Sample records for bar-on emotional quotient

  1. The validity of the BarOn emotional intelligence quotient in an offender population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toni Hemmati; Jeremy F Mills; Daryl G Kroner

    2004-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that emotional intelligence can be quantified and is distinct from general intelligence. Bar-On (1997) established a self-report measure of emotional intelligence, the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i), proposed to reflect the potential for success in life. The current study examines the validity of the EQ-i in an offender sample. Results show that the EQ-i has no relationship

  2. Assessing emotional intelligence: reliability and validity of the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) in university students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darek Dawda; Stephen D. Hart

    2000-01-01

    The study examined reliability and validity of a new measure of emotional (i.e. non-cognitive) intelligence, the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i; Bar-On, 1997, in a sample of 243 university students. Results indicated that the EQ-i domain and component scales had good item homogeneity and internal consistency. Scores were not unduly affected by response styles or biases. The EQ-i scales had

  3. The BarOn Model of Emotional-Social Intelligence (ESI)1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reuven Bar-On

    2005-01-01

    The present manuscript is an empirically based theoretical paper that presents, describes, and exami- nes the Bar-On Model of Emotional-Social Intelligence (ESI) in deep. First, a description of the Emo- tional Quotient Inventory (the EQ-i), which has played an instrumental role in developing the model, is given. The EQ-i is a self-report measure of emotionally and socially intelligent behaviour. It

  4. Emotional expression and implications for occupational stress; an application of the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Bar-On; J. M Brown; B. D Kirkcaldy; E. P Thomé

    2000-01-01

    The concept of emotional intelligence was examined in relation to the latitude permitted for emotional expressiveness and adaptation to occupational culture in three groups of helping professionals: police officers, child care workers, and educators in mental health care. A total of 167 individuals were administered the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i). There were no differences in the primary scales measuring various

  5. Toward a Brief Multidimensional Assessment of Emotional Intelligence: Psychometric Properties of the Emotional Quotient Inventory-Short Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, James D. A.; Keefer, Kateryna V.; Wood, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Although several brief instruments are available for the emotional intelligence (EI) construct, their conceptual coverage tends to be quite limited. One notable exception is the short form of the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i:S), which measures multiple EI dimensions in addition to a global EI index. Despite the unique advantage offered by…

  6. An Analysis of the Emotional Quotient Inventory: Youth Version as a Measure of Emotional Intelligence in Children and Adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Celeste Nobles Shuler

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contribute to the understanding of emotional intelligence as it occurs in children and adolescents by investigating the psychometric properties (i.e. validity) of the Emotional Quotient Inventory: Youth Version (EQ-i: YV). The validation of this instrument involved considering its relationship to cognitive intelligence, self-report of personality, and parent-report of behavior. A battery of tests

  7. An Exploratory Study of Emotional Intelligence and Domestic Abuse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason Winters; Robert J. W. Clift; Donald G. Dutton

    2004-01-01

    To date, there is no literature specifically addressing the relationship between spousal battering and emotional intelligence, a concept that captures the success, or lack thereof, of a person's functioning in their immediate environment. Forty-four men convicted of spousal assault and 76 undergraduate students completed the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i; R. Bar-On, BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory: User's Manual, Multi-Health Systems, Inc.,

  8. Organizational Justice: Personality Traits or Emotional Intelligence? An Empirical Study in an Italian Hospital Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Palazzeschi, Letizia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of personality traits and emotional intelligence in relation to organizational justice. The Organizational Justice Scale, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised Short Form, and the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory were administered to 384 Italian nurses. The emotional intelligence…

  9. The relationship between emotional intelligence and alexithymia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James D. A Parker; Graeme J Taylor; R. Michael Bagby

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the empirical association between the apparently similar constructs of emotional intelligence and alexithymia was examined using latent variable analysis in a large community sample of adults (N=734). The Twenty-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) were used to assess alexithymia and emotional intelligence. Results revealed that although the constructs are independent, they

  10. Revisiting the predictive validity of emotional intelligence: self-report versus ability-based measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raymond M O'Connor; Ian S Little

    2003-01-01

    In response to general press assertions that training emotionally intelligent children will lead to great rewards, this study examined the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and academic achievement in college students, using both self-report and ability-based measures of EI. Specifically, the Mayer, Salovey, Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT, an ability-based measure) and the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i, a self-report

  11. Does the concept of emotional intelligence contribute to our understanding of temporal lobe resections?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jodie R. Gawryluk; Jeannette McGlone

    2007-01-01

    Research on temporal lobe (TL) resection has revealed impairments in cognition and emotion that differ as a function of laterality. Until recently, however, a construct called “emotional intelligence” had not been investigated in surgical recipients. We asked if Bar-On’s Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) was sensitive to the side of the temporal lobe lesion, and if the EQ-i correlated with intellectual

  12. The Relationship of Emotional Intelligence and Transformational Leadership Behavior in Texas AgriLife Extension Service Mid-Managers

    E-print Network

    Burkham, Angela B.

    2010-10-12

    for transformational, transactional and laissez?faire leadership styles and those were compared with scores on the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory Test (EQ?i). An independent samples t test was performed to assess whether the mean EI subscales scores for the high...

  13. What's Your Literature Quotient?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouzts, Dan T.

    Because a teacher who demonstrates a love of literature and reading is a valuable model for children, a study determined the knowledge of children's and adolescent literature of students enrolled in a graduate reading methods course. A questionnaire entitled "What's Your Literature Quotient?" was administered to 72 teachers concerning knowledge of…

  14. The DISC Quotient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, John R.; Baxter, Stephen

    2012-09-01

    D.I.S.C: Decipherment Impact of a Signal's Content. The authors present a numerical method to characterise the significance of the receipt of a complex and potentially decipherable signal from extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). The purpose of the scale is to facilitate the public communication of work on any such claimed signal, as such work proceeds, and to assist in its discussion and interpretation. Building on a "position" paper rationale, this paper looks at the DISC quotient proposed and develops the algorithmic steps and comprising measures that form this post detection strategy for information dissemination, based on prior work on message detection, decipherment. As argued, we require a robust and incremental strategy, to disseminate timely, accurate and meaningful information, to the scientific community and the general public, in the event we receive an "alien" signal that displays decipherable information. This post-detection strategy is to serve as a stepwise algorithm for a logical approach to information extraction and a vehicle for sequential information dissemination, to manage societal impact. The "DISC Quotient", which is based on signal analysis processing stages, includes factors based on the signal's data quantity, structure, affinity to known human languages, and likely decipherment times. Comparisons with human and other phenomena are included as a guide to assessing likely societal impact. It is submitted that the development, refinement and implementation of DISC as an integral strategy, during the complex processes involved in post detection and decipherment, is essential if we wish to minimize disruption and optimize dissemination.

  15. Quantum walks on quotient graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A. [Communication Sciences Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

    2007-06-15

    A discrete-time quantum walk on a graph {gamma} is the repeated application of a unitary evolution operator to a Hilbert space corresponding to the graph. If this unitary evolution operator has an associated group of symmetries, then for certain initial states the walk will be confined to a subspace of the original Hilbert space. Symmetries of the original graph, given by its automorphism group, can be inherited by the evolution operator. We show that a quantum walk confined to the subspace corresponding to this symmetry group can be seen as a different quantum walk on a smaller quotient graph. We give an explicit construction of the quotient graph for any subgroup H of the automorphism group and illustrate it with examples. The automorphisms of the quotient graph which are inherited from the original graph are the original automorphism group modulo the subgroup H used to construct it. The quotient graph is constructed by removing the symmetries of the subgroup H from the original graph. We then analyze the behavior of hitting times on quotient graphs. Hitting time is the average time it takes a walk to reach a given final vertex from a given initial vertex. It has been shown in earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 74, 042334 (2006)] that the hitting time for certain initial states of a quantum walks can be infinite, in contrast to classical random walks. We give a condition which determines whether the quotient graph has infinite hitting times given that they exist in the original graph. We apply this condition for the examples discussed and determine which quotient graphs have infinite hitting times. All known examples of quantum walks with hitting times which are short compared to classical random walks correspond to systems with quotient graphs much smaller than the original graph; we conjecture that the existence of a small quotient graph with finite hitting times is necessary for a walk to exhibit a quantum speedup.

  16. Emotional Intelligence (EI) of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

    PubMed Central

    GHAJARZADEH, Mahsa; OWJI, Mahsa; SAURAIAN, Mohammad Ali; NASER MOGHADASI, Abdorreza; AZIMI, Amirreza

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that affects physical and emotional aspects of patient’s lives. The aim of this study was to evaluate Emotional Intelligence (EI) in cases with MS. Methods One hundred sixty six clinically definite MS and 110 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. All participants filled valid and reliable Persian version Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i) questionnaire, which had been developed due to Bar-On model. Results Mean EI total score and 12 out of 15 subscales were significantly different between patients and controls. Total EI score and most of its subscales were significantly higher in patients with RR (Relapsing Remitting) than Secondary Progressive (SP) ones. There was significant negative correlation between EDSS and total EI score (rho=-0.4, P<0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis between the EI as a dependent variable and sex, type of disease, level of education, age and marital status as independent variables in patients showed that type of disease and level of education were independent predictors of EI. Conclusion Emotional intelligence as the ability to behave better and communicate with others should be considered in MS cases as their physical and psychological health are affected by their illness.

  17. Predicting Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) from the Systemizing Quotient-Revised (SQ-R) and Empathy Quotient (EQ)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Wheelwright; S. Baron-Cohen; N. Goldenfeld; J. Delaney; D. Fine; R. Smith; L. Weil; A. Wakabayashi

    2006-01-01

    Background:Empathizing is a specific component of social cognition. Empathizing is also specifically impaired in autism spectrum condition (ASC). These are two dimensions, measurable using the Empathy Quotient (EQ) and the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ). ASC also involves strong systemizing, a dimension measured using the Systemizing Quotient (SQ). The present study examined the relationship between the EQ, AQ and SQ. The

  18. Empathizing with basic emotions: Common and discrete neural substrates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bhismadev Chakrabarti; Edward Bullmore; Simon Baron-Cohen

    2006-01-01

    Empathizing is a quantitative trait involving understanding another's mental state (including their emotion) and responding to this with an appropriate emotion. A reliable, behaviorally validated self-report questionnaire measure of this is the Empathy Quotient (EQ), which is continuously distributed across the general population. The “discrete emotions” model posits that each “basic” emotion has a relatively independent evolutionary antecedent and social-communicative

  19. Associations between Emotional Intelligence, Socio-Emotional Adjustment, and Academic Achievement in Childhood: The Influence of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouzos, Andreas; Misailidi, Plousia; Hadjimattheou, Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between trait emotional intelligence (EI) with children's socio-emotional adjustment at school and academic achievement. Children aged 8 to 10 (n = 106) and 11 to 13 years (n = 99) completed the youth version of the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i: YV). Their socio-emotional adjustment was measured with…

  20. Causal inheritence in plane wave quotients

    SciTech Connect

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund; Ross, Simon F.

    2003-11-24

    We investigate the appearance of closed timelike curves in quotients of plane waves along spacelike isometries. First we formulate a necessary and sufficient condition for a quotient of a general spacetime to preserve stable causality. We explicitly show that the plane waves are stably causal; in passing, we observe that some pp-waves are not even distinguishing. We then consider the classification of all quotients of the maximally supersymmetric ten-dimensional plane wave under a spacelike isometry, and show that the quotient will lead to closed timelike curves iff the isometry involves a translation along the u direction. The appearance of these closed timelike curves is thus connected to the special properties of the light cones in plane wave spacetimes. We show that all other quotients preserve stable causality.

  1. A review and critique of emotional intelligence measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey M. Conte

    2005-01-01

    Summary Emotional intelligence measures vary widely in both their content and in their method of assessment. In particular, emotional intelligence measures tend to use either a self-report personality-based approach, an informant approach, or an ability-based assessment procedure. In this paper, the measurement and psychometric properties of four of the major emotional intelligence measures (Emotional Competence Inventory, Emotional Quotient Inventory, Multifactor

  2. Medium wave exposure characterisation using exposure quotients.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Jesús M; Rufo, Montaña; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia; Pinar, Iván

    2010-06-01

    One of the aspects considered in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines is that, in situations of simultaneous exposure to fields of different frequencies, exposure quotients for thermal and electrical stimulation effects should be examined. The aim of the present work was to analyse the electromagnetic radiation levels and exposure quotients for exposure to multiple-frequency sources in the vicinity of medium wave radio broadcasting antennas. The measurements were made with a spectrum analyser and a monopole antenna. Kriging interpolation was used to prepare contour maps and to estimate the levels in the towns and villages of the zone. The results showed that the exposure quotient criterion based on electrical stimulation effects to be more stringent than those based on thermal effects or power density levels. Improvement of dosimetry evaluations requires the spectral components of the radiation to be quantified, followed by application of the criteria for exposure to multiple-frequency sources. PMID:20159912

  3. Supersymmetric Quotients of M-Theory and Supergravity Backgrounds 

    E-print Network

    Gadhia, Sunil

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we explore discrete quotients of maximally supersymmetric supergravity backgrounds. Our main focus will be on eleven-dimensional backgrounds preserving all 32 supercharges. We shall first consider quotients ...

  4. Psychometric analysis of the Empathy Quotient (EQ)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Allison; S. Baron-Cohen; S. J. Wheelwright; M. H. Stone; S. J. Muncer

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the dimensionality of the Empathy Quotient (EQ) using two statistical approaches: Rasch and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Participants included N=658 with an autism spectrum condition diagnosis (ASC), N=1375 family members of this group, and N=3344 typical controls. Data were applied to the Rasch model (Rating Scale) using WINSTEPS. The Rasch model explained 83% of the variance. Reliability

  5. Emotional Intelligence Abilities and Traits in Different Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafetsios, Konstantinos; Maridaki-Kassotaki, Aikaterini; Zammuner, Vanda L.; Zampetakis, Leonidas A.; Vouzas, Fotios

    2009-01-01

    Two studies tested hypotheses about differences in emotional intelligence (EI) abilities and traits between followers of different career paths. Compared to their social science peers, science students had higher scores in adaptability and general mood traits measured with the Emotion Quotient Inventory, but lower scores in strategic EI abilities…

  6. The impact of maternal emotional intelligence and parenting style on child anxiety and behavior in the dental setting

    PubMed Central

    Pourkazemi, Maryam; Babapour, Jalil; Oskouei, Sina-Ghertasi

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The present study investigated the correlations between maternal emotional intelligence (EQ), parenting style, child trait anxiety and child behavior in the dental setting. Study design. One-hundred seventeen children, aged 4-6 years old (mean 5.24 years), and their mothers participated in the study. The BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory and Bumrind?s parenting style questionnaire were used to quantify maternal emotional intelligence and parenting style. Children?s anxiety and behavior was evaluated using the Spence Children?s Anxiety Scale (SCAS) and Frankl behavior scale. Results. Significant correlation was found between maternal EQ and child behavior (r=0.330; p<0.01); but not between parenting style and child behavior. There was no significant correlation between mother?s total EQ and child?s total anxiety; however, some subscales of EQ and anxiety showed significant correlations. There were significant correlations between authoritarian parenting style and separation anxiety (r=0.186; p<0.05) as well as authoritative parenting style and mother?s EQ (r=0.286; p<0.01). There was no significant correlation between child anxiety and behavior (r = -0.81). Regression analysis revealed maternal EQ is effective in predicting child behavior (?=0.340; p<0.01). Conclusion. This study provides preliminary evidence that the child?s behavior in the dental setting is correlated to mother?s emotional intelligence. Emotionally intelligent mothers were found to have predominantly authoritative parenting style. Key words:Anxiety, child behavior, parenting, pediatric dentistry. PMID:22926462

  7. Review Essay of Dorit Bar-On's Speaking My Mind

    E-print Network

    Byrne, Alex

    “Avowals” are utterances that “ascribe [current] states of mind”; for instance utterances of ‘I have a terrible headache’ and ‘I’m finding this painting utterly puzzling’ (Bar-On 2004: 1). And avowals, “when compared to ...

  8. The Correlation of IQ and Emotional Intelligence with Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghabanchi, Zargham; Rastegar, Rabe'e

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of both IQ and emotional intelligence on reading comprehension in Iran. Forty-five EFL college students from Payame Noor University of Gonbad and Azad University of Gorgan participated in this study. Three independent tests were administrated, including Bar-On's emotional intelligence…

  9. Math Videos Captioned and Signed in ASL: Quotient Rule and Quotients with Negative Exponents

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a video on exponents in the series of lessons on math provided by DeafTEC. Gary Blatto-Vallee, a math and science instructor at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf, guides viewers through a variety of mathematical exercises in this DeafTEC video series. All lessons are fully captioned, signed in ASL, and voiced. In this 10:18 video, Blatto-Vallee uses an electronic whiteboard to show several examples of how to use the quotient rule and use quotients with negative exponents. See the main Math Video Resources page for an introduction to this video series.

  10. Growth of Finitely Presented Rees Quotients of Free Inverse Semigroups

    E-print Network

    Sydney, University of

    1 Growth of Finitely Presented Rees Quotients of Free Inverse Semigroups Dedicated to Professor John Meakin L.M. SHNEERSON and D. EASDOWN We prove that a finitely presented Rees quotient of a free semigroup analogue of a classical result that characterises polynomial growth of finitely presented Rees

  11. An Impossibility Theorem for Linear Symplectic Circle Quotients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, Hans-Christian; Seaton, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Using explicit computations of Hilbert series, we prove that when d > 2, a d-dimensional symplectic quotient at the zero level of a unitary circle representation V such that VS1 = { 0 } cannot be ?-graded regularly symplectomorphic to the quotient of a unitary representations of a finite group.

  12. Averaging and Globalising Quotients of Informetric and Scientometric Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egghe, Leo; Rousseau, Ronald

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of impact factors for "Journal Citation Reports" subject categories focuses on the difference between an average of quotients and a global average, obtained as a quotient of averages. Applications in the context of informetrics and scientometrics are given, including journal prices and subject discipline influence scores. (Author/LRW)

  13. SUBSPACES AND QUOTIENTS OF BANACH SPACES WITH SHRINKING UNCONDITIONAL BASES

    E-print Network

    Johnson, William B.

    SUBSPACES AND QUOTIENTS OF BANACH SPACES WITH SHRINKING UNCONDITIONAL BASES W. B. JOHNSON tree property is isomorphic to a subspace as well as a quotient of a Banach space with a shrinking, Example 1.d.2]. Since every skipped block basis of its natural shrinking basis is equivalent to the unit

  14. Emotional Intelligence and Job Satisfaction: The EQ Relationship for Deans of U.S. Business Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coco, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine if a positive relationship existed between Emotional Intelligence and Job Satisfaction for deans of business schools. A secondary purpose was to determine which Emotional Quotient (EQ) competencies were most important for satisfied deans and how these competencies assisted processes related to…

  15. Academic achievement in high school: does emotional intelligence matter?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James D. A. Parker; Ronald E. Creque; David L. Barnhart; Jan Irons Harris; Sarah A. Majeski; Laura M. Wood; Barbara J. Bond; Marjorie J. Hogan

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between emotional intelligence and academic achievement in high school was examined. Students (N=667) attending a high school in Huntsville, Alabama completed the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i:YV). At the end of the academic year the EQ-i:YV data was matched with students’ academic records for the year. When EQ-i:YV variables were compared in groups who had achieved very different levels

  16. The largest left quotient ring of a ring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. V. Bavula

    2011-01-01

    The left quotient ring (i.e. the left classical ring of fractions) $Q_{cl}(R)$ of a ring $R$ does not always exist and still, in general, there is no good understanding of the reason why this happens. In this paper, it is proved existence of the largest left quotient ring $Q_l(R)$, i.e. $Q_l(R) = S_0(R)^{-1}R$ where $S_0(R)$ is the largest left regular

  17. Respiratory quotient and ammonia excretion in Tilapia mossambica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. N. Kutty

    1972-01-01

    Tilapia mossambica (Peters), acclimated to and tested in fresh water at 30°C, maintained a routine respiratory quotient (R Q) of about unity and an ammonia quotient (A Q) (Vol. NH2\\/Vol. O2) of about 0.2 at high ambient oxygen concentrations. At low oxygen concentrations (below 2 ppm) R Q and A Q increased sharply to values of 8 and 1, respectively

  18. Convergent, Discriminant, and Incremental Validity of Competing Measures of Emotional Intelligence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc A. Brackett; John D. Mayer

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the convergent, discriminant, and incre- mental validity of one ability test of emotional intelligence (EI)—the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso-Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT)—and two self-report measures of EI—the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) and the self-report EI test (SREIT). The MSCEIT showed minimal relations to the EQ-i and SREIT, whereas the latter two measures were moderately interrelated. Among EImeasures, the MSCEIT was

  19. Development of short forms of the Empathy Quotient (EQ-Short) and the Systemizing Quotient (SQ-Short)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akio Wakabayashi; Simon Baron-Cohen; Sally Wheelwright; Nigel Goldenfeld; Joe Delaney; Debra Fine; Richard Smith; Leonora Weil

    2006-01-01

    The empathizing–systemizing (E–S) theory has been tested using the Empathy Quotient (EQ) and the Systemizing Quotient (SQ). The present study tested n=1761 students with these instruments, to determine if short versions of these scales could be constructed. This would be desirable both for faster assessment and to establish which are the key items on each scale. Principal component analysis and

  20. Emotional Pathfinding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toby Donaldson; Andrew Park; I-ling Lin

    2004-01-01

    \\u000a This paper presents a study of the influence of emotions on the behaviour of an intelligent pathfinding agent. A model of\\u000a pathfinding is proposed that takes into account the emotional state of the agent. Results show that blindly following the\\u000a most urgent emotion can lead to degenerate behaviour, and that cross-exclusion can be used to effectively moderate emotional\\u000a influences. Applications

  1. Emotion Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiberg, Daniel; Elenius, Kjell; Burger, Susanne

    Studies of expressive speech have shown that discrete emotions such as anger, fear, joy, and sadness can be accurately communicated, also cross-culturally, and that each emotion is associated with reasonably specific acoustic characteristics [8]. However, most previous research has been conducted on acted emotions. These certainly have something in common with naturally occurring emotions but may also be more intense and prototypical than authentic, everyday expressions [6, 13]. Authentic emotions are, on the other hand, often a combination of different affective states and occur rather infrequently in everyday life.

  2. A selection-quotient process for packed word Hopf algebra

    E-print Network

    Duchamp, G H E; Tanasa, A

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we define a Hopf algebra structure on the vector space spanned by packed words using a selection-quotient coproduct. We show that this algebra is free on its irreducible packed words. Finally, we give some brief explanations on the Maple codes we have used.

  3. A selection-quotient process for packed word Hopf algebra

    E-print Network

    G. H. E. Duchamp; N. Hoang-Nghia; A. Tanasa

    2013-10-16

    In this paper, we define a Hopf algebra structure on the vector space spanned by packed words using a selection-quotient coproduct. We show that this algebra is free on its irreducible packed words. Finally, we give some brief explanations on the Maple codes we have used.

  4. Hybrid intelligent fault diagnosis based on quotient space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jinfeng Zhang; Chuang Sun; Zhousuo Zhang; Zhengjia He

    2011-01-01

    Aiming at the problem that existing hybrid intelligent models do not take into account the advantages and limitations of different diagnostic methods and fail to achieve complementary advantages of different classifiers, a new model of hybrid intelligent fault diagnosis based on quotient space is proposed. In this model, samples are granulated and granular layers are constructed by calculating equivalence and

  5. Geometry of the ergodic quotient reveals coherent structures in flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiši?, Marko; Mezi?, Igor

    2012-08-01

    Dynamical systems that exhibit diverse behaviors can rarely be completely understood using a single approach. However, by identifying coherent structures in their state spaces, i.e., regions of uniform and simpler behavior, we could hope to study each of the structures separately and then form the understanding of the system as a whole. The method we present in this paper uses trajectory averages of scalar functions on the state space to: (a) identify invariant sets in the state space, and (b) to form coherent structures by aggregating invariant sets that are similar across multiple spatial scales. First, we construct the ergodic quotient, the object obtained by mapping trajectories to the space of the trajectory averages of a function basis on the state space. Second, we endow the ergodic quotient with a metric structure that successfully captures how similar the invariant sets are in the state space. Finally, we parametrize the ergodic quotient using intrinsic diffusion modes on it. By segmenting the ergodic quotient based on the diffusion modes, we extract coherent features in the state space of the dynamical system. The algorithm is validated by analyzing the Arnold-Beltrami-Childress flow, which was the test-bed for alternative approaches: the Ulam’s approximation of the transfer operator and the computation of Lagrangian Coherent Structures. Furthermore, we explain how the method extends the Poincaré map analysis for periodic flows. As a demonstration, we apply the method to a periodically-driven three-dimensional Hill’s vortex flow, discovering unknown coherent structures in its state space. Finally, we discuss differences between the ergodic quotient and alternatives, propose a generalization to analysis of (quasi-)periodic structures, and lay out future research directions.

  6. A family of quotients of the Rees algebra V. Barucci, M. D'Anna, F. Strazzanti

    E-print Network

    Barucci, Valentina

    A family of quotients of the Rees algebra V. Barucci, M. D'Anna, F. Strazzanti October 4, 2013 Dedicated to Marco Fontana on occasion of his 65-th birthday Abstract A family of quotient rings of the Rees present both of them as quotients of the Rees algebra modulo particular ideals. This observation leaded

  7. QUOTIENTS OF FULLY NONLINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS PAULO TABUADA AND GEORGE J. PAPPAS

    E-print Network

    Pappas, George J.

    QUOTIENTS OF FULLY NONLINEAR CONTROL SYSTEMS PAULO TABUADA AND GEORGE J. PAPPAS SIAM J. CONTROL. In this paper, we introduce and study quotients of fully nonlinear control systems. Our definition is inspired by categorical definitions of quotients as well as recent work on abstractions of affine control systems. We show

  8. Cocaine Users Manifest Impaired Prosodic and Cross-Modal Emotion Processing

    PubMed Central

    Hulka, Lea M.; Preller, Katrin H.; Vonmoos, Matthias; Broicher, Sarah D.; Quednow, Boris B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: A small number of previous studies have provided evidence that cocaine users (CU) exhibit impairments in complex social cognition tasks, while the more basic facial emotion recognition is widely unaffected. However, prosody and cross-modal emotion processing has not been systematically investigated in CU so far. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess complex multisensory emotion processing in CU in comparison to controls and to examine a potential association with drug use patterns. Method: The abbreviated version of the comprehensive affect testing system (CATS-A) was used to measure emotion perception across the three channels of facial affect, prosody, and semantic content in 58 CU and 48 healthy control (HC) subjects who were matched for age, sex, verbal intelligence, and years of education. Results: CU had significantly lower scores than controls in the quotient scales of “emotion recognition” and “prosody recognition” and the subtests “conflicting prosody/meaning – attend to prosody” and “match emotional prosody to emotional face” either requiring to attend to prosody or to integrate cross-modal information. In contrast, no group difference emerged for the “affect recognition quotient.” Cumulative cocaine doses and duration of cocaine use correlated negatively with emotion processing. Conclusion: CU show impaired cross-modal integration of different emotion processing channels particularly with regard to prosody, whereas more basic aspects of emotion processing such as facial affect perception are comparable to the performance of HC. PMID:24046750

  9. Emotional intelligence and academic success: examining the transition from high school to university

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James D. A. Parker; Laura J. Summerfeldt; Marjorie J. Hogan; Sarah A. Majeski

    2004-01-01

    The transition from high school to university was used as the context for examining the relationship between emotional intelligence and academic achievement. During the first month of classes 372 first-year full-time students at a small Ontario university completed the short form of the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i:Short). At the end of the academic year the EQ-i:Short data was matched with

  10. Quotient Construction of 't Hooft's Quantum Equivalence Classes

    E-print Network

    C. P. Sun X. F. Liu; S. X. Yu

    2000-06-15

    Most recently 't Hooft has postulated (G 't Hooft, Class. Quant. Grav. 16 (1999) 3263-3279) that quantum states at the ``atomic scale''can be understood as equivalence classes of primordial states governed by a dissipative deterministic theory underlying quantum theory at the ``Planck scale''. Defining invariant subspaces clearly for primordial states according to a given evolution, we mathematically re-formulate 't Hooft's theory as a quotient space construction with the time-reversible evolution operator induced naturally. With this observation and some analysis, 't Hooft's theory is generalized beyond his case where the evolution at the ``Planck scale'' is periodic or the time is discrete. We also give a novel illustration that the Fock space of quantum oscillator could follow from the quotient space construction for certain primordial states obeying non-reversible evolution governed by a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian.

  11. Application of Quotient Rings for Stability Analysis in Chemical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerbrei, Sonja; Sensse, Anke; Eiswirth, Markus

    2011-04-01

    Concepts from algebraic geometry (polynomial rings) can be used to determine analytically the stationary solutions in chemical reactions systems, more generally, systems of ordinary differential equations of polynomial form. The stability analysis via the Jacobian matrix often leads to complicated expressions which can hardly be analyzed. It is shown that these expressions can be simplified by forming quotient rings of the corresponding polynomial ring. The coefficients in the characteristic equation of the Jacobian can be represented by the normal forms obtained by generating the quotient rings so that their sign changes in dependence of a kinetic parameter and, hence, the stability can be determined. The procedure is illustrated using a well-known surface reaction.

  12. Gromov-Witten invariants of symplectic quotients and adiabatic limits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Rita Gaio; Fac. Ciencias-Porto

    2001-01-01

    We study pseudoholomorphic curves in symplectic quotients as adiabatic limits\\u000aof solutions of a system of nonlinear first order elliptic partial differential\\u000aequations in the ambient symplectic manifold. The symplectic manifold carries a\\u000aHamiltonian group action. The equations involve the Cauchy-Riemann operator\\u000aover a Riemann surface, twisted by a connection, and couple the curvature of\\u000athe connection with the moment

  13. Effects of therapeutic recreation on the brain quotient in the elderly dementia patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moon-Suk; Cho, Byung-Jun; Min, Gyung-Hun; Kim, Seon-Rye

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated how participation in a recreation program influences electroencephalogram changes in the demented elderly. [Subjects] Fourteen patients were included in the experimental group and 18 in the control group. [Methods] They had no regular exercise habits, and walked independently, and scored 11–23 points on the Mini-Mental State Examination, and thus had no apraxia and could communicate. To empirically verify changes in electroencephalograms of the demented elderly for depression, sleep disorder, and life quality through their participation in the therapeutic recreation program, male and female citizens >65?years old at a geriatric hospital were included. The experimental group attended therapeutic recreation programs regularly for 3 months and control group did not. [Results] Electroencephalogram values were higher in the experimental than in the control group, demonstrating that the therapeutic recreation program enhances electroencephalogram values. However, post-program electroencephalograms between the two groups showed minor differences for all variables, except for the anti-stress index and brain quotient. [Conclusion] The therapeutic recreation program caused changes in brain activation, and this method revealed the relation between the activity program and emotion via the anti-stress index. PMID:26180346

  14. Emotion Talk: Helping Caregivers Facilitate Emotion Understanding and Emotion Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinton, Bonnie; Fujiki, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on two aspects of emotional intelligence, emotion understanding and emotion regulation. These abilities are important because of their impact on social communication and the way in which they influence a child's access to knowledge. Caregivers who engage their children in emotion talk may strengthen the ability of their…

  15. Eating behaviours in relation to emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Filaire, E; Larue, J; Rouveix, M

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the abnormal eating attitudes in judoists and the possible relationships between eating attitudes, emotional intelligence, and body dissatisfaction. A total of 20 national judoists and 25 control participants were enrolled in the study. Subjects completed the following questionnaires: The Eating Attitudes Test, The Body Image Assessment Scale-Body Dimensions and the Bar-On Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire. 30 % of the athletes (n=6) and 20% of the controls (n=5) presented disordered eating attitudes although these subjects were of normal weight. They also presented body dissatisfaction and had lower levels of emotional intelligence in comparison to the groups without disordered eating attitudes, particularly in factors such as intrapersonal (p<0.01), adaptability (p<0.05), stress tolerance (p<0.04) and general mood (p<0.04). The athletes reported using different weight loss methods such as self-induced vomiting (20%), fasting (40%), diuretics (15%), and laxatives (50%). Among disordered eating attitude groups (Controls+Judoists), Global EAT-26 was negatively correlated with stress tolerance (p<0.04: r=-0.64), emotional self-awareness (p<0.05: r=-0.70), general mood (p<0.01: r=-0.74), and positively correlated with body dissatisfaction (p<0.01: r=0.79). Results highlight the role of emotion in disordered eating attitudes, which is an important finding in terms of the prevention and management of disordered eating. PMID:21165809

  16. Rayleigh Quotient Iteration in 3D, Deterministic Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Slaybaugh, R [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin; Evans, Thomas M [ORNL] [ORNL; Davidson, Gregory G [ORNL] [ORNL; Wilson, P. [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin

    2012-01-01

    Today's "grand challenge" neutron transport problems require 3-D meshes with billions of cells, hundreds of energy groups, and accurate quadratures and scattering expansions. Leadership-class computers provide platforms on which high-fidelity fluxes can be calculated. However, appropriate methods are needed that can use these machines effectively. Such methods must be able to use hundreds of thousands of cores and have good convergence properties. Rayleigh quotient iteration (RQI) is an eigenvalue solver that has been added to the Sn code Denovo to address convergence. Rayleigh quotient iteration is an optimal shifted inverse iteration method that should converge in fewer iterations than the more common power method and other shifted inverse iteration methods for many problems of interest. Denovo's RQI uses a new multigroup Krylov solver for the fixed source solutions inside every iteration that allows parallelization in energy in addition to space and angle. This Krylov solver has been shown to scale successfully to 200,000 cores: for example one test problem scaled from 69,120 cores to 190,080 cores with 98% efficiency. This paper shows that RQI works for some small problems. However, the Krylov method upon which it relies does not always converge because RQI creates ill-conditioned systems. This result leads to the conclusion that preconditioning is needed to allow this method to be applicable to a wider variety of problems.

  17. An Exploration of the Relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and the Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Wendy; Hovey, Richard; Hodwitz, Kathryn; Zhang, Su

    2011-01-01

    The present study explored the relationship between the Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI) admissions process and the Bar-On EQ-i emotional intelligence (EI) instrument in order to investigate the potential for the EQ-i to serve as a proxy measure to the MMI. Participants were 196 health science candidates who completed both the MMI and the EQ-i as…

  18. Does a self-report measure for emotional intelligence assess something different than general intelligence?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. J. L. Derksen; Ingrid Kramer; Michael Katzko

    2002-01-01

    One of the theoretical claims made regarding the concept of emotional intelligence is that it concerns a range of human abilities which are independent of the more familiar concept of intellectual ability. This study was conducted to evaluate the divergent validity of Bar-On's EQ-i as compared to the General Adult Mental Ability scale (GAMA), a measure of fluid intelligence. In

  19. Growth of Rees quotients of free inverse semigroups defined by small numbers of relators

    E-print Network

    Sydney, University of

    1 Growth of Rees quotients of free inverse semigroups defined by small numbers of relators D. It is shown that if the semigroup S has polyno- mial growth then S is monogenic (with zero) or k 3. The three required to guarantee polynomial growth of a finitely presented Rees quotient, assuming no generator

  20. Students' Errors in Setting up Difference Quotients and Connections to Their Conceptions of Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Although finding the limits of the difference quotients in the definitions of the derivative is troubling for many students, a difficulty that preceded this confusion was observed: students were not able to correctly set up the difference quotients as required in the definitions. The purpose of this study is to uncover student errors in setting up…

  1. A Floating Point Divider Performing IEEE Rounding and Quotient Conversion in Parallel

    E-print Network

    Yang, Sung-Bong

    A Floating Point Divider Performing IEEE Rounding and Quotient Conversion in Parallel Woo-Chan Park-749 Korea, {hantack}@kurene.yonsei.ac.kr {yang}@cs.yonsei.ac.kr Abstract. Processing floating point division time. In this paper, a floating point divider performing quotient conversion and rounding in parallel

  2. Incremental Maintenance of Quotient Cube for Median Dept. of Computer Science,

    E-print Network

    Tung, Anthony Kum Hoe

    Incremental Maintenance of Quotient Cube for Median Cuiping Li Dept. of Computer Science, Renmin of China Beijing 100872, China ABSTRACT Data cube pre-computation is an important concept for sup- porting to compute a complete data cube due to the huge storage requirement. Recently proposed quotient cube

  3. Emotion Words Shape Emotion Percepts Maria Gendron

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    Emotion Words Shape Emotion Percepts Maria Gendron Boston College and Northeastern University/Harvard Medical School People believe they see emotion written on the faces of other people. In an instant, simple facial actions are transformed into information about another's emotional state. The present research

  4. Betti numbers of holomorphic symplectic quotients via arithmetic Fourier transform

    PubMed Central

    Hausel, Tamás

    2006-01-01

    A Fourier transform technique is introduced for counting the number of solutions of holomorphic moment map equations over a finite field. This technique in turn gives information on Betti numbers of holomorphic symplectic quotients. As a consequence, simple unified proofs are obtained for formulas of Poincaré polynomials of toric hyperkähler varieties (recovering results of Bielawski–Dancer and Hausel–Sturmfels), Poincaré polynomials of Hilbert schemes of points and twisted Atiyah–Drinfeld–Hitchin–Manin (ADHM) spaces of instantons on ?2 (recovering results of Nakajima–Yoshioka), and Poincaré polynomials of all Nakajima quiver varieties. As an application, a proof of a conjecture of Kac on the number of absolutely indecomposable representations of a quiver is announced. PMID:16606857

  5. Parental Socialization of Emotion

    PubMed Central

    Cumberland, Amanda; Spinrad, Tracy L.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of research on emotion, including the socialization of emotion. In this article, a heuristic model of factors contributing to the socialization of emotion is presented. Then literature relevant to the socialization of children’s emotion and emotion-related behavior by parents is reviewed, including (a) parental reactions to children’s emotions, (b) socializers’ discussion of emotion, and (c) socializers’ expression of emotion. The relevant literature is not conclusive and most of the research is correlational. However, the existing body of data provides initial support for the view that parental socialization practices have effects on children’s emotional and social competence and that the socialization process is bidirectional. In particular, parental negative emotionality and negative reactions to children’s expression of emotion are associated with children’s negative emotionality and low social competence. In addition, possible moderators of effects such as level of emotional arousal are discussed. PMID:16865170

  6. Emotional Intelligence Components in Alcohol Dependent and Mentally Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Mohagheghi, Arash; Amiri, Shahrokh; Mousavi Rizi, Seyedreza; Safikhanlou, Salman

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Emotional intelligence might play an important role in the onset and persistence of different psychopathologies. This study investigated the relationship between emotional intelligence and alcohol dependence. Methods. In this case-control study, participants included alcohol dependent individuals and mentally healthy inpatients. Each group consisted of 40 individuals (male/female: 1). The diagnosis was based on the criteria of the DSM-IV-TR using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-IV). All the participants completed Bar-On emotional intelligence test. Results. 20 males and 20 females were included in each group. Mean age of alcohol dependent participants and controls was 31.28?±?7.82 and 34.93?±?9.83 years in that order. The analyses showed that the alcohol dependent individuals had a significant difference compared with the control group and received lower scores in empathy, responsibility, impulse control, self-esteem, optimism, emotional consciousness, stress tolerance, autonomy, problem-solving, and total score of emotional intelligence components. Conclusion. Patients with alcohol dependence have deficits in components of emotional intelligence. Identifying and targeted training of the individuals with lower scores in components of emotional intelligence may be effective in prevention of alcohol dependence. PMID:25893214

  7. PROC. S. D. ACAD. SCI., VOL. 57 0978, 13n FAULT BARS ON FEATHERS OF PHEASANTS

    E-print Network

    PROC. S. D. ACAD. SCI., VOL. 57 0978, 13n FAULT BARS ON FEATHERS OF PHEASANTS SUBJECTED TO STRESS on the feathers of many species of songbirds (Wood 1950) and raptors (Hammerstrom 1967). These bars are straight, translucent lines perpendicular to the feather barbs (Fig. 1) that develop as the growing barbs emerge from

  8. The Rate of Photorespiration as Measured by Means of Oxygen Uptake and Its Respiratory Quotient

    PubMed Central

    Samish, Yochai B.

    1971-01-01

    Oxygen recycling inside photosynthesizing leaves was found to amount to less than 0.3% of the oxygen consumed by photorespiration under natural conditions, provided the influence of buildup of oxygen released by photosynthesis into the external air was taken into consideration. When this is related to the amounts of photorespired CO2, which had been previously found to be reabsorbed by photosynthesis, it appears that previous respiratory quotients reported for photorespiration were underestimated. For the same reason the photosynthetic quotient was overestimated. Actually, quotients of photorespiration and of photosynthesis approach the more normal range of respiratory quotients int the dark. The oxygen recycling was calculated according to an electrical analogue to oxygen flow. The determination of photorespiration, when measured by oxygen uptake, can be more accurate than that by CO2 measurement. However, recycling of oxygen occurs in larger amounts at lower oxygen and higher CO2 concentrations, as well as under conditions of high resistance to transpiration. PMID:16657795

  9. Use of risk quotient and probabilistic approaches to assess risks of pesticides to birds

    EPA Science Inventory

    When conducting ecological risk assessments for pesticides, the United States Environmental Protection Agency typically relies upon the risk quotient (RQ). This approach is intended to be conservative in nature, making assumptions related to exposure and effects that are intended...

  10. The mean number of steps in the Euclidean algorithm with odd partial quotients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. V. Ustinov

    2010-01-01

    The length of the continued-fraction expansion of a rational number with odd partial quotients is expressed via the Gauss-Kuz’min\\u000a statistics for the classical continued fraction. This has made it possible to prove asymptotic formulas, similar to those\\u000a already known for the classical Euclidean algorithm, for the mean length of the Euclidean algorithm with odd partial quotients.

  11. Validation of Autism Spectrum Quotient Adult Version in an Australian Sample

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, J.; Galic, I.; Stokes, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Autism Spectrum Quotient is used to assess autistic spectrum traits in intellectually competent adults in both the general population and the autism spectrum community. While the autism spectrum Quotient has been validated in several different cultures, to date no study has assessed the psychometrics of the Autism Spectrum Quotient on an Australian population. The purpose of this study was to assess the psychometrics of the autism spectrum Quotient in an Australian sample of both typically developing individuals (n = 128) and individuals with autism spectrum disorder (n = 104). The results revealed that the internal consistency and the test-retest reliability were satisfactory; individuals with autism spectrum disorder scored higher on total Autism Spectrum Quotient score and its subscales than typically developing individuals; however, gender differences were not apparent on total score. Possible cultural differences may explain some of the psychometric variations found. The results of this analysis revealed that the Autism Spectrum Quotient was a reliable instrument for investigating variation in autistic symptomology in both typically developing and Autism Spectrum Disorders populations within an Australian population. PMID:23762552

  12. Estimated intelligence quotient in anorexia nervosa: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesised that people with anorexia nervosa have a higher intelligence quotient (IQ) level than the general population. The purpose of this review was to systematically appraise the research into reported IQ levels in people with anorexia nervosa. Methods A search using the terms intelligence quotient, IQ, intelligence, cognition, eating disorders and anorexia was conducted in electronic databases only. Results In all, 30 peer-reviewed studies written in English that used well established measures of intelligence quotient (the National Adult Reading Test and Wechsler Intelligence Scales) were identified. This review established that people with anorexia nervosa score 10.8 units and 5.9 units above the average intelligence quotient of the normative population on the National Adult Reading Test and Wechsler Intelligence Scales, respectively. An association was found between Body Mass Index and intelligence quotient, as measured by the National Adult Reading Test. Conclusions More studies including other eating disorder categories and recovered people are needed to explore important questions regarding the role of the intelligence quotient in treatment response. PMID:21182794

  13. Priming Ability Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutte, Nicola S.; Malouff, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined whether priming self-schemas relating to successful emotional competency results in better emotional intelligence performance. In the first study participants were randomly assigned to a successful emotional competency self-schema prime condition or a control condition and then completed an ability measure of emotional

  14. Emotions and antisocial behavior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roy F. Baumeister; Jill Lobbestael

    2011-01-01

    Traditional theories have regarded emotions as transient states that directly cause or inhibit behavior. Contrary to them, recent evidence has suggested that links between emotion and behavior are largely indirect, often depending on learning by stimulating cognitive appraisal and anticipation of future emotional outcomes. We propose that one major function of the human emotion system is to foster positive social

  15. Human Abilities: Emotional Intelligence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John D. Mayer; Richard D. Roberts; Sigal G. Barsade

    2008-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) involves the ability to carry out accu- rate reasoning about emotions and the ability to use emotions and emotional knowledge to enhance thought. We discuss the origins of the EI concept, define EI, and describe the scope of the field today. We review three approaches taken to date from both a theoretical and methodological perspective. We find

  16. How Emotions Affect Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylwester, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Studies show our emotional system is a complex, widely distributed, and error-prone system that defines our basic personality early in life and is quite resistant to change. This article describes our emotional system's major parts (the peptides that carry emotional information and the body and brain structures that activate and regulate emotions)…

  17. Food and emotion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura Canetti; Eytan Bachar; Elliot M Berry

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between eating and emotion has always interested researchers of human behavior. This relationship varies according to the particular characteristics of the individual and according to the specific emotional state. We consider findings on the reciprocal interactions between, on the one hand, emotions and food intake, and, on the other, the psychological and emotional consequences of losing weight and

  18. 7?Emotion in Organizations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hillary Anger Elfenbein

    2007-01-01

    Emotion has become one of the most popular—and popularized—areas within organizational scholarship. This chapter attempts to review and bring together within a single framework the wide and often disjointed literature on emotion in organizations. The integrated framework includes processes detailed by previous theorists who have defined emotion as a sequence that unfolds chronologically. The emotion process begins with a focal

  19. Emotional state and efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ovchinnikova, O. V.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was made of the effect of emotional states-negative and positive- on work performance. Data cover intensity of emotional arousal, personality characteristics of person involved, typological features of person's nervous system, emotional stability of person, and past experience of person. Particular attention was given to emotional stress effects on efficiency, given modern working conditions.

  20. Bodily maps of emotions.

    PubMed

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Hari, Riitta; Hietanen, Jari K

    2014-01-14

    Emotions are often felt in the body, and somatosensory feedback has been proposed to trigger conscious emotional experiences. Here we reveal maps of bodily sensations associated with different emotions using a unique topographical self-report method. In five experiments, participants (n = 701) were shown two silhouettes of bodies alongside emotional words, stories, movies, or facial expressions. They were asked to color the bodily regions whose activity they felt increasing or decreasing while viewing each stimulus. Different emotions were consistently associated with statistically separable bodily sensation maps across experiments. These maps were concordant across West European and East Asian samples. Statistical classifiers distinguished emotion-specific activation maps accurately, confirming independence of topographies across emotions. We propose that emotions are represented in the somatosensory system as culturally universal categorical somatotopic maps. Perception of these emotion-triggered bodily changes may play a key role in generating consciously felt emotions. PMID:24379370

  1. Bodily maps of emotions

    PubMed Central

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Hari, Riitta; Hietanen, Jari K.

    2014-01-01

    Emotions are often felt in the body, and somatosensory feedback has been proposed to trigger conscious emotional experiences. Here we reveal maps of bodily sensations associated with different emotions using a unique topographical self-report method. In five experiments, participants (n = 701) were shown two silhouettes of bodies alongside emotional words, stories, movies, or facial expressions. They were asked to color the bodily regions whose activity they felt increasing or decreasing while viewing each stimulus. Different emotions were consistently associated with statistically separable bodily sensation maps across experiments. These maps were concordant across West European and East Asian samples. Statistical classifiers distinguished emotion-specific activation maps accurately, confirming independence of topographies across emotions. We propose that emotions are represented in the somatosensory system as culturally universal categorical somatotopic maps. Perception of these emotion-triggered bodily changes may play a key role in generating consciously felt emotions. PMID:24379370

  2. Effects of Music Interventions on Emotional States and Running Performance

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew M.; Davis, Paul A.; Devonport, Tracey J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study compared the effects of two different music interventions on changes in emotional states before and during running, and also explored effects of music interventions upon performance outcome. Volunteer participants (n = 65) who regularly listened to music when running registered online to participate in a three-stage study. Participants attempted to attain a personally important running goal to establish baseline performance. Thereafter, participants were randomly assigned to either a self-selected music group or an Audiofuel music group. Audiofuel produce pieces of music designed to assist synchronous running. The self-selected music group followed guidelines for selecting motivating playlists. In both experimental groups, participants used the Brunel Music Rating Inventory-2 (BMRI-2) to facilitate selection of motivational music. Participants again completed the BMRI-2 post- intervention to assess the motivational qualities of Audiofuel music or the music they selected for use during the study. Results revealed no significant differences between self-selected music and Audiofuel music on all variables analyzed. Participants in both music groups reported increased pleasant emotions and decreased unpleasant emotions following intervention. Significant performance improvements were demonstrated post-intervention with participants reporting a belief that emotional states related to performance. Further analysis indicated that enhanced performance was significantly greater among participants reporting music to be motivational as indicated by high scores on the BMRI-2. Findings suggest that both individual athletes and practitioners should consider using the BMRI-2 when selecting music for running. Key points Listening to music with a high motivational quotient as indicated by scores on the BMRI-2 was associated with enhanced running performance and meta-emotional beliefs that emotions experienced during running helped performance. Beliefs on the effectiveness of music intended to alter emotions were associated with high scores on the BMRI-2. Runners seeking to use music as an emotion regulating strategy should consider using the BMRI-2 as an effective means by which to identify potentially motivating tracks. PMID:24149889

  3. Practical emotional neural networks.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Ehsan; Akbarzadeh-T, M-R

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a limbic-based artificial emotional neural network (LiAENN) for a pattern recognition problem. LiAENN is a novel computational neural model of the emotional brain that models emotional situations such as anxiety and confidence in the learning process, the short paths, the forgetting processes, and inhibitory mechanisms of the emotional brain. In the model, the learning weights are adjusted by the proposed anxious confident decayed brain emotional learning rules (ACDBEL). In engineering applications, LiAENN is utilized in facial detection, and emotion recognition. According to the comparative results on ORL and Yale datasets, LiAENN shows a higher accuracy than other applied emotional networks such as brain emotional learning (BEL) and emotional back propagation (EmBP) based networks. PMID:25078111

  4. Emotion and decision making.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Jennifer S; Li, Ye; Valdesolo, Piercarlo; Kassam, Karim S

    2015-01-01

    A revolution in the science of emotion has emerged in recent decades, with the potential to create a paradigm shift in decision theories. The research reveals that emotions constitute potent, pervasive, predictable, sometimes harmful and sometimes beneficial drivers of decision making. Across different domains, important regularities appear in the mechanisms through which emotions influence judgments and choices. We organize and analyze what has been learned from the past 35 years of work on emotion and decision making. In so doing, we propose the emotion-imbued choice model, which accounts for inputs from traditional rational choice theory and from newer emotion research, synthesizing scientific models. PMID:25251484

  5. The hidden emotions of tourism 

    E-print Network

    Carnegie, Margaret Simone

    1996-01-01

    To date, scholarship has presented us with three perspectives on organizational uses of emotion: Emotion as Work, Organizational Uses of Emotional Expression, and Organizational Cultural Manipulation of Emotion. Within all three...

  6. Emotions and Leadership: The Role of Emotional Intelligence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer M. George

    2000-01-01

    This paper suggests that feelings (moods and emotions) play a central role in the leadership process. More specifically, it is proposed that emotional intelligence, the ability to understand and manage moods and emotions in the self and others, contributes to effective leadership in organizations. Four major aspects of emotional intelligence, the appraisal and expression of emotion, the use of emotion

  7. The systemizing quotient: an investigation of adults with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism, and normal sex differences.

    PubMed Central

    Baron-Cohen, Simon; Richler, Jennifer; Bisarya, Dheraj; Gurunathan, Nhishanth; Wheelwright, Sally

    2003-01-01

    Systemizing is the drive to analyse systems or construct systems. A recent model of psychological sex differences suggests that this is a major dimension in which the sexes differ, with males being more drawn to systemize than females. Currently, there are no self-report measures to assess this important dimension. A second major dimension of sex differences is empathizing (the drive to identify mental states and respond to these with an appropriate emotion). Previous studies find females score higher on empathy measures. We report a new self-report questionnaire, the Systemizing Quotient (SQ), for use with adults of normal intelligence. It contains 40 systemizing items and 20 control items. On each systemizing item, a person can score 2, 1 or 0, so the SQ has a maximum score of 80 and a minimum of zero. In Study 1, we measured the SQ of n = 278 adults (114 males, 164 females) from a general population, to test for predicted sex differences (male superiority) in systemizing. All subjects were also given the Empathy Quotient (EQ) to test if previous reports of female superiority would be replicated. In Study 2 we employed the SQ and the EQ with n = 47 adults (33 males, 14 females) with Asperger syndrome (AS) or high-functioning autism (HFA), who are predicted to be either normal or superior at systemizing, but impaired at empathizing. Their scores were compared with n = 47 matched adults from the general population in Study 1. In Study 1, as predicted, normal adult males scored significantly higher than females on the SQ and significantly lower on the EQ. In Study 2, again as predicted, adults with AS/HFA scored significantly higher on the SQ than matched controls, and significantly lower on the EQ than matched controls. The SQ reveals both a sex difference in systemizing in the general population and an unusually strong drive to systemize in AS/HFA. These results are discussed in relation to two linked theories: the 'empathizing-systemizing' (E-S) theory of sex differences and the extreme male brain (EMB) theory of autism. PMID:12639333

  8. A Reevaluation of the Use of a Self-service Fruit and Vegetable Bar on Consumption and Plate Waste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. L. Broussard; R. M. Fournet

    1996-01-01

    LEARNING OUTCOME: To reevaluate the use of a self-service fruit and vegetable bar on consumption and plate waste of these foods by elementary school children.This study was undertaken to reevaluate the use of a self-service fruit and vegetable bar on consumption and plate waste of fruits and vegetables by elementary school children. The secondary purpose was to identify factors that

  9. Emotion, Social Function, and Psychopathology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dacher Keltner; Ann M. Kring

    1998-01-01

    The studies of emotion function and emotional disorders complement one another. In this article, the authors outline relations between the social functions of emotion and four psychological disorders. The authors first present a social-functional account of emotion and argue that emotions help coordinate social interactions through their informative, evocative, and incentive functions. They then review evidence concerning the emotional and

  10. Emotion Detection from Text

    E-print Network

    Shivhare, Shiv Naresh

    2012-01-01

    Emotion can be expressed in many ways that can be seen such as facial expression and gestures, speech and by written text. Emotion Detection in text documents is essentially a content - based classification problem involving concepts from the domains of Natural Language Processing as well as Machine Learning. In this paper emotion recognition based on textual data and the techniques used in emotion detection are discussed.

  11. Emotional intelligence and the identification of emotion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John D. Mayer; Glenn Geher

    1996-01-01

    This article is concerned with individual differences in the ability to connect thoughts to emotions. People who are good at connecting thoughts to feelings may better “hear” the emotional implications of their own thoughts, as well as understand the feelings of others from what they say. We had 321 participants read the writings of a target group of people and

  12. Neuromodulatory Basis of Emotion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Marc Fellous

    1999-01-01

    The neural basis of emotion can be found in both the neural computation and the neuromodulation of the neural substrate mediating behavior. I review the experimental evidence showing the involvement of the hypothalamus, the a mygdala and the prefrontal cortex in emotion. For each of these structures, I show the important role of various neuromodulatory systems in mediating emotional behavior.

  13. Emotional Intelligence through Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosn, Irma K.

    Children develop emotional intelligence during the early years of life, and according to some experts, emotional intelligence is a more reliable predictor of academic achievement than is IQ. However, today's children appear to be low on emotional well-being. This has potentially negative consequences, not only for academic achievement but also for…

  14. The amygdala and emotion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michela Gallagher; Andrea A Chiba

    1996-01-01

    The amygdala complex has long been known as part of the neural circuitry critical for emotion. Beyond its role in emotional reactivity, studies of animal models and patients with amygdala damage demonstrate its importance in emotional learning, whereby cues acquire significance through association with rewarding or aversive events. Although its function in associative learning has become well established, other recent

  15. Emotional memory in schizophrenia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeremy Hall; Jonathan M. Harris; James W. McKirdy; Eve C. Johnstone; Stephen M. Lawrie

    2007-01-01

    Emotionally arousing scenes are better remembered than neutral ones. The biological basis of this emotional memory effect has been studied in lesion and neuro-imaging studies and depends upon an interaction between the amygdala and medial temporal lobe memory systems including the hippocampus. This study sought to investigate whether patients with schizophrenia had performance deficits on emotional memory tasks consistent with

  16. Emotion elicitation using films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James J. Gross; Robert W. Levenson

    1995-01-01

    Researchers interested in emotion have long struggled with the problem of how to elicit emotional responses in the laboratory. In this article, we summarise five years of work to develop a set of films that reliably elicit each of eight emotional states (amusement, anger, contentment, disgust, fear, neutral, sadness, and surprise). After evaluating over 250 films, we showed selected film

  17. Managing Your Emotional Reactions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about what you might do next time. Continue Emotions 101 The skills we use to manage our emotions and react well are part of a bigger ... about being able to notice and identify the emotions we feel at any given moment. It is ...

  18. Emotion Regulation CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

    E-print Network

    Gross, James J.

    CHAPTER 1 Emotion Regulation CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS JAMES J. GROSS ROSS A. THOMPSON Standing, paper or plastic are made. Quotidian acts of emotion regulation such as this constitute one important- changes that require us to regulate how emotions are experienced and expressed. But what do people do

  19. Three dimensions of emotion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harold Schlosberg

    1954-01-01

    The author contends that the activation theory of emotions is the most adequate to date for conceptualizing the intensitive dimension of emotion, and that electrical skin conductance is a good measure of the extent of activation present. For other dimensions of emotion, however, he feels that other measurement approaches are necessary and discusses facial expressions as one of these. Evidence

  20. Computational Emotions Encourage Collective

    E-print Network

    Pollack, Jordan B.

    Computational Emotions Encourage Collective Behavior in Population Dynamics Megan Olsen University of emotions may enable collective behav- ior in a predator-prey system. Our cellular automata model combines emotion-based decision rules with simple communication. Although there are a number of human psychological

  1. Immediacy Bias in Emotion Perception: Current Emotions Seem More Intense than Previous Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Boven, Leaf; White, Katherine; Huber, Michaela

    2009-01-01

    People tend to perceive immediate emotions as more intense than previous emotions. This "immediacy bias" in emotion perception occurred for exposure to emotional but not neutral stimuli (Study 1), when emotional stimuli were separated by both shorter (2 s; Studies 1 and 2) and longer (20 min; Studies 3, 4, and 5) delays, and for emotional

  2. On Four-Dimensional Terminal Quotient Singularities Author(s): Shigefumi Mori, David R. Morrison, Ian Morrison

    E-print Network

    Cheltsov, Ivan

    On Four-Dimensional Terminal Quotient Singularities Author(s): Shigefumi Mori, David R. Morrison, Ian Morrison Source: Mathematics of Computation, Vol. 51, No. 184 (Oct., 1988), pp. 769-786 Published-DimensionalTerminalQuotient Singularities* By Shigefumi Mori, David R. Morrison, and Ian Morrison** Abstract. We report on an investigation

  3. Emotional aging: a discrete emotions perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kunzmann, Ute; Kappes, Cathleen; Wrosch, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Perhaps the most important single finding in the field of emotional aging has been that the overall quality of affective experience steadily improves during adulthood and can be maintained into old age. Recent lifespan developmental theories have provided motivation- and experience-based explanations for this phenomenon. These theories suggest that, as individuals grow older, they become increasingly motivated and able to regulate their emotions, which could result in reduced negativity and enhanced positivity. The objective of this paper is to expand existing theories and empirical research on emotional aging by presenting a discrete emotions perspective. To illustrate the usefulness of this approach, we focus on a discussion of the literature examining age differences in anger and sadness. These two negative emotions have typically been subsumed under the singular concept of negative affect. From a discrete emotions perspective, however, they are highly distinct and show multidirectional age differences. We propose that such contrasting age differences in specific negative emotions have important implications for our understanding of long-term patterns of affective well-being across the adult lifespan. PMID:24834060

  4. A CANONICAL ARITHMETIC QUOTIENT FOR ACTIONS OF LATTICES IN SIMPLE GROUPS

    E-print Network

    Fisher, David

    an important class of actions for lattices # actionA CANONICAL ARITHMETIC QUOTIENT FOR ACTIONS OF LATTICES IN SIMPLE GROUPS DAVID FISHER Abstract. In this paper we produce an invariant for any ergodic, finite entropy action of a lattice in a simple Lie group

  5. Personality correlates of the broader autism phenotype as assessed by the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth J. Austin

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to characterise the five-factor personality model profile of the broader autism phenotype as assessed by the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ). Comparison data were also obtained for a brief Asperger syndrome screening measure. The psychometric properties and factor structure of the AQ were also assessed and group differences in AQ scores examined. The AQ

  6. Estimation of the Intelligence Quotient Using Wechsler Intelligence Scales in Children and Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merchan-Naranjo, Jessica; Mayoral, Maria; Rapado-Castro, Marta; Llorente, Cloe; Boada, Leticia; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2012-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) patients show heterogeneous intelligence profiles and the validity of short forms for estimating intelligence has rarely been studied in this population. We analyzed the validity of Wechsler Intelligence Scale (WIS) short forms for estimating full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) and assessing intelligence profiles in 29…

  7. initial rise in respiratory quotient (RQ) was also similar in both groups. However, in rats

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    initial rise in respiratory quotient (RQ) was also similar in both groups. However, in rats fed in rats fed the TC diet the decline in RQ was more progressive and began its decrease only 3-4 h after ad libitum to two groups of eight male Wister rats. Rats fed the TD diet showed the first significant

  8. Brain-Age Quotients in Recently Detoxified Alcoholic, Recovered Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochla, Nancy A. Nichols; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Examined performance of female alcoholics, recovered alcoholics, and controls on the Brain-Age Quotient (BAQ) and subtests. The mean BAQs of the alcoholics and recovered alcoholics were significantly lower than that of the controls. Results suggest a differential recovery of cognitive abilities in abstinent female alcoholics. (Author)

  9. Effect of Leucovorin (Folinic Acid) on the Developmental Quotient of Children with Down's Syndrome (Trisomy 21)

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Effect of Leucovorin (Folinic Acid) on the Developmental Quotient of Children with Down's Syndrome deficiency may contribute to mental retardation in Down's syndrome (DS). Methodology: We investigated development of children with Down's syndrome, at least in some subgroups of the DS population, particularly

  10. Lexical Effects on Children's Speech Processing: Individual Differences Reflected in the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ota, Mitsuhiko; Stewart, Mary E.; Petrou, Alexandra M.; Dickie, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to examine whether children exhibit the same relationship that adults show between lexical influence on phoneme identification and individual variation on the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ). Method: Data from 62 4- to 7-year-olds with no diagnosis of autism were analyzed. The main task involved identification of…

  11. Intelligence Quotient (IQ) and Growth Indices in Children with the History of Low Birth Weight

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manoochehr Mahram; Noureddin Mousavinasab; Gooran Urimei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In two groups of children with and without the history of low birth weight (LBW), Intelligence Quotient (IQ) and growth indices including weight and height are compared. Methods: In this historical cohort study performed in Zanjan City (Iran), 130 six-year-old children of both sexes in two equal groups, 65 with LBW history and 65 with normal birth weight (NBW),

  12. Facial emotion recognition in agenesis of the corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired social functioning is a common symptom of individuals with developmental disruptions in callosal connectivity. Among these developmental conditions, agenesis of the corpus callosum provides the most extreme and clearly identifiable example of callosal disconnection. To date, deficits in nonliteral language comprehension, humor, theory of mind, and social reasoning have been documented in agenesis of the corpus callosum. Here, we examined a basic social ability as yet not investigated in this population: recognition of facial emotion and its association with social gaze. Methods Nine individuals with callosal agenesis and nine matched controls completed four tasks involving emotional faces: emotion recognition from upright and inverted faces, gender recognition, and passive viewing. Eye-tracking data were collected concurrently on all four tasks and analyzed according to designated facial regions of interest. Results Individuals with callosal agenesis exhibited impairments in recognizing emotions from upright faces, in particular lower accuracy for fear and anger, and these impairments were directly associated with diminished attention to the eye region. The callosal agenesis group exhibited greater consistency in emotion recognition across conditions (upright vs. inverted), with poorest performance for fear identification in both conditions. The callosal agenesis group also had atypical facial scanning (lower fractional dwell time in the eye region) during gender naming and passive viewing of faces, but they did not differ from controls on gender naming performance. The pattern of results did not differ when taking into account full-scale intelligence quotient or presence of autism spectrum symptoms. Conclusions Agenesis of the corpus callosum results in a pattern of atypical facial scanning characterized by diminished attention to the eyes. This pattern suggests that reduced callosal connectivity may contribute to the development and maintenance of emotion processing deficits involving reduced attention to others' eyes. PMID:25705318

  13. The Brain Basis of Emotions 1 BRAIN BASIS OF EMOTION

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    The Brain Basis of Emotions 1 BRAIN BASIS OF EMOTION The brain basis of emotion: A meta, Building 149 Charlestown, MA 02129 lindqukr@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu #12;The Brain Basis of Emotions 2 Abstract Researchers have wondered how the brain creates emotions since the early days of psychological science

  14. Speed of emotional information processing and emotional intelligence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yulia A. Dodonova; Yury S. Dodonov

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between the speed of emotional information processing and emotional intelligence (EI). To evaluate individual differences in the speed of emotional information processing, a recognition memory task consisted of two subtests similar in design but differing in the emotionality of the stimuli. The first subtest required judgment about whether an emotional facial expression

  15. Conditions Under Which the "Package Principle" is Required for a DBA Theorem: Suppose an agent's betting quotients q(X) are defined over a set of

    E-print Network

    Fitelson, Branden

    an agent's betting quotients q(X) are defined over a set of propositions B. If those betting quotients meet the following conditions, there does not exist a Dutch Book against the agent consisting of a single bet: 1. q: Suppose for reductio that the agent's quotients meet the three conditions and that a single-bet Book

  16. Emotion Regulation JAMES J. GROSS

    E-print Network

    Gross, James J.

    CHAPTER 31 ·Emotion Regulation JAMES J. GROSS Have you ever gotten so angry that you've done). Although the topic of emotion regulation is a relatively late addition to the field of emotion, a concern with emotion regulation is anything but new. Emotion regu lation has been a focus in the study of psycho

  17. Emotional Robotics: Tug of War

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Grant Cooper; Dov Katz; Hava T. Siegelmann

    Emotional communication skills are dominant in biological systems. Although the rules that govern creating and broadcasting emotional cues are inherently complex, their effectiveness makes them attractive for biological systems. Emotional communication requires very low bandwidth and is generally easy to interpret. Despite the ad- vantages of emotional communication, little or no research has explored which emotional cues are the most

  18. What's Basic About Basic Emotions?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Ortony; Terence J. Turner

    1990-01-01

    A widespread assumption in theories of emotion is that there exists a small set of basic emotions. From a biological perspective, this idea is manifested in the belief that there might be neurophysiological and anatomical substrates corresponding to the basic emotions. From a psychological perspective, basic emotions are often held to be the primitive building blocks of other, nonbasic emotions.

  19. Emotion and Autobiographical Memory

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Alisha C.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Autobiographical memory encompasses our recollections of specific, personal events. In this article, we review the interactions between emotion and autobiographical memory, focusing on two broad ways in which these interactions occur. First, the emotional content of an experience can influence the way in which the event is remembered. Second, emotions and emotional goals experienced at the time of autobiographical retrieval can influence the information recalled. We discuss the behavioral manifestations of each of these types of interactions and describe the neural mechanisms that may support those interactions. We discuss how findings from the clinical literature (e.g., regarding depression) and the social psychology literature (e.g., on emotion regulation) might inform future investigations of the interplay between the emotions experienced at the time of retrieval and the memories recalled, and we present ideas for future research in this domain. PMID:20374933

  20. Emotional Eavesdropping: Infants Selectively Respond to Indirect Emotional Signals

    PubMed Central

    Repacholi, Betty M.; Meltzoff, Andrew N.

    2007-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether 18-month-olds learn from emotions directed to a third party. Infants watched an adult perform actions on objects, and an Emoter expressed Anger or Neutral affect toward the adult in response to her actions. The Emoter then became neutral and infants were given access to the objects. Infants’ actions were influenced by their memory of the Emoter’s affect. Moreover, infants’ actions varied as a function of whether they were currently in the Emoter’s visual field. If the previously angry Emoter was absent (Experiment 1) or turned her back (Experiment 2), infants did not use the prior emotion to regulate their behavior. Infants learn from emotional eavesdropping, and their subsequent behavior depends on the Emoter’s orientation toward them. PMID:17381787

  1. Emotional intelligence is…?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janette Warwick; Ted Nettelbeck

    2004-01-01

    Eighty-four tertiary students completed questionnaires measuring emotional intelligence (EI), personality, affiliation, abstract reasoning ability, emotional knowledge, and task orientation. Among personality variables, extraversion and agreeableness correlated moderately with total Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS) (p<0.01), and weakly (p<0.05) with openness, conscientiousness and neuroticism. TMMS was also correlated with emotional knowledge (p<0.01) but not with abstract reasoning or interest in affiliation. Results

  2. A Robot Emotion Generation Mechanism Based on PAD Emotion Space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gao Qingji; Wang Kai; Liu Haijuan

    2008-01-01

    A robot emotion generation mechanism is presented in this paper, in which emotion is described in PAD emotion space. In this\\u000a mechanism, emotion is affected by the robot personality, the robot task and the emotion origin, so the robot emotion will\\u000a change naturally when it senses the extern stimuli. We also experiment on Fuwa robot, and demonstrate that this mechanism

  3. Positive Emotion, Negative Emotion, and Emotion Control in the Externalizing Problems of School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Geunyoung; Walden, Tedra; Harris, Vicki; Karrass, Jan; Catron, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the role of emotion and emotion control in children's externalizing problems. Third- to sixth-grade children were administered a self-report measure of positive emotion, negative emotion, and emotion control. Peer- and teacher-reported adjustment problems were assessed. Structural equations modeling revealed that…

  4. Facial Areas and Emotional Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucher, Jerry D.; Ekman, Paul

    1975-01-01

    Provides strong support for the view that there is no one area of the face which best reveals emotion, but that the value of the different facial areas in distinguishing emotions depends upon the emotion being judged. (Author)

  5. Dystonia: Emotional and Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    Emotional & Mental Health Although dystonia is a movement disorder that impacts the physical body, it can also impact emotional and ... emotion as well as muscle movement. For years, mental health professionals have recognized that coping with a chronic ...

  6. A Novel Method Testing the Ability to Imitate Composite Emotional Expressions Reveals an Association with Empathy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Justin H. G.; Nicolson, Andrew T. A.; Clephan, Katie J.; de Grauw, Haro; Perrett, David I.

    2013-01-01

    Social communication relies on intentional control of emotional expression. Its variability across cultures suggests important roles for imitation in developing control over enactment of subtly different facial expressions and therefore skills in emotional communication. Both empathy and the imitation of an emotionally communicative expression may rely on a capacity to share both the experience of an emotion and the intention or motor plan associated with its expression. Therefore, we predicted that facial imitation ability would correlate with empathic traits. We built arrays of visual stimuli by systematically blending three basic emotional expressions in controlled proportions. Raters then assessed accuracy of imitation by reconstructing the same arrays using photographs of participants’ attempts at imitations of the stimuli. Accuracy was measured as the mean proximity of the participant photographs to the target stimuli in the array. Levels of performance were high, and rating was highly reliable. More empathic participants, as measured by the empathy quotient (EQ), were better facial imitators and, in particular, performed better on the more complex, blended stimuli. This preliminary study offers a simple method for the measurement of facial imitation accuracy and supports the hypothesis that empathic functioning may utilise motor control mechanisms which are also used for emotional expression. PMID:23626756

  7. Annotating Emotion in Meetings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis Reidsma; Dirk Heylen; Roeland Ordelman

    We present the results of two trials testing procedures for the annotation of emotion and mental state of the AMI corpus. The first procedure is an adaptation of the FeelTrace method, focusing on a continuous labelling of emotion dimensions. The second method is centered around more discrete labeling of segments using categorical labels. The results reported are promising for this

  8. Darwin and Emotion Expression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ursula Hess; Pascal Thibault

    2009-01-01

    In his book The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals, Charles Darwin (1872\\/1965) defended the argument that emotion expressions are evolved and adaptive (at least at some point in the past) and serve an important communicative function. The ideas he developed in his book had an important impact on the field and spawned rich domains of inquiry. This

  9. Professional emotional development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Perry; I Ball

    2008-01-01

    Emotional intelligence is vital for effective teaching and teacher wellbeing, so there is good reason for teachers to get in touch with their emotions. Sooner or later, all teachers experience some kind of pressure, some form of stress and some level of concern about their performance in the classroom. They may feel that they are not in touch with the

  10. Emotions and Golf Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Alexander B.; Tenenbaum, Gershon; English, R. William

    2006-01-01

    A multiple case study investigation is reported in which emotions and performance were assessed within the probabilistic individual zone of optimal functioning (IZOF) model (Kamata, Tenenbaum, & Hanin, 2002) to develop idiosyncratic emotion-performance profiles. These profiles were incorporated into a psychological skills training (PST)…

  11. Emotionally Expressive Agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Magy Seif El-nasr; Thomas R. Ioerger; John Yen; Donald H. House; Frederic I. Parke

    1999-01-01

    The ability to express emotions is important for creating believable interactive characters. To simulate emotional expressions in an interactive environment, an intelligent agent needs both an adaptive model for generating believ- able responses, and a visualization model for mapping emo- tions into facial expressions. Recent advances in intelligent agents and in facial modeling have produced effective al- gorithms for these

  12. Emotions "Unleashed" in Paint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Many painters use lines to express powerful emotions. Both Vincent van Gogh and Jean-Michel Basquiat had difficult lives filled with hardship, and died at a young age. They both used art to deal with their emotions. It seems like the stronger the feelings were in them, the faster the strokes were put down in their work. In this article,…

  13. Poincaré polynomials for Abelian symplectic quotients of pure $r$-qubits via wall-crossings

    E-print Network

    Saeid Molladavoudi; Hishamuddin Zainuddin

    2015-06-17

    In this paper, we compute a recursive wall-crossing formula for the Poincar\\'e polynomials and Euler characteristics of Abelian symplectic quotients of a complex projective manifold under a special effective action of a torus with non-trivial characters. An analogy can be made with the space of pure states of a composite quantum system containing $r$ quantum bits under action of the maximal torus of Local Unitary operations.

  14. The Greatest Common Quotient of Borel-Serre and the Toroidal Compactifications of Locally Symmetric Spaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Ji

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we identify the greatest common quotient (GCQ) of the Borel-Serre compactification and the toroidal compactifications of Hermitian locally symmetric spaces with a new compactification. Using this compactification, we completely settle a conjecture of Harris-Zucker that this GCQ is equal to the Baily-Borel compactification. We also show that the GCQ of the reductive Borel-Serre compactification and the toroidal

  15. A Formula for the Standard Error of Estimate of Deviation Quotients on Short Forms of Wechsler's Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    A formula is presented for the standard error of estimate of Deviation Quotients (DQs). The formula is shown to perform well when used with data on short forms of two of Wechsler's scales. (Author/JAC)

  16. Hepatic Steatosis, Carbohydrate Intake, and Food Quotient in Patients with NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Concepcion; de Ledinghen, Victor; Vergniol, Julien; Foucher, Juliette; Le Bail, Brigitte; Carlier, Sabrina; Maury, Elisa; Gin, Henri; Rigalleau, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Is steatosis related to the spontaneous carbohydrate intake in patients with NAFLD? We performed dietary records for 24 patients with NAFLD, 3 months after their liver biopsy was performed and before the deliverance of a dietary advice. The food quotient, indicator of the proportion of calories from carbohydrates, was calculated as (1.00×%??calories from carbohydrates/100) + (0.70×%??calories from lipids/100) + (0.81×%??calories from proteins/100). The associations between diet variables and steatosis% on the hepatic biopsies were tested by regression analysis, and diet variables were compared according to the presence of fibrosis. The subjects displayed a large range of steatosis, 50.5%?±?25.5 [10–90], correlated with their energy intake (1993?±?597?kcal/d, r = 0.41, P < 0.05) and food quotient (0.85?±?0.02, r = 0.42, P < 0.05), which remained significant with both variables by a multivariate regression analysis (r = 0.51, P < 0.05). For the 17/24 patients with a hepatic fibrosis, the energy intake was lower (fibrosis: 1863?±?503 versus others: 2382?±?733?kcal/d, P < 0.05), and their food quotients did not differ from patients without fibrosis. Hepatic steatosis was related to the energy and carbohydrate intakes in our patients; the role of dietary carbohydrates was detectable in the range of usual carbohydrate intake: 32% to 58% calories. PMID:23737773

  17. Emotion in Intelligent Virtual Agents: the Flow Model of Emotion

    E-print Network

    Gaspar, Graça

    have allowed the definition of emotion like characteristics and behavior, however they also have someEmotion in Intelligent Virtual Agents: the Flow Model of Emotion Luís Morgado1,2 and Graça Gaspar2 emotion in artificial agents. However, a general framework to support the implementation of emo- tional

  18. Emotion Concepts and Emotional States in Social Judgment and Categorization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Åse Innes-Ker; Paula M. Niedenthal

    2002-01-01

    An objection to conclusions of research investigating effects of emotions on cognitive processes is that the effects are due to the activation of semantic concepts rather than to emotional feelings. A sentence unscrambling task was developed to prime concepts of happiness, sadness, or neutral ideas. Pilot studies demonstrated that unscrambling emotional sentences did not affect emotional state but did prime

  19. Emotional reactivity and emotion recognition in frontotemporal lobar

    E-print Network

    Levenson, Robert W.

    Emotional reactivity and emotion recognition in frontotemporal lobar degeneration K.H. Werner, Ph de- cline in social and emotional behavior; however, current understanding regarding the specific aspects of emotional functioning that are preserved and disrupted is limited. Objective: To assess

  20. Negativity bias, emotion targets, and emotion systems.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Patrick Colm

    2014-06-01

    Hibbing et al.'s article isolates a plausible psychological factor contributing to differences in political orientation. However, there are two potential difficulties. Both the nature of negativity and the liberal-conservative opposition are ambiguous. A possible way of treating these problems enhances the theoretical framework through fuller reference to emotion systems and categories of triggers for those systems. PMID:24970436

  1. Comparative analysis of the closed quotient for lip and tongue trills in relation to the sustained vowel /?/.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Gislaine Ferro; Montagnoli, Arlindo Neto; Nemr, Nair Kátia; Menezes, Márcia Helena Moreira; Tsuji, Domingos Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Various types of trill exercises have been used for a long time as a tool in the treatment and preparation of the voice. Although they are reported to produce vocal benefits in most subjects, their physiology has not yet been studied in depth. The aim of this study was to compare the mean and standard deviation of the closed quotient in exercises of lip and tongue trills with the sustained vowel /?/ in opera singers. Ten professional classical (operatic) singers, reportedly in perfect laryngeal health, served as subjects for this study and underwent electroglottography. During the examination, the subjects were instructed to deliver the sustained vowel /?/ and lip and tongue trills in a same preestablished frequency and intensity. The mean values and standard deviation of the closed quotient were obtained using the software developed for this purpose. The comparison of the results was intrasubjects; maximum intensities were compared only among them and so were minimum intensities. The means of closed quotient were statistically significant only in the strong intensities, and the lip trill was different from the tongue trill and the sustained vowel /?/. The standard deviation of the closed quotient distinguished the sustained vowel /?/ from the lip and tongue trills in the two intensities. We concluded that there is oscillation of the closed quotient during the exercises of tongue and lip trills, and the closed quotient is higher during the performance of exercises of the lip trill, when compared with the two other utterances, only in the strong intensities. PMID:20926253

  2. Unconscious Emotion Piotr Winkielman1

    E-print Network

    Berridge, Kent

    ). Such an emotional process may nevertheless drive the person's behavior and physiological reactions, even whileUnconscious Emotion Piotr Winkielman1 and Kent C. Berridge2 1 University of California, San Diego and necessary ingredient of emotion. Here we argue that emotion also can be genuinely unconscious. We describe

  3. Emotional intelligence and effective leadership

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin Palmer; Melissa Walls; Zena Burgess; Con Stough

    2001-01-01

    Emotional intelligence has become increasingly popular as a measure for identifying potentially effective leaders, and as a tool for developing effective leadership skills. Despite this popularity, however, there is little empirical research that substantiates the efficacy of emotional intelligence in these areas. The aim of the present paper was to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence and effective leadership. Emotional

  4. An argument for basic emotions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Ekman

    1992-01-01

    Emotions are viewed as having evolved through their adaptive value in dealing with fundamental life-tasks. Each emotion has unique features: signal, physiology, and antecedent events. Each emotion also has characteristics in common with other emotions: rapid onset, short duration, unbidden occurrence, automatic appraisal, and coherence among responses. These shared and unique characteristics are the product of our evolution, and distinguish

  5. Evaluation of Emotional Intelligence and Job Satisfaction in Employees of Kashan Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ghoreishi, Fatemeh Sadat; Zahirrodine, Ali Reza; Assarian, Fatemeh; Moosavi, Seyed Gholam Abbas; Zare Zadeh Mehrizi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Job satisfaction and emotional intelligence are two important variables in organizational behavioral studies, and are key factors in promoting the efficiency of organizations. Objectives: The present study was conducted in order to determine the job satisfaction and emotional intelligence of employees of Kashan hospitals in 2011. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 121 employees of Kashan hospitals who were selected using random stratified method. In this study, Bar-on emotional intelligence and job satisfaction questionnaires were used. The data were analyzed using statistical methods such as odds ratio, Chi-square and Fisher's exact test. Results: The majority of employees (76%) had moderate emotional intelligence while 88.2% of them had moderate job satisfaction. In this study, there were no significant relations between emotional intelligence and variables such as sex, education, and marital and job status (P > 0.05) but significant relations were found between the age and emotional intelligence (P = 0.01). Furthermore, there was no significant relation between job satisfaction and demographic variables. Moreover, no significant relation was found between the emotional intelligence and job satisfaction (P > 0.05). Conclusions: As the majority of the staff had average level of job satisfaction and emotional intelligence and others were lower than average, it seems necessary for authorities to explore the reasons for job dissatisfaction to prevent job burnout, depression and developing a sense of helplessness in the staff. It is also recommended to hold educational workshops for the staff especially who are younger than 40 years to promote their emotional intelligence. PMID:25414889

  6. Expressiveness in musical emotions.

    PubMed

    Vieillard, Sandrine; Roy, Mathieu; Peretz, Isabelle

    2012-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate how emotion category, characterized by distinct musical structures (happiness, sadness, threat) and expressiveness (mechanical, expressive) may influence overt and covert behavioral judgments and physiological responses in musically trained and untrained listeners. Mechanical and expressive versions of happy, sad and scary excerpts were presented while physiological measures were recorded. Participants rated the intensity of the emotion they felt. In addition, they monitored excerpts for the presence of brief breaths. Results showed that the emotion categories were rated higher in the expressive than in the mechanical versions and that this effect was larger in musicians. Moreover, expressive excerpts were found to increase skin conductance level more than the mechanical ones, independently of their arousal value, and to slow down response times in the breath detection task relative to the mechanical versions, suggesting enhanced capture of attention by expressiveness. Altogether, the results support the key role of the performer's expression in the listener's emotional response to music. PMID:21761216

  7. Postpartum Period: Emotions

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... register. I'm interested in: Pregnancy Baby growth & care Research Volunteer opportunities Advocacy in government For health ... acid During your pregnancy Your pregnant body Prenatal care Eating and nutrition Physical activity Emotional and life ...

  8. Emotion as morphofunctionality.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Carlos Herrera; Sanz, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    We argue for a morphofunctional approach to emotion modeling that can also aid the design of adaptive embodied systems. By morphofunctionality we target the online change in both structure and function of a system, and relate it to the notion of physiology and emotion in animals. Besides the biological intuition that emotions serve the function of preparing the body, we investigate the control requirements that any morphofunctional autonomous system must face. We argue that changes in morphology modify the dynamics of the system, thus forming a variable structure system (VSS). We introduce some of the techniques of control theory to deal with VSSs and derive a twofold hypothesis: first, the loose coupling between two control systems, in charge of action and action readiness, respectively; second, the formation of patterned metacontrol. Emotional phenomena can be seen as emergent from this control setup. PMID:23186348

  9. Immediacy bias in emotion perception: current emotions seem more intense than previous emotions.

    PubMed

    Van Boven, Leaf; White, Katherine; Huber, Michaela

    2009-08-01

    People tend to perceive immediate emotions as more intense than previous emotions. This immediacy bias in emotion perception occurred for exposure to emotional but not neutral stimuli (Study 1), when emotional stimuli were separated by both shorter (2 s; Studies 1 and 2) and longer (20 min; Studies 3, 4, and 5) delays, and for emotional reactions to pictures (Studies 1 and 2), films (Studies 3 and 4), and descriptions of terrorist threats (Study 5). The immediacy bias may be partly caused by immediate emotion's salience, and by the greater availability of information about immediate compared with previous emotion. Consistent with emotional salience, when people experienced new emotions, they perceived previous emotions as less intense than they did initially (Studies 3 and 5)-a change in perception that did not occur when people did not experience a new immediate emotion (Study 2). Consistent with emotional availability, reminding people that information about emotions naturally decays from memory reduced the immediacy bias by making previous emotions seem more intense (Study 4). Discussed are implications for psychological theory and other judgments and behaviors. PMID:19653796

  10. Emotion work: disclosing cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Grace J.; Aviv, Caryn; Levine, Ellen G.; Ewing, Cheryl; Au, Alfred

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality for all women in the US. Current research has focused on the psychological relationship and not the sociological relationship between emotions and the experience of breast cancer survivors. This paper focuses on the emotion work involved in self-disclosing a breast cancer diagnosis in a racially or ethnically diverse population. Methods The participants (n=176) selected for this study were African American, Asian American, Latina, and Caucasian women who had been diagnosed with stages 0, I, or II breast cancer within the past 4 years. They completed an in-depth qualitative interview on self-disclosure and social support. Findings The results indicate self-disclosing was done at a time when important decisions about treatment needed to be made. Different strategies for disclosure were used, all of which entailed emotion work. Respondents talked about the various elements of emotion work in the disclosure process including: managing others' worry, protecting and soothing others, and educating and instructing others.. For many respondents, disclosure without calculating emotional management meant opening up to others which meant support and an increase in emotional resources. Conclusions The findings in this paper have implications for women with breast cancer and demonstrate the need for women to be involved in honest disclosure and less emotional management of others' feelings. There is also a need for education about the nature of the cancer experience among people who are not well educated about the treatment and consequences of cancer. This need may be even stronger among racial and ethnic minorities. PMID:19434430

  11. What Good Are Positive Emotions?

    PubMed Central

    Fredrickson, Barbara L.

    2011-01-01

    This article opens by noting that positive emotions do not fit existing models of emotions. Consequently, a new model is advanced to describe the form and function of a subset of positive emotions, including joy, interest, contentment, and love. This new model posits that these positive emotions serve to broaden an individual’s momentary thought–action repertoire, which in turn has the effect of building that individual’s physical, intellectual, and social resources. Empirical evidence to support this broaden-and-build model of positive emotions is reviewed, and implications for emotion regulation and health promotion are discussed. PMID:21850154

  12. Relationships Between Spiritual Quotient and Marital Satisfaction Level of Men, Women and Couples Referred to Consultancy Centers of Bandar Abbas

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Eghbal; Ahmadisarkhooni, Tahereh

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this research is to determine the relationship between Spiritual Quotient parameters including understanding, life origin, and spiritual life and marital satisfaction of couples in Bandar Abbas City. Methods: It is descriptive correlational study. 150 couples referred to consultancy centers of Bandar Abbas City were selected by accessible sampling method. We utilized Spiritual Quotient Questionnaire and Marriage Satisfaction Questionnaire (ENRICH) which both have high reliability and validity levels. We calculated men, women and couples’ scores in the questionnaires. Results: According to the findings; among all parameters of Spiritual Quotient, spiritual life had the strongest correlation with spiritual quotient (r=0.282 and r=0.277 for men and women; P<0.01 for both). Meanwhile, there were not any significant relationship between couples’ understanding and origin of life and their marital satisfaction. Conclusion: Overall, we can conclude that training according to cultural conditions as well as promoting couples’ spiritual quotient can be utilized to improve the quality of marital life of couples.–More studies should be conducted for further evaluation of the relationship between SQ and marital satisfaction. The results can be used for helping couples in increasing their marital satisfaction. Declaration of interest: None PMID:24644499

  13. Childhood emotional maltreatment and its impact on emotion regulation 

    E-print Network

    Mulholland, Paula Claire

    2010-11-26

    An aim of this research was to gain prevalence rates of emotional abuse (EA) and emotional neglect (EN) in a community based adolescent sample. This exploratory research also attempted to determine the impact of EA, EN ...

  14. GROUPED'ANALYSEETDETHORIECONOMIQUELYONSTTIENNE Emotions,SanctionsandCooperation

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    GROUPED'ANALYSEETDETHÉORIEÉCONOMIQUELYONSTÉTIENNE WP1113 Emotions #12;Emotions, Sanctions and Cooperation Mateus Joffily 1 , David Masclet 2 , Charles N. Noussair 3-reports of hedonic valence to study the emotional basis of cooperation and punishment in a social dilemma. Emotional

  15. Modulation of emotion by cognition and cognition by emotion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. S. Blair; B. W. Smith; D. G. V. Mitchell; J. Morton; M. Vythilingam; L. Pessoa; D. Fridberg; A. Zametkin; E. E. Nelson; W. C. Drevets; D. S. Pine; A. Martin; R. J. R. Blair

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we examined the impact of goal-directed processing on the response to emotional pictures and the impact of emotional pictures on goal-directed processing. Subjects (N=22) viewed neutral or emotional pictures in the presence or absence of a demanding cognitive task. Goal-directed processing disrupted the BOLD response to emotional pictures. In particular, the BOLD response within bilateral amygdala and

  16. Emotional Intelligence: Giving Computers Effective Emotional Skills to Aid Interaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Creed; Russell Beale

    2008-01-01

    Why do computers need emotional intelligence? Science fiction often portrays emotional computers as dangerous and frightening,\\u000a and as a serious threat to human life. One of the most famous examples is HAL, the supercomputer onboard the spaceship Discovery,\\u000a in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey. HAL could express, recognize and respond to human emotion, and generally had strong emotional skills

  17. Emotional intelligence (EI) and nursing leadership styles among nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Tyczkowski, Brenda; Vandenhouten, Christine; Reilly, Janet; Bansal, Gaurav; Kubsch, Sylvia M; Jakkola, Raelynn

    2015-01-01

    Less than 12.5% of nurses aspire to leadership roles, noting lack of support and stress as major factors in their decision not to pursue this area of practice. Psychological resiliency, described as the ability to properly adapt to stress and adversity, is key to successful nurse managers. Emotional intelligence (EI) is a related concept to resiliency and is another noteworthy predictor of leadership and management success. This study was undertaken to determine the level of and relationship between EI and leadership style of nurse managers employed in Wisconsin and Illinois facilities. A descriptive, exploratory study design was utilized, with a convenience sample of nurse managers working in 6 large Midwestern health systems. Nurse managers were invited to participate in the study by their employer, completing the online consent form and the demographic, Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) Form 5X and the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i 2.0) surveys. Statistically significant positive relationships were noted between EI and transformational leadership and the outcomes of leadership (extra effort, effectiveness, and satisfaction). No statistically significant relationships were noted between EI and transactional or laissez-faire leadership styles. PMID:25714956

  18. AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF RESPIRATORY QUOTIENT CALIBRATION AND ASSOCIATION WITH POSTMENOPAUSAL BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Ross L.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Tinker, Lesley F.; Pettinger, Mary; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Thomas, Fridtjof; Qi, Lihong; Huang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Background The respiratory quotient (RQ), defined as the ratio of carbon dioxide exhaled to oxygen uptake, reflects substrate utilization when energy is expended. Fat and alcohol have RQ values of about 0.7, compared to 1.0 for carbohydrate, and about 0.8 for protein. Here, the association between RQ and postmenopausal breast cancer risk is studied. Methods Paired RQ measurements were obtained, separated by about 6 months, for women in the reliability subset of a Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Nutrition and Physical Activity Assessment Study. Linear regression of the average of the paired log RQ assessments on a corresponding log food quotient (FQ) average and other study subject characteristics, including age, body mass index, race, and education, yielded calibration equations for predicting RQ. Results Calibration equations, using any of food frequency, food record, or dietary recall data, explained an appreciable fraction of measured log RQ variation, and these were used to compute calibrated RQ estimates throughout WHI cohorts. Calibrated RQ estimates using four-day food record data related inversely (P=0.004) to (invasive) breast cancer risk in the WHI Dietary Modification trial comparison group, and corresponding RQ estimates using food frequency data related inversely (P=0.002) to breast cancer incidence in this cohort combined with the larger WHI Observational Study. Conclusion Though preliminary, these analyses suggest a substantially higher postmenopausal breast cancer risk among women having relatively low RQ. Impact RQ elevation could provide a novel target for breast cancer risk reduction. PMID:24108790

  19. Spanish parents' emotion talk and their children's understanding of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Aznar, Ana; Tenenbaum, Harriet R.

    2013-01-01

    Relations between parent-child emotion talk and children's emotion understanding were examined in 63 Spanish mothers and fathers and their 4- (M = 53.35 months, SD = 3.86) and 6-year-old (M = 76.62 months, SD = 3.91) children. Parent-child emotion talk was analyzed during two storytelling tasks: a play-related storytelling task and a reminiscence task (conversation about past experiences). Children's emotion understanding was assessed twice through a standardized test of emotion comprehension (TEC; Pons et al., 2004), once before one of the two parent-child storytelling sessions and again 6 months later. Mothers' use of emotion labels during the play-related storytelling task predicted children's emotion understanding after controlling for children's previous emotion understanding. Whereas fathers' use of emotion labels during the play-related storytelling task was correlated with children's emotion understanding, it did not predict children's emotion understanding after controlling for previous emotion understanding. Implications of these findings for future research on children's socioemotional development are discussed. PMID:24069016

  20. In this Issue Feeling emotional: the amygdala links emotional

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    In this Issue Feeling emotional: the amygdala links emotional perception and experience The term). Numerous neuroimaging studies have shown the amygdala varies with emotional experience in both healthy or the bore of an MRI scanner, the amygdala has been associated to some extent with all of these putative

  1. Emotional Eavesdropping: Infants Selectively Respond to Indirect Emotional Signals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repacholi, Betty M.; Meltzoff, Andrew N.

    2007-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether 18-month-olds learn from emotions directed to a third party. Infants watched an adult perform actions on objects, and an Emoter expressed Anger or Neutral affect toward the adult in response to her actions. The Emoter then became neutral and infants were given access to the objects. Infants' actions were influenced…

  2. The Experience of Emotion

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Mesquita, Batja; Ochsner, Kevin N.; Gross, James J.

    2007-01-01

    Experiences of emotion are content-rich events that emerge at the level of psychological description, but must be causally constituted by neurobiological processes. This chapter outlines an emerging scientific agenda for understanding what these experiences feel like and how they arise. We review the available answers to what is felt (i.e., the content that makes up an experience of emotion) and how neurobiological processes instantiate these properties of experience. These answers are then integrated into a broad framework that describes, in psychological terms, how the experience of emotion emerges from more basic processes. We then discuss the role of such experiences in the economy of the mind and behavior. PMID:17002554

  3. Emotional Intelligence and Social Perception 

    E-print Network

    Forrester, Roisin

    2010-06-30

    Abstract The concept of Emotional Intelligence (EI) involves understanding the relation between reason and emotion. The present study introduces EI and investigates its relation to social intelligence (SI) and nonverbal ...

  4. Autonomic Nervous System Activity Distinguishes among Emotions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Ekman; Robert W. Levenson; Wallace V. Friesen

    1983-01-01

    Emotion-specific activity in the autonomic nervous system was generated by constructing facial prototypes of emotion muscle by muscle and by reliving past emotional experiences. The autonomic activity produced distinguished not only between positive and negative emotions, but also among negative emotions. This finding challenges emotion theories that have proposed autonomic activity to be undifferentiated or that have failed to address

  5. A Review of Virtual Character's Emotion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen

    2008-11-01

    Emotional virtual characters are essential to digital entertainment, an emotion is related to virtual environment and a virtual character's inner variables, emotion model of virtual character is a hot topic in many fields, domain knowledge is very important for modeling emotion, and the current research of emotion expression in the world was also summarized, and some new research directions of emotion model are presented.

  6. Social and Emotional Aging

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Susan; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    The past several decades have witnessed unidimensional decline models of aging give way to life-span developmental models that consider how specific processes and strategies facilitate adaptive aging. In part, this shift was provoked by the stark contrast between findings that clearly demonstrate decreased biological, physiological, and cognitive capacity with those suggesting that people are generally satisfied in old age and experience relatively high levels of emotional well-being. In recent years, this supposed “paradox” of aging has been reconciled through careful theoretical analysis and empirical investigation. Viewing aging as adaptation sheds light on resilience, wellbeing, and emotional distress across adulthood. PMID:19575618

  7. Emotional Intelligence: A Stable Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goroshit, Marina; Hen, Meirav

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, emotional intelligence (EI) has emerged as one of the crucial components of emotional adjustment, personal well-being, interpersonal relationships, and overall success in life. Yet few professional curricula adequately address this subject. The results of this study indicate that the potential for enhanced emotional intelligence…

  8. Emotional Intelligence and Interpersonal Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutte, Nicola S.; Malouff, John M.; Bobik, Chad; Coston, Tracie D.; Greeson, Cyndy; Jedlicka, Christina; Rhodes, Emily; Wendorf, Greta

    2001-01-01

    Presents the results of seven studies that focused on the link between emotional intelligence and interpersonal relations. Tests emotional intelligence with empathy and self-monitoring, social skills, cooperation, relations with others, and marital satisfaction. Explores preference for emotionally intelligent partners in the final study. Includes…

  9. Emotional Intelligence and Interpersonal Relations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola S. Schutte; John M. Malouff; Chad Bobik; Tracie D. Coston; Cyndy Greeson; Christina Jedlicka; Emily Rhodes; Greta Wendorf

    2001-01-01

    In 7 studies, the authors examined the link between emotional intelligence and interpersonal relations. In Studies 1 and 2, the participants with higher scores for emotional intelligence had higher scores for empathic perspective taking and self-monitoring in social situations. In Study 3, the participants with higher scores for emotional intelligence had higher scores for social skills. In Study 4, the

  10. The Science of Emotional Intelligence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Salovey; Daisy Grewal

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current research on emotional intelligence. Although it has been defined in many ways, we focus on the four-branch model by Mayer and Salovey (1997), which characterizes emotional intelligence as a set of four related abilities: perceiving, using, understanding, and managing emotions. The theory provides a useful framework for studying individual differences in abilities related

  11. Toward Machines with Emotional Intelligence

    E-print Network

    1 Toward Machines with Emotional Intelligence Rosalind W. Picard MIT Media Laboratory Abstract pets, desktop computers, and more) skills of emotional intelligence. Machines have long been able intelligent. Machines are now being given the ability to sense and recognize expressions of human emotion

  12. Moral Education and the Emotions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, John Martin

    1980-01-01

    This paper argues that the emotions have a central place in moral education. Two types of emotions involved in moral judgment are defined: constitutive and regulative. Fear and guilt are used as paradigms to explain how emotions are learned. A model for education in conscientiousness, compassion, and benevolence is outlined. (Author/SJL)

  13. The Physical Basis of Emotion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, William

    1994-01-01

    Reviews the theories of C. Lange and William James on emotional consciousness, affirming it to be the effect of organic changes which express emotion. The name emotion might be considered to connote organic excitement as the distinctive feature of the state. (SLD)

  14. Emotion, Cognition, and Mental State

    E-print Network

    Salzman, Daniel

    , such as the amygdala for emotion and the prefrontal cortex for cognition. In this framework, functional interactionsEmotion, Cognition, and Mental State Representation in Amygdala and Prefrontal Cortex C. Daniel between the amygdala and pre- frontal cortex mediate emotional influences on cognitive processes

  15. Detecting Emotions in Mandarin Speech

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tsang-Long Pao; Yu-Te Chen; Jun-Heng Yeh; Wen-Yuan Liao

    2005-01-01

    The importance of automatically recognizing emotions in human speech has grown with the increasing role of spoken language interfaces in human-computer interaction applications. In this paper, a Mandarin speech based emotion classification method is presented. Five primary human emotions, including anger, boredom, happiness, neutral and sadness, are investigated. Combining different feature streams to obtain a more accurate result is a

  16. Emotion locomotion: promoting the emotional health of elementary school children by recognizing emotions.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Debra A; Burgos, Teresa; Honeycutt, Holly K; Linam, Eve H; Moneymaker, Laura D; Rathke, Meghan K

    2009-10-01

    Emotion recognition is a critical life skill children need for mental health promotion to meet the complexities and challenges of growing up in the world today. Five nursing students and their instructor designed Emotion Locomotion, a program for children ages 6-8 during a public health nursing practicum for an inner-city parochial school. Emotion Locomotion used an analogy that the "engine" of a train represents the "individual" and the train "cars" represent various emotions, such as happiness, sadness, calmness, and anger. Analysis of pre- and posttest scores showed an increase in appropriate student responses that involved identifying emotions from photographs and in recognition of vocabulary words representing emotions. Students' role playing during puppet shows demonstrated increased appropriate expression of emotions and healthy ways to deal with feelings during scenarios. Programs such as Emotion Locomotion present opportunities to expand the outreach of school nurses and colleges of nursing through community partnerships to provide critical life skills for student populations. PMID:19592675

  17. Emotions and Acne

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Polenghi; S. Zizak; E. Molinari

    2002-01-01

    Summary Background: Acne is a very common and disfiguring disease that more or less severely affects the majority of adolescents and, to some extent, also adults. The importance of emotional stress in the onset or worsening particularly of skin diseases has long been a subject of study and debate, and it has been shown that stress stimuli may lead to

  18. Emotionally Impaired Elementary Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taulbee, Dianne R.; And Others

    The Jackson County (Michigan) Intermediate School District curriculum for teaching emotionally impaired elementary students is presented. The curriculum document describes program management techniques, strategies for developing and maintaining teacher-student relationships, and therapy/change systems. It outlines referral and eligibility…

  19. Emotionally Impaired Elementary Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taulbee, Dianne R.; And Others

    A curriculum is presented for teaching emotionally impaired elementary students. The curriculum document describes program management techniques, strategies for developing and maintaining teacher-student relationships, and therapy/change systems. It outlines referral and eligibility procedures and exit criteria. It contains job descriptions for…

  20. Lateralization for Processing Facial Emotions in Gay Men, Heterosexual Men, and Heterosexual Women.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Qazi; Yusuf, Sifat

    2015-07-01

    This study tested whether male sexual orientation and gender nonconformity influenced functional cerebral lateralization for the processing of facial emotions. We also tested for the effects of sex of poser and emotion displayed on putative differences. Thirty heterosexual men, 30 heterosexual women, and 40 gay men completed measures of demographic variables, recalled childhood gender nonconformity (CGN), IQ, and the Chimeric Faces Test (CFT). The CFT depicts vertically split chimeric faces, formed with one half showing a neutral expression and the other half showing an emotional expression and performance is measured using a "laterality quotient" (LQ) score. We found that heterosexual men were significantly more right-lateralized when viewing female faces compared to heterosexual women and gay men, who did not differ significantly from each other. Heterosexual women and gay men were more left-lateralized for processing female faces. There were no significant group differences in lateralization for male faces. These results remained when controlling for age and IQ scores. There was no significant effect of CGN on LQ scores. These data suggest that gay men are feminized in some aspects of functional cerebral lateralization for facial emotion. The results were discussed in relation to the selectivity of functional lateralization and putative brain mechanisms underlying sexual attraction towards opposite-sex and same-sex targets. PMID:25564038

  1. Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 12141218 On Certain Quotient of TemperleyLieb Algebra

    E-print Network

    Popovych, Roman

    Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2004, Vol. 50, Part 3, 1214­1218 On Certain Quotient of Temperley­Lieb Algebra Mariya O. VLASENKO Institute of Mathematics of NAS Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivs'ka Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: mariyka@imath.kiev.ua We consider a certain quotient

  2. Situating emotional experience

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Mendenhall, Christine D.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Barsalou, Lawrence W.

    2013-01-01

    Psychological construction approaches to emotion suggest that emotional experience is situated and dynamic. Fear, for example, is typically studied in a physical danger context (e.g., threatening snake), but in the real world, it often occurs in social contexts, especially those involving social evaluation (e.g., public speaking). Understanding situated emotional experience is critical because adaptive responding is guided by situational context (e.g., inferring the intention of another in a social evaluation situation vs. monitoring the environment in a physical danger situation). In an fMRI study, we assessed situated emotional experience using a newly developed paradigm in which participants vividly imagine different scenarios from a first-person perspective, in this case scenarios involving either social evaluation or physical danger. We hypothesized that distributed neural patterns would underlie immersion in social evaluation and physical danger situations, with shared activity patterns across both situations in multiple sensory modalities and in circuitry involved in integrating salient sensory information, and with unique activity patterns for each situation type in coordinated large-scale networks that reflect situated responding. More specifically, we predicted that networks underlying the social inference and mentalizing involved in responding to a social threat (in regions that make up the “default mode” network) would be reliably more active during social evaluation situations. In contrast, networks underlying the visuospatial attention and action planning involved in responding to a physical threat would be reliably more active during physical danger situations. The results supported these hypotheses. In line with emerging psychological construction approaches, the findings suggest that coordinated brain networks offer a systematic way to interpret the distributed patterns that underlie the diverse situational contexts characterizing emotional life. PMID:24324420

  3. Situating emotional experience.

    PubMed

    Wilson-Mendenhall, Christine D; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2013-01-01

    Psychological construction approaches to emotion suggest that emotional experience is situated and dynamic. Fear, for example, is typically studied in a physical danger context (e.g., threatening snake), but in the real world, it often occurs in social contexts, especially those involving social evaluation (e.g., public speaking). Understanding situated emotional experience is critical because adaptive responding is guided by situational context (e.g., inferring the intention of another in a social evaluation situation vs. monitoring the environment in a physical danger situation). In an fMRI study, we assessed situated emotional experience using a newly developed paradigm in which participants vividly imagine different scenarios from a first-person perspective, in this case scenarios involving either social evaluation or physical danger. We hypothesized that distributed neural patterns would underlie immersion in social evaluation and physical danger situations, with shared activity patterns across both situations in multiple sensory modalities and in circuitry involved in integrating salient sensory information, and with unique activity patterns for each situation type in coordinated large-scale networks that reflect situated responding. More specifically, we predicted that networks underlying the social inference and mentalizing involved in responding to a social threat (in regions that make up the "default mode" network) would be reliably more active during social evaluation situations. In contrast, networks underlying the visuospatial attention and action planning involved in responding to a physical threat would be reliably more active during physical danger situations. The results supported these hypotheses. In line with emerging psychological construction approaches, the findings suggest that coordinated brain networks offer a systematic way to interpret the distributed patterns that underlie the diverse situational contexts characterizing emotional life. PMID:24324420

  4. Emotions, narratives, and ethical mindfulness.

    PubMed

    Guillemin, Marilys; Gillam, Lynn

    2015-06-01

    Clinical care is laden with emotions, from the perspectives of both clinicians and patients. It is important that emotions are addressed in health professions curricula to ensure that clinicians are humane healers as well as technical experts. Emotions have a valuable and generative role in health professional ethics education.The authors have previously described a narrative ethics pedagogy, the aim of which is to develop ethical mindfulness. Ethical mindfulness is a state of being that acknowledges everyday ethics and ethically important moments as significant in clinical care, with the aim of enabling ethical clinical practice. Using a sample narrative, the authors extend this concept to examine five features of ethical mindfulness as they relate to emotions: (1) being sensitized to emotions in everyday practice, (2) acknowledging and understanding the ways in which emotions are significant in practice, (3) being able to articulate the emotions at play during ethically important moments, (4) being reflexive and acknowledging both the generative aspects and the limitations of emotions, and (5) being courageous.The process of writing and engaging with narratives can lead to ethical mindfulness, including the capacity to understand and work with emotions. Strategies for productively incorporating emotions in narrative ethics teaching are described. This can be a challenging domain within medical education for both educators and health care students and thus needs to be addressed sensitively and responsibly. The potential benefit of educating health professionals in a way which addresses emotionality in an ethical framework makes the challenges worthwhile. PMID:25853684

  5. [Emotional labor in nursing praxis].

    PubMed

    Vilelas, José Manuel Da Silva; Diogo, Paula Manuela Jorge

    2014-09-01

    Healthcare work is, by nature, an activity full of intense emotions and therefore, is opportune ground for exploring emotions in the workplace in different contexts of nursing care. It is a very fertile terrain if care is focused on the emotions of the client, nurses, healthcare teams, and on the interaction of all actors involved. This article presents a theoretical reflection exploring the concept of emotional labor in the context of nursing care. Theoretical references from several fields of knowledge, namely sociology and nursing, have been adopted to conceptualize the theme. Studies on emotional labor have contributed toward the understanding of the key issue of emotional management in healthcare institutions and both its positive and negative impact on clients and professionals. The development of the theme of emotional labor in nursing has given rise to numerous theoretical approaches and perspectives explaining this concept. PMID:25474853

  6. [Emotional labor in nursing praxis].

    PubMed

    Vilelas, José Manuel Da Silva; Diogo, Paula Manuela Jorge

    2014-09-01

    Healthcare work is, by nature, an activity full of intense emotions and therefore, is opportune ground for exploring emotions in the workplace in different contexts of nursing care. It is a very fertile terrain if care is focused on the emotions of the client, nurses, healthcare teams, and on the interaction of all actors involved. This article presents a theoretical reflection exploring the concept of emotional labor in the context of nursing care. Theoretical references from several fields of knowledge, namely sociology and nursing, have been adopted to conceptualize the theme. Studies on emotional labor have contributed toward the understanding of the key issue of emotional management in healthcare institutions and both its positive and negative impact on clients and professionals. The development of the theme of emotional labor in nursing has given rise to numerous theoretical approaches and perspectives explaining this concept. PMID:25508632

  7. Relationship between respiratory quotient, nitrification, and nitrous oxide emissions in a forced aerated composting process.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Hirofumi; Fujiwara, Taku; Inoue, Daisuke; Ito, Ryusei; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Funamizu, Naoyuki

    2015-08-01

    We assessed the relationship between respiratory quotient (RQ) and nitrification and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission in forced aerated composting using lab-scale reactors. Relatively high RQ values from degradation of readily degradable organics initially occurred. RQ then stabilized at slightly lower values, then decreased. Continuous emission of N2O was observed during the RQ decrease. Correlation between nitrification and N2O emission shows that the latter was triggered by nitrification. Mass balances demonstrated that the O2 consumption of nitrification (?24.8mmol) was slightly higher than that of CO2 emission (?20.0mmol), indicating that the RQ decrease was caused by the occurrence of nitrification. Results indicate that RQ is a useful index, which not only reflects the bioavailability of organics but also predicts the occurrence of nitrification and N2O emission in forced aerated composting. PMID:25987285

  8. Issues Related to Obtaining Intelligence Quotient-Matched Controls in Autism Research

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Vanitha S.; Raman, Vijaya; Mysore, Ashok V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intelligence Quotient (IQ) is considered to be an index of global cognitive functioning and has traditionally been used as a fulcral measure in case-control studies in neuro-developmental disorders such as autism. Aim: The aim is to highlight the issues of “matching for IQ” with controls in autism research. Materials and Methods: Percentile scores on the Coloured Progressive Matrices of 20 children with autism in the age range of 5 to 12 years have been graphically compared with 21 age matched typically developing children. Results and Conclusions: The percentile scores of the so-called high functioning children with autism from special schools were well below that of typically developing children. There are many challenges when using IQ in case-control studies of autism. Alternative approaches need to be considered. PMID:25969598

  9. The Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) in Japan: A cross-cultural comparison.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Akio; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Wheelwright, Sally; Tojo, Yoshikuni

    2006-02-01

    The AQ (Autism-Spectrum Quotient) is a self-administered instrument for measuring the degree to which an adult with normal intelligence has the traits associated with the autistic spectrum. The AQ was administered in Japan to test whether the UK results would generalize to a very different culture. Three groups of subjects, adults with AS or HFA (n = 57), adult controls (n = 194), and University students (n = 1050) were assessed. The adults with AS/HFA had a mean AQ score which was significantly higher than both the controls and the University students. Among the controls, males scored significantly higher than females. The similarity of results in both the general population and the clinical group across the two cultures was remarkable. PMID:16586157

  10. Target hazard quotient evaluation of cadmium and lead in fish from Caspian Sea.

    PubMed

    Basim, Yalda; Khoshnood, Zahra

    2013-10-23

    Heavy metals are being increasingly released into the natural waters from geological and anthropogenic sources. The distributions of several heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were investigated in muscle and liver of three different fish species seasonally collected from Caspian Sea (autumn 2011-summer 2012). The concentrations of all metals were lower in flesh than those recorded in liver due to their physiological roles. The target hazard quotient (THQ) index for fish was calculated. Estimation of THQ calculations for the contaminated fish consumption was calculated to evaluate the effect of pollution on health. Total metal THQ values of Pb and Cd for adults were 0.05 and 0.04 in Anzali and Noshahr, respectively, and for children were 0.08 and 0.05 in Anzali and Noshahr, respectively. PMID:24081633

  11. Estimation of the intelligence quotient using Wechsler Intelligence Scales in children and adolescents with Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Merchán-Naranjo, Jessica; Mayoral, María; Rapado-Castro, Marta; Llorente, Cloe; Boada, Leticia; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2012-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) patients show heterogeneous intelligence profiles and the validity of short forms for estimating intelligence has rarely been studied in this population. We analyzed the validity of Wechsler Intelligence Scale (WIS) short forms for estimating full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) and assessing intelligence profiles in 29 AS patients. Only the Information and Block Design dyad meets the study criteria. No statistically significant differences were found between dyad scores and FSIQ scores (t(28) = 1.757; p = 0.09). The dyad has a high correlation with FSIQ, good percentage of variance explained (R(2) = 0.591; p < 0.001), and high consistency with the FSIQ classification (?(2)(36) = 45.202; p = 0.14). Short forms with good predictive accuracy may not be accurate in clinical groups with atypical cognitive profiles such as AS patients. PMID:21455795

  12. Transformations of emotional experience.

    PubMed

    de Cortiñas, Lia Pistiner

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the author approaches mental pain and the problems in a psychoanalytic treatment of patients with difficulties in the psychic transformation of their emotional experiences. The author is interested in the symbolic failure related to the obstruction of development of phantasies, dreams, dream-thoughts, etc. She differentiates symbolization disturbances related to hypertrophic projective identification from a detention of these primitive communications and emotional isolation. She puts forward the conjecture that one factor in the arrest of this development is the detention of projective identifications and that, when this primitive means of communication is re-established in a container-contained relationship of mutual benefit, this initiates the development of a symbolization process that can replace the pathological 'protection'. Another hypothesis she develops is that of inaccessible caesuras that, associated with the detention of projective identification, obstruct any integrative or interactive movement. This caesura and the detention of projective identifications affect mental functions needed for dealing with mental pain. The personality is left with precarious mental equipment for transforming emotional experiences. How can a psychoanalytical process stimulate the development of creative symbolization, transforming the emotional experiences and leading towards mental growth? The author approaches the clinical problem with the metaphor of the psychic birth of emotional experience. The modulation of mental pain in a container-contained relationship is a central problem for the development of the human mind. For discovering and giving a meaning to emotional experience, the infant depends on reverie, a function necessary in order to develop an evolved consciousness capable of being aware, which is different from the rudimentary consciousness that perceives but does not understand. The development of mature mental equipment is associated with the personality's attitude towards mental pain. The differentiation between psychotic, neurotic or autistic functioning depends on what defences are erected to avoid mental pain. The primary link between infant and mother is where the building of mental equipment takes place, through communicational forms that, to begin with, are not verbal. The author suggests the need for the development of an ideo-grammar (in gestures, paralinguistic forms, etc.) in primary relations, as the precursor forms that will become the matrix for the mental tools for dealing with emotional experiences in a mature way. The paper stresses the significance of the parental containing function for the development of symbolization of prenatal emotional experiences. This containment develops ideograms, transformations of sense impressions into proto-symbols, instruments that attenuate the traumatic experiences of helplessness. The author takes Bion's ideas about extending the notion of dream-work to an alpha function that goes on continually, day and night, transforming raw emotional experiences in a 'dream'. In order to acquire a meaning, facts need to be 'dreamed' in this extended sense. Meaning and truth are the nurture of the mind. Mental growth, the development of adequate tools--including reverie--for dealing with mental pain, seen from a psychoanalytic perspective including reverie, implies that the object becomes a provider of meanings. Analysis begins to aim primarily at the generation or expansion of the mental container, instead of predominantly working on unconscious contents as such. PMID:23781834

  13. The French Version of the Autism-Spectrum Quotient in Adolescents: A Cross-Cultural Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonie, Sandrine; Kassai, Behrouz; Pirat, Elodie; Bain, Paul; Robinson, Janine; Gomot, Marie; Barthelemy, Catherine; Charvet, Dorothee; Rochet, Thierry; Tatou, Mohamed; Assouline, Brigitte; Cabrol, Stephane; Chabane, Nadia; Arnaud, Valerie; Faure, Patricia; Manificat, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the accuracy of the French version of the "Autism Spectrum Quotient" ("AQ") in adolescents with Asperger syndrome (AS) and high-functioning autism (HFA) compared to healthy controls and adolescents with psychiatric disorders (PDs). Three groups of adolescents, aged 11-18, were assessed: 116 with AS/HFA (93 with IQ [greater than or…

  14. hal-00020120,version2-9Jul2007 Le groupe des traces de Poisson de la variete quotient h h

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    induite et munit ainsi la vari´et´e quotient X = V/G d'une structure de vari´et´e de Poisson. On peut'en ce qui concerne Al(C)G , on dispose d'une ´equivalence de Morita qui ram`ene les calculs `a ceux

  15. Evaluation of a rapid determination of heat production and respiratory quotient in Holstein steers using the washed rumen technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to validate use of the washed rumen technique for rapid measurement of fasting heat production (FHP) and respiratory quotient (RQ), and compare this with heart rate (HR) and core temperature (CT). The experiment used 8 Holstein steers (322±30 kg) under controlled temp...

  16. Section 11.6: Complex Numbers First of all, I want to discuss the theorem about the quotients of power

    E-print Network

    Section 11.6: Complex Numbers First of all, I want to discuss the theorem about the quotients of complex numbers. Recall that we define i to be the square root of -1. Don't worry too much about what. Definition: a complex number is an expression a + bi. Complex numbers can be added and multiplied. Examples

  17. Mercury, cadmium and lead contamination in seafood: A comparative study to evaluate the usefulness of Target Hazard Quotients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Petroczi; D. P. Naughton

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the applicability of Target Hazard Quotient (THQ) estimations to inform on seafood hazards through metal contamination. The food recall data set was collated by the Laboratory of the Government Chemist (LGC, UK) over the period from January to November 2007. Pearson chi-square goodness of fit test, nonparametric correlation (Kendall tau) and Kruskal–Wallis

  18. Developmental quotient at 24 months and fatty acid composition of diet in early infancy: a follow up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlo Agostoni; Sabina Trojan; Roberto Bellù; Enrica Riva; Maria Grazia Bruzzese; Marcello Giovannini

    1997-01-01

    AIMA follow up study of developmental quotient (DQ) at 24 months of toddlers whose diets in early infancy differed in fatty acid composition, and in whom an association between diet and DQ was observed at 4 months.METHODS81 toddlers were distributed among three groups according to early type of diet: standard infant formula (SFo, n = 30); long chain polyunsaturated fatty

  19. An improved correction formula for the estimation of harmonic magnitudes and its application to open quotient estimation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Markus Iseli; Abeer Alwan

    2004-01-01

    Many voice quality parameters, such as the open quotient (OQ), depend on an accurate estimate of the source spectrum. It is known that OQ, for example, is correlated with the magnitude difference of the first two harmonics (H1-H2) of the speech source spectrum. In order to compare OQ estimates across different vocal tract configurations a magnitude correction is achieved by

  20. The Empathy Quotient: An Investigation of Adults with Asperger Syndrome or High Functioning Autism, and Normal Sex Differences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon Baron-Cohen; Sally Wheelwright

    2004-01-01

    Empathy is an essential part of normal social functioning, yet there are precious few instruments for measuring individual differences in this domain. In this article we review psychological theories of empathy and its measurement. Previous instruments that purport to measure this have not always focused purely on empathy. We report a new self-report questionnaire, the Empathy Quotient (EQ), for use

  1. This Emotional Life

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    How are we happy? Is adolescence the most difficult stage of life? These are but a few of the questions explored in the PBS program "This Emotional Life". The three part series was produced by the NOVA/WGBH Science Unit and Vulcan Productions, and visitors to the site can discuss current news regarding emotional health and also "participate in the ongoing exploration of mental health and wellness." The materials on the site are divided into "Topics", "Perspectives", and "People & Blogs". The "Perspectives" area is a good place to start, and visitors can listen to people like Larry David and Chevy Chase give their own insights into the meaning of happiness, stress, and falling in love. The "Topics" area provides resources that help people with conditions like addiction, depression, bipolar disorder, and autism. The site is rounded out by the "Resource Finder", which can be used to locate mental health and well-being support organizations around the United States.

  2. Chemosignals communicate human emotions.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Jasper H B; Smeets, Monique A M; Kaldewaij, Annemarie; Duijndam, Maarten J A; Semin, Gün R

    2012-01-01

    Can humans communicate emotional states via chemical signals? In the experiment reported here, we addressed this question by examining the function of chemosignals in a framework furnished by embodied social communication theory. Following this theory, we hypothesized that the processes a sender experiences during distinctive emotional states are transmitted to receivers by means of the chemicals that the sender produces, thus establishing a multilevel correspondence between sender and receiver. In a double-blind experiment, we examined facial reactions, sensory-regulation processes, and visual search in response to chemosignals. We demonstrated that fear chemosignals generated a fearful facial expression and sensory acquisition (increased sniff magnitude and eye scanning); in contrast, disgust chemosignals evoked a disgusted facial expression and sensory rejection (decreased sniff magnitude, target-detection sensitivity, and eye scanning). These findings underline the neglected social relevance of chemosignals in regulating communicative correspondence outside of conscious access. PMID:23019141

  3. Emotional gestures in sport

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giorgio Merola

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents a study about the gestures of athletes while reporting emotions. The study was aimed at singling out possible\\u000a differences in gestural activity of athletes during the telling of their best and worst performances. To analyse the gestures\\u000a a manual annotation scheme was adopted that classifies each gesture in terms of handshape, motoric structure, meaning, goal,\\u000a and type.

  4. Emotional Aspects of Hyperprolactinemia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. G. Sobrinho

    1998-01-01

    Patients with hyperprolactinemia often present with emotional difficulties. These occasionally persist even after successful treatment. Insight into the roots of their diseased state makes a difference in the handling of all cases, but becomes crucial in the not‐so‐rare situations in which the normalization of hormonal levels is not followed by a feeling of cure. This chapter attempts to provide details,

  5. Justice and Emotions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan H. Turner

    2007-01-01

    Sociological theories of justice emphasize (a) the level of discrepancy or congruence between shares of resources received\\u000a relative to individuals’ perceptions of “just shares” and (b) the emotions aroused with either discrepancy or congruence.\\u000a While these theories tend to have precision and elegance, they generally do not specify the full range of reference points\\u000a that can be used to establish

  6. Speaker Recognition Systems in the Emotional Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ismail Shahin

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that speaker recognition systems perform extremely well in the neutral environment. However, such systems perform poorly in the emotional environment. Our work in this research focuses on text- dependent speaker identification systems in the emotional environment. Our emotional environment consists of five emotions. These emotions are angry, sad, happy, disgust, and fear. Each of the hidden

  7. Emotion Regulation and Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Amstadter, Ananda B.

    2009-01-01

    Recent attention has been given to the role of emotion regulation in the development and maintenance of psychopathology. Gross (1998) provided a framework from which to understand emotion regulation processes, and it is within this framework that the literature on emotion regulation/dysregulation in the anxiety disorder population is reviewed, with a focus on possible deficiencies that lead to or maintain the disorders. The present paper aims to (1) briefly introduce emotion regulation strategies of suppression and reappraisal; (2) summarize the empirical studies of emotion regulation within anxiety disorders; (3) discuss the neurobiological markers of emotion regulation within these disorders; (4) provide future directions for research; and (5) summarize possible treatment implications resulting from this important area of research. PMID:17349775

  8. Emotion simulation during language comprehension.

    PubMed

    Havas, David A; Glenberg, Arthur M; Rinck, Mike

    2007-06-01

    We report a novel finding on the relation of emotion and language. Covert manipulation of emotional facial posture interacts with sentence valence when measuring the amount of time to judge valence (Experiment 1) and sensibility (Experiment 2) of the sentence. In each case, an emotion-sentence compatibility effect is found: Judgment times are faster when facial posture and sentence valence match than when they mismatch. We interpret the finding using a simulation account; that is, emotional systems contribute to language comprehension much as they do in social interaction. Because the effect was not observed on a lexical decision task using emotion-laden words (Experiment 3), we suggest that the emotion simulation affects comprehension processes beyond initial lexical access. PMID:17874584

  9. Same Situation--Different Emotions: How Appraisals Shape Our Emotions Matthias Siemer

    E-print Network

    Gross, James J.

    Same Situation--Different Emotions: How Appraisals Shape Our Emotions Matthias Siemer University of Miami Iris Mauss University of Denver James J. Gross Stanford University Appraisal theories of emotion rise to one emotion rather than another emotion (or no emotion at all). Unfortunately, most prior tests

  10. Moral Emotions and Moral Behavior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    June Price Tangney; Jeff Stuewig; Debra J. Mashek

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Moral emotions,represent a key element of our human,moral appa- ratus, influencing the link between moral standards and moral be- havior. This chapter reviews current theory and research on moral emotions. We first focus on a triad of negatively valenced,“self- conscious” emotions—shame, guilt, and embarrassment. As in previ- ous decades, much research remains focused on shame and guilt. We review

  11. Measuring emotional intelligence in adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Ciarrochi; Amy Y. C. Chan; Jane Bajgar

    2001-01-01

    Can emotional intelligence (EI) be reliably and validly measured in adolescents? One-hundred and thirty-one students (aged 13 to 15) completed a self-report measure of emotional intelligence (SEI) [Schutte, N., Malouff, J., Hall, L., Haggerty, D., Cooper, J., Golden, C., & Dornheim, L. (1998). Development and validation of a measure of emotional intelligence. Personality and Individual Differences, 25, 167–177.] and a

  12. Psychiatric rehabilitation of emotional disorders

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Sang-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Emotional disorder is psychological and behavioral problems of emotional domain that is different from cognitive domain, such as thought and memory. Typical emotional disorders are anxiety disorder, depression, and bipolar disorder. In the present study, we discussed on the symptoms, progression, and treatment for the anxiety disorder (panic disorder, social phobia, and obsessive compulsive disorder), depression, and bipolar disorder. The goal of treatment for the emotional disorder is removal of symptoms. In spite of the development of brain science, removal of symptoms, prevention of recurrence, and coming back to normal life require patience and effort. PMID:25210694

  13. Emotions in teaching environmental science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, Cassie

    2015-01-01

    This op-ed article examines the emotional impact of teaching environmental science and considers how certain emotions can broaden viewpoints and other emotions narrow them. Specifically, it investigates how the topic of climate change became an emotional debate in a science classroom because of religious beliefs. Through reflective practice and examination of positionality, the author explored how certain teaching practices of pre-service science teachers created a productive space and other practices closed down the conversations. This article is framed with theories that explore both divergent and shared viewpoints.

  14. Facets of emotional awareness and associations with emotion regulation and depression.

    PubMed

    Boden, Matthew Tyler; Thompson, Renee J

    2015-06-01

    Emotion theories posit that effective emotion regulation depends upon the nuanced information provided by emotional awareness; attending to and understanding one's own emotions. Additionally, the strong associations between facets of emotional awareness and various forms of psychopathology may be partially attributable to associations with emotion regulation. These logically compelling hypotheses are largely uninvestigated, including which facets compose emotional awareness and how they relate to emotion regulation strategies and psychopathology. We used exploratory structural equation modeling of individual difference measures among a large adult sample (n = 919) recruited online. Results distinguished 4 facets of emotional awareness (type clarity, source clarity, involuntary attention to emotion, and voluntary attention to emotion) that were differentially associated with expressive suppression, acceptance of emotions, and cognitive reappraisal. Facets were associated with depression both directly and indirectly via associations with emotion regulation strategies. We discuss implications for theory and research on emotional awareness, emotion regulation, and psychopathology. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25706832

  15. Knowledge and Self-Knowledge of Emotions 

    E-print Network

    Zamuner, Edoardo

    2008-01-01

    This thesis addresses two questions. One concerns the metaphysics of emotions and asks what kinds of mental states emotions are. The other asks how the metaphysics of emotions bears on first and third-personal knowledge ...

  16. Emotion Communication and the Development of the Social Emotions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Karen Caplovitz; Nelson-Goens, G. Christina

    1997-01-01

    Presents a functionalist perspective on emotion communication and its role in the development of shame and guilt. Emotion communication influences relationship-building between parent and child; gives significance to standards, rules, and achievement; and serves as a channel of communication between parent and child regarding standards, rules, and…

  17. Emotional Video Album: getting emotions into the picture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eva Oliveira; Teresa Chambel

    Emotions are essential to human beings, influencing their health, their cognition and creativity. One of the greatest strengths of video is its power to generate attitudes and emotions as no other medium can, and it is also an excellent tool for displaying affective information (1, 10). Video is becoming more and more pervasive in our lives. Technological developments and the

  18. Emotion in voice matters: neural correlates of emotional prosody perception.

    PubMed

    Iredale, Jaimi Marie; Rushby, Jacqueline A; McDonald, Skye; Dimoska-Di Marco, Aneta; Swift, Joshua

    2013-09-01

    The ability to perceive emotions is imperative for successful interpersonal functioning. The present study examined the neural characteristics of emotional prosody perception with an exploratory event-related potential analysis. Participants were 59 healthy individuals who completed a discrimination task presenting 120 semantically neutral word pairs from five prosody conditions (happy/happy, angry/angry, neutral/neutral, angry/happy, happy/angry). The task required participants to determine whether words in the pair were spoken in same or different emotional prosody. Reflective of an initial processing stage, the word 1 N1 component was found to have greatest amplitude in parietal regions of the hemispheres, and was largest for emotional compared to neutral stimuli, indicating detection of emotion features. A second processing stage, represented by word 1 P2, showed similar topographic effects; however, amplitude was largest for happy in the left hemisphere while angry was largest in the right, illustrating differentiation of emotions. At the third processing stage, word 1 N3 amplitude was largest in frontal regions, indicating later cognitive processing occurs in the frontal cortex. N3 was largest for happy, which had lowest accuracy compared to angry and neutral. The present results support Schirmer and Kotz's (2006) model of vocal emotion perception because they elucidated the function and ERP components by reflecting three primary stages of emotional prosody perception, controlling for semantic influence. PMID:23830881

  19. Emotional intelligence and recovering from induced negative emotional state

    PubMed Central

    Limonero, Joaquín T.; Fernández-Castro, Jordi; Soler-Oritja, Jordi; Álvarez-Moleiro, María

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and recovering from negative emotions induction, using a performance test to measure EI. Sixty seven undergraduates participated in the procedure, which lasted 75 min and was divided into three stages. At Time 1, subjects answered the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)-S, Profile of Mood States (POMS)-A, and EI was assessed by Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). At Time 2, negative emotions were induced by nine pictures taken from the International Affective Picture System and participants were asked to complete a second STAI-S and POMS-B questionnaires. At Time 3 participants were allowed to rest doing a distracting task and participants were asked to complete a third STAI-S and POMS-A questionnaires. Results showed that the branches of the MSCEIT emotional facilitation and emotional understanding are related to previous mood states and mood recovery, but not to mood reactivity. This finding contrasts nicely with studies on which emotional recovery was assessed in relation to EI self-reported measures, highlighting the perception and emotional regulation. PMID:26150794

  20. Evoked Emotions Predict Food Choice

    PubMed Central

    Dalenberg, Jelle R.; Gutjar, Swetlana; ter Horst, Gert J.; de Graaf, Kees; Renken, Remco J.; Jager, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In the current study we show that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores significantly improve food choice prediction over merely liking scores. Previous research has shown that liking measures correlate with choice. However, liking is no strong predictor for food choice in real life environments. Therefore, the focus within recent studies shifted towards using emotion-profiling methods that successfully can discriminate between products that are equally liked. However, it is unclear how well scores from emotion-profiling methods predict actual food choice and/or consumption. To test this, we proposed to decompose emotion scores into valence and arousal scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and apply Multinomial Logit Models (MLM) to estimate food choice using liking, valence, and arousal as possible predictors. For this analysis, we used an existing data set comprised of liking and food-evoked emotions scores from 123 participants, who rated 7 unlabeled breakfast drinks. Liking scores were measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale, while food-evoked emotions were measured using 2 existing emotion-profiling methods: a verbal and a non-verbal method (EsSense Profile and PrEmo, respectively). After 7 days, participants were asked to choose 1 breakfast drink from the experiment to consume during breakfast in a simulated restaurant environment. Cross validation showed that we were able to correctly predict individualized food choice (1 out of 7 products) for over 50% of the participants. This number increased to nearly 80% when looking at the top 2 candidates. Model comparisons showed that evoked emotions better predict food choice than perceived liking alone. However, the strongest predictive strength was achieved by the combination of evoked emotions and liking. Furthermore we showed that non-verbal food-evoked emotion scores more accurately predict food choice than verbal food-evoked emotions scores. PMID:25521352

  1. Linear scaling solution of the time-dependent self-consistent-field equations with quasi-independent Rayleigh quotient iteration

    SciTech Connect

    Challacombe, Matt [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm for solution of the Time-Dependent Self-Consistent-Field (TD-SCF) equations is developed, based on dual solution channels for non-linear optimization of the Tsiper functional [J.Phys.B, 34 L401 (2001)]. This formulation poses the TD-SCF problem as two Rayleigh quotients, coupled weakly through biorthogonality. Convergence rates for the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) are found to be equivalent to the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). Moreover, the variational nature of the quotient is robust to approximation errors, allowing linear scaling solution to the bulk limit of the RPA matrix-eigenvalue and exchange operator problem for molecular wires with extended conjugation, including polyphenylene vinylene and the (4,3) nanotube.

  2. Rasch modeling and confirmatory factor analysis of the systemizing quotient-revised (SQ-R) scale.

    PubMed

    Allison, Carrie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Stone, Mark H; Muncer, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the dimensionality of the Systemizing Quotient-Revised (SQ-R), a measure of how strong a person's interest is in systems, using two statistical approaches: Rasch modeling and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Participants included N = 675 with an autism spectrum condition (ASC), N = 1369 family members of people with ASC, and N = 2014 typical controls. Data were applied to the Rasch model (Rating Scale) using WINSTEPS. The data fit the Rasch model quite well lending support to the idea that systemizing could be seen as unidimensional. Reliability estimates were .99 for items and .92 for persons. A CFA parceling approach confirmed that a unidimensional model fit the data. There was, however, differential functioning by sex in some of these items. An abbreviated 44-item version of the scale, consisting of items without differential item functioning by sex was developed. This shorter scale also was tested from a Rasch perspective and confirmed through CFA. All measures showed differences on total scale scores between those participants with and without ASC (d = 0.71, p < .005), and between sexes (d = 0.53, p < .005). We conclude that the SQ-R is an appropriate measure of systemizing which can be measured along a single dimension. PMID:25818099

  3. Intellectual quotient of juveniles evaluated in a forensic psychiatry clinic after committing a violent crime.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Leon, Manuel; Rosner, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study is to evaluate if there is a difference between the intelligence quotient (IQ) of 27 adolescent defendants referred to the Bellevue Hospital Center Forensic Psychiatry Clinic after committing violent crimes, and those adolescents in the same age group in the general population of the United States, as defined by the norms of the psychometric testing instrument Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, 4th edition (WISC-IV). The IQ scores and sub-scores were compared to IQ scores of the general population (mean = 100, SD = 15) using a Z-test. The mean for the Full Scale IQ was 82.93. The means for the subtests which include Processing Speed Index, Perceptual Reasoning Index, Verbal Comprehension Index, and Working Memory Index, were: 78.48, 87.78, 86.70 (p < 0.05), and 90.78 (p = 0.09) respectively. There is a statistically significant difference in the IQ scores of the violent juveniles studied when compared to the general population. PMID:20015167

  4. Emotional Intelligence and Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neophytou, Lefkios

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the notion of educational reform and discusses Emotional Intelligence (EI) in the context of the modernist-postmodernist debate. It is argued that through the application of EI into contemporary societies a new wave of reform emerges that provides science with normative power over the emotional world of individuals. This…

  5. Emotional Availability: Foster Caregiving Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Dean R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate if the emotional availability of caregivers is explanatory for successful adolescent foster care placement--from initial placement of an adolescent to age eighteen or emancipation from foster care, as mandated by the state of Colorado. Emotional availability of foster caregivers and the phenomenon's…

  6. Emotional Skills-Building Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickover, Sheri

    2010-01-01

    Current anger management programs use a cognitive behavior perspective; however, research also links anger control to developmental deficits such as attachment insecurity and emotional regulation. This article previews the Emotional Skills-Building Curriculum (ESBC), a 13-week treatment program designed to treat individuals who are referred for…

  7. Emotional Reactivity and Psychological Distress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Rosen, Karen H.; Stith, Sandra M.

    2002-01-01

    This article reports on an empirical test of Bowen's hypothesized relationships between differentiation of self and psychological symptoms, and examines further evidence for the construct validity of a newly developed instrument, the Behavioral and Emotional Reactivity Index (BERI). Finds an indirect relationship between emotional reactivity…

  8. Perfectionsism, Coping, and Emotional Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Lapsley, Daniel K.

    2001-01-01

    Undergraduates (N=204) completed three scales of the student adaptation to college questionnaire. Measures of coping and emotional adjustment revealed differences among the three groups of students labeled adaptive, maladaptive, and non-perfectionists. Perfectionism and coping predicted emotional adjustment but coping as a moderator or mediator in…

  9. The Automaticity of Emotion Recognition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jessica L. Tracy; Richard W. Robins

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary accounts of emotion typically assume that humans evolved to quickly and efficiently recognize emotion expressions because these expressions convey fitness-enhancing messages. The present research tested this assumption in 2 studies. Specifically, the authors examined (a) how quickly perceivers could recognize expressions of anger, contempt, disgust, embarrassment, fear, happiness, pride, sadness, shame, and surprise; (b) whether accuracy is improved when

  10. Emotional intelligence and life satisfaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin Palmer; Catherine Donaldson; Con Stough

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between emotional intelligence and life satisfaction. To determine the nature of this relationship, personality constructs known to predict life satisfaction were also assessed (positive and negative affect). Emotional intelligence was assessed in 107 participants using a modified version of the Trait Meta-Mood Scale [TMMS; Salovey, P, Mayer, J., Goldman, S., Turvey, C. & Palfai, T.1995.

  11. School Principals' Emotional Coping Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poirel, Emmanuel; Yvon, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines the emotional coping of school principals in Quebec. Emotional coping was measured by stimulated recall; six principals were filmed during a working day and presented a week later with their video showing stressful encounters. The results show that school principals experience anger because of reproaches from staff…

  12. Toddlers' Understanding of Peers' Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Sara R.; Svetlova, Margarita; Brownell, Celia A.

    2010-01-01

    The second year of life sees dramatic developments in infants' ability to understand emotions in adults alongside their growing interest in peers. In this study, the authors used a social-referencing paradigm to examine whether 12-, 18-, and 24-month-old children could use a peer's positive or negative emotion messages about toys to regulate their…

  13. Emotion and sociable humanoid robots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cynthia Breazeal

    2003-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of emotion and expressive behavior in regulating social interaction between humans and expressive anthropomorphic robots, either in communicative or teaching scenarios. We present the scientific basis underlying our humanoid robot's emotion models and expressive behavior, and then show how these scientific viewpoints have been adapted to the current implementation. Our robot is also able

  14. The importance of emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Cheri

    2014-11-27

    Nurse managers who exhibit high emotional intelligence (EI) can elicit higher nurse-retention rates, better patient satisfaction and optimal organisational outcomes, and those who are emotionally intelligent tend consistently to model the positive behaviour that is expected of healthcare staff. PMID:25428315

  15. Assessment as an "Emotional Practice"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Carola

    2008-01-01

    The intention of this article is to illustrate how assessment is an "emotional practice" (Hargreaves, 1998) for teachers and how paying attention to the emotions involved can provide useful information about assessment practices to teachers, teacher-educators and policy-reformers. Through presenting a review of research literature it makes three…

  16. Artificial emotions as emergent phenomena

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takashi Gomi; Joseph Ulvr

    1993-01-01

    Although some researchers claim that emotion is unique to mammals, this paper describes a notion of artificial emotion as a phenomenon resulting from a series of modifications to emergent behaviors generated by a behavior-based artificial intelligence (AI) approach. Such modifications to behaviors are caused by stimuli (including those from humans) which a robot receives from its environment. The paper describes

  17. Further Evidence for Mixed Emotions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeff T. Larsen; A. Peter McGraw

    2011-01-01

    Emotion theorists have long debated whether valence, which ranges from pleasant to unpleasant states, is an irreducible aspect of the experience of emotion or whether positivity and negativity are separable in experience. If valence is irreducible, it follows that people cannot feel happy and sad at the same time. Conversely, if positivity and negativity are separable, people may be able

  18. Grounding Emotion in Situated Conceptualization

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Mendenhall, Christine D.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Simmons, W. Kyle; Barsalou, Lawrence W.

    2011-01-01

    According to the Conceptual Act Theory of Emotion, the situated conceptualization used to construe a situation determines the emotion experienced. A neuroimaging experiment tested two core hypotheses of this theory: (1) different situated conceptualizations produce different forms of the same emotion in different situations, (2) the composition of a situated conceptualization emerges from shared multimodal circuitry distributed across the brain that produces emotional states generally. To test these hypotheses, the situation in which participants experienced an emotion was manipulated. On each trial, participants immersed themselves in a physical danger or social evaluation situation and then experienced fear or anger. According to Hypothesis 1, the brain activations for the same emotion should differ as a function of the preceding situation (after removing activations that arose while constructing the situation). According to Hypothesis 2, the critical activations should reflect conceptual processing relevant to the emotion in the current situation, drawn from shared multimodal circuitry underlying emotion. The results supported these predictions and demonstrated the compositional process that produces situated conceptualizations dynamically. PMID:21192959

  19. Logicality and Emotionality in Argumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrin, Elise Trumbull; And Others

    The contention of this paper is that logicality and emotionality are not two poles of a continuum but orthogonal dimensions which may exist to varying degrees in an argument. It was hypothesized that: (1) logicality and emotionality would be perceived as independent components by subject; and (2) messages high in logic would have more influence on…

  20. Finance organizations, decisions and emotions.

    PubMed

    Pixley, Jocelyn

    2002-03-01

    Analyses of global financial markets are dominated by atomized models of decision-making and behavioural psychology ('exuberance' or 'panic'). In contrast, this paper argues that overwhelmingly, finance organizations rather than 'individuals' make decisions, and routinely use emotions in formulating expectations. Keynes introduced emotion (business confidence and animal spirits) but in economics, emotion remains individualistic and irrational. Luhmann's system theory lies at the other extreme, where emotions like trust and confidence are central variables, functional in the reduction of complexity in sub-systems like the economy. The gap between irrational emotions aggregated to 'herd' behaviour in economics, and 'system trust' applied to finance and money as a 'medium of communication' in sociology, remains largely unfilled. This paper argues that while organizations cannot be said to 'think' or 'feel', they are rational and emotional, because impersonal trust, confidence and their contrary emotions are unavoidable in decision-making due to fundamental uncertainty. These future-oriented emotions are prevalent within and between organizations in the financial sector, primarily in generating expectations. The dynamic of corporate activities of tense and ruthless struggle is a more plausible level of analysis than either financial 'manias' in aggregate or 'system trust'. PMID:11958678

  1. Examining Emotions in Identity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stets, Jan E.

    2005-01-01

    In this study I develop theoretically the role of emotions in identity theory by examining individuals' emotional reactions to identity nonverification (in a positive and a negative direction) and identity verification, which occurs once versus repeatedly, and which is perpetrated by a familiar other compared with an unfamiliar other. Predictions…

  2. Measuring Emotion Socialization in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Christy G.; Wallace, Tanner L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Understanding how school personnel can best support students' development of communication skills around feelings is critical to long-term health outcomes. The measurement of emotion socialization in schools facilitates future research in this area; we review existing measures of emotion socialization to assess their applicability…

  3. Mapping the Classroom Emotional Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Shane T.; Bimler, David; Evans, Ian M.; Kirkland, John; Pechtel, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Harvey and Evans (2003) have proposed that teachers' emotional skills, as required in the classroom, can be organized into a five-dimensional model. Further research is necessary to validate this model and evaluate the importance of each dimension of teacher emotion competence for educational practice. Using a statistical method for mapping…

  4. Parents’ Beliefs about Emotions and Children’s Recognition of Parents’ Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Dunsmore, Julie C.; Her, Pa; Halberstadt, Amy G.; Perez-Rivera, Marie B.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated parents’ emotion-related beliefs, experience, and expression, and children’s recognition of their parents’ emotions with 40 parent-child dyads. Parents reported beliefs about danger and guidance of children’s emotions. While viewing emotion-eliciting film clips, parents self-reported their emotional experience and masking of emotion. Children and observers rated videos of parents watching emotion-eliciting film clips. Fathers reported more masking than mothers and their emotional expressions were more difficult for both observers and children to recognize compared with mothers’ emotional expressions. For fathers, but not mothers, showing clearer expressions was related to children’s general skill at recognizing emotional expressions. Parents who believe emotions are dangerous reported greater masking of emotional expression. Contrary to hypothesis, when parents strongly believe in guiding their child’s emotion socialization, children showed less accurate recognition of their parents’ emotions. PMID:20160992

  5. Acquisition of Visuomotor Abilities and Intellectual Quotient in Children Aged 4–10 Years: Relationship with Micronutrient Nutritional Status

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Horacio F. González; Agustina Malpeli; Graciela Etchegoyen; Lucrecia Lucero; Florencia Romero; Carolina Lagunas; Gustavo Lailhacar; Manuel Olivares; Ricardo Uauy

    2007-01-01

    Lethargy, poor attention, and the high rate and severity of infections in malnourished children affect their educational achievement.\\u000a We therefore studied the association between visuomotor abilities and intelligence quotient (IQ) and their relationship with\\u000a iron, zinc, and copper. A cross-sectional study was carried out on a sample of 89 healthy children (age range, 4–10 years).\\u000a Evaluations of visuomotor ability and IQ

  6. The Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ): Evidence from Asperger Syndrome\\/High-Functioning Autism, Males and Females, Scientists and Mathematicians

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon Baron-Cohen; Sally Wheelwright; Richard Skinner; Joanne Martin; Emma Clubley

    2001-01-01

    Currently there are no brief, self-administered instruments for measuring the degree to which an adult with normal intelligence has the traits associated with the autistic spectrum. In this paper, we report on a new instrument to assess this: the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ). Indi- viduals score in the range 0-50. Four groups of subjects were assessed: Group 1: 58 adults with

  7. Networks of Emotion Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Toivonen, Riitta; Kivelä, Mikko; Saramäki, Jari; Viinikainen, Mikko; Vanhatalo, Maija; Sams, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the similarity network and hierarchical clustering of Finnish emotion concepts. Native speakers of Finnish evaluated similarity between the 50 most frequently used Finnish words describing emotional experiences. We hypothesized that methods developed within network theory, such as identifying clusters and specific local network structures, can reveal structures that would be difficult to discover using traditional methods such as multidimensional scaling (MDS) and ordinary cluster analysis. The concepts divided into three main clusters, which can be described as negative, positive, and surprise. Negative and positive clusters divided further into meaningful sub-clusters, corresponding to those found in previous studies. Importantly, this method allowed the same concept to be a member in more than one cluster. Our results suggest that studying particular network structures that do not fit into a low-dimensional description can shed additional light on why subjects evaluate certain concepts as similar. To encourage the use of network methods in analyzing similarity data, we provide the analysis software for free use (http://www.becs.tkk.fi/similaritynets/). PMID:22276099

  8. Emotional response to musical repetition.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Steven R; Palmer, Caroline; Schubert, Emery

    2012-06-01

    Two experiments examined the effects of repetition on listeners' emotional response to music. Listeners heard recordings of orchestral music that contained a large section repeated twice. The music had a symmetric phrase structure (same-length phrases) in Experiment 1 and an asymmetric phrase structure (different-length phrases) in Experiment 2, hypothesized to alter the predictability of sensitivity to musical repetition. Continuous measures of arousal and valence were compared across music that contained identical repetition, variation (related), or contrasting (unrelated) structure. Listeners' emotional arousal ratings differed most for contrasting music, moderately for variations, and least for repeating musical segments. A computational model for the detection of repeated musical segments was applied to the listeners' emotional responses. The model detected the locations of phrase boundaries from the emotional responses better than from performed tempo or physical intensity in both experiments. These findings indicate the importance of repetition in listeners' emotional response to music and in the perceptual segmentation of musical structure. PMID:21707165

  9. Emotional distractors can enhance attention

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Tamara J.; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A.; Mohanty, Aprajita

    2015-01-01

    The deleterious effects of emotional distractors on attention are well demonstrated. However, it is unclear if emotional distractors inevitably disrupt task-relevant attention. Using multilevel modeling (MLM), the present study examined the impact of valence and arousal dimensions of distracting emotional stimuli and individual differences in anxiety on task-relevant processing. Consistent with prior literature, high-arousal negative distractors were associated with poor task-relevant attention compared to positive and neutral distractors. However, low-arousal negative distractors were associated with better task-relevant performance than were positive and neutral distractors. Furthermore, these effects were accentuated by individual differences in worry. These findings challenge assumptions that distraction and worry must be minimized for augmented attentional performance. Overall, these results emphasize the importance of taking into account emotional dimensions of arousal and valence as well as individual differences in anxiety when examining attention in the presence of emotional distractors. PMID:24058065

  10. Emotional intelligence and emotional reactivity and recovery in laboratory context.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo; Extremera, Natalio

    2006-01-01

    This research analysed the influence of Emotional Intelligence (EI) on emotional responses in laboratory context. Specifically, 1) how does EI affect previous mood states? 2) How does persons' emotional reactivity to different mood induction conditions depend on their EI? 3) How does EI help to a better mood recovery? For these purposes, 155 participants (123 women and 32 men) were measured for EI using Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS) one month before the experimental session. The TMMS assesses perceived ability to (a) attend to moods (Attention), (b) discriminate clearly among moods (Clarity), and (c) regulate moods (Repair). The experiment comprised three phases. At time 1 experimenter assessed mood states of the participants before mood induction. At time 2 (mood reactivity phase), participants were randomly assigned to one of the three experimental conditions: amusement, anger, and sadness mood conditions. Subsequently participants were assessed in their mood states. At time 3 (mood recovery phase), following a rest period participants were evaluated in mood states and intrusive thoughts measures. Results indicated that EI, specifically Clarity and Repair, was related to previous mood states, emotional reactivity to mood induction conditions, and emotional recovery. Clarity and Repair play different but complementary roles in processing emotional situations generated in laboratory context. In this sense, EI could join the list of personal and interpersonal factors that contribute to the efficient processing of positive and negative emotions. PMID:17295961

  11. The Dark Side of Emotion in the Classroom: Emotional Processes as Mediators of Teacher Communication Behaviors and Student Negative Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazer, Joseph P.; McKenna-Buchanan, Timothy P.; Quinlan, Margaret M.; Titsworth, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Based on emotional response theory (ERT), recent researchers have observed connections between teachers' communication behaviors and students' emotional reactions. In the present study, we further elaborated ERT by exploring the effects of teacher communication behaviors and emotional processes on discrete negative emotions, including…

  12. Mental fatigue impairs emotion regulation

    PubMed Central

    Grillon, C; Quispe-Escudero, D; Mathur, A; Ernst, M

    2015-01-01

    As healthy physical and mental functioning depends on the ability to regulate emotions, it is important to identify moderators of such regulations. Whether mental fatigue, subsequent to the depletion of cognitive resources, impairs explicit emotion regulation to negative stimuli is currently unknown. This study explored this possibility. In a within-subject design over two separate sessions, healthy individuals performed easy (control session) or difficult (depletion session) cognitive tasks. Subsequently, they were presented neutral and negative pictures, with the instructions to either maintain or regulate (i.e., reduce) the emotions evoked by the pictures. Emotional reactivity was probed with the startle reflex. The negative pictures evoked a similar aversive state in the control and depletion sessions as measured by startle potentiation. However, subjects were able to down-regulate their aversive state only in the control session, but not in the depletion session. These results indicate that mental fatigue following performance of cognitive tasks impairs emotion regulation without affecting emotion reactivity. These findings suggest that mental fatigue needs to be incorporated into models of emotion regulation. PMID:25706833

  13. Compound facial expressions of emotion.

    PubMed

    Du, Shichuan; Tao, Yong; Martinez, Aleix M

    2014-04-15

    Understanding the different categories of facial expressions of emotion regularly used by us is essential to gain insights into human cognition and affect as well as for the design of computational models and perceptual interfaces. Past research on facial expressions of emotion has focused on the study of six basic categories--happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. However, many more facial expressions of emotion exist and are used regularly by humans. This paper describes an important group of expressions, which we call compound emotion categories. Compound emotions are those that can be constructed by combining basic component categories to create new ones. For instance, happily surprised and angrily surprised are two distinct compound emotion categories. The present work defines 21 distinct emotion categories. Sample images of their facial expressions were collected from 230 human subjects. A Facial Action Coding System analysis shows the production of these 21 categories is different but consistent with the subordinate categories they represent (e.g., a happily surprised expression combines muscle movements observed in happiness and surprised). We show that these differences are sufficient to distinguish between the 21 defined categories. We then use a computational model of face perception to demonstrate that most of these categories are also visually discriminable from one another. PMID:24706770

  14. Compound facial expressions of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shichuan; Tao, Yong; Martinez, Aleix M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the different categories of facial expressions of emotion regularly used by us is essential to gain insights into human cognition and affect as well as for the design of computational models and perceptual interfaces. Past research on facial expressions of emotion has focused on the study of six basic categories—happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. However, many more facial expressions of emotion exist and are used regularly by humans. This paper describes an important group of expressions, which we call compound emotion categories. Compound emotions are those that can be constructed by combining basic component categories to create new ones. For instance, happily surprised and angrily surprised are two distinct compound emotion categories. The present work defines 21 distinct emotion categories. Sample images of their facial expressions were collected from 230 human subjects. A Facial Action Coding System analysis shows the production of these 21 categories is different but consistent with the subordinate categories they represent (e.g., a happily surprised expression combines muscle movements observed in happiness and surprised). We show that these differences are sufficient to distinguish between the 21 defined categories. We then use a computational model of face perception to demonstrate that most of these categories are also visually discriminable from one another. PMID:24706770

  15. Mental fatigue impairs emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Grillon, Christian; Quispe-Escudero, David; Mathur, Ambika; Ernst, Monique

    2015-06-01

    Because healthy physical and mental functioning depends on the ability to regulate emotions, it is important to identify moderators of such regulations. Whether mental fatigue, subsequent to the depletion of cognitive resources, impairs explicit emotion regulation to negative stimuli is currently unknown. This study explored this possibility. In a within-subject design over 2 separate sessions, healthy individuals performed easy (control session) or difficult (depletion session) cognitive tasks. Subsequently, they were presented with neutral and negative pictures, with instructions to either maintain or regulate (i.e., reduce) the emotions evoked by the pictures. Emotional reactivity was probed with the startle reflex. The negative pictures evoked a similar aversive state in the control and depletion sessions as measured by startle potentiation. However, subjects were able to down-regulate their aversive state only in the control session, not in the depletion session. These results indicate that mental fatigue following performance of cognitive tasks impairs emotion regulation without affecting emotional reactivity. These findings suggest that mental fatigue needs to be incorporated into models of emotion regulation. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25706833

  16. Further evidence for mixed emotions.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jeff T; McGraw, A Peter

    2011-06-01

    Emotion theorists have long debated whether valence, which ranges from pleasant to unpleasant states, is an irreducible aspect of the experience of emotion or whether positivity and negativity are separable in experience. If valence is irreducible, it follows that people cannot feel happy and sad at the same time. Conversely, if positivity and negativity are separable, people may be able to experience such mixed emotions. The authors tested several alternative interpretations for prior evidence that happiness and sadness can co-occur in bittersweet situations (i.e., those containing both pleasant and unpleasant aspects). One possibility is that subjects who reported mixed emotions merely vacillated between happiness and sadness. The authors tested this hypothesis in Studies 1-3 by asking subjects to complete online continuous measures of happiness and sadness. Subjects reported more simultaneously mixed emotions during a bittersweet film clip than during a control clip. Another possibility is that subjects in earlier studies reported mixed emotions only because they were explicitly asked whether they felt happy and sad. The authors tested this hypothesis in Studies 4-6 with open-ended measures of emotion. Subjects were more likely to report mixed emotions after the bittersweet clip than the control clip. Both patterns occurred even when subjects were told that they were not expected to report mixed emotions (Studies 2 and 5) and among subjects who did not previously believe that people could simultaneously feel happy and sad (Studies 3 and 6). These results provide further evidence that positivity and negativity are separable in experience. PMID:21219075

  17. Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery Increases Respiratory Quotient and Energy Expenditure during Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Werling, Malin; Fändriks, Lars; Olbers, Torsten; Bueter, Marco; Sjöström, Lars; Lönroth, Hans; Wallenius, Ville; Stenlöf, Kaj; le Roux, Carel W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The mechanisms determining long-term weight maintenance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) remain unclear. Cross sectional studies have suggested that enhanced energy expenditure (EE) may play a significant role and the aim of this study was to reveal the impact of RYGB on each major component constituting total EE. Design Six obese female subjects, without other co-morbidities, were assessed before and at 10 days, 3 and 20 months after RYGB. Indirect calorimetry in a metabolic chamber was used to assess 24h EE at each study visit. Other measurements included body composition by DEXA, gut hormone profiles and physical activity (PA) using high sensitivity accelerometers. Results Median Body Mass Index decreased from 41.1 (range 39.1-44.8) at baseline to 28 kg/m2 (range 22.3-30.3) after 20 months (p<0.05). Lean tissue decreased from 55.9 (range 47.5-59.3) to 49.5 (range 41.1-54.9) kg and adipose tissue from 61 (range 56-64.6) to 27 (range 12-34.3) kg (both p<0.05). PA over 24h did not change after surgery whereas 24h EE and basal metabolic rate (BMR) decreased. EE after a standard meal increased after surgery when adjusted for total tissue (p<0.05). After an initial drop, RQ (respiratory quotient) had increased at 20 months, both as measured during 24h and after food intake (p<0.05). Conclusion RYGB surgery up-regulates RQ and EE after food intake resulting in an increased contribution to total EE over 24h when corrected for total tissue. PMID:26098889

  18. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ).

    PubMed

    Lau, Winnie Yu-Pow; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Wu, Yu-Yu; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Liu, Shih-Kai; Chou, Miao-Chun

    2013-01-01

    The Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) has been widely used for measuring autistic characteristics in parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Nonetheless, its psychometric validity is yet to be justified. This study tested the factor structure of the AQ by means of principal component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis using, for the first time, data from 4192 Taiwanese parents (1208 with ASD children and 2984 with typically developing children). Results yielded a 35-item, 5-dimensional factor solution that had favorable psychometric characteristics (RMSEA = .054; NNFI = .962; CFI = .969) than any of the previously-published AQ factor solutions. Subscales of this new AQ-Chinese model were statistically and semantically coherent, namely: Socialness, Mindreading, Patterns, Attention to Details and Attention Switching. The psychometric properties of the AQ-Chinese did not change between clinic-based and community-based data suggesting good fitting for a continuum of autistic expression. Furthermore, the considerable overlap between the AQ-Chinese and the AQ factor structures derived previously using student samples indicated consistency in the manifestation of the autistic profile across different cultures and age groups. Group differences in the AQ-Chinese scores were in line with previous studies, i.e. males generally scored radically higher than females except in Attention to Details. Interestingly, mothers of ASD children reported lower total AQ scores than community mothers yet no significant group difference for the fathers. Important research and clinical implications pertinent to parents with children with ASD and the utility of the AQ were drawn. PMID:22985783

  19. Quantitative Evaluation of the Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ) for Comparing Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Kniss, Andrew R.; Coburn, Carl W.

    2015-01-01

    Various indicators of pesticide environmental risk have been proposed, and one of the most widely known and used is the environmental impact quotient (EIQ). The EIQ has been criticized by others in the past, but it continues to be used regularly in the weed science literature. The EIQ is typically considered an improvement over simply comparing the amount of herbicides applied by weight. Herbicides are treated differently compared to other pesticide groups when calculating the EIQ, and therefore, it is important to understand how different risk factors affect the EIQ for herbicides. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the suitability of the EIQ as an environmental indicator for herbicides. Simulation analysis was conducted to quantify relative sensitivity of the EIQ to changes in risk factors, and actual herbicide EIQ values were used to quantify the impact of herbicide application rate on the EIQ Field Use Rating. Herbicide use rate was highly correlated with the EIQ Field Use Rating (Spearman’s rho >0.96, P-value <0.001) for two herbicide datasets. Two important risk factors for herbicides, leaching and surface runoff potential, are included in the EIQ calculation but explain less than 1% of total variation in the EIQ. Plant surface half-life was the risk factor with the greatest relative influence on herbicide EIQ, explaining 26 to 28% of the total variation in EIQ for actual and simulated EIQ values, respectively. For herbicides, the plant surface half-life risk factor is assigned values without any supporting quantitative data, and can result in EIQ estimates that are contrary to quantitative risk estimates for some herbicides. In its current form, the EIQ is a poor measure of herbicide environmental impact. PMID:26121252

  20. Investigating the structure of the autism-spectrum quotient using Mokken scaling.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Mary E; Allison, Carrie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Watson, Roger

    2015-06-01

    Traits similar to those shown in autism spectrum condition (ASC) are apparent in relatives of individuals with ASC, and in the general population without necessarily meeting diagnostic criteria for an ASC. We assess whether the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ), a self-report measure, has hierarchical properties using Mokken scaling. Hierarchical scales allow the presence of a latent trait to be identified by discovering whether and how many specific items form an ordered array along it. Data were collected from 2 groups: (1) people with ASC (n = 449: 240 males, 209 females, Mage 35.4 years, SD = 12.8) and (2) university students (n = 943: 465 males, 475 females, Mage = 23.0 years, SD = 8.4). A single Mokken scale was obtained in the data from university students and 3 scales were obtained in the data from people with ASC. The scales all showed moderate Mokken scaling properties with the single scale obtained from university students showing weak invariant item ordering and 2 of the scales from people with ASC showing weak invariant item ordering. The AQ formed reliable Mokken scales. There was a large overlap between the scale from the university student sample and the sample with ASC, with the first scale, relating to social interaction, being almost identical. The present study confirms the utility of the AQ as a single instrument that can dimensionalize autistic traits in both university student and clinical samples of ASC, and confirms that items of the AQ are consistently ordered relative to one another. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25664635

  1. RECOGNIZING EMOTIONS IN SPONTANEOUS FACIAL EXPRESSIONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Grimm; Dhrubabrata Ghosh Dastidar; Kristian Kroschel

    In this paper we present a method for classifying emotions in spon- taneous facial expressions of both active and inactive speakers in spoken dialogues. Evaluation and classification was performed for emotion categories (happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, disgust, neutral) and emotion space classes (3 classes for valence and activation, respectively). In addition, continuous values of the emotion space attributes were

  2. Realistic human body movement for emotional expressiveness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aaron Hertzmann; Carol O'Sullivan; Ken Perlin

    2009-01-01

    Humans express their emotions in many ways, in particular through face, eye, and body motion. So creators of virtual humans strive to convincingly depict emotional movements using a variety of methods.This course focuses on the use of realistic human body motion to generate emotional expressiveness. Topics include: applications and research relating to procedural animation of humans with emotion and personality,

  3. A Neurobiological Approach to Emotional Intelligence

    E-print Network

    Rolls, Edmund T.

    72 3 A Neurobiological Approach to Emotional Intelligence edmund t. rolls Emotions may be defined also leads to a framework for understanding emotional intelligence, in that the evolution of each and intelligence. By focusing on the core capacities that are fundamental to emotion, it is possible to identify

  4. Preschool Emotional Competence: Pathway to Social Competence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Susanne A.; Blair, Kimberly A.; DeMulder, Elizabeth; Levitas, Jennifer; Sawyer, Katherine; Auerbach-Major, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    Assessed preschoolers' patterns of emotional expressiveness, emotion regulation, and emotion knowledge. Used latent variable modeling to identify their contributions to social competence, evidenced by sociometric liability and teacher ratings. Found that emotional competence assessed at 3 to 4 years of age contributed to both concurrent and…

  5. Modeling emotion dynamics in intelligent agents 

    E-print Network

    Seif El-Nasr, Magy

    1998-01-01

    on emotional intelligent agents treats emotion as a black-and-white matter. We used fuzzy rules to explore the capability of fuzzy logic in modeling emotions. Fuzzy logic helped us to capture the fuzzy and complex nature of emotions. Experience and learning...

  6. A Computational Model for Adaptive Emotion Regulation

    E-print Network

    Treur, Jan

    A Computational Model for Adaptive Emotion Regulation Tibor Bosse, Matthijs Pontier, and Jan Treur} Abstract. Emotion regulation describes how a subject can use certain strategies to affect emotion response levels. Usually, models for emotion regulation as- sume mechanisms based on feedback loops that indicate

  7. Hypnotic Experience is Related to Emotional Contagion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Etzel Cardeña; Devin B. Terhune; Angelica Lööf; Sandra Buratti

    2008-01-01

    The authors conducted 2 studies to evaluate whether emotional contagion, the propensity to automatically imitate the emotional expressions of others and experience the corresponding emotions, is related to behavioral and experiential indices of hypnotizability and whether such a relationship is influenced by administration context. In Study 1, behavioral and subjective measures of hypnotizability were measured alongside emotional contagion in the

  8. Towards the neurobiology of emotional body language

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beatrice de Gelder

    2006-01-01

    People's faces show fear in many different circumstances. However, when people are terrified, as well as showing emotion, they run for cover. When we see a bodily expression of emotion, we immediately know what specific action is associated with a particular emotion, leaving little need for interpretation of the signal, as is the case for facial expressions. Research on emotional

  9. Emotion lateralisation: Developments throughout the lifespan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dawn Watling; Lance Workman; Victoria J. Bourne

    2012-01-01

    There is a great amount of research on hemispheric lateralisation for processing emotions and on the recognition of emotions across the lifespan. However, few researchers have explored the links between these two measures. This paper highlights how trends in these two research areas inform our understanding of how lateralisation for emotion processing may influence emotion recognition performance throughout the lifespan,

  10. Emptiness and the Education of the Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that Buddhist philosophy offers a plausible theory of the education of the emotions. Emotions are analyzed as cognitive feeling events in which the subject is passive. The education of the emotions is possible if and only if it is possible to evaluate one's emotional life (the normative condition) and it is possible to…

  11. Moment-to-Moment Emotions during Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graesser, Arthur C.; D'Mello, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Moment-to-moment emotions are affective states that dynamically change during reading and potentially influence comprehension. Researchers have recently identified these emotions and the emotion trajectories in reading, tutoring, and problem solving. The primary learning-centered emotions are boredom, frustration, confusion, flow (engagement),…

  12. Love and knowledge: Emotion in feminist epistemology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alison M. Jaggar

    1989-01-01

    This paper argues that, by construing emotion as epistemologically subversive, the Western tradition has tended to obscure the vital role of emotion in the construction of knowledge. The paper begins with an account of emotion that stresses its active, voluntary, and socially constructed aspects, and indicates how emotion is involved in evaluation and observation. It then moves on to show

  13. Managing Emotions in Teaching: Toward an Understanding of Emotion Displays and Caring as Nonprescribed Role Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oplatka, Izhar

    2007-01-01

    Background: Much research has sought to investigate emotions and forms of emotion management among teachers worldwide, including the connection between educational change and teacher emotion; the association between the culture of teaching and teachers' emotional experience within parent-teacher interactions; the link between teacher emotion and…

  14. Explaining the protective effect of trait emotional intelligence regarding occupational stress: Exploration of emotional labour processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Moïra Mikolajczak; Clémentine Menil; Olivier Luminet

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims at understanding the processes explaining the protective effect of trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) regarding occupational stress. The present study focuses on a widespread occupational stressor: emotional labour (EL). EL refers to the act of managing emotions and emotional expressions in order to be consistent with organizational ‘display rules’, defined as the organizationally required emotions during interpersonal

  15. IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION 1 Running Head: IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION

    E-print Network

    Gross, James J.

    IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION 1 Running Head: IMPLICIT EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION How to Bite Your Tongue without Blowing Your Top: Implicit Evaluation of Emotion Regulation Predicts EVALUATION OF EMOTION REGULATION 2 Abstract People frequently have to control their emotions to function

  16. Parental Emotion Coaching and Child Emotion Regulation as Protective Factors for Children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunsmore, Julie C.; Booker, Jordan A.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed linkages of mothers' emotion coaching and children's emotion regulation and emotion lability/negativity with children's adjustment in 72 mother-child dyads seeking treatment for oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). Dyads completed the questionnaires and discussed emotion-related family events. Maternal emotion coaching…

  17. Proceedings of the Agent Construction and Emotions Workshop, 2006. Incorporating Emotions into Automated Negotiation

    E-print Network

    Vidal, Jose M.

    Proceedings of the Agent Construction and Emotions Workshop, 2006. Incorporating Emotions We introduce an emotional agent model that shows how emotions affect an agent's nego- tiation strategy. By adding emotions, we add the effects of these indirectly related fea- tures to the negotiation

  18. Emotion Regulation and Emotion Coherence: Evidence for Strategy-Specific Effects

    E-print Network

    Gross, James J.

    Emotion Regulation and Emotion Coherence: Evidence for Strategy-Specific Effects Elise S. Dan-Glauser and James J. Gross Stanford University One of the central tenets of emotion theory is that emotions involve is known, however, about how the strength of this emotion coherence is altered when people try to regulate

  19. The Effect of Smoke-Free Air Law in Bars on Smoking Initiation and Relapse among Teenagers and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ce

    2015-01-01

    Background: Existing evidence has shown that most smoking uptake and escalation occurs while smokers are teenagers or young adults. Effective policies that reduce smoking uptake and escalation will play an important role in curbing cigarette smoking. This study aims to investigate the effect of smoke-free air (SFA) laws in bars on smoking initiation/relapse while controlling for other confounders. Methods: The national longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) from 1997–2009 was linked to state-level scores for the strength of SFA laws in order to carry out the analysis. Results and Conclusion: We find that SFA laws in bars with exemptions significantly reduce (p ? 0.01) the probability of smoking initiation (one-puff, daily, and heavy smoking initiation). The 100% SFA law in bars without exemption significantly deters smoking relapse from abstinence into daily smoking (p ? 0.05) or relapse from abstinence into heavy smoking (p ? 0.01) among people age 21 or older. The reduction of one-puff and daily smoking initiation is larger among ages 20 or younger than ages 21 or older, while the reduction in relapse does not differ by whether respondents reach the drinking age. Results also indicate that higher cigarette taxes significantly reduce daily smoking initiation and relapse into nondaily and light smoking. PMID:25584419

  20. The BaLROG project - I. Quantifying the influence of bars on the kinematics of nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, M. K.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Martínez-Valpuesta, I.; Díaz-García, S.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Knapen, J. H.

    2015-07-01

    We present the BaLROG (Bars in Low Redshift Optical Galaxies) sample of 16 morphologically distinct barred spirals to characterize observationally the influence of bars on nearby galaxies. Each galaxy is a mosaic of several pointings observed with the integral-field unit (IFU) SAURON leading to a tenfold sharper spatial resolution (˜100 pc) compared to ongoing IFU surveys. In this paper we focus on the kinematic properties. We calculate the bar strength Q__b from classical torque analysis using 3.6-?m Spitzer (S4G) images, but also develop a new method based solely on the kinematics. A correlation between the two measurements is found and backed up by N-body simulations, verifying the measurement of Q__b. We find that bar strengths from ionized gas kinematics are ˜2.5 larger than those measured from stellar kinematics and that stronger bars have enhanced influence on inner kinematic features. We detect that stellar angular momentum `dips' at 0.2 ± 0.1 bar lengths and half of our sample exhibits an anticorrelation of h3-stellar velocity (v/?) in these central parts. An increased flattening of the stellar ? gradient with increasing bar strength supports the notion of bar-induced orbit mixing. These measurements set important constraints on the spatial scales, namely an increasing influence in the central regions (0.1-0.5 bar lengths), revealed by kinematic signatures due to bar-driven secular evolution in present-day galaxies.

  1. Origin of Emotion Effects on ERP Correlates of Emotional Word Processing: The Emotion Duality Approach

    PubMed Central

    Imbir, Kamil Konrad; Jarymowicz, Maria Teresa; Spustek, Tomasz; Ku?, Rafa?; ?ygierewicz, Jaros?aw

    2015-01-01

    We distinguish two evaluative systems which evoke automatic and reflective emotions. Automatic emotions are direct reactions to stimuli whereas reflective emotions are always based on verbalized (and often abstract) criteria of evaluation. We conducted an electroencephalography (EEG) study in which 25 women were required to read and respond to emotional words which engaged either the automatic or reflective system. Stimulus words were emotional (positive or negative) and neutral. We found an effect of valence on an early response with dipolar fronto-occipital topography; positive words evoked a higher amplitude response than negative words. We also found that topographically specific differences in the amplitude of the late positive complex were related to the system involved in processing. Emotional stimuli engaging the automatic system were associated with significantly higher amplitudes in the left-parietal region; the response to neutral words was similar regardless of the system engaged. A different pattern of effects was observed in the central region, neutral stimuli engaging the reflective system evoked a higher amplitudes response whereas there was no system effect for emotional stimuli. These differences could not be reduced to effects of differences between the arousing properties and concreteness of the words used as stimuli. PMID:25955719

  2. Toll Bar on Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Dave

    2008-01-01

    In the summer of 2007 the United Kingdom experienced some of the heaviest rainfall since records began. Toll Bar in South Yorkshire featured prominently in media coverage as the village and the homes surrounding it began to flood. Many people lost everything: their homes, their furniture, their possessions. In an effort to come to terms with what…

  3. Emotional Intelligence and Social Perception 

    E-print Network

    Teale, Cassandra

    2010-06-30

    The present study had the chief aim of validating the new Social Perception Test (SPT) as a veridically scored, pragmatic measure of Emotional Intelligence (EI). To this end the SPT was compared to three similarly visually ...

  4. Emotional Development: 1 Year Olds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Emotional Development: 1 Year Olds Article Body Throughout her second year, your ... for shelter. She may seem to change from one moment to the next, or she may seem ...

  5. The emotional effects of disruption 

    E-print Network

    Adcock, Christina Annie Lee

    2004-11-15

    Disruption is something that we must negotiate as part of our everyday lives. The context of disruption can vary in nature from being positive to being negative in nature. However, the emotional effects of the disruption have not been investigated...

  6. The relationship between emotional intelligence health and marital satisfaction: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, Ahmad Ali; Hasanzadeh, Akbar; Jamshidi, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Marriage is known as the most important incident in everyone's life after birth. The most important purpose of marriage is achieving a life followed with love and affection beside the spouse and providing mental comfort and general health. The aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence health and marital satisfaction among married people. Materials and Methods: The research method is descriptive- analytic and its design is comparative, done on 226 people including 114 persons (50 women and 64 men) having marital conflicts, and 112 people (58 women and 54 men) having marital satisfaction, by cluster random sampling from 13 districts of the city of Isfahan. Bar-on (with 90 questions) and Enrich marital satisfaction (115 questions) questionnaires were used for collecting the required information. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics including independent t-tests, Pearson correlation, and linear regression analysis, using SPSS software version 19. Results: The results from the research showed that the scores of emotional intelligence in married people group having marriage conflicts who had referred to the administration of justice was 57.3 ± 13.2, and the random sample from the married people in the city of Isfahan as the comparing group had the score of 67.2 ± 9.5, and the difference of the average scores for the emotional intelligence for the two groups was significant (P < 0.001). The correlation analysis showed that there was a significant and positive relation between emotional intelligence and marital satisfaction (P < 0.001, r = 0.529). The results of linear regression also showed that the general emotional intelligence predicts the quality of marital satisfaction. The emotion of the predicting line of the marital satisfaction score (y) is in the form of: y = 14.8 + 0.656x, by using the emotional intelligence score (x). Conclusion: Regarding the close relations between emotional intelligence and marital satisfaction, education centers such as universities, organizations and family clinics could use this variable in micro- and macro-social plans for improving the quality of the married people relations and promoting health of the families and the society. PMID:24741664

  7. Teachers' emotions and test feedback 

    E-print Network

    Stough, Laura

    1998-01-01

    , London W1T 3JH, UK International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/tqse20 Teachers' emotions and test feedback Laura M. Stough... & Edmund T. Emmer Published online: 25 Nov 2010. To cite this article: Laura M. Stough & Edmund T. Emmer (1998) Teachers' emotions and test feedback, International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 11:2, 341-361, DOI: 10...

  8. Teachers' emotions and test feedback

    E-print Network

    Stough, Laura

    1998-01-01

    , London W1T 3JH, UK International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/tqse20 Teachers' emotions and test feedback Laura M. Stough... & Edmund T. Emmer Published online: 25 Nov 2010. To cite this article: Laura M. Stough & Edmund T. Emmer (1998) Teachers' emotions and test feedback, International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 11:2, 341-361, DOI: 10...

  9. Associations between emotional intelligence, emotion regulation, personality and stress in undergraduate students 

    E-print Network

    Cruickshank, Kimberley

    2009-07-03

    Emotional intelligence is the name given to the ability to identify and manage emotions. It has often been linked to emotion regulation and stress. A sample of 213 participants filled out an online questionnaire about ...

  10. Reducing the negative effects of emotion work in service occupations: emotional competence as a psychological resource.

    PubMed

    Giardini, Angelo; Frese, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Although emotion work and emotional competence focus on similar processes, there has been a lack of integration between the 2 concepts. Emotion work is the regulatory effort to express organizationally desired emotions, whereas emotional competence encompasses skills that focus on how people deal with and regulate their own affect and that of others. The general hypothesis of this study was that emotional competence can be regarded as an important personal resource in emotion work because it moderates the relationships between work characteristics, emotional dissonance, and outcome variables. Eighty-four service employees completed a questionnaire on their working conditions and their well-being. In addition, peer ratings for emotional competence were completed. The authors found that emotional competence moderated most of the proposed relationships between work characteristics and emotional dissonance, between emotional dissonance and outcome variables, and between work characteristics and outcome variables. PMID:16551175

  11. Emotion and trauma: underlying emotions and trauma symptoms in two flooded populations 

    E-print Network

    Nesbitt, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    -related distress over time. Participants were asked to complete a survey pertaining to: basic emotions experienced during the flood event, basic emotions experienced after the flood, Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R), Regulation of Emotions Questionnaire (REQ...

  12. Effects of altered soil moisture on respiratory quotient in the Edwards Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, M. A.; Hawkes, C.; Breecker, D.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is expected to alter precipitation patterns around the world. The impacts of altered precipitation on ecosystem function will be partly controlled by soil microbes because of their primary role in soil carbon cycling. However, microbial responses to drought remain poorly understood, particularly local responses that might partly reflect specialization based on historical conditions. Here, we investigated the respiratory response of microbial communities originating from historically wetter and drier sites to both low and high soil moistures. We focused on the respiratory quotient (RQ= moles of CO2 produced per mole of O2 consumed), which varies with the oxidation state of organic carbon being respired and/or the compounds being synthesized by soil microbes. We hypothesized that there would be a shift in RQ across the gradient of soil moisture. Soils were collected from 13 sites across a steep precipitation gradient on the Edwards plateau in central Texas, air-dried, rewet at low or high soil moisture (6% or 24% gravimetric, respectively), and incubated in an atmosphere of 21% O2, 1% Ar, and balance He. After eight weeks, CO2, O2 and Ar in the headspace of incubation vials were measured by gas chromatography after separation of Ar and O2 at subambient temperature. Because of the high calcite content in soils on the Edwards plateau, we corrected the RQ values by assuming pH was buffered at 8 and then adding the calculated amount of CO2 dissolved in water in the incubations vials to the measured CO2 in the headspace. We found that uncorrected RQ values were slightly less than one and increased significantly with increasing mean annual precipitation. In contrast, corrected RQ values were greater than one and decreased with increasing mean annual precipitation. In both cases, we see a shift in RQ across the gradient, suggesting that differences in substrate utilization may vary based on origin across the gradient and with current level of soil moisture. This could provide insight into how microbial communities respond physiologically to shifts in environmental conditions, such as precipitation.

  13. An emotion-differentiated perspective on empathy with the emotion specific empathy questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Olderbak, Sally; Sassenrath, Claudia; Keller, Johannes; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Empathy refers to the thoughts and feelings of one individual in response to the observed (emotional) experiences of another individual. Empathy, however, can occur toward persons experiencing a variety of emotions, raising the question of whether or not empathy can be emotion specific. This paper discusses theoretical and empirical support for the emotion specificity of empathy. We present a new measure, the Emotion Specific Empathy questionnaire, which assesses affective and cognitive empathy for the six basic emotions. This paper presents the measure's psychometric qualities and demonstrates, through a series of models, the discriminant validity between emotion specific empathies suggesting empathy is emotion specific. Results and implications are discussed. PMID:25071632

  14. EMCORE - Emotional Cooperative Groupware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasoli, N.; Messina, A.

    In the last years considerable effort has been spent to develop groupware applications. Despite this, no general consenus has been met by groupware applications in computer field. Interdisciplinary approach could prove very useful to overcome these difficulties. A workgroup is not simply a set of people gathered together, working for a common goal. It can also be thought as a strong, hard mental reality. Actually, sociological and psychological definitions of group differ considerably. At sociological level a group is generally described in the view of the activities and events occurring inside the group itself. On the other hand, the psychological group approach considers not only the actions occurring inside the group, but also all the mental activities originated by belonging to the group, be they emotional or rational nature. Since early '60 simple work group (i.e. discussion group) has been analyzed in his psychological behavior. EMCORE is a prototype which aims to support computer science methods with psychological approach. The tool has been developed for a discussion group supported by heterogeneous distributed systems and has been implemented according to the CORBA abstraction augmented by the machine independent JAVA language. The tool allows all the common activities of a discussion group: discussion by voice or by chatting board if multimedia device are not present; discussion and elaboration of a shared document by text and/or graphic editor. At the same time, tools are provided for the psychoanalytic approach, according to a specific methodology.

  15. Magnocellular visual evoked potential delay with high autism spectrum quotient yields a neural mechanism for altered perception.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Alexandra; Crewther, David P

    2010-07-01

    Everyone has autistic characteristics to a greater or lesser degree, encapsulated in the Autism Spectrum Quotient, a scale that measures the degree to which an adult of normal intelligence displays traits associated with autism spectrum disorders. Recent psychophysical analyses of autism spectrum disorders point to superior local processing, and impaired or ignored global and contextual processing. The aim of this study was to test whether low- and high-scoring individuals on the Autism Spectrum Quotient differ on a measure of local and global processing, motion processing and visual pathway integrity. Fifteen low-scoring individuals and 14 high-scoring individuals derived from a normal population participated in the study. The results indicate that the initial cortical response to the magnocellular afferents is weaker at low contrast in the high autistic tendency group and that a second-order response, reflecting magnocellular activity, demonstrated a delay for high versus low scorers when the parvocellular pathway was also active in response to a high contrast stimulus. High-scoring individuals also demonstrated difficulty in identifying the global components of locally salient hierarchical Navon figures. Furthermore, cross-validated discriminant analysis, using four physiologically and three psychophysically derived parameters, correctly classified 83% of individuals who scored either high or low on the Autism Spectrum Quotient. These findings in the group scoring high on the Autism Spectrum Quotient indicate that a delay in primary visual/prestriate cortical processing of magnocellular input diminishes the advantage of its early arrival to primary visual cortex. This appears to be associated with impaired global visual perception, predicting with high accuracy behavioural tendencies associated with autism spectrum disorders. It has been proposed that perceptual impairment in autism may be attributed to a dysfunction of horizontal connections within early visual areas, presumably parvocellular in nature. However, the timing of such form processing aberrations is much later than the timing of abnormal magnocellular visual processing measured directly here. Thus it is proposed that a magnocellular processing delay decreases the ability of autistic individuals to benefit perceptually from feedback normally associated with the magnocellular advantage. PMID:20513659

  16. Children's understanding and experience of mixed emotions.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jeff T; To, Yen M; Fireman, Gary

    2007-02-01

    Though some models of emotion contend that happiness and sadness are mutually exclusive in experience, recent findings suggest that adults can feel happy and sad at the same time in emotionally complex situations. Other research has shown that children develop a better conceptual understanding of mixed emotions as they grow older, but no research has examined children's actual experience of mixed emotions. To examine developmental differences in the experience of mixed emotions, we showed children ages 5 to 12 scenes from an animated film that culminated with a father and daughter's bittersweet farewell. In subsequent interviews, older children were more likely than younger children to report experiencing mixed emotions. These results suggest that in addition to having a better conceptual understanding of mixed emotions, older children are more likely than younger children to actually experience mixed emotions in emotionally complex situations. PMID:17425541

  17. [Mutual inhibition between positive and negative emotions].

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, A

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between positive and negative emotions. In study 1, 62 emotional items were selected in order to measure subjective emotional experiences. In study 2, comics, photos and poems were randomly presented to 1,220 college students to induce emotion. Subjects were asked to rate their momentary emotional intensity on two set of 5-point scales (general emotional intensity scale and 62 specific emotional intensity scale). In analysis 1, positive correlations were suggested between general emotional intensity scale and some of the specific emotional intensity scales which were activated by stimuli. In analysis 2, 10 positive and 10 negative emotional items were extracted from 62 items by factor analysis. In analysis 3, 4 and 5, it became clear that the distribution of frequency of correlations of 10 positive x 10 negative items changed according to the general emotional intensity scale. That is, from low to moderate levels of GEIS, the two kinds of emotion had no or slightly positive correlation, but at high level they became to be negatively correlated. From the facts described above, it is concluded that positive and negative emotions is not always independent, but show mutual inhibition in case of high intensity level of one of each emotions. PMID:8201808

  18. Do emergency nurses have enough emotional intelligence?

    PubMed

    Codier, Estelle; Codier, David

    2015-06-01

    A significant body of research suggests there is a correlation between measured emotional intelligence (EI) abilities and performance in nursing. The four critical elements of EI, namely the abilities to identify emotions correctly in self and others, using emotions to support reasoning, understanding emotions and managing emotions, apply to emergency care settings and are important for safe patient care, teamwork, retention and burnout prevention. This article describes 'emotional labour' and the importance of EI abilities for emergency nurses, and suggests that such abilities should be considered core competencies for the profession. PMID:26050781

  19. Emotional Intelligence as a Moderator of Affectivity\\/Emotional Labor and Emotional Labor\\/Psychological Distress Relationships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jahanvash Karim; Robert Weisz

    Emotional labor refers to effort, planning, and control required to display organizationally desired emotions during interpersonal\\u000a transactions and performed by individuals either through deep acting or surface acting. Deep acting refers to the modification\\u000a of inner feeling in order to express the organizationally desired emotions, whereas surface acting refers to the change of\\u000a emotional expression without facilitating the change of

  20. The Role of Emotion in Parent-Child Relationships: Children's Emotionality, Maternal Meta-Emotion, and Children's Attachment Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Fu Mei; Lin, Hsiao Shih; Li, Chun Hao

    2012-01-01

    This study was intended to examine the relationship among children's emotionality, parental meta-emotion, and parent-child attachment. The sample consisted of 546 5th and 6th grade children and their mothers. The test instruments used in this study were the Emotionality subscale of the EAS Temperament Survey (mothers' ratings only), the Parental…

  1. Mothers' Acculturation and Beliefs about Emotions, Mother-Child Emotion Discourse, and Children's Emotion Understanding in Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez Rivera, Marie Belle; Dunsmore, Julie C.

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: We examined associations among Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, maternal beliefs, mother-child emotion talk, and emotion understanding in 40 Latino preschool-age children and their mothers. Mothers self-reported Anglo acculturation, Latino enculturation, and beliefs about the value/danger of children's emotions and…

  2. Emotion is Essential to All Intentional Behaviors

    E-print Network

    Freeman, Walter J III

    2000-01-01

    Emotion is Essential to All Intentional Behaviors Walter JEmotion is defined as a property of intentional behavior.emotion, actions that conform to social standards of considerate, productive behavior

  3. http://emr.sagepub.com/ Emotion Review

    E-print Network

    Gross, James J.

    as satisfying social-attachment needs. A Functionalist Approach to Emotion and Emotion Regulation Rimé's approach is functionalist in the sense that he holds that social sharing serves important social functions

  4. The effect of praying on emotion regulation 

    E-print Network

    Kossurok, Anke

    2012-11-28

    , and is associated with experiencing a greater purpose in life. Similarly, the present study examined whether praying affects people’s ability to regulate emotions. Participants were randomly assigned to a prayer, coping and control group. They completed the Emotion...

  5. Modeling emotion dynamics in intelligent agents

    E-print Network

    Seif El-Nasr, Magy

    1998-01-01

    Emotions were shown to have a leading role in the human decision-making process, and thus they play an important role in human intelligence. Intelligent agents' research produced many models of emotional agents. However, most of these models focused...

  6. Decoding Emotions from Facial Animations Shazia Afzal

    E-print Network

    Robinson, Peter

    Decoding Emotions from Facial Animations Shazia Afzal Computer Laboratory University of Cambridge of Cambridge Keywords: Facial expression analysis, animation 1 Introduction Facial feature point tracking conducted an experiment that compared human raters judgements of emotional expressions between actual video

  7. EmotionML an upcoming standard for representing emotions and related states

    E-print Network

    Pelachaud, Catherine

    annotation of data; (2) automatic recognition of emotion-related states from user behavior; and (3) generation of emotion-related system behavior. This exploratory work was formalised in the "RecommendationEmotionML ­ an upcoming standard for representing emotions and related states Marc Schröder1

  8. Tears and Fears: Modeling emotions and emotional behaviors in synthetic agents

    E-print Network

    Sukthankar, Gita Reese

    Tears and Fears: Modeling emotions and emotional behaviors in synthetic agents Jonathan Gratch's plans and goals. Marsella et al.'s IPD system focuses more on the impact of emotions on behavior, to the appraisal of their emotional significance, through to their outward impact on an agent's behavior. The focus

  9. The effect of emotional context on facial emotion ratings in schizophrenia Yu Sun Chung a,

    E-print Network

    The effect of emotional context on facial emotion ratings in schizophrenia Yu Sun Chung a, , Deanna Schizophrenia Face recognition Individuals with schizophrenia show deficits both in facial emotion recognition­1644). Thus, individuals with schizophrenia may have deficits in facial emotion processing, at least in part

  10. The Development of Emotional Competence. The Guilford Series on Social and Emotional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saarni, Carolyn

    The concept of emotional competence entails resilience, self-efficacy, and acting in accord with one's sense of moral character. This suggests argues that emotional competence is demonstrated by the self-efficacy in emotion-eliciting encounters and identifies eight key emotional skills that support its acquisition in interpersonal contexts. The…

  11. The Relationships Among Momentary Emotion Experiences, Personality Descriptions, and Retrospective Ratings of Emotion.

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    . At the end of the study, participants recalled what their emotions had been during the course of the study retrospective ratings of their emotional experiences after an extended period of time. The present study sought emotionality, over and above a summary of their momentary emotion ratings. Participants completed self-report

  12. Do you know how I feel? Evaluating emotional display of primary and secondary emotions

    E-print Network

    Becker-Asano, Christian

    Do you know how I feel? Evaluating emotional display of primary and secondary emotions Julia Tolksdorf, Christian Becker-Asano, Stefan Kopp Artificial Intelligence Group, University of Bielefeld, 33594 and secondary emotions [2] can be recognized from the face of our emotional virtual human Max [1]. Primary

  13. Developing Emotionally Competent Teachers: Emotional Intelligence and Pre-Service Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Roisin P.; Tormey, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Classrooms are emotional places, filled at different times with enjoyment, excitement, anger, hurt and boredom. The teacher's skill in working with emotional information and in regulating their own and their pupils' emotion impacts upon what and how pupils learn. But what emotional competence do teachers need? Can they learn this in pre-service…

  14. Emotion Regulation as Situated Conceptualizations 1 RUNNING HEAD: EMOTION REGULATION AS SITUATED CONCEPTUALIZATIONS

    E-print Network

    Barsalou, Lawrence W.

    Emotion Regulation as Situated Conceptualizations 1 RUNNING HEAD: EMOTION REGULATION AS SITUATED CONCEPTUALIZATIONS TITLE: A psychological construction account of emotion regulation and dysregulation: The role Boston, MA 02115 Phone: 617-373-2044 Fax: 617-373-8714 Email: l.barrett@neu.edu #12;Emotion Regulation

  15. Temporal Interaction of Emotional Prosody and Emotional Semantics: Evidence from ERPs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Silke Paulmann; Sonja A. Kotz

    2006-01-01

    Emotional prosody carries information about the inner state of a speaker and therefore helps us to understand how other people feel. However, emotions are also transferred verbally. In or- der to further substantiate the underlying mechanisms of emo- tional prosodic processing we investigated the interaction of both emotional prosody and emotional semantics with event- related brain potentials (ERPs) utilizing a

  16. The Quest to Control Emotion(s): A Critical Integral Fearanalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although emotion(s) have been of long interest to humans, they have particularly captivated the attention of many people and scholarly disciplines in the last 20 years. This paper critiques mainstream psychology of emotions and in particular, what Daniel Goleman has labeled the "collective emotional crisis" of our times and its relationship with…

  17. Bottom-up and top-down emotion generation: implications for emotion regulation

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Supriya; Prasad, Aditya K.; Pereira, Sean C.; Gross, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Emotion regulation plays a crucial role in adaptive functioning and mounting evidence suggests that some emotion regulation strategies are often more effective than others. However, little attention has been paid to the different ways emotions can be generated: from the ‘bottom-up’ (in response to inherently emotional perceptual properties of the stimulus) or ‘top-down’ (in response to cognitive evaluations). Based on a process priming principle, we hypothesized that mode of emotion generation would interact with subsequent emotion regulation. Specifically, we predicted that top-down emotions would be more successfully regulated by a top-down regulation strategy than bottom-up emotions. To test this hypothesis, we induced bottom-up and top-down emotions, and asked participants to decrease the negative impact of these emotions using cognitive reappraisal. We observed the predicted interaction between generation and regulation in two measures of emotional responding. As measured by self-reported affect, cognitive reappraisal was more successful on top-down generated emotions than bottom-up generated emotions. Neurally, reappraisal of bottom-up generated emotions resulted in a paradoxical increase of amygdala activity. This interaction between mode of emotion generation and subsequent regulation should be taken into account when comparing of the efficacy of different types of emotion regulation, as well as when reappraisal is used to treat different types of clinical disorders. PMID:21296865

  18. The Hundred-Year Emotion War: Are Emotions Natural Kinds or Psychological Constructions? Comment on Lench,

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    COMMENT The Hundred-Year Emotion War: Are Emotions Natural Kinds or Psychological Constructions about the nature of emotion. In the most recent offering in this scientific dialogue, Lench, Flores, and Bench (2011) reported a meta-analysis of emotion induction research and claimed support for the natural

  19. Relations among Teachers' Emotion Socialization Beliefs and Practices and Preschoolers' Emotional Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Carol A. S.; Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.; Curby, Timothy W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Utilizing a 3-part model of emotion socialization that included modeling, contingent responding, and teaching, this study examined the associations between 44 teachers' self-reported and observed emotion socialization practices and 326 preschoolers' emotion knowledge and observed emotional behavior. Multilevel analyses…

  20. Robust Representations for Out-of-Domain Emotions Using Emotion Profiles Emily Mower

    E-print Network

    Mataric, Maja J.

    Robust Representations for Out-of-Domain Emotions Using Emotion Profiles Emily Mower , Maja J@usc.edu, mataric@usc.edu, shri@sipi.usc.edu Abstract The proper representation of emotion is of vital importance the course of an interaction, the human interaction partner will express an emotion not seen during

  1. Movement to emotions to music: using whole body emotional expression as an interaction for electronic music

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Movement to emotions to music: using whole body emotional expression as an interaction interaction that we used in the frame of this project: using the dancer's movements to recognize the emotions he expresses, and use these emotions to generate musical audio flows evolving in real

  2. Musical emotions: Functions, origins, evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlovsky, Leonid

    2010-03-01

    Theories of music origins and the role of musical emotions in the mind are reviewed. Most existing theories contradict each other, and cannot explain mechanisms or roles of musical emotions in workings of the mind, nor evolutionary reasons for music origins. Music seems to be an enigma. Nevertheless, a synthesis of cognitive science and mathematical models of the mind has been proposed describing a fundamental role of music in the functioning and evolution of the mind, consciousness, and cultures. The review considers ancient theories of music as well as contemporary theories advanced by leading authors in this field. It addresses one hypothesis that promises to unify the field and proposes a theory of musical origin based on a fundamental role of music in cognition and evolution of consciousness and culture. We consider a split in the vocalizations of proto-humans into two types: one less emotional and more concretely-semantic, evolving into language, and the other preserving emotional connections along with semantic ambiguity, evolving into music. The proposed hypothesis departs from other theories in considering specific mechanisms of the mind-brain, which required the evolution of music parallel with the evolution of cultures and languages. Arguments are reviewed that the evolution of language toward becoming the semantically powerful tool of today required emancipation from emotional encumbrances. The opposite, no less powerful mechanisms required a compensatory evolution of music toward more differentiated and refined emotionality. The need for refined music in the process of cultural evolution is grounded in fundamental mechanisms of the mind. This is why today's human mind and cultures cannot exist without today's music. The reviewed hypothesis gives a basis for future analysis of why different evolutionary paths of languages were paralleled by different evolutionary paths of music. Approaches toward experimental verification of this hypothesis in psychological and neuroimaging research are reviewed.

  3. Emotion and language - When and how comes emotion into words?. Comment on "The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional model" by S. Koelsch et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Mario

    2015-06-01

    The Quartet Theory of Emotion [13] is the first emotion theory to include language as part of its four affect systems allocating two functions of language in emotion processing: communication and regulation. Both are supposed to occur late during the emotion process and by translation or reconfiguration of a pre-verbal emotion percept into a symbolic language code which then gives rise to the conscious experience of an emotion allowing communication or regulation [14] of a felt emotion.

  4. Preschoolers' Emotional Competence: Links to Pretend and Physical Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Eric W.; Colwell, Malinda J.

    2003-01-01

    Examined associations between preschoolers' play and emotional competence with peers. Found that emotion regulation and emotion understanding made unique contributions to teacher ratings of children's emotional competence with peers. High pretend play levels related to high emotion understanding for both boys and girls, and high emotion regulation…

  5. The Couples Emotion Rating Form: Psychometric Properties and Theoretical Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The Couples Emotion Rating Form assesses 3 types of negative emotion that are salient during times of relationship conflict. Hard emotion includes feeling angry and aggravated, soft emotion includes feeling hurt and sad, and flat emotion includes feeling bored and indifferent. In Study 1, scales measuring hard and soft emotion were validated by…

  6. Intelligent Expressions of Emotions Magalie Ochs1, 3

    E-print Network

    Pelachaud, Catherine

    Intelligent Expressions of Emotions Magalie Ochs1, 3 , Radoslaw Niewiadomski2 , Catherine Pelachaud aspects of emotions: the emotions triggered by an event (the felt emotions) and the expressed emotions of emotion eliciting-events based on a model of the agent's mental state composed of beliefs, choices

  7. Common Emotional Problems of Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Froese, A. P.

    1975-01-01

    Common emotional problems of adolescence are discussed under three headings: those specific to adolescence; common psychiatric problems of adolescence, and those complicating physical illness in adolescence. Adolescence is a phase of emotional sensitivity and self-centeredness. The whole family is affected and may require professional support. As the adolescent moves towards greater independence, some turbulence and acting out is normal. Some make an impulsive break from their family by running away, others gradually gain their independence and some remain overly dependent. The latter group often become dependent on and demanding of their physician. PMID:20469172

  8. The empirical themes of five maternal emotions 

    E-print Network

    Krause, Matthew David

    1998-01-01

    of parental emotions is proposed. Parental Emotions Many researchers have suggested that the emotional states experienced by parents play an important role in parenting behavior. For example, Vasta (1982) suggested a dual-component model of child abuse... and format of the Journal of Clinical Child Psychology. the skills repertoire and learning history of the parent. The impulsive element of parental aggression directed at children is composed of the emotional state of the parent (e. g. , anger and arousal...

  9. Psychology and the Rationality of Emotion*

    PubMed Central

    Clore, Gerald L.

    2014-01-01

    Questions addressed by recent psychological research on emotion include questions about how thought shapes emotion and how emotion, in turn, shapes thought. Research on emotion and cognition paints a somewhat different picture than that seen in traditional discussions of passion and reason. This article reviews several aspects of this research, concentrating specifically on three views of rationality: Rationality as Process, Rationality as Product, and Rationality as Outcome. PMID:25125770

  10. Emotional robot for intelligent system-artificial emotional creature project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Shibata; K. Inoue; R. Irie

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in robotics have been applied to automation in industrial manufacturing, with the primary purpose of optimizing practical systems in terms of such objective measures as accuracy, speed, and cost. This paper introduces the artificial emotional creature project that seeks to explore a different direction that is not so rigidly dependent an such objective measures. The goal of this

  11. The Emotional Foundations of Social Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Heather K.; Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.

    2008-01-01

    The infant and toddler years are a watershed of development in the emotional domain. These skills lay the foundation for positive social interactions, and ultimately, academic and life success. This article describes the development of three skills that are central in creating successful relationships: expressing emotion, understanding emotion,…

  12. Emotional Intelligence and Education: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, Neil; Curran, Andrew; Morris, Elisabeth; Farrell, Peter; Woods, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in the role of emotional intelligence in both the academic success of students and their emotional adjustment in school. However, promotion of emotional intelligence in schools has proven a controversial pursuit, challenging as it does traditional "rationalist" views of education. Furthermore,…

  13. Social and Emotional Learning in Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Howard E.; Larson, Susan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses what social and emotional learning is; why it is necessary; what its key concepts and goals are; and why it is necessary to focus on social and emotional learning in the middle grades. Discusses how social and emotional learning is related to the social studies. Describes ways middle-school social-studies teachers can foster such…

  14. Emotion Regulation and Childhood Aggression: Longitudinal Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roll, Judith; Koglin, Ute; Petermann, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that emotion dysregulation is associated with psychopathology. This paper provides a review of recent longitudinal studies that investigate the relationship between emotion regulation and aggressive behavior in childhood age. While there is substantial evidence for assuming a close relation of emotion regulation and…

  15. Emotion Based Control Architecture for Robotics Applications

    E-print Network

    Berns, Karsten

    suggest that emotion plays an important role in rational and intelligent behavior [1]. Because: behavior, emotion, and cognition. All possible movements of the robot from simple reflexes up to high level level behaviors are mostly activated by the emotion and especially by the cognitive part. Whereas

  16. Visual Search for Faces with Emotional Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frischen, Alexandra; Eastwood, John D.; Smilek, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this review is to critically examine contradictory findings in the study of visual search for emotionally expressive faces. Several key issues are addressed: Can emotional faces be processed preattentively and guide attention? What properties of these faces influence search efficiency? Is search moderated by the emotional state of the…

  17. Emotion and Morality in Psychopathy and Paraphilias

    PubMed Central

    Harenski, Carla L.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the role of emotion in moral judgment has been an active area of investigation and debate. Here we comment on this topic by examining the interaction between emotion and moral judgment in certain psychopathological groups that are characterized by abnormalities in emotion processing, such as psychopaths and sexual offenders with paraphilic disorders. PMID:24899928

  18. The Emotional Life of the Toddler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Alicia F.

    Noting that parenting a toddler can be both exhilarating and frustrating, this book draws on lifelong research into children's emotional development to provide parents with a better understanding of toddlers' emotional range and how it affects toddler behavior. The 10 chapters and the conclusion cover the following areas: (1) the emotional

  19. Rumination and intentional forgetting of emotional material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jutta Joormann; Tanya B. Tran

    2009-01-01

    The tendency to respond to negative life events and negative mood states with ruminative thinking has been linked to emotion dysregulation and to a heightened risk for the onset and maintenance of emotional disorders. To further investigate this maladaptive response style, the present study examined whether rumination is linked to individual differences in the ability to intentionally forget emotional material.

  20. Immediacy bias in social-emotional comparisons.

    PubMed

    White, Katherine; Van Boven, Leaf

    2012-08-01

    In seven studies of naturally occurring, "real-world" emotional events, people demonstrated an immediacy bias in social-emotional comparisons, perceiving their own current or recent emotional reactions as more intense compared with others' emotional reactions to the same events. The events examined include crossing a scary bridge (study 1a), a national tragedy (study 1b), terrorist attacks (studies 2a and 3b), a natural disaster (study 2b), and a presidential election (study 3b). These perceived differences between one's own and others' emotions declined over time, as relatively immediate and recent emotions subsided, a pattern that people were not intuitively aware of (study 2c). This immediacy bias in social-emotional comparisons emerged for both explicit comparisons (studies 1a, 1b, and 3b), and for absolute judgments of emotional intensity (studies 2a, 2b, and 3a). Finally, the immediacy bias in social-emotional comparisons was reduced when people were reminded that emotional display norms might lead others' appearances to understate emotional intensity (studies 3a and 3b). Implications of these findings for social-emotional phenomena are discussed. PMID:22148998

  1. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE & PEAK PERFORMANCE Intended for

    E-print Network

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE & PEAK PERFORMANCE Intended for: Managers who want to increase intelligence. Emotional intelligence can be learned and improved over time, as opposed to traditional intelligence that is generally stable over time. The ability to manage one's own emotions, thoughts, stress

  2. Emotional Intelligence: New Ability or Eclectic Traits?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John D. Mayer; Peter Salovey; David R. Caruso

    2008-01-01

    Some individuals have a greater capacity than others to carry out sophisticated information processing about emotions and emotion-relevant stimuli and to use this information as a guide to thinking and behavior. The authors have termed this set of abilities emotional intelligence (EI). Since the introduction of the concept, however, a schism has developed in which some researchers focus on EI

  3. PETEEI: a PET with evolving emotional intelligence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Magy Seif El-Nasr; Thomas R. Ioerger; John Yen

    1999-01-01

    The emergence of what is now called 'emotional inte lligence' has revealed yet another aspect of human intelligence. Emotions have been shown to have a major impact on many of our everyday functions, including decision-making, planning, communication, and behavior. AI researchers have recently acknowle dged this major role that emotions play, and thus have began to incorporate models for simulating

  4. Assessing the predictive validity of emotional intelligence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shaun Newsome; Arla L. Day; Victor M. Catano

    2000-01-01

    Emotional intelligence has become a fashionable topic in the popular press, and has been heralded as an effective predictor of successful performance. However, little empirical evidence has borne out these claims. The present study was conducted in order to determine the relationship of emotional intelligence, cognitive ability, and personality with academic achievement. Emotional intelligence was assessed using the EQ-i (total

  5. Domestic Violence, Emotional Competence, and Child Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Hessler, Danielle M.; Annest, Amalia

    2007-01-01

    This article examined emotion competence in children exposed to domestic violence (DV). It also examined the hypothesis that children's emotional competence mediates relations between DV and children's later difficulties with peers and behavioral adjustment. DV was assessed when children were at the age of five, emotional competence was assessed…

  6. Social Emotional Learning Skills and Educational Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çelik, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    The basic aim of this research is to examine the predicting role of social emotional learning skills in educational stress. The participants were 238 adolescents at high school. In this study, the Social Emotional Learning Skills Scale and the Educational Stress Scale were used. The relationships between social emotional learning skills and…

  7. Expressions of Emotion as Mediated by Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altarriba, Jeanette

    2008-01-01

    In her thoughtful work regarding various aspects of emotion and emotion related words, Pavlenko explores a variety of perspectives on how we might characterize and conceptualize expressions of emotion. It is a work that is quite rich in breadth--one that leads to a variety of different thoughts on this topic, many of which are amenable to…

  8. Emotion and Cognition Processes in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leerkes, Esther M.; Paradise, Matthew; O'Brien, Marion; Calkins, Susan D.; Lange, Garrett

    2008-01-01

    The core processes of emotion understanding, emotion control, cognitive understanding, and cognitive control and their association with early indicators of social and academic success were examined in a sample of 141 3-year-old children. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the hypothesized four-factor model of emotion and cognition in early…

  9. The Role of Emotion in Word Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doan, S. N.

    2010-01-01

    The way in which emotion interacts with cognition has been of great interest to researchers for hundreds of years. Emotion has been shown to play an important role in attention, learning and memory. However, the way in which emotion influences the basic process of word learning in infancy has largely been ignored. In the current paper, the…

  10. Emotional body language displayed by artificial agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aryel Beck; Brett Stevens; Kim A. Bard; Lola Cañamero

    2012-01-01

    Complex and natural social interaction between artificial agents (computer-generated or robotic) and humans necessitates the display of rich emotions in order to be believable, socially relevant, and accepted, and to generate the natural emotional responses that humans show in the context of social interaction, such as engagement or empathy. Whereas some robots use faces to display (simplified) emotional expressions, for

  11. Understanding Schemas and Emotion in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Cath

    2010-01-01

    This book makes explicit connections between young children's spontaneous repeated actions and their representations of their emotional worlds. Drawing on the literature on schemas, attachment theory and family contexts, the author takes schema theory into the territory of the emotions, making it relevant to the social and emotional development…

  12. "Keeping It Real" with an Emotional Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storrs, Debbie

    2012-01-01

    Students' emotions can significantly enhance or distract from learning. This paper details a case study of innovative pedagogy in which an "emotional curriculum" was central to my teaching. The analysis of student journals, on-line discussions, and metaphorical exercises revealed a vicissitude of emotions that stemmed from challenging course…

  13. Pedagogical Possibilities: Engaging Cultural Rules of Emotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight-Diop, Michelle; Oesterreich, Heather A.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: Teaching, leading, and learning are inextricably connected to emotions. Yet, the significance of emotions is rarely addressed in educational settings, and when it is, the relationship between emotions and curricula is most often framed by of an overly individualistic behavior model that focuses on the management and regulation…

  14. Emotion capture based on body postures and

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Emotion capture based on body postures and movements Alexis Clay*, Nadine Couture*, Laurence Nigay systems that are sensible to human emotions based on the body movements. To do so, we first review the literature on the various approaches for defining and characterizing human emotions. After justifying

  15. Emotion Regulation and Depressive Symptoms in Preadolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siener, Shannon; Kerns, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined associations among several measures of emotion regulation, and their links to depressive symptoms, in a sample of children ages 10-12 years old (N = 87). Both temporal features of emotion regulation and regulation processes involved in the evaluation, monitoring, and modification of emotion were assessed through parent and…

  16. Ritual and Emotions: Moving Relations, Patterned Effusions

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ritual and Emotions: Moving Relations, Patterned Effusions François Berthomé and Michael Houseman ABSTRACT: This article reconsiders the connection between `ritual' and `emotion' from a pragmatic, relational perspective in which rituals are seen as dynamic inter- active contexts and emotions as fairly

  17. Are Emotions Natural Kinds? Lisa Feldman Barrett

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    Are Emotions Natural Kinds? Lisa Feldman Barrett Boston College ABSTRACT--Laypeople and scientists alike believe that they know anger, or sadness, or fear, when they see it. These emotions and a few kinds. If a given emotion is a natural kind and can be identified objectively, then it is possible

  18. Emotion recognition from Mandarin speech signals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tsang-Long Pao; Yu-Te Chen; Jun-Heng Yeh

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a Mandarin speech based emotion classification method is presented. Five primary human emotions including anger, boredom, happiness, neutral and sadness are investigated. In emotion classification of speech signals, the conventional features are statistics of fundamental frequency, loudness, duration and voice quality. However, the recognition accuracy of systems employing these features degrades substantially when more than two valence

  19. Emotion regulation and sport performance.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Christopher R D

    2014-08-01

    This study used a single-blind, within-participant, counterbalanced, repeated-measures design to examine the relationship between emotional self-regulation and sport performance. Twenty competitive athletes completed four laboratory-based conditions; familiarization, control, emotion suppression, and nonsuppression. In each condition participants completed a 10-km cycling time trial requiring self-regulation. In the experimental conditions participants watched an upsetting video before performing the cycle task. When participants suppressed their emotional reactions to the video (suppression condition) they completed the cycling task slower, generated lower mean power outputs, and reached a lower maximum heart rate and perceived greater physical exertion than when they were given no self-regulation instructions during the video (nonsuppression condition) and received no video treatment (control condition). The findings suggest that emotional self-regulation resource impairment affects perceived exertion, pacing and sport performance and extends previous research examining the regulation of persistence on physical tasks. The results are discussed in line with relevant psychophysiological theories of self-regulation and fatigue and pertinent potential implications for practice regarding performance and well-being are suggested. PMID:25226609

  20. Motor Action and Emotional Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casasanto, Daniel; Dijkstra, Katinka

    2010-01-01

    Can simple motor actions affect how efficiently people retrieve emotional memories, and influence what they choose to remember? In Experiment 1, participants were prompted to retell autobiographical memories with either positive or negative valence, while moving marbles either upward or downward. They retrieved memories faster when the direction…

  1. Boosting Social and Emotional Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beland, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Beland maintains that high school students will need a high level of skill in the social and emotional arena to be ready for competitive employment in the 21st century. In a 2006 survey, human resource professionals said five skills were most crucial to high school graduates' success: professionalism/work ethic; teamwork; oral communications;…

  2. Emotion Circuits in the Brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph E. LeDoux

    2000-01-01

    The field of neuroscience has, after a long period of looking the other way, again embraced emotion as an important research area. Much of the progress has come from studies of fear, and especially fear conditioning. This work has pin- pointed the amygdala as an important component of the system involved in the acqui- sition, storage, and expression of fear

  3. Gender, Emotion, and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Leslie

    Breaking with conventional wisdom, this book integrates a wealth of perspectives and research-- biological, sociocultural, developmental--to explore the nature and extent of gender differences in emotional expression and the question of how such differences come about. In the book, nurture rather than nature emerges as the stronger force in…

  4. Emotional Contagion and Social Judgment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. William Doherty

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the influence of another's emotional expressions and individual differences in responsiveness to afferent feedback on attention, evaluations, and memory. In a mixed design, participants (N = 71) rated pictures following exposure to a “sender” in a neutral mood and then in either a happy or sad mood. Attention, ratings, and recall evidenced a bias characteristic of the

  5. The Public Life of Emotions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Corinne Squire

    Emotionalism, the centring of social and political as well as personal judgements on individual feeling, seems to many to be an increasingly prevalent frame for thought and action. A variety of historical and cultural explanations are advanced to account for this situation, ranging from the conceptual contradictions of Enlightenment thinking through the power of popular media to the aftereffects of

  6. Learning Emotional Intelligence: Training & Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shults, Allison

    2015-01-01

    This core assessment provides an overview and training of the use of Emotional Intelligence (EI) in the workplace. It includes a needs analysis for a local Chamber of Commerce, and outlines the importance of improving their organizational communication with the improvement of their EI. Behavioral objectives related to the skills needed are…

  7. Attentional bias in emotional disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colin MacLeod; Andrew Mathews; Philip Tata

    1986-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that anxiety may be associated with processing biases that favor the encoding of emotionally threatening information. However, the available data can be accommodated by alternative explanations, including response bias accounts. The current study introduces a novel paradigm that circumvents such interpretative problems by requiring subjects to make a neutral response (button press) to a neutral stimulus

  8. Priming Macho Attitudes and Emotions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Erik D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Investigated the effects of reading one of four priming stimuli stories (control, consenting sex, rape, or family) on males' evaluations of, and emotional reactions to, two videotaped date-rape scenarios. Results supported the concepts of a macho personality and revealed interactive effects for both the rape and family prime. (RJM)

  9. Mandarin emotion recognition in speech

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tsang-Long Pao; Yu-Te Chen

    2003-01-01

    Humans interact with others in several ways, such as speech, gesture, eye contact etc. Among them, speech is the most effective way of communication through which people can readily exchange information without the need for any other tool. Emotions color the speech, and can make the meaning more complex and tell about how it is said. A Mandarin speech based

  10. Detecting Emotional Contagion in Massive Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Coviello, Lorenzo; Sohn, Yunkyu; Kramer, Adam D. I.; Marlow, Cameron; Franceschetti, Massimo; Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Happiness and other emotions spread between people in direct contact, but it is unclear whether massive online social networks also contribute to this spread. Here, we elaborate a novel method for measuring the contagion of emotional expression. With data from millions of Facebook users, we show that rainfall directly influences the emotional content of their status messages, and it also affects the status messages of friends in other cities who are not experiencing rainfall. For every one person affected directly, rainfall alters the emotional expression of about one to two other people, suggesting that online social networks may magnify the intensity of global emotional synchrony. PMID:24621792

  11. Emotions: Happy, Sad, Mad, and Glad

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Plouffe

    2011-12-09

    In this activity, you and your child can explore the emotions we all experience. Read the instructions aloud to your child and follow the links provided. Discuss each question with your child as you go through. You may be surprised by how much you both learn! Do you know what emotions are? Emotions are the feelings we have. We can show these feelings on our face, by our actions, or through our words. Some examples of positive emotions are: happiness, joy, and excitement. Some examples of negative emotions are: sadness, fear, or anger. In this video, our friend Kermit ...

  12. The French version of the autism-spectrum quotient in adolescents: a cross-cultural validation study.

    PubMed

    Sonié, Sandrine; Kassai, Behrouz; Pirat, Elodie; Bain, Paul; Robinson, Janine; Gomot, Marie; Barthélémy, Catherine; Charvet, Dorothée; Rochet, Thierry; Tatou, Mohamed; Assouline, Brigitte; Cabrol, Stéphane; Chabane, Nadia; Arnaud, Valérie; Faure, Patricia; Manificat, Sabine

    2013-05-01

    We assessed the accuracy of the French version of the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) in adolescents with Asperger syndrome (AS) and high-functioning autism (HFA) compared to healthy controls and adolescents with psychiatric disorders (PDs). Three groups of adolescents, aged 11-18, were assessed: 116 with AS/HFA (93 with IQ ? 85 and 20 with 70 ? IQ < 85), 39 with other PDs, and 199 healthy controls. The AS/HFA group scored significantly higher than the healthy control and PD groups. A cut-off score of 26 was used to differentiate the autism group from healthy controls with 0.89 sensitivity and 0.98 specificity. Scores did not vary by age or sex. PMID:23015111

  13. How does emotional content affect lexical processing?

    PubMed Central

    Ponari, Marta; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Even single words in isolation can evoke emotional reactions, but the mechanisms by which emotion is involved in automatic lexical processing are unclear. Previous studies using extremely similar materials and methods have yielded apparently incompatible patterns of results. In much previous work, however, words' emotional content is entangled with other non-emotional characteristics such as frequency of occurrence, familiarity and age of acquisition, all of which have potential consequences for lexical processing themselves. In the present study, the authors compare different models of emotion using the British Lexicon Project, a large-scale freely available lexical decision database. After controlling for the potentially confounding effects of non-emotional variables, a variety of statistical approaches revealed that emotional words, whether positive or negative, are processed faster than neutral words. This effect appears to be categorical rather than graded; is not modulated by emotional arousal; and is not limited to words explicitly referring to emotions. The authors suggest that emotional connotations facilitate processing due to the grounding of words' meanings in emotional experience. PMID:24215294

  14. How does emotional content affect lexical processing?

    PubMed

    Vinson, David; Ponari, Marta; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    Even single words in isolation can evoke emotional reactions, but the mechanisms by which emotion is involved in automatic lexical processing are unclear. Previous studies using extremely similar materials and methods have yielded apparently incompatible patterns of results. In much previous work, however, words' emotional content is entangled with other non-emotional characteristics such as frequency of occurrence, familiarity and age of acquisition, all of which have potential consequences for lexical processing themselves. In the present study, the authors compare different models of emotion using the British Lexicon Project, a large-scale freely available lexical decision database. After controlling for the potentially confounding effects of non-emotional variables, a variety of statistical approaches revealed that emotional words, whether positive or negative, are processed faster than neutral words. This effect appears to be categorical rather than graded; is not modulated by emotional arousal; and is not limited to words explicitly referring to emotions. The authors suggest that emotional connotations facilitate processing due to the grounding of words' meanings in emotional experience. PMID:24215294

  15. Measuring Emotional Contagion in Social Media

    E-print Network

    Ferrara, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Social media are used as main discussion channels by millions of individuals every day. The content individuals produce in daily social-media-based micro-communications, and the emotions therein expressed, may impact the emotional states of others. A recent experiment performed on Facebook hypothesized that emotions spread online, even in absence of non-verbal cues typical of in-person interactions, and that individuals are more likely to adopt positive or negative emotions if these are over-expressed in their social network. Experiments of this type, however, raise ethical concerns, as they require massive-scale content manipulation with unknown consequences for the individuals therein involved. Here, we study the dynamics of emotional contagion using Twitter. Rather than manipulating content, we devise a null model that discounts some confounding factors (including the effect of emotional contagion). We measure the emotional valence of content the users are exposed to before posting their own tweets. We det...

  16. The Sensory Perception Quotient (SPQ): development and validation of a new sensory questionnaire for adults with and without autism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Questionnaire-based studies suggest atypical sensory perception in over 90% of individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC). Sensory questionnaire-based studies in ASC mainly record parental reports of their child’s sensory experience; less is known about sensory reactivity in adults with ASC. Given the DSM-5 criteria for ASC now include sensory reactivity, there is a need for an adult questionnaire investigating basic sensory functioning. We aimed to develop and validate the Sensory Perception Quotient (SPQ), which assesses basic sensory hyper- and hyposensitivity across all five modalities. Methods A total of 359 adults with (n?=?196) and without (n?=?163) ASC were asked to fill in the SPQ, the Sensory Over-Responsivity Inventory (SensOR) and the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) online. Results Adults with ASC reported more sensory hypersensitivity on the SPQ compared to controls (P?

  17. The use of the Autism-spectrum Quotient in differentiating high-functioning adults with autism, adults with schizophrenia and a neurotypical adult control group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saskia G. M. Wouters; Annelies A. Spek

    2011-01-01

    The present study compared 21 high functioning individuals with autism, 21 individuals with schizophrenia and 21 healthy individuals in self-reported features of autism, as measured by the Autism-spectrum Quotient (AQ). The individuals with autism reported impairment on all AQ subscales, compared to the neurotypical group. The schizophrenia group reported deficits on all subscales except Attention to Detail, compared to the

  18. A Simplified Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment to Evaluate the Effect of the Ionic Strength on the Equilibrium Concentration Quotient of the Bromcresol Green Dye

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Hernan B.; Mirenda, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A modified laboratory experiment for undergraduate students is presented to evaluate the effects of the ionic strength, "I", on the equilibrium concentration quotient, K[subscript c], of the acid-base indicator bromcresol green (BCG). The two-step deprotonation of the acidic form of the dye (sultone form), as it is dissolved in water, yields…

  19. The Use of the Autism-Spectrum Quotient in Differentiating High-Functioning Adults with Autism, Adults with Schizophrenia and a Neurotypical Adult Control Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wouters, Saskia G. M.; Spek, Annelies A.

    2011-01-01

    The present study compared 21 high functioning individuals with autism, 21 individuals with schizophrenia and 21 healthy individuals in self-reported features of autism, as measured by the Autism-spectrum Quotient (AQ). The individuals with autism reported impairment on all AQ subscales, compared to the neurotypical group. The schizophrenia group…

  20. Factor Structure, Reliability and Criterion Validity of the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ): A Study in Dutch Population and Patient Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoekstra, Rosa A.; Bartels, Meike; Cath, Danielle C.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2008-01-01

    The factor structure of the Dutch translation of the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ; a continuous, quantitative measure of autistic traits) was evaluated with confirmatory factor analyses in a large general population and student sample. The criterion validity of the AQ was examined in three matched patient groups (autism spectrum conditions (ASC),…

  1. Toward Brief "Red Flags" for Autism Screening: The Short Autism Spectrum Quotient and the Short Quantitative Checklist in 1,000 Cases and 3,000 Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Carrie; Auyeung, Bonnie; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Frontline health professionals need a "red flag" tool to aid their decision making about whether to make a referral for a full diagnostic assessment for an autism spectrum condition (ASC) in children and adults. The aim was to identify 10 items on the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) (Adult, Adolescent, and Child versions) and on the…

  2. Further Evidence on the Factorial Structure of the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) for Adults with and without a Clinical Diagnosis of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Winnie Yu Pow; Kelly, Adrian B.; Peterson, Candida Clifford

    2013-01-01

    The Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) has been widely used for measuring autistic traits however its factor structure has been primarily determined from nonclinic populations. This study aimed to establish an internally coherent and reliable factor structure for the AQ using a sample of 455 Australian adults of whom 141 had autism spectrum disorder…

  3. Emotion Recognition following Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: Longitudinal Analysis of Emotional Prosody and Facial Emotion Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Adam T.; Hanten, Gerri R.; Li, Xiaoqi; Orsten, Kimberley D.; Levin, Harvey S.

    2010-01-01

    Children with closed head injuries often experience significant and persistent disruptions in their social and behavioral functioning. Studies with adults sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBI) indicate deficits in emotion recognition and suggest that these difficulties may underlie some of the social deficits. The goal of the current study was…

  4. Integrating emotion regulation and emotional intelligence traditions: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Sarrionandia, Ainize; Mikolajczak, Moïra; Gross, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Two relatively independent research traditions have developed that address emotion management. The first is the emotion regulation (ER) tradition, which focuses on the processes which permit individuals to influence which emotions they have, when they have them, and how they experience and express these emotions. The second is the emotional intelligence (EI) tradition, which focuses—among other things—on individual differences in ER. To integrate these two traditions, we employed the process model of ER (Gross, 1998b) to review the literature on EI. Two key findings emerged. First, high EI individuals shape their emotions from the earliest possible point in the emotion trajectory and have many strategies at their disposal. Second, high EI individuals regulate their emotions successfully when necessary but they do so flexibly, thereby leaving room for emotions to emerge. We argue that ER and EI traditions stand to benefit substantially from greater integration. PMID:25759676

  5. Parental reactions to children's negative emotions: relationships with emotion regulation in children with an anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Katherine E; Hudson, Jennifer L; Schniering, Carolyn A

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that parental reactions to children's emotions play a significant role in the development of children's emotion regulation (ER) and adjustment. This study compared parent reactions to children's negative emotions between families of anxious and non-anxious children (aged 7-12) and examined associations between parent reactions and children's ER. Results indicated that children diagnosed with an anxiety disorder had significantly greater difficulty regulating a range of negative emotions and were regarded as more emotionally negative and labile by their parents. Results also suggested that mothers of anxious children espoused less supportive parental emotional styles when responding to their children's negative emotions. Supportive and non-supportive parenting reactions to children's negative emotions related to children's emotion regulation skills, with father's non-supportive parenting showing a unique relationship to children's negativity/lability. PMID:25527899

  6. Emotional maltreatment and disordered eating in adolescents: testing the mediating role of emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Mills, Pamela; Newman, Emily Frances; Cossar, Jill; Murray, George

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine if emotion regulation mediates the relationship between emotional maltreatment and disordered eating behavior in adolescents. Participants were 222 secondary school pupils (aged 14-18 years) from a state high school in the UK. Standardized questionnaire measures were used to gather self-report data on emotional abuse and emotional neglect, functional and dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies and disordered eating behavior. Results showed that disordered eating was associated with emotional abuse, dysfunctional emotion regulation and being female. Multiple mediation analysis found an indirect relationship between emotional abuse and disordered eating through dysfunctional emotion regulation. Interestingly, emotional neglect predicted lower levels of functional emotion regulation. The findings support previous research showing emotion regulation to mediate the relationship between childhood abuse and disordered eating in adults and a differential effect of abuse and neglect on emotion regulation. Longitudinal studies are required to confirm the direction of relationships; however these data suggest that dysfunctional emotion regulation is a significant variable in the development of disordered eating and may be a useful target for intervention. PMID:25129874

  7. An exploration of the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and the Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI).

    PubMed

    Yen, Wendy; Hovey, Richard; Hodwitz, Kathryn; Zhang, Su

    2011-03-01

    The present study explored the relationship between the Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI) admissions process and the Bar-On EQ-i emotional intelligence (EI) instrument in order to investigate the potential for the EQ-i to serve as a proxy measure to the MMI. Participants were 196 health science candidates who completed both the MMI and the EQ-i as part of their admissions procedure at the Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences. Three types of analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between the two tools: reliability analyses, correlational analyses, and a t-test. The tools were found to be moderately reliable. No significant relationships were found between the MMI and the EQ-i at the total or subscale level. The ability of the EQ-i to discriminate between accepted and not-accepted students was also not supported. These findings do not support the use of the EQ-i as a potential pre-screening tool for the MMI, but rather highlight the need to exercise caution when using emotional intelligence instruments for high-stakes admissions purposes. PMID:20535634

  8. Implicit theories and ability emotional intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Rosario; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that people differ in their implicit theories about the essential characteristics of intelligence and emotions. Some people believe these characteristics to be predetermined and immutable (entity theorists), whereas others believe that these characteristics can be changed through learning and behavior training (incremental theorists). The present study provides evidence that in healthy adults (N = 688), implicit beliefs about emotions and emotional intelligence (EI) may influence performance on the ability-based Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Adults in our sample with incremental theories about emotions and EI scored higher on the MSCEIT than entity theorists, with implicit theories about EI showing a stronger relationship to scores than theories about emotions. Although our participants perceived both emotion and EI as malleable, they viewed emotions as more malleable than EI. Women and young adults in general were more likely to be incremental theorists than men and older adults. Furthermore, we found that emotion and EI theories mediated the relationship of gender and age with ability EI. Our findings suggest that people’s implicit theories about EI may influence their emotional abilities, which may have important consequences for personal and professional EI training.

  9. Basic emotions elicited by odors and pictures.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Olgun, Selda; Joraschky, Peter

    2011-12-01

    The sense of olfaction is often reported to have a special relationship with emotional processing. Memories triggered by olfactory cues often have a very emotional load. On the other hand, basic negative or positive emotional states should be sufficient to cover the most significant functions of the olfactory system including ingestion, hazard avoidance, and social communication. Thus, we investigated whether different basic emotions can be evoked in healthy people through the sense of olfaction. We asked 119 participants which odor evokes one of the six basic emotions (happiness, disgust, anger, anxiety, sadness, and surprise); another 97 participants were asked about pictures evoking those emotions. The results showed that almost every participant could name an olfactory elicitor for happiness or disgust. Olfactory elicitors of anxiety were reported less frequently, but they were still reported by three-quarters of the participants. However, for sadness and anger only about half of the participants reported an olfactory elicitor, whereas significantly more named a visual cue. Olfactory emotion elicitors were mainly related to the classes of culture, plants, and food, and visual emotion elicitors were largely related to humans. This data supports the hypothesis that in the vast majority of people, few differentiated emotions can be elicited through the olfactory channel. These emotions are happiness, disgust, and anxiety. PMID:21787073

  10. A Framework for Studying Emotions Across Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, David J.; Adolphs, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Since the 19th century, there has been disagreement over the fundamental question of whether “emotions” are cause or consequence of their associated behaviors. This question of causation is most directly addressable in genetically tractable model organisms, including invertebrates such as Drosophila. Yet there is ongoing debate about whether such species even have “emotions,” since emotions are typically defined with reference to human behavior and neuroanatomy. Here we argue that emotional behaviors are a class of behaviors that express internal emotion states. These emotion states exhibit certain general functional and adaptive properties that apply across any specific human emotions like fear or anger, as well as across phylogeny. These general properties, which can be thought of as “emotion primitives”, can be modeled and studied in evolutionarily distant model organisms, allowing functional dissection of their mechanistic bases, and tests of their causal relationships to behavior. More generally, our approach aims not only at better integration of such studies in model organisms with studies of emotion in humans, but also suggests a revision of how emotion should be operationalized within psychology and psychiatry. PMID:24679535

  11. Flexible Emotional Responsiveness in Trait Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, Christian E.; Thompson, Renee J.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2011-01-01

    Field studies and laboratory experiments have documented that a key component of resilience is emotional flexibility – the ability to respond flexibly to changing emotional circumstances. In the present study we tested the hypotheses that resilient people exhibit emotional flexibility: a) in response to frequently changing emotional stimuli; and b) across multiple modalities of emotional responding. As participants viewed a series of emotional pictures, we assessed their self-reported affect, facial muscle activity, and startle reflexes. Higher trait resilience predicted more divergent affective and facial responses (corrugator and zygomatic) to positive versus negative pictures. Thus, compared with their low resilient counterparts, resilient people appear to be able to more flexibly match their emotional responses to the frequently changing emotional stimuli. Moreover, whereas high trait resilient participants exhibited divergent startle responses to positive versus negative pictures regardless of the valence of the preceding trial, low trait resilient participants did not exhibit divergent startle responses when the preceding picture was negative. High trait resilient individuals, therefore, appear to be better able than are their low-resilient counterparts to either switch or maintain their emotional responses depending on whether the emotional context changes. The present findings broaden our understanding of the mechanisms underlying resilience by demonstrating that resilient people are able to flexibly change their affective and physiological responses to match the demands of frequently changing environmental circumstances. PMID:21707168

  12. Mental imagery of emotions: Electrophysiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Suess, Franziska; Abdel Rahman, Rasha

    2015-07-01

    Affective stimuli such as emotional words, scenes or facial expressions elicit well-investigated emotional responses. For instance, two distinct event-related brain potentials (ERPs) have been reported in response to emotional facial expressions, the early posterior negativity (EPN), associated with enhanced attention and perception of affective stimuli, and a later centro-parietal positivity (LPP) that is taken to reflect evaluations of the intrinsic relevance of emotional stimuli. However, other rich sources of emotions that have as yet received little attention are internal mental events such as thoughts, memories and imagination. Here we investigated mental imagery of emotional facial expressions and its time course using ERPs. Participants viewed neutral familiar and unfamiliar faces, and were subsequently asked to imagine the faces with an emotional or neutral expression. Imagery was compared to visually perceiving the same faces with the different expressions. Early ERP modulations during imagery resemble the effects frequently reported for perceived emotional facial expressions, suggesting that common early processes are associated with emotion perception and imagination. A later posterior positivity was also found in the imagery condition, but with a different distribution than for perception. These findings underscore the similarity of the brain's responses to internally generated and external sources of emotions. PMID:25842292

  13. Strategic automation of emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Inge Schweiger; Keil, Andreas; McCulloch, Kathleen C; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Gollwitzer, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    As implementation intentions are a powerful self-regulation tool for thought and action (meta-analysis by P. M. Gollwitzer & P. Sheeran, 2006), the present studies were conducted to address their effectiveness in regulating emotional reactivity. Disgust- (Study 1) and fear- (Study 2) eliciting stimuli were viewed under 3 different self-regulation instructions: the goal intention to not get disgusted or frightened, respectively, this goal intention furnished with an implementation intention (i.e., an if-then plan), and a no-self-regulation control group. Only implementation-intention participants succeeded in reducing their disgust and fear reactions as compared to goal-intention and control participants. In Study 3, electrocortical correlates (using dense-array electroencephalography) revealed differential early visual activity in response to spider slides in ignore implementation-intention participants, as reflected in a smaller P1. Theoretical and applied implications of the present findings for emotion regulation via implementation intentions are discussed. PMID:19210061

  14. The Relationship of Trait EI with Personality, IQ and Sex in a UK Sample of Employees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adriane Arteche; Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic; Adrian Furnham; John Crump

    2008-01-01

    The relationships among trait emotional intelligence (EI), personality, IQ and sex were investigated in a sample of 585 employees (478 males, 107 females). Participants completed the Watson–Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal, the Bar-On Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) and the Neuroticism–Extraversion–Openness Personality Inventory Revised. Bivariate correlations revealed significant associations between overall EQ-i and Neuroticism (negative), Agreeableness, Extraversion, Openness and Conscientiousness (all positive). While

  15. Value Maps, Drives, and Emotions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel S. Levine

    \\u000a This chapter discusses value maps, drives, and emotions through the modeling of decision making, judgment, and choice. Ever\\u000a the since the seminal work of Amos Tversky and Nobel Laureate Daniel Kahneman (Tversky and Kahneman 1974, 1981), it has been\\u000a known that decision models based on rational maximization of expected utility do not capture the typical choices that people\\u000a or nonhuman

  16. Strategic Automation of Emotion Regulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Inge Schweiger Gallo; Andreas Keil; Kathleen C. McCulloch; Brigitte Rockstroh; Peter M. Gollwitzer

    2009-01-01

    As implementation intentions are a powerful self-regulation tool for thought and action (meta-analysis by P. M. Gollwitzer & P. Sheeran, 2006), the present studies were conducted to address their effectiveness in regulating emotional reactivity. Disgust- (Study 1) and fear- (Study 2) eliciting stimuli were viewed under 3 different self-regulation instructions: the goal intention to not get disgusted or frightened, respectively,

  17. Physiological and self-assessed emotional responses to emotion-eliciting films in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Elices, Matilde; Soler, Joaquim; Fernández, Cristina; Martín-Blanco, Ana; Jesús Portella, María; Pérez, Víctor; Alvarez, Enrique; Carlos Pascual, Juan

    2012-12-30

    According to Linehan's biosocial model, the core characteristic of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is emotional dysregulation. In the present study, we investigated two components of this model: baseline emotional intensity and emotional reactivity. A total of 60 women, 30 with BPD diagnosis and 30 age and sex-matched healthy subjects (HCs), participated in two experiments. In the first experiment, we evaluated emotional responses to six films designed to elicit discrete emotions (anger, fear, sadness, disgust, amusement and neutral). The second experiment evaluated emotional reactions to three emotion-eliciting films containing BPD-specific content (sexual abuse, emotional dependence and abandonment/separation). Skin conductance level, heart rate, and subjective emotional response were recorded for each film. Although self-reported data indicated that negative emotions at baseline were stronger in the BPD group, physiological measures showed no differences between the groups. Physiological results should be interpreted with caution since most BPD participants were under pharmacological treatment. BPD subjects presented no subjective heightened reactivity to most of the discrete emotion-eliciting films. Subjective responses to amusement and "BPD-specific content" films revealed significant between-group differences. These findings suggest that the main characteristic of BPD might be negative emotional intensity rather than heightened emotional reactivity. PMID:22884218

  18. Vowel Context and Speaker Interactions Influencing Glottal Open Quotient and Formant Frequency Shifts in Physical Task Stress

    E-print Network

    Texas at Dallas, University of

    , emotions, environmental noise, and fatigue af- fect the production of speech and the resulting acoustic and the speech production process are not only of interest to more fully under- stand the breadth of human speech durational and fundamental frequency effects, and more than added breaths in non-speech regions. The extent

  19. Toddlers’ Understanding of Peers’ Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Sara R.; Svetlova, Margarita; Brownell, Celia

    2012-01-01

    The second year of life sees dramatic developments in infants’ ability to understand emotions in adults alongside their growing interest in peers. In this study, a social referencing paradigm was employed to examine whether 12-, 18-, and 24-month-old children can use a peer’s positive or negative emotion messages about toys to regulate their own behavior with the toys. Twelve-month-olds decreased their play with toys toward which a peer had expressed either positive or negative emotion compared to play following a peer’s neutral attention toward a toy. Eighteen-month-olds did not respond systematically, but 24-month-old children increased their toy play after watching a peer display negative affect toward the toy. Regardless of their age, children with siblings decreased their play with toys toward which they had seen a peer display fear, the typical social referencing response. Results are discussed in the context of developmental changes in social understanding and peer interaction over the second year of life. PMID:20333894

  20. The time–emotion paradox

    PubMed Central

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Gil, Sandrine

    2009-01-01

    The present manuscript discusses the time–emotion paradox in time psychology: although humans are able to accurately estimate time as if they possess a specific mechanism that allows them to measure time (i.e. an internal clock), their representations of time are easily distorted by the context. Indeed, our sense of time depends on intrinsic context, such as the emotional state, and on extrinsic context, such as the rhythm of others' activity. Existing studies on the relationships between emotion and time suggest that these contextual variations in subjective time do not result from the incorrect functioning of the internal clock but rather from the excellent ability of the internal clock to adapt to events in one's environment. Finally, the fact that we live and move in time and that everything, every act, takes more or less time has often been neglected. Thus, there is no unique, homogeneous time but instead multiple experiences of time. Our subjective temporal distortions directly reflect the way our brain and body adapt to these multiple time scales. PMID:19487196

  1. Impact of the Usage of a Slotted Collector Bar on Thermoelectric Field in a 300-kA Aluminum Reduction Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wenju; Wang, Li; Wang, Zhaowen; Gao, Bingliang; Shi, Zhongning; Hu, Xianwei; Cui, Jianzhong

    2015-02-01

    The horizontal current in a metal pad is critical because of its effect on the aluminum reduction cell current efficiency and energy consumption. A type of slotted collector bar was considered to have great potential to reduce the horizontal current. The effects of the slotted collector bar on the horizontal current in the metal pad, current, and temperature distribution in the cathode carbon and collector bar were simulated using the finite-element method. The results show that the maximum current at the middle of the metal pad decreases from 11,940 A m-2 to 9490 A m-2 and the peak of current density (the maximum current density) shifts toward the cell side. Moreover, the maximum horizontal current and average horizontal current at the middle of the metal pad in the cell with slotted collector bar decreases by ~50% and 50.9%, respectively. However, the cathode voltage in the cathode with the slotted collector bar is ~53 mV higher than that in the conventional cell, and the temperature in the slotted collector bar is higher than that in the conventional cathode. The results of this study may provide the database in understanding the effect of the slotted collector bar on cell.

  2. Cognitive Emotion Regulation Insights From Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

    E-print Network

    Ochsner, Kevin

    in the study of cognitive emotion regulation illustrate how functional imaging is extending behavioral analyses understanding of cognitive emotion regulation. MULTILEVEL MODELS One tenet of SCAN research is that behavior- tive emotion regulation. BEHAVIORAL STUDIES OF COGNITIVE EMOTION REGULATION Empirical work on emotion

  3. Vocal communication of emotion: A review of research paradigms

    E-print Network

    Hirschberg, Julia

    research efforts are discussed. In particular, it is suggested to use the Brunswikian lens model as a base of the model (i.e., the speakerÕs emotional state, the listenerÕs attribution, and the mediating acoustic cues; Evaluation of emotion effects on voice and speech; Acoustic markers of emotion; Emotion induction; Emotion

  4. Elaborative encoding during REM dreaming as prospective emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Stefan; Paulus, Frieder M; Müller-Pinzler, Laura; Krach, Sören

    2013-12-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) dreaming results in "emotionally intelligent encoding," according to the target article. Building on this, we argue that elaborative encoding alters emotional processing of upcoming events and thereby functions as prospective emotion regulation. After elaborative encoding, future events are appraised differently and result in a redirected emotional response. Disturbed elaborative encoding might be relevant for emotional dysregulation in psychopathology. PMID:24304773

  5. Neural Correlates of Positive and Negative Emotion Regulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sang Hee Kim; Stephan Hamann

    2007-01-01

    The ability to cope adaptively with emotional events by volitionally altering one's emotional reactions is important for psychological and physical health as well as social interaction. Cognitive regulation of emotional responses to aversive events engages prefrontal regions that modulate activity in emotion-processing regions such as the amygdala. However, the neural correlates of the regulation of positive emotions remain largely unexplored.

  6. Emotional Labor and Burnout: Comparing Two Perspectives of “People Work”

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Céleste M. Brotheridge; Alicia A. Grandey

    2002-01-01

    Although it has often been presumed that jobs involving “people work” (e.g., nurses, service workers) are emotionally taxing (Maslach & Jackson, 1982), seldom is the emotional component of these jobs explicitly studied. The current study compared two perspectives of emotional labor as predictors of burnout beyond the effects of negative affectivity: job-focused emotional labor (work demands regarding emotion expression) and

  7. The development of nonverbal communication of emotion: A functionalist perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Caplovitz Barrett

    1993-01-01

    A functionalist perspective on the development of nonverbal communication of emotion is presented. This perspective is distinguished from other current conceptualizations by the following features: (a) Emphasis is placed on the functional implications of emotion-relevant movements for social regulation (communication), intrapersonal (internal) regulation, and behavior regulation. (b) Emotions are viewed as “members of families of emotions.” Emotion families are composed

  8. Emotional persistence in online chatting communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garas, Antonios; Garcia, David; Skowron, Marcin; Schweitzer, Frank

    2012-05-01

    How do users behave in online chatrooms, where they instantaneously read and write posts? We analyzed about 2.5 million posts covering various topics in Internet relay channels, and found that user activity patterns follow known power-law and stretched exponential distributions, indicating that online chat activity is not different from other forms of communication. Analysing the emotional expressions (positive, negative, neutral) of users, we revealed a remarkable persistence both for individual users and channels. I.e. despite their anonymity, users tend to follow social norms in repeated interactions in online chats, which results in a specific emotional ``tone'' of the channels. We provide an agent-based model of emotional interaction, which recovers qualitatively both the activity patterns in chatrooms and the emotional persistence of users and channels. While our assumptions about agent's emotional expressions are rooted in psychology, the model allows to test different hypothesis regarding their emotional impact in online communication.

  9. Auditory emotional cues enhance visual perception.

    PubMed

    Zeelenberg, René; Bocanegra, Bruno R

    2010-04-01

    Recent studies show that emotional stimuli impair performance to subsequently presented neutral stimuli. Here we show a cross-modal perceptual enhancement caused by emotional cues. Auditory cue words were followed by a visually presented neutral target word. Two-alternative forced-choice identification of the visual target was improved by emotional cues as compared to neutral cues. When the cue was presented visually we replicated the emotion-induced impairment found in other studies. Our results suggest emotional stimuli have a twofold effect on perception. They impair perception by reflexively attracting attention at the expense of competing stimuli. However, emotional stimuli also induce a nonspecific perceptual enhancement that carries over onto other stimuli when competition is reduced, for example, by presenting stimuli in different modalities. PMID:20096407

  10. TIE: An Ability Test of Emotional Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    ?mieja, Magdalena; Orzechowski, Jaros?aw; Stolarski, Maciej S.

    2014-01-01

    The Test of Emotional Intelligence (TIE) is a new ability scale based on a theoretical model that defines emotional intelligence as a set of skills responsible for the processing of emotion-relevant information. Participants are provided with descriptions of emotional problems, and asked to indicate which emotion is most probable in a given situation, or to suggest the most appropriate action. Scoring is based on the judgments of experts: professional psychotherapists, trainers, and HR specialists. The validation study showed that the TIE is a reliable and valid test, suitable for both scientific research and individual assessment. Its internal consistency measures were as high as .88. In line with theoretical model of emotional intelligence, the results of the TIE shared about 10% of common variance with a general intelligence test, and were independent of major personality dimensions. PMID:25072656

  11. Building Emotional Resilience to Promote Health

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary C.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, a growing body of evidence has linked positive emotional health with lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, independent of negative emotion. Several potential mechanisms have been posited to account for these associations, including improved health behavior, direct physiological benefits, and enhanced resistance to and recovery from stress among individuals with high versus low positive emotional resources. Links between positive emotion and health have implications for targeted interventions, but no empirical investigations to date have tested the impact of efforts to enhance positive emotion on cardiovascular risk. Nevertheless, some existing data point to the potential value of strategies to increase emotional resources for individuals' functional health and capacity to manage stress. PMID:20046858

  12. The motion in emotion a CERT based approach to the FERA emotion challenge

    E-print Network

    Bartlett, Marian Stewart

    of automated facial expression recognition is rapidly advancing. Technologies like smile detection have already Expression Recognition Toolbox (CERT) for classifying emotions in the Facial Expression Recognition on the emotion recognition subtest of the Facial Expression Recognition Analysis Challenge (FERA) [13

  13. Emotion Recognition: The Effects of Age on the Identification of Emotion from Facial and Body Expressions 

    E-print Network

    Gibbon, Sarah

    2013-07-02

    Previous research has identified a well-replicated decline in the recognition of emotion in healthy adult ageing. Furthermore, research has shown that multiple sources of emotion al information can help to reduce the severity of this decline...

  14. Do Emotional Intelligence and personality predict the way that Emotional Labour is performed 

    E-print Network

    Dore, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Despite the many claims made about the importance of Emotional Intelligence (EI) for employee performance, no previous research has studied EI as an antecedent of Emotional Labour (EL). The focus of the present study was ...

  15. Experiencing emotional labor: an analysis of the discursive construction of emotional labor 

    E-print Network

    Haman, Mary Kathryn

    2007-04-25

    This study analyzes how employees at a university recreation center discursively construct their experiences of emotional labor, how they conceptualize such behavior in terms of displaying unfelt emotions and faking in good and bad faith, and what...

  16. The relation between negative emotional suppression and emotional distress in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Iwamitsu, Yumi; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Abe, Hajime; Tani, Toru; Okawa, Masako; Buck, Ross

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate differences in emotional distress between negative emotional suppression and expression patients in the progress of medical treatment, including the operation. We studied the differences in affective response between patients who suppress negative emotion and those who express negative emotion by using Profile of Mood States (McNair, Lorr, & Droppleman, 1971) at four sessions: (a) at the first visit to the clinic, (b) immediately after being told the diagnosis of breast cancer, (c) after the operation, and (d) at 3 months after discharge. Our results showed that emotional suppression patients tended to report more emotional distress (in particular, anxiety, depression, and anger) than did emotional expression patients on 3 sessions, the exception being after the operation. Also, patients who suppress anger and anxiety felt strong psychological distress. We suggest that it is essential to encourage suppressive patients to express both negative and positive emotion clearly and appropriately. PMID:16187928

  17. Long-term intergroup conflicts are saturated with negative emotions. These emotions are

    E-print Network

    Gross, James J.

    Stanford University Corresponding author: Eran Halperin, Deputy Director Political Psychology ProgramLong-term intergroup conflicts are saturated with negative emotions. These emotions are thought to play a central role in initiating and sustaining intergroup conflicts (Halperin, 2010; Halperin, Bar

  18. A database of German emotional speech

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Felix Burkhardt; Astrid Paeschke; M. Rolfes; Walter F. Sendlmeier; Benjamin Weiss

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The article describes a database ,of emotional ,speech. Ten actors (5 female and 5 male) simulated the emotions, producing,10 German ,utterances (5 short and ,5 longer sentences) which could be used ,in everyday ,communication and are interpretable in all applied emotions. The recordings were taken in an ,anechoic chamber ,with high-quality recording equipment. In addition ,to the ,sound electro-glottograms

  19. Emotional behavior in long-term marriage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura L. Carstensen; John M. Gottman; Robert W. Levenson

    1995-01-01

    In exploring the emotional climate of long-term marriages, this study used an observational coding system to identify specific emotional behaviors expressed by middle-aged and older spouses during discussions of a marital problem. One hundred and fifty-six couples differing in age and marital satisfaction were studied. Emotional behaviors expressed by couples differed as a function of age, gender, and marital satisfaction.

  20. The effects of emotional responsiveness in marriage 

    E-print Network

    Hass, Sally Duffin

    1987-01-01

    THE EFFECFS OF EMOTIONAL RESPONSIVENESS IN MARRIAGE A Thesis by SALLY DUFFIN BASS Approved as to style and content by: ndoza i n f Comnitt Willi S. Rholes (Member) Lowell J. Krokoff (Member) Frances Worchel (Member) Steph Worchel... (Head of: Department) May 1987 The Effects of Emotional Responsiveness in Harriage. (Nay 1987) Sally Ouffin Hase, B. S. , University of Illinois Chairnmn of Advisory Cozmittee: Or. Jorge Nendoza This paper examines the effects of emotional...

  1. EEMML: the emotional eye movement animation toolkit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zheng Li; Xia Mao

    Eye movement plays an important role in face to face communication in that it conveys nonverbal information and emotional\\u000a intent beyond speech. Being “a window to the mind”, the eye and its behavior are tightly coupled with human cognitive processes.\\u000a In this paper, we proposed an Emotional Eye Movement Markup Language (EEMML) which is an emotional eye movement animation\\u000a scripting

  2. Continuous dimensional emotion tracking in music

    E-print Network

    Imbrasaite, Vaiva

    2015-04-28

    ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 2.5. An example of a 2.5 dimensional representation of emotion predic- tion over time (height represents the intensity of emotion and colour is an interpolation between red-green axis of valence and yellow- blue axis of arousal with time... and Intelligent Interaction, Geneva, Switzerland, September 2013. Chapter 3 Vaiva Imbrasaite?, Tadas Baltrušaitis, Peter Robinson Emotion tracking in music using continuous conditional random fields and baseline feature representation. AAM workshop, IEEE...

  3. An Emotional Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yang Ge; Zhang Rubo

    2005-01-01

    \\u000a This paper presents a modification of the particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO) intended to introduce some psychology\\u000a factor of emotion into the algorithm. In the new algorithm, which is based on a simple perception and emotion psychology model,\\u000a each particle has its own feeling and reaction to the current position, and it also has specified emotional factor towards\\u000a the sense

  4. Emotion recognition and emotional theory of mind in chronic fatigue syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Oldershaw; D. Hambrook; K. A. Rimes; K. Tchanturia; J. Treasure; S. Richards; U. Schmidt; T. Chalder

    2011-01-01

    Background: Difficulties with social function have been reported in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), but underpinning factors are unknown. Emotion recognition, theory of mind (inference of another's mental state) and ‘emotional’ theory of mind (eToM) (inference of another's emotional state) are important social abilities, facilitating understanding of others. This study examined emotion recognition and eToM in CFS patients and their relationship

  5. Child and Adolescent Emotion Regulation: The Role of Parental Emotion Regulation and Expression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emily Bariola; Eleonora Gullone; Elizabeth K. Hughes

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews current literature relating to parent and child emotional functioning, specifically their emotion regulatory\\u000a skills and emotional expression. Included are considerations regarding theoretical, methodological, and sampling strengths\\u000a and weaknesses of existing literature. On the basis of the review, several directions for future research are proposed. First,\\u000a it is argued that consistency in the measurement of emotion regulation is

  6. The role of emotional intelligence and other individual difference variables in predicting emotional labor relative to situational demands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Céleste M. Brotheridge

    2006-01-01

    This study found a significant positive relationship between emotional intelligence (MSCEIT) and deep acting (making an effort to feel emotions that are required in interpersonal interactions) in a sample of service workers. Surface acting (faking displayed emotions and hiding personal feelings) was positi- vely associated with emotional awareness. Emotional intelligence did not add to the prediction of va- riance in

  7. Adolescents’ Emotional Reactivity across Relationship Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Emily C.; Buehler, Cheryl; Blair, Bethany L.

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents’ emotional reactivity in family, close friendships, and romantic relationships was examined in a community-based sample of 416 two-parent families. Six waves of annual data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Emotional reactivity to interparental conflict during early adolescence was associated prospectively with adolescents’ reactivity to conflict in friendships and romantic relationships during middle adolescence. Close friendship reactivity partially explained the prospective association between reactivity to interparental conflict and romantic relationship reactivity. The association between perceived emotional reactivity and relationship conflict was stronger for girls than boys. Results have important developmental implications regarding adolescents’ emotional reactivity across salient interpersonal contexts during adolescence. PMID:22545839

  8. Implicit emotion regulation affects outcome evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Tang, Ping; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Wenbo; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2015-06-01

    Efficient implicit emotion regulation processes, which run without awareness, are important for human well-being. In this study, to investigate the influence of implicit emotion regulation on psychological and electrophysiological responses to gains and losses, participants were required to select between two Chinese four-character idioms to match the meaning of the third one before they performed a monetary gambling task. According to whether their meanings were related to emotion regulation, the idioms fell into two categories. Event-related potentials and self-rating emotional experiences to outcome feedback were recorded during the task. Priming emotion regulation reduced subjective emotional experience to both gains and losses and the amplitudes of the feedback-related negativity, while the P3 component was not influenced. According to these results, we suggest that the application of implicit emotion regulation effectively modulated the subjective emotional experience and the motivational salience of current outcomes without the cost of cognitive resources. This study implicates the potential significance of implicit emotion regulation in decision-making processes. PMID:25332404

  9. Exciting Course Cultivating the Power of Emotional

    E-print Network

    Niebur, Ernst

    ..........................................................................13 E-Learning, Department Training, Diversity Training for the High-Pressure Workplace Negativity: Creating Optimism in the Workplace Cultivating the Power of Emotional Intelligence The Downside

  10. The etiology of nonpsychotic emotional illness.

    PubMed

    Waring, E M; Patton, D; Wister, A V

    1990-02-01

    Two hundred and fifty couples in the general population completed self-report questionnaires which measured life events, personality, marital intimacy, and symptoms of nonpsychotic emotional illness. Path analysis was utilized to explain the development of symptoms of nonpsychotic emotional illness. Personality traits of neuroticism and extroversion explained most of the variance of symptoms of nonpsychotic emotional illness. Life events played a much smaller but significant role and marital intimacy was a nonsignificant factor. The data support a proneness model for the etiology of nonpsychotic emotional illness. PMID:2317734

  11. Increased negative emotional responses in PROP supertasters.

    PubMed

    Macht, Michael; Mueller, Jochen

    2007-02-28

    Based on animal data it has been suggested that an increased sensitivity to bitter tastes is linked with increased emotional reactivity. The present study examined for the first time in humans whether the intensity of experimentally induced negative emotional responses is related to sensitivity to the bitter tasting compound PROP (6-n-propylthiouracil). Normal-weight participants (61 men, 57 women) with a mean age of 24 years were classified into PROP non-tasters (n=54), medium tasters (n=25), or supertasters (n=39), and were shown two film clips to induce negative emotional response patterns: one pattern predominated by anger and tension, and another predominated by sadness and depressed mood. A third film clip was emotionally neutral. Before and after film clip viewing, self-rated emotional responses were obtained. PROP supertasters showed more intense responses than non-tasters or medium tasters after the anger-inducing film clip (increased anger, tension, sadness and fear as well as decreased mood and joy). Significant correlations were found between emotional responses and a continuos measure of PROP sensitivity. Group differences and correlations could not be attributed to personality measures, trait affectivity, or gender. For emotional responses after the sadness-inducing film clip, no differences between taster groups could be detected. PROP sensitivity appears to be related to arousability of emotions, in particular those emotions that are associated with an increased readiness to respond actively to stimuli from the environment, e.g. anger, disgust and fear. PMID:17141813

  12. Neural Networks for Mindfulness and Emotion Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Katsunuma, Ruri; Oba, Kentaro; Terasawa, Yuri; Motomura, Yuki; Mishima, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness, an attentive non-judgmental focus on “here and now” experiences, has been incorporated into various cognitive behavioral therapy approaches and beneficial effects have been demonstrated. Recently, mindfulness has also been identified as a potentially effective emotion regulation strategy. On the other hand, emotion suppression, which refers to trying to avoid or escape from experiencing and being aware of one’s own emotions, has been identified as a potentially maladaptive strategy. Previous studies suggest that both strategies can decrease affective responses to emotional stimuli. They would, however, be expected to provide regulation through different top-down modulation systems. The present study was aimed at elucidating the different neural systems underlying emotion regulation via mindfulness and emotion suppression approaches. Twenty-one healthy participants used the two types of strategy in response to emotional visual stimuli while functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted. Both strategies attenuated amygdala responses to emotional triggers, but the pathways to regulation differed across the two. A mindful approach appears to regulate amygdala functioning via functional connectivity from the medial prefrontal cortex, while suppression uses connectivity with other regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Thus, the two types of emotion regulation recruit different top-down modulation processes localized at prefrontal areas. These different pathways are discussed. PMID:26083379

  13. Social regulation of emotion: messy layers

    PubMed Central

    Kappas, Arvid

    2013-01-01

    Emotions are evolved systems of intra- and interpersonal processes that are regulatory in nature, dealing mostly with issues of personal or social concern. They regulate social interaction and in extension, the social sphere. In turn, processes in the social sphere regulate emotions of individuals and groups. In other words, intrapersonal processes project in the interpersonal space, and inversely, interpersonal experiences deeply influence intrapersonal processes. Thus, I argue that the concepts of emotion generation and regulation should not be artificially separated. Similarly, interpersonal emotions should not be reduced to interacting systems of intraindividual processes. Instead, we can consider emotions at different social levels, ranging from dyads to large scale e-communities. The interaction between these levels is complex and does not only involve influences from one level to the next. In this sense the levels of emotion/regulation are messy and a challenge for empirical study. In this article, I discuss the concepts of emotions and regulation at different intra- and interpersonal levels. I extend the concept of auto-regulation of emotions (Kappas, 2008, 2011a,b) to social processes. Furthermore, I argue for the necessity of including mediated communication, particularly in cyberspace in contemporary models of emotion/regulation. Lastly, I suggest the use of concepts from systems dynamics and complex systems to tackle the challenge of the “messy layers.” PMID:23424049

  14. Adolescents’ emotional competence is associated with parents’ neural sensitivity to emotions

    PubMed Central

    Telzer, Eva H.; Qu, Yang; Goldenberg, Diane; Fuligni, Andrew J.; Galván, Adriana; Lieberman, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    An essential component of youths’ successful development is learning to appropriately respond to emotions, including the ability to recognize, identify, and describe one’s feelings. Such emotional competence is thought to arise through the parent–child relationship. Yet, the mechanisms by which parents transmit emotional competence to their children are difficult to measure because they are often implicit, idiosyncratic, and not easily articulated by parents or children. In the current study, we used a multifaceted approach that went beyond self-report measures and examined whether parental neural sensitivity to emotions predicted their child’s emotional competence. Twenty-two adolescent–parent dyads completed an fMRI scan during which they labeled the emotional expressions of negatively valenced faces. Results indicate that parents who recruited the amygdala, VLPFC, and brain regions involved in mentalizing (i.e., inferring others’ emotional states) had adolescent children with greater emotional competence. These results held after controlling for parents’ self-reports of emotional expressivity and adolescents’ self-reports of the warmth and support of their parent relationships. In addition, adolescents recruited neural regions involved in mentalizing during affect labeling, which significantly mediated the associated between parental neural sensitivity and adolescents’ emotional competence, suggesting that youth are modeling or referencing their parents’ emotional profiles, thereby contributing to better emotional competence. PMID:25100982

  15. Tears and fears: modeling emotions and emotional behaviors in synthetic agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Gratch; Stacy Marsella

    2001-01-01

    Emotions play a critical role in creating engaging and believable characters to populate virtual worlds. Our goal is to create general computational models to support characters that act in virtual environments, make decisions, but whose behavior also suggests an underlying emotional current. In service of this goal, we integrate two complementary approaches to emotional modeling into a single unified system.

  16. The Neural Bases of Emotion Regulation: Reappraisal and Suppression of Negative Emotion

    E-print Network

    Gross, James J.

    has directly probed the neural bases of two contrasting (e.g., cognitive versus behavioral) emotion) and expressive suppression (a behavioral strategy thought to have its impact later in the emotion demonstrate the differential efficacy of reappraisal and suppression on emotional experience, facial behavior

  17. Maternal Emotion Socialization in Maltreating and Non-Maltreating Families: Implications for Children's Emotion Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Kimberly L.; Schneider, Renee; Fitzgerald, Monica M.; Sims, Chandler; Swisher, Lisa; Edwards, Anna

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the socialization of children's emotion regulation in physically maltreating and non-maltreating mother-child dyads (N = 80 dyads). Mother-child dyads participated in the parent-child emotion interaction task (Shipman & Zeman, 1999) in which they talked about emotionally-arousing situations. The PCEIT was coded for maternal…

  18. Parents' Reactions to Elementary School Children's Negative Emotions: Relations to Social and Emotional Functioning at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sarah; Eisenberg, Nancy; Fabes, Richard A.; MacKinnon, David P.

    2002-01-01

    Examined relations of parents' reactions to first- through fourth-graders' negative emotions with children's social and emotional competence at school and the moderating role of children's dispositional emotionality. Found that problem-focused parental reactions related positively to socioemotional competence for boys but negatively for girls.…

  19. Physiology and Functioning: Parents' Vagal Tone, Emotion Socialization, and Children's Emotion Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Susan B.; Camras, Linda A.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined relationships among parents' physiological regulation, their emotion socialization behaviors, and their children's emotion knowledge. Parents' resting cardiac vagal tone was measured, and parents provided information regarding their socialization behaviors and family emotional expressiveness. Their 4- or 5-year-old children (N…

  20. An ontology for predicting students' emotions during a quiz. Comparison with self-reported emotions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victoria Eyharabide; Analia Amandi; Matthieu Courgeon; Celine Clavel; Chahnez Zakaria; Jean-Claude Martin

    2011-01-01

    Recent research suggests that predicting students' emotions during e-learning is quite relevant but should be situated in the learning context and consider the individual profile of users. More knowledge is required for assessing the possible contributions of multiple sources of information for predicting students' emotions. In this paper we describe an ontology that we have implemented for predicting students' emotions

  1. Facial EMG Responses to Emotional Expressions Are Related to Emotion Perception Ability

    PubMed Central

    Künecke, Janina; Hildebrandt, Andrea; Recio, Guillermo; Sommer, Werner; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Although most people can identify facial expressions of emotions well, they still differ in this ability. According to embodied simulation theories understanding emotions of others is fostered by involuntarily mimicking the perceived expressions, causing a “reactivation” of the corresponding mental state. Some studies suggest automatic facial mimicry during expression viewing; however, findings on the relationship between mimicry and emotion perception abilities are equivocal. The present study investigated individual differences in emotion perception and its relationship to facial muscle responses - recorded with electromyogram (EMG) - in response to emotional facial expressions. N°?=?°269 participants completed multiple tasks measuring face and emotion perception. EMG recordings were taken from a subsample (N°?=?°110) in an independent emotion classification task of short videos displaying six emotions. Confirmatory factor analyses of the m. corrugator supercilii in response to angry, happy, sad, and neutral expressions showed that individual differences in corrugator activity can be separated into a general response to all faces and an emotion-related response. Structural equation modeling revealed a substantial relationship between the emotion-related response and emotion perception ability, providing evidence for the role of facial muscle activation in emotion perception from an individual differences perspective. PMID:24489647

  2. On the Validity of the Autobiographical Emotional Memory Task for Emotion Induction

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Caitlin; D'Mello, Sidney

    2014-01-01

    The Autobiographical Emotional Memory Task (AEMT), which involves recalling and writing about intense emotional experiences, is a widely used method to experimentally induce emotions. The validity of this method depends upon the extent to which it can induce specific desired emotions (intended emotions), while not inducing any other (incidental) emotions at different levels across one (or more) conditions. A review of recent studies that used this method indicated that most studies exclusively monitor post-writing ratings of the intended emotions, without assessing the possibility that the method may have differentially induced other incidental emotions as well. We investigated the extent of this issue by collecting both pre- and post-writing ratings of incidental emotions in addition to the intended emotions. Using methods largely adapted from previous studies, participants were assigned to write about a profound experience of anger or fear (Experiment 1) or happiness or sadness (Experiment 2). In line with previous research, results indicated that intended emotions (anger and fear) were successfully induced in the respective conditions in Experiment 1. However, disgust and sadness were also induced while writing about an angry experience compared to a fearful experience. Similarly, although happiness and sadness were induced in the appropriate conditions, Experiment 2 indicated that writing about a sad experience also induced disgust, fear, and anger, compared to writing about a happy experience. Possible resolutions to avoid the limitations of the AEMT to induce specific discrete emotions are discussed. PMID:24776697

  3. Investigating Transactions among Motives, Emotional Regulation Related to Testing, and Test Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCuir-Gunby, Jessica T.; Aultman, Lori Price; Schutz, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relationships among achievement motives, emotional regulation, and emotions. They collected data from 425 college undergraduates (110 men, 315 women) and used several scales, including the Achievement Motives Scales (K. Hagtvet & L. Zou, 2000), the Emotional Regulation During Testing Scale (P. A. Schutz, C. DiStefano, J.…

  4. Emotional Competence, Emotion Socialization, and Young Children's Peer-Related Social Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Pamela W.; Estep, Kimberly M.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated linkages between aspects of emotional competence and preschoolers' social skills with peers, as well as parental emotion socialization practices as predictors of social skill. Found that emotional competence variables were meaningfully related to the peer variables and that, for non-constructive anger reactions, maternal reports of…

  5. Automatic emotion processing as a function of trait emotional awareness: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Lichev, Vladimir; Sacher, Julia; Ihme, Klas; Rosenberg, Nicole; Quirin, Markus; Lepsien, Jöran; Pampel, André; Rufer, Michael; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Kugel, Harald; Kersting, Anette; Villringer, Arno; Lane, Richard D; Suslow, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    It is unclear whether reflective awareness of emotions is related to extent and intensity of implicit affective reactions. This study is the first to investigate automatic brain reactivity to emotional stimuli as a function of trait emotional awareness. To assess emotional awareness the Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale (LEAS) was administered. During scanning, masked happy, angry, fearful and neutral facial expressions were presented to 46 healthy subjects, who had to rate the fit between artificial and emotional words. The rating procedure allowed assessment of shifts in implicit affectivity due to emotion faces. Trait emotional awareness was associated with increased activation in the primary somatosensory cortex, inferior parietal lobule, anterior cingulate gyrus, middle frontal and cerebellar areas, thalamus, putamen and amygdala in response to masked happy faces. LEAS correlated positively with shifts in implicit affect caused by masked happy faces. According to our findings, people with high emotional awareness show stronger affective reactivity and more activation in brain areas involved in emotion processing and simulation during the perception of masked happy facial expression than people with low emotional awareness. High emotional awareness appears to be characterized by an enhanced positive affective resonance to others at an automatic processing level. PMID:25140051

  6. Emotional labor actors: A latent profile analysis of emotional labor strategies.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Allison S; Daniels, Michael A; Diefendorff, James M; Greguras, Gary J

    2015-05-01

    Research on emotional labor focuses on how employees utilize 2 main regulation strategies-surface acting (i.e., faking one's felt emotions) and deep acting (i.e., attempting to feel required emotions)-to adhere to emotional expectations of their jobs. To date, researchers largely have considered how each strategy functions to predict outcomes in isolation. However, this variable-centered perspective ignores the possibility that there are subpopulations of employees who may differ in their combined use of surface and deep acting. To address this issue, we conducted 2 studies that examined surface acting and deep acting from a person-centered perspective. Using latent profile analysis, we identified 5 emotional labor profiles-non-actors, low actors, surface actors, deep actors, and regulators-and found that these actor profiles were distinguished by several emotional labor antecedents (positive affectivity, negative affectivity, display rules, customer orientation, and emotion demands-abilities fit) and differentially predicted employee outcomes (emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, and felt inauthenticity). Our results reveal new insights into the nature of emotion regulation in emotional labor contexts and how different employees may characteristically use distinct combinations of emotion regulation strategies to manage their emotional expressions at work. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25068812

  7. Aging and Goal-Directed Emotional Attention: Distraction Reverses Emotional Biases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marisa Knight; Travis L. Seymour; Joshua T. Gaunt; Christopher Baker; Kathryn Nesmith; Mara Mather

    2007-01-01

    Previous findings reveal that older adults favor positive over negative stimuli in both memory and attention (for a review, see Mather & Carstensen, 2005). This study used eye tracking to investigate the role of cognitive control in older adults’ selective visual attention. Younger and older adults viewed emotional-neutral and emotional-emotional pairs of faces and pictures while their gaze patterns were

  8. Emotionally-Vulnerable Subjects and New Inequalities: The Educational Implications of an "Epistemology of the Emotions"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ecclestone, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by very different goals, various interest groups argue that the British government should address problems with citizens' emotional well-being. Concerns about emotional vulnerability and poor emotional well-being amongst growing numbers of children, young people and adults produce ideas and approaches from different branches of…

  9. Are Women the ``More Emotional'' Sex? Evidence From Emotional Experiences in Social Context

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    . These beliefs pervade American culture, from self-help books to talk shows, from ® lms to comedy routines between global, retrospective, and on-line, momentary self-descriptions of emotional experience-related differences in emotion in global self-descriptions, but not in the averaged momentary ratings of emotion

  10. Emotion Regulation in Youth with Emotional Disorders: Implications for a Unified Treatment Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trosper, Sarah E.; Buzzella, Brian A.; Bennett, Shannon M.; Ehrenreich, Jill T.

    2009-01-01

    Given the relationship between internalizing disorders and deficits in emotion regulation in youth, the emotion science literature has suggested several avenues for increasing the efficacy of interventions for youth presenting with anxiety and depression. These possibilities include the identification and addition of emotion-regulation skills to…

  11. The Nonverbal Expression of Negative Emotions: Peer and Supervisor Responses to Occupational Therapy Students' Emotional Attributes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tickle-Degnen, Linda; Puccinelli, Nancy M.

    1999-01-01

    A study to investigate the preclinical and clinical consequences of 79 occupational-therapy students' emotional attributes found that, when interviews were conducted in pairs, their feelings and behavior were associated with attributes of negative emotionality and nonverbal expressiveness. Students who had a high degree of negative emotionality

  12. The Components of Young Children's Emotion Knowledge: Which Are Enhanced by Adult Emotion Talk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Karen; Evans, Ian M.; Moskowitz, Sophie; Grouden, Melissa; Parkes, Fiona; Miller, Emily

    2013-01-01

    This research adopted observational and experimental paradigms to investigate the relationships between components of emotion knowledge in three- to four-year-old children. In Study 1, 88 children were assessed on the Emotion Matching Task (Morgan, Izard, & King), and two tasks requiring the generation of emotion labels and causes. Most tasks were…

  13. Giving Shape and Form to Emotion: Using Drawings to Identify Emotions in University Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Löfström, Erika; Nevgi, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Academia is generally not considered a place for expressing emotions, yet emotions are inevitably present in complex activities such as teaching. We investigated whether drawings could be used as a means of gaining access to emotions in university teaching and how. The data consisted of academics' drawings of themselves as university teachers…

  14. Investigating Children's Emotion Regulation in Socio-Emotionally Challenging Classroom Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurki, Kristiina; Järvelä, Sanna; Mykkänen, Arttu; Määttä, Elina

    2015-01-01

    Decades of research have associated effective emotion and behaviour regulation with learning and social competence among young children. However, further studies on children's use of emotion regulation in their everyday lives are required. This study focuses on investigating six- to nine-year-old children's (N?=?24) use of emotion regulation…

  15. Selective Attention to Emotional Stimuli: What IQ and Openness Do, and Emotional Intelligence Does Not

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiori, Marina; Antonakis, John

    2012-01-01

    We examined how general intelligence, personality, and emotional intelligence--measured as an ability using the MSCEIT--predicted performance on a selective-attention task requiring participants to ignore distracting emotion information. We used a visual prime in which participants saw a pair of faces depicting emotions; their task was to focus on…

  16. NEURAL DYNAMICS OF AUTISTIC BEHAVIORS: Cognitive, Emotional, and Timing Substrates

    E-print Network

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    NEURAL DYNAMICS OF AUTISTIC BEHAVIORS: Cognitive, Emotional, and Timing Substrates Stephen behavioral symptoms. The model includes interactions between cognitive, emotional, timing, and motor of normal cognitive and cognitive- emotional behavior was derived over a period of years to explain many

  17. ForPeerReview Preferential association between childhood emotional abuse

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ForPeerReview Preferential association between childhood emotional abuse and bipolar disorder Exposure: Sexual abuse/assault, childhood Keyword - Statistical Categories: Keyword - Intervention: Keyword association between childhood emotional abuse and bipolar disorder Running head: Emotional abuse and bipolar

  18. Emotion Regulation in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    E-print Network

    Gross, James J.

    Emotion Regulation in Children and Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder Andrea C. Samson group- matched typically developing (TD) controls completed a Reactivity and Regulation Situation Task. This task assesses emotional reactivity and spontaneous use of emotion regulation strategies (problem

  19. Personality and the prediction of short-duration emotional reactions 

    E-print Network

    Sheese, Bradley E

    2000-01-01

    Three converging studies (N=1413) presented initial evidence on the associations between personality dimensions and emotions (short-duration emotional reactions). We evaluated two distinct conceptual models of personality-emotion ...

  20. Theory and Methodology in Researching Emotions in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zembylas, Michalinos

    2007-01-01

    Differing theoretical approaches to the study of emotions are presented: emotions as private (psychodynamic approaches); emotions as sociocultural phenomena (social constructionist approaches); and a third perspective (interactionist approaches) transcending these two. These approaches have important methodological implications in studying…

  1. The Role of trait emotional intelligence and the Big Five in the selection of emotional labour strategies 

    E-print Network

    O'Donovan, Katharine

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: We investigated the relationship of the Big Five personality dimensions and trait emotional intelligence (EI) with the selection of emotional labour strategies. Emotional labour refers to the ...

  2. Emotional manipulation : factor analysis of a self-report measure. Links to emotional intelligence, Machiavellianism and personality 

    E-print Network

    Moore, Helen

    2006-01-01

    The current emotions research literature emphasises positive understanding and management of others’ emotions. However, a more negative type of management of others may occur. A 41-item self-report emotional manipulation ...

  3. A systems biology approach to identify intelligence quotient score-related genomic regions, and pathways relevant to potential therapeutic treatments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Kong, Lei; Qu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Although the intelligence quotient (IQ) is the most popular intelligence test in the world, little is known about the underlying biological mechanisms that lead to the differences in human. To improve our understanding of cognitive processes and identify potential biomarkers, we conducted a comprehensive investigation of 158 IQ-related genes selected from the literature. A genomic distribution analysis demonstrated that IQ-related genes were enriched in seven regions of chromosome 7 and the X chromosome. In addition, these genes were enriched in target lists of seven transcription factors and sixteen microRNAs. Using a network-based approach, we further reconstructed an IQ-related pathway from known human pathway interaction data. Based on this reconstructed pathway, we incorporated enriched drugs and described the importance of dopamine and norepinephrine systems in IQ-related biological process. These findings not only reveal several testable genes and processes related to IQ scores, but also have potential therapeutic implications for IQ-related mental disorders. PMID:24566931

  4. Interpersonal reactivity and the attribution of emotional reactions.

    PubMed

    Haas, Brian W; Anderson, Ian W; Filkowski, Megan M

    2015-06-01

    The ability to identify the cause of another person's emotional reaction is an important component associated with improved success of social relationships and survival. Although many studies have investigated the mechanisms involved in emotion recognition, very little is currently known regarding the processes involved during emotion attribution decisions. Research on complementary "emotion understanding" mechanisms, including empathy and theory of mind, has demonstrated that emotion understanding decisions are often made through relatively emotion- or cognitive-based processing streams. The current study was designed to investigate the behavioral and brain mechanisms involved in emotion attribution decisions. We predicted that dual processes, emotional and cognitive, are engaged during emotion attribution decisions. Sixteen healthy adults completed the Interpersonal Reactivity Index to characterize individual differences in tendency to make emotion- versus cognitive-based interpersonal decisions. Participants then underwent functional MRI while making emotion attribution decisions. We found neuroimaging evidence that emotion attribution decisions engage a similar brain network as other forms of emotion understanding. Further, we found evidence in support of a dual processes model involved during emotion attribution decisions. Higher scores of personal distress were associated with quicker emotion attribution decisions and increased anterior insula activity. Conversely, higher scores in perspective taking were associated with delayed emotion attribution decisions and increased prefrontal cortex and premotor activity. These findings indicate that the making of emotion attribution decisions relies on dissociable emotional and cognitive processing streams within the brain. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25706827

  5. Nouveaux r'esultats de transcendance de nombres r'eels dont les chiffres ou les quotients partiels ne sont pas

    E-print Network

    Allouche, Jean-Paul

    Nouveaux r'esultats de transcendance de nombres r'eels dont les chiffres ou les quotients partiels continue (ou plus correctement en fraction continu'ee) d'un r'eel x s''ecrit x = [a 0 ; a 1 ; a 2 ; a 3 continue d'un nombre r'eel alg'ebrique positif qui n'est ni rationnel ni quadratique ne sont pas born

  6. Whole-Brain Voxel-Based Correlation Analysis between Regional Cerebral Blood Flow and Intelligence Quotient Score in Parkinson’s Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenichi Oishi; Masafumi Ogawa; Yasushi Oya; Mitsuru Kawai

    2004-01-01

    The correlation between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and intelligence quotient (IQ) score was investigated in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) without severe dementia. We analyzed the 99mTc-ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission computed tomography quantitative images and Revised Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale scores of 44 PD patients using statistical parametric mapping. Verbal IQ positively correlated with rCBF in the right

  7. PMath 467/667 Homework 4 Solutions 1. Let X be the quotient of an octagon O by identifying two pairs of opposite

    E-print Network

    McKinnon, David

    , along their common diameter, V is homeomorphic to a disk, as desired. If P is the image of a point P(/)ix is then a homeomorphism between V and H, as desired. 2. (Problem 6-1 in the textbook.) Show that a connected sum of one orientation. Let f : E1 E2 be the homeomorphism that identifies two such edges in the quotient, and let I1 E

  8. Multiple emotions: a person-centered approach to the relationship between intergroup emotion and action orientation.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Julian W; Kashima, Yoshihisa; Laham, Simon M

    2014-08-01

    Although a great deal of research has investigated the relationship between emotions and action orientations, most studies to date have used variable-centered techniques to identify the best emotion predictor(s) of a particular action. Given that people frequently report multiple or blended emotions, a profitable area of research may be to adopt person-centered approaches to examine the action orientations elicited by a particular combination of emotions or "emotion profile." In two studies, across instances of intergroup inequality in Australia and Canada, we examined participants' experiences of six intergroup emotions: sympathy, anger directed at three targets, shame, and pride. In both studies, five groups of participants with similar emotion profiles were identified by cluster analysis and their action orientations were compared; clusters indicated that the majority of participants experienced multiple emotions. Each action orientation was also regressed on the six emotions. There were a number of differences in the results obtained from the person-centered and variable-centered approaches. This was most apparent for sympathy: the group of participants experiencing only sympathy showed little inclination to perform prosocial actions, yet sympathy was a significant predictor of numerous action orientations in regression analyses. These results imply that sympathy may only prompt a desire for action when experienced in combination with other emotions. We suggest that the use of person-centered and variable-centered approaches as complementary analytic strategies may enrich research into not only the affective predictors of action, but emotion research in general. PMID:24749637

  9. Emotional intelligence, not music training, predicts recognition of emotional speech prosody.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Christopher G; Cuddy, Lola L

    2008-12-01

    Is music training associated with greater sensitivity to emotional prosody in speech? University undergraduates (n = 100) were asked to identify the emotion conveyed in both semantically neutral utterances and melodic analogues that preserved the fundamental frequency contour and intensity pattern of the utterances. Utterances were expressed in four basic emotional tones (anger, fear, joy, sadness) and in a neutral condition. Participants also completed an extended questionnaire about music education and activities, and a battery of tests to assess emotional intelligence, musical perception and memory, and fluid intelligence. Emotional intelligence, not music training or music perception abilities, successfully predicted identification of intended emotion in speech and melodic analogues. The ability to recognize cues of emotion accurately and efficiently across domains may reflect the operation of a cross-modal processor that does not rely on gains of perceptual sensitivity such as those related to music training. PMID:19102595

  10. Metacognitive Emotion Regulation: Children’s Awareness that Changing Thoughts and Goals Can Alleviate Negative Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elizabeth L.; Levine, Linda J.; Lench, Heather C.; Quas, Jodi A.

    2010-01-01

    Metacognitive emotion regulation strategies involve deliberately changing thoughts or goals to alleviate negative emotions. Adults commonly engage in this type of emotion regulation, but little is known about the developmental roots of this ability. Two studies were designed to assess whether 5- and 6-year-old children can generate such strategies and, if so, the types of metacognitive strategies they employ. In Study 1, children described how story protagonists could alleviate negative emotions. In Study 2, children recalled times that they personally had felt sad, angry, and scared, and described how they had regulated their emotions. In contrast to research suggesting that young children cannot use metacognitive regulation strategies, the majority of children in both studies described such strategies. Children were surprisingly sophisticated in their suggestions for how to cope with negative emotions and tailored their regulatory responses to specific emotional situations. PMID:20677867

  11. Emotion-related hemisphere asymmetry: subjective emotional responses to laterally presented films.

    PubMed

    Wittling, W; Roschmann, R

    1993-09-01

    To investigate whether the cerebral hemispheres differ in their subjective emotional responses 54 adult subjects were presented two films of different emotion-related qualities (positive and negative film) either to their left or right hemisphere. The films were exposed by means of a technique for the lateralization of visual input that allows prolonged viewing while permitting free ocular scanning. Subjective emotional responses were assessed by means of a continuous rating of emotional arousal experienced during the movie as well as by retrospective ratings of ten different emotional qualities. Presenting both films to the right hemisphere resulted in stronger subjective responses in the continuous emotion rating as well as in some retrospectively assessed ratings compared to left-hemispheric presentation. The effects were more pronounced for the negative film. Taken together, the findings suggest a higher responsiveness of the right hemisphere in subjective emotional experience. PMID:8258284

  12. Infant emotion regulation: relations to bedtime emotional availability, attachment security, and temperament.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Ram; Stifter, Cynthia A; Philbrook, Lauren E; Teti, Douglas M

    2014-11-01

    The present study examines the influences of mothers' emotional availability toward their infants during bedtime, infant attachment security, and interactions between bedtime parenting and attachment with infant temperamental negative affectivity, on infants' emotion regulation strategy use at 12 and 18 months. Infants' emotion regulation strategies were assessed during a frustration task that required infants to regulate their emotions in the absence of parental support. Whereas emotional availability was not directly related to infants' emotion regulation strategies, infant attachment security had direct relations with infants' orienting toward the environment and tension reduction behaviors. Both maternal emotional availability and security of the mother-infant attachment relationship interacted with infant temperamental negative affectivity to predict two strategies that were less adaptive in regulating frustration. PMID:24995668

  13. The Emotionally Challenging, Open-Ended Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    For most job candidates, the interview experience is "an emotionally challenging endeavor." To succeed in interviews, candidates must understand the emotional labor needed to "manage their feelings" as they "create a publicly observable facial and bodily display." This is particularly true when recruiters use open-ended interviews that are not…

  14. Fashion design in emotional consumption era

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Weihua

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid economic and technological development, a new consumption pattern -emotional consumption arises, which begin to replace the consumption of product attributes gradually. Consumers' demand for garment products has shifted from the focus on the physical functions of products to the direction which is more desirous of comforting the soul for pleasure of emotional experience, that is, from the

  15. Alexithymia and cognitive bias for emotional information

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lars-Gunnar Lundh; Margareta Simonsson-Sarnecki

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between alexithymia (TAS-20) and cognitive bias (attentional bias and implicit memory bias) for illness words and negative emotion words (masked and unmasked) was investigated in a community sample of 120 individuals. Attentional bias was measured by the emotional Stroop task, and implicit memory bias was measured by a perceptual identification task. No significant correlation was found between alexthymia

  16. Developing Emotionally Intelligent Leadership in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the success of higher education institutions is dependent on effective competent leaders and leadership. There is also growing evidence to support the proposition that emotional intelligence is strongly linked to effective leadership in the higher education setting. Additionally, the premise that emotional intelligence…

  17. Emotional Intelligence in Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gliebe, Sudi Kate

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the importance of emotional intelligence in Christian higher education. Specifically, it addresses possible implications between emotional intelligence skills and success in the areas of learning, mental health, and career preparation. The paper addresses the following questions: Is there a positive relationship between…

  18. Outdoor Leaders' Emotional Intelligence and Transformational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayashi, Aya; Ewert, Alan

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the concept of outdoor leadership from the perspectives of emotional intelligence and transformational leadership. Levels of emotional intelligence, multifactor leadership, outdoor experience, and social desirability were examined using 46 individuals designated as outdoor leaders. The results revealed a number of unique…

  19. Encouraging Preadolescent Emotional Intelligence through Leadership Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, John Henry

    2010-01-01

    The study sought to determine effects of leadership activity on emotional intelligence in preadolescents. Ninety-two Central California Valley sixth grade students in two schools and four classes were assessed on emotional intelligence. Treatment and comparison groups were identified. A Two-Way Repeated Measures ANOVA examined change over time…

  20. Music and emotions: from enchantment to entrainment.

    PubMed

    Vuilleumier, Patrik; Trost, Wiebke

    2015-03-01

    Producing and perceiving music engage a wide range of sensorimotor, cognitive, and emotional processes. Emotions are a central feature of the enjoyment of music, with a large variety of affective states consistently reported by people while listening to music. However, besides joy or sadness, music often elicits feelings of wonder, nostalgia, or tenderness, which do not correspond to emotion categories typically studied in neuroscience and whose neural substrates remain largely unknown. Here we review the similarities and differences in the neural substrates underlying these "complex" music-evoked emotions relative to other more "basic" emotional experiences. We suggest that these emotions emerge through a combination of activation in emotional and motivational brain systems (e.g., including reward pathways) that confer its valence to music, with activation in several other areas outside emotional systems, including motor, attention, or memory-related regions. We then discuss the neural substrates underlying the entrainment of cognitive and motor processes by music and their relation to affective experience. These effects have important implications for the potential therapeutic use of music in neurological or psychiatric diseases, particularly those associated with motor, attention, or affective disturbances. PMID:25773637

  1. How Neglect and Punitiveness Influence Emotion Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Margaret Wolan; Carmody, Dennis P.; Lewis, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To explore whether punitive parenting styles contribute to early-acquired emotion knowledge deficits observable in neglected children, we observed 42 preschool children's emotion knowledge, expression recognition time, and IQ. The children's mothers completed the Parent-Child Conflict Tactics Scales to assess the recent use of three types of…

  2. Promoting Social and Emotional Learning in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMeulenaere, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Michelle DeMeulenaere discusses social/emotional learning (SEL), with a focus on helping preschool children gain knowledge about feelings and getting along with others. SEL is the process in which children are able to acknowledge and recognize the emotions of others, develop empathy, make good decisions, establish friendships, and…

  3. Modeling emotional dynamics : currency versus field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Sallach

    2008-01-01

    Randall Collins has introduced a simplified model of emotional dynamics in which emotional energy, heightened and focused by interaction rituals, serves as a common denominator for social exchange: a generic form of currency, except that it is active in a far broader range of social transactions. While the scope of this theory is attractive, the specifics of the model remain

  4. Transnationalism, Migration and Emotions: Implications for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zembylas, Michalinos

    2012-01-01

    This article is concerned with the emotional dynamics of transnationalism and migration and the impact on education. This impact is discussed in terms of how the movement of people involves complex emotional processes that have important consequences for educational policy, practice and research. The purpose of the author is to theorise how…

  5. Teaching Emotionally Immature High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    How do teachers teach gifted students whose emotional age trails their chronological age? How can they integrate those students into their classes so that these students mature while not detracting from the learning of the other students? In this article, the author offers pieces of advice on teaching gifted students whose emotional ages trail…

  6. The Diagnosticity of Color for Emotional Objects

    PubMed Central

    McMenamin, Brenton W.; Radue, Jasmine; Trask, Joanna; Huskamp, Kristin; Kersten, Daniel; Marsolek, Chad J.

    2012-01-01

    Object classification can be facilitated if simple diagnostic features can be used to determine class membership. Previous studies have found that simple shapes may be diagnostic for emotional content and automatically alter the allocation of visual attention. In the present study, we analyzed whether color is diagnostic of emotional content and tested whether emotionally diagnostic hues alter the allocation of visual attention. Reddish-yellow hues are more common in (i.e., diagnostic of) emotional images, particularly images with positive emotional content. An exogenous cueing paradigm was employed to test whether these diagnostic hues orient attention differently from other hues due to the emotional diagnosticity. In two experiments, we found that participants allocated attention differently to diagnostic hues than to non-diagnostic hues, in a pattern indicating a broadening of spatial attention when cued with diagnostic hues. Moreover, the attentional broadening effect was predicted by self-reported measures of affective style, linking the behavioral effect to emotional processes. These results confirm the existence and use of diagnostic features for the rapid detection of emotional content. PMID:24659831

  7. [Introduction of emotional labour into oncology].

    PubMed

    Lazányi, Kornélia; Molnár, Péter; Szluha, Kornélia

    2007-06-01

    Health care professionals do not have emotional labour obligations in their employment contract. However, in everyday work it is often inevitable for them to change their true feelings. This is critically true for professionals treating chronic or cancer patients. The suitable emotional state of the treatment staff does not only influence the practitioner-patient relationship but the process of recovery as well. Depending on the way one might get into the appropriate emotional state, the literature distinguishes between surface, deep and genuine acting. While surface and deep emotional labour has numerous negative psychological consequences genuine acting is usually accompanied by positive side effects. For those working in the field of oncology, emotional labour is a part of the role expectations of the professionals. This is how the appropriate attitude is a fundamental part of the professionals' essence. For the in depth analysis of subjects related to emotional labour, the authors adopted ideas from L. Festinger 's cognitive dissonance theory. The best way to alleviate cognitive dissonance and the negative side effects of emotional labour is to prevent the emergence of them. Oncology professionals should fit their role expectations genuinely, without particular efforts. If this was impossible, or the particular life situations did not allow genuine acting, it is the employer's and the workmates' common duty to help professionals, to ease the load of emotional labour, to diminish the occurring cognitive dissonance with the help of appropriate recompense. PMID:17526445

  8. Multimodal Emotion Recognition and Expressivity Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefanos D. Kollias; Kostas Karpouzis

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the framework of a special session that aims at investigating the best possible techniques for multimodal emotion recognition and expressivity analysis in human computer interaction, based on a common psychological background. The session mainly deals with audio and visual emotion analysis, with physiological signal analysis serving as supplementary to these modalities. Specific topics that are examined include

  9. On the dimensional structure of emotional intelligence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. V. Petrides; Adrian Furnham

    2000-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the self-report emotional intelligence (EI) measured by Schutte et al. (1998) [Schutte, N. S., Malouff, J. M., Hall, L. E., Haggerty, D. J., Cooper, J. T., Golden, C. J., & Dornheim, L. (1998). Development and validation of a measure of emotional intelligence. Personality and Individual Differences, 25, 167–177] are scrutinized and several weaknesses are identified. It

  10. Why Emotional Intelligence Needs a Fluid Component

    E-print Network

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    288 11 Why Emotional Intelligence Needs a Fluid Component andrew ortony, william revelle, and richard zinbarg There is something intuitively appealing and "right" about the idea of emotional intelligence (EI), but what is that something? Before we can answer this question, and especially before we

  11. Premarital Sexual Behavior, Attitudes, and Emotional Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamant, Louis

    Opinions vary as to whether the current "sexual revolution" with its acceptance of sexual permissiveness does or does not contribute to emotional maladjustment. In the fact of conflicting views this study was designed to test for the existence of a relationship between premarital sexual intercourse and emotional adjustment. The Minnesota…

  12. Mother and Child Emotions during Mathematics Homework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Else-Quest, Nicole M.; Hyde, Janet S.; Hejmadi, Ahalya

    2008-01-01

    Mathematics is often thought of as a purely intellectual and unemotional activity. Recently, researchers have begun to question the validity of this approach, arguing that emotions and cognition are intertwined. The emotions expressed during mathematics work may be linked to mathematics achievement. We used behavioral measures to identify the…

  13. Using Music to Elicit Emotion in Robots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryan Gephart

    In this work, we look at determining the better of two models when implementing a system of emotional response in anthropomorphic robots. The models relate music to emotional responses in humans, the first modeling the human auditory system and doing continuous analysis of sound, and the second, taking into account discrete features from music samples, basing itself on the various

  14. Parent-Child Attachment and Emotion Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brumariu, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    Given the centrality of both parent-child attachment and emotion regulation in children's development and adjustment, it is important to evaluate the relations between these constructs. This article discusses conceptual and empirical links between attachment and emotion regulation in middle childhood, highlights progress and challenges in the…

  15. Eye movements during emotion recognition in faces.

    PubMed

    Schurgin, M W; Nelson, J; Iida, S; Ohira, H; Chiao, J Y; Franconeri, S L

    2014-01-01

    When distinguishing whether a face displays a certain emotion, some regions of the face may contain more useful information than others. Here we ask whether people differentially attend to distinct regions of a face when judging different emotions. Experiment 1 measured eye movements while participants discriminated between emotional (joy, anger, fear, sadness, shame, and disgust) and neutral facial expressions. Participant eye movements primarily fell in five distinct regions (eyes, upper nose, lower nose, upper lip, nasion). Distinct fixation patterns emerged for each emotion, such as a focus on the lips for joyful faces and a focus on the eyes for sad faces. These patterns were strongest for emotional faces but were still present when viewers sought evidence of emotion within neutral faces, indicating a goal-driven influence on eye-gaze patterns. Experiment 2 verified that these fixation patterns tended to reflect attention to the most diagnostic regions of the face for each emotion. Eye movements appear to follow both stimulus-driven and goal-driven perceptual strategies when decoding emotional information from a face. PMID:25406159

  16. Emotion Context Insensitivity in Major Depressive Disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Rottenberg; James J. Gross; Ian H. Gotlib

    2005-01-01

    The present study tested 3 competing views of how depression alters emotional reactivity: positive attenuation (reduced positive), negative potentiation (increased negative), and emotion context insensitivity (ECI; reduced positive and negative). Normative and idiographic stimuli that elicited happy, sad, and neutral states were presented to currently depressed, formerly depressed, and healthy control individuals while experiential, behavioral, and autonomic responses were measured.

  17. Emotion Work in Time-Out Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brüggen, Susanne; Labhart, Carmen Kosorok

    2013-01-01

    From a sociological perspective, the topic of emotion in schools has been a rather neglected issue. In this article, we present two types of "emotion work", namely degradation work and rectification work. We describe how teachers in a special education programme called Time-out class employ feelings to get the work done efficiently.…

  18. Facial Emotion Labeling in Language Impaired Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaunay-El Allam, Maryse; Guidetti, Michele; Chaix, Yves; Reilly, Judy

    2011-01-01

    The few studies that have investigated emotion labeling in children with specific language impairment (SLI) have generally focused on global identification performances and appear contradictory. The current study is a fine-grained examination of how children with SLI and typical peers differ in the accuracy of their emotional lexicon use. Children…

  19. Emotional Intelligence and Teaching: Further Validation Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Chris; Ball, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Further evidence is presented to demonstrate the validity of a new measure of emotional intelligence: Reactions to Teaching Situations (RTS). Using criterion-related groups of high and low scorers on the RTS, it is shown that high scorers give more responses coded as emotional intelligence in their answers to sentence completion tasks relating to…

  20. Towards multimodal emotion recognition: a new approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco Paleari; Benoit Huet; Ryad Chellali

    2010-01-01

    Multimedia indexing is about developing techniques allowing people to effectively find media. Content-based methods become necessary when dealing with large databases as people cannot possibly annotate all available content. Emotions are intrinsic in human beings and are known to be very important for natural interactions, decision making, memory, and many other cognitive functions. Current technologies allows exploring the emotional space