catch Me if You Can  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the fakability of the Emotional Quotient Inventory Short Form (EQ-i:S), a mixed-model emotional intelligence test developed by Bar-On (2002). A sample of 229 undergraduate students from a southeastern university completed a battery of selection and assessment measures in both an honest and faking good condition. When responded to honestly, the EQ-i:Sis predicted by The Big Five with

W. Lee Grubb III; Michael A. McDaniel

2007-01-01

3

Psychometric Characteristics of the Emotional Quotient Inventory, Youth Version, Short Form, in Hungarian High School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on the psychometric characteristics, including factor structure, of measures assessing emotional intelligence improve our understanding of the manifest and latent dimensions of the construct. The factor structure of the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (Bar-On, 1997), despite the popularity of the measure, has been the subject of only…

Kun, Bernadette; Urban, Robert; Paksi, Borbala; Csobor, Lujza Vargane; Olah, Attila; Demetrovics, Zsolt

2012-01-01

4

The BarOn Model of Emotional-Social Intelligence (ESI)1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present manuscript is an empirically based theoretical paper that presents, describes, and exami- nes the Bar-On Model of Emotional-Social Intelligence (ESI) in deep. First, a description of the Emo- tional Quotient Inventory (the EQ-i), which has played an instrumental role in developing the model, is given. The EQ-i is a self-report measure of emotionally and socially intelligent behaviour. It

Reuven Bar-On

2005-01-01

5

Emotional expression and implications for occupational stress; an application of the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of emotional intelligence was examined in relation to the latitude permitted for emotional expressiveness and adaptation to occupational culture in three groups of helping professionals: police officers, child care workers, and educators in mental health care. A total of 167 individuals were administered the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i). There were no differences in the primary scales measuring various

R. Bar-On; J. M Brown; B. D Kirkcaldy; E. P Thomé

2000-01-01

6

Toward a Brief Multidimensional Assessment of Emotional Intelligence: Psychometric Properties of the Emotional Quotient Inventory-Short Form  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although several brief instruments are available for the emotional intelligence (EI) construct, their conceptual coverage tends to be quite limited. One notable exception is the short form of the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i:S), which measures multiple EI dimensions in addition to a global EI index. Despite the unique advantage offered by…

Parker, James D. A.; Keefer, Kateryna V.; Wood, Laura M.

2011-01-01

7

Adapting and Validating the BarOn EQ?i:YV in the Lebanese Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to adapt and validate the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory: Youth Version (BarOn EQ?i:YV), a measure of emotional intelligence, in the Lebanese context. The scale was translated and adapted into Arabic using a 3-step process involving judgmental, logical, and empirical methods. It was then administered to a…

El Hassan, Karma; El Sader, Maliha

2005-01-01

8

The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Student Teacher Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine whether student teacher performance is associated with emotional intelligence. The results indicate that emotional intelligence (as assessed by the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory) and college supervisors' assessments of student teacher performance are related. While total emotional quotient scores…

Drew, Todd L.

2010-01-01

9

The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Middle School Students with Learning Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence and academic success in middle school students with learning disabilities. Emotional Intelligence (EI) was measured using the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory: Youth Version (BarOn EQ-i: YV). The results of the BarOn EQ-i: YV was then compared to…

Petersen, Vanessa C.

2010-01-01

10

Assessing Emotional Intelligence Using the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) and Related Instruments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the emergence of the emotional intelligence (EI) construct two decades ago (Salovey & Mayer, 1990) a variety of theoretical\\u000a models and measures have appeared. Conceptual models of EI can typically be organized into one of two complementary types:\\u000a ability models or trait models (Petrides & Furnham, 2001). The former approach views EI as a set of cognitive-emotional abilities\\u000a best

Laura M. Wood; James D. A. Parker; Kateryna V. Keefer

11

An Exploratory Study of Emotional Intelligence and Domestic Abuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

To date, there is no literature specifically addressing the relationship between spousal battering and emotional intelligence, a concept that captures the success, or lack thereof, of a person's functioning in their immediate environment. Forty-four men convicted of spousal assault and 76 undergraduate students completed the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i; R. Bar-On, BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory: User's Manual, Multi-Health Systems, Inc.,

Jason Winters; Robert J. W. Clift; Donald G. Dutton

2004-01-01

12

Emotional Intelligence, Personality Traits and Career Decision Difficulties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims to take an in-depth look at the role of emotional intelligence and personality traits in relation to career decision difficulties. The Italian version of the Career Decision Difficulties Questionnaire (CDDQ), the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory: Short (Bar-On EQ-i: S), and the Big Five Questionnaire (BFQ) were administered to…

Di Fabio, Annamaria; Palazzeschi, Letizia

2009-01-01

13

Emotional Intelligence and Decisional Conflict Styles: Some Empirical Evidence among Italian High School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the relationship between emotional intelligence and decisional conflict styles. Five hundred and twenty-eight Italian high school students (median age = 18; SD = 0.76) were given the Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire (MDMQ) and the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory: short (Bar-On EQ-i:S). The "Intrapersonal" dimension…

Di Fabio, Annamaria; Blustein, David L.

2010-01-01

14

Emotional intelligence, personality traits and career decision difficulties  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims to take an in-depth look at the role of emotional intelligence and personality traits in relation to career\\u000a decision difficulties. The Italian version of the Career Decision Difficulties Questionnaire (CDDQ), the Bar-On Emotional\\u000a Quotient Inventory: Short (Bar-On EQ-i: S), and the Big Five Questionnaire (BFQ) were administered to 296 interns of the tertiary sector. The emotional intelligence

Annamaria Di Fabio; Letizia Palazzeschi

2009-01-01

15

Measures of Emotional Intelligence and Social Acceptability in Children: A Concurrent Validity Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The concurrent validity of two measures of Emotional Intelligence (EI), one considered a trait measure, the other an ability measure, was examined by administering the Emotional Quotient Inventory: Youth Version (EQi:YV; Bar-On & Parker, 2000), the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test: Youth Version (MSCEIT:YV; Mayer, Salovey, &…

Windingstad, Sunny; McCallum, R. Steve; Bell, Sherry Mee; Dunn, Patrick

2011-01-01

16

Development of Emotional Intelligence in First-Year Undergraduate Students in a Frontier State  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotional Intelligence (EI) has been defined as knowing the emotional state of self and others. Its relevance for college student development is only beginning to be researched. In the present research, the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory was administered to college students at the beginning and end of a semester-long course designed…

Leedy, Gail M.; Smith, James E.

2012-01-01

17

Emotional Intelligence and Decisional Conflict StylesSome Empirical Evidence Among Italian High School Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the relationship between emotional intelligence and decisional conflict styles. Five hundred and twenty-eight Italian high school students (median age = 18; SD = .76) were given the Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire (MDMQ) and the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory: short (Bar-On EQ-i:S). The Intrapersonal dimension of emotional intelligence emerged as the best inverse predictor of nonadaptive styles, whereas

Annamaria Di Fabio; David L. Blustein

2010-01-01

18

Emotional Intelligence and Selection to Administrative Chief Residency  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors sought to determine whether emotional intelligence, as measured by the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i), is associated with selection to administrative chief resident. Method: Authors invited senior-year residents at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston to participate in an observational…

Kilpatrick, Charlie C.; Doyle, Peter D.; Reichman, Eric F.; Chohan, Lubna; Uthman, Margaret O.; Orejuela, Francisco J.

2012-01-01

19

Emotional Intelligence and Teacher Efficacy: A Study of Turkish EFL Pre-Service Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relationship between emotional intelligence and teacher efficacy among 90 English language pre-service teachers from a university in Turkey. Data sources included Tschannen-Moran and Woolfolk-Hoy's Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale and Reuven Bar-On's Emotional Quotient Inventory. The findings indicated that Turkish EFL…

Kocoglu, Zeynep

2011-01-01

20

The Role of Personality Traits, Core Self-Evaluation, and Emotional Intelligence in Career Decision-Making Difficulties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the role of personality traits, core self-evaluation, and emotional intelligence (EI) in career decision-making difficulties. Italian university students (N = 232) responded to questions on the Big Five Questionnaire, Core Self-Evaluation Scale, Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory, and Career Decision-Making Difficulties…

Di Fabio, Annamaria; Palazzeschi, Letizia; Bar-On, Reuven

2012-01-01

21

Emotional Intelligence and Adaptive Success of Nurses Caring for People with Mental Retardation and Severe Behavior Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The emotional intelligence profiles, gender differences, and adaptive success of 380 Dutch nurses caring for people with mental retardation and accompanying severe behavior problems are reported. Data were collected with the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory, Utrecht-Coping List, Utrecht-Burnout Scale, MMPI-2, and GAMA. Absence due to illness…

Gerits, Linda; Derksen, Jan J. L.; Verbruggen, Antoine B.

2004-01-01

22

The Relationship of Emotional Intelligence and Transformational Leadership Behavior in Texas AgriLife Extension Service Mid-Managers  

E-print Network

for transformational, transactional and laissez?faire leadership styles and those were compared with scores on the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory Test (EQ?i). An independent samples t test was performed to assess whether the mean EI subscales scores for the high...

Burkham, Angela B.

2010-10-12

23

Emotional intelligence and teacher efficacy: a study of Turkish EFL pre-service teachers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the relationship between emotional intelligence and teacher efficacy among 90 English language pre-service teachers from a university in Turkey. Data sources included Tschannen-Moran and Woolfolk-Hoy’s Teachers’ Sense of Efficacy Scale and Reuven Bar-On’s Emotional Quotient Inventory. The findings indicated that Turkish EFL pre-service teachers felt more efficacious in managing the class rather than in making the class

Zeynep Koço?lu

2011-01-01

24

The DISC Quotient  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

D.I.S.C: Decipherment Impact of a Signal's Content. The authors present a numerical method to characterise the significance of the receipt of a complex and potentially decipherable signal from extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). The purpose of the scale is to facilitate the public communication of work on any such claimed signal, as such work proceeds, and to assist in its discussion and interpretation. Building on a "position" paper rationale, this paper looks at the DISC quotient proposed and develops the algorithmic steps and comprising measures that form this post detection strategy for information dissemination, based on prior work on message detection, decipherment. As argued, we require a robust and incremental strategy, to disseminate timely, accurate and meaningful information, to the scientific community and the general public, in the event we receive an "alien" signal that displays decipherable information. This post-detection strategy is to serve as a stepwise algorithm for a logical approach to information extraction and a vehicle for sequential information dissemination, to manage societal impact. The "DISC Quotient", which is based on signal analysis processing stages, includes factors based on the signal's data quantity, structure, affinity to known human languages, and likely decipherment times. Comparisons with human and other phenomena are included as a guide to assessing likely societal impact. It is submitted that the development, refinement and implementation of DISC as an integral strategy, during the complex processes involved in post detection and decipherment, is essential if we wish to minimize disruption and optimize dissemination.

Elliott, John R.; Baxter, Stephen

2012-09-01

25

Spiritual-Intelligence/-Quotient  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on the "new" [c. 2000], upgraded science of the human brain with its three different kinds of neural structures--mental, emotional and spiritual--Zohar [14] offers a model for structure, leadership and learning within an organization that allows them to thrive on uncertainty, deal creatively with rapid change, and realize the full…

Selman, Victor; Selman, Ruth Corey; Selman, Jerry; Selman, Elsie

2005-01-01

26

Quantum walks on quotient graphs  

SciTech Connect

A discrete-time quantum walk on a graph {gamma} is the repeated application of a unitary evolution operator to a Hilbert space corresponding to the graph. If this unitary evolution operator has an associated group of symmetries, then for certain initial states the walk will be confined to a subspace of the original Hilbert space. Symmetries of the original graph, given by its automorphism group, can be inherited by the evolution operator. We show that a quantum walk confined to the subspace corresponding to this symmetry group can be seen as a different quantum walk on a smaller quotient graph. We give an explicit construction of the quotient graph for any subgroup H of the automorphism group and illustrate it with examples. The automorphisms of the quotient graph which are inherited from the original graph are the original automorphism group modulo the subgroup H used to construct it. The quotient graph is constructed by removing the symmetries of the subgroup H from the original graph. We then analyze the behavior of hitting times on quotient graphs. Hitting time is the average time it takes a walk to reach a given final vertex from a given initial vertex. It has been shown in earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 74, 042334 (2006)] that the hitting time for certain initial states of a quantum walks can be infinite, in contrast to classical random walks. We give a condition which determines whether the quotient graph has infinite hitting times given that they exist in the original graph. We apply this condition for the examples discussed and determine which quotient graphs have infinite hitting times. All known examples of quantum walks with hitting times which are short compared to classical random walks correspond to systems with quotient graphs much smaller than the original graph; we conjecture that the existence of a small quotient graph with finite hitting times is necessary for a walk to exhibit a quantum speedup.

Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A. [Communication Sciences Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

2007-06-15

27

The Product and Quotient Rules Revisited  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mathematical elegance is illustrated by strikingly parallel versions of the product and quotient rules of basic calculus, with some applications. Corresponding rules for second derivatives are given: the product rule is familiar, but the quotient rule is less so.

Eggleton, Roger; Kustov, Vladimir

2011-01-01

28

Emotion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It was widely accepted that emotion such as fear, anger and pleasure could not be studied using a modern scientific tools. During the very early periods of emotion researches, psychologists, but not biologist, dominated in studying emotion and its disorders. Intuitively, one may think that emotion arises from brain first and then bodily responses follow. For example, we are sad first, and then cry. However, groups of psychologists suggested a proposal that our feeling follows bodily responses; that is, we feel sad because we cry! This proposal seems counterintuitive but became a popular hypothesis for emotion. Another example for this hypothesis is as follows. When you accidentally confront a large bear in a mountain, what would be your responses?; you may feel terrified first, and then run, or you may run first, and then feel terrified later on. In fact, the latter explanation is correct! You feel fear after you run (even because you run?). Or, you can imagine that you date with your girl friend who you love so much. Your heart must be beating fast and your body temperature must be elevated! In this situation, if you take a very cold bath, what would you expect? Your hot feeling is usually calmed down after this cold bath; that is, you feel hot because your heart and bodily temperature change. While some evidence supported this hypothesis, others do not. In the case of patients whose cervical vertebrae were severed with an accident, they still retained significant amount of emotion (feelings!) in some cases (but other patients lost most of emotional experience). In addition, one can imagine that there would be a specific set of physical responses for specific emotion if the original hypothesis is correct (e.g. fasten heart beating and redden face for anger etc.). However, some psychologists failed to find any specific set of physical responses for specific emotion, though others insisted that there existed such specific responses. Based on these controversial observations, another hypothesis was proposed; that is, we feel first, and then have physical responses. These two hypotheses seem contradictory to each other, but detailed examination on these hypotheses waited for the development of new analytical tools.

Choi, Sukwoo

29

Causal inheritence in plane wave quotients  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the appearance of closed timelike curves in quotients of plane waves along spacelike isometries. First we formulate a necessary and sufficient condition for a quotient of a general spacetime to preserve stable causality. We explicitly show that the plane waves are stably causal; in passing, we observe that some pp-waves are not even distinguishing. We then consider the classification of all quotients of the maximally supersymmetric ten-dimensional plane wave under a spacelike isometry, and show that the quotient will lead to closed timelike curves iff the isometry involves a translation along the u direction. The appearance of these closed timelike curves is thus connected to the special properties of the light cones in plane wave spacetimes. We show that all other quotients preserve stable causality.

Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund; Ross, Simon F.

2003-11-24

30

Emotional intelligence of dental students and patient satisfaction.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to determine the degree of correlation between emotional intelligence of dental students, patient satisfaction and related factors. A total of 123 senior students and their patients participated in the study. Students completed the 133 item Bar-On Standardised Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQI) and patients completed a seven item satisfaction questionnaire. The mean score for EI of female students was 442 and 462 for male students, for an overall average score of 452 for all dental students. Male students significantly scored higher in stress control (P = 0.0), general mood (P = 0.011) and intrapersonal scales (P = 0.024). There was a statistically significant relationship between student gender and average EI score (P = 0.007). Married students scored higher in adaptability (P = 0.019) and general mood scales (P = 0.039). Significant relationships existed between students' gender (P = 0.009), level of patient education (P = 0.0) and patient satisfaction levels. Not recording a significant relationship for the interpersonal scale (r = 0.134), there was a significant relationship amongst intrapersonal, stress control, adaptability, and general mood dimensions of the students and patient satisfaction reports. There was a statistically significant relationship between general emotional intelligence score of the students and patient satisfaction. Patients of the students with high general emotional intelligence scores were significantly more satisfied with treatment than patients of students with low EI. PMID:20646037

Azimi, S; AsgharNejad Farid, A A; Kharazi Fard, M J; Khoei, N

2010-08-01

31

Vocal responses to emotional picture viewing.  

PubMed

Vocal changes in emotional situations may identify contributing factors in behavioral voice disorders and direct more efficient therapies. Finding appropriate measures of voicing that detect emotional conditions is a first step in this line of investigation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether electroglottography (EGG) contact quotient is a viable measure to detect vocal changes in different emotion states. Vocal responses in 18 vocally healthy participants were measured using EGG contact quotient during picture viewing from the International Affective Picture System. Results demonstrated that in negative emotional conditions participants employed significantly greater EGG contact quotient than in neutral or positive conditions. EGG contact quotient appears to be a viable measure to investigate voice and emotion. PMID:23570409

van Mersbergen, Miriam; Delany, Molly

2013-04-01

32

Emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.  

PubMed

Nowadays, educators pay attention to emotional intelligence which is defined as the ability to monitor and explain one's own and other's emotional experience and feelings to differentiate between them as well as applying necessary information for determining thoughts and actions. The goal of this study was to determine emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. By means of two stage cluster sampling, 98 medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected. Participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian version of Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i) questionnaire which had been developed due to Bar-On model. Seventy two filled-up questionnaires were returned (RR=73%). Mean EI score of all participants was 319.94 ± 32.4. Mean EI score was not significantly different between male and female also, single and married participants. EI did not differ significantly in residents in respect to their discipline. Mean responsibility subscale differ significantly between male and female participants (P=0.008). Multiple regression analysis showed that happiness subscale is a predictive factor for total EI score (B=-0.32, P=0.009). Responsibility subscale differed significantly between men and women participants and happiness subscale was a good predictor for emotional intelligence score. These factors should be considered in education of medical residents. PMID:23605604

Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Mohammadifar, Mehdi

2013-01-01

33

Dental ethics and emotional intelligence.  

PubMed

Dental ethics is often taught, viewed, and conducted as an intell enterprise, uninformed by other noncognitive factors. Emotional intelligence (EQ) is defined distinguished from the cognitive intelligence measured by Intelligence Quotient (IQ). This essay recommends more inclusion of emotional, noncognitive input to the ethical decision process in dental education and dental practice. PMID:25219193

Rosenblum, Alvin B; Wolf, Steve

2014-01-01

34

Product and Quotient Rules from Logarithmic Differentiation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new application of logarithmic differentiation is presented, which provides an alternative elegant proof of two basic rules of differentiation: the product rule and the quotient rule. The proof can intrigue students, help promote their critical thinking and rigorous reasoning and deepen their understanding of previously encountered concepts. The…

Chen, Zhibo

2012-01-01

35

Associations between Emotional Intelligence, Socio-Emotional Adjustment, and Academic Achievement in Childhood: The Influence of Age  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationship between trait emotional intelligence (EI) with children's socio-emotional adjustment at school and academic achievement. Children aged 8 to 10 (n = 106) and 11 to 13 years (n = 99) completed the youth version of the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i: YV). Their socio-emotional adjustment was measured with…

Brouzos, Andreas; Misailidi, Plousia; Hadjimattheou, Anastasia

2014-01-01

36

Self-Reported Sleep Correlates with Prefrontal-Amygdala Functional Connectivity and Emotional Functioning  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: Prior research suggests that sleep deprivation is associated with declines in some aspects of emotional intelligence and increased severity on indices of psychological disturbance. Sleep deprivation is also associated with reduced prefrontal-amygdala functional connectivity, potentially reflecting impaired top-down modulation of emotion. It remains unknown whether this modified connectivity may be observed in relation to more typical levels of sleep curtailment. We examined whether self-reported sleep duration the night before an assessment would be associated with these effects. Design: Participants documented their hours of sleep from the previous night, completed the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i), Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), and Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI), and underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Setting: Outpatient neuroimaging center at a private psychiatric hospital. Participants: Sixty-five healthy adults (33 men, 32 women), ranging in age from 18-45 y. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Greater self-reported sleep the preceding night was associated with higher scores on all scales of the EQ-i but not the MSCEIT, and with lower symptom severity scores on half of the psychopathology scales of the PAI. Longer sleep was also associated with stronger negative functional connectivity between the right ventromedial prefrontal cortex and amygdala. Moreover, greater negative connectivity between these regions was associated with higher EQ-i and lower symptom severity on the PAI. Conclusions: Self-reported sleep duration from the preceding night was negatively correlated with prefrontal-amygdala connectivity and the severity of subjective psychological distress, while positively correlated with higher perceived emotional intelligence. More sleep was associated with higher emotional and psychological strength. Citation: Killgore WDS. Self-reported sleep correlates with prefrontal-amygdala functional connectivity and emotional functioning. SLEEP 2013;36(11):1597-1608. PMID:24179291

Killgore, William D. S.

2013-01-01

37

Review Essay of Dorit Bar-On's Speaking My Mind  

E-print Network

“Avowals” are utterances that “ascribe [current] states of mind”; for instance utterances of ‘I have a terrible headache’ and ‘I’m finding this painting utterly puzzling’ (Bar-On 2004: 1). And avowals, “when compared to ...

Byrne, Alex

38

Quotient familial 12 500 100 % de la bourse = 380 /mois  

E-print Network

Quotient familial Tranches 12 500 100 % de la bourse = 380 /mois 12 501 - 18 750 75 % de la bourse = 285 /mois 18 751 - 25 000 50 % de la bourse = 190 /mois 25 001 pas de bourse attribuée Quotient familial Tranches 12 500 100 % de la bourse = 300 /mois 12 501 - 18 750 75 % de la bourse

Jeanjean, Louis

39

Averaging and Globalising Quotients of Informetric and Scientometric Data.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussion of impact factors for "Journal Citation Reports" subject categories focuses on the difference between an average of quotients and a global average, obtained as a quotient of averages. Applications in the context of informetrics and scientometrics are given, including journal prices and subject discipline influence scores. (Author/LRW)

Egghe, Leo; Rousseau, Ronald

1996-01-01

40

Technical Report No. 2011577 State Complexity of Star and Quotient  

E-print Network

, there are two essentially di#erent ways to compute the star of tree languages. We name them top­down starTechnical Report No. 2011­577 State Complexity of Star and Quotient Operation for Unranked Tree of the Kleene star and quotient operations to unranked tree languages. Due to the na­ ture of the tree structure

Graham, Nick

41

Brief Report: Development of the Adolescent Empathy and Systemizing Quotients  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adolescent versions of the Empathy Quotient (EQ) and Systemizing Quotient (SQ) were developed and administered to n = 1,030 parents of typically developing adolescents, aged 12-16 years. Both measures showed good test-retest reliability and high internal consistency. Girls scored significantly higher on the EQ, and boys scored significantly higher…

Auyeung, Bonnie; Allison, Carrie; Wheelwright, Sally; Baron-Cohen, Simon

2012-01-01

42

Emotional intelligence (EI) as a predictor of depression status in older adults.  

PubMed

Underdeveloped recognition systems or predictors for negative consequences related to depression in the older adult put this population at a significant risk for suicide, medical illness, and poor health status. Research concerning strategies for predicting depression in the older adult population has not until recently focused on the possibility of measuring one's EI as a potential predictive factor. To address an aspect of this neglect, the present quantitative correlational study explored to what extent the total Emotional Quotient (EQ) scale score of EI predicted depression. Two self-report measures were utilized: the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short (GDS-Short), and the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory:Short (EQ-i:S). A purposive sample of 128 men and women (ages 65 and older) were recruited from local recreation centers and independent living facilities. To determine the extent to which EQ-i:S scaled score predicted depression, multiple logistic regression analysis was carried out. After accounting for age, education, and anti-depressant use, EQ-i:S scaled score had a statistically significant effect OR=0.94 (0.91, 0.97), p<0.001. This result indicated that for every 1-point increase in EQ-i:S scaled score, the risk of having depression decreased by 6%. The results indicated that increased EI has a beneficial effect in terms of current depression status. Future longitudinal research in examining EI as a predictor for depression in the older adult population is needed to substantiate and expand upon these findings. PMID:22769431

Lloyd, Sandra J; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Barclay, Kathleen; Fernandez, Miguel R; Chartrand, Max Stanley

2012-01-01

43

The Children's Empathy Quotient and Systemizing Quotient: Sex Differences in Typical Development and in Autism Spectrum Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children's versions of the Empathy Quotient (EQ-C) and Systemizing Quotient (SQ-C) were developed and administered to n = 1,256 parents of typically developing children, aged 4-11 years. Both measures showed good test-retest reliability and high internal consistency. As predicted, girls scored significantly higher on the EQ-C, and boys scored…

Auyeung, Bonnie; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Atkinson, Matthew; Samarawickrema, Nelum; Baron-Cohen, Simon

2009-01-01

44

The relationship between emotional intelligence and clinical teaching effectiveness in nursing faculty.  

PubMed

Nursing faculty play an important role in facilitating nursing student learning and shaping student experience in the clinical setting. Emotional intelligence (EI) in clinical nursing faculty may be one avenue to develop teaching effectiveness. This study investigated the relationship between EI and clinical teaching effectiveness of nursing faculty in an undergraduate nursing program. Using a cross-sectional correlation design, data were collected from a convenience sample of nursing faculty (N = 47) using the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory: Short (EQ-i:S), the Nursing Clinical Teacher Effectiveness Inventory (NCTEI) and a demographic data page. The results indicated a statistically significant positive relationship between the EQ-i:S and the NCTEI total scores (rs = .599, P < .01) and between many subscales of these tools. These findings contribute new knowledge to nursing education, including the following: (a) a significant relationship between EI and clinical teaching effectiveness exists, (b) faculty exhibit effective overall EI functioning with room to enhance competencies, and (c) faculty members see themselves as effective in their clinical teaching. Implications for clinical teaching practice include the need for faculty development and strengthening the faculty-student relationship. Possibilities for future research are discussed. PMID:22818193

Allen, Dianne E; Ploeg, Jenny; Kaasalainen, Sharon

2012-01-01

45

9. A photograph, looking southwest, from the sand bar on ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

9. A photograph, looking southwest, from the sand bar on the east side of the bridge. This image shows the west abutment, including the mold marks which remained from the timber forms. Leaching and cracking are also visible along the arch ring. - Vigo County Bridge No. 139, Spanning Sugar Creek at Seventy-fourth Place, Terre Haute, Vigo County, IN

46

Finite Generation of Cohomology of Quotients of PBW Algebras  

E-print Network

FINITE GENERATION OF THE COHOMOLOGY OF QUOTIENTS OF PBW ALGEBRAS A Dissertation by PIYUSH RAVINDRA SHROFF Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR... OF PHILOSOPHY August 2012 Major Subject: Mathematics FINITE GENERATION OF THE COHOMOLOGY OF QUOTIENTS OF PBW ALGEBRAS A Dissertation by PIYUSH RAVINDRA SHROFF Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment...

Shroff, Piyush

2012-10-19

47

Emotional intelligence of leaders: a profile of top executives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the emotional intelligence (EI) scores of two high profile executive groups in comparison with the general population. Also the study aims to investigate the executive group's EI scores in relation to various organizational outcomes such as net profit, growth management, and employee management and retention. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The Emotional Quotient

Steven J. Stein; Peter Papadogiannis; Jeremy A. Yip; Gill Sitarenios

2009-01-01

48

Acoustic and EGG analyses of emotional utterances.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the glottal and filter variables of emotional expressions vary by emotion and valence expressed. Prolonged emotional vowels (n = 96) were produced by professional actors and actresses (n = 4) expressing joy, surprise, interest, sadness, fear, anger, disgust, and a neutral emotional state. Acoustic parameters and the contact quotient from the electroglottographic signal (CQEGG) were calculated. Statistics were calculated for the parameters. Vocal fold contact time differed significantly between the emotional expressions reflecting differences in phonation types. It was concluded that CQEGG may vary simultaneously and inversely with F3 and F4 in emotional expressions of positive emotions. Changes in the lower pharynx and larynx may affect the higher formant frequencies. PMID:22587654

Waaramaa, Teija; Kankare, Elina

2013-04-01

49

COHOMOLOGY RINGS AND NILPOTENT QUOTIENTS OF REAL AND COMPLEX ARRANGEMENTS  

E-print Network

COHOMOLOGY RINGS AND NILPOTENT QUOTIENTS OF REAL AND COMPLEX ARRANGEMENTS DANIEL MATEI in R 4 |for which the above questions are amenable to a detailed study, capable of yielding classi#12 of Japan, Tokyo. Available at http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/math.GT/9812087. 1 #12; 2 DANIEL MATEI AND ALEXANDER

50

COHOMOLOGY RINGS AND NILPOTENT QUOTIENTS OF REAL AND COMPLEX ARRANGEMENTS  

E-print Network

COHOMOLOGY RINGS AND NILPOTENT QUOTIENTS OF REAL AND COMPLEX ARRANGEMENTS DANIEL MATEI, and complements of arrangements of transverse planes in R4 --for which the above questions are amenable. Available at http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/math.GT/9812087. 1 #12;2 DANIEL MATEI AND ALEXANDER I. SUCIU Section 1

51

ASYMPTOTIC GEOMETRY OF BANACH SPACES AND UNIFORM QUOTIENT MAPS  

E-print Network

(X, ) be a Banach space and t > 0. We denote by BX the closed unit ball of X and by SX its unit., then T is called co-Lipschitz. Here and throughout this article B(x, ) denotes the closed ball of center x that a Banach space that is a uniform quotient of p for 1

Boyer, Edmond

52

Influence of College Experience on Intelligence Quotients of Negro Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to determine what happens to the intelligence quotient of freshman students during their enrollment at a private Negro college. The Otis Quick-Scoring Mental Ability Test, Gamma Em, was administered to 822 students from a population of approximately 2,000 in their freshman year at Hampton Institue, Hampton, Virginia. The…

Buszek, Beatrice R.; Mitchell, Blythe C.

53

Gromov-Witten invariants of symplectic quotients and adiabatic limits  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study pseudoholomorphic curves in symplectic quotients as adiabatic limits\\u000aof solutions of a system of nonlinear first order elliptic partial differential\\u000aequations in the ambient symplectic manifold. The symplectic manifold carries a\\u000aHamiltonian group action. The equations involve the Cauchy-Riemann operator\\u000aover a Riemann surface, twisted by a connection, and couple the curvature of\\u000athe connection with the moment

A. Rita Gaio; Fac. Ciencias-Porto

2001-01-01

54

The Autism Spectrum Quotient: Children's Version (AQ-Child)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Autism Spectrum Quotient-Children's Version (AQ-Child) is a parent-report questionnaire that aims to quantify autistic traits in children 4-11 years old. The range of scores on the AQ-Child is 0-150. It was administered to children with an autism spectrum condition (ASC) (n = 540) and a general population sample (n = 1,225). Results showed a…

Auyeung, Bonnie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie

2008-01-01

55

Emotional Intelligence and Job Satisfaction: The EQ Relationship for Deans of U.S. Business Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main purpose of this study was to determine if a positive relationship existed between Emotional Intelligence and Job Satisfaction for deans of business schools. A secondary purpose was to determine which Emotional Quotient (EQ) competencies were most important for satisfied deans and how these competencies assisted processes related to…

Coco, Charles M.

2009-01-01

56

Academic Achievement and Emotional Intelligence: Predicting the Successful Transition from High School to University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the impact of emotional intelligence (EI) on the successful transition from high school to university. The short form of the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) was completed by 1,426 first-year students attending four different universities within the first week of classes (September). At the end of the academic year (May),…

Parker, James D. A.; Duffy, Jon M.; Wood, Laura M.; Bond, Barbara J.; Hogan, Marjorie J.

2005-01-01

57

Emotional Intelligence and Beliefs about Children, Discipline and Classroom Practices among Pre-Service Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research sought to explore how emotional intelligence (EI) shapes the beliefs of pre-service teachers with respect to issues such as classroom management and student behavior. 101 pre-service teachers were recruited from undergraduate and graduate education courses at a private, mid-sized university. The Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i),…

Flanagan, Maryclare E.

2009-01-01

58

The Relation of LD and Gender with Emotional Intelligence in College Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relation of learning disabilities (LD) and gender with emotional intelligence (as measured by the Emotional Quotient Inventory) in 128 college students. Analyses indicated significant differences between students with and without LD on stress management and adaptability, between men and women students on interpersonal…

Reiff, Henry B.; Hatzes, Nanette M.; Bramel, Michael H.; Gibbon, Thomas

2001-01-01

59

The Role of EFL Teachers' Emotional Intelligence in Their Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the relationship between EFL teachers' emotional quotient (EQ) and their pedagogical success in language institutes. In addition, the role played by their years of teaching experience in their EQ and the relationship between their age and EQ were also studied. For this purpose, 89 EFL teachers were chosen from different…

Ghanizadeh, Afsaneh; Moafian, Fatemeh

2010-01-01

60

Technical versus Non-Technical Students: Does Emotional Intelligence Matter?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intellectual Quotient (IQ) has long been considered in education as the deciding factor in a person's success but have we overlooked emotional intelligence (EI) in determining one's success in life? In my attempt to reexamine the acceptance of EI, I studied the difference in EI between different groups of undergraduates in Singapore in terms of…

Fatt, James Poon Teng

2004-01-01

61

PROC. S. D. ACAD. SCI., VOL. 57 0978, 13n FAULT BARS ON FEATHERS OF PHEASANTS  

E-print Network

stress from limited food intake and crowding. METHODS Year-old pheasants were divided into 12 treatment between bars on feathers and de- gree of food intake or crowding. Examination of each treatment group also treated birds did. The purpose of our study was to determine if bars on pheasant wing feathers indicated

62

Evolution, Emotions, and Emotional Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotions research is now routinely grounded in evolution, but explicit evolutionary analyses of emotions remain rare. This article considers the implications of natural selection for several classic questions about emotions and emotional disorders. Emotions are special modes of operation shaped by natural selection. They adjust multiple response…

Nesse, Randolph M.; Ellsworth, Phoebe C.

2009-01-01

63

Study of emotional intelligence and empathy in medical postgraduates  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The important domains of emotional intelligence (EI) are self-awareness and control of emotions, motivating oneself, and empathy. These are necessary to handle any relationship. This study aims to (i) assess emotional intelligence focusing specifically on empathy; (ii) to study the level of anger; and (iii) correlating level of anger with (a) EI and (b) empathy in medical postgraduates. Materials and Methods: Subjects were assessed randomly after obtaining informed consent, through semi-structured proforma and various scales, including Emotional Quotient Self-Assessment Checklist, Multi-Dimensional Emotional Empathy Scale, and Clinical Anger Scale. Data was analyzed using multivariate analysis with analysis of covariance test. Results: On Emotional Quotient Self-Assessment checklist, more than 70% had poor emotional intelligence. Married males in the study were more confident and empathizing. Those with some major problem at home were more aware of their own emotions and other's feelings. Residents who had voluntarily chosen their specialty postgraduation training course (eg, medicine, surgery, and others), those who had less work load, those who had time for recreational activities, and exercise had scored high on EI. Good control of emotions in self was associated with good relationship with superiors and colleagues. Score on Clinical anger was moderate to severe in 10.6% of the subjects. EI and clinical anger correlated negatively. PMID:21772646

Faye, Abhijeet; Kalra, Gurvinder; Swamy, Rajeev; Shukla, Aniket; Subramanyam, Alka; Kamath, Ravindra

2011-01-01

64

Convergent, Discriminant, and Incremental Validity of Competing Measures of Emotional Intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the convergent, discriminant, and incre- mental validity of one ability test of emotional intelligence (EI)—the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso-Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT)—and two self-report measures of EI—the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) and the self-report EI test (SREIT). The MSCEIT showed minimal relations to the EQ-i and SREIT, whereas the latter two measures were moderately interrelated. Among EImeasures, the MSCEIT was

Marc A. Brackett; John D. Mayer

2003-01-01

65

The brain of the horse: weight and cephalization quotients.  

PubMed

The horse is a common domestic animal whose anatomy has been studied since the XVI century. However, a modern neuroanatomy of this species does not exist and most of the data utilized in textbooks and reviews derive from single specimens or relatively old literature. Here, we report information on the brain of Equus caballus obtained by sampling 131 horses, including brain weight (as a whole and subdivided into its constituents), encephalization quotient (EQ), and cerebellar quotient (CQ), and comparisons with what is known about other relevant species. The mean weight of the fresh brains in our experimental series was 598.63 g (SEM ± 7.65), with a mean body weight of 514.12 kg (SEM ± 15.42). The EQ was 0.78 and the CQ was 0.841. The data we obtained indicate that the horse possesses a large, convoluted brain, with a weight similar to that of other hoofed species of like mass. However, the shape of the brain, the noteworthy folding of the neocortex, and the peculiar longitudinal distribution of the gyri suggest an evolutionary specificity at least partially separate from that of the Cetartiodactyla (even-toed mammals and cetaceans) with whom Perissodactyla (odd-toed mammals) are often grouped. PMID:24335261

Cozzi, Bruno; Povinelli, Michele; Ballarin, Cristina; Granato, Alberto

2014-01-01

66

Effects of oxygen and inorganic carbon concentrations on the photosynthetic quotients of marine algae  

Microsoft Academic Search

The photosynthetic quotients of the marine prymnesiophyte Pavlova lutheri and the marine dinoflagellate Glenodinum sp. were measured at different concentrations of dissolved oxygen and inorganic carbon. Dissolved oxygen concentration appeared to be the most important factor controlling the photosynthetic quotient. Photosynthetic quotients generally were between 1.0 and 1.8 at oxygen concentrations less than saturation, were approximately 1.0 at oxygen saturation,

J. E. Burris

1981-01-01

67

Quotients of AdSp+1×Sq: Causally well-behaved spaces and black holes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Starting from the recent classification of quotients of Freund-Rubin backgrounds in string theory of the type AdSp+1×Sq by one-parameter subgroups of isometries, we investigate the physical interpretation of the associated quotients by discrete cyclic subgroups. We establish which quotients have well-behaved causal structures, and of those containing closed timelike curves, which have interpretations as black holes. We explain the relation to previous investigations of quotients of asymptotically flat spacetimes and plane waves, of black holes in AdS spacetimes, and of Gödel-type universes.

Figueroa-O'Farrill, José; Madden, Owen; Ross, Simon F.; Simón, Joan

2004-06-01

68

Technical Report No. 2011-577 State Complexity of Star and Quotient  

E-print Network

, there are two essentially different ways to compute the star of tree languages. We name them top-down starTechnical Report No. 2011-577 State Complexity of Star and Quotient Operation for Unranked Tree of the Kleene star and quotient operations to unranked tree languages. Due to the na- ture of the tree structure

Graham, Nick

69

Incremental Maintenance of Quotient Cube for Median Dept. of Computer Science,  

E-print Network

Incremental Maintenance of Quotient Cube for Median Cuiping Li Dept. of Computer Science, Renmin of China Beijing 100872, China ABSTRACT Data cube pre-computation is an important concept for sup- porting to compute a complete data cube due to the huge storage requirement. Recently proposed quotient cube

Tung, Anthony Kum Hoe

70

Emotional Issues  

MedlinePLUS

Emotional Issues Duchenne’s emotional toll on a child can manifest in a variety of ways. Patience, consistency, understanding, and love are some of the most important things you can provide to ensure the emotional health of your child. Parents of a ...

71

Language skills and intelligence quotient of protein energy malnutrition survivors.  

PubMed

The study was conducted on 33 children aged 3-6 years who suffered from protein energy malnutrition (PEM) during infancy in comparison to 30 matching children to assess the long-term deficits in cognition and language skills. The patients' files were revised to record their admission and follow-up data and history, clinical examination, intelligence quotient and language assessment were done. The study revealed that 2-5 years from the acute attack the PEM patients were still shorter than the controls and their cognitive abilities were poorer. Their mental ages and language skills were mostly determined by their height and the duration of follow-up during their acute illness. Additionally their diet after the 3-5 years is still defective and does not meet their recommended daily allowance. These observations urge us to continue following these patients for longer durations to make sure no permanent damage occurs due to the PEM insult to the growing brain. PMID:21930668

Nassar, May F; Shaaban, Sanaa Y; Nassar, Jilan F; Younis, Neveen T; Abdel-Mobdy, Ahmad E

2012-06-01

72

Emotion Recognition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies of expressive speech have shown that discrete emotions such as anger, fear, joy, and sadness can be accurately communicated, also cross-culturally, and that each emotion is associated with reasonably specific acoustic characteristics [8]. However, most previous research has been conducted on acted emotions. These certainly have something in common with naturally occurring emotions but may also be more intense and prototypical than authentic, everyday expressions [6, 13]. Authentic emotions are, on the other hand, often a combination of different affective states and occur rather infrequently in everyday life.

Neiberg, Daniel; Elenius, Kjell; Burger, Susanne

73

Cocaine Users Manifest Impaired Prosodic and Cross-Modal Emotion Processing  

PubMed Central

Background: A small number of previous studies have provided evidence that cocaine users (CU) exhibit impairments in complex social cognition tasks, while the more basic facial emotion recognition is widely unaffected. However, prosody and cross-modal emotion processing has not been systematically investigated in CU so far. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess complex multisensory emotion processing in CU in comparison to controls and to examine a potential association with drug use patterns. Method: The abbreviated version of the comprehensive affect testing system (CATS-A) was used to measure emotion perception across the three channels of facial affect, prosody, and semantic content in 58 CU and 48 healthy control (HC) subjects who were matched for age, sex, verbal intelligence, and years of education. Results: CU had significantly lower scores than controls in the quotient scales of “emotion recognition” and “prosody recognition” and the subtests “conflicting prosody/meaning – attend to prosody” and “match emotional prosody to emotional face” either requiring to attend to prosody or to integrate cross-modal information. In contrast, no group difference emerged for the “affect recognition quotient.” Cumulative cocaine doses and duration of cocaine use correlated negatively with emotion processing. Conclusion: CU show impaired cross-modal integration of different emotion processing channels particularly with regard to prosody, whereas more basic aspects of emotion processing such as facial affect perception are comparable to the performance of HC. PMID:24046750

Hulka, Lea M.; Preller, Katrin H.; Vonmoos, Matthias; Broicher, Sarah D.; Quednow, Boris B.

2013-01-01

74

Defining the broader, medium and narrow autism phenotype among parents using the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ)  

E-print Network

Abstract Background The Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) is a self-report questionnaire for quantifying autistic traits. This study tests whether the AQ can differentiate between parents of children with an autism spectrum condition (ASC) and control...

Wheelwright, Sally; Auyeung, Bonnie; Allison, Carrie; Baron-Cohen, Simon

2010-06-17

75

Programme : 1. Complments de topologie : Espaces quotients, recollements, attachement de cel-  

E-print Network

Résumé Programme : 1. Compléments de topologie : Espaces quotients, recollements, attachement de, dualité de Poincaré. 7. Homologie à coefficients locaux. 8. Topologie des espaces d'applications. 9

Blanchet, Christian - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

76

Emotional Intelligence: A Look at Its Effect on Performance at the United States Naval Academy.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study uses the results from the Baron Emotional Quotient (EQ) inventory by a freshman class upon entry to the United States Naval Academy. The data reflects the response of 1,040 students between the ages of 17 and 22. Using Baron's model, this study...

S. L. Hoffman

1999-01-01

77

Anti-de Sitter Quotients, Bubbles of Nothing, and Black Holes  

E-print Network

In 3+1 dimensions there are anti-de quotients which are black holes with toroidal event horizons. By analytic continuation of the Schwarzschild-anti-de Sitter solution (and appropriate identifications) one finds two one parameter families of spacetimes that contain these quotient black holes. One of these families consists of B-metrics ("bubbles of nothing"), the other of black hole spacetimes. All of them have vanishing conserved charges.

Jan E. Aman; Stefan Aminneborg; Ingemar Bengtsson; Narit Pidokrajt

2008-01-28

78

Emotional maltreatment.  

PubMed

Child abuse is a problem that affects the lives of many American children. The public is often bombarded with information regarding horrific cases of physical and sexual abuse. Emotional maltreatment, however, has been slow to achieve recognition as a serious social problem for a variety of reasons. Compared with physical or sexual abuse, emotional maltreatment is more difficult to identify and define, and good epidemiological data are not available. An erroneous perception also exists that the sequelae of emotional maltreatment are less severe than that of physical and/or sexual abuse. Prompt identification of emotional maltreatment, appropriate intervention and referral, and reporting of concerns to child protective services are essential to the health and well-being of the child. This article will define emotional maltreatment, discuss consequences of emotional maltreatment, and provide implications for pediatric nurse practitioner practice. PMID:23099310

Hornor, Gail

2012-01-01

79

Emotional intelligence and the Occupational Personality Questionnaire (OPQ)  

PubMed Central

This study explores the relationship between the Bar-on EQ-I and the Occupational Personality Questionnaire OPQ32i to determine if there is a link between self- and other-reported Emotional Intelligence and personality traits. Data was obtained from 329 managers working in the IT and Finance sectors and included multi-source (360°) measures of Emotional Intelligence. Results indicated construct overlap and correlations between some elements of Emotional Intelligence and the OPQ32i with a stronger relationship between 360 measures of Emotional Intelligence and personality. On both the self-report measure of EQ-I and the 360 measure the mood scale showed a strongest link with personality factors. Measures of Emotional Intelligence which include a 360 component may thus provide a more useful indicator of an individual's ability to manage their own feelings and those of others. PMID:25309468

Furnham, Adrian; Race, Mary-Clare; Rosen, Adrienne

2014-01-01

80

Half-BPS quotients in M-theory: ADE with a twist  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We classify Freund-Rubin backgrounds of eleven-dimensional supergravity of the form AdS4 × X7 which are at least half BPS — equivalently, smooth quotients of the round 7-sphere by finite subgroups of SO(8) which admit an (N > 3)-dimensional subspace of Killing spinors. The classification is given in terms of pairs consisting of an ADE subgroup of SU(2) and an automorphism defining its embedding in SO(8). In particular we find novel half-BPS quotients associated with the subgroups of type Dn >= 6, E7 and E8 and their outer automorphisms.

de Medeiros, Paul; Figueroa-O'Farrill, José; Gadhia, Sunil; Méndez-Escobar, Elena

2009-10-01

81

Emotional Adjustment of Gifted Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluation of the personality functioning of 90 adolescents with intelligence quotients greater than 135 found the incidence of psychopathology in the sample to be comparable to that in the normative population. Children with intelligence quotients greater than 150 had no greater levels of psychopathology than those with intelligence quotients

Gallucci, Nicholas T.

1988-01-01

82

The Contribution of Emotional Intelligence to Decisional Styles among Italian High School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and styles of decision making. Two hundred and six Italian high school students completed two measures of EI, the Bar-On EI Inventory, based on a mixed model of EI, and the Mayer Salovey Caruso EI Test, based on an ability-based model of EI, in addition to the General…

Di Fabio, Annamaria; Kenny, Maureen E.

2012-01-01

83

The systemizing quotient: an investigation of adults with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism, and normal sex differences.  

PubMed Central

Systemizing is the drive to analyse systems or construct systems. A recent model of psychological sex differences suggests that this is a major dimension in which the sexes differ, with males being more drawn to systemize than females. Currently, there are no self-report measures to assess this important dimension. A second major dimension of sex differences is empathizing (the drive to identify mental states and respond to these with an appropriate emotion). Previous studies find females score higher on empathy measures. We report a new self-report questionnaire, the Systemizing Quotient (SQ), for use with adults of normal intelligence. It contains 40 systemizing items and 20 control items. On each systemizing item, a person can score 2, 1 or 0, so the SQ has a maximum score of 80 and a minimum of zero. In Study 1, we measured the SQ of n = 278 adults (114 males, 164 females) from a general population, to test for predicted sex differences (male superiority) in systemizing. All subjects were also given the Empathy Quotient (EQ) to test if previous reports of female superiority would be replicated. In Study 2 we employed the SQ and the EQ with n = 47 adults (33 males, 14 females) with Asperger syndrome (AS) or high-functioning autism (HFA), who are predicted to be either normal or superior at systemizing, but impaired at empathizing. Their scores were compared with n = 47 matched adults from the general population in Study 1. In Study 1, as predicted, normal adult males scored significantly higher than females on the SQ and significantly lower on the EQ. In Study 2, again as predicted, adults with AS/HFA scored significantly higher on the SQ than matched controls, and significantly lower on the EQ than matched controls. The SQ reveals both a sex difference in systemizing in the general population and an unusually strong drive to systemize in AS/HFA. These results are discussed in relation to two linked theories: the 'empathizing-systemizing' (E-S) theory of sex differences and the extreme male brain (EMB) theory of autism. PMID:12639333

Baron-Cohen, Simon; Richler, Jennifer; Bisarya, Dheraj; Gurunathan, Nhishanth; Wheelwright, Sally

2003-01-01

84

The Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) in Japan: A Cross-Cultural Comparison  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The AQ (Autism-Spectrum Quotient) is a self-administered instrument for measuring the degree to which an adult with normal intelligence has the traits associated with the autistic spectrum. The AQ was administered in Japan to test whether the UK results would generalize to a very different culture. Three groups of subjects, adults with AS or HFA…

Wakabayashi, Akio; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Wheelwright, Sally; Tojo, Yoshikuni

2006-01-01

85

THE TRACE FORMULA FOR COMPACT QUOTIENTS JEREMY BOOHER WITH AN APPENDIX BY BRIAN CONRAD  

E-print Network

THE TRACE FORMULA FOR COMPACT QUOTIENTS JEREMY BOOHER WITH AN APPENDIX BY BRIAN CONRAD These notes Conrad records modern proofs of several classical results for which we do not know a suitable modern reference. I thank Iurie Boreico, Brian Conrad, Dan Litt, Niccol`o Ronchetti, and Akshay Venkatesh

Conrad, Brian

86

Effect of Leucovorin (Folinic Acid) on the Developmental Quotient of Children with Down's Syndrome (Trisomy 21)  

E-print Network

Effect of Leucovorin (Folinic Acid) on the Developmental Quotient of Children with Down's Syndrome deficiency may contribute to mental retardation in Down's syndrome (DS). Methodology: We investigated development of children with Down's syndrome, at least in some subgroups of the DS population, particularly

Boyer, Edmond

87

MediaQuotient[TM]: National Survey of Family Media Habits, Knowledge, and Attitudes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined family media habits, including the use of television, movies, videos, computer and video games, the Internet, music, and print media. The study was conducted by mail with telephone follow-ups, surveying a national random sample of 527 parents of 2- to 17-year-olds who completed MediaQuotient questionnaires. Findings were…

Gentile, Douglas A.; Walsh, David A.

88

Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in the Context of a High Intellectual Quotient/Giftedness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The diagnosis of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children with a high intellectual quotient (IQ) and/or giftedness is controversial with many opinions existing on both sides of the debate. Relationships between IQ and cognitive vulnerabilities frequently described in the ADHD population vary in strength. Data asserting the…

Antshel, Kevin M.

2008-01-01

89

A SIMPLE AND ACCURATE NEW METHOD TO MEASURE SPECIFIC HEAT AT ARBITRARY TEMPERATURE (QUOTIENT METHOD) (*)  

E-print Network

298 A SIMPLE AND ACCURATE NEW METHOD TO MEASURE SPECIFIC HEAT AT ARBITRARY TEMPERATURE (QUOTIENT is described which allows the measurement of specific heat in prin- ciple at arbitrary temperature. - The purpose of the equipment described here is to measure the specific heat, Cp, of solids from liquid helium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

90

What Has Caused the Flynn Effect? Secular Increases in the Development Quotients of Infants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of five studies show that during the second half of the twentieth century there were increases in the Development Quotients (DQs) of infants in the first two years of life. These gains were obtained for the Bayley Scales in the United States and Australia, and for the Griffiths Test in Britain. The average of 19 data points is a DQ gain of…

Lynn, Richard

2009-01-01

91

THE RESPIRATORY QUOTIENT OF SEEDLINGS OF LUPINUS ALBUS DURING THE EARLY STAGES OF GERMINATION  

PubMed Central

In germinating seedlings of Lupinus albus, the initial respiratory quotient was found to be unity. After a drop to 0.76 at 9 hours, the value rose to 0.90 at 12 hours, and then fell to 0.64 at 60 hours. It is improbable that the fat oxidation system is the first to become activated. PMID:19873001

Craig, F. N.

1937-01-01

92

Contributions of Incidental Teaching, Developmental Quotient, and Peer Interactions to Child Engagement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the analysis reported in this article was to determine to what extent child and classroom characteristics were associated with the amount of time children with disabilities spent displaying each of 5 categories of engagement. Predictors consisted of children's receipt of incidental teaching, developmental quotient, and quality of…

Casey, Amy M.; McWilliam, R. A.; Sims, Jessica

2012-01-01

93

Emotion Talk: Helping Caregivers Facilitate Emotion Understanding and Emotion Regulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on two aspects of emotional intelligence, emotion understanding and emotion regulation. These abilities are important because of their impact on social communication and the way in which they influence a child's access to knowledge. Caregivers who engage their children in emotion talk may strengthen the ability of their…

Brinton, Bonnie; Fujiki, Martin

2011-01-01

94

Emotional and Non-Emotional Persuasion  

Microsoft Academic Search

A relevant issue in the domain of natural argumentation and persuasion is the interaction (synergic or conflicting) between “rational” or “cognitive” modes of persuasion and “irrational” or “emotional” ones. This work provides a model of general persuasion and emotional persuasion. We examine two basic modes for appealing to emotions, arguing that emotional persuasion does not necessarily coincide with irrational persuasion,

Maria Miceli; Fiorella De Rosis; Isabella Poggi

2006-01-01

95

Conditions Under Which the "Package Principle" is Required for a DBA Theorem: Suppose an agent's betting quotients q(X) are defined over a set of  

E-print Network

an agent's betting quotients q(X) are defined over a set of propositions B. If those betting quotients meet the following conditions, there does not exist a Dutch Book against the agent consisting of a single bet: 1. q: Suppose for reductio that the agent's quotients meet the three conditions and that a single-bet Book

Fitelson, Branden

96

Emotion complexity and emotion regulation across adulthood  

PubMed Central

This research used data from a study on daily emotional experience in adulthood to examine the associations between age, emotion complexity, and emotion regulation. Data were drawn from a study of daily stress that included 239 participants ranging in age from 18 to 89 from North Central Florida. Two indicators of emotion complexity were considered: emotion differentiation and the co-occurrence of positive and negative affect. Emotion regulation was assessed in terms of individuals’ likelihood of maintaining adaptive emotion states. There were no age differences in adults’ co-occurrence of positive and negative emotions. In contrast to theories suggesting age would be associated with greater emotion complexity, the findings revealed that older adults had lower differentiation scores than younger adults. Age was also associated with more adaptive patterns of emotion regulation. Specifically, older adults persisted in low negative states and moved out of high negative states more readily than younger adults. Finally, neuroticism, self-concept incoherence, mean daily stress, and emotion complexity were associated with emotion regulation. Notably, adults who reported a greater mix of positive and negative affect moved out of high negative affect states more rapidly than adults with lower co-occurrence scores. This finding is in keeping with a growing body of work suggesting that positive affect promotes recovery from negative affect. Overall, the findings suggest that although emotion complexity is associated with emotion regulation, it does not appear to be a key factor underlying age differences in emotion regulation. PMID:21941465

Hay, Elizabeth L.; Diehl, Manfred

2011-01-01

97

The Empathy Quotient: A cross-cultural comparison of the Italian version  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction. The Empathy Quotient (EQ) is a self-report questionnaire that was developed to measure the cognitive, affective, and behavioural aspects of empathy. We evaluated its cross-cultural validity in an Italian sample.Methods. A sample of 18- to 30-year-old undergraduate students of both sexes (N=256, males=118) were invited to fill in the Italian version of the EQ, as well as other measures

Antonio Preti; Marcello Vellante; Simon Baron-Cohen; Giulia Zucca; Donatella Rita Petretto; Carmelo Masala

2011-01-01

98

Estimation of the Intelligence Quotient Using Wechsler Intelligence Scales in Children and Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Asperger syndrome (AS) patients show heterogeneous intelligence profiles and the validity of short forms for estimating intelligence\\u000a has rarely been studied in this population. We analyzed the validity of Wechsler Intelligence Scale (WIS) short forms for\\u000a estimating full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) and assessing intelligence profiles in 29 AS patients. Only the Information\\u000a and Block Design dyad meets the study criteria.

Jessica Merchan-NaranjoMarõ; María Mayoral; Marta Rapado-Castro; Cloe Llorente; Leticia Boada; Celso Arango; Mara Parellada

99

CSF/serum quotient graphs for the evaluation of intrathecal C4 synthesis  

PubMed Central

Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/serum quotient graphs have been used previously to determine local synthesis in brain of immunoglobulins and C3 complement component. The aim of this study was to use the same technique to construct quotient graphs, or Reibergrams, for the beta globulin C4 and to evaluate the method for assessing intrathecal synthesis in neurological disease. Methods The constants in the previously-defined Reibergram for immunoglobulin IgA were used to calculate the CSF/serum quotient for C4. CSF and serum were analyzed for C4, IgA and albumin from a total of 12 patients with meningoencephalitis caused by encapsulated microorganisms and 10 subjects without infections or inflammatory neurological disease, some of which had dysfunction of the blood-CSF barrier, Results The formula and C4 Reibergram with the constants previously found for IgA, determined the intrathecal C4 synthesis in CSF. The intrathecal C4 fraction in CSF (C4 loc in mg/l) was compared to the C4-Index (fraction of CSF: serum for C 4/fraction of CSF: serum for albumin). There was a significant correlation between the two formulae. The CSF/Serum quotient graph was superior for detecting intrathecal synthesis of C4 under variable conditions of blood-CSF barrier permeability. Conclusion The C4 Reibergram can be used to quantify the intrathecal synthesis of this component of the complement system in different infectious diseases of the central nervous system and is especially useful for patients with blood-brain barrier dysfunction. PMID:19573230

Padilla-Docal, Barbara; Dorta-Contreras, Alberto J; Bu-Coifiu-Fanego, Raisa; Rey, Alexis Rodriguez

2009-01-01

100

Hepatic Steatosis, Carbohydrate Intake, and Food Quotient in Patients with NAFLD  

PubMed Central

Is steatosis related to the spontaneous carbohydrate intake in patients with NAFLD? We performed dietary records for 24 patients with NAFLD, 3 months after their liver biopsy was performed and before the deliverance of a dietary advice. The food quotient, indicator of the proportion of calories from carbohydrates, was calculated as (1.00×%??calories from carbohydrates/100) + (0.70×%??calories from lipids/100) + (0.81×%??calories from proteins/100). The associations between diet variables and steatosis% on the hepatic biopsies were tested by regression analysis, and diet variables were compared according to the presence of fibrosis. The subjects displayed a large range of steatosis, 50.5%?±?25.5 [10–90], correlated with their energy intake (1993?±?597?kcal/d, r = 0.41, P < 0.05) and food quotient (0.85?±?0.02, r = 0.42, P < 0.05), which remained significant with both variables by a multivariate regression analysis (r = 0.51, P < 0.05). For the 17/24 patients with a hepatic fibrosis, the energy intake was lower (fibrosis: 1863?±?503 versus others: 2382?±?733?kcal/d, P < 0.05), and their food quotients did not differ from patients without fibrosis. Hepatic steatosis was related to the energy and carbohydrate intakes in our patients; the role of dietary carbohydrates was detectable in the range of usual carbohydrate intake: 32% to 58% calories. PMID:23737773

Gonzalez, Concepcion; de Ledinghen, Victor; Vergniol, Julien; Foucher, Juliette; Le Bail, Brigitte; Carlier, Sabrina; Maury, Elisa; Gin, Henri; Rigalleau, Vincent

2013-01-01

101

Emotion Regulation CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS  

E-print Network

- changes that require us to regulate how emotions are experienced and expressed. But what do people do and adult literatures relevant to emotion regulation. Because a discussion of emotion regulation presupposes an understanding of what emotion is, we first consider emotion in the context of the larger family of affective pro

Gross, James J.

102

Emotional eating: Eating when emotional or emotional about eating?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the extent to which self-reported emotional eating is a predictor of unhealthy snack consumption or, alternatively, an expression of beliefs about the relation between emotions and eating derived from concerns about eating behaviour. Three studies were conducted. Study 1 (N = 151) and Study 2 (N = 184) investigated the predictive validity of emotional eating compared to

Marieke A. Adriaanse; Denise T. D. de Ridder; Catharine Evers

2011-01-01

103

Quotient Based Multiresolution Image Fusion of Thermal and Visual Images Using Daubechies Wavelet Transform for Human Face Recognition  

E-print Network

This paper investigates the multiresolution level-1 and level-2 Quotient based Fusion of thermal and visual images. In the proposed system, the method-1 namely "Decompose then Quotient Fuse Level-1" and the method-2 namely "Decompose-Reconstruct then Quotient Fuse Level-2" both work on wavelet transformations of the visual and thermal face images. The wavelet transform is well-suited to manage different image resolution and allows the image decomposition in different kinds of coefficients, while preserving the image information without any loss. This approach is based on a definition of an illumination invariant signature image which enables an analytic generation of the image space with varying illumination. The quotient fused images are passed through Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for dimension reduction and then those images are classified using a multi-layer perceptron (MLP). The performances of both the methods have been evaluated using OTCBVS and IRIS databases. All the different classes have been ...

Bhowmik, Mrinal Kanti; Nasipuri, Mita; Basu, Dipak Kumar; Kundu, Mahantapas

2010-01-01

104

High-speed imaging and electroglottography measurements of the open quotient in untrained male voices' register transitions.  

PubMed

Vocal fold oscillation patterns in vocal register transitions are still unclarified. The vocal fold oscillations and the open quotient were analyzed with high-speed digital imaging (HSDI) and electroglottography (EGG) in 18 male untrained subjects singing a glissando from modal to the falsetto register. Results reveal that the open quotient changed with register in both HSDI and EGG. The in-class correlations for different HSDI and EGG determinations of the open quotient were high. However, we found only weak interclass correlations between both methods. In 10 subjects, irregularities of vocal fold vibration occurred during the register transition. Our results confirm previous observations that falsetto register is associated with a higher open quotient compared with modal register. These data suggest furthermore that irregularities typically observed in audio and electroglottographic signals during register transitions are caused by irregularities in vocal fold vibration. PMID:20083378

Echternach, Matthias; Dippold, Sebastian; Sundberg, Johan; Arndt, Susan; Zander, Mark F; Richter, Bernhard

2010-11-01

105

Comparing closed quotient in children singers' voices as measured by high-speed-imaging, electroglottography, and inverse filtering.  

PubMed

The closed quotient, i.e., the ratio between the closed phase and the period, is commonly studied in voice research. However, the term may refer to measures derived from different methods, such as inverse filtering, electroglottography or high-speed digital imaging (HSDI). This investigation compares closed quotient data measured by these three methods in two boy singers. Each singer produced sustained tones on two different pitches and a glissando. Audio, electroglottographic signal (EGG), and HSDI were recorded simultaneously. The audio signal was inverse filtered by means of the decap program; the closed phase was defined as the flat minimum portion of the flow glottogram. Glottal area was automatically measured in the high speed images by the built-in camera software, and the closed phase was defined as the flat minimum portion of the area-signal. The EGG-signal was analyzed in four different ways using the matlab open quotient interface. The closed quotient data taken from the EGG were found to be considerably higher than those obtained from inverse filtering. Also, substantial differences were found between the closed quotient derived from HSDI and those derived from inverse filtering. The findings illustrate the importance of distinguishing between these quotients. PMID:22280605

Mecke, Ann-Christine; Sundberg, Johan; Granqvist, Svante; Echternach, Matthias

2012-01-01

106

Comparative analysis of the closed quotient for lip and tongue trills in relation to the sustained vowel /?/.  

PubMed

Various types of trill exercises have been used for a long time as a tool in the treatment and preparation of the voice. Although they are reported to produce vocal benefits in most subjects, their physiology has not yet been studied in depth. The aim of this study was to compare the mean and standard deviation of the closed quotient in exercises of lip and tongue trills with the sustained vowel /?/ in opera singers. Ten professional classical (operatic) singers, reportedly in perfect laryngeal health, served as subjects for this study and underwent electroglottography. During the examination, the subjects were instructed to deliver the sustained vowel /?/ and lip and tongue trills in a same preestablished frequency and intensity. The mean values and standard deviation of the closed quotient were obtained using the software developed for this purpose. The comparison of the results was intrasubjects; maximum intensities were compared only among them and so were minimum intensities. The means of closed quotient were statistically significant only in the strong intensities, and the lip trill was different from the tongue trill and the sustained vowel /?/. The standard deviation of the closed quotient distinguished the sustained vowel /?/ from the lip and tongue trills in the two intensities. We concluded that there is oscillation of the closed quotient during the exercises of tongue and lip trills, and the closed quotient is higher during the performance of exercises of the lip trill, when compared with the two other utterances, only in the strong intensities. PMID:20926253

Cordeiro, Gislaine Ferro; Montagnoli, Arlindo Neto; Nemr, Nair Kátia; Menezes, Márcia Helena Moreira; Tsuji, Domingos Hiroshi

2012-01-01

107

Graph C*-algebras and Z/2Z-quotients of quantum spheres.  

E-print Network

We consider two Z/2Z-actions on the Podles generic quantum spheres. They yield, as noncommutative quotient spaces, the Klimek-Lesniewski q-disc and the quantum real projective space, respectively. The C*-algebras of all these quantum spaces are described as graph C*-algebras. The K-groups of the thus presented C*-algebras are then easily determined from the general theory of graph C*-algebras. For the quantum real projective space, we also recall the classification of the classes of irreducible *-representations of its algebra and give a linear basis for this algebra.

P. M. Hajac; R. Matthes; W. Szymanski

108

Quotients of the conifold in compact Calabi-Yau threefolds, and new topological transitions  

E-print Network

The moduli space of multiply-connected Calabi-Yau threefolds is shown to contain codimension-one loci on which the corresponding variety develops a certain type of hyperquotient singularity. These have local descriptions as discrete quotients of the conifold, and are referred to here as hyperconifolds. In many (or possibly all) cases such a singularity can be resolved to yield a distinct compact Calabi-Yau manifold. These considerations therefore provide a method for embedding an interesting class of singularities in compact Calabi-Yau varieties, and for constructing new Calabi-Yau manifolds. It is unclear whether the transitions described can be realised in string theory.

Rhys Davies

2009-11-03

109

Effects of Music Interventions on Emotional States and Running Performance  

PubMed Central

The present study compared the effects of two different music interventions on changes in emotional states before and during running, and also explored effects of music interventions upon performance outcome. Volunteer participants (n = 65) who regularly listened to music when running registered online to participate in a three-stage study. Participants attempted to attain a personally important running goal to establish baseline performance. Thereafter, participants were randomly assigned to either a self-selected music group or an Audiofuel music group. Audiofuel produce pieces of music designed to assist synchronous running. The self-selected music group followed guidelines for selecting motivating playlists. In both experimental groups, participants used the Brunel Music Rating Inventory-2 (BMRI-2) to facilitate selection of motivational music. Participants again completed the BMRI-2 post- intervention to assess the motivational qualities of Audiofuel music or the music they selected for use during the study. Results revealed no significant differences between self-selected music and Audiofuel music on all variables analyzed. Participants in both music groups reported increased pleasant emotions and decreased unpleasant emotions following intervention. Significant performance improvements were demonstrated post-intervention with participants reporting a belief that emotional states related to performance. Further analysis indicated that enhanced performance was significantly greater among participants reporting music to be motivational as indicated by high scores on the BMRI-2. Findings suggest that both individual athletes and practitioners should consider using the BMRI-2 when selecting music for running. Key points Listening to music with a high motivational quotient as indicated by scores on the BMRI-2 was associated with enhanced running performance and meta-emotional beliefs that emotions experienced during running helped performance. Beliefs on the effectiveness of music intended to alter emotions were associated with high scores on the BMRI-2. Runners seeking to use music as an emotion regulating strategy should consider using the BMRI-2 as an effective means by which to identify potentially motivating tracks. PMID:24149889

Lane, Andrew M.; Davis, Paul A.; Devonport, Tracey J.

2011-01-01

110

7?Emotion in Organizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotion has become one of the most popular—and popularized—areas within organizational scholarship. This chapter attempts to review and bring together within a single framework the wide and often disjointed literature on emotion in organizations. The integrated framework includes processes detailed by previous theorists who have defined emotion as a sequence that unfolds chronologically. The emotion process begins with a focal

Hillary Anger Elfenbein

2007-01-01

111

Emotional state and efficiency  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was made of the effect of emotional states-negative and positive- on work performance. Data cover intensity of emotional arousal, personality characteristics of person involved, typological features of person's nervous system, emotional stability of person, and past experience of person. Particular attention was given to emotional stress effects on efficiency, given modern working conditions.

Ovchinnikova, O. V.

1973-01-01

112

Priming Ability Emotional Intelligence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two studies examined whether priming self-schemas relating to successful emotional competency results in better emotional intelligence performance. In the first study participants were randomly assigned to a successful emotional competency self-schema prime condition or a control condition and then completed an ability measure of emotional

Schutte, Nicola S.; Malouff, John M.

2012-01-01

113

Human Abilities: Emotional Intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotional intelligence (EI) involves the ability to carry out accu- rate reasoning about emotions and the ability to use emotions and emotional knowledge to enhance thought. We discuss the origins of the EI concept, define EI, and describe the scope of the field today. We review three approaches taken to date from both a theoretical and methodological perspective. We find

John D. Mayer; Richard D. Roberts; Sigal G. Barsade

2008-01-01

114

Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Working with couples who are both survivors of emotional abuse and are currently in an emotionally abusive relationship can be particularly challenging for the clinician. This article focuses on Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy as a recommended practice approach for clients who are caught in emotionally abusive patterns with one another. The article reviews relevant literature on this approach and illustrates

Nancy L. Beckerman; Michele Sarracco

2002-01-01

115

Reduced accuracy and sensitivity in the perception of emotional facial expressions in individuals with high autism spectrum traits.  

PubMed

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is among other things characterized by specific impairments in emotion processing. It is not clear, however, to what extent the typical decline in affective functioning is related to the specific autistic traits. We employed The Autism Spectrum-Quotient (AQ) to quantify autistic traits in a group of 500 healthy individuals and investigate whether we could detect similar difficulties in the perception of emotional expressions in a broader autistic phenotype. The group with high AQ score was less accurate and needed higher emotional content to recognize emotions of anger, disgust, and sadness. Our findings demonstrate a selective impairment in identification of emotional facial expressions in healthy individuals that is primarily related to the extent of autistic traits. PMID:22987888

Poljac, Ervin; Poljac, Edita; Wagemans, Johan

2013-11-01

116

Inverse association between 18-carbon trans fatty acids and intelligence quotients in smoking schizophrenia patients.  

PubMed

This study aimed to investigate polyunsaturated (PUFA) and trans isomeric fatty acid status in schizophrenia patients. Fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids (PL) and triacylglycerols (TG) was analyzed by gas chromatography in 29 schizophrenia patients and 15 healthy controls. We found no difference in PL n-3 fatty acid status between the two groups, while the values of 22:5n-6 were significantly higher in patients with schizophrenia than in controls. In TG, values of docosatrienoic acid (20:3n-3) and docosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) were significantly higher in schizophrenia patients than in controls. We found no difference in the trans fatty acid status between patients and controls. In smoking schizophrenia patients significant negative correlations were detected between Wechsler adult full-scale intelligence quotients and values of total trans fatty acids in PL lipids, whereas no such correlation was seen either in non-smoking schizophrenia patients, or in healthy controls. While data obtained in the present study fail to furnish evidence for n-3 PUFA supplementation to the diet of patients with schizophrenia, they indicate that in smoking schizophrenia patients high dietary exposure to trans fatty acids is associated with lower intelligence quotients. PMID:24210662

Lohner, Szimonetta; Vágási, Judit; Marosvölgyi, Tamás; Tényi, Tamás; Decsi, Tamás

2014-01-30

117

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN RELATIONAL AND PHYSICAL AGGRESSION  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sample of 134 (93 female, 41 male) university students were evaluated with measures of relational and physical aggression, as well as measures of the five personality factors (NEO Five-Factor Inventory; Costa & McCrae, 1992), depression and anxiety (Beck Depression Inventory; Beck, 1987 and Anxiety Inventory; Beck, 1990), and general emotional understanding and functioning (Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory; Bar-On, 1997).

Leslie A. Burton; Jessica Hafetz; Debra Henninger

2007-01-01

118

Managing Intergroup Emotions: How Intergroup Ideologies and Emotion Regulation Can Stifle Positive Emotions and Intergroup Friendships  

E-print Network

ideologies or motivations, some emotion regulation iswith emotion and self-regulatory motivation, the managementmotivations and values specific to those domains, which may influence how one manages emotions

O'Connor, Alexander

2012-01-01

119

Empirical Study of Hall Bars on Few-Layer Graphene on C-Face 4H-SiC  

E-print Network

Empirical Study of Hall Bars on Few-Layer Graphene on C-Face 4H-SiC M.L. BOLEN,1,2,5 T. SHEN,1,4 J, IN 47907, USA. 5.--e-mail: mbolen@purdue.edu Hall bars were fabricated on epitaxial graphene formed on 4H-SiC-axis, semi-insulating 4H-SiC wafers, purchased from Cree and chemomechanically polished by NovaSiC

Ye, Peide "Peter"

120

Difference-quotient turbulence model: analytical solutions for the core region of plane poiseuille flow  

PubMed

The difference-quotient turbulence model and an explanation in terms of fluid dynamics is presented. With this model an analytical theory for the symmetric core region of turbulent plane Poiseuille flow is derived. The equations and the solutions reveal an order/disorder transition with analogies in other scientific fields where statistical physics applies. At moderate Reynolds numbers the time-averaged profile of the downstream mean velocity and a second-order fluctuation correlation are described in terms of Bessel functions of the first type. At the infinite Reynolds number limit these solutions converge toward functions which can be described by simple geometric figures. Experimental data confirm the model results. PMID:11088492

Egolf; Weiss

2000-07-01

121

Leiter-R versus developmental quotient for estimating cognitive function in preschoolers with pervasive developmental disorders  

PubMed Central

The utility of the developmental quotient (DQ) obtained with the Psychoeducational Profile Revised (PEP-R) was assessed as a means of estimating cognitive ability in young children with pervasive developmental disorders. Data from the PEP-R were analysed in a sample of 44 children aged from 2.0 to 5.9 years (mean 3.46 ± 1), 13 with an autistic disorder and 31 with a pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. DQ scores were compared with scores from the Leiter International Performance Scale Revised-Visualization and Reasoning Battery (Leiter-R) in the same 44 children. Overall and domain DQs on the PEP-R were significantly correlated with Leiter-R scores. This study suggests that DQ scores obtained from the PEP-R in preschool children with pervasive developmental disorders may be a viable alternative to the Leiter-R as an assessment tool. PMID:20856598

Portoghese, Claudia; Buttiglione, Maura; De Giacomo, Andrea; Lafortezza, Mariaelena; Lecce, Paola A; Martinelli, Domenico; Lozito, Vito; Margari, Lucia

2010-01-01

122

[Effects of calcification on respiratory quotient of cultured oyster Crassostrea gigas and its fouling animals].  

PubMed

Respiratory quotient (RQ) is one of the basic indices in physiology and energy metabolism of animals. When RQ is calculated, the amount of released CO2 is typically used directly. But for calcifying marine organisms, calcification which can affect dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) content in the water may cause methodological error to some extent, if it is ignored. In this paper, RQ and O/N of cultured oyster Crassostrea gigas and 3 marine fouling animal species (Mytilus edulis, Ciona intestinalis, Styela clava) were measured in the respiratory chamber to discuss the effect of calcification in RQ determination. The results demonstrated that calcification rates of C. gigas and M. edulis were (56.37 +/- 14.85) and (17.95 +/- 7.21) micromol x g(-1) x h(-1), respectively. (3.72 +/- 0.80) and (1.48 +/- 0.14) mg x L(-1) DIC in the water were correspondingly decreased, which occupied about (60.9 +/- 7.6)% and (39.9 +/- 5.7)% of respired CO2, respectively. RQ values of 4 animals were C. gigas 1.38 +0.19, M. edulis 1.18 +/- 0.11, C. intestinalis 1.11 +/- 0.05 and S. clava 1.32 +/- 0.19, which agreed with the O/N values except C. intestinalis. Meanwhile, the uncorrected RQ values of C. gigas and M. edulis were 0.56 +/- 0.19 and 0.70 +/- 0.04, respectively, which were contrary to the O/N values. Therefore, it was obviously that calcification could result in a significant influence on the respiratory quotient by affecting water DIC concentration and should be accurately calculated in RQ measurement. PMID:25223039

Ren, Li-Hu; Zhang, Ji-Hong; Fang, Jian-Guang; Yao, Yong-Feng; Zhang, Yi-Tao; Gao, Zhen-Kun; Zhang, Ming-Liang

2014-06-01

123

Emotionally Colorful Reflexive Games  

E-print Network

This study addresses the matter of reflexive control of the emotional states by means of Reflexive Game Theory (RGT). It is shown how to build a bridge between RGT and emotions. For this purpose the Pleasure-Arousal-Dominance (PAD) model is adopted. The major advantages of RGT are its ability to predict human behavior and unfold the entire spectra of reflexion in the human mind. On the other hand, PAD provides ultimate approach to model emotions. It is illustrated that emotions are reflexive processes and, consequently, RGT fused with PAD model is natural solution to model emotional interactions between people. The fusion of RGT and PAD, called Emotional Reflexive Games (ERG), inherits the key features of both components. Using ERG, we show how reflexive control can be successfully applied to model human emotional states. Up to date, EGR is a unique methodology capable of modeling human reflexive processes and emotional aspects simultaneously.

Tarasenko, Sergey

2011-01-01

124

Emotion and Facial Expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Facial expression is usually synthesized or predicted on the basis of a given emotion. The prototypical expressions for basic\\u000a emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, anger, and fear) as postulated by discrete emotion psychologists are rather\\u000a consistently produced and interpreted among different cultures, and can be used as icons to represent a basic emotion. However,\\u000a these facial expressions are actually rarely

Thomas Wehrle; Susanne Kaiser

1999-01-01

125

Emotion Detection from Text  

E-print Network

Emotion can be expressed in many ways that can be seen such as facial expression and gestures, speech and by written text. Emotion Detection in text documents is essentially a content - based classification problem involving concepts from the domains of Natural Language Processing as well as Machine Learning. In this paper emotion recognition based on textual data and the techniques used in emotion detection are discussed.

Shivhare, Shiv Naresh

2012-01-01

126

Emotion, Cognition, and Behavior  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emotion is central to the quality and range of everyday human experience. The neurobiological substrates of human emotion are now attracting increasing interest within the neurosciences motivated, to a considerable extent, by advances in functional neuroimaging techniques. An emerging theme is the question of how emotion interacts with and influences other domains of cognition, in particular attention, memory, and reasoning. The psychological consequences and mechanisms underlying the emotional modulation of cognition provide the focus of this article.

Dolan, R. J.

2002-11-01

127

Up with Emotional Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Daniel Goleman, author of the bestseller "Emotional Intelligence," spoke at the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development annual conference about children's declining emotional health indicators. He noted that emotional well-being predicts success in academic achievement, employment, marriage, and physical health; and that schools…

Pool, Carolyn R.

1997-01-01

128

Neuromodulatory Basis of Emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The neural basis of emotion can be found in both the neural computation and the neuromodulation of the neural substrate mediating behavior. I review the experimental evidence showing the involvement of the hypothalamus, the a mygdala and the prefrontal cortex in emotion. For each of these structures, I show the important role of various neuromodulatory systems in mediating emotional behavior.

Jean-Marc Fellous

1999-01-01

129

Self-referential emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper is to examine a special subgroup of emotion: self-referential emotions such as shame, pride and guilt. Self-referential emotions are usually conceptualized as (i) essentially involving the subject herself and as (ii) having complex conditions such as the capacity to represent others’ thoughts. I will show that rather than depending on a fully fledged ‘theory of

Alexandra Zinck

2008-01-01

130

Music, memory and emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because emotions enhance memory processes and music evokes strong emotions, music could be involved in forming memories, either\\u000a about pieces of music or about episodes and information associated with particular music. A recent study in BMC Neuroscience has given new insights into the role of emotion in musical memory.

Lutz Jäncke

2008-01-01

131

Emotional Intelligence through Literature.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children develop emotional intelligence during the early years of life, and according to some experts, emotional intelligence is a more reliable predictor of academic achievement than is IQ. However, today's children appear to be low on emotional well-being. This has potentially negative consequences, not only for academic achievement but also for…

Ghosn, Irma K.

132

Retrieval of Emotional Memories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Long-term memories are influenced by the emotion experienced during learning as well as by the emotion experienced during memory retrieval. The present article reviews the literature addressing the effects of emotion on retrieval, focusing on the cognitive and neurological mechanisms that have been revealed. The reviewed research suggests that the…

Buchanan, Tony W.

2007-01-01

133

Quotient-based Control Synthesis for Partially Observed Non-Deterministic Plants with Mu-Calculus Specifications  

E-print Network

Quotient-based Control Synthesis for Partially Observed Non-Deterministic Plants with Mu-Calculus Specifications Samik Basu and Ratnesh Kumar Abstract-- Supervisory control of discrete event plants re- quires the identification of a supervisor, if one exists, such that the controlled plant satisfies certain desired

Kumar, Ratnesh

134

The French Version of the Autism-Spectrum Quotient in Adolescents: A Cross-Cultural Validation Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We assessed the accuracy of the French version of the "Autism Spectrum Quotient" ("AQ") in adolescents with Asperger syndrome (AS) and high-functioning autism (HFA) compared to healthy controls and adolescents with psychiatric disorders (PDs). Three groups of adolescents, aged 11-18, were assessed: 116 with AS/HFA (93 with IQ [greater than or…

Sonie, Sandrine; Kassai, Behrouz; Pirat, Elodie; Bain, Paul; Robinson, Janine; Gomot, Marie; Barthelemy, Catherine; Charvet, Dorothee; Rochet, Thierry; Tatou, Mohamed; Assouline, Brigitte; Cabrol, Stephane; Chabane, Nadia; Arnaud, Valerie; Faure, Patricia; Manificat, Sabine

2013-01-01

135

Correction: Determination of metal ion content of beverages and estimation of target hazard quotients: a comparative study  

PubMed Central

This is a correction to the following paper: Hague T, Petroczi A, Andrews PR, Barker J, Naughton DP: Determination of metal ion content of beverages and estimation of target hazard quotients: a comparative study. Chem Central J 2008, 2:13.

2010-01-01

136

Brief Report: The Autism Spectrum Quotient Has Convergent Validity with the Social Responsiveness Scale in a High-Functioning Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) is widely used to measure autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms and screen for ASD. It is readily available free of charge online and is easily accessible to practitioners, researchers and individuals who suspect that they may have an ASD. Thus, the AQ is a potentially useful, widely accessible tool for ASD…

Armstrong, Kimberly; Iarocci, Grace

2013-01-01

137

A quick referral guide for adults with suspected autism who do not have a learning disability. Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ)  

E-print Network

diagnostic assessment. This test is recommended in `Autism: recognition, referral, diagnosis and managementA quick referral guide for adults with suspected autism who do not have a learning disability. AQ-10 Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) 1 I often notice small sounds when others do not 2 I usually

Cambridge, University of

138

Comparing ecological risks of pesticides: the utility of a Risk Quotient ranking approach across refinements of exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental risk assessment of pesticides and other chemicals often uses the Risk Quotient (RQ) method to characterize risk quantitatively. An RQ is calculated by dividing an environmental exposure value by a toxicity end-point value. Tier 1 RQs, which are characterized by highly conservative toxicity and exposure assumptions, are used primarily for screening out negligible risks in regulatory decision making. It

Robert KD Peterson

2006-01-01

139

Using a hazard quotient to evaluate pesticide residues detected in pollen trapped from honey bees (Apis mellifera) in Connecticut.  

PubMed

Analysis of pollen trapped from honey bees as they return to their hives provides a method of monitoring fluctuations in one route of pesticide exposure over location and time. We collected pollen from apiaries in five locations in Connecticut, including urban, rural, and mixed agricultural sites, for periods from two to five years. Pollen was analyzed for pesticide residues using a standard extraction method widely used for pesticides (QuEChERS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis. Sixty pesticides or metabolites were detected. Because the dose lethal to 50% of adult worker honey bees (LD50) is the only toxicity parameter available for a wide range of pesticides, and among our pesticides there were contact LD50 values ranging from 0.006 to >1000 ?g per bee (range 166,000X), and even among insecticides LD50 values ranged from 0.006 to 59.8 ?g/bee (10,000X); therefore we propose that in studies of honey bee exposure to pesticides that concentrations be reported as Hazard Quotients as well as in standard concentrations such as parts per billion. We used both contact and oral LD50 values to calculate Pollen Hazard Quotients (PHQ = concentration in ppb ÷ LD50 as ?g/bee) when both were available. In this study, pesticide Pollen Hazard Quotients ranged from over 75,000 to 0.01. The pesticides with the greatest Pollen Hazard Quotients at the maximum concentrations found in our study were (in descending order): phosmet, Imidacloprid, indoxacarb, chlorpyrifos, fipronil, thiamethoxam, azinphos-methyl, and fenthion, all with at least one Pollen Hazard Quotient (using contact or oral LD50) over 500. At the maximum rate of pollen consumption by nurse bees, a Pollen Hazard Quotient of 500 would be approximately equivalent to consuming 0.5% of the LD50 per day. We also present an example of a Nectar Hazard Quotient and the percentage of LD50 per day at the maximum nectar consumption rate. PMID:24143241

Stoner, Kimberly A; Eitzer, Brian D

2013-01-01

140

Cognitive approaches to emotions.  

PubMed

Cognitive approaches offer clear links between how emotions are thought about in everyday life and how they are investigated psychologically. Cognitive researchers have focused on how emotions are caused when events or other people affect concerns and on how emotions influence processes such as reasoning, memory, and attention. Three representative cognitive theories of emotion continue to develop productively: the action-readiness theory, the core-affect theory, and the communicative theory. Some principles are common to them and divergences can be resolved by future research. Recent explanations have included how emotions structure social relationships, how they function in psychological illnesses, and how they are central to music and fiction. PMID:24389368

Oatley, Keith; Johnson-Laird, P N

2014-03-01

141

Parents' Beliefs about Emotions and Children's Recognition of Parents' Emotions  

PubMed Central

This study investigated parents’ emotion-related beliefs, experience, and expression, and children’s recognition of their parents’ emotions with 40 parent-child dyads. Parents reported beliefs about danger and guidance of children’s emotions. While viewing emotion-eliciting film clips, parents self-reported their emotional experience and masking of emotion. Children and observers rated videos of parents watching emotion-eliciting film clips. Fathers reported more masking than mothers and their emotional expressions were more difficult for both observers and children to recognize compared with mothers’ emotional expressions. For fathers, but not mothers, showing clearer expressions was related to children’s general skill at recognizing emotional expressions. Parents who believe emotions are dangerous reported greater masking of emotional expression. Contrary to hypothesis, when parents strongly believe in guiding their child’s emotion socialization, children showed less accurate recognition of their parents’ emotions. PMID:20160992

Dunsmore, Julie C.; Her, Pa; Halberstadt, Amy G.; Perez-Rivera, Marie B.

2009-01-01

142

The emotionally competent leader.  

PubMed

Aristotle once challenged man "to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way" (The Nicomachean Ethics). Daniel Goleman, Ph.D., a journalist for the New York Times, expands on this statement in his new book, "Emotional Intelligence." He defines emotional intelligence as the ability to rein in emotional impulses, to read another's innermost feelings and to handle relationships and conflict smoothly. This new model of intelligence puts emotions at the center of our aptitudes for living. Goleman asserts that these emotional aptitudes can preserve relationships, protect our health and improve our success at work. The following adaptation from "Emotional Intelligence" (Bantam Books, 1995) offers suggestions to managers and supervisors on how they can create a more cost-effective and healthier workplace for their employees by becoming more aware of their own emotional. intelligence. PMID:10177113

Goleman, D

1998-01-01

143

A Robot Emotion Generation Mechanism Based on PAD Emotion Space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A robot emotion generation mechanism is presented in this paper, in which emotion is described in PAD emotion space. In this mechanism, emotion is affected by the robot personality, the robot task and the emotion origin, so the robot emotion will change naturally when it senses the extern stimuli. We also experiment on Fuwa robot, and demonstrate that this mechanism can make the robot's emotion change be more easily accepted by people and is good for human-robot interaction.

Qingji, Gao; Kai, Wang; Haijuan, Liu

144

Emotions: An Indian perspective  

PubMed Central

The present paper is an attempt to understand emotions and the affect from Indian traditional point of view. In the Indian philosophical texts’ detailed descriptions of emotions are not available nor are dealt with as a separate concept. This view of emotions lays emphasis on desires as the root cause of emotional upheavals. They are seen as modification of desire and attachment. The desires are seen as arising from the contact and attachment of the ego or ahamkara with the external world and are caused by a sense of imperfection, incompleteness or non-fulfillment. Ego or ahamkara is differentiated from the true Self or atman. Emotions are viewed as springs of action and are bipolar in nature. According to Patanjali's Yoga Shastra, suffering is due to ignorance about one's true “self” (avidya). Hence, suffering or dukha arises from within and not from the outside world. Bhagvadgita traces all emotional experiences to the gunas, i.e., sattva, rajas, and tamas. Works of Bharathmuni have contributed to the understanding of emotional experiences. Concept of rasa or aesthetic relish is central to this approach to understanding affective experiences as dealt with in the Natyashastra of Bharathamuni. These views underline the recommended path for self-transformation. Regulating emotions, both emotional experience and emotional expression, is an integral part of the recommended “principles of living.” PMID:23858247

Ramaprasad, Dharitri

2013-01-01

145

Emotional intelligence: recognizing and regulating emotions.  

PubMed

Occupational health nurses are in the unique position to influence health in the work force. To maximize this positive health influence, occupational health nurses should develop the skills of emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence includes awareness of self and others and empathy. These behaviors are congruent with the mission of nursing because they improve health outcomes. Occupational health nurses who are emotionally intelligent have improved relationships with others, an important aspect of the nursing role. Emotional intelligence can be developed. The process begins with self-awareness, enhanced through self-care behaviors, such as exercise and journaling. Reading popular self-help literature also can improve self-awareness. After a nurse becomes self-aware, the next phase is to develop an awareness of others. This can be learned using the same type of techniques in the self-awareness stage. The final step is the development of empathy. This is the active step using the knowledge developed in the prior two stages. Through discipline and effort, an individual can learn to actively listen to others. This type of listening fosters empathy. By working in a positive, caring environment, personal growth in emotional intelligence can be enhanced (McMullen, 2003). Through the development of emotional intelligence, the nurse can improve personally and professionally, a win-win situation for all involved. PMID:15853293

Reeves, Amy

2005-04-01

146

The Brain Basis of Emotions 1 BRAIN BASIS OF EMOTION  

E-print Network

The Brain Basis of Emotions 1 BRAIN BASIS OF EMOTION The brain basis of emotion: A meta, Building 149 Charlestown, MA 02129 lindqukr@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu #12;The Brain Basis of Emotions 2 Abstract Researchers have wondered how the brain creates emotions since the early days of psychological science

Barrett, Lisa Feldman

147

The effects of developmental quotient and diagnostic criteria on challenging behaviors in toddlers with developmental disabilities.  

PubMed

Previous research has found that individuals with intellectual disability and/or autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and those with greater symptom severity within these diagnoses, show higher rates of aggressive/destructive behavior, stereotypic behavior, and self-injurious behavior. In this exploratory cross-sectional study, toddlers at-risk for a developmental disorder (n=1509) ranging from 17 to 36 months fell into one of three diagnostic categories: Autistic Disorder, Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified [PDD-NOS], and atypically developing - no ASD diagnosis. Mental health professionals from EarlySteps, Louisiana's Early Intervention System, interviewed parents and guardians using the Baby and Infant Screen for Children with aUtIsm Traits (BISCUIT) -Part 3 (Matson, Boisjoli, & Wilkins, 2007) to obtain measures of challenging behaviors and the Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd Edition (BDI-2) (Newborg, 2005) to obtain developmental quotients (DQ). Toddlers diagnosed with Autistic Disorder or PDD-NOS showed a positive relationship between total DQ and challenging behavior; whereas, atypically developing toddlers with no ASD diagnosis showed a more adaptive, negative relationship. The DQ domains that were most influential on challenging behaviors varied by diagnosis, with communication and motor domains playing greater roles for toddlers with Autistic Disorder or PDD-NOS, and personal-social and cognitive domains playing greater roles for atypically developing toddlers with no ASD diagnosis. PMID:22502836

Medeiros, Kristen; Kozlowski, Alison M; Beighley, Jennifer S; Rojahn, Johannes; Matson, Johnny L

2012-01-01

148

Influence of formalin fixation on the implant stability quotient and mechanical characteristics of bone.  

PubMed

The implant stability quotient (ISQ) has been widely evaluated in clinical studies and animal experiments. However, accurate measurement is often difficult in animal models. In such cases, measurement of ISQ in bone is needed after formalin fixation. However, it is not yet clear how such fixation influences the measurement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of formalin fixation on ISQ and the mechanical characteristics of bone. Fourteen tibias were harvested from rabbits; the samples from the left (length 60mm, control group) were soaked in saline and the samples from the right (length 60mm, fixation group) were fixed in 10% neutral-buffered formalin at 4°C for 4h. Three-point bending tests were done at 5mm/min to measure the maximum load and total absorbed energy. Twelve titanium implants (Brånemark System(®) Mk-III TiUnite, Nobel Biocare, Sweden) were placed into the edentulous molar site of the mandibles of 2 dogs and the ISQ was measured by Osstell(®) (control group) 3 months later. The implants involved in the bone block were then fixed for 4h (fixation group) and the ISQ measured. The maximum load values did not differ significantly between the control and fixation groups. Total absorbed energy was significantly higher in the control group than in the fixation group. ISQ did not differ significantly between the groups. These results suggest that formalin fixation of bone might affect some of the mechanical characteristics of bone, but not its ISQ. PMID:23036835

Morita, Koji; Doi, Kazuya; Oue, Hiroshi; Kajihara, Shiho; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Akagawa, Yasumasa

2013-09-01

149

Intellectual quotient of juveniles evaluated in a forensic psychiatry clinic after committing a violent crime.  

PubMed

The purpose of this preliminary study is to evaluate if there is a difference between the intelligence quotient (IQ) of 27 adolescent defendants referred to the Bellevue Hospital Center Forensic Psychiatry Clinic after committing violent crimes, and those adolescents in the same age group in the general population of the United States, as defined by the norms of the psychometric testing instrument Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, 4th edition (WISC-IV). The IQ scores and sub-scores were compared to IQ scores of the general population (mean = 100, SD = 15) using a Z-test. The mean for the Full Scale IQ was 82.93. The means for the subtests which include Processing Speed Index, Perceptual Reasoning Index, Verbal Comprehension Index, and Working Memory Index, were: 78.48, 87.78, 86.70 (p < 0.05), and 90.78 (p = 0.09) respectively. There is a statistically significant difference in the IQ scores of the violent juveniles studied when compared to the general population. PMID:20015167

Lopez-Leon, Manuel; Rosner, Richard

2010-01-01

150

Closed quotient and spectral measures of female adolescent singers in different singing styles.  

PubMed

Although quantifiable assessment of the singing voice is now commonplace, research on young (child and adolescent) voices is still in its infancy. There is still insufficient data on young people's voices based on which, "norms" in behavior could be modeled, particularly for contemporary commercial music (CCM), such as musical theater (MT). The objective of this study was to assess if quantifiable differences in vocal production and acoustic output of young singers exist between "classical" and "MT" styles. The study was a prospective cohort study of 20 adolescent female singers aged 12-17 years training their voices using a system, which includes both "classical" and "MT" styles. The study examined laryngographically derived closed quotient (CQ), average vowel spectra (AVS) and long-term average spectra (LTAS) measures of the sung voices of singers in "classical" and "MT" styles. The spectral slope was shallower for the MT voice, and the mean CQ was significantly higher across the pitch range when singing in an MT style than in a "classical" style. The second to fifth harmonics were stronger in the MT style than in classical, with a significant difference between the two styles. The increase in relative intensity in the first five harmonics was disproportionately higher than the increase in CQ. Results, therefore, suggested that MT singing primarily uses change in resonance strategy rather than raised vocal tension to achieve the tonal changes associated with the genre. PMID:19595563

Barlow, Christopher; Lovetri, Jeannette

2010-05-01

151

Programa de psicoterapia para madres de bebés con síndrome de Down: abordaje emocional de la diada madre-hijo en el primer año de vida del niño Programme about psycotherapy for mothers of babies with Down syndrome: emotional approach of the relationship between mother-child in the child's first year of life  

Microsoft Academic Search

A program of psycotherapy for mothers of babies with Down síndrome is exposed. The main target of this project is to modify the interactive patterns between the mother and the baby, in order that this affects positively the babies' quotients of intellectual development. The treatment program incorporates the boarding of the mother's emotional alterations, in combination with the administration of

Miralles Isern

2005-01-01

152

Emotion and autobiographical memory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Autobiographical memory encompasses our recollections of specific, personal events. In this article, we review the interactions between emotion and autobiographical memory, focusing on two broad ways in which these interactions occur. First, the emotional content of an experience can influence the way in which the event is remembered. Second, emotions and emotional goals experienced at the time of autobiographical retrieval can influence the information recalled. We discuss the behavioral manifestations of each of these types of interactions and describe the neural mechanisms that may support those interactions. We discuss how findings from the clinical literature (e.g., regarding depression) and the social psychology literature (e.g., on emotion regulation) might inform future investigations of the interplay between the emotions experienced at the time of retrieval and the memories recalled, and we present ideas for future research in this domain.

Holland, Alisha C.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

2010-03-01

153

Disorders of emotional behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

After having stressed the distinction between general adaptive systems and specific functional systems, the author argues\\u000a that emotions constitute a general adaptive system distinct from, but interacting with, the cognitive system, considered as\\u000a the other (more evolved) adaptive system.\\u000a \\u000a The main characteristics of the emotional system are its componential nature and its hierarchical organization. These basic\\u000a features of the emotional

Guido Gainotti

2001-01-01

154

A novel method testing the ability to imitate composite emotional expressions reveals an association with empathy.  

PubMed

Social communication relies on intentional control of emotional expression. Its variability across cultures suggests important roles for imitation in developing control over enactment of subtly different facial expressions and therefore skills in emotional communication. Both empathy and the imitation of an emotionally communicative expression may rely on a capacity to share both the experience of an emotion and the intention or motor plan associated with its expression. Therefore, we predicted that facial imitation ability would correlate with empathic traits. We built arrays of visual stimuli by systematically blending three basic emotional expressions in controlled proportions. Raters then assessed accuracy of imitation by reconstructing the same arrays using photographs of participants' attempts at imitations of the stimuli. Accuracy was measured as the mean proximity of the participant photographs to the target stimuli in the array. Levels of performance were high, and rating was highly reliable. More empathic participants, as measured by the empathy quotient (EQ), were better facial imitators and, in particular, performed better on the more complex, blended stimuli. This preliminary study offers a simple method for the measurement of facial imitation accuracy and supports the hypothesis that empathic functioning may utilise motor control mechanisms which are also used for emotional expression. PMID:23626756

Williams, Justin H G; Nicolson, Andrew T A; Clephan, Katie J; de Grauw, Haro; Perrett, David I

2013-01-01

155

A Novel Method Testing the Ability to Imitate Composite Emotional Expressions Reveals an Association with Empathy  

PubMed Central

Social communication relies on intentional control of emotional expression. Its variability across cultures suggests important roles for imitation in developing control over enactment of subtly different facial expressions and therefore skills in emotional communication. Both empathy and the imitation of an emotionally communicative expression may rely on a capacity to share both the experience of an emotion and the intention or motor plan associated with its expression. Therefore, we predicted that facial imitation ability would correlate with empathic traits. We built arrays of visual stimuli by systematically blending three basic emotional expressions in controlled proportions. Raters then assessed accuracy of imitation by reconstructing the same arrays using photographs of participants’ attempts at imitations of the stimuli. Accuracy was measured as the mean proximity of the participant photographs to the target stimuli in the array. Levels of performance were high, and rating was highly reliable. More empathic participants, as measured by the empathy quotient (EQ), were better facial imitators and, in particular, performed better on the more complex, blended stimuli. This preliminary study offers a simple method for the measurement of facial imitation accuracy and supports the hypothesis that empathic functioning may utilise motor control mechanisms which are also used for emotional expression. PMID:23626756

Williams, Justin H. G.; Nicolson, Andrew T. A.; Clephan, Katie J.; de Grauw, Haro; Perrett, David I.

2013-01-01

156

Positive Emotion, Negative Emotion, and Emotion Control in the Externalizing Problems of School-Aged Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examined the role of emotion and emotion control in children's externalizing problems. Third- to sixth-grade children were administered a self-report measure of positive emotion, negative emotion, and emotion control. Peer- and teacher-reported adjustment problems were assessed. Structural equations modeling revealed that…

Kim, Geunyoung; Walden, Tedra; Harris, Vicki; Karrass, Jan; Catron, Thomas

2007-01-01

157

The uncharted waters of emotion: Ethnicity, trait emotion and emotion expression in older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotions are central to contemporary theories of health, and a growingbody of psychological research has shown emotion and emotion regulatorystyles to be predictive of health outcomes. Yet despite these clear links andthe fact that patterns of emotion and expression are partially a product ofculture, there is a meager literature on the emotional characteristics ofdifferent ethnic groups. Even where ethnicity has

Nathan S. Consedine; Carol Magai

2002-01-01

158

Emotional reactivity and emotion recognition in frontotemporal lobar degeneration  

PubMed Central

Background Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is associated with a profound decline in social and emotional behavior; however, current understanding regarding the specific aspects of emotional functioning that are preserved and disrupted is limited. Objective To assess preservation of function and deficits in two aspects of emotional processing (emotional reactivity and emotion recognition) in FTLD. Methods Twenty-eight FTLD patients were compared with 16 controls in emotional reactivity (self-reported emotional experience, emotional facial behavior, and autonomic nervous system response to film stimuli) and emotion recognition (ability to identify a target emotion of fear, happy, or sad experienced by film characters). Additionally, the neural correlates of emotional reactivity and emotion recognition were investigated. Results FTLD patients were comparable to controls in 1) emotional reactivity to the fear, happy, and sad film clips and 2) emotion recognition for the happy film clip. However, FTLD patients were significantly impaired compared with controls in emotion recognition for the fear and sad film clips. Volumetric analyses revealed that deficits in emotion recognition were associated with decreased lobar volumes in the frontal and temporal lobes. Conclusions The socioemotional decline typically seen in frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients may result more from an inability to process certain emotions in other people than from deficits in emotional reactivity. PMID:17620547

Werner, K.H.; Roberts, N.A.; Rosen, H.J.; Dean, D.L.; Kramer, J.H.; Weiner, M.W.; Miller, B.L.; Levenson, R.W.

2008-01-01

159

The architecture of emotion experience  

E-print Network

Psychology, Volume 3, The Neuroscience of Morality: Emotion, Brain Disorders,Psychology, Volume 3, The Neuroscience of Morality: Emotion, Brain Disorders,Psychology, Volume 3, The Neuroscience of Morality: Emotion, Brain Disorders,

Damm, Lisa Marie

2009-01-01

160

Emotion Socialization in the Home  

E-print Network

emotional understanding in preschool children. Developmental Psychology,emotional adjustment: A birth-to-maturity perspective. Developmental Psychology,emotional life of families: Theoretical models and preliminary data. Journal of Family Psychology,

Sperling, Jacqueline

2012-01-01

161

Soil microbial metabolic quotient (qCO2) of twelve ecosystems of Mt. Kilimanjaro  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil organic carbon, microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and the metabolic quotient qCO2 - as sensitive and important parameters for soil fertility and C turnover - are strongly affected by land-use changes all over the world. These effects are particularly distinct upon conversion of natural to agricultural ecosystems due to very fast carbon (C) and nutrient cycles and high vulnerability, especially in the tropics. In this study, we used an elevational gradient on Mt. Kilimanjaro to investigate the effects of land-use change and elevation on Corg, MBC and qCO2. Down to a soil depth of 18 cm we compared 4 natural (Helichrysum, Erica forest, Podocarpus forest, Ocotea forest), 5 seminatural (disturbed Podocarpus forest, disturbed Ocotea forest, lower montane forest, grassland, savannah), 1 sustainably used (homegarden) and 2 intensively used ecosystems (coffee plantation, maize field) on an elevation gradient from 950 to 3880 m a.s.l.. Using an incubation device, soil CO2-efflux of 18 cm deep soil cores was measured under field moist conditions and mean annual temperature. MBC to Corg ratios varied between 0.7 and 2.3%. qCO2 increased with magnitude of the disturbance, albeit this effect decreased with elevation. Following the annual precipitation of the ecosystems, both, Corg and MBC showed a hum-shaped distribution with elevation, whereas their maxima were between 2500 and 3000 m a.s.l.. Additionaly, Corg and MBC contents were significantly reduced in intensively used agricultural systems. We conclude that the soil microbial biomass and its activity in Mt. Kilimanjaro ecosystems are strongly altered by land-use. This effect is more distinct in lower than in higher elevated ecosystems and strongly dependent on the magnitude of disturbance.

Pabst, Holger; Gerschlauer, Friederike; Kiese, Ralf; Kuzyakov, Yakov

2014-05-01

162

Magnitude and regulation of bacterioplankton respiratory quotient across freshwater environmental gradients  

PubMed Central

Bacterioplankton respiration (BR) may represent the largest single sink of organic carbon in the biosphere and constitutes an important driver of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from freshwaters. Complete understanding of BR is precluded by the fact that most studies need to assume a respiratory quotient (RQ; mole of CO2 produced per mole of O2 consumed) to calculate rates of BR. Many studies have, without clear support, assumed a fixed RQ around 1. Here we present 72 direct measurements of bacterioplankton RQ that we carried out in epilimnetic samples of 52 freshwater sites in Québec (Canada), using O2 and CO2 optic sensors. The RQs tended to converge around 1.2, but showed large variability (s.d.=0.45) and significant correlations with major gradients of ecosystem-level, substrate-level and bacterial community-level characteristics. Experiments with natural bacterioplankton using different single substrates suggested that RQ is intimately linked to the elemental composition of the respired compounds. RQs were on average low in net autotrophic systems, where bacteria likely were utilizing mainly reduced substrates, whereas we found evidence that the dominance of highly oxidized substrates, for example, organic acids formed by photo-chemical processes, led to high RQ in the more heterotrophic systems. Further, we suggest that BR contributes to a substantially larger share of freshwater CO2 emissions than presently believed based on the assumption that RQ is ?1. Our study demonstrates that bacterioplankton RQ is not only a practical aspect of BR determination, but also a major ecosystem state variable that provides unique information about aquatic ecosystem functioning. PMID:22094347

Berggren, Martin; Lapierre, Jean-Francois; del Giorgio, Paul A

2012-01-01

163

Effects of an artificially lengthened vocal tract on the glottal closed quotient in untrained male voices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of hard-walled narrow tubes, often called resonance tubes, for the purpose of voice therapy and voice training has a historical precedent and some theoretical support, but the mechanism of any potential benefit from the application of this technique has remained poorly understood. Fifteen vocally untrained male participants produced a series of spoken /a / vowels at a modal pitch and constant loudness, followed by a minute of repeated phonation into a hard-walled glass tube at the same pitch and loudness targets. The tube parameters and tube phonation task criteria were selected according to theoretical calculations predicting an increase in the acoustic load such that phonation would occur under conditions of near-maximum inertive reactance. Following tube phonation, each participant repeated a similar series of spoken /a/ vowels. Electroglottography (EGG) was used to measure the glottal closed quotient (CQ) during each phase of the experiment. A single-subject, multiple-baseline design with direct replication across subjects was used to identify any changes in CQ across the phases of the experiment. Single-subject analysis using the method of Statistical Process Control (SPC) revealed statistically significant changes in CQ during tube phonation, but with no discernable pattern across the 15 participants. These results indicate that the use of resonance tubes can have a distinct effect on glottal closure, but the mechanism behind this change remains unclear. The implication is that vocal loading techniques such as this need to be studied further with specific attention paid to the underlying mechanism of any measured changes in glottal behavior, and especially to the role of instruction and feedback in the therapeutic and pedagogical application of these techniques.

Gaskill, Christopher Somers

164

IQdb: an intelligence quotient score-associated gene resource for human intelligence.  

PubMed

Intelligence quotient (IQ) is the most widely used phenotype to characterize human cognitive abilities. Recent advances in studies on human intelligence have identified many new susceptibility genes. However, the genetic mechanisms involved in IQ score and the relationship between IQ score and the risk of mental disorders have won little attention. To address the genetic complexity of IQ score, we have developed IQdb (http://IQdb.cbi.pku.edu.cn), a publicly available database for exploring IQ-associated human genes. In total, we collected 158 experimental verified genes from literature as a core dataset in IQdb. In addition, 46 genomic regions related to IQ score have been curated from literature. Based on the core dataset and 46 confirmed linked genomic regions, more than 6932 potential IQ-related genes are expanded using data of protein-protein interactions. A systematic gene ranking approach was applied to all the collected and expanded genes to represent the relative importance of all the 7090 genes in IQdb. Our further systematic pathway analysis reveals that IQ-associated genes are significantly enriched in multiple signal events, especially related to cognitive systems. Of the 158 genes in the core dataset, 81 are involved in various psychotic and mental disorders. This comprehensive gene resource illustrates the importance of IQdb to our understanding on human intelligence, and highlights the utility of IQdb for elucidating the functions of IQ-associated genes and the cross-talk mechanisms among cognition-related pathways in some mental disorders for community. Database URL: http://IQdb.cbi.pku.edu.cn. PMID:24030781

Kong, Lei; Cheng, Lu; Fan, Li-ya; Zhao, Min; Qu, Hong

2013-01-01

165

Beware Emotional Maltreatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotional maltreatment is a less visible form of abuse that frequently occurs in schools, but is often ignored or dismissed as an acceptable form of discipline or sanctioned classroom-management practice. The impact of emotional maltreatment on children is significant and impacts personality development, relationships, and learning. Principals, as…

King, Margaret A.; Janson, Gregory R.

2011-01-01

166

emotional brain without sleep  

E-print Network

evidence, reported here, that a lack of sleep inappropriately modulates the human emotional brain responseMagazine R877 The human emotional brain without sleep -- a prefrontal amygdala disconnect Seung-Schik Yoo1, Ninad Gujar2, Peter Hu2, Ferenc A. Jolesz1 and Matthew P. Walker2,* Sleep deprivation is known

Walker, Matthew P.

167

Emotion Vocabulary in Interlanguage.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines five factors that may impact the use of second language emotion vocabulary. Considers the impact of language proficiency, gender, and extroversion on the use of emotion words in the advanced French interlanguage of 29 native Dutch speakers, and examines influence of sociocultural competence, gender, and type of linguistic material on use…

Dewaele, Jean-Marc; Pavlenko, Aneta

2002-01-01

168

Denying Medical Students' Emotions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medical educators nationwide are questioning the process that leads to the denial of the emotional side of medicine by its practitioners. Emotional dilemmas are often verbally suppressed by most students, but they surface in many ways, such as depression, insomnia, loss of appetite, and anxiety. (RM)

USA Today, 1984

1984-01-01

169

EmoteMail  

Microsoft Academic Search

Email has become a central communication channel for private and professional exchange. Its format remains equally neutral regardless of the relation to the recipient. While writing remains an excellent vehicle to communicate tone and emotion, this can sometimes be a painstaking and tedious process, and requires considerable skill.EmoteMail is an email client that is augmented to convey aspects of the

Jussi Ängeslevä; Carson Reynolds; Sile O'Modhrain

2004-01-01

170

An Emotional Control Card for Inappropriate and Appropriate Emotions in Using Rational-Emotive Imagery.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the emotional control card techniques developed by Sklare, Taylor, and Hyland (1985) to help clients more effectively use the rational-emotive imagery technique of Ellis (1974). Suggests a revision of the emotional control card technique. (NB)

Ellis, Albert

1986-01-01

171

Emotional complexity and the neural representation of emotion in motion.  

PubMed

According to theories of emotional complexity, individuals low in emotional complexity encode and represent emotions in visceral or action-oriented terms, whereas individuals high in emotional complexity encode and represent emotions in a differentiated way, using multiple emotion concepts. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, participants viewed valenced animated scenarios of simple ball-like figures attending either to social or spatial aspects of the interactions. Participant's emotional complexity was assessed using the Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale. We found a distributed set of brain regions previously implicated in processing emotion from facial, vocal and bodily cues, in processing social intentions, and in emotional response, were sensitive to emotion conveyed by motion alone. Attention to social meaning amplified the influence of emotion in a subset of these regions. Critically, increased emotional complexity correlated with enhanced processing in a left temporal polar region implicated in detailed semantic knowledge; with a diminished effect of social attention; and with increased differentiation of brain activity between films of differing valence. Decreased emotional complexity was associated with increased activity in regions of pre-motor cortex. Thus, neural coding of emotion in semantic vs action systems varies as a function of emotional complexity, helping reconcile puzzling inconsistencies in neuropsychological investigations of emotion recognition. PMID:20207691

Tavares, Paula; Barnard, Philip J; Lawrence, Andrew D

2011-01-01

172

Weather and emotional state  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction Given the proven effects of weather on the human organism, an attempt to examine its effects on a psychic and emotional level has been made. Emotions affect the bio-tonus, working ability and concentration, hence their significance in various domains of economic life, such as health care, education, transportation, tourism, etc. Data and methods The research has been made in Sofia City within a period of 8 months, using 5 psychological methods (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Test for Self-assessment of the emotional state (developed by Wessman and Ricks), Test for evaluation of moods and Test "Self-confidence - Activity - Mood" (developed by the specialists from the Military Academy in Saint Petersburg). The Fiodorov-Chubukov's complex-climatic method was used to characterize meteorological conditions because of the purpose to include in the analysis a maximal number of meteorological elements. 16 weather types are defined in dependence of the meteorological elements values according to this method. Abrupt weather changes from one day to another, defined by the same method, were considered as well. Results and discussions The results obtained by t-test show that the different categories of weather lead to changes in the emotional status, which indicates a character either positive or negative for the organism. The abrupt weather changes, according to expectations, have negative effect on human emotions but only when a transition to the cloudy weather or weather type, classified as "unfavourable" has been realized. The relationship between weather and human emotions is rather complicated since it depends on individual characteristics of people. One of these individual psychological characteristics, marked by the dimension "neuroticism", has a strong effect on emotional reactions in different weather conditions. Emotionally stable individuals are more "protected" to the weather influence on their emotions, while those who are emotionally unstable have a stronger dependence to the impacts of the weather.

Spasova, Z.

2010-09-01

173

Modeling the Experience of Emotion  

E-print Network

Affective computing has proven to be a viable field of research comprised of a large number of multidisciplinary researchers resulting in work that is widely published. The majority of this work consists of computational models of emotion recognition, computational modeling of causal factors of emotion and emotion expression through rendered and robotic faces. A smaller part is concerned with modeling the effects of emotion, formal modeling of cognitive appraisal theory and models of emergent emotions. Part of the motivation for affective computing as a field is to better understand emotional processes through computational modeling. One of the four major topics in affective computing is computers that have emotions (the others are recognizing, expressing and understanding emotions). A critical and neglected aspect of having emotions is the experience of emotion (Barrett, Mesquita, Ochsner, and Gross, 2007): what does the content of an emotional episode look like, how does this content change over time and wh...

Broekens, Joost

2009-01-01

174

An emotion model using emotional memory and consciousness occupancy ratio  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on general emotion model which can be used in cyber characters in VR. Our model shows the various kinds of emotional transition whose factors are ranged from single variable to multiple variables by emotional memory and Consciousness Occupancy Ratio (COR). This model also shows emotional memory recall which is an established theory in Psychology. In the last

Sung June Chang; In Ho Lee

2005-01-01

175

An Emotion Expression System for the Emotional Robot  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we presents an emotion expression system for expressing emotion for the emotional robot, which have a plurality of different sensors sense information about internal\\/external stimuli. In detail, we propose method for processing information that is collected through various sensors in an intelligent robot, a method for determining an emotion, and a method for expressing a corresponding action.

Jungwoo Ryu; Joochan Sohn; Hyunkyu Cho

2007-01-01

176

Toward Machines with Emotional Intelligence  

E-print Network

and how to display emotion in ways that enable the machine to appear empathetic or otherwise emotionally1 Toward Machines with Emotional Intelligence Rosalind W. Picard MIT Media Laboratory Abstract pets, desktop computers, and more) skills of emotional intelligence. Machines have long been able

177

What good are positive emotions?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article opens by noting that positive emotions do not fit existing models of emotions. Consequently, a new model is advanced to describe the form and function of a subset of positive emotions, including joy, interest, contentment, and love. This new model posits that these positive emotions serve to broaden an individual's momentary thought-action repertoire, which in turn has the

Barbara L. Fredrickson

1998-01-01

178

Emotions in Pervasive Computing Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability of an intelligent environment to connect and adapt to real internal sates, needs and behaviors' meaning of humans can be made possible by considering users' emotional states as contextual parameters. In this paper, we build on enactive psychology and investigate the incorporation of emotions in pervasive systems. We define emotions, and discuss the coding of emotional human markers

Nevin Vunka Jungum; Eric Laurent

2009-01-01

179

On dimensions in emotion psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Is the study of the dimensional space that is meant to represent human emotions helpful in understanding the mecha- nisms underlying emotional processes? Emotional experience is frequently described along a certain number of dimensions, often including valence and arousal. This paper argues that dimen- sional models may obfuscate the mechanisms underlying the genesis of emotions. A parallel is drawn to

Christian Kaernbach

2011-01-01

180

Evaluation of Emotional Intelligence and Job Satisfaction in Employees of Kashan Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background: Job satisfaction and emotional intelligence are two important variables in organizational behavioral studies, and are key factors in promoting the efficiency of organizations. Objectives: The present study was conducted in order to determine the job satisfaction and emotional intelligence of employees of Kashan hospitals in 2011. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 121 employees of Kashan hospitals who were selected using random stratified method. In this study, Bar-on emotional intelligence and job satisfaction questionnaires were used. The data were analyzed using statistical methods such as odds ratio, Chi-square and Fisher's exact test. Results: The majority of employees (76%) had moderate emotional intelligence while 88.2% of them had moderate job satisfaction. In this study, there were no significant relations between emotional intelligence and variables such as sex, education, and marital and job status (P > 0.05) but significant relations were found between the age and emotional intelligence (P = 0.01). Furthermore, there was no significant relation between job satisfaction and demographic variables. Moreover, no significant relation was found between the emotional intelligence and job satisfaction (P > 0.05). Conclusions: As the majority of the staff had average level of job satisfaction and emotional intelligence and others were lower than average, it seems necessary for authorities to explore the reasons for job dissatisfaction to prevent job burnout, depression and developing a sense of helplessness in the staff. It is also recommended to hold educational workshops for the staff especially who are younger than 40 years to promote their emotional intelligence.

Ghoreishi, Fatemeh Sadat; Zahirrodine, Ali Reza; Assarian, Fatemeh; Moosavi, Seyed Gholam Abbas; Zare Zadeh Mehrizi, Maryam

2014-01-01

181

Crowdsourcing Collective Emotional Intelligence  

E-print Network

One of the hallmarks of emotional intelligence is the ability to regulate emotions. Research suggests that cognitive reappraisal - a technique that involves reinterpreting the meaning of a thought or situation - can down-regulate negative emotions, without incurring significant psychological or physiological costs. Habitual use of this strategy is also linked to many key indices of physical and emotional health. Unfortunately, this technique is not always easy to apply. Thinking flexibly about stressful thoughts and situations requires creativity and poise, faculties that often elude us when we need them the most. In this paper, we propose an assistive technology that coordinates collective intelligence on demand, to help individuals reappraise stressful thoughts and situations. In two experiments, we assess key features of our design and we demonstrate the feasibility of crowdsourcing empathetic reappraisals with on demand workforces, such as Amazon's Mechanical Turk.

Morris, Robert R

2012-01-01

182

Beyond Reason: Emotion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A theoretical approach that aims to the identification of information processing that may be responsible for emotional dimensions of subjective experience is studied as an initial step in the construction of a neural net model of affective dimensions of psychological experiences. In this paper it is suggested that a way of orientated recombination of attributes can be present not only in the perceptive processing but also in cognitive ones. We will present an analysis of the most important emotion theories, we show their neural organization and we propose the neural computation approach as an appropriate framework for generating knowledge about the neural base of emotional experience. Finally, in this study we present a scheme corresponding to framework to design a computational neural multi-system for Emotion (CONEMSE).

Suárez Araujo, Carmen Paz; Barahona da Fonseca, Isabel; Barahona da Fonseca, José; Simões da Fonseca, J.

2004-08-01

183

Teaching Emotion Understanding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main goal of this research was to assess whether it is possible to help children develop their general understanding of emotions. Thirty-six nine-year-old children divided in two groups were examined using a pre-test/train/post-test design. The emotion understanding of the two groups was measured in the pre- and post-test phases using the Test…

Pons, Francisco; Harris, Paul L.; Doudin, Pierre-Andre

2002-01-01

184

Emotion work: disclosing cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Breast cancer remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality for all women in the US. Current research has focused\\u000a on the psychological relationship and not the sociological relationship between emotions and the experience of breast cancer\\u000a survivors. This paper focuses on the emotion work involved in self-disclosing a breast cancer diagnosis in a racially or ethnically\\u000a diverse

Grace J. Yoo; Caryn Aviv; Ellen G. Levine; Cheryl Ewing; Alfred Au

2010-01-01

185

Magnocellular visual evoked potential delay with high autism spectrum quotient yields a neural mechanism for altered perception.  

PubMed

Everyone has autistic characteristics to a greater or lesser degree, encapsulated in the Autism Spectrum Quotient, a scale that measures the degree to which an adult of normal intelligence displays traits associated with autism spectrum disorders. Recent psychophysical analyses of autism spectrum disorders point to superior local processing, and impaired or ignored global and contextual processing. The aim of this study was to test whether low- and high-scoring individuals on the Autism Spectrum Quotient differ on a measure of local and global processing, motion processing and visual pathway integrity. Fifteen low-scoring individuals and 14 high-scoring individuals derived from a normal population participated in the study. The results indicate that the initial cortical response to the magnocellular afferents is weaker at low contrast in the high autistic tendency group and that a second-order response, reflecting magnocellular activity, demonstrated a delay for high versus low scorers when the parvocellular pathway was also active in response to a high contrast stimulus. High-scoring individuals also demonstrated difficulty in identifying the global components of locally salient hierarchical Navon figures. Furthermore, cross-validated discriminant analysis, using four physiologically and three psychophysically derived parameters, correctly classified 83% of individuals who scored either high or low on the Autism Spectrum Quotient. These findings in the group scoring high on the Autism Spectrum Quotient indicate that a delay in primary visual/prestriate cortical processing of magnocellular input diminishes the advantage of its early arrival to primary visual cortex. This appears to be associated with impaired global visual perception, predicting with high accuracy behavioural tendencies associated with autism spectrum disorders. It has been proposed that perceptual impairment in autism may be attributed to a dysfunction of horizontal connections within early visual areas, presumably parvocellular in nature. However, the timing of such form processing aberrations is much later than the timing of abnormal magnocellular visual processing measured directly here. Thus it is proposed that a magnocellular processing delay decreases the ability of autistic individuals to benefit perceptually from feedback normally associated with the magnocellular advantage. PMID:20513659

Sutherland, Alexandra; Crewther, David P

2010-07-01

186

A decomposition theorem for the space of C^1-smooth skew products with complicated dynamics of the quotient map  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use the notions of the \\Omega-function and functions suitable to it, to give a detailed proof of a decomposition theorem for the space of C^{1}-smooth skew products of interval maps whose quotient maps have complicated dynamics and satisfy the additional condition of \\Omega-stability with respect to the C^1-norm. In our theorem, the space of C^1-smooth skew products is decomposed into a union of four nonempty, pairwise disjoint subspaces. We give examples of maps contained in each of the four subspaces. Bibliography: 46 titles.

Efremova, L. S.

2013-11-01

187

Toll Bar on Sea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the summer of 2007 the United Kingdom experienced some of the heaviest rainfall since records began. Toll Bar in South Yorkshire featured prominently in media coverage as the village and the homes surrounding it began to flood. Many people lost everything: their homes, their furniture, their possessions. In an effort to come to terms with what…

Hunter, Dave

2008-01-01

188

Potentiometric and solubility studies of association quotients of aluminum malonate complexation in NaCl media to 75 C  

SciTech Connect

A potentiometric method was used to determine the formation quotients for aluminum-malonate (Al(Ma){sub y}{sup 3{minus}2y}, Ma = CH{sub 2}(CO{sub 2}){sub 2}{sup 2{minus}}) complexes from 5 to 75 C at four ionic strengths from 0.1 to 1.0 molal in aqueous NaCl media. Two mononuclear aluminum-malonate species, Al(Ma){sup +} and Al(Ma){sub 2}{sup {minus}}, were identified, and the formation quotients for these species were modeled by empirical equations to describe their temperature and ionic strength dependencies. Differentiation of the two empirical equations with respect to temperature provided thermodynamic quantities for the Al-malonate complexes. The thermodynamic quantities obtained for Al(Ma){sup +} and for Al(Ma){sub 2}{sup {minus}} indicate that Al(Ma){sup +}, a chelate complex, is much more stable than the equivalent monodentate Al-diacetate complex (Al(Ac){sub 2}{sup +}). A solubility study, which was undertaken to verify the 50 C potentiometric data, was performed by reacting powdered gibbsite (Al(OH){sub 3}) with malonic acid solutions at 0.1 molal ionic strength in aqueous NaCl media. The results of the solubility study are in excellent agreement with the potentiometric data.

Ridley, M.K.; Kettler, R.M. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Geology] [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Geology; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

1998-07-01

189

Variability in the relationships among voice quality, harmonic amplitudes, open quotient, and glottal area waveform shape in sustained phonationa  

PubMed Central

Increases in open quotient are widely assumed to cause changes in the amplitude of the first harmonic relative to the second (H1*–H2*), which in turn correspond to increases in perceived vocal breathiness. Empirical support for these assumptions is rather limited, and reported relationships among these three descriptive levels have been variable. This study examined the empirical relationship among H1*–H2*, the glottal open quotient (OQ), and glottal area waveform skewness, measured synchronously from audio recordings and high-speed video images of the larynges of six phonetically knowledgeable, vocally healthy speakers who varied fundamental frequency and voice qualities quasi-orthogonally. Across speakers and voice qualities, OQ, the asymmetry coefficient, and fundamental frequency accounted for an average of 74% of the variance in H1*–H2*. However, analyses of individual speakers showed large differences in the strategies used to produce the same intended voice qualities. Thus, H1*–H2* can be predicted with good overall accuracy, but its relationship to phonatory characteristics appears to be speaker dependent. PMID:23039455

Kreiman, Jody; Shue, Yen-Liang; Chen, Gang; Iseli, Markus; Gerratt, Bruce R.; Neubauer, Juergen; Alwan, Abeer

2012-01-01

190

Using the perturbation of the contact quotient of the EGG waveform to analyze age differences in adult speech.  

PubMed

This study examines electroglottographic (EGG) recordings for 15 young and 14 old male speakers of New Zealand English. Analysis was performed on the sustained vowels /i:/ and /a:/ at three target levels for both pitch and loudness. Jitter was greater for older speakers, and the contact quotient (Qx) was significantly lower for older speakers. The greater jitter for older speakers indicates a decrease in the stability of the vocal production mechanism of the older speakers. The jitter is an acoustic measure, so to examine the stability at a physiological level, a perturbation measure of the Qx is developed and applied to the EGG recordings. The contact quotient perturbation (CQP) showed a significant increase for older speakers (1.55% and 3.54% for young and old, respectively), and this demonstrated more about the variability than the jitter data alone. When loudness is also considered, the Qx was significantly greater for louder vowels, whereas its perturbation was significantly lower for louder vowels. This relationship combined with the age effect, with the CQP for all three loudness levels being greater for the older speakers. The findings of this study will contribute to the development of vocal fold models that account for aging. PMID:24495426

Bier, Stephen D; Watson, Catherine I; McCann, Clare M

2014-05-01

191

Uncertainties in ecological, chemical and physiological parameters of a bioaccumulation model: implications for internal concentrations and tissue based risk quotients.  

PubMed

Bioaccumulation models predict internal contaminant concentrations (c(i)) using ecological, chemical and physiological parameters. Here we analyse the effect of uncertainties on these parameters on bioaccumulation model predictions. Simultaneously considering the uncertainties on all these parameters in a bioaccumulation model resulted in uncertainty ranges of c(i) that increased with the octanol water partition coefficient K(ow) and reached maxima of up to 1.25 log units for mesozooplankton and up to 1.45 log units fish at logK(ow)=8. A global sensitivity analysis (SA) was performed to rank the contribution of different parameters to the observed uncertainty. The SA demonstrated that this interspecies difference resulted predominantly from uncertain production rates of fish. The K(ow), the water concentration and organic carbon-octanol proportionality constant were important drivers of uncertainty on c(i) for both species. A tissue based risk quotient (RQ(tissue)) combining uncertainty on c(i) with realistic tissue based effect thresholds indicated that fish were up to 10 times more probable to have RQ(tissue)>1 than mesozooplankton, depending on the considered threshold value. Conventional exposure based risk quotients were up to 5 times less probable to exceed one than were corresponding RQ(tissue), and this for both species. PMID:20045560

De Laender, F; Van Oevelen, D; Middelburg, J J; Soetaert, K

2010-03-01

192

A probabilistic analysis reveals fundamental limitations with the environmental impact quotient and similar systems for rating pesticide risks.  

PubMed

Comparing risks among pesticides has substantial utility for decision makers. However, if rating schemes to compare risks are to be used, they must be conceptually and mathematically sound. We address limitations with pesticide risk rating schemes by examining in particular the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ) using, for the first time, a probabilistic analytic technique. To demonstrate the consequences of mapping discrete risk ratings to probabilities, adjusted EIQs were calculated for a group of 20 insecticides in four chemical classes. Using Monte Carlo simulation, adjusted EIQs were determined under different hypothetical scenarios by incorporating probability ranges. The analysis revealed that pesticides that have different EIQs, and therefore different putative environmental effects, actually may be no different when incorporating uncertainty. The EIQ equation cannot take into account uncertainty the way that it is structured and provide reliable quotients of pesticide impact. The EIQ also is inconsistent with the accepted notion of risk as a joint probability of toxicity and exposure. Therefore, our results suggest that the EIQ and other similar schemes be discontinued in favor of conceptually sound schemes to estimate risk that rely on proper integration of toxicity and exposure information. PMID:24795854

Peterson, Robert K D; Schleier, Jerome J

2014-01-01

193

In-situ Mass Distribution Quotient (iMDQ) - A New Factor to Compare Bioavailability of Pesticides in Soils?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aim of this work was the development of a new non-biological factor to determine microbial in-situ bioavailability of chemicals in soils. Pesticide residues were extracted from ten highly different agricultural soils that had been incubated with the 14C-herbicide isoproturon (IPU) under comparable soil conditions (water tension - 15 kPa; soil density 1.3 g cm 3). Two different pesticide extraction approaches were compared: (i) 14C-Pesticide residues were measured in the pore water (PW) which was extracted from soil by centrifugation; (ii) 14C-Pesticide residues were extracted from soil samples with an excess of water (EEW). We introduce the pesticide's in-situ mass distribution quotient (iMDQ) as a measure for pesticide bioavailability, which is calculated as a quotient of adsorbed and dissolved chemical amounts for both approaches (iMDQPW, iMDQEEW). Pesticide mineralization in soils served as a reference for real microbial availability. A highly significant correlation between iMDQPW and mineralization showed that pore water extraction is adequate to assess IPU bioavailability. In contrast, no correlation exists between IPU mineralization and its extractability from soil with an excess of water. Therefore, it can be concluded that soil equilibration at comparable conditions and subsequent pore water extraction is vital for a isoproturon bioavailability ranking of soils.

Schroll, R.; Folberth, C.; Scherb, H.; Suhadolc, M.; Munch, J. C.

2009-04-01

194

Empathy and emotion recognition in people with autism, first-degree relatives, and controls.  

PubMed

Empathy is the lens through which we view others' emotion expressions, and respond to them. In this study, empathy and facial emotion recognition were investigated in adults with autism spectrum conditions (ASC; N=314), parents of a child with ASC (N=297) and IQ-matched controls (N=184). Participants completed a self-report measure of empathy (the Empathy Quotient [EQ]) and a modified version of the Karolinska Directed Emotional Faces Task (KDEF) using an online test interface. Results showed that mean scores on the EQ were significantly lower in fathers (p<0.05) but not mothers (p>0.05) of children with ASC compared to controls, whilst both males and females with ASC obtained significantly lower EQ scores (p<0.001) than controls. On the KDEF, statistical analyses revealed poorer overall performance by adults with ASC (p<0.001) compared to the control group. When the 6 distinct basic emotions were analysed separately, the ASC group showed impaired performance across five out of six expressions (happy, sad, angry, afraid and disgusted). Parents of a child with ASC were not significantly worse than controls at recognising any of the basic emotions, after controlling for age and non-verbal IQ (all p>0.05). Finally, results indicated significant differences between males and females with ASC for emotion recognition performance (p<0.05) but not for self-reported empathy (p>0.05). These findings suggest that self-reported empathy deficits in fathers of autistic probands are part of the 'broader autism phenotype'. This study also reports new findings of sex differences amongst people with ASC in emotion recognition, as well as replicating previous work demonstrating empathy difficulties in adults with ASC. The use of empathy measures as quantitative endophenotypes for ASC is discussed. PMID:23174401

Sucksmith, E; Allison, C; Baron-Cohen, S; Chakrabarti, B; Hoekstra, R A

2013-01-01

195

What Good Are Positive Emotions?  

PubMed Central

This article opens by noting that positive emotions do not fit existing models of emotions. Consequently, a new model is advanced to describe the form and function of a subset of positive emotions, including joy, interest, contentment, and love. This new model posits that these positive emotions serve to broaden an individual’s momentary thought–action repertoire, which in turn has the effect of building that individual’s physical, intellectual, and social resources. Empirical evidence to support this broaden-and-build model of positive emotions is reviewed, and implications for emotion regulation and health promotion are discussed. PMID:21850154

Fredrickson, Barbara L.

2011-01-01

196

The secret life of emotions.  

PubMed

The possibility of unconsciously evoked emotions is often denied because awareness of an emotion's cause is considered to be precisely what produces the emotion. However, we argue that because emotional responding is important for successful living, both global and specific emotional responses can be induced without awareness. The present research used quick and super-quick subliminal priming techniques, and cognitive, feelings, and behavioral measures, to test this hypothesis. Our results show that both global moods and specific emotions can be evoked without conscious awareness of their cause. PMID:18399892

Ruys, Kirsten I; Stapel, Diederik A

2008-04-01

197

Relationships among Facial Mimicry, Emotional Experience, and Emotion Recognition  

PubMed Central

Background The relationships between facial mimicry and subsequent psychological processes remain unclear. We hypothesized that the congruent facial muscle activity would elicit emotional experiences and that the experienced emotion would induce emotion recognition. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis, we re-analyzed data collected in two previous studies. We recorded facial electromyography (EMG) from the corrugator supercilii and zygomatic major and obtained ratings on scales of valence and arousal for experienced emotions (Study 1) and for experienced and recognized emotions (Study 2) while participants viewed dynamic and static facial expressions of negative and positive emotions. Path analyses showed that the facial EMG activity consistently predicted the valence ratings for the emotions experienced in response to dynamic facial expressions. The experienced valence ratings in turn predicted the recognized valence ratings in Study 2. Conclusion These results suggest that facial mimicry influences the sharing and recognition of emotional valence in response to others' dynamic facial expressions. PMID:23536774

Sato, Wataru; Fujimura, Tomomi; Kochiyama, Takanori; Suzuki, Naoto

2013-01-01

198

Emotional Intelligence: Giving Computers Effective Emotional Skills to Aid Interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Why do computers need emotional intelligence? Science fiction often portrays emotional computers as dangerous and frightening,\\u000a and as a serious threat to human life. One of the most famous examples is HAL, the supercomputer onboard the spaceship Discovery,\\u000a in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey. HAL could express, recognize and respond to human emotion, and generally had strong emotional skills

Chris Creed; Russell Beale

2008-01-01

199

Socialization of emotion: Pathway to preschoolers' emotional and social competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aspects of 47 preschoolers'emotional competence—their patterns of emotional expressiveness and reactions to others' emotion displays—were observed in two settings, with mother and with peers, and their general social competence was rated by their preschool teachers. Intrapersonal and interpersonal (i.e., socialization correlates of children's emotional competence were identified, and a causal model incorporating direct and indirect influences on social competence was

Susanne A. Denham; Leslie Grout

1993-01-01

200

The Experience of Emotion  

PubMed Central

Experiences of emotion are content-rich events that emerge at the level of psychological description, but must be causally constituted by neurobiological processes. This chapter outlines an emerging scientific agenda for understanding what these experiences feel like and how they arise. We review the available answers to what is felt (i.e., the content that makes up an experience of emotion) and how neurobiological processes instantiate these properties of experience. These answers are then integrated into a broad framework that describes, in psychological terms, how the experience of emotion emerges from more basic processes. We then discuss the role of such experiences in the economy of the mind and behavior. PMID:17002554

Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Mesquita, Batja; Ochsner, Kevin N.; Gross, James J.

2007-01-01

201

Prospective Effects of Emotion-Regulation Skills on Emotional Adjustment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deficits in emotion-regulation skills have widely been shown to be associated with poor emotional adjustment. However, it is still unclear whether these deficits are a cause or a consequence of poor adjustment. The purpose of the present research was to clarify the reciprocal effects between these 2 concepts. In 2 studies (Ns = 446 and 635), self-reports of emotion regulation

Matthias Berking; Ulrich Orth; Peggilee Wupperman; Laurenz L. Meier; Franz Caspar

2008-01-01

202

Resilience and Positive Emotions: Examining the Role of Emotional Memories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resilience has been frequently associated with positive emo- tions, especially when experienced during taxing events. However, the psy- chological processes that might allow resilient individuals to self-generate those positive emotions have been mostly overlooked. In line with recent advances in memory research, we propose that emotional memories play an important role in the self-generation of positive emotions. The present re-

Frederick L. Philippe; Serge Lecours; Geneviève Beaulieu-Pelletier

2009-01-01

203

Emotional reactivity and emotion recognition in frontotemporal lobar  

E-print Network

to these aspects of emotional functioning. From the Department of Psychology, University of California-Berkeley, CAEmotional reactivity and emotion recognition in frontotemporal lobar degeneration K.H. Werner, Ph de- cline in social and emotional behavior; however, current understanding regarding the specific

Levenson, Robert W.

204

Solving the Emotion Paradox: Categorization and the Experience of Emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, I introduce an emotion paradox: People believe that they know an emo- tion when they see it, and as a consequence assume that emotions are discrete events that can be recognized with some degree of accuracy, but scientists have yet to pro- duce a set of clear and consistent criteria for indicating when an emotion is present

Lisa Feldman Barrett

2006-01-01

205

Spanish parents' emotion talk and their children's understanding of emotion  

PubMed Central

Relations between parent-child emotion talk and children's emotion understanding were examined in 63 Spanish mothers and fathers and their 4- (M = 53.35 months, SD = 3.86) and 6-year-old (M = 76.62 months, SD = 3.91) children. Parent-child emotion talk was analyzed during two storytelling tasks: a play-related storytelling task and a reminiscence task (conversation about past experiences). Children's emotion understanding was assessed twice through a standardized test of emotion comprehension (TEC; Pons et al., 2004), once before one of the two parent-child storytelling sessions and again 6 months later. Mothers' use of emotion labels during the play-related storytelling task predicted children's emotion understanding after controlling for children's previous emotion understanding. Whereas fathers' use of emotion labels during the play-related storytelling task was correlated with children's emotion understanding, it did not predict children's emotion understanding after controlling for previous emotion understanding. Implications of these findings for future research on children's socioemotional development are discussed. PMID:24069016

Aznar, Ana; Tenenbaum, Harriet R.

2013-01-01

206

BRIEF REPORT Psychological Distance and Emotional Experience  

E-print Network

BRIEF REPORT Psychological Distance and Emotional Experience: What You See Is What You Get Joshua: emotional experience, psychological distance, mental imagery, mental representation, emotion regulation Many Columbia University Recent research suggests that perceiving negative emotion-eliciting scenes approaching

Ochsner, Kevin

207

Emotional Intelligence and Interpersonal Relations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents the results of seven studies that focused on the link between emotional intelligence and interpersonal relations. Tests emotional intelligence with empathy and self-monitoring, social skills, cooperation, relations with others, and marital satisfaction. Explores preference for emotionally intelligent partners in the final study. Includes…

Schutte, Nicola S.; Malouff, John M.; Bobik, Chad; Coston, Tracie D.; Greeson, Cyndy; Jedlicka, Christina; Rhodes, Emily; Wendorf, Greta

2001-01-01

208

Linguistic Markers and Emotional Intensity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this experiment is to explore possible relationships between the intensity of emotions and the lexical modalities for expressing those emotions. In this experiment, 60 Hebrew-speaking subjects were asked to watch four short films that aroused emotion. Two of the films gave rise to different degrees of happiness, and two produced…

Argaman, Osnat

2010-01-01

209

Emotional Intelligence: A Stable Change?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent decades, emotional intelligence (EI) has emerged as one of the crucial components of emotional adjustment, personal well-being, interpersonal relationships, and overall success in life. Yet few professional curricula adequately address this subject. The results of this study indicate that the potential for enhanced emotional intelligence…

Goroshit, Marina; Hen, Meirav

2012-01-01

210

Emotional conflict in interpersonal interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Facial displays of emotions can help to infer the mental states of other individuals. However, the expectations we generate on the basis of people's emotions can mismatch their actual behaviour in certain circumstances, which generates conflict. In the present study, we explored the neural mechanisms of emotional conflict during interpersonal interactions. Participants had to accept or reject economic offers made

María Ruz; Pío Tudela

2011-01-01

211

THE ROLE OF LEADERS’ EMOTIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Western cultures support the notion that the ideal ‘professional’ behaviour for a leader is primarily rational and carefully controlled emotionally. The relationship of reason and emotion is often played out as one of mutual exclusion, and moreover as one representing hierarchy of leaders and followers. Power positions in most organizations are ritually emphasized through strict emotional control\\/suppression. Thus this display

Kornelia Lazanyi

2009-01-01

212

Emotional and Motivational ITS Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Since emotional variations interfere in the production,of astudent, it is important making Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) able to cope ,with this issue. Although the Expert Overlay approach ,does ,consider ,pedagogic aspects, it does not deal with emotional and motivational questions. This paper proposes an emotional model, by specifying the variables to be captured from the cognitive structure,and ,suggests ,inferences

Lúbia Mara Lopes Rodrigues; Marco Carvalho

2003-01-01

213

Emotional and Motivational ITS Architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considering that emotional variations interfere in the academic production of a student, it is paramount to make intelligent tutoring systems able to cope with this issue. Although the expert overlay student model approach does consider pedagogic and disciplinary aspects, it does not explicitly deal with emotional and motivational questions. This paper proposes an emotional model, by specifying the variables to

Lúbia Mara Lopes Rodrigues; Marco Carvalho

2004-01-01

214

Emotions Across Cultures and Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Participants included 46 European American, 33 Asian American, 91 Japanese, 160 Indian, and 80 Hispanic students (N = 416). Discrete emotions, as well as pleasant and unpleasant emotions, were assessed: (a) with global self-report measures, (b) using an experience-sampling method for 1 week, and (c) by asking participants to recall their emotions from the experience sampling week. Cultural differences emerged

Christie N. Scollon; Ed Diener; Shigehiro Oishi; Robert Biswas-Diener

2004-01-01

215

Negative Emotion Enhances Memory Accuracy  

E-print Network

People experience many events that elicit emotional reactions: They greet loved ones at the airport, visit sick children at the hospital, and attend friends' weddings. Such events often are remembered-Eaton, & Schacter, 2006) compared the effects of emotion on memory for general item features with emotion's effects

Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

216

Modeling the Experience of Emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Affective computing has proven to be a viable field of research comprised of a large number of multidisciplinary researchers resulting in work that is widely published. The majority of this work consists of emotion recognition technology, computational modeling of causal factors of emotion and emotion expression in virtual characters and robots. A smaller part is concerned with modeling the effects

Joost Broekens

2009-01-01

217

Nurturing Emotional Intelligence through Literature.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the use of literature in the English-as-a-Foreign-Language classroom for enhancing development of children's emotional intelligence. Literature can foster emotional intelligence by providing vicarious emotional experiences that shape the brain circuits for empathy and help children gain insight into human behavior and can promote…

Ghosn, Irma K.

2001-01-01

218

A Review of Virtual Character's Emotion Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emotional virtual characters are essential to digital entertainment, an emotion is related to virtual environment and a virtual character's inner variables, emotion model of virtual character is a hot topic in many fields, domain knowledge is very important for modeling emotion, and the current research of emotion expression in the world was also summarized, and some new research directions of emotion model are presented.

Liu, Zhen

2008-11-01

219

Emotional Intelligence and the Career Choice Process.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotional intelligence as conceptualized by Mayer and Salovey consists of perceiving emotions, using emotions to facilitate thoughts, understanding emotions, and managing emotions to enhance personal growth. The Multifactor Emotional Intelligence Scale has proven a valid and reliable measure that can be used to explore the implications of…

Emmerling, Robert J.; Cherniss, Cary

2003-01-01

220

Précis of The brain and emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The topics treated in The Brain and Emotion include the definition, nature and functions of emotion (Chapter 3), the neural bases of emotion (Chapter 4), reward, punishment and emotion in brain design (Chapter 10), a theory of consciousness and its application to under- standing emotion and pleasure (Chapter 9), and neural networks and emotion-related learning (Appendix). The approach is that

Edmund T. Rolls

2000-01-01

221

Emotional Child Abuse  

MedlinePLUS

... control (after a child has been trained), and destructive or antisocial behavior (being constantly withdrawn and sad). Furthermore, poor relationships ... children, but a change in pattern of these behaviors is a strong indicator of emotional ... perpetrator. Parents, teachers, pastors, social workers, neighbors, lawyers, or judges ...

222

Computational Emotions Encourage Collective  

E-print Network

Computational Emotions Encourage Collective Behavior in Population Dynamics Megan Olsen University population to cooperate and improve their population's fitness. 196 #12;1 Introduction Collective behavior can refer to both human and animal tendencies to influence each other's behavior. In this paper we

Pollack, Jordan B.

223

Mentoring Emotionally Sensitive Individuals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mentoring individuals who are gifted, talented, and creative, but somewhat emotionally sensitive is a challenging and provocative arena. Several reasons individuals experience heightened sensitivity include: lack of nurturing, abuse, alcoholism in the family, low self-esteem, unrealistic parental expectations, and parental pressure to achieve.…

Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Self, Elizabeth

224

The Emotionally Sensitive Adolescent.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides a list of signs, symptoms, and indicators of emotionally sensitive adolescents includes clinging behavior, withdrawn behavior, shy/inhibited behavior, represses anger, poor reaction to criticism, makes self-disparaging statements, low self-esteem, "can't forgive self or others," ruined by a small critical comment, exploding…

Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Lehtonen, Kimmo

225

Emotional Subjects for Composition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Metaphors such as "gypsy academics,""freeway flyers," and "contingent laborers," ascribed by compositionists to their work and its conditions, comment on the low status of composition specialists and teachers in academic hierarchies. Work is the activity around which a profession forms, and, as such, it produces emotional dispositions compatible…

Micciche, Laura R.

226

Unconscious Emotions, Conscious Feelings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotion is an innate, powerful, and principally unconscious process that is perceptible in body language, responds vigorously to high-contrast information concerning dangers and opportunities, and often biases the direction of our problem- solving responses. Curricular challenges involving the arts, play, and classroom management are discussed.…

Sylwester, Robert

2000-01-01

227

Developing Emotionally Intelligent Principals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Transformational change in today's schools will require leaders with strong intrapersonal and interpersonal skills. A recent assessment program in South Carolina focused attention on the identification of the emotional intelligence of aspiring and newly appointed principals. A battery of personality and leadership assessments was used to develop…

Cox, Edward P.

2009-01-01

228

Emotion dysregulation and schizotypy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In schizophrenia, blunted affect has been argued to reflect difficulties with the amplification of emotion expressive behavior. The aim of the present study was to assess whether ostensibly healthy individuals vulnerable to schizophrenia present with similar difficulties. In the first component of the study, 843 non-clinical participants completed the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire, of which 27 scoring in the upper 15%

Julie D. Henry; Melissa J. Green; Corinne Restuccia; Amber de Lucia; Peter G. Rendell; Skye McDonald; Jessica R. Grisham

2009-01-01

229

Managing Intergroup Emotions: How Intergroup Ideologies and Emotion Regulation Can Stifle Positive Emotions and Intergroup Friendships  

E-print Network

Emotional intelligence and social interaction. Personality and Social Psychologyemotional reactions in inter-ethnic relations. British Journal of Social Psychology,emotional suppression: A prospective study of the transition to college. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,

O'Connor, Alexander

2012-01-01

230

Incidental emotions in moral dilemmas: The influence of emotion regulation.  

PubMed

Recent theories have argued that emotions play a central role in moral decision-making and suggested that emotion regulation may be crucial in reducing emotion-linked biases. The present studies focused on the influence of emotional experience and individual differences in emotion regulation on moral choice in dilemmas that pit harming another person against social welfare. During these "harm to save" moral dilemmas, participants experienced mostly fear and sadness but also other emotions such as compassion, guilt, anger, disgust, regret and contempt (Study 1). Fear and disgust were more frequently reported when participants made deontological choices, whereas regret was more frequently reported when participants made utilitarian choices. In addition, habitual reappraisal negatively predicted deontological choices, and this effect was significantly carried through emotional arousal (Study 2). Individual differences in the habitual use of other emotion regulation strategies (i.e., acceptance, rumination and catastrophising) did not influence moral choice. The results of the present studies indicate that negative emotions are commonly experienced during "harm to save" moral dilemmas, and they are associated with a deontological bias. By efficiently reducing emotional arousal, reappraisal can attenuate the emotion-linked deontological bias in moral choice. PMID:24611625

Szekely, Raluca D; Miu, Andrei C

2015-01-01

231

Potentiometric and solubility studies of association quotients of aluminum malonate complexation in NaCl media to 75°C  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A potentiometric method was used to determine the formation quotients for aluminum-malonate (Al(Ma) y3-2y, Ma ? CH 2(CO 2) 22-) complexes from 5 to 75°C at four ionic strengths from 0.1 to 1.0 molal in aqueous NaCl media. Two mononuclear aluminum-malonate species, Al(Ma) + and Al(Ma) 2-, were identified, and the formation quotients for these species were modeled by empirical equations to describe their temperature and ionic strength dependencies. Differentiation of the two empirical equations with respect to temperature provided thermodynamic quantities for the Al-malonate complexes. The thermodynamic quantities obtained for Al(Ma) + at 25°C and infinite dilution are: log K 1 = 7.49 ± 0.18, ?H °1 = 19 ± 5 kJ · mol -1, ?S °1 = 208 ± 18 J · K -1 · mol -1 and ?C °p1 = 331 ± 120 J · K -1 · mol -1; whereas the values for Al(Ma) 2- are: log K 2 = 12.62 ± 0.40, ?H °2 = 29 ± 10 kJ · mol -1, ?S °2 = 340 ± 36 J · K -1 mol -1 and ?C °p2 = 575 ± 230 J · K -1 mol -1. These thermodynamic values indicate that Al(Ma) +, a chelate complex, is much more stable than the equivalent monodentate Al-diacetate complex (Al(Ac) 2+) (Palmer and Bell, 1994). A solubility study, which was undertaken to verify the 50°C potentiometric data, was performed by reacting powdered gibbsite (Al(OH) 3) with malonic acid solutions at 0.1 molal ionic strength in aqueous NaCl media. The results of the solubility study are in excellent agreement with the potentiometric data.

Ridley, Moira K.; Palmer, Donald A.; Wesolowski, David J.; Kettler, Richard M.

1998-07-01

232

Situating emotional experience  

PubMed Central

Psychological construction approaches to emotion suggest that emotional experience is situated and dynamic. Fear, for example, is typically studied in a physical danger context (e.g., threatening snake), but in the real world, it often occurs in social contexts, especially those involving social evaluation (e.g., public speaking). Understanding situated emotional experience is critical because adaptive responding is guided by situational context (e.g., inferring the intention of another in a social evaluation situation vs. monitoring the environment in a physical danger situation). In an fMRI study, we assessed situated emotional experience using a newly developed paradigm in which participants vividly imagine different scenarios from a first-person perspective, in this case scenarios involving either social evaluation or physical danger. We hypothesized that distributed neural patterns would underlie immersion in social evaluation and physical danger situations, with shared activity patterns across both situations in multiple sensory modalities and in circuitry involved in integrating salient sensory information, and with unique activity patterns for each situation type in coordinated large-scale networks that reflect situated responding. More specifically, we predicted that networks underlying the social inference and mentalizing involved in responding to a social threat (in regions that make up the “default mode” network) would be reliably more active during social evaluation situations. In contrast, networks underlying the visuospatial attention and action planning involved in responding to a physical threat would be reliably more active during physical danger situations. The results supported these hypotheses. In line with emerging psychological construction approaches, the findings suggest that coordinated brain networks offer a systematic way to interpret the distributed patterns that underlie the diverse situational contexts characterizing emotional life. PMID:24324420

Wilson-Mendenhall, Christine D.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Barsalou, Lawrence W.

2013-01-01

233

Sad music induces pleasant emotion  

PubMed Central

In general, sad music is thought to cause us to experience sadness, which is considered an unpleasant emotion. As a result, the question arises as to why we listen to sad music if it evokes sadness. One possible answer to this question is that we may actually feel positive emotions when we listen to sad music. This suggestion may appear to be counterintuitive; however, in this study, by dividing musical emotion into perceived emotion and felt emotion, we investigated this potential emotional response to music. We hypothesized that felt and perceived emotion may not actually coincide in this respect: sad music would be perceived as sad, but the experience of listening to sad music would evoke positive emotions. A total of 44 participants listened to musical excerpts and provided data on perceived and felt emotions by rating 62 descriptive words or phrases related to emotions on a scale that ranged from 0 (not at all) to 4 (very much). The results revealed that the sad music was perceived to be more tragic, whereas the actual experiences of the participants listening to the sad music induced them to feel more romantic, more blithe, and less tragic emotions than they actually perceived with respect to the same music. Thus, the participants experienced ambivalent emotions when they listened to the sad music. After considering the possible reasons that listeners were induced to experience emotional ambivalence by the sad music, we concluded that the formulation of a new model would be essential for examining the emotions induced by music and that this new model must entertain the possibility that what we experience when listening to music is vicarious emotion. PMID:23785342

Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Katahira, Kentaro; Okanoya, Kazuo

2013-01-01

234

Emotion regulation, attention to emotion, and the ventral attentional network.  

PubMed

ACCOUNTS OF THE EFFECT OF EMOTIONAL INFORMATION ON BEHAVIORAL RESPONSE AND CURRENT MODELS OF EMOTION REGULATION ARE BASED ON TWO OPPOSED BUT INTERACTING PROCESSES: automatic bottom-up processes (triggered by emotionally arousing stimuli) and top-down control processes (mapped to prefrontal cortical areas). Data on the existence of a third attentional network operating without recourse to limited-capacity processes but influencing response raise the issue of how it is integrated in emotion regulation. We summarize here data from attention to emotion, voluntary emotion regulation, and on the origin of biases against negative content suggesting that the ventral network is modulated by exposure to emotional stimuli when the task does not constrain the handling of emotional content. In the parietal lobes, preferential activation of ventral areas associated with "bottom-up" attention by ventral network theorists is strongest in studies of cognitive reappraisal. In conditions when no explicit instruction is given to change one's response to emotional stimuli, control of emotionally arousing stimuli is observed without concomitant activation of the dorsal attentional network, replaced by a shift of activation toward ventral areas. In contrast, in studies where emotional stimuli are placed in the role of distracter, the observed deactivation of these ventral semantic association areas is consistent with the existence of proactive control on the role emotional representations are allowed to take in generating response. It is here argued that attentional orienting mechanisms located in the ventral network constitute an intermediate kind of process, with features only partially in common with effortful and automatic processes, which plays an important role in handling emotion by conveying the influence of semantic networks, with which the ventral network is co-localized. Current neuroimaging work in emotion regulation has neglected this system by focusing on a bottom-up/top-down dichotomy of attentional control. PMID:24223546

Viviani, Roberto

2013-01-01

235

Integrating the emotional intelligence construct: the relationship between emotional ability and emotional competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper posits that the concept of emotional intelligence (EI) has not advanced as quickly and adroitly as it could have because of a lack of validity studies that combine the two most prevalent models, emotionality ability (EA) and emotional competency (EC). Although prior EI validations studies exist, none have examined the relationship between the primary EA and EC measurement

Craig R Seal; Mary D Sass; James R Bailey; Matthew Liao-Troth

2009-01-01

236

Re-appraisal of negative emotions in cocaine dependence: dysfunctional corticolimbic activation and connectivity.  

PubMed

Cocaine dependence is associated with pronounced elevations of negative affect and deficient regulation of negative emotions. We aimed to investigate the neural substrates of negative emotion regulation in cocaine-dependent individuals (CDI), as compared to non-drug-using controls, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a re-appraisal task. Seventeen CDI abstinent for at least 15 days and without other psychiatric co-morbidities and 18 intelligence quotient-matched non-drug-using controls participated in the study. Participants performed the re-appraisal task during fMRI scanning: they were exposed to 24 blocks of negative affective or neutral pictures that they should Observe (neutral pictures), Maintain (sustain the emotion elicited by negative pictures) or Suppress (regulate the emotion elicited by negative pictures through previously trained re-appraisal techniques). Task-related activations during two conditions of interest (Maintain>Observe and Suppress>Maintain) were analyzed using the general linear model in SPM8 software. We also performed psychophysiological interaction (PPI) seed-based analyses based on one region from each condition: the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC-Maintain>Observe) and the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG-Suppress>Maintain). Results showed that cocaine users had increased right dlPFC and bilateral temporoparietal junction activations during Maintain>Observe, whereas they showed decreased right IFG, posterior cingulate cortex, insula and fusiform gyrus activations during Suppress>Maintain. PPI analyses showed that cocaine users had increased functional coupling between the dlPFC and emotion-related regions during Maintain>Observe, whereas they showed decreased functional coupling between the right IFG and the amygdala during Suppress>Maintain. These findings indicate that CDI have dysfunctional corticolimbic activation and connectivity during negative emotion experience and re-appraisal. PMID:22978709

Albein-Urios, Natalia; Verdejo-Román, Juan; Asensio, Samuel; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Martínez-González, José M; Verdejo-García, Antonio

2014-05-01

237

Further Evidence on the Factorial Structure of the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) for Adults with and without a Clinical Diagnosis of Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) has been widely used for measuring autistic traits however its factor structure has been primarily determined from nonclinic populations. This study aimed to establish an internally coherent and reliable factor structure for the AQ using a sample of 455 Australian adults of whom 141 had autism spectrum disorder…

Lau, Winnie Yu Pow; Kelly, Adrian B.; Peterson, Candida Clifford

2013-01-01

238

Using self-report to identify the broad phenotype in parents of children with autistic spectrum disorders: a study using the Autism-Spectrum Quotient  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The concept of the 'broad phenotype' of autism refers to the finding that relatives of people with autism often have mild forms of autistic-like characteristics, such as social and communicative difficulties. This study used the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ), a questionnaire devised to assess features of the broad phenotype in adults, with parents of people with autism, to see

Dorothy V. M. Bishop; Murray Maybery; Alana Maley; Dana Wong; Wayne Hill; Joachim Hallmayer

2004-01-01

239

Toward Brief "Red Flags" for Autism Screening: The Short Autism Spectrum Quotient and the Short Quantitative Checklist in 1,000 Cases and 3,000 Controls  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Frontline health professionals need a "red flag" tool to aid their decision making about whether to make a referral for a full diagnostic assessment for an autism spectrum condition (ASC) in children and adults. The aim was to identify 10 items on the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) (Adult, Adolescent, and Child versions) and on the…

Allison, Carrie; Auyeung, Bonnie; Baron-Cohen, Simon

2012-01-01

240

Structural Validation of the Abridged Autism Spectrum Quotient-Short Form in a Clinical Sample of People with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary aim of this article was to provide a structural validation of the 28-item Autism Spectrum Quotient-Short Form questionnaire in a sample of adults with clinically diagnosed autism spectrum disorders ("n" = 148). Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated that the proposed structure, comprising a second-order Social Skills…

Kuenssberg, Renate; Murray, Aja L.; Booth, Tom; McKenzie, Karen

2014-01-01

241

A Simplified Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment to Evaluate the Effect of the Ionic Strength on the Equilibrium Concentration Quotient of the Bromcresol Green Dye  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A modified laboratory experiment for undergraduate students is presented to evaluate the effects of the ionic strength, "I", on the equilibrium concentration quotient, K[subscript c], of the acid-base indicator bromcresol green (BCG). The two-step deprotonation of the acidic form of the dye (sultone form), as it is dissolved in water, yields…

Rodriguez, Hernan B.; Mirenda, Martin

2012-01-01

242

The Use of the Autism-Spectrum Quotient in Differentiating High-Functioning Adults with Autism, Adults with Schizophrenia and a Neurotypical Adult Control Group  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study compared 21 high functioning individuals with autism, 21 individuals with schizophrenia and 21 healthy individuals in self-reported features of autism, as measured by the Autism-spectrum Quotient (AQ). The individuals with autism reported impairment on all AQ subscales, compared to the neurotypical group. The schizophrenia group…

Wouters, Saskia G. M.; Spek, Annelies A.

2011-01-01

243

Emotion processing in the auditory modality : the time course and development of emotional prosody recognition  

E-print Network

auditory emotional material. Developmental Psychology, 20,auditory emotional material. Developmental Psychology, 20,emotional faces: Eye-movement assessment of component processes. Experimental Psychology,

Cornew, Lauren A.

2008-01-01

244

Hamburger hazards and emotions.  

PubMed

Previous studies indicate that many consumers eat rare hamburgers and that information about microbiological hazards related to undercooked meat not necessarily leads to more responsible behavior. With this study we aim to investigate whether consumers' willingness to eat hamburgers depends on the emotions they experience when confronted with the food. A representative sample of 1046 Norwegian consumers participated in an online experiment. In the first part, participants were randomly divided into two groups. One group was confronted with a picture of a rare hamburger, whereas the other group was confronted with a picture of a well-done hamburger. The respondents were instructed to imagine that they were served the hamburger on the picture and then to indicate which emotions they experienced: fear, disgust, surprise, interest, pleasure, or none of these. In part two, all respondents were confronted with four pictures of hamburgers cooked to different degrees of doneness (rare, medium rare, medium well-done, well-done), and were asked to state their likelihood of eating. We analyzed the data by means of a multivariate probit model and two linear fixed-effect models. The results show that confrontation with rare hamburgers evokes more fear and disgust than confrontation with well-done hamburgers, that all hamburgers trigger pleasure and interest, and that a consumer's willingness to eat rare hamburgers depends on the particular type of emotion evoked. These findings indicate that emotions play an important role in a consumer's likelihood of eating risky food, and should be considered when developing food safety strategies. PMID:24656947

Olsen, Nina Veflen; Røssvoll, Elin; Langsrud, Solveig; Scholderer, Joachim

2014-07-01

245

Emotional gestures in sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents a study about the gestures of athletes while reporting emotions. The study was aimed at singling out possible\\u000a differences in gestural activity of athletes during the telling of their best and worst performances. To analyse the gestures\\u000a a manual annotation scheme was adopted that classifies each gesture in terms of handshape, motoric structure, meaning, goal,\\u000a and type.

Giorgio Merola

2007-01-01

246

Tactile-emotion synesthesia  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss experiments on two individuals in whom specific textures (e.g., denim, wax, sandpaper, silk, etc.) evoked equally distinct emotions (e.g., depression, embarrassment, relief, and contentment, respectively). The test\\/retest consistency after 8 months was 100%. A video camera recorded subjects' facial expressions and skin conductance responses (SCR) were monitored as they palpated different textures. Evaluators' ratings significantly correlated with the

V. S. Ramachandran; David Brang

2008-01-01

247

Emotions, care and particularity.  

PubMed

The main intention of this article is to illuminate the normative foundation of caring in nursing. I will focus on the debate between an ethics of care and an ethics of universal principles which has evolved both in nursing ethics and moral philosophy during the last decade. In spite of what a number of people have claimed, I shall argue that a care-based ethics is compatible with judgment based on universal, impartial principles. However, an ethics of care articulates other important aspects of morality and moral behavior than the justificational ones that are central to prevailing impartialist ethics. The paper explains why and how moral perception, sensitivity and emotional capacities are important for a modern professional nursing ethics. It focuses on capacities and preconditions for principle-based reflection and action by arguing that moral perception and certain emotional qualities are prerequisites for moral judgment and action. Achieving perceptual awareness and emotional sensitivity in understanding the situation and its particulars are genuine moral tasks in nursing. These qualities are essential in discovering the morally salient features of the situation. This perspective on an ethics of care also recognizes an important place to central positions in traditional nursing ethics, where developing personal qualities and altruistic capabilities have always been a fundamental normative claim. PMID:8488625

Nortvedt, P

1993-01-01

248

Drug Design and Emotion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

"Geteiltes Leid ist halbes Leid." The old German proverb reflects the fact that sharing a bad emotion or feeling with someone else may lower the psychological strain of the person experiencing sorrow, mourning or anger. On the other hand the person showing empathy will take literally a load from its counterpart, up to physiological reaction of the peripheral and central nervous pain system. Though subjective, mental and physical states can be shared. Visual perception of suffering may be important but also narrative description plays a role, all our senses are mixing in. It is hypothetized that literature, art and humanities allow this overlap. A change of mental states can lead to empirically observable effects as it is the case for the effect of role identity or placebo on pain perception. Antidepressants and other therapeutics are another choice to change the mental and bodily states. Their development follows today's notion of "rationality" in the design of therapeutics and is characterized solely by an atomic resolution approach to understand drug activity. Since emotional states and physiological states are entangled, given the difficulty of a physical description of emotion, the future rational drug design should encompass mental states as well.

Folkers, Gerd; Wittwer, Amrei

2007-11-01

249

Language, Emotions, and Cultures: Emotional Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis  

E-print Network

An emotional version of Sapir-Whorf hypothesis suggests that differences in language emotionalities influence differences among cultures no less than conceptual differences. Conceptual contents of languages and cultures to significant extent are determined by words and their semantic differences; these could be borrowed among languages and exchanged among cultures. Emotional differences, as suggested in the paper, are related to grammar and mostly cannot be borrowed. Conceptual and emotional mechanisms of languages are considered here along with their functions in the mind and cultural evolution. A fundamental contradiction in human mind is considered: language evolution requires reduced emotionality, but "too low" emotionality makes language "irrelevant to life," disconnected from sensory-motor experience. Neural mechanisms of these processes are suggested as well as their mathematical models: the knowledge instinct, the language instinct, the dual model connecting language and cognition, dynamic logic, neur...

Perlovsky, Leonid

2011-01-01

250

The psychology of emotion regulation: An integrative review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present article reviews modern research on the psychology of emotion regulation. Emotion regulation determines the offset of emotional responding and is thus distinct from emotional sensitivity, which determines the onset of emotional responding. Among the most viable categories for classifying emotion-regulation strategies are the targets and functions of emotion regulation. The emotion-generating systems that are targeted in emotion regulation

Sander L. Koole

2009-01-01

251

Emotional Expression and Growth Following Adversity: Emotional Expression Mediates Subjective Distress and is Moderated by Emotional Intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotional expression is hypothesised to be associated with growth following adversity. Two studies are described that test predictions made for emotional expression, first that it mediates the relation between event-related distress and growth, and second, that the relation between emotional expression and growth is moderated by emotional intelligence. In Study 1, college students (n = 148) completed measures of traumatic experiences, emotional

P. Alex Linley; Aimee Felus; Raphael Gillett; Stephen Joseph

2011-01-01

252

Processing orientation and emotion recognition.  

PubMed

There is evidence that some emotional expressions are characterized by diagnostic cues from individual face features. For example, an upturned mouth is indicative of happiness, whereas a furrowed brow is associated with anger. The current investigation explored whether motivating people to perceive stimuli in a local (i.e., feature-based) rather than global (i.e., holistic) processing orientation was advantageous for recognizing emotional facial expressions. Participants classified emotional faces while primed with local and global processing orientations, via a Navon letter task. Contrary to previous findings for identity recognition, the current findings are indicative of a modest advantage for face emotion recognition under conditions of local processing orientation. When primed with a local processing orientation, participants performed both significantly faster and more accurately on an emotion recognition task than when they were primed with a global processing orientation. The impacts of this finding for theories of emotion recognition and face processing are considered. PMID:21842989

Martin, Douglas; Slessor, Gillian; Allen, Roy; Phillips, Louise H; Darling, Stephen

2012-02-01

253

Promoting the Emotional Development of Preschoolers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the emotional development of preschoolers, including the issues of emotional expression, emotional understanding, regulation of emotions, developmental significance, and the role of the caregiver-child relationship. Finds that caregivers influence the emotional development of children as they model, coach, and respond to children.…

Ashiabi, Godwin S.

2000-01-01

254

Promoting the Emotional Development of Preschoolers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper looks at evidence pertaining to the emotional development of preschoolers. The issues talked about include a synopsis of emotional expression, emotional understanding, the regulation of emotions, and their developmental significance. Furthermore, the role of the caregiver–child relationship as indicated by the security of attachment is provided. It is argued that caregivers influence the emotional development of children as

Godwin S. Ashiabi

2000-01-01

255

Emotional content of true and false memories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many people believe that emotional memories (including those that arise in therapy) are particularly likely to represent true events because of their emotional content. But is emotional content a reliable indicator of memory accuracy? The current research assessed the emotional content of participants’ pre-existing (true) and manipulated (false) memories for childhood events. False memories for one of three emotional childhood

Cara Laney; Elizabeth F. Loftus

2008-01-01

256

Emotion Regulation in Children with Anxiety Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined emotion management skills in addition to the role of emotional intensity and self-efficacy in emotion regulation in 26 children with anxiety disorders (ADs) ages 8 to 12 years and their counterparts without any form of psychopathology. Children completed the Children's Emotion Management Scales (CEMS) and Emotion Regulation…

Suveg, Cynthia; Zeman, Janice

2004-01-01

257

The Theory of Emotions in Marketing  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine whether a theory of emotions in marketing is needed, this article assesses the current theoretical status of emotions in marketing. The theoretical propositions and the characteristics of four major theories of emotions borrowed from psychology, as well as five marketing accounts for emotions are reviewed. The characteristics of emotions in marketing are specified and compared with the characteristics

Ming-Hui Huang

2001-01-01

258

Emotions Across Cultures and Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Participants included 46 European American, 33 Asian American, 91 Japanese, 160 Indian, and 80 Hispanic students (N = 416). Discrete emotions, as well as pleasant and unpleasant emotions, were assessed: (a) with global self-report measures,\\u000a (b) using an experience-sampling method for 1 week, and (c) by asking participants to recall their emotions from the experience\\u000a sampling week. Cultural differences emerged

Christie Napa Scollon; Ed Diener; Shigehiro Oishi; Robert Biswas-Diener

259

Emotion Regulation in Childhood Anxiety  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The field of psychology is in the midst of an “emotion revolution,” reflecting the emerging role of emotion theory in clinical\\u000a research and practice (Samoilov & Goldfried, 2000; Southam-Gerow & Kendall, 2002). Although many researchers have commended\\u000a this trend, there is also an ongoing call for more clinical research that is founded on emotion theory and expands our understanding\\u000a of

Marni L. Jacob; Kristel Thomassin; Diana Morelen; Cynthia Suveg

260

Emotional function in dementia patients.  

PubMed

Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, which can be considered as hyperreactivity of the emotional functioning of dementia, can be alleviated or aggravated by the behavioural and psychological symptoms of the caregiver. Comfortable stimulations of emotional function through sensory stimulations are effective methods for alleviating behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. Although cognitive function deteriorates with age, emotional function is often retained even in advanced years. Thus, it is recommended that care in patients with dementia be focused mainly on the stimulation of emotional function (e.g. sympathy and empathy, which are human traits), rather than relying solely on the stimulation of cognitive function. PMID:25250479

Fujii, Masahiko; Butler, James P; Sasaki, Hidetada

2014-09-01

261

Do you know how I feel? Evaluating emotional display of primary and secondary emotions  

E-print Network

Do you know how I feel? Evaluating emotional display of primary and secondary emotions Julia by direct mapping on basic emotion display; secondary emotions like relief or gloating are considered and secondary emotions [2] can be recognized from the face of our emotional virtual human Max [1]. Primary

Becker-Asano, Christian

262

Assessing Emotion Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder: The Emotion Regulation Interview  

E-print Network

specified by Gross's (Review of General Psychology 2: 271­299, 1998) process model of emotion regulationAssessing Emotion Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder: The Emotion Regulation Interview Kelly H to involve emotional hyper-reactivity and emotion dysregulation. How- ever, the precise nature of the emotion

Gross, James J.

263

The effect of an artificially lengthened vocal tract on estimated glottal contact quotient in untrained male voices.  

PubMed

The use of hard-walled narrow tubes, often called resonance tubes, for the purpose of voice therapy and voice training has a historical precedent and some theoretical support, but the mechanism of any potential benefit from the application of this technique is not well understood. Fifteen vocally untrained male participants produced a series of spoken /a/ vowels at a modal pitch and constant loudness, before and after a minute of repeated phonation into a 50-cm hard-walled glass tube at the same pitch and loudness targets. Electroglottography was used to measure the glottal contact quotient (CQ) during each phase of the experiment. Single-subject analysis revealed statistically significant changes in CQ during tube phonation, but with no discernable pattern across the 15 participants. These results indicate that the use of resonance tubes can have a distinct effect on glottal closure, but the mechanism behind this change remains unclear. The implication is that vocal loading techniques such as this need to be studied further with specific attention paid to the underlying mechanism of any measured changes in glottal behavior, and especially to the role of instruction and feedback in the therapeutic and pedagogical application of these techniques. PMID:19135851

Gaskill, Christopher S; Erickson, Molly L

2010-01-01

264

A new method for continuous measuring of respiratory quotient in a computer-assisted working heart preparation.  

PubMed

A method was developed for continuous monitoring of the respiratory quotient (RQ) and the ratio of O2-consumption to O2-demand (EQ) in an isolated working rat heart preparation. The RQ allows to get informations about substrates actually oxidized in the myocardium. The EQ is a parameter which behaves reciprocally to the ATP/O of the oxidized substrates during steady state and additionally it allows monitoring of a transitory oxygen debt. For registration of RQ the arterio-venous O2-difference and the CO2-release are measured. As the CO2-production is very small compared with arterial CO2- and HCO-3 -concentrations when using a bicarbonate buffer for perfusion, a bicarbonate-free perfusion-fluid is used. In a portion of coronary effluent the pH is lowered to shift the CO2/HCO-3 -equilibrium to the side of dissolved CO2. Then the pCO2 is measured with a CO2-Nelectrode. Additionally, ventricular pressure, cardiac input and coronary flow are continuously registrated. All data are fed via an AD-converter into an LSI 11-computer. Heart rate, maximum ventricular pressure, dP/dtmax, oxygen demand after Bretschneider's formula, RQ and EQ are calculated. The advantages of the system described are demonstrated with two examples. PMID:6847578

Hütter, J F; Piper, H M; Spieckermann, P G

1983-01-01

265

A systems biology approach to identify intelligence quotient score-related genomic regions, and pathways relevant to potential therapeutic treatments  

PubMed Central

Although the intelligence quotient (IQ) is the most popular intelligence test in the world, little is known about the underlying biological mechanisms that lead to the differences in human. To improve our understanding of cognitive processes and identify potential biomarkers, we conducted a comprehensive investigation of 158 IQ-related genes selected from the literature. A genomic distribution analysis demonstrated that IQ-related genes were enriched in seven regions of chromosome 7 and the X chromosome. In addition, these genes were enriched in target lists of seven transcription factors and sixteen microRNAs. Using a network-based approach, we further reconstructed an IQ-related pathway from known human pathway interaction data. Based on this reconstructed pathway, we incorporated enriched drugs and described the importance of dopamine and norepinephrine systems in IQ-related biological process. These findings not only reveal several testable genes and processes related to IQ scores, but also have potential therapeutic implications for IQ-related mental disorders. PMID:24566931

Zhao, Min; Kong, Lei; Qu, Hong

2014-01-01

266

Mothers' Acculturation and Beliefs About Emotions, Mother–Child Emotion Discourse, and Children's Emotion Understanding in Latino Families  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Findings: We examined associations among Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, maternal beliefs, mother–child emotion talk, and emotion understanding in 40 Latino preschool-age children and their mothers. Mothers self-reported Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, and beliefs about the value\\/danger of children's emotions and parent\\/child roles in emotion socialization. Mother–child emotion talk was observed during a Lego storytelling task. Children's emotion understanding was

Marie Belle Perez Rivera; Julie C. Dunsmore

2011-01-01

267

Regional brain function, emotion and disorders of emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the neural substrates of emotion and its disorders. Neuroimaging methods have been used to characterize the circuitry underlying disorders of emotion. Particular emphasis has been placed on the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, parietal cortex, and the amygdala as critical components of the circuitry that may be dysfunctional in both depression and

Richard J Davidson; Heather Abercrombie; Jack B Nitschke; Katherine Putnam

1999-01-01

268

Prospective Effects of Emotion-Regulation Skills on Emotional Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Deficits in emotion-regulation skills have widely been shown to be associated with poor emotional adjustment. However, it is still unclear whether these deficits are a cause or a consequence of poor adjustment. The purpose of the present research was to clarify the reciprocal effects between these 2 concepts. In 2 studies (Ns = 446 and 635),…

Berking, Matthias; Orth, Ulrich; Wupperman, Peggilee; Meier, Laurenz L.; Caspar, Franz

2008-01-01

269

Preschoolers' Understanding of Parents' Emotions: Implications for Emotional Competence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated preschoolers' understanding of three parental emotions: happiness, sadness, and anger. The study also examined relationships of these understandings to preschoolers' emotional competence. Subjects, 70 children with a mean age of 55 months, were presented with a dollhouse and were encouraged to imagine that the dollhouse…

Denham, Susanne A.; And Others

270

Learning Emotional Understanding and Emotion Regulation through Sibling Interaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Young children's relationships with their sisters and brothers offer unique and important opportunities for learning about emotions and developing emotional understanding. Through a critical analysis, this article examines sibling interaction in 3 different but normative contexts (conflict/conflict management, play, and…

Kramer, Laurie

2014-01-01

271

Emotion and Emotion-Laden Words in the Bilingual Lexicon  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to draw on recent studies of bilingualism and emotions to argue for three types of modifications to the current models of the bilingual lexicon. The first modification involves word categories: I will show that emotion words need to be considered as a separate class of words in the mental lexicon, represented and…

Pavlenko, Aneta

2008-01-01

272

Emotion Telepresence: Emotion Augmentation through Affective Haptics and Visual Stimuli  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper focuses on a novel concept of emotional telepresence. The iFeel_IM! system which is in the vanguard of this technology integrates 3D virtual world Second Life, intelligent component for automatic emotion recognition from text messages, and innovative affective haptic interfaces providing additional nonverbal communication channels through simulation of emotional feedback and social touch (physical co-presence). Users can not only exchange messages but also emotionally and physically feel the presence of the communication partner (e.g., family member, friend, or beloved person). The next prototype of the system will include the tablet computer. The user can realize haptic interaction with avatar, and thus influence its mood and emotion of the partner. The finger gesture language will be designed for communication with avatar. This will bring new level of immersion of on-line communication.

Tsetserukou, D.; Neviarouskaya, A.

2012-03-01

273

Neural correlates of emotion processing: from emotional to social brain.  

PubMed

Different models of emotion highlight the role of strategic brain regions in emotion identification, response and regulation. Cortical, subcortical and limbic structures constitute the emotional brain. In this short review, we focus on the function of the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex. Both regions have reciprocal connections and are densely connected with cortical and subcortical structures. Beyond its classical role in fear processing, the amygdala is considered as a region that detects salient and personally relevant stimuli in cooperation with ventral and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex. Amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex are also engaged in the processing of socially relevant stimuli. Our review emphasized the overlap between the emotional and the social brain. Adopting a socio-affective neuroscience perspective is a promising perspective to identify new pathophysiological pathways in the study of emotion and mental disorders, especially major depressive disorder. PMID:22959113

Fossati, P

2012-01-01

274

Preschool Teachers' Emotional Experience Traits, Awareness of Their Own Emotions, and Their Emotional Socialization Practices.  

E-print Network

??Emotions are composed of three interrelated sets of processes, which are (a) neurophysiologic and biochemical processes, (b) motor and behavioral expressive processes, and (c) cognitive-experiential… (more)

ERSAY, EBRU

2007-01-01

275

Emotion socialization in formerly homeless families.  

E-print Network

??Emotional competence in children is increasingly understood as an outcome of parents? adaptive socialization behaviors. Parent?s socialization of children?s emotions and children?s emotion competence were… (more)

Davis, Karen Laurel

2012-01-01

276

The Voice of Emotion: Acoustic Properties of Six Emotional Expressions.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies in the perceptual identification of emotional states suggested that listeners seemed to depend on a limited set of vocal cues to distinguish among emotions. Linguistics and speech science literatures have indicated that this small set of cues included intensity, fundamental frequency, and temporal properties such as speech rate and duration. Little research has been done, however, to validate these cues in the production of emotional speech, or to determine if specific dimensions of each cue are associated with the production of a particular emotion for a variety of speakers. This study addressed deficiencies in understanding of the acoustical properties of duration and intensity as components of emotional speech by means of speech science instrumentation. Acoustic data were conveyed in a brief sentence spoken by twelve English speaking adult male and female subjects, half with dramatic training, and half without such training. Simulated expressions included: happiness, surprise, sadness, fear, anger, and disgust. The study demonstrated that the acoustic property of mean intensity served as an important cue for a vocal taxonomy. Overall duration was rejected as an element for a general taxonomy due to interactions involving gender and role. Findings suggested a gender-related taxonomy, however, based on differences in the ways in which men and women use the duration cue in their emotional expressions. Results also indicated that speaker training may influence greater use of the duration cue in expressions of emotion, particularly for male actors. Discussion of these results provided linkages to (1) practical management of emotional interactions in clinical and interpersonal environments, (2) implications for differences in the ways in which males and females may be socialized to express emotions, and (3) guidelines for future perceptual studies of emotional sensitivity.

Baldwin, Carol May

277

Networks of Emotion Concepts  

PubMed Central

The aim of this work was to study the similarity network and hierarchical clustering of Finnish emotion concepts. Native speakers of Finnish evaluated similarity between the 50 most frequently used Finnish words describing emotional experiences. We hypothesized that methods developed within network theory, such as identifying clusters and specific local network structures, can reveal structures that would be difficult to discover using traditional methods such as multidimensional scaling (MDS) and ordinary cluster analysis. The concepts divided into three main clusters, which can be described as negative, positive, and surprise. Negative and positive clusters divided further into meaningful sub-clusters, corresponding to those found in previous studies. Importantly, this method allowed the same concept to be a member in more than one cluster. Our results suggest that studying particular network structures that do not fit into a low-dimensional description can shed additional light on why subjects evaluate certain concepts as similar. To encourage the use of network methods in analyzing similarity data, we provide the analysis software for free use (http://www.becs.tkk.fi/similaritynets/). PMID:22276099

Toivonen, Riitta; Kivela, Mikko; Saramaki, Jari; Viinikainen, Mikko; Vanhatalo, Maija; Sams, Mikko

2012-01-01

278

The emotional impact of malpractice.  

PubMed

Nurses rarely think they will be named as defendants in malpractice suits, and when they are named, they almost never envision the emotional impact that will occur regardless of the outcome of the suit. This article explores the lived experience of a nurse named as a defendant in a malpractice lawsuit and the use of strategies for emotional and professional survival. PMID:20462075

Larson, Kristin; Elliott, Rowena

2010-01-01

279

Music Emotion Identification from Lyrics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Very large online music databases have recently been created by vendors, but they generally lack content-based retrieval methods. One exception is Allmusic.com which offers browsing by musical emotion, using human experts to classify several thousand songs into 183 moods. In this paper, machine learning techniques are used instead of human experts to extract emotions in Music. The classification is based

Dan Yang; Won-Sook Lee

2009-01-01

280

Measures of emotion: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

A consensual, componential model of emotions conceptualises them as experiential, physiological, and behavioural responses to personally meaningful stimuli. The present review examines this model in terms of whether different types of emotion-evocative stimuli are associated with discrete and invariant patterns of responding in each response system, how such responses are structured, and if such responses converge across different response systems.

Iris B. Mauss; Michael D. Robinson

2009-01-01

281

Emotional Intelligence: Components and Correlates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is no accepted definition and no adequate measure for the concept of Emotional Intelligence (EI). Some of the myriad issues surrounding EI are discussed here. One problem in the consideration of EI is the confusion between the terms "feelings" and "emotions." Differences between the two are examined and a working definition of feelings is…

Bernet, Michael

282

Toddlers' Understanding of Peers' Emotions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The second year of life sees dramatic developments in infants' ability to understand emotions in adults alongside their growing interest in peers. In this study, the authors used a social-referencing paradigm to examine whether 12-, 18-, and 24-month-old children could use a peer's positive or negative emotion messages about toys to regulate their…

Nichols, Sara R.; Svetlova, Margarita; Brownell, Celia A.

2010-01-01

283

The Emotions and Reproductive Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is surprising that social demography has so little to say on the emotional underpinnings of demographic behavior. The central proposition of this essay is that emotions are particularly important for understanding the problems of reproductive health. This understanding allows one to consider the usual determinants of personal autonomy, or access to knowledge or services, but also to take into

Alaka Malwade Basu

2006-01-01

284

On the Nature of Emotion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay argues that humans are capable of a large number of affect states; a distinction should be made among acute emotions, chronic moods, and temperamental vulnerabilities to a particular emotion state; and research on human effects will profit from a return to, and reinterpretation of, Sigmund Freud's suggestion of unconscious affect…

Kagan, Jerome

1994-01-01

285

Emotive qualities in robot speech  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the expression of emotion in synthesized speech for an anthropomorphic robot. We adapted several key emotional correlates of human speech to the robot speech synthesizer to allow the robot to speak in either an angry, calm, disgusted, fearful, happy, sad, or surprised manner. We evaluated our approach thorough an acoustic analysis of the speech patterns for each

Cynthia Breazeal

2001-01-01

286

Finance organizations, decisions and emotions.  

PubMed

Analyses of global financial markets are dominated by atomized models of decision-making and behavioural psychology ('exuberance' or 'panic'). In contrast, this paper argues that overwhelmingly, finance organizations rather than 'individuals' make decisions, and routinely use emotions in formulating expectations. Keynes introduced emotion (business confidence and animal spirits) but in economics, emotion remains individualistic and irrational. Luhmann's system theory lies at the other extreme, where emotions like trust and confidence are central variables, functional in the reduction of complexity in sub-systems like the economy. The gap between irrational emotions aggregated to 'herd' behaviour in economics, and 'system trust' applied to finance and money as a 'medium of communication' in sociology, remains largely unfilled. This paper argues that while organizations cannot be said to 'think' or 'feel', they are rational and emotional, because impersonal trust, confidence and their contrary emotions are unavoidable in decision-making due to fundamental uncertainty. These future-oriented emotions are prevalent within and between organizations in the financial sector, primarily in generating expectations. The dynamic of corporate activities of tense and ruthless struggle is a more plausible level of analysis than either financial 'manias' in aggregate or 'system trust'. PMID:11958678

Pixley, Jocelyn

2002-03-01

287

Emotion in Sport across Adulthood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotions make life worth living. They are essential to sporting life, whether experienced as a child or adult, player or spectator. Our sporting memories are dominated by strong emotion- al events. In the 2000 Olympics, many in the world rejoiced with Australia's Cathy Freeman as she captured gold in the 400 meters. At the other extreme, many Major League Baseball

Peter R. E. CrockerKent; C. KowalskiSharleen; D. Hoar; Meghan H. McDonough

288

The importance of emotional intelligence.  

PubMed

Nurse managers who exhibit high emotional intelligence (EI) can elicit higher nurse-retention rates, better patient satisfaction and optimal organisational outcomes, and those who are emotionally intelligent tend consistently to model the positive behaviour that is expected of healthcare staff. PMID:25428315

Clancy, Cheri

2014-11-27

289

Emotional Intelligence and Educational Reform  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper focuses on the notion of educational reform and discusses Emotional Intelligence (EI) in the context of the modernist-postmodernist debate. It is argued that through the application of EI into contemporary societies a new wave of reform emerges that provides science with normative power over the emotional world of individuals. This…

Neophytou, Lefkios

2013-01-01

290

Contradictions of emotion in schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers contradictory features of emotional or affective experience and expression in schizophrenia in light of the “Kretschmerian paradox”—the fact that schizophrenia-spectrum patients can simultaneously experience both exaggerated and diminished levels of affective response. An attempt is made to explain the paradox and explore its implications. Recent research on emotion in schizophrenia is reviewed, including subjective reports, psychophysiological measures

Louis Sass

2007-01-01

291

Emotional facial expressions capture attention  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the emotional significance of stimuli can influence spatial attention. BACKGROUND: Motivational and emotional factors may affect attention toward stimuli. However, this has never been examined in brain-damaged patients who present with unilateral inattention due to left spatial neglect. METHODS: The authors studied three patients with chronic left neglect and visual extinction after right parietal stroke. Shapes

Patrik Vuilleumier; Sophie Schwartz

2001-01-01

292

Mapping the Classroom Emotional Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Harvey and Evans (2003) have proposed that teachers' emotional skills, as required in the classroom, can be organized into a five-dimensional model. Further research is necessary to validate this model and evaluate the importance of each dimension of teacher emotion competence for educational practice. Using a statistical method for mapping…

Harvey, Shane T.; Bimler, David; Evans, Ian M.; Kirkland, John; Pechtel, Pia

2012-01-01

293

Measuring Emotion Socialization in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Understanding how school personnel can best support students' development of communication skills around feelings is critical to long-term health outcomes. The measurement of emotion socialization in schools facilitates future research in this area; we review existing measures of emotion socialization to assess their applicability…

Horner, Christy G.; Wallace, Tanner L.

2013-01-01

294

Medical & Emotional Emergency Policy & Protocol  

E-print Network

Medical & Emotional Emergency Policy & Protocol The College of William and Mary Contact: Dean is the College's response to cases that might involve violation of the Medical and Emotional Emergencies section when a student attempts suicide or makes a threat or gesture of suicide, harms or attempts to harm him

Shaw, Leah B.

295

Emotional response to musical repetition.  

PubMed

Two experiments examined the effects of repetition on listeners' emotional response to music. Listeners heard recordings of orchestral music that contained a large section repeated twice. The music had a symmetric phrase structure (same-length phrases) in Experiment 1 and an asymmetric phrase structure (different-length phrases) in Experiment 2, hypothesized to alter the predictability of sensitivity to musical repetition. Continuous measures of arousal and valence were compared across music that contained identical repetition, variation (related), or contrasting (unrelated) structure. Listeners' emotional arousal ratings differed most for contrasting music, moderately for variations, and least for repeating musical segments. A computational model for the detection of repeated musical segments was applied to the listeners' emotional responses. The model detected the locations of phrase boundaries from the emotional responses better than from performed tempo or physical intensity in both experiments. These findings indicate the importance of repetition in listeners' emotional response to music and in the perceptual segmentation of musical structure. PMID:21707165

Livingstone, Steven R; Palmer, Caroline; Schubert, Emery

2012-06-01

296

Emotion Regulation Deficits in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Alzheimer's Disease  

E-print Network

Emotion Regulation Deficits in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Alzheimer's Disease Madeleine), which presents with profound emotional and personality changes; patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD, N in the emotional realm. Keywords: emotion, emotion regulation, frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer's disease

Levenson, Robert W.

297

Showing and telling about emotions: Interrelations between facets of emotional competence and associations with classroom adjustment in Head Start preschoolers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study of low income preschoolers (N?=? 60), we examined relations between three facets of emotional competence: emotion knowledge, level of negative emotion expression, and emotion regulation; and their associations with indicators of classroom adjustment. Emotion knowledge was positively related to positive emotion regulation but was not related to negative emotion expression or negative dysregulation. Negative emotion expression related

Alison L. Miller; Sarah E. Fine; Kathleen Kiely Gouley; Ronald Seifer; Susan Dickstein; Ann Shields

2006-01-01

298

Maternal Pre-Pregnancy BMI and Intelligence Quotient (IQ) in 5-Year-Old Children: A Cohort Based Study  

PubMed Central

Background An association between maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and childhood intelligence quotient (IQ) has repeatedly been found but it is unknown if this association is causal or due to confounding caused by genetic or social factors. Methods We used a cohort of 1,783 mothers and their 5-year-old children sampled from the Danish National Birth Cohort. The children participated between 2003 and 2008 in a neuropsychological assessment of cognitive ability including IQ tests taken by both the mother and the child. Linear regression analyses were used to estimate the associations between parental BMI and child IQ adjusted for a comprehensive set of potential confounders. Child IQ was assessed with the Wechsler Primary and Preschool Scales of Intelligence – Revised (WPPSI-R). Results The crude association between maternal BMI and child IQ showed that BMI was adversely associated with child IQ with a reduction in IQ of ?0.40 point for each one unit increase in BMI. This association was attenuated after adjustment for social factors and maternal IQ to a value of ?0.27 (?0.50 to ?0.03). After mutual adjustment for the father's BMI and all other factors except maternal IQ, the association between paternal BMI and child IQ yielded a regression coefficient of ?0.26 (?0.59 to 0.07), which was comparable to that seen for maternal BMI (?0.20 (?0.44 to 0.04)). Conclusion Although maternal pre-pregnancy BMI was inversely associated with the IQ of her child, the similar association with paternal BMI suggests that it is not a specific pregnancy related adiposity effect. PMID:24727836

Bliddal, Mette; Olsen, J?rn; St?vring, Henrik; Eriksen, Hanne-Lise F.; Kesmodel, Ulrik S.; S?rensen, Thorkild I. A.; N?hr, Ellen A.

2014-01-01

299

Comparing ecological risks of pesticides: the utility of a Risk Quotient ranking approach across refinements of exposure.  

PubMed

Environmental risk assessment of pesticides and other chemicals often uses the Risk Quotient (RQ) method to characterize risk quantitatively. An RQ is calculated by dividing an environmental exposure value by a toxicity end-point value. Tier 1 RQs, which are characterized by highly conservative toxicity and exposure assumptions, are used primarily for screening out negligible risks in regulatory decision making. It has been argued that the tier 1 RQ approach is valuable for making direct comparisons of quantitative risk between pesticides. However, an outstanding question is whether relative risks among pesticides would change if refinements of exposure are incorporated into the RQ calculations. This study tested that hypothesis. Aquatic ecological risk assessments were conducted for 12 herbicide and 12 insecticide active ingredients used on agricultural crops in the USA. The pesticides were chosen because surface-water monitoring data for them were available as part of the United States Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA). Ecological receptors and effects evaluated were aquatic non-vascular plants (acute risk), aquatic vertebrates (acute risk) and aquatic invertebrates (acute risk) for the herbicides and aquatic vertebrates (acute and chronic risk) and aquatic invertebrates (acute and chronic risk) for the insecticides. The data indicate that there were significant statistical correlations between numerical rankings of tier 1 RQs and RQs using refined environmental exposures. The results support the hypothesis that numerical ranking of RQs for the purpose of comparing potential ecological risks is a valid approach because the rankings are significantly correlated regardless of the degree of exposure refinement. PMID:16217731

Peterson, Robert Kd

2006-01-01

300

Contextualizing Emotional Exhaustion and Positive Emotional Display: The Signaling Effects of Supervisors’ Emotional Exhaustion and Service Climate  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we investigated how supervisors’ emotional exhaustion and service climate jointly influence the relationship between subordinates’ emotional exhaustion and their display of positive emotions at work. Using data from frontline sales employees and their immediate supervisors in a fashion retailer, we hypothesized and found that under the condition of a less positive service climate, subordinates’ emotional exhaustion was

Catherine K. Lam; Xu Huang; Onne Janssen

2010-01-01

301

The Dark Side of Emotion in the Classroom: Emotional Processes as Mediators of Teacher Communication Behaviors and Student Negative Emotions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on emotional response theory (ERT), recent researchers have observed connections between teachers' communication behaviors and students' emotional reactions. In the present study, we further elaborated ERT by exploring the effects of teacher communication behaviors and emotional processes on discrete negative emotions, including…

Mazer, Joseph P.; McKenna-Buchanan, Timothy P.; Quinlan, Margaret M.; Titsworth, Scott

2014-01-01

302

Compound facial expressions of emotion  

PubMed Central

Understanding the different categories of facial expressions of emotion regularly used by us is essential to gain insights into human cognition and affect as well as for the design of computational models and perceptual interfaces. Past research on facial expressions of emotion has focused on the study of six basic categories—happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. However, many more facial expressions of emotion exist and are used regularly by humans. This paper describes an important group of expressions, which we call compound emotion categories. Compound emotions are those that can be constructed by combining basic component categories to create new ones. For instance, happily surprised and angrily surprised are two distinct compound emotion categories. The present work defines 21 distinct emotion categories. Sample images of their facial expressions were collected from 230 human subjects. A Facial Action Coding System analysis shows the production of these 21 categories is different but consistent with the subordinate categories they represent (e.g., a happily surprised expression combines muscle movements observed in happiness and surprised). We show that these differences are sufficient to distinguish between the 21 defined categories. We then use a computational model of face perception to demonstrate that most of these categories are also visually discriminable from one another. PMID:24706770

Du, Shichuan; Tao, Yong; Martinez, Aleix M.

2014-01-01

303

Emotion regulation meets emotional attention: the influence of emotion suppression on emotional attention depends on the nature of the distracters.  

PubMed

Recent evidence has suggested a crucial role of people's current goals in attention to emotional information. This asks for research investigating how and what kinds of goals shape emotional attention. The present study investigated how the goal to suppress a negative emotional state influences attention to emotion-congruent events. After inducing disgust, we instructed participants to suppress all feelings of disgust during a subsequent dot probe task. Attention to disgusting images was modulated by the sort of distracter that was presented in parallel with disgusting imagery. When disgusting images were presented together with neutral images, emotion suppression was accompanied by a tendency to attend to disgusting images. However, when disgusting images were shown with positive images that allow coping with disgust (i.e., images representing cleanliness), attention tended away from disgusting images and toward images representing cleanliness. These findings show that emotion suppression influences the allocation of attention but that the successful avoidance of emotion-congruent events depends on the availability of effective distracters. PMID:25046243

Vogt, Julia; De Houwer, Jan

2014-10-01

304

Moral Emotions and Moral Behavior  

PubMed Central

Moral emotions represent a key element of our human moral apparatus, influencing the link between moral standards and moral behavior. This chapter reviews current theory and research on moral emotions. We first focus on a triad of negatively valenced “self-conscious” emotions—shame, guilt, and embarrassment. As in previous decades, much research remains focused on shame and guilt. We review current thinking on the distinction between shame and guilt, and the relative advantages and disadvantages of these two moral emotions. Several new areas of research are highlighted: research on the domain-specific phenomenon of body shame, styles of coping with shame, psychobiological aspects of shame, the link between childhood abuse and later proneness to shame, and the phenomena of vicarious or “collective” experiences of shame and guilt. In recent years, the concept of moral emotions has been expanded to include several positive emotions—elevation, gratitude, and the sometimes morally relevant experience of pride. Finally, we discuss briefly a morally relevant emotional process—other-oriented empathy. PMID:16953797

Stuewig, Jeff; Mashek, Debra J.

2011-01-01

305

Enhancing Students' Employability Quotient.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The communication skills believed to be relevant to a successful career in the business world and the organizational communication program in the Department of Communication at Central Missouri State University (CMSU) are the two major focuses of this paper. The first part of the paper discusses the importance of identifying factors that might…

Curtis, Dan B.; And Others

306

What's Your "Sexism Quotient?"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A questionnaire, created to help one identify and define sexist attitudes is followed by a selected partially annotated, bibliography on sex roles and non-sexist education and educational materials. (JC)

Clark, Linda; Lord, Sharon B.

1974-01-01

307

Quotients of Metric Spaces  

E-print Network

metric on each S(s,x) by d(s , s ) • |~ - i| and d(x, s ) = we obtain a topology v n' nr !n m' v ' n 7 n' * compatible with the topology of S(s,x). Then T is a metric space by Lemma 1.6. (2) -> (3). Every metric space is first countable. 11 (3...{U :U fl B / j^ ) is called the star of B with respect to and is denoted by St(B, 27). Definition 4.3: Let 77. • (U : a € U} be an open covering vX of Y. A sequence i7fn: n = 1,2, . . . } of open coverings is called locally starring for 27...

Herman, Robert A.

1968-01-01

308

Parental Emotion Coaching and Child Emotion Regulation as Protective Factors for Children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder  

PubMed Central

We assessed linkages of mothers’ emotion coaching and children’s emotion regulation and emotion lability/negativity with children’s adjustment in 72 mother-child dyads seeking treatment for Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). Dyads completed questionnaires and discussed emotion-related family events. Maternal emotion coaching was associated with children’s emotion regulation, which in turn was related to higher mother-reported adaptive skills, higher child-reported internalizing symptoms, and lower child-reported adjustment. When children were high in emotion lability/negativity, mothers’ emotion coaching was associated with lower mother and child reports of externalizing behavior. Results suggest the role of emotion regulation and emotion lability in child awareness of socio-emotional problems and support the potential of maternal emotion coaching as a protective factor for children with ODD, especially for those high in emotion lability. PMID:24187441

Dunsmore, Julie C.; Booker, Jordan A.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

2012-01-01

309

An Integrated Approach to Emotion Recognition for Advanced Emotional Intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotion identification is beginning to be considered as an essential feature in human-computer interaction. However, most\\u000a of the studies are mainly focused on facial expression classifications and speech recognition and not much attention has been\\u000a paid until recently to physiological pattern recognition. In this paper, an integrative approach is proposed to emotional\\u000a interaction by fusing multi-modal signals. Subjects are exposed

Panagiotis D. Bamidis; Christos A. Frantzidis; Evdokimos I. Konstantinidis; Andrej Luneski; Chrysa D. Lithari; Manousos A. Klados; Charalampos Bratsas; Christos L. Papadelis; Costas Pappas

2009-01-01

310

Emotion Chat: A Web Chatroom with Emotion Regulation for E-Learners  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to compensate for lack of emotion communication between teachers and students in e-learning systems, we have designed and implemented the EmotionChat -- a web chatroom with emotion regulation. EmotionChat perceives e-learners’ emotional states based on interactive text. And it recommends resources such as music, cartoons, and mottos to an e-learner when it detects negative emotional states. Meanwhile, it recommends emotion regulation cases to the e-learner's listeners and teachers. The result of our initial experiment shows that EmotionChat can recommend valuable emotion regulation policies for e-learners.

Zheng, Deli; Tian, Feng; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Qinghua; Qin, Jiwei

311

Age and Emotional Experience During Mutual Reminiscing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present article, the authors examined age differences in the emotional experiences involved in talking about past events. In Study 1, 129 adults in an experience-sampling study reported whether they were engaged in mutual reminiscing and their concurrent experience of positive and negative emotion. Their experiences of positive and negative emotion during mutual reminiscing were compared with emotional experience

Monisha Pasupathi; Laura L. Carstensen

2003-01-01

312

Building Emotional Literacy: Groundwork to Early Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Part of social and emotional development is a child's emotional literacy. Numerous strategies exist for the development of children's emotional and social development, and for their emotional readiness for school. Teachers might arrange a classroom environment that is not overly structured or regimented. The environment should reflect who the…

Figueroa-Sanchez, Magali

2008-01-01

313

Accounting for Immediate Emotional Memory Enhancement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Memory for emotional events is usually very good even when tested shortly after study, before it is altered by the influence of emotional arousal on consolidation. Immediate emotion-enhanced memory may stem from the influence of emotion on cognitive processes at encoding and retrieval. Our goal was to test which cognitive factors are necessary and…

Talmi, Deborah; McGarry, Lucy M.

2012-01-01

314

Moment-to-Moment Emotions during Reading  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Moment-to-moment emotions are affective states that dynamically change during reading and potentially influence comprehension. Researchers have recently identified these emotions and the emotion trajectories in reading, tutoring, and problem solving. The primary learning-centered emotions are boredom, frustration, confusion, flow (engagement),…

Graesser, Arthur C.; D'Mello, Sidney

2012-01-01

315

Young Children's Emotional Development and School Readiness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current emphasis on children's academic preparedness continues to overshadow the importance of children's social and emotional development for school readiness (Raver & Zigler, 1997). Research, however, indicates that young children's emotional adjustment matters—children who are emotionally well adjusted have a significantly greater chance of early school success, while children who experience serious emotional difficulty face grave risks of early

C. Cybele Raver; ERIC DIGEST

316

A Neurobiological Approach to Emotional Intelligence  

E-print Network

of emotion, and how can disorders of emotion be understood? What motivates us to work for particular rewards operate to ensure that we eat approximately the correct amount of food to maintain our body weight we have emotions? What are the rules by which emotion operates? What are the brain mechanisms

Rolls, Edmund T.

317

‘Keeping it real’ with an emotional curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students’ emotions can significantly enhance or distract from learning. This paper details a case study of innovative pedagogy in which an ‘emotional curriculum’ was central to my teaching. The analysis of student journals, on-line discussions, and metaphorical exercises revealed a vicissitude of emotions that stemmed from challenging course expectations and group dynamics. Attention to emotions enhanced my ability to address

Debbie Storrs

2012-01-01

318

‘Keeping it real’ with an emotional curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students’ emotions can significantly enhance or distract from learning. This paper details a case study of innovative pedagogy in which an ‘emotional curriculum’ was central to my teaching. The analysis of student journals, on-line discussions, and metaphorical exercises revealed a vicissitude of emotions that stemmed from challenging course expectations and group dynamics. Attention to emotions enhanced my ability to address

Debbie Storrs

2011-01-01

319

Adult attachment, emotional control, and marital satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study extends previous research into the relations among attachment style, emotional experience, and emotional control. Questionnaire measures of these variables were completed by a broad sample of 238 married couples. Continuous measures of attachment showed that insecure attachment (low Comfort with closeness; high Anxiety over relationships) was related to greater control of emotion, regardless of whether the emotion was

JUDITH A. FEENEY

1999-01-01

320

Indentifying Emotional Characteristics from Short Blog Texts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotion is at the core of understanding ourselves and others, and the automatic expression and detection of emotion could enhance our experience with technologies. In this paper, we explore the use of computational linguistic tools to derive emotional features. Using 50 and 200 word samples of naturally-occurring blog texts, we find that some emotions are more discernible than others. In

Alastair J. Gill; Darren Gergle

2008-01-01

321

The relationship between emotional intelligence health and marital satisfaction: A comparative study  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Marriage is known as the most important incident in everyone's life after birth. The most important purpose of marriage is achieving a life followed with love and affection beside the spouse and providing mental comfort and general health. The aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence health and marital satisfaction among married people. Materials and Methods: The research method is descriptive- analytic and its design is comparative, done on 226 people including 114 persons (50 women and 64 men) having marital conflicts, and 112 people (58 women and 54 men) having marital satisfaction, by cluster random sampling from 13 districts of the city of Isfahan. Bar-on (with 90 questions) and Enrich marital satisfaction (115 questions) questionnaires were used for collecting the required information. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics including independent t-tests, Pearson correlation, and linear regression analysis, using SPSS software version 19. Results: The results from the research showed that the scores of emotional intelligence in married people group having marriage conflicts who had referred to the administration of justice was 57.3 ± 13.2, and the random sample from the married people in the city of Isfahan as the comparing group had the score of 67.2 ± 9.5, and the difference of the average scores for the emotional intelligence for the two groups was significant (P < 0.001). The correlation analysis showed that there was a significant and positive relation between emotional intelligence and marital satisfaction (P < 0.001, r = 0.529). The results of linear regression also showed that the general emotional intelligence predicts the quality of marital satisfaction. The emotion of the predicting line of the marital satisfaction score (y) is in the form of: y = 14.8 + 0.656x, by using the emotional intelligence score (x). Conclusion: Regarding the close relations between emotional intelligence and marital satisfaction, education centers such as universities, organizations and family clinics could use this variable in micro- and macro-social plans for improving the quality of the married people relations and promoting health of the families and the society. PMID:24741664

Eslami, Ahmad Ali; Hasanzadeh, Akbar; Jamshidi, Farid

2014-01-01

322

African American and European American Mothers' Beliefs About Negative Emotions and Emotion Socialization Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The authors examined mothers’ beliefs about their children's negative emotions and their emotion socialization practices. Design. A total of 65 African American and 137 European American mothers of 5-year-old children reported their beliefs and typical responses to children's negative emotions, and mothers’ emotion teaching practices were observed. Results. African American mothers reported that the display of negative emotions was

Jackie A. Nelson; Esther M. Leerkes; Marion OBrien; Susan D. Calkins; Stuart Marcovitch

2012-01-01

323

The experience of positive emotion is associated with the automatic processing of positive emotional words  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study examines the relationship between attention bias for positive emotional words and self-reported emotional experience. Previous research suggests that the experience of positive emotion momentarily broadens cognitive processes, potentially allowing individuals to build an array of enduring personal resources. However, it is unknown whether the experience of positive emotion also broadens emotional information processing. Participants included 60 healthy

Gregory P. Strauss; Daniel N. Allen

2006-01-01

324

The emotional feeling as a combination of two qualia: A neurophilosophical-based emotion theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is argued that the emotional feeling comprises the following two emotional qualia. (1) A nucleus feeling or primary emotional quale, which is the phenomenological counterpart of the end product of appraisal by the central nervous system. (2) The experience of being urged to emotion-related reflection or secondary emotional quale, which is the phenomenological counterpart of the brain's decision to

Bob Bermond

2008-01-01

325

Emotional dysregulation in dysphoria: Support for emotion context insensitivity in response to performance-based feedback  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Emotion Context Insensitivity (ECI) hypothesis predicts that individuals experiencing a sad mood will show diminished reactivity to emotionally evocative stimuli and will not differentiate emotional responses across contexts. Previous work has primarily been limited to studying depressed individuals' emotional responses to film clips, images, and autobiographical memories. The current study builds upon this work by examining emotional reactivity of

Alissa J. Ellis; Christopher G. Beevers; Tony T. Wells

2009-01-01

326

The Hundred-Year Emotion War: Are Emotions Natural Kinds or Psychological Constructions? Comment on Lench,  

E-print Network

COMMENT The Hundred-Year Emotion War: Are Emotions Natural Kinds or Psychological Constructions with the alternative (a psychological constructionist approach to emotion). We close by appealing for a construct to finally resolve the emotion debate. Keywords: emotion, natural kinds, psychological construction

Barrett, Lisa Feldman

327

Managing Emotions in Teaching: Toward an Understanding of Emotion Displays and Caring as Nonprescribed Role Elements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Much research has sought to investigate emotions and forms of emotion management among teachers worldwide, including the connection between educational change and teacher emotion; the association between the culture of teaching and teachers' emotional experience within parent-teacher interactions; the link between teacher emotion and…

Oplatka, Izhar

2007-01-01

328

From everyday emotions to aesthetic emotions: Towards a unified theory of musical emotions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The sound of music may arouse profound emotions in listeners. But such experiences seem to involve a ‘paradox’, namely that music - an abstract form of art, which appears removed from our concerns in everyday life - can arouse emotions - biologically evolved reactions related to human survival. How are these (seemingly) non-commensurable phenomena linked together? Key is to understand the processes through which sounds are imbued with meaning. It can be argued that the survival of our ancient ancestors depended on their ability to detect patterns in sounds, derive meaning from them, and adjust their behavior accordingly. Such an ecological perspective on sound and emotion forms the basis of a recent multi-level framework that aims to explain emotional responses to music in terms of a large set of psychological mechanisms. The goal of this review is to offer an updated and expanded version of the framework that can explain both ‘everyday emotions’ and ‘aesthetic emotions’. The revised framework - referred to as BRECVEMA - includes eight mechanisms: Brain Stem Reflex, Rhythmic Entrainment, Evaluative Conditioning, Contagion, Visual Imagery, Episodic Memory, Musical Expectancy, and Aesthetic Judgment. In this review, it is argued that all of the above mechanisms may be directed at information that occurs in a ‘musical event’ (i.e., a specific constellation of music, listener, and context). Of particular significance is the addition of a mechanism corresponding to aesthetic judgments of the music, to better account for typical ‘appreciation emotions’ such as admiration and awe. Relationships between aesthetic judgments and other mechanisms are reviewed based on the revised framework. It is suggested that the framework may contribute to a long-needed reconciliation between previous approaches that have conceptualized music listeners' responses in terms of either ‘everyday emotions’ or ‘aesthetic emotions’.

Juslin, Patrik N.

2013-09-01

329

From everyday emotions to aesthetic emotions: towards a unified theory of musical emotions.  

PubMed

The sound of music may arouse profound emotions in listeners. But such experiences seem to involve a 'paradox', namely that music--an abstract form of art, which appears removed from our concerns in everyday life--can arouse emotions - biologically evolved reactions related to human survival. How are these (seemingly) non-commensurable phenomena linked together? Key is to understand the processes through which sounds are imbued with meaning. It can be argued that the survival of our ancient ancestors depended on their ability to detect patterns in sounds, derive meaning from them, and adjust their behavior accordingly. Such an ecological perspective on sound and emotion forms the basis of a recent multi-level framework that aims to explain emotional responses to music in terms of a large set of psychological mechanisms. The goal of this review is to offer an updated and expanded version of the framework that can explain both 'everyday emotions' and 'aesthetic emotions'. The revised framework--referred to as BRECVEMA--includes eight mechanisms: Brain Stem Reflex, Rhythmic Entrainment, Evaluative Conditioning, Contagion, Visual Imagery, Episodic Memory, Musical Expectancy, and Aesthetic Judgment. In this review, it is argued that all of the above mechanisms may be directed at information that occurs in a 'musical event' (i.e., a specific constellation of music, listener, and context). Of particular significance is the addition of a mechanism corresponding to aesthetic judgments of the music, to better account for typical 'appreciation emotions' such as admiration and awe. Relationships between aesthetic judgments and other mechanisms are reviewed based on the revised framework. It is suggested that the framework may contribute to a long-needed reconciliation between previous approaches that have conceptualized music listeners' responses in terms of either 'everyday emotions' or 'aesthetic emotions'. PMID:23769678

Juslin, Patrik N

2013-09-01

330

Back Pain and Emotional Distress  

MedlinePLUS

North American Spine Society Public Education Series Back Pain and Emotional Distress Common Reactions to Back Pain Four out of five adults will experience an episode of significant back pain sometime during ...

331

Emotional Issues and Bathroom Problems  

MedlinePLUS

... be unearthed by considering any changes in your child’s life or emotional development, observing her other behaviors, and listening carefully to what she says. Major change in a child's life can cause her to regress during toilet ...

332

Sleep and Emotional Memory Processing  

PubMed Central

Cognitive neuroscience continues to build meaningful connections between affective behavior and human brain function. Within the biological sciences, a similar renaissance has taken place, focusing on the role of sleep in various neurocognitive processes, and most recently, the interaction between sleep and emotional regulation. In this article, we survey an array of diverse findings across basic and clinical research domains, resulting in a convergent view of sleep-dependent emotional brain processing. Based on the unique neurobiology of sleep, we outline a model describing the overnight modulation of affective neural systems and the (re)processing of recent emotional experiences, both of which appear to redress the appropriate next-day reactivity of limbic and associated autonomic networks. Furthermore, a REM sleep hypothesis of emotional-memory processing is proposed, the implications of which may provide brain-based insights into the association between sleep abnormalities and the initiation and maintenance of mood disturbances.

van der Helm, Els; Walker, Matthew P.

2011-01-01

333

Emotional Development: 1 Year Olds  

MedlinePLUS

... 1 Year Olds Ages & Stages Listen Emotional Development: 1 Year Olds Article Body Throughout her second year, ... for shelter. She may seem to change from one moment to the next, or she may seem ...

334

The emotional effects of disruption  

E-print Network

Disruption is something that we must negotiate as part of our everyday lives. The context of disruption can vary in nature from being positive to being negative in nature. However, the emotional effects of the disruption have not been investigated...

Adcock, Christina Annie Lee

2004-11-15

335

Raising the bar on achieving racial diversity in higher education: the United States Supreme Court's decision in Fisher v University of Texas.  

PubMed

In Fisher v University of Texas, the U.S. Supreme Court revisited the constitutionality of race-conscious admissions practices aimed at fostering student diversity in university programs. Although it concluded that student diversity remains the type of compelling state interest that justifies consideration of race in admissions, the court nonetheless raised the bar on the use of such practices by requiring universities to prove that no workable race-neutral methods can produce the same result. Whether this standard of proof is one that can be met-and whether challenges will mount against universities that continue to use the holistic methods sanctioned 10 years ago in Grutter v Bollinger-remains to be seen. In this commentary, the authors review the background and history of the Supreme Court's decisions on race as a factor in university admissions decisions and examine the potential effects of Fisher on medical education specifically. PMID:24128633

Rosenbaum, Sara; Teitelbaum, Joel; Scott, James

2013-12-01

336

Emotions in economic action and interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

How do emotions influence economic action? Current literature recognizes the importance of emotions for economy because they\\u000a either help individuals perform economic roles through emotion management or enhancement of emotional intelligence, or because\\u000a they aid rationality through their influence on preference formation. All these strands of research investigate the link between\\u000a emotions and economy from an atomistic\\/individualistic perspective. I argue

Nina Bandelj

2009-01-01

337

Performance and learning goals for emotion regulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goal orientation theory is concerned with performance and learning goals in academic, athletic, and other ability areas. Here\\u000a we examine performance and learning goals for emotion regulation. We define performance goals for emotion regulation as seeking\\u000a to prove one’s ability to manage emotions; learning goals for emotion regulation are defined as seeking to improve one’s ability to manage emotions. In

Natalie RuskMaya TamirFred Rothbaum; Maya Tamir; Fred Rothbaum

338

Toddlers’ Understanding of Peers’ Emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The second year of life sees dramatic developments in infants’ ability to understand emotions in adults alongside their growing interest in peers. In this study, the authors used a social-referencing paradigm to examine whether 12-, 18-, and 24-month-old children could use a peer's positive or negative emotion messages about toys to regulate their own behavior with the toys. They found

Sara R. Nichols; Margarita Svetlova; Celia A. Brownell

2010-01-01

339

Emotion and the motivational brain.  

PubMed

Psychophysiological and neuroscience studies of emotional processing undertaken by investigators at the University of Florida Laboratory of the Center for the Study of Emotion and Attention (CSEA) are reviewed, with a focus on reflex reactions, neural structures and functional circuits that mediate emotional expression. The theoretical view shared among the investigators is that expressed emotions are founded on motivational circuits in the brain that developed early in evolutionary history to ensure the survival of individuals and their progeny. These circuits react to appetitive and aversive environmental and memorial cues, mediating appetitive and defensive reflexes that tune sensory systems and mobilize the organism for action and underly negative and positive affects. The research reviewed here assesses the reflex physiology of emotion, both autonomic and somatic, studying affects evoked in picture perception, memory imagery, and in the context of tangible reward and punishment, and using the electroencephalograph (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), explores the brain's motivational circuits that determine human emotion. PMID:19879918

Lang, Peter J; Bradley, Margaret M

2010-07-01

340

Emotion and the motivational brain  

PubMed Central

Psychophysiological and neuroscience studies of emotional processing undertaken by investigators at the University of Florida Laboratory of the Center for the Study of Emotion and Attention (CSEA) are reviewed, with a focus on reflex reactions, neural structures and functional circuits that mediate emotional expression. The theoretical view shared among the investigators is that expressed emotions are founded on motivational circuits in the brain that developed early in evolutionary history to ensure the survival of individuals and their progeny. These circuits react to appetitive and aversive environmental and memorial cues, mediating appetitive and defensive reflexes that tune sensory systems and mobilize the organism for action and underly negative and positive affects. The research reviewed here assesses the reflex physiology of emotion, both autonomic and somatic, studying affects evoked in picture perception, memory imagery, and in the context of tangible reward and punishment, and using the electroencephalograph (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), explores the brain’s motivational circuits that determine human emotion. PMID:19879918

Lang, Peter J.; Bradley, Margaret M.

2013-01-01

341

[Emotional impact of facial palsy].  

PubMed

Facial palsy is not only a movement disorder but leads also to an emotional and communicative disorder in chronic stage but also in some patients already during the acute phase of the disease. The present review describes the current knowledge of the neurobiological and psychological fundamentals on the relation of facial movement and its emotional context. So far there is not much knowledge on the impact of a facial palsy on the interaction between facial movement, emotional processing and communicative skills of the patient. The emotional contagion seems to be reduced in patients with facial palsy. The ability to express emotions seems also to be reduced. Moreover, the patients feel to be perceived negatively. In fact, most of the expressions of patients with facial palsy are allocated with a negative affect even when the patients are smiling. Patients with facial palsy react with negative stress, anxiety and depression. The patients avoid social contacts. In turn, this reinforces the communicative disorder. The otorhinolaryngologist can use the Facial Disability Index as a simple questionnaire to detect such dysfunctions. Diagnostics that are necessary to develop a therapy program are presented in this review. Standardized therapy concepts that are not only treat the movement disorder but also the emotional context is missing so far. Finally, the review will give an outlook on potential therapy strategies. PMID:23065673

Dobel, C; Miltner, W H R; Witte, O W; Volk, G F; Guntinas-Lichius, O

2013-01-01

342

EMCORE - Emotional Cooperative Groupware  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last years considerable effort has been spent to develop groupware applications. Despite this, no general consenus has been met by groupware applications in computer field. Interdisciplinary approach could prove very useful to overcome these difficulties. A workgroup is not simply a set of people gathered together, working for a common goal. It can also be thought as a strong, hard mental reality. Actually, sociological and psychological definitions of group differ considerably. At sociological level a group is generally described in the view of the activities and events occurring inside the group itself. On the other hand, the psychological group approach considers not only the actions occurring inside the group, but also all the mental activities originated by belonging to the group, be they emotional or rational nature. Since early '60 simple work group (i.e. discussion group) has been analyzed in his psychological behavior. EMCORE is a prototype which aims to support computer science methods with psychological approach. The tool has been developed for a discussion group supported by heterogeneous distributed systems and has been implemented according to the CORBA abstraction augmented by the machine independent JAVA language. The tool allows all the common activities of a discussion group: discussion by voice or by chatting board if multimedia device are not present; discussion and elaboration of a shared document by text and/or graphic editor. At the same time, tools are provided for the psychoanalytic approach, according to a specific methodology.

Fasoli, N.; Messina, A.

343

The influence of prior expectations on emotional face perception in adolescence.  

PubMed

Prior expectations influence the way incoming stimuli are processed. A standard, validated way of manipulating prior expectations is to bias participants to perceive a stimulus by instructing them to look out for this type of stimulus. Here, we investigated the influence of prior expectations on the processing of incoming stimuli (emotional faces) in adolescence. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we assessed activity and functional connectivity in 13 adolescents and 13 healthy adults (matched for gender and intelligence quotient), while they were presented with sequences of emotional faces (happy, fearful, or angry). A specific instruction at the start of each sequence instructed the participants to look out for fearful or angry faces in the subsequent sequence. Both groups responded more accurately and with shorter reaction times (RTs) to faces that were congruent with the instruction. For anger, this bias was lower in the adolescents (for RTs), and adults demonstrated greater activation than adolescents in the ventro-medial prefrontal cortex (vMPFC) and greater functional connectivity between the vMPFC and the thalamus when the face was congruent with the instruction. Our results demonstrate that the influence of prior expectations (in the form of an instruction) on the subsequent processing of face stimuli is still developing in the adolescent brain. PMID:22661411

Barbalat, Guillaume; Bazargani, Narges; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

2013-07-01

344

Do You Know How I Feel? Evaluating Emotional Display of Primary and Secondary Emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we report on an empirical study on how well different facial expressions of primary and secondary emotions [2]\\u000a can be recognized from the face of our emotional virtual human Max [1]. Primary emotions like happiness are more primitive,\\u000a onto-genetically earlier types of emotions, which are expressed by direct mapping on basic emotion display; secondary emotions\\u000a like relief

Julia Tolksdorf; Christian Werner Becker-asano; Stefan Kopp

2008-01-01

345

Living Emotions, Avoiding Emotions: Behavioral Investigation of the Regulation of Socially Driven Emotions  

PubMed Central

Emotion regulation is important for psychological well-being. Although it is known that alternative regulation strategies may have different emotional consequences, the effectiveness of such strategies for socially driven emotions remains unclear. In this study we investigated the efficacy of different forms of reappraisal on responses to the selfish and altruistic behavior of others in the Dictator Game. In Experiment 1, subjects mentalized the intentions of the other player in one condition, and took distance from the situation in the other. Emotion ratings were recorded after each offer. Compared with a baseline condition, mentalizing led subjects to experience their emotions more positively when receiving both selfish and altruistic proposals, whereas distancing decreased the valence when receiving altruistic offers, but did not affect the perception of selfish behavior. In Experiment 2, subjects played with both computer and human partners while reappraising the meaning of the player’s intentions (with a human partner) or the meaning of the situation (with a computer partner). Results showed that both contexts were effectively modulated by reappraisal, however a stronger effect was observed when the donor was a human partner, as compared to a computer partner. Taken together, these results demonstrate that socially driven emotions can be successfully modulated by reappraisal strategies that focus on the reinterpretation of others’ intentions. PMID:23349645

Grecucci, Alessandro; Giorgetta, Cinzia; Bonini, Nicolao; Sanfey, Alan G.

2013-01-01

346

AN EVALUATION OF METHODS FOR CALCULATING MEAN SEDIMENT QUALITY GUIDELINE QUOTIENTS AS INDICATORS OF CONTAMINATION AND ACUTE TOXICITY TO AMPHIPODS BY CHEMICAL MIXTURES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract—Mean sediment,quality guideline quotients (mean SQGQs) were developed,to represent the presence of chemical,mixtures in sediments,and are derived by normalizing,a suite of chemicals,to their respective numerical,sediment,quality guidelines (SQGs). Mean SQGQs incorporate the number,of SQGs exceeded,and the degree to which,they are exceeded,and are used for comparison with observed biological effects in the laboratory or field. The current research makes it clear, however,

Russell Fairey; Edward R. Long; Cassandra A. Roberts; Brian S. Anderson; Bryn M. Phillips; John W. Hunt; Howard R. Puckett; Craig J. Wilson

2001-01-01

347

An emotion-differentiated perspective on empathy with the emotion specific empathy questionnaire  

PubMed Central

Empathy refers to the thoughts and feelings of one individual in response to the observed (emotional) experiences of another individual. Empathy, however, can occur toward persons experiencing a variety of emotions, raising the question of whether or not empathy can be emotion specific. This paper discusses theoretical and empirical support for the emotion specificity of empathy. We present a new measure, the Emotion Specific Empathy questionnaire, which assesses affective and cognitive empathy for the six basic emotions. This paper presents the measure's psychometric qualities and demonstrates, through a series of models, the discriminant validity between emotion specific empathies suggesting empathy is emotion specific. Results and implications are discussed. PMID:25071632

Olderbak, Sally; Sassenrath, Claudia; Keller, Johannes; Wilhelm, Oliver

2014-01-01

348

Mixed emotional appeals in emotional and danger control processes.  

PubMed

Negative emotional appeals do not always help to reduce risk behaviors. We report two studies about a new strategy based on the presentation of appeals with mixed sequential emotions (e.g., sadness/fear-joy/relief). Study 1 shows that a mixed message generates lower post-message discomfort than an exclusively negative message; moreover, in this first study, reported probability of performing the risk behavior, binge drinking, in the future is also lower in the mixed condition. Study 2 replicates these results and relates them to the extended parallel process model (EPPM) (Witte, 1992). Here, the mixed emotional message again generates lower post-message discomfort than the negative one, and participants are motivated to control the danger (response efficacy is evaluated more positively in the mixed condition). PMID:21153989

Carrera, Pilar; Muñoz, Dolores; Caballero, Amparo

2010-12-01

349

Musical emotions: Functions, origins, evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Theories of music origins and the role of musical emotions in the mind are reviewed. Most existing theories contradict each other, and cannot explain mechanisms or roles of musical emotions in workings of the mind, nor evolutionary reasons for music origins. Music seems to be an enigma. Nevertheless, a synthesis of cognitive science and mathematical models of the mind has been proposed describing a fundamental role of music in the functioning and evolution of the mind, consciousness, and cultures. The review considers ancient theories of music as well as contemporary theories advanced by leading authors in this field. It addresses one hypothesis that promises to unify the field and proposes a theory of musical origin based on a fundamental role of music in cognition and evolution of consciousness and culture. We consider a split in the vocalizations of proto-humans into two types: one less emotional and more concretely-semantic, evolving into language, and the other preserving emotional connections along with semantic ambiguity, evolving into music. The proposed hypothesis departs from other theories in considering specific mechanisms of the mind-brain, which required the evolution of music parallel with the evolution of cultures and languages. Arguments are reviewed that the evolution of language toward becoming the semantically powerful tool of today required emancipation from emotional encumbrances. The opposite, no less powerful mechanisms required a compensatory evolution of music toward more differentiated and refined emotionality. The need for refined music in the process of cultural evolution is grounded in fundamental mechanisms of the mind. This is why today's human mind and cultures cannot exist without today's music. The reviewed hypothesis gives a basis for future analysis of why different evolutionary paths of languages were paralleled by different evolutionary paths of music. Approaches toward experimental verification of this hypothesis in psychological and neuroimaging research are reviewed.

Perlovsky, Leonid

2010-03-01

350

Musical emotions: functions, origins, evolution.  

PubMed

Theories of music origins and the role of musical emotions in the mind are reviewed. Most existing theories contradict each other, and cannot explain mechanisms or roles of musical emotions in workings of the mind, nor evolutionary reasons for music origins. Music seems to be an enigma. Nevertheless, a synthesis of cognitive science and mathematical models of the mind has been proposed describing a fundamental role of music in the functioning and evolution of the mind, consciousness, and cultures. The review considers ancient theories of music as well as contemporary theories advanced by leading authors in this field. It addresses one hypothesis that promises to unify the field and proposes a theory of musical origin based on a fundamental role of music in cognition and evolution of consciousness and culture. We consider a split in the vocalizations of proto-humans into two types: one less emotional and more concretely-semantic, evolving into language, and the other preserving emotional connections along with semantic ambiguity, evolving into music. The proposed hypothesis departs from other theories in considering specific mechanisms of the mind-brain, which required the evolution of music parallel with the evolution of cultures and languages. Arguments are reviewed that the evolution of language toward becoming the semantically powerful tool of today required emancipation from emotional encumbrances. The opposite, no less powerful mechanisms required a compensatory evolution of music toward more differentiated and refined emotionality. The need for refined music in the process of cultural evolution is grounded in fundamental mechanisms of the mind. This is why today's human mind and cultures cannot exist without today's music. The reviewed hypothesis gives a basis for future analysis of why different evolutionary paths of languages were paralleled by different evolutionary paths of music. Approaches toward experimental verification of this hypothesis in psychological and neuroimaging research are reviewed. PMID:20374916

Perlovsky, Leonid

2010-03-01

351

Principles of Emotional Development and Children's Pretend Play.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the links between emotional development and pretend play in young children using basic foundations of psychoanalytic and learning theories. Explains emotional development and pretend play through interactive levels of expression, control and modeling of emotion, and emotional intelligence. (JPB)

Kwon, Jeong Yoon; Yawkey, Thomas D.

2000-01-01

352

Cognitive Emotion Regulation 1 Thinking makes it so  

E-print Network

in emotion and emotion regulation, the development of emotion regulation skills, and psychopathology. #12 that resonates throughout the history of Western culture. According to the Hebrew Bible, our emotion regulatory

Ochsner, Kevin

353

DESCRIBING THE EMOTIONAL STATES EXPRESSED IN SPEECH Roddy Cowie  

E-print Network

DESCRIBING THE EMOTIONAL STATES EXPRESSED IN SPEECH Roddy Cowie Psychology, Queen's University that somebody's voice is tinged with emotion. Research on emotion in psychology and biology has tended, Belfast ABSTRACT Describing relationships between speech and emotion depends on identifying appropriate

Hirschberg, Julia

354

Cultural and Temperamental Variation in Emotional Response Jeanne L. Tsai  

E-print Network

events. Given the fundamental role that emotion plays in psychological and social functioningCultural and Temperamental Variation in Emotional Response Jeanne L. Tsai Stanford University influence of cultural and temperamental factors on emotional response, we compared the emotional behavior

Levenson, Robert W.

355

The pragmatics of emotion language  

E-print Network

- versity of Virginia, Gilmer Hall 102, Charlottesville, VA 22904. E-mail: schnall@virginia.edu References Abu-Lughod, L., & Lutz, C. A. (1990). Introduction: Emotion, dis- course, and the politics of everyday life. In C. A. Lutz & L. Abu-Lughod (Eds... . The main difference between those two emotions lies in whether the existence of the shortcom- ing is real or not. Regardless, however, as long as both speaker and audience share, to use Sperber and Wil- son’s (1995) terms, the same cognitive environment...

Schnall, Simone

2005-01-01

356

Common Emotional Problems of Adolescence  

PubMed Central

Common emotional problems of adolescence are discussed under three headings: those specific to adolescence; common psychiatric problems of adolescence, and those complicating physical illness in adolescence. Adolescence is a phase of emotional sensitivity and self-centeredness. The whole family is affected and may require professional support. As the adolescent moves towards greater independence, some turbulence and acting out is normal. Some make an impulsive break from their family by running away, others gradually gain their independence and some remain overly dependent. The latter group often become dependent on and demanding of their physician. PMID:20469172

Froese, A. P.

1975-01-01

357

The Role of Emotion in Parent-Child Relationships: Children's Emotionality, Maternal Meta-Emotion, and Children's Attachment Security  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was intended to examine the relationship among children's emotionality, parental meta-emotion, and parent-child attachment. The sample consisted of 546 5th and 6th grade children and their mothers. The test instruments used in this study were the Emotionality subscale of the EAS Temperament Survey (mothers' ratings only), the Parental…

Chen, Fu Mei; Lin, Hsiao Shih; Li, Chun Hao

2012-01-01

358

Influence of children's emotional states on the recognition of emotion in peers and social motives to change another's emotional state  

Microsoft Academic Search

This experiment addressed the question of whether children's own emotional states influence their accuracy in recognizing emotional states in peers and any motives they may have to intervene in order to change their peers' emotional states. Happiness, sadness, anger, or a neutral state were induced in preschool children, who then viewed slides of other 4-year-old children who were actually experiencing

Charles R. Carlson; Elyse Schwartz Felleman; John C. Masters

1983-01-01

359

Mothers' Acculturation and Beliefs about Emotions, Mother-Child Emotion Discourse, and Children's Emotion Understanding in Latino Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: We examined associations among Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, maternal beliefs, mother-child emotion talk, and emotion understanding in 40 Latino preschool-age children and their mothers. Mothers self-reported Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, and beliefs about the value/danger of children's emotions and…

Perez Rivera, Marie Belle; Dunsmore, Julie C.

2011-01-01

360

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE & PEAK PERFORMANCE Intended for  

E-print Network

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE & PEAK PERFORMANCE Intended for: Managers who want to increase intelligence in leading employees to optimal performance. Course Description: Current research in organizations intelligence. Emotional intelligence can be learned and improved over time, as opposed to traditional

Gleeson, Joseph G.

361

The empirical themes of five maternal emotions  

E-print Network

hypotheses proposed by Lazarus (1991) concerning the expected themes of emotional events. Mothers were asked to produce narratives about actual emotional events that they had experienced, and then to rate each event across cognitive dimensions. Comparisons...

Krause, Matthew David

2012-06-07

362

Mental Health: Keeping Your Emotional Health  

MedlinePLUS

... emotional health can sometimes have emotional problems or mental illness. Mental illness often has a physical cause, such as a ... with family, work or school can sometimes trigger mental illness or make it worse. However, people who are ...

363

Beyond Describing Affect: Reconceptualizing Emotions in Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several research that examine emotions as a way to diagnose and treat pediatric depression are discussed. The growing research into this field may one day elevate emotion to be included in the standard diagnostic and clinical interview.

Horner, Michelle S.

2009-01-01

364

Fundamentals of Mathematical Theory of Emotional Robots  

E-print Network

In this book we introduce a mathematically formalized concept of emotion, robot's education and other psychological parameters of intelligent robots. We also introduce unitless coefficients characterizing an emotional memory of a robot. Besides, the effect of a robot's memory upon its emotional behavior is studied, and theorems defining fellowship and conflicts in groups of robots are proved. Also unitless parameters describing emotional states of those groups are introduced, and a rule of making alternative (binary) decisions based on emotional selection is given. We introduce a concept of equivalent educational process for robots and a concept of efficiency coefficient of an educational process, and suggest an algorithm of emotional contacts within a group of robots. And generally, we present and describe a model of a virtual reality with emotional robots. The book is meant for mathematical modeling specialists and emotional robot software developers.

Pensky, Oleg

2010-01-01

365

Culture and the Emotion Socialization of Preschoolers.  

E-print Network

??Objective:The present study examined mothers’ emotion socialization of 3-year–old children with behavior problems, to determine whether emotion socialization practices, as well as the relation between… (more)

Lugo-Candelas, Claudia I

2012-01-01

366

Are emotional intelligent workers also more empathic?  

PubMed

This paper analyzes whether emotional intelligence and self-monitoring are related to empathy among a sample of workers in both the public and private employment sectors. Two hundred and forty-two employees (42.5% men and 57.5% women) with a mean age of 35.21 years (SD = 10.07, range 18-61) completed a questionnaire that measured the variables of interest. The results showed that emotion regulation, a dimension of emotional intelligence, accounts for most of the variance of empathy, followed by the ability to understand emotions and the management of others' emotions. Furthermore, gender did not yield any moderator effect on the relations among emotional intelligence, self-monitoring and empathy. We conclude that the intrapersonal aspects of emotional intelligence, in particular, emotion regulation, help explain the empathy of workers. The implications of these findings are discussed herein. PMID:23786638

Martos, Maria Pilar Berrios; Lopez-Zafra, Esther; Pulido-Martos, Manuel; Augusto, José María

2013-10-01

367

Emotional intelligence, emotional labor, and job satisfaction among physicians in Greece  

PubMed Central

Background There is increasing evidence that psychological constructs, such as emotional intelligence and emotional labor, play an important role in various organizational outcomes in service sector. Recently, in the “emotionally charged” healthcare field, emotional intelligence and emotional labor have both emerged as research tools, rather than just as theoretical concepts, influencing various organizational parameters including job satisfaction. The present study aimed at investigating the relationships, direct and/or indirect, between emotional intelligence, the surface acting component of emotional labor, and job satisfaction in medical staff working in tertiary healthcare. Methods Data were collected from 130 physicians in Greece, who completed a series of self-report questionnaires including: a) the Wong Law Emotional Intelligence Scale, which assessed the four dimensions of emotional intelligence, i.e. Self-Emotion Appraisal, Others’ Emotion Appraisal, Use of Emotion, and Regulation of Emotion, b) the General Index of Job Satisfaction, and c) the Dutch Questionnaire on Emotional Labor (surface acting component). Results Emotional intelligence (Use of Emotion dimension) was significantly and positively correlated with job satisfaction (r=.42, p<.001), whereas a significant negative correlation between surface acting and job satisfaction was observed (r=?.39, p<.001). Furthermore, Self-Emotion Appraisal was negatively correlated with surface acting (r=?.20, p<.01). Self-Emotion Appraisal was found to influence job satisfaction both directly and indirectly through surface acting, while this indirect effect was moderated by gender. Apart from its mediating role, surface acting was also a moderator of the emotional intelligence-job satisfaction relationship. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that surface acting could predict job satisfaction over and above emotional intelligence dimensions. Conclusions The results of the present study may contribute to the better understanding of emotion-related parameters that affect the work process with a view to increasing the quality of service in the health sector. PMID:23244390

2012-01-01

368

The Quest to Control Emotion(s): A Critical Integral Fearanalysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although emotion(s) have been of long interest to humans, they have particularly captivated the attention of many people and scholarly disciplines in the last 20 years. This paper critiques mainstream psychology of emotions and in particular, what Daniel Goleman has labeled the "collective emotional crisis" of our times and its relationship with…

Fisher, R. Michael

2009-01-01

369

Bottom-up and top-down emotion generation: implications for emotion regulation  

PubMed Central

Emotion regulation plays a crucial role in adaptive functioning and mounting evidence suggests that some emotion regulation strategies are often more effective than others. However, little attention has been paid to the different ways emotions can be generated: from the ‘bottom-up’ (in response to inherently emotional perceptual properties of the stimulus) or ‘top-down’ (in response to cognitive evaluations). Based on a process priming principle, we hypothesized that mode of emotion generation would interact with subsequent emotion regulation. Specifically, we predicted that top-down emotions would be more successfully regulated by a top-down regulation strategy than bottom-up emotions. To test this hypothesis, we induced bottom-up and top-down emotions, and asked participants to decrease the negative impact of these emotions using cognitive reappraisal. We observed the predicted interaction between generation and regulation in two measures of emotional responding. As measured by self-reported affect, cognitive reappraisal was more successful on top-down generated emotions than bottom-up generated emotions. Neurally, reappraisal of bottom-up generated emotions resulted in a paradoxical increase of amygdala activity. This interaction between mode of emotion generation and subsequent regulation should be taken into account when comparing of the efficacy of different types of emotion regulation, as well as when reappraisal is used to treat different types of clinical disorders. PMID:21296865

Misra, Supriya; Prasad, Aditya K.; Pereira, Sean C.; Gross, James J.

2012-01-01

370

Memory for emotional and neutral information: Gender and individual differences in emotional sensitivity  

E-print Network

Memory for emotional and neutral information: Gender and individual differences in emotional. A measure of emotional sensitivity mediated the gender difference in emotional recall suggesting that memory in the relation between gender and memory. A number of studies demonstrate that men and women's memories

Johnson, Marcia K.

371

Emotion as a Thermostat: Representing Emotion Regulation Using a Damped Oscillator Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors present in this study a damped oscillator model that provides a direct mathematical basis for testing the notion of emotion as a self-regulatory thermostat. Parameters from this model reflect individual differences in emotional lability and the ability to regulate emotion. The authors discuss concepts such as intensity, rate of change, and acceleration in the context of emotion, and

Sy-Miin Chow; Nilam Ram; Steven M. Boker; Frank Fujita; Gerald Clore

2005-01-01

372

Emotional responding in depression: Distinctions in the time course of emotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current studies were designed to investigate if the emotion context insensitivity hypothesis (ECI; Rottenberg & Gotlib, 2004) is applicable across the time course of emotion. Recent affective science research has pointed to the importance of considering anticipation and maintenance of emotion. In the current studies, we assessed emotion responses among college students with depression symptoms in anticipation of, during,

Erin K. Moran; Neera Mehta; Ann M. Kring

2012-01-01

373

The Development of Emotion-Processing in Children: Effects of Age, Emotion, and Intensity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: This study examined the effects of age and two novel factors (intensity and emotion category) on healthy children's developing emotion-processing from 4 to 15 years using two matching paradigms. Methods: An explicit emotion-matching task was employed in which children matched the emotion of a target individual, and an implicit task…

Herba, Catherine M.; Landau, Sabine; Russell, Tamara; Ecker, Christine; Phillips, Mary L.

2006-01-01

374

A Developmental Sequence in the Comprehension of Emotions: Multiple Emotions, Intensity, and Valence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined whether varying intensity of emotions can be employed in conjunction with multiple emotion responses and valence of emotion to describe a scalable developmental sequence for young children. Eighty children between the ages of 4 and 8 years were interviewed individually. A version of the Emotions Situations Questionnaire was…

Wintre, Maxine Gallander; Vallance, Denise D.

375

The relation of young children's vicarious emotional responding to social competence, regulation, and emotionality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relation of preschool and kindergarten children's vicarious emotional responding to their social competence, regulation (attentional and coping styles), and emotionality (negative emotional intensity and dispositional negative affect) was examined. Vicarious responding was assessed by means of facial reactions to a film about a peer in a social conflict and children's reported negative affect to viewing peers' real-life negative emotion.

Nancy Eisenberg; Richard A. Fabes

1995-01-01

376

Emotional Flooding--Using Empathy to Help Babies Manage Strong Emotions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Often a young child's challenging behavior results from emotional flooding--being overwhelmed by one's emotions. The authors explain that in children, the "thinking brain," the cerebral cortex, is not fully developed, and children get emotionally overwhelmed more easily than adults because they process their experiences through the "emotional

Gillespie, Linda; Hunter, Amy

2008-01-01

377

Emotional Intelligence and Emotion Work: Examining Constructs from an Interdisciplinary Framework  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emotional intelligence and emotion work are two research areas traditionally presented as distinct. This article reviews their definitions, examines their intersections, and illustrates the advantage of approaching emotion research from an interdisciplinary framework. Conclusions address the following: (a) An employee's emotional intelligence or…

Opengart, Rose

2005-01-01

378

Exploring the Relationships between Trait Emotional Intelligence and Objective Socio-Emotional Outcomes in Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Trait emotional intelligence ("trait EI" or "trait emotional self-efficacy") is a constellation of emotion-related self-perceptions and dispositions located at the lower levels of personality hierarchies. This paper examines the validity of this construct, as operationalized by the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Child Form…

Mavroveli, Stella; Petrides, K. V.; Sangareau, Yolanda; Furnham, Adrian

2009-01-01

379

The effect of emotional context on facial emotion ratings in schizophrenia Yu Sun Chung a,  

E-print Network

The effect of emotional context on facial emotion ratings in schizophrenia Yu Sun Chung a, , Deanna Schizophrenia Face recognition Individuals with schizophrenia show deficits both in facial emotion recognition­1644). Thus, individuals with schizophrenia may have deficits in facial emotion processing, at least in part

380

Emotional complexity and emotional well-being in older adults: Risks of high neuroticism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Older and midlife adults tend to report greater emotional complexity and greater emotional well-being than younger adults but there is variability in these factors across the lifespan. This study determined how the personality trait of neuroticism at baseline predicts emotional complexity and emotional well-being 10 years later; a goal was to determine if neuroticism is a stronger predictor of these

Rebecca E. Ready; Anna M. Åkerstedt; Daniel K. Mroczek

2012-01-01

381

Emotional complexity and emotional well-being in older adults: Risks of high neuroticism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Older and midlife adults tend to report greater emotional complexity and greater emotional well-being than younger adults but there is variability in these factors across the lifespan. This study determined how the personality trait of neuroticism at baseline predicts emotional complexity and emotional well-being 10 years later; a goal was to determine if neuroticism is a stronger predictor of these

Rebecca E. Ready; Anna M. Åkerstedt; Daniel K. Mroczek

2011-01-01

382

Emotion Dysregulation Mediates the Link between Childhood Emotional Maltreatment and Young Adult Romantic Relationship Satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the mediating role of emotion dysregulation in the relation between retrospective reports of childhood emotional maltreatment and current satisfaction in a romantic relationship. Participants included 492 (135 male, 357 female) young adults in current romantic relationships. Results indicated that total emotion regulation difficulties mediated the relation between childhood emotional maltreatment and romantic relationship satisfaction. Multiple mediator analyses

Laura L. Bradbury; Anne Shaffer

2012-01-01

383

Family Expressiveness and Parental Emotion Coaching: Their Role in Children's Emotion Regulation and Aggression  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we explored the relations between positive and negative family expressiveness, parental emotion coaching, child emotion regulation, and child aggression. The sample included 120 fourth-grade children and their mothers. Mothers completed the Emotion Regulation Checklist, the Family Expressiveness Questionnaire, and a portion of the meta-emotion interview to assess their awareness and acceptance of, and instruction in managing their

Sally R. Ramsden; Julie A. Hubbard

2002-01-01

384

The automatic access of emotion: Emotional Stroop effects in Spanish–English bilingual speakers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emotional Stroop task provides an experimental measure of selective attention to emotional information. In the current study, the emotional Stroop effect was examined in a Spanish–English bilingual speaking population. The results revealed that the emotional Stroop effect is a robust phenomenon and replicable within a bilingual population. Furthermore, highly proficient bilinguals demonstrated equal interference effects in both their first

Tina M. Sutton; Jeanette Altarriba; Jennifer L. Gianico; Dana M. Basnight-Brown

2007-01-01

385

Creating Emotional Resonance: Interpersonal Emotion Work and Motivational Framing in a Transgender Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we examine how interpersonal emotion work in a transgender support group and motiva- tional framing of transgender social movement organizations together constructed favorable conditions for emo- tional resonance. We define emotional resonance as the emotional harmony and\\/or disjuncture between collective action frames and the emotional lives of potential recruits. Data derive from fieldwork, interviews, online e-mail lists

DOUGLAS SCHROCK; DAPHNE HOLDEN; LORI REID

2004-01-01

386

Relations among Teachers' Emotion Socialization Beliefs and Practices and Preschoolers' Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Findings: Utilizing a 3-part model of emotion socialization that included modeling, contingent responding, and teaching, this study examined the associations between 44 teachers' self-reported and observed emotion socialization practices and 326 preschoolers' emotion knowledge and observed emotional behavior. Multilevel analyses…

Morris, Carol A. S.; Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.; Curby, Timothy W.

2013-01-01

387

Face to face with emotion: Holistic face processing is modulated by emotional state  

Microsoft Academic Search

Negative emotions are linked with a local, rather than global, visual processing style, which may preferentially facilitate feature-based, relative to holistic, processing mechanisms. Because faces are typically processed holistically, and because social contexts are prime elicitors of emotions, we examined whether negative emotions decrease holistic processing of faces. We induced positive, negative, or neutral emotions via film clips and measured

Kim M. Curby; Kareem J. Johnson; Alyssa Tyson

2012-01-01

388

Face to face with emotion: Holistic face processing is modulated by emotional state  

Microsoft Academic Search

Negative emotions are linked with a local, rather than global, visual processing style, which may preferentially facilitate feature-based, relative to holistic, processing mechanisms. Because faces are typically processed holistically, and because social contexts are prime elicitors of emotions, we examined whether negative emotions decrease holistic processing of faces. We induced positive, negative, or neutral emotions via film clips and measured

Kim M. Curby; Kareem J. Johnson; Alyssa Tyson

2011-01-01

389

The effects of emotional responsiveness in marriage  

E-print Network

be as dysfunctional for the relationship as those relationships low in ezmtional linkage. The second hypothesis involved an asyzmetry in emotional responsiveness: those couples in which one spouse is nnre responsive than the other spouse will display more... of enmeshment and disengagement, and Krokoff's concept of emotional linkage, the hypothesis that interactions characterized by either high emotional linkage or low emotional linkage will display more negativity than those characterized by a nnderate degree...

Hass, Sally Duffin

2012-06-07

390

Emotion and Cognition Processes in Preschool Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The core processes of emotion understanding, emotion control, cognitive understanding, and cognitive control and their association with early indicators of social and academic success were examined in a sample of 141 3-year-old children. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the hypothesized four-factor model of emotion and cognition in early childhood. A subsequent structural model indicated that emotion understanding processes were significantly positively

Esther M. Leerkes; Matthew John. Paradise; Marion OBrien; Susan D. Calkins; Garrett. Lange

2008-01-01

391

Affective Computing Model Based on Emotional Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to the basic emotions theory, the paper presents personality,mood, and emotion space. The mapping relationship among\\u000a personality , mood and emotion is built. The equations for updating the affective and mood states are induced and a generic\\u000a computing model for personality ,mood and emotion simulation for virtual human is constructed. The simulation results demonstrate\\u000a that the affective model can

Yang Guoliang; Wang Zhiliang; Wang Guojiang; Chen Fengjun

2006-01-01

392

Emotion-Focused Therapy: A Synopsis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The basic principles of an emotion-focused approach to therapy (EFT) are presented. In this view, emotion is seen as foundational in the construction of the self and is a key determinant of self-organization. As well as simply having emotion, people also live in a constant process of making sense of their emotions. Personal meaning emerges by the self-organization and explication

Leslie Greenberg

2006-01-01

393

The influence of cognitive control over emotional re-sponses has been labeled emotion regulation and has been  

E-print Network

The influence of cognitive control over emotional re- sponses has been labeled emotion regulation, and modifying emotional reactions, especially their intensity and temporal features" (Thompson, 1994). Understanding emotion regulation is especially important insofar as the inability to success- fully regulate

Nieuwenhuis, Sander

394

Emotional reactions to learning in cattle  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been suggested that during instrumental learning, animals are likely to react emotionally to the reinforcer. They may in addition react emotionally to their own achievements. These reactions are of interest with regard to the animals’ capacity for self-awareness. Therefore, we devised a yoked control experiment involving the acquisition of an operant task. We aimed to identify the emotional

Kristin Hagen; Donald M Broom

2004-01-01

395

GROUPED'ANALYSEETDETHORIECONOMIQUELYONSTTIENNE Emotions,SanctionsandCooperation  

E-print Network

the availability of costly punishment increases surplus through its strong positive effect on cooperation (Gaechter-reports of hedonic valence to study the emotional basis of cooperation and punishment in a social dilemma. Emotional cooperators relieve negative emotions when they punish free riders. In response, the free-riders experience

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

396

Extended Speech Emotion Recognition and Prediction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Humans are considered to reason and act rationally and that is believed to be their fundamental factor that differentiates them from the rest of living entities. Furthermore, modern approaches in the science of psychology underlying that human except of thinking creatures are also sentimental and emotional organisms. There are fifteen universal extended emotions plus neutral emotion, that is: hot anger,

Christos Skourlas

2014-01-01

397

Bimodal Emotion Recognition from Speech and Text  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an approach to emotion recognition from speech signals and textual content. In the analysis of speech signals, thirty-seven acoustic features are extracted from the speech input. Two different classifiers Support Vector Machines (SVMs) and BP neural network are adopted to classify the emotional states. In text analysis, we use the two-step classification method to recognize the emotional

Weilin Ye; Xinghua Fan

2014-01-01

398

Teachers' Emotion Regulation and Classroom Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a series of studies on teachers' attempts to modify the intensity and duration of their emotions, and how their emotions are expressed in the classroom. Among the important findings is that teachers practice emotion regulation because they believe it makes them more effective in management, discipline, and their…

Sutton, Rosemary E.; Mudrey-Camino, Renee; Knight, Catharine C.

2009-01-01

399

Social and Emotional Education in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students' social and emotional development is vital in today's education, especially in light of changing family structures. This paper examines implications of recent cultural changes which have resulted in positive and negative changes in students' social and emotional needs, then describes and presents approaches to social and emotional

Burke, Robert W.

2002-01-01

400

Dynamical Systems Approaches to Emotional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Within the last 20 years, transitions in the conceptualization of emotion and its development have given rise to calls for an explanatory framework that captures emotional development in all its organizational complexity and variability. Recent attempts have been made to couch emotional development in terms of a dynamical systems approach through…

Camras, Linda A.; Witherington, David C.

2005-01-01

401

Emotional Awareness and Couples' Relationship Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the role of emotional awareness in couples' relationships and the effects of a tendency to respond to difficult couples' situations with "soft" emotions (including sadness and fear) versus "hard" emotions (including anger and resentment). Participants were 56 heterosexual couples who completed a measure of relationship…

Croyle, Kristin L.; Waltz, Jennifer

2002-01-01

402

The Role of Emotion in Word Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The way in which emotion interacts with cognition has been of great interest to researchers for hundreds of years. Emotion has been shown to play an important role in attention, learning and memory. However, the way in which emotion influences the basic process of word learning in infancy has largely been ignored. In the current paper, the…

Doan, S. N.

2010-01-01

403

"Red Eyes": Engaging Emotions in Multicultural Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Engaging emotions in multicultural education is an important but a relatively neglected issue in teacher education. This essay calls for pedagogical attention to the role of emotions and attempts to analyze how teaching autobiographies and films sheds light on the emotional dynamics of multicultural education. Two films, "The Color of Fear", and…

Wang, Hongyu

2008-01-01

404

Behavior generation in robots by emotional motivation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotions are necessary in robotic system to get some extra benefits especially in intelligence and autonomy with the motivational mechanism for behavior generation. A robot needs to be intelligent enough to adjust with dynamic and flexible environment. Benefits can be amplified if emotional intelligence can be incorporated with the available control methods. We describe an emotion model to be used

Kiyoaka Izumi; Sajal Chandra Banik; Keigo Watanabe

2009-01-01

405

Emotion Regulation in Children with Down Syndrome.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study presents a preliminary exploration of emotion regulation in a sample of 20 children (ages 3-18 years) with Down Syndrome. Three aspects of emotion regulation (modulation, organization, flexibility) were predicted from emotion variables (affect intensity, affective expression, and autonomy-curiosity and motivation) in backward regression…

Smith, Maureen C.; Walden, Tedra A.

406

Emotion Comprehension: The Impact of Nonverbal Intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

A substantial body of research has established that emotion understanding develops throughout early childhood and has identified three hierarchical developmental phases: external, mental, and reflexive. The authors analyzed nonverbal intelligence and its effect on children's improvement of emotion understanding and hypothesized that cognitive level is a consistent predictor of emotion comprehension. In all, 366 children (182 girls, 184 boys) between the

Ottavia Albanese; Simona De Stasio; Carlo Di Chiacchio; Caterina Fiorilli; Francisco Pons

2010-01-01

407

Do Readers Mentally Represent Characters' Emotional States?  

PubMed Central

Subjects read stories that described concrete actions, such as a main character stealing money from a store where his best friend worked and later learning that his friend had been fired. Following each story, subjects read a target sentence that contained an emotion word that either matched the emotional state implied by the story (e.g. guilt) or mismatched that emotional state. In Experiment 1, target sentences were read more slowly when the mismatched emotion words were the perceived opposites of the emotional states implied by the stories (e.g. pride). In Experiment 2, target sentences were read more slowly when the mismatched emotion words shared the affective valence of the implied emotional state; therefore, readers must represent more than simply the affective valence of the emotional states. Instead of reading target sentences that contained matching versus mismatching emotion words, subjects in Experiment 3 simply pronounced matching versus mismatching emotion words. Mismatching emotion words were pronounced more slowly. These experiments suggest that readers form explicit, lifelike, mental representations of fictional characters’ emotional states, and readers form these representations as a normal part of reading comprehension.

Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Goldsmith, H. Hill; Robertson, Rachel R.W.

2014-01-01

408

Expressions of Emotion as Mediated by Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In her thoughtful work regarding various aspects of emotion and emotion related words, Pavlenko explores a variety of perspectives on how we might characterize and conceptualize expressions of emotion. It is a work that is quite rich in breadth--one that leads to a variety of different thoughts on this topic, many of which are amenable to…

Altarriba, Jeanette

2008-01-01

409

"Keeping It Real" with an Emotional Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students' emotions can significantly enhance or distract from learning. This paper details a case study of innovative pedagogy in which an "emotional curriculum" was central to my teaching. The analysis of student journals, on-line discussions, and metaphorical exercises revealed a vicissitude of emotions that stemmed from challenging course…

Storrs, Debbie

2012-01-01

410

Emotional Intelligence and Education: A Critical Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years there has been an increased interest in the role of emotional intelligence in both the academic success of students and their emotional adjustment in school. However, promotion of emotional intelligence in schools has proven a controversial pursuit, challenging as it does traditional "rationalist" views of education. Furthermore,…

Humphrey, Neil; Curran, Andrew; Morris, Elisabeth; Farrell, Peter; Woods, Kevin

2007-01-01

411

Emotion and Object Processing in Parkinson's Disease  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The neuropsychological literature on the processing of emotions in Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals conflicting evidence about the role of the basal ganglia in the recognition of facial emotions. Hence, the present study had two objectives. One was to determine the extent to which the visual processing of emotions and objects differs in PD. The…

Cohen, Henri; Gagne, Marie-Helene; Hess, Ursula; Pourcher, Emmanuelle

2010-01-01

412

Representing Face Images for Emotion Classi cation  

E-print Network

" smile. The quality of the displayed emotion is one of the reasons cited by Cottrell and MetcalfeRepresenting Face Images for Emotion Classi cation Curtis Padgett Department of Computer Science of three distinct rep- resentation schemes for facial emotions using a single classi cation strategy neural

Cottrell, Garrison W.

413

Emotional body language displayed by artificial agents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complex and natural social interaction between artificial agents (computer-generated or robotic) and humans necessitates the display of rich emotions in order to be believable, socially relevant, and accepted, and to generate the natural emotional responses that humans show in the context of social interaction, such as engagement or empathy. Whereas some robots use faces to display (simplified) emotional expressions, for

Aryel Beck; Brett Stevens; Kim A. Bard; Lola Cañamero

2012-01-01

414

Bimodal Emotion Recognition , Erwin Bakker2  

E-print Network

of the speech and display of emotions. As a consequence, the new interface technologies are steadily drivingBimodal Emotion Recognition Nicu Sebe1 , Erwin Bakker2 , Ira Cohen3 , Theo Gevers1 , and Thomas for natural interaction is still missing - emotions. This paper describes the challenging problem of bimodal

Sebe, Nicu

415

The Lateralisation of Emotion: A Critical Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent experimental investigations on patients with unilateral brain lesions and on neurologically intact people are reviewed with a view to appreciating the role of lateralised processes in emotion. Distinctions are drawn between the perception of emotion, the expression of emotion and the interaction of these two factors in studies of lateralisation. In spite of a mass of contradictory findings, and

Ruth Campbell

1982-01-01

416

Emotional Storytelling Kristopher J. Blom Steffi Beckhaus  

E-print Network

Emotional Storytelling Kristopher J. Blom Steffi Beckhaus interactive media/virtual environments a concept we feel can help to enable such experiences, Emotional Storytelling. Storytelling has long been centered on emotions. Whether a break room anecdote or a well crafted drama, the storyteller is hoping

Beckhaus, Steffi

417

Discourse Comprehension and Simulation of Positive Emotions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research has suggested that emotional sentences are understood by constructing an emotion simulation of the events being described. The present study aims to investigate whether emotion simulation is also involved in online and offline comprehension of larger language segments such as discourse. Participants read a target text describing…

Horchak, Oleksandr V.; Giger, Jean-Christophe; Pochwatko, Grzegorz

2014-01-01

418

Emotion and Morality in Psychopathy and Paraphilias  

PubMed Central

Understanding the role of emotion in moral judgment has been an active area of investigation and debate. Here we comment on this topic by examining the interaction between emotion and moral judgment in certain psychopathological groups that are characterized by abnormalities in emotion processing, such as psychopaths and sexual offenders with paraphilic disorders. PMID:24899928

Harenski, Carla L.; Kiehl, Kent A.

2014-01-01

419

Emotion Understanding in Children with ADHD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several studies suggest that children with ADHD tend to perform worse than typically developing children on emotion recognition tasks. However, most of these studies have focused on the recognition of facial expression, while there is evidence that context plays a major role on emotion perception. This study aims at further investigating emotion

Da Fonseca, David; Seguier, Valerie; Santos, Andreia; Poinso, Francois; Deruelle, Christine

2009-01-01

420

A Computational Model for Adaptive Emotion Regulation  

E-print Network

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Artificial Intelligence, De Boelelaan 1081a, 1081 HVA Computational Model for Adaptive Emotion Regulation Tibor Bosse, Matthijs Pontier, and Jan Treur} Abstract. Emotion regulation describes how a subject can use certain strategies to affect emotion response

Treur, Jan

421

Emotion Regulation and Depressive Symptoms in Preadolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined associations among several measures of emotion regulation, and their links to depressive symptoms, in a sample of children ages 10-12 years old (N = 87). Both temporal features of emotion regulation and regulation processes involved in the evaluation, monitoring, and modification of emotion were assessed through parent and…

Siener, Shannon; Kerns, Kathryn A.

2012-01-01

422

The Emotional Life of the Toddler.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that parenting a toddler can be both exhilarating and frustrating, this book draws on lifelong research into children's emotional development to provide parents with a better understanding of toddlers' emotional range and how it affects toddler behavior. The 10 chapters and the conclusion cover the following areas: (1) the emotional

Lieberman, Alicia F.

423

Emotional Intelligence: New Ability or Eclectic Traits?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some individuals have a greater capacity than others to carry out sophisticated information processing about emotions and emotion-relevant stimuli and to use this information as a guide to thinking and behavior. The authors have termed this set of abilities emotional intelligence (EI). Since the introduction of the concept, however, a schism has…

Mayer, John D.; Salovey, Peter; Caruso, David R.

2008-01-01

424

Emotions and their expression in Chinese culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper attempts to integrate the scattered studies on Chinese emotion and proposes some methodological and substantive suggestions for future work. Emotions are construed as interpretations of physiological response to important social events with these interpretations guiding behavior. Concerning interpretation, the dimensions used by Chinese to understand emotion-eliciting events are the same as those found in many other cultures. Which

Michael Harris Bond

1993-01-01

425

Transnationalism, migration and emotions: implications for education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is concerned with the emotional dynamics of transnationalism and migration and the impact on education. This impact is discussed in terms of how the movement of people involves complex emotional processes that have important consequences for educational policy, practice and research. The purpose of the author is to theorise how emotions in the context of an increasingly globalised

Michalinos Zembylas

2012-01-01

426

The role of emotion in moral psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent work in the cognitive and neurobiological sciences indicates an important relationship between emotion and moral judgment. Based on this evidence, several researchers have argued that emotions are the source of our intuitive moral judgments. However, despite the richness of the correlational data between emotion and morality, we argue that the current neuro- logical, behavioral, developmental and evolutionary evi- dence

Bryce Huebner; Susan Dwyer; Marc Hauser

2008-01-01

427

The Role of Emotion in Teaching  

Microsoft Academic Search

Associated with the recent research results of emotion psychology, the paper addresses the role of emotion in teaching from five aspects. The author presents that emotion plays a primary role of internalization and regulation in the process of teaching and directly restricts the accepting of course contents, the mastery of academic knowledge, the internalization of learning motivation, the regulation of

Jianzhong Qiao

428

Arnold's Theory of Emotion in Historical Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magda B. Arnold's theory of emotion is examined from three historical viewpoints. First, I look backward from Arnold to precursors of her theory of emotion in 19th century introspectionist psychology and in classical evolutionary psychology. I try to show that Arnold can be regarded as belonging intellectually to the cognitive tradition of emotion theorizing that originated in Brentano and his

Rainer Reisenzein

429

Arnold's theory of emotion in historical perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magda B. Arnold's theory of emotion is examined from three historical viewpoints. First, I look backward from Arnold to precursors of her theory of emotion in 19th century introspectionist psychology and in classical evolutionary psychology. I try to show that Arnold can be regarded as belonging intellectually to the cognitive tradition of emotion theorising that originated in Brentano and his

Rainer Reisenzein

2006-01-01

430

Understanding Schemas and Emotion in Early Childhood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book makes explicit connections between young children's spontaneous repeated actions and their representations of their emotional worlds. Drawing on the literature on schemas, attachment theory and family contexts, the author takes schema theory into the territory of the emotions, making it relevant to the social and emotional development…

Arnold, Cath

2010-01-01

431

Do Suicides' Characteristics Influence Survivors' Emotions?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The suicide of a related person can often induce severe negative emotional reactions. The objective of this study was to explore the relationships between sociodemographic and diagnostic data of suicides and survivors' emotions and to close this substantial gap. The main outcome of this study was that survivors' severity of emotional disturbance…

Schneider, Barbara; Grebner, Kristin; Schnabel, Axel; Georgi, Klaus

2011-01-01

432

Domestic Violence, Emotional Competence, and Child Adjustment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examined emotion competence in children exposed to domestic violence (DV). It also examined the hypothesis that children's emotional competence mediates relations between DV and children's later difficulties with peers and behavioral adjustment. DV was assessed when children were at the age of five, emotional competence was assessed…

Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Hessler, Danielle M.; Annest, Amalia

2007-01-01

433

Japanese and American Folk Vocabularies for Emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors investigated how emotions are labeled and conceptualized by individuals representing widely varying ages and educational backgrounds, who live in rural areas of Japan and the United States. The authors gathered data in 2 phases: 30 participants in each country first produced emotion terms, and another 2 groups of 28 (1 group from each country) sorted out those emotion

Futoshi Kobayashi; Diane L. Schallert; Holly A. Ogren

2003-01-01

434

Expressing emotion in text-based communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our ability to express and accurately assess emotional states is central to human life. The present study examines how people express and detect emotions during text-based communication, an environment that eliminates the nonverbal cues typically associated with emotion. The results from 40 dyadic interactions suggest that users relied on four strategies to express happiness versus sadness, including disagreement, negative affect

Jeffrey T. Hancock; Christopher Landrigan; Courtney Silver

2007-01-01

435

State and Trait Emotions in Delinquent Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine the structure of emotions and affective dysregulation in juvenile delinquents. Method: Fifty-six juvenile delinquents from a local juvenile hall and 169 subjects from a local high school were recruited for this study. All participants completed psychometric testing for trait emotions followed by measurements of state emotions

Plattner, Belinda; Karnik, Niranjan; Jo, Booil; Hall, Rebecca E.; Schallauer, Astrid; Carrion, Victor; Feucht, Martha; Steiner, Hans

2007-01-01

436

Robust Recognition of Emotion from Speech  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents robust recognition of selected emotions from salient spoken words. The prosodic and acoustic features were used to extract the intonation patterns and correlates of emotion from speech samp les in order to develop and evaluate models of emotion. The computed features are projected using a combination of linear projection techniques for compact and clu stered representation of

Mohammed E. Hoque; Mohammed Yeasin; Max M. Louwerse

2006-01-01

437

Stereotypical Portrayals of Emotionality in News Photos  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research content analyzed the news photographs of a major U.S. daily newspaper to examine the emotional portrayals of individuals in different gender, age, and ethnic subgroups. A multidimensional measure of emotion (pleasure, arousal, dominance) was used. A total of 1,595 individuals were coded. The results demonstrate that emotionality was stereotyped to some degree, particularly in relation to women, ethnic

Shelly Rodgers; Linda Jean Kenix; Esther Thorson

2007-01-01

438

Emotion Regulation and Childhood Aggression: Longitudinal Associations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Accumulating evidence suggests that emotion dysregulation is associated with psychopathology. This paper provides a review of recent longitudinal studies that investigate the relationship between emotion regulation and aggressive behavior in childhood age. While there is substantial evidence for assuming a close relation of emotion regulation and…

Roll, Judith; Koglin, Ute; Petermann, Franz

2012-01-01

439

Emotionally Handicapped Pupils: Developing Appropriate Educational Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The document is designed to assist local school systems as they plan, develop, and improve programs for emotionally handicapped students. Sections cover the following areas: definition of emotionally handicapped students; pre-planninq for emotionally handicapped programs; identification, referral, screening, assessment, and placement; service…

North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. for Exceptional Children.

440

Emotional Development, Intellectual Ability, and Gender.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

K. Dabrowski's Theory of Emotional Development was used to compare 41 gifted adults (mean age 37) and 42 graduate students (mean age 29). Greater overexcitability scores by the gifted adults suggested substantially greater potential for emotional development, but no significant differences between groups were found for actual level of emotional

Miller, Nancy B.; And Others

1994-01-01

441

Vocal cues in emotion encoding and decoding  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examines the correspondence between theoretical predictions on vocal expression patterns in naturally occurring emotions (as based on the component process theory of emotion; Scherer, 1986) and empirical data on the acoustic characteristics of actors' portrayals. Two male and two female professional radio actors portrayed anger, sadness, joy, fear, and disgust based on realistic scenarios of emotion-eliciting events. A

Klaus R. Scherer; Rainer Banse; Harald G. Wallbott; Thomas Goldbeck

1991-01-01

442

Color planner for designers based on color emotions  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the color perception process, an associated feeling or emotion is induced in our brains, and this kind of emotion is termed as 'color emotion.' The researchers in the field of color emotions have put many efforts in quantifying color emotions with the standard color specifications and evaluating the influence of hue, lightness and chroma to the color emotions of

Ka-Man Cheng; John H. Xin; Gail Taylor

2002-01-01

443

How Emotions Develop and How they Organise Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concepts from functional theories of emotions are integrated with principles of skill development to produce a theory of emotional development. The theory provides tools for predicting both the sequences of emotional development and the ways emotions shape development. Emotions are characterised in terms of three component models: (a) the process of emotion generation from event appraisal, (b) a hierarchy of

Kurt W. Fischer; Phillip R. Shaver; Peter Carnochan

1990-01-01

444

Perception of Blended Emotions: from Video Corpus to Expressive Agent  

E-print Network

. A masked emotion may leak over the displayed emotion [17]; while superposi- tion of two emotions was displaying expressions of felt emotion or expression of fake emotion. Video corpora of TV interviews enablePerception of Blended Emotions: from Video Corpus to Expressive Agent Stéphanie Buisine1, Sarkis

Pelachaud, Catherine

445

The Couples Emotion Rating Form: Psychometric Properties and Theoretical Associations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Couples Emotion Rating Form assesses 3 types of negative emotion that are salient during times of relationship conflict. Hard emotion includes feeling angry and aggravated, soft emotion includes feeling hurt and sad, and flat emotion includes feeling bored and indifferent. In Study 1, scales measuring hard and soft emotion were validated by…

Sanford, Keith

2007-01-01

446

Parental Contributions to Preschoolers' Emotional Competence: Direct and Indirect Effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examines the contributions of (1) parental socialization of emotion and preschoolers' emotional interaction with parents to their emotional competence, and (2) parental socialization and child emotional competence to their general social competence. Both observational and self-report techniques were used to measure emotion socialization, emotional competence, and social competence of preschoolers (average age = 49.8 months) from 60

Susanne A. Denham; Jennifer Mitchell-Copeland; Katherine Strandberg; Sharon Auerbach; Kimberly Blair

1997-01-01

447

Emotion Regulation and Emotion Work: Two Sides of the Same Coin?  

PubMed Central

This contribution links psychological models of emotion regulation to sociological accounts of emotion work to demonstrate the extent to which emotion regulation is systematically shaped by culture and society. I first discuss a well-established two-factor process model of emotion regulation and argue that a substantial proportion of emotion regulatory goals are derived from emotion norms. In contrast to universal emotion values and hedonic preferences, emotion norms are highly specific to social situations and institutional contexts. This specificity is determined by social cognitive processes of categorization and guided by framing rules. Second, I argue that the possibilities for antecedent-focused regulation, in particular situation selection and modification, are not arbitrarily available to individuals. Instead, they depend on economic, cultural, and social resources. I suggest that the systematic and unequal distribution of these resources in society leads to discernible patterns of emotion and emotion regulation across groups of individuals. PMID:23181041

von Scheve, Christian

2012-01-01

448

Emotion elicitor or emotion messenger? Subliminal priming reveals two faces of facial expressions.  

PubMed

Facial emotional expressions can serve both as emotional stimuli and as communicative signals. The research reported here was conducted to illustrate how responses to both roles of facial emotional expressions unfold over time. As an emotion elicitor, a facial emotional expression (e.g., a disgusted face) activates a response that is similar to responses to other emotional stimuli of the same valence (e.g., a dirty, nonflushed toilet). As an emotion messenger, the same facial expression (e.g., a disgusted face) serves as a communicative signal by also activating the knowledge that the sender is experiencing a specific emotion (e.g., the sender feels disgusted). By varying the duration of exposure to disgusted, fearful, angry, and neutral faces in two subliminal-priming studies, we demonstrated that responses to faces as emotion elicitors occur prior to responses to faces as emotion messengers, and that both types of responses may unfold unconsciously. PMID:18578850

Ruys, Kirsten I; Stapel, Diederik A

2008-06-01

449

SERT Models of Emotional Dysregulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The serotonin system plays a key modulatory role in central nervous system processes that appear to be dysregulated in psychiatric disorders. Specifically, the serotonin transporter (SERT) is thought to be critical to many aspects of emotional dysregulation, and has been a successful target for medications that treat several psychiatric disorders. Here, we narrowly focused on two psychiatric conditions, anxiety and

Adam Tripp; Etienne Sibille

450

Emotion, Memory, and Religious Concepts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent work has shown that 'minimally counterintuitive' (MCI) concepts are more memorable than both normal and bizarre concepts in ways that may explain why supernatural ideas lie at the heart of religious systems. However, such investigations have ignored other factors, including especially emotional loadings, that may also be relevant. The present study replicated previous findings of an MCI effect on

Peter F. Alfaro

451

Emodiversity and the emotional ecosystem.  

PubMed

[Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 143(6) of Journal of Experimental Psychology: General (see record 2014-49316-001). There is a color coding error in Figure 2. The correct color coding is explained in the erratum.] Bridging psychological research exploring emotional complexity and research in the natural sciences on the measurement of biodiversity, we introduce-and demonstrate the benefits of-emodiversity: the variety and relative abundance of the emotions that humans experience. Two cross-sectional studies across more than 37,000 respondents demonstrate that emodiversity is an independent predictor of mental and physical health-such as decreased depression and doctor's visits-over and above mean levels of positive and negative emotion. These results remained robust after controlling for gender, age, and the 5 main dimensions of personality. Emodiversity is a practically important and previously unidentified metric for assessing the health of the human emotional ecosystem. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25285428

Quoidbach, Jordi; Gruber, June; Mikolajczak, Moïra; Kogan, Alexsandr; Kotsou, Ilios; Norton, Michael I

2014-12-01

452

State Definitions of Emotional Disturbance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines definitions state education agencies use to describe the federal education disability called "emotional disturbance." State definitions were collected so that various aspects of them could be analyzed and compared with results of similar studies completed in the 1970s and 1980s. Among results are that state definitions have…

Wery, Jessica J.; Cullinan, Douglas

2013-01-01

453

Emotional adjustment in infertile couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: This study assessed emotional adjustment of infertile couples and the psychological outcomes of infertility (depression, anxiety, relationship and sexual problems, and personality disorders) in different phases of treatment. References used include studies which have been performed within the last two decades. The articles were invested on data bases at Pub med, Scholar, Google, Scpous and Amazon and key words

Fatemeh Ramazanzadeh; Ahmad Ali Noorbala; Nasrin Abedinia; Mohammad Mehdi Naghizadeh

2009-01-01

454

Boosting Social and Emotional Competence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Beland maintains that high school students will need a high level of skill in the social and emotional arena to be ready for competitive employment in the 21st century. In a 2006 survey, human resource professionals said five skills were most crucial to high school graduates' success: professionalism/work ethic; teamwork; oral communications;…

Beland, Kathy

2007-01-01

455

Emotion regulation and sport performance.  

PubMed

This study used a single-blind, within-participant, counterbalanced, repeated-measures design to examine the relationship between emotional self-regulation and sport performance. Twenty competitive athletes completed four laboratory-based conditions; familiarization, control, emotion suppression, and nonsuppression. In each condition participants completed a 10-km cycling time trial requiring self-regulation. In the experimental conditions participants watched an upsetting video before performing the cycle task. When participants suppressed their emotional reactions to the video (suppression condition) they completed the cycling task slower, generated lower mean power outputs, and reached a lower maximum heart rate and perceived greater physical exertion than when they were given no self-regulation instructions during the video (nonsuppression condition) and received no video treatment (control condition). The findings suggest that emotional self-regulation resource impairment affects perceived exertion, pacing and sport performance and extends previous research examining the regulation of persistence on physical tasks. The results are discussed in line with relevant psychophysiological theories of self-regulation and fatigue and pertinent potential implications for practice regarding performance and well-being are suggested. PMID:25226609

Wagstaff C, R D

2014-08-01

456

Emotional Intelligence and Medical Professionalism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies have shown that IQ alone does not contribute to the professional success of medical professionals. Professionals who are trained to be clinically competent, but have inadequate social skills for practice have proved to be less successful in their profession. Emotional intelligence (EI), which has already proved to be a key attribute for…

Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

2011-01-01

457

The Importance of Emotional Usability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As technology evolves rapidly, users of technology products and interactive computing systems are no longer only satisfied with the levels of product efficiency and effectiveness. Users are also looking for emotional satisfaction from using and interacting with the products. With powerful interactive features technology can potentially deliver…

Shih, Yi-Hsuen; Liu, Min

2008-01-01

458

____________________________________________ -:-_----,-'~\\t~ Emotion Regulation and Psychopathology  

E-print Network

and Psychopathology A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK Kelly Werner and James J. Gross A person with social anxiety clenches her% of the diagnostic categories of psychopathology in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Youth types of psychopathology and may be a key to their treat- which may not be present in every emotional

Gross, James J.

459

Emotional Giftedness: An Expanded View.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses an expanded definition of the concept of emotional giftedness in children as defined by Annemarie Roeper. In contrast to examples of academic and artistic prodigies, cases are reviewed that illustrate less tangibly measured examples of children's giftedness, such as expressions of compassion, moral sensitivity, positive…

Piechowski, Michael M.

460

Dystonia: Emotional and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... emotion as well as muscle movement. For years, mental health professionals have recognized that coping with a chronic disorder like dystonia is similar to grieving a loss, such as a death or divorce. Common phases of dealing with dystonia include denial, ...

461

Spatial frequencies and emotional perception.  

PubMed

It has been suggested that, during evolution, specific mechanisms developed in order to optimize the detection of threats and opportunities even in perceptually degraded conditions. A naturalistic example of perceptual degradation can be found in blurry images, which contain the coarsest elements of a scene (low spatial frequencies) but lack the fine-grained details (high spatial frequencies). In the past decade, several studies have examined the relation between spatial frequencies and emotions, using a variety of methods, stimuli, and rationales. Here, we conduct a literature survey on the studies that have examined the relation between emotion and spatial frequencies. Some studies have suggested that the low spatial frequencies of emotional stimuli may be processed by a subcortical neural pathway, eventually eliciting emotional responses. However, the evidence provided by the reviewed studies does not support this possibility, for conceptual and methodological reasons (e.g., mistaking the processing of a fuzzy stimulus for subcortical processing). Here, the conceptual and methodological problems present in the reviewed studies are analyzed and discussed, along with suggestions for future research. PMID:23183741

De Cesarei, Andrea; Codispoti, Maurizio

2013-01-01

462

Believable Social and Emotional Agents.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

One of the key steps in creating quality interactive drama is the ability to create quality interactive characters (or believable agents). Two important aspects of such characters will be that they appear emotional and that they can engage in social inter...

W. S. Reilly

1996-01-01

463

Attentional bias in emotional disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research has suggested that anxiety may be associated with processing biases that favor the encoding of emotionally threatening information. However, the available data can be accommodated by alternative explanations, including response bias accounts. The current study introduces a novel paradigm that circumvents such interpretative problems by requiring subjects to make a neutral response (button press) to a neutral stimulus

Colin MacLeod; Andrew Mathews; Philip Tata

1986-01-01

464

Mothers’ Socialization of Emotion Regulation: The Moderating Role of Children’s Negative Emotional Reactivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the toddler period, children begin to shift from being primarily dependent on parents to regulate their emotions to\\u000a managing their emotions independently. The present study considers how children’s propensity towards negative emotional arousal\\u000a interacts with mothers’ efforts to socialize emotion regulation. Fifty-five low income mothers and their 2-year-old children\\u000a completed observational assessments measuring mothers’ socialization of emotion regulation, children’s

Scott P. Mirabile; Laura V. Scaramella; Sara L. Sohr-Preston; Sarah D. Robison

2009-01-01

465

Assessing Emotion Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder: The Emotion Regulation Interview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is thought to involve emotional hyper-reactivity and emotion dysregulation. However, the precise\\u000a nature of the emotion dysregulation in SAD has not been well characterized. In the present study, the Emotion Regulation Interview\\u000a (ERI) was developed to quantify the frequency and self-efficacy of five emotion regulation strategies specified by Gross’s\\u000a (Review of General Psychology 2: 271–299, 1998)

Kelly H. Werner; Philippe R. Goldin; Tali M. Ball; Richard G. Heimberg; James J. Gross

466

Emotion regulation strategies in preschool children.  

PubMed

This study investigated the development of emotion regulation strategies as reflected in the narratives of children between the ages of 3 and 6 years. An experimental procedure based on story completion tasks was devised to elicit the emotion-related narratives of 69 preschool children. Coding of the narratives led to the observation of different emotion regulation strategies: Behavioural strategies, social support, and cognitive reappraisal. Several significant gender and age differences were identified in the use of these strategies. In addition, verbal skills, non-verbal intelligence, and emotion comprehension were found to be associated with use of the observed emotion regulation strategies, although only at specific ages. PMID:25040163

Sala, Maria Nives; Pons, Francisco; Molina, Paola

2014-11-01

467

Emotions: Happy, Sad, Mad, and Glad  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, you and your child can explore the emotions we all experience. Read the instructions aloud to your child and follow the links provided. Discuss each question with your child as you go through. You may be surprised by how much you both learn! Do you know what emotions are? Emotions are the feelings we have. We can show these feelings on our face, by our actions, or through our words. Some examples of positive emotions are: happiness, joy, and excitement. Some examples of negative emotions are: sadness, fear, or anger. In this video, our friend Kermit ...

Plouffe, Mrs.

2011-12-09

468

Detecting emotional contagion in massive social networks.  

PubMed

Happiness and other emotions spread between people in direct contact, but it is unclear whether massive online social networks also contribute to this spread. Here, we elaborate a novel method for measuring the contagion of emotional expression. With data from millions of Facebook users, we show that rainfall directly influences the emotional content of their status messages, and it also affects the status messages of friends in other cities who are not experiencing rainfall. For every one person affected directly, rainfall alters the emotional expression of about one to two other people, suggesting that online social networks may magnify the intensity of global emotional synchrony. PMID:24621792

Coviello, Lorenzo; Sohn, Yunkyu; Kramer, Adam D I; Marlow, Cameron; Franceschetti, Massimo; Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

2014-01-01

469

Detecting Emotional Contagion in Massive Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Happiness and other emotions spread between people in direct contact, but it is unclear whether massive online social networks also contribute to this spread. Here, we elaborate a novel method for measuring the contagion of emotional expression. With data from millions of Facebook users, we show that rainfall directly influences the emotional content of their status messages, and it also affects the status messages of friends in other cities who are not experiencing rainfall. For every one person affected directly, rainfall alters the emotional expression of about one to two other people, suggesting that online social networks may magnify the intensity of global emotional synchrony. PMID:24621792

Coviello, Lorenzo; Sohn, Yunkyu; Kramer, Adam D. I.; Marlow, Cameron; Franceschetti, Massimo; Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

2014-01-01

470

Brain correlates of music-evoked emotions.  

PubMed

Music is a universal feature of human societies, partly owing to its power to evoke strong emotions and influence moods. During the past decade, the investigation of the neural correlates of music-evoked emotions has been invaluable for the understanding of human emotion. Functional neuroimaging studies on music and emotion show that music can modulate activity in brain structures that are known to be crucially involved in emotion, such as the amygdala, nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, hippocampus, insula, cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. The potential of music to modulate activity in these structures has important implications for the use of music in the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders. PMID:24552785

Koelsch, Stefan

2014-03-01

471

Emotion regulation patterns in adolescents with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder: comparison to typically developing adolescents and association with psychiatric symptoms.  

PubMed

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is often associated with poor emotional control and psychopathology, such as anxiety and depression; however, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Emotion regulation (ER) is a potential contributing factor, but there has been limited research on ER and its role in comorbid psychopathology in ASD. In this study, we compared self-reported ER with self- and parent reports of psychopathology in 25 high-functioning adolescents with ASD and 23 age- and Intelligence Quotient (IQ)-matched typically developing controls. Contrary to expectations, both groups reported similar levels of adaptive, voluntary forms of ER (problem solving, acceptance, etc.). However, the ASD group reported significantly greater use of involuntary forms of ER that are typically maladaptive, including remaining focused on the stressor (e.g. rumination and emotional arousal) and shutting down (e.g. emotional numbing and being unable to think or act). Associations between ER and psychopathology were generally more robust using self-report rather than parent report. For both groups, greater endorsement of involuntary ER strategies was associated with higher ratings of psychopathology, whereas voluntary ER strategies focused on changing or adapting to the situation were significantly associated with lower levels of psychopathology. The magnitude and direction of association between ER types and psychopathology were similar for measures of depression and anxiety. These findings can help guide the development of psychosocial treatments targeting dysfunctional ER in adolescents with ASD. Interventions focused on ER as a transdiagnostic process may be a more robust method to improve emotional control and decrease emotional distress in ASD than disorder-specific interventions. PMID:24610869

Mazefsky, Carla A; Borue, Xenia; Day, Taylor N; Minshew, Nancy J

2014-06-01

472

Emotion Regulation Patterns in Adolescents With High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: Comparison to Typically Developing Adolescents and Association With Psychiatric Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is often associated with poor emotional control and psychopathology, such as anxiety and depression; however, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Emotion regulation (ER) is a potential contributing factor, but there has been limited research on ER and its role in comorbid psychopathology in ASD. In this study, we compared self-reported ER with self- and parent reports of psychopathology in 25 high-functioning adolescents with ASD and 23 age- and Intelligence Quotient (IQ)-matched typically developing controls. Contrary to expectations, both groups reported similar levels of adaptive, voluntary forms of ER (problem solving, acceptance, etc.). However, the ASD group reported significantly greater use of involuntary forms of ER that are typically maladaptive, including remaining focused on the stressor (e.g. rumination and emotional arousal) and shutting down (e.g. emotional numbing and being unable to think or act). Associations between ER and psychopathology were generally more robust using self-report rather than parent report. For both groups, greater endorsement of involuntary ER strategies was associated with higher ratings of psychopathology, whereas voluntary ER strategies focused on changing or adapting to the situation were significantly associated with lower levels of psychopathology. The magnitude and direction of association between ER types and psychopathology were similar for measures of depression and anxiety. These findings can help guide the development of psychosocial treatments targeting dysfunctional ER in adolescents with ASD. Interventions focused on ER as a transdiagnostic process may be a more robust method to improve emotional control and decrease emotional distress in ASD than disorder-specific interventions. PMID:24610869

Mazefsky, Carla A.; Borue, Xenia; Day, Taylor N.; Minshew, Nancy J.

2014-01-01

473

Emotion Recognition following Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: Longitudinal Analysis of Emotional Prosody and Facial Emotion Recognition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with closed head injuries often experience significant and persistent disruptions in their social and behavioral functioning. Studies with adults sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBI) indicate deficits in emotion recognition and suggest that these difficulties may underlie some of the social deficits. The goal of the current study was…

Schmidt, Adam T.; Hanten, Gerri R.; Li, Xiaoqi; Orsten, Kimberley D.; Levin, Harvey S.

2010-01-01

474

Models and methods of emotional concordance.  

PubMed

Theories of emotion generally posit the synchronized, coordinated, and/or emergent combination of psychophysiological, cognitive, and behavioral components of the emotion system--emotional concordance--as a functional definition of emotion. However, the empirical support for this claim has been weak or inconsistent. As an introduction to this special issue on emotional concordance, we consider three domains of explanations as to why this theory-data gap might exist. First, theory may need to be revised to more accurately reflect past research. Second, there may be moderating factors such as emotion regulation, context, or individual differences that have obscured concordance. Finally, the methods typically used to test theory may be inadequate. In particular, we review a variety of potential issues: intensity of emotions elicited in the laboratory, nonlinearity, between- versus within-subject associations, the relative timing of components, bivariate versus multivariate approaches, and diversity of physiological processes. PMID:24394718

Hollenstein, Tom; Lanteigne, Dianna

2014-04-01

475

Follow your heart: Emotion adaptively influences perception  

PubMed Central

The current review introduces a new program of research that suggests the perception of spatial layout is influenced by emotions. Though perceptual systems are often described as closed and insulated, this review presents research suggesting that a variety of induced emotions (e.g., fear, disgust, sadness) can produce changes in vision and audition. Thus, the perceptual system may be highly interconnected, allowing emotional information to influence perceptions that, in turn, influence cognition. The body of work presented here also suggests that emotion-based changes in perception help us solve particular adaptive problems because emotion does not change all perceptions of the world. Taking the adaptive significance of emotion into account allows us to make predictions about when and how emotion influences perception. PMID:21731579

Stefanucci, Jeanine K.; Gagnon, Kyle T.; Lessard, David A.

2011-01-01

476

Strategic automation of emotion regulation.  

PubMed

As implementation intentions are a powerful self-regulation tool for thought and action (meta-analysis by P. M. Gollwitzer & P. Sheeran, 2006), the present studies were conducted to address their effectiveness in regulating emotional reactivity. Disgust- (Study 1) and fear- (Study 2) eliciting stimuli were viewed under 3 different self-regulation instructions: the goal intention to not get disgusted or frightened, respectively, this goal intention furnished with an implementation intention (i.e., an if-then plan), and a no-self-regulation control group. Only implementation-intention participants succeeded in reducing their disgust and fear reactions as compared to goal-intention and control participants. In Study 3, electrocortical correlates (using dense-array electroencephalography) revealed differential early visual activity in response to spider slides in ignore implementation-intention participants, as reflected in a smaller P1. Theoretical and applied implications of the present findings for emotion regulation via implementation intentions are discussed. PMID:19210061

Gallo, Inge Schweiger; Keil, Andreas; McCulloch, Kathleen C; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Gollwitzer, Peter M

2009-01-01

477

Conflict management and emotional intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this research are to investigate the reasons for conflicts in the customer service industry, to examine strategies for conflict management which can be used to help resolve these conflicts, to examine the relationship of these strategies with the concept of emotional intelligence, and to improve the quality of customer service provisions in the customer service industry.\\u000aThe

Yu Fai Leung

2010-01-01

478

Evidence for Unintentional Emotional Contagion Beyond Dyads  

PubMed Central

Little is known about the spread of emotions beyond dyads. Yet, it is of importance for explaining the emergence of crowd behaviors. Here, we experimentally addressed whether emotional homogeneity within a crowd might result from a cascade of local emotional transmissions where the perception of another’s emotional expression produces, in the observer's face and body, sufficient information to allow for the transmission of the emotion to a third party. We reproduced a minimal element of a crowd situation and recorded the facial electromyographic activity and the skin conductance response of an individual C observing the face of an individual B watching an individual A displaying either joy or fear full body expressions. Critically, individual B did not know that she was being watched. We show that emotions of joy and fear displayed by A were spontaneously transmitted to C through B, even when the emotional information available in B’s faces could not be explicitly recognized. These findings demonstrate that one is tuned to react to others’ emotional signals and to unintentionally produce subtle but sufficient emotional cues to induce emotional states in others. This phenomenon could be the mark of a spontaneous cooperative behavior whose function is to communicate survival-value information to conspecifics. PMID:23840683

Dezecache, Guillaume; Conty, Laurence; Chadwick, Michele; Philip, Leonor; Soussignan, Robert

2013-01-01

479

Asymmetric effects of emotion on mnemonic interference  

PubMed Central

Emotional experiences can strengthen memories so that they can be used to guide future behavior. Emotional arousal, mediated by the amygdala, is thought to modulate storage by the hippocampus, which may encode unique episodic memories via pattern separation – the process by which similar memories are stored using non-overlapping representations. While prior work has examined mnemonic interference due to similarity and emotional modulation of memory independently, examining the mechanisms by which emotion influences mnemonic interference has not been previously accomplished in humans. To this end, we developed an emotional memory task where emotional content and stimulus similarity were varied to examine the effect of emotion on fine mnemonic discrimination (a putative behavioral correlate of hippocampal pattern separation). When tested immediately after encoding, discrimination was reduced for similar emotional items compared to similar neutral items, consistent with a reduced bias towards pattern separation. After 24 h, recognition of emotional target items was preserved compared to neutral items, whereas similar emotional item discrimination was further diminished. This suggests a potential mechanism for the emotional modulation of memory with a selective remembering of gist, as well as a selective forgetting of detail, indicating an emotion-induced reduction in pattern separation. This can potentially increase the effective signal-to-noise ratio in any given situation to promote survival. Furthermore, we found that individuals with depressive symptoms hyper-discriminate negative items, which correlated with their symptom severity. This suggests that utilizing mnemonic discrimination paradigms allows us to tease apart the nuances of disorders with aberrant emotional mnemonic processing. PMID:24607286

Leal, Stephanie L.; Tighe, Sarah K.; Yassa, Michael A.

2014-01-01

480

Anterior Insular Cortex and Emotional Awareness  

PubMed Central

This paper reviews the foundation for a role of the human anterior insular cortex (AIC) in emotional awareness, defined as the conscious experience of emotions. We first introduce the neuroanatomical features of AIC and existing findings on emotional awareness. Using empathy, the awareness and understanding of other people’s emotional states, as a test case, we then present evidence to demonstrate: 1) AIC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) are commonly coactivated as revealed by a meta-analysis, 2) AIC is functionally dissociable from ACC, 3) AIC integrates stimulus-driven and top-down information, and 4) AIC is necessary for emotional awareness. We propose a model in which AIC serves two major functions: integrating bottom-up interoceptive signals with top-down predictions to generate a current awareness state and providing descending predictions to visceral systems that provide a point of reference for autonomic reflexes. We argue that AIC is critical and necessary for emotional awareness. PMID:23749500

Gu, Xiaosi; Hof, Patrick R.; Friston, Karl J.; Fan, Jin

2014-01-01

481

Music evokes vicarious emotions in listeners  

PubMed Central

Why do we listen to sad music? We seek to answer this question using a psychological approach. It is possible to distinguish perceived emotions from those that are experienced. Therefore, we hypothesized that, although sad music is perceived as sad, listeners actually feel (experience) pleasant emotions concurrent with sadness. This hypothesis was supported, which led us to question whether sadness in the context of art is truly an unpleasant emotion. While experiencing sadness may be unpleasant, it may also be somewhat pleasant when experienced in the context of art, for example, when listening to sad music. We consider musically evoked emotion vicarious, as we are not threatened when we experience it, in the way that we can be during the course of experiencing emotion in daily life. When we listen to sad music, we experience vicarious sadness. In this review, we propose two sides to sadness by suggesting vicarious emotion. PMID:24910621

Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Okanoya, Kazuo

2014-01-01

482

Modeling emotional dynamics : currency versus field.  

SciTech Connect

Randall Collins has introduced a simplified model of emotional dynamics in which emotional energy, heightened and focused by interaction rituals, serves as a common denominator for social exchange: a generic form of currency, except that it is active in a far broader range of social transactions. While the scope of this theory is attractive, the specifics of the model remain unconvincing. After a critical assessment of the currency theory of emotion, a field model of emotion is introduced that adds expressiveness by locating emotional valence within its cognitive context, thereby creating an integrated orientation field. The result is a model which claims less in the way of motivational specificity, but is more satisfactory in modeling the dynamic interaction between cognitive and emotional orientations at both individual and social levels.

Sallach, D .L.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Chicago

2008-08-01

483

Music evokes vicarious emotions in listeners.  

PubMed

Why do we listen to sad music? We seek to answer this question using a psychological approach. It is possible to distinguish perceived emotions from those that are experienced. Therefore, we hypothesized that, although sad music is perceived as sad, listeners actually feel (experience) pleasant emotions concurrent with sadness. This hypothesis was supported, which led us to question whether sadness in the context of art is truly an unpleasant emotion. While experiencing sadness may be unpleasant, it may also be somewhat pleasant when experienced in the context of art, for example, when listening to sad music. We consider musically evoked emotion vicarious, as we are not threatened when we experience it, in the way that we can be during the course of experiencing emotion in daily life. When we listen to sad music, we experience vicarious sadness. In this review, we propose two sides to sadness by suggesting vicarious emotion. PMID:24910621

Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Okanoya, Kazuo

2014-01-01

484

The impact of emotion on numerosity estimation  

PubMed Central

Both time and numerosity can be represented continuously as analog properties whose discrimination conforms to Weber’s Law, suggesting that the two properties may be represented similarly. Recent research suggests that the representation of time is influenced by the presence of emotional stimuli. If time and numerosity share a common cognitive representation, it follows that a similar relationship may exist between emotional stimuli and the representation of numerosity. Here, we provide evidence that emotional stimuli significantly affect humans’ estimation of visual numerosity. During a numerical bisection task, enumeration of emotional stimuli (angry faces) was more accurate compared to enumeration of neutrally valenced stimuli (neutral faces), demonstrating that emotional stimuli affect humans’ visual representation of numerosity as previously demonstrated for time. These results inform and broaden our understanding of the effect of negative emotional stimuli on psychophysical discriminations of quantity. PMID:23950754

Baker, Joseph M.; Rodzon, Katrina S.; Jordan, Kerry

2013-01-01

485

Agency and facial emotion judgment in context.  

PubMed

Past research showed that East Asians' belief in holism was expressed as their tendencies to include background facial emotions into the evaluation of target faces more than North Americans. However, this pattern can be interpreted as North Americans' tendency to downplay background facial emotions due to their conceptualization of facial emotion as volitional expression of internal states. Examining this alternative explanation, we investigated whether different types of contextual information produce varying degrees of effect on one's face evaluation across cultures. In three studies, European Canadians and East Asians rated the intensity of target facial emotions surrounded with either affectively salient landscape sceneries or background facial emotions. The results showed that, although affectively salient landscapes influenced the judgment of both cultural groups, only European Canadians downplayed the background facial emotions. The role of agency as differently conceptualized across cultures and multilayered systems of cultural meanings are discussed. PMID:23504599

Ito, Kenichi; Masuda, Takahiko; Li, Liman Man Wai

2013-06-01

486

Emotional persistence in online chatting communities  

PubMed Central

How do users behave in online chatrooms, where they instantaneously read and write posts? We analyzed about 2.5 million posts covering various topics in Internet relay channels, and found that user activity patterns follow known power-law and stretched exponential distributions, indicating that online chat activity is not different from other forms of communication. Analysing the emotional expressions (positive, negative, neutral) of users, we revealed a remarkable persistence both for individual users and channels. I.e. despite their anonymity, users tend to follow social norms in repeated interactions in online chats, which results in a specific emotional “tone” of the channels. We provide an agent-based model of emotional interaction, which recovers qualitatively both the activity patterns in chatrooms and the emotional persistence of users and channels. While our assumptions about agent's emotional expressions are rooted in psychology, the model allows to test different hypothesis regarding their emotional impact in online communication. PMID:22577512

Garas, Antonios; Garcia, David; Skowron, Marcin; Schweitzer, Frank

2012-01-01

487

The impact of emotion on numerosity estimation.  

PubMed

Both time and numerosity can be represented continuously as analog properties whose discrimination conforms to Weber's Law, suggesting that the two properties may be represented similarly. Recent research suggests that the representation of time is influenced by the presence of emotional stimuli. If time and numerosity share a common cognitive representation, it follows that a similar relationship may exist between emotional stimuli and the representation of numerosity. Here, we provide evidence that emotional stimuli significantly affect humans' estimation of visual numerosity. During a numerical bisection task, enumeration of emotional stimuli (angry faces) was more accurate compared to enumeration of neutrally valenced stimuli (neutral faces), demonstrating that emotional stimuli affect humans' visual representation of numerosity as previously demonstrated for time. These results inform and broaden our understanding of the effect of negative emotional stimuli on psychophysical discriminations of quantity. PMID:23950754

Baker, Joseph M; Rodzon, Katrina S; Jordan, Kerry

2013-01-01

488

Emotional Granularity and Borderline Personality Disorder  

PubMed Central

This study examined the affective dysregulation component of borderline personality disorder (BPD) from an emotional granularity perspective, which refers to the specificity in which one represents emotions. Forty-six female participants meeting criteria for BPD and 51 female control participants without BPD and Axis I pathology completed tasks that assessed the degree to which participants incorporated information about valence (pleasant–unpleasant) and arousal (calm–activated) in their semantic/conceptual representations of emotions and in using labels to represent emotional reactions. As hypothesized, participants with BPD emphasized valence more and arousal less than control participants did when using emotion terms to label their emotional reactions. Implications and future research directions are discussed. PMID:21171723

Suvak, Michael K.; Litz, Brett T.; Sloan, Denise M.; Zanarini, Mary C.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Hofmann, Stefan G.

2011-01-01

489

Experiencing emotional labor: an analysis of the discursive construction of emotional labor  

E-print Network

This study analyzes how employees at a university recreation center discursively construct their experiences of emotional labor, how they conceptualize such behavior in terms of displaying unfelt emotions and faking in good and bad faith, and what...

Haman, Mary Kathryn

2007-04-25

490

Emotion Regulation and Emotion Coherence: Evidence for Strategy-Specific Effects  

PubMed Central

One of the central tenets of emotion theory is that emotions involve coordinated changes across experiential, behavioral, and physiological response domains. Surprisingly little is known, however, on how the strength of this emotion coherence is altered when people try to regulate their emotions. To address this issue, we recorded experiential, behavioral, and physiological responses while participants watched negative and positive pictures. Cross-correlations were used to quantify emotion coherence. Study 1 tested how two types of suppression (expressive and physiological) influence coherence. Results showed that both strategies decreased the response coherence measured in negative and positive contexts. Study 2 tested how multi-channel suppression (simultaneously targeting expressive and physiological responses) and acceptance influence emotion coherence. Results again showed that suppression decreased coherence. By contrast, acceptance was not significantly different from the unregulated condition. These findings help to clarify the nature of emotion response coherence by showing how different forms of emotion regulation may differentially affect it. PMID:23731438

Dan-Glauser, Elise S.; Gross, James J.

2014-01-01

491

Emotions as within or between people? Cultural variation in lay theories of emotion expression and inference.  

PubMed

Four studies using open-ended and experimental methods test the hypothesis that in Japanese contexts, emotions are understood as between people, whereas in American contexts, emotions are understood as primarily within people. Study 1 analyzed television interviews of Olympic athletes. When asked about their relationships, Japanese athletes used significantly more emotion words than American athletes. This difference was not significant when questions asked directly about athletes' feelings. In Study 2, when describing an athlete's emotional reaction to winning, Japanese participants implicated others more often than American participants. After reading an athlete's self-description, Japanese participants inferred more emotions when the athlete mentioned relationships, whereas American participants inferred more emotions when the athlete focused only on herself (Study 3). Finally, when viewing images of athletes, Japanese participants inferred more emotions for athletes pictured with teammates, whereas American participants inferred more emotions for athletes pictured alone (Studies 4a and 4b). PMID:19745200

Uchida, Yukiko; Townsend, Sarah S M; Rose Markus, Hazel; Bergsieker, Hilary B

2009-11-01

492

Emotional news : how emotional content of news and financial markets are related  

E-print Network

We present here a first step towards developing a quantitative model that relates investor emotions to financial markets. We used Wall Street Journal articles as a proxy of investor emotions on a "macro" level. We measured ...

Zhu, Wan Li, 1981-

2004-01-01

493

On the Relationship between the Creative and Social-Emotional Development of Emotionally Handicapped Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A significant relationship was found between changes in social emotional status and creativity. Creative and social-emotional changes occurred independently of most variables known about a child at the beginning of treatment. (Author)

Paget, Kathleen D.

1980-01-01

494

Sex differences in emotion: Expression, experience, and physiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although previous studies of emotional responding have found that women are more emotionally expressive than men, it remains unclear whether men and women differ in other domains of emotional response. We assessed the expressive, experiential, and physiological emotional responses of men and women in 2 studies. In Study 1, undergraduates viewed emotional films. Compared with men, women were more expressive,

Ann M. Kring; Albert H. Gordon

1998-01-01

495

Intelligent Expressions of Emotions Magalie Ochs1, 3  

E-print Network

to the former as display rules. We distinguish two kinds of emotions: the felt emotion named elicited-emotion in order to display an expressed-emotion consistent with some display rules [4]. Most of researches so far of displaying elicited and ex- pressed emot

Pelachaud, Catherine

496

Probabilistic Assessment of User's Emotions in Educational Games Cristina Conati  

E-print Network

display their own emotions and react to the user's emotions. Building computers that display emotions1 Probabilistic Assessment of User's Emotions in Educational Games Cristina Conati Department-8224632 Abstract We present a probabilistic model to monitor a user's emotions and engagement during

Conati, Cristina

497

The BASES Expert Statement on emotion regulation in sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emotions experienced before and during sports competition have been found to influence sports performance. Emotion regulation is defined as the automatic or deliberate use of strategies to initiate, maintain, modify or display emotions (Gross & Thompson, 2007) and is proposed to occur when a discrepancy exists between current and desired emotions. Two distinct motivations to regulate emotion – hedonic and

Chris J. Beedie; Marc V. Jones; Mark Uphill; Tracey J. Devonport

2012-01-01

498

Emotion regulation in incarcerated young offenders with psychopathic traits  

Microsoft Academic Search

Core features of psychopathic personality in adults are shallow affectivity and generally low levels of emotional distress. Several studies suggest that these features are also in young people with psychopathic personality traits. The concept of emotion regulation refers to a person's ability to regulate negative emotions to reduce feelings of emotional distress. Since maladaptive emotion regulation has been associated with

Hanna Heinzen; Denis Koehler; Tom Smeets; Tibor Hoffer; Christian Huchzermeier

2011-01-01

499

Neuroscience projections to current debates in emotion psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Possible contributions from different branches of the neurosciences to current debates in emotion psychology are discussed. The controversial issues covered in the paper include the nature of emotion, cognitionemotion interaction, the evaluative criteria used in emotion-antecedent appraisal processes, sequential vs. parallel processing in appraisal, differential patterning of discrete emotions, and possible entry points into the emotion system. Examples for neuroscience

Klaus R. Scherer

1993-01-01