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Sample records for bardet-biedl syndrome case

  1. Bardet-Biedl syndrome with vulva carcinoma presented with acute renal failure: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sari, F; Sarikaya, A M; Suren, D; Eren, M; Yilmaz, B

    2015-01-01

    Background Bardet-Biedl syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by retinal dystrophy, obesity, kidney dysfunction, polydactyly, hypogonadism and cognitive impairment. It can be accompanied by systemic findings such as malignancy, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, constitutional and functional disorders of urogenital system and liver fibrosis. Case report A 35-year-old woman with Bardet-Biedl syndrome was referred to our outpatient nephrology clinic with dysuria, acute renal failure, and urinary tract infection. A sized 2 x 1 cm mass between labia major and minor was noted, while CT scan showed a lesion that encompassed uterus and extended to the posterior side of the bladder in the left adnexal region and a 3 cm lesion in the liver. Excisional biopsy of the mass revealed a well-differentiated, squamous cell carcinoma. Dysuria resolved with insertion of urinary catheter after bougie dilatation and the patient was referred for radiotherapy. Conclusion It should be kept in the mind that renal failure may develop due to constitutional urogenital anomalies such as vulva carcinoma. This can be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome.Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2):176-178.

  2. Bardet-Biedl syndrome in two sisters: A rare incidence

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Chaitanya; Bhat, Ramesh Y.; Bhatt, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, polydactyly, mental retardation and hypogonadism. We present two sisters with this rare genetic condition.

  3. Genetics of human Bardet-Biedl syndrome, an updates.

    PubMed

    Khan, S A; Muhammad, N; Khan, M A; Kamal, A; Rehman, Z U; Khan, S

    2016-07-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal recessive multisystemic human genetic disorder characterized by six major defects including obesity, mental retardation, renal anomalies, polydactyly, retinal degeneration and hypogenitalism. In several cases of BBS, few other features such as metabolic defects, cardiovascular anomalies, speech deficits, hearing loss, hypertension, hepatic defects and high incidence of diabetes mellitus have been reported as well. The BBS displays extensive genetic heterogeneity. To date, 19 genes have been mapped on different chromosomes causing BBS phenotypes having varied mutational load of each BBS gene. In this review, we have discussed clinical spectrum and genetics of BBS. This report presents a concise overview of the current knowledge on clinical data and its molecular genetics progress upto date. PMID:26762677

  4. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: A rare genetic disease

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Diana; Castro-Sánchez, Sheila; Álvarez-Satta, María

    2013-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare multisystem genetic disease, with high phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Rod-cone dystrophy, obesity, polydactyly, hypogonadism, cognitive impairment and renal abnormalities have been established as primary features. There are 17 BBS genes (BBS1-BBS17) described to date, which explain 70–80% of the patients clinically diagnosed, therefore more BBS genes remain to be identified. BBS belongs to a group of diseases known as ciliopathies. In general, ciliopathies and BBS in particular share a partial overlapping phenotype that makes them complicated to diagnose. We present an up-to-date review including clinical, epidemiologic and genetic aspects of the syndrome.

  5. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Is it only cilia dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Novas, Rossina; Cardenas-Rodriguez, Magdalena; Irigoín, Florencia; Badano, Jose L

    2015-11-14

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous, pleiotropic disorder, characterized by both congenital and late onset defects. From the analysis of the mutational burden in patients to the functional characterization of the BBS proteins, this syndrome has become a model for both understanding oligogenic patterns of inheritance and the biology of a particular cellular organelle: the primary cilium. Here we briefly review the genetics of BBS to then focus on the function of the BBS proteins, not only in the context of the cilium but also highlighting potential extra-ciliary roles that could be relevant to the etiology of the disorder. Finally, we provide an overview of how the study of this rare syndrome has contributed to the understanding of cilia biology and how this knowledge has informed on the cellular basis of different clinical manifestations that characterize BBS and the ciliopathies. PMID:26231314

  6. Genetic predictors of cardiovascular morbidity in Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, E; Sparks, K; Hoskins, B E; Bagkeris, E; McGowan, B M; Carroll, P V; Huda, M S B; Mujahid, S; Peters, C; Barrett, T; Mohammed, S; Beales, P L

    2015-04-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome is a rare ciliopathy characterized by retinal dystrophy, obesity, intellectual disability, polydactyly, hypogonadism and renal impairment. Patients are at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Mutations in BBS1 and BBS10 account for more than half of those with molecular confirmation of the diagnosis. To elucidate genotype-phenotype correlations with respect to cardiovascular risk indicators 50 patients with mutations in BBS1 were compared with 19 patients harbouring BBS10 mutations. All patients had truncating, missense or compound missense/truncating mutations. The effect of genotype and mutation type was analysed. C-reactive protein was higher in those with mutations in BBS10 and homozygous truncating mutations (p = 0.013 and p = 0.002, respectively). Patients with mutations in BBS10 had higher levels of C peptide than those with mutations in BBS1 (p = 0.043). Triglyceride levels were significantly elevated in patients with homozygous truncating mutations (p = 0.048). Gamma glutamyl transferase was higher in patients with homozygous truncating mutations (p = 0.007) and heterozygous missense and truncating mutations (p = 0.002) than those with homozygous missense mutations. The results are compared with clinical cardiovascular risk factors. Patients with missense mutations in BBS1 have lower biochemical cardiovascular disease markers compared with patients with BBS10 and other BBS1 mutations. This could contribute to stratification of the clinical service. PMID:24611735

  7. Two Brothers with Bardet-Biedl Syndrome Presenting with Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Cem; Huddam, Bulent; Akbaba, Gulhan; Tunca, Hasan; Koca, Emine; Levent, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS) is a rarely seen autosomal recessive transfer disease characterised by retinal dystrophy, obesity, extremity deformities, mental retardation, and renal and genital system anomalies. BBS shows heterogenic transfer. To date, 18 genes (BBS1–18) and 7 BBS proteins have been defined as related to BBS. All of the defined BBS genes have been shown to be related to the biogenesis or function of cilia. Renal failure accompanying the syndrome, especially in the advanced stages, is the most common cause of mortality. Therefore, as one of the major diagnostic criteria, renal damage is of great importance in early diagnosis. This paper presents the cases of two brothers with BBS who presented with chronic renal failure. PMID:25960897

  8. Genetic linkage analysis in 26 families with Bardet-Biedl syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.F.; Bruford, E.A.; Mansfield, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by polydactyly, obesity, hypogonadism, retinitis pigmentosa, renal anomalies and mental retardation. Clinical heterogeneity is quite marked both within and between families. Linkage has been reported between Bardet-Biedl syndrome and the D16408 marker in chromosomal region 16q21 in an extended Bedouin kindred and, more recently, in a subset of 17 out of 31 families using the PYGM/D11S913 markers in chromosomal region 11q13. We have analyzed linkage to the 16q21 and 11q13 regions and used markers covering chromosomes 2, 3, 17 and 18 in a set of 26 Bardet-Biedl families, each containing at least two affected individuals, with a total of 57 affected members. Evidence of linkage to the D11S527 locus has been identified assuming linkage homogeneity with a lod score of 2.72 at a recombination fraction of 0.11 (95% limits 0.03-0.25).

  9. Structural Characterization of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome 9 Protein (BBS9)*

    PubMed Central

    Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2015-01-01

    The Bardet-Biedl syndrome protein complex (BBSome) is an octameric complex that transports membrane proteins into the primary cilium signaling organelle in eukaryotes and is implicated in human disease. Here we have analyzed the 99-kDa human BBS9 protein, one of the eight BBSome components. The protein is composed of four structured domains, including a β-stranded N-terminal domain. The 1.8 Å crystal structure of the 46-kDa N-terminal domain reveals a seven-bladed β-propeller. A structure-based homology search suggests that it functions in protein-protein interactions. We show that the Bardet-Biedl syndrome-causing G141R mutation in BBS9 likely results in misfolding of the β-propeller. Although the C-terminal half of BBS9 dimerizes in solution, the N-terminal domain only does so in the crystal lattice. This C-terminal dimerization interface might be important for the assembly of the BBSome. PMID:26085087

  10. Molecular basis of the obesity associated with Bardet-Biedl syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Deng-Fu; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2011-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS) is a rare human hereditary disorder associated with several features including obesity, retinopathy, renal defects, polydactyly, learning disabilities and hypogenitalism. This article discusses the abnormalities accounting for energy imbalance leading to obesity in BBS with emphasis on the recent evidence pointing to aberrations in hypothalamic action of leptin. Indeed, BBS proteins have emerged as important mediators of leptin receptor trafficking, and loss of BBS genes results in leptin resistance that may be due to abnormal leptin receptor handling in a subset of leptin responsive neurons. These recent discoveries hold promise for improved clinical management of BBS patients. The relevance of these findings to non-syndromic common obesity is also discussed. PMID:21514177

  11. Transient ciliogenesis involving Bardet-Biedl syndrome proteins is a fundamental characteristic of adipogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Marion, Vincent; Stoetzel, Corinne; Schlicht, Dominique; Messaddeq, Nadia; Koch, Michael; Flori, Elisabeth; Danse, Jean Marc; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Dollfus, Hélène

    2009-02-10

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an inherited ciliopathy generally associated with severe obesity, but the underlying mechanism remains hypothetical and is generally proposed to be of neuroendocrine origin. In this study, we show that while the proliferating preadipocytes or mature adipocytes are nonciliated in culture, a typical primary cilium is present in differentiating preadipocytes. This transient cilium carries receptors for Wnt and Hedgehog pathways, linking this organelle to previously described regulatory pathways of adipogenesis. We also show that the BBS10 and BBS12 proteins are located within the basal body of this primary cilium and inhibition of their expression impairs ciliogenesis, activates the glycogen synthase kinase 3 pathway, and induces peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor nuclear accumulation, hence favoring adipogenesis. Moreover, adipocytes derived from BBS-patients' dermal fibroblasts in culture exhibit higher propensity for fat accumulation when compared to controls. This strongly suggests that a peripheral primary dysfunction of adipogenesis participates to the pathogenesis of obesity in BBS. PMID:19190184

  12. Retinal dystrophy in Bardet-Biedl syndrome and related syndromic ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Mockel, A; Perdomo, Y; Stutzmann, F; Letsch, J; Marion, V; Dollfus, H

    2011-07-01

    Primary cilia are almost ubiquitously expressed in eukaryotic cells where they function as sensors relaying information either from the extracellular environment or between two compartments of the same cell, such as in the photoreceptor cell. In ciliopathies, a continuously growing class of genetic disorders related to ciliary defects, the modified primary cilium of the photoreceptor, also known as the connecting cilium, is frequently defective. Ciliary dysfunction involves disturbances in the trafficking and docking of specific proteins involved in its biogenesis or maintenance. The main well-conserved ciliary process, intraflagellar transport (IFT), is a complex process carried out by multimeric ciliary particles and molecular motors of major importance in the photoreceptor cell. It is defective in a growing number of ciliopathies leading to retinal degeneration. Retinitis pigmentosa related to ciliary dysfunction can be an isolated feature or a part of a syndrome such as Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS). Research on ciliopathies and BBS has led to the discovery of several major cellular processes carried out by the primary cilium structure and has highlighted their genetic heterogeneity. PMID:21477661

  13. Value of MRI olfactory bulb evaluation in the assessment of olfactory dysfunction in Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Braun, J J; Noblet, V; Kremer, S; Molière, S; Dollfus, H; Marion, V; Goetz, N; Muller, J; Riehm, S

    2016-07-01

    Olfactory bulb (OB) volume evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been demonstrated to be related to olfactory dysfunction in many different diseases. Olfactory dysfunction is often overlooked in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) patients and is rarely objectively evaluated by MRI. We present a series of 20 BBS patients with olfactory dysfunction. The OB was evaluated separately and blindly by two radiologists (SR and SM) with 3 Tesla MRI imaging comparatively to 12 normal control subjects by global visual evaluation and by quantitative measurement of OB volume. In the 12 control cases OB visual evaluation was considered as normal in all cases for radiologist (SR) and in 10 cases for radiologist (SM). In the 20 BBS patients, OB visual evaluation was considered as abnormal in 18 cases for SR and in all cases for SM. OB volumetric evaluation for SR and SM in BBS patients was able to provide significant correlation between BBS and olfactory dysfunction. This study indicates that OB volume evaluation by MRI imaging like structural MRI scan for gray matter modifications demonstrates that olfactory dysfunction in BBS patients is a constant and cardinal symptom integrated in a genetical syndrome with peripheral and central olfactory structure alterations. PMID:26586152

  14. Phenotypic differences among patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome linked to three different chromosome loci

    SciTech Connect

    Carmi, R.; Elbedour, K.; Stone, E.M.; Sheffield, V.C.

    1995-11-06

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of mental retardation, obesity, retinal dystrophy, polydactyly, and hypogenitalism. Renal and cardiac abnormalities are also frequent in this disorder. Previous clinical suggestions of heterogeneity of BBS were confirmed recently by the identification of four different chromosome loci linked to the disease. In this study we compared clinical manifestations of the syndrome in patients form 3 unrelated, extended Arab-Bedouin kindreds which were used for the linkage mapping of the BBS loci to chromosomes 3, 15, and 16. The observed differences included the limb distribution of the postaxial polydactyly and the extent and age-association of obesity. It appears that the chromosome 3 locus is associated with polydactyly of all four limbs, while polydactyly of the chromosome 15 type is mostly confined to the hands. On the other hand, the chromosome 15 type is associated with early-onset morbid obesity, while the chromosome 16 type appears to present the {open_quotes}leanest{close_quotes} form of BBS. Future cloning of the various BB genes will contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis of limb development and the identification of human obesity-related genes. 22 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  15. Characterization of Courtesy Stigma Perceived by Parents of Overweight Children with Bardet-Biedl Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hamlington, Barbara; Ivey, Lauren E.; Brenna, Ethan; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Biesecker, Barbara B.; Sapp, Julie C.

    2015-01-01

    Background A child’s obesity is generally perceived by the public to be under the control of the child’s parents. While the health consequences of childhood obesity are well understood, less is known about psychological and social effects of having an obese child on parents. We set out to characterize stigma and courtesy stigma experiences surrounding obesity among children with Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), a multisystem genetic disorder, and their parents. Methods Twenty-eight parents of children with BBS participated in semi-structured interviews informed by social stigmatization theory, which describes courtesy stigma as parental perception of stigmatization by association with a stigmatized child. Parents were asked to describe such experiences. Results Parents of children with BBS reported the child’s obesity as the most frequent target of stigmatization. They perceived health care providers as the predominant source of courtesy stigma, describing interactions that resulted in feeling devalued and judged as incompetent parents. Conclusions Parents of children with BBS feel blamed by others for their child’s obesity and described experiences that suggest health care providers may contribute to courtesy stigma and thus impede effective communication about managing obesity. Health care providers may reinforce parental feelings of guilt and responsibility by repeating information parents may have previously heard and ignoring extremely challenging barriers to weight management, such as a genetic predisposition to obesity. Strategies to understand and incorporate parents’ perceptions and causal attributions of their children’s weight may improve communication about weight control. PMID:26473736

  16. Patterns of rod and cone dysfunction in Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, S G; Borruat, F X; Apáthy, P P

    1990-06-15

    We studied visual function in 16 patients with the Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Visual acuity, kinetic perimetry, and electroretinography results indicated a severe loss of central and peripheral vision and rod and cone function by the second or third decade of life. Light- and dark-adapted static perimetry in patients 10 to 15 years of age with early involvement showed a parallel and marked loss of rod and cone sensitivity across the visual field. Patients with more advanced disease and no measurable peripheral visual field showed different patterns of central visual dysfunction: an island of only cone function centered in a bull's-eye lesion; patches of rod function surrounding geographic atrophy; or a central island of excellent rod sensitivity but severely impaired cones. In the two least-affected patients, a 13-year-old boy and the asymptomatic 45-year-old sibling of a patient, there were more rod than cone abnormalities as determined by electroretinography and static perimetry. PMID:2346197

  17. Cognitive, sensory, and psychosocial characteristics in patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brinckman, Danielle D; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M; Blumhorst, Catherine; Biesecker, Leslie G; Sapp, Julie C; Johnston, Jennifer J; Wiggs, Edythe A

    2013-12-01

    Forty-two patients with a clinical diagnosis of Bardet-Biedl syndrome ages 2-61 years were given a neuropsychological test battery to evaluate cognitive, sensory, and behavioral functioning. These tests included the Wechsler scales of intelligence, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Boston Naming Test, D-KEFS Verbal Fluency Test, D-KEFS Color-Word Interference Test, D-KEFS Sorting Test, Wide Range Achievement Test: Math and Reading Subtests, Purdue Pegboard, The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test, Social Communication Questionnaire, Social Responsiveness Scale, and Behavior Assessment System for Children, Second Edition, Parent Rating Scale. On the age appropriate Wechsler scale, the mean Verbal Comprehension was 81 (n = 36), Working Memory was 81 (n = 36), Perceptual Reasoning was 78 (n = 24) and Full Scale IQ was 75 (n = 26). Memory for a word list (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test) was in the average range with a mean of 89 (n = 19). Fine motor speed was slow on the Purdue with mean scores 3-4 standard deviations below norms. All subjects were microsmic on the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test. Of these 42 patients, only 6 were able to complete all auditory and visual tests; 52% were unable to complete the visual tests due to impaired vision. A wide range of behavioral issues were endorsed on questionnaires given to parents. Most had social skill deficits but no pattern of either externalizing or internalizing problems. We identify a characteristic neuro-behavioral profile in our cohort comprised of reduced IQ, impaired fine-motor function, and decreased olfaction. PMID:24194441

  18. Copy-Number Variation Contributes to the Mutational Load of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lindstrand, Anna; Frangakis, Stephan; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Richardson, Ellen B; McFadden, Kelsey A; Willer, Jason R; Pehlivan, Davut; Liu, Pengfei; Pediaditakis, Igor L; Sabo, Aniko; Lewis, Richard Alan; Banin, Eyal; Lupski, James R; Davis, Erica E; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2016-08-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a defining ciliopathy, notable for extensive allelic and genetic heterogeneity, almost all of which has been identified through sequencing. Recent data have suggested that copy-number variants (CNVs) also contribute to BBS. We used a custom oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) covering 20 genes that encode intraflagellar transport (IFT) components and 74 ciliopathy loci to screen 92 unrelated individuals with BBS, irrespective of their known mutational burden. We identified 17 individuals with exon-disruptive CNVs (18.5%), including 13 different deletions in eight BBS genes (BBS1, BBS2, ARL6/BBS3, BBS4, BBS5, BBS7, BBS9, and NPHP1) and a deletion and a duplication in other ciliopathy-associated genes (ALMS1 and NPHP4, respectively). By contrast, we found a single heterozygous exon-disruptive event in a BBS-associated gene (BBS9) in 229 control subjects. Superimposing these data with resequencing revealed CNVs to (1) be sufficient to cause disease, (2) Mendelize heterozygous deleterious alleles, and (3) contribute oligogenic alleles by combining point mutations and exonic CNVs in multiple genes. Finally, we report a deletion and a splice site mutation in IFT74, inherited under a recessive paradigm, defining a candidate BBS locus. Our data suggest that CNVs contribute pathogenic alleles to a substantial fraction of BBS-affected individuals and highlight how either deletions or point mutations in discrete splice isoforms can induce hypomorphic mutations in genes otherwise intolerant to deleterious variation. Our data also suggest that CNV analyses and resequencing studies unbiased for previous mutational burden is necessary to delineate the complexity of disease architecture. PMID:27486776

  19. Identification of a novel mutation confirms the implication of IFT172 (BBS20) in Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Elise; Stoetzel, Corinne; Scheidecker, Sophie; Geoffroy, Véronique; Prasad, Megana K; Redin, Claire; Missotte, Isabelle; Lacombe, Didier; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Muller, Jean; Dollfus, Hélène

    2016-05-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS; MIM 209900) is a recessive heterogeneous ciliopathy characterized by retinitis pigmentosa (RP), postaxial polydactyly, obesity, hypogonadism, cognitive impairment and kidney dysfunction. So far, 20 BBS genes have been identified, with the last reported ones being found in one or very few families. Whole-exome sequencing was performed in a consanguineous family in which two affected children presented typical BBS features (retinitis pigmentosa, postaxial polydactyly, obesity, hypogonadism and cognitive impairment) without any mutation identified in known BBS genes at the time of the study. We identified a homozygous splice-site mutation (NM_015662.2: c.4428+3A>G) in both affected siblings in the last reported BBS gene, namely, Intraflagellar Transport 172 Homolog (IFT172). Familial mutation segregation was consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. IFT172 mutations were initially reported in Jeune and Mainzer-Saldino syndromes. Recently, mutations have also been found in isolated RP and Bardet-Biedl-like ciliopathy. This is the second report of IFT172 mutations in BBS patients validating IFT172 as the twentieth BBS gene (BBS20). Moreover, another IFT gene, IFT27, was already associated with BBS, confirming the implication of IFT genes in the pathogenesis of BBS. PMID:26763875

  20. Recurrent CNVs and SNVs at the NPHP1 Locus Contribute Pathogenic Alleles to Bardet-Biedl Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrand, Anna; Davis, Erica E.; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.; Pehlivan, Davut; Willer, Jason R.; Tsai, I-Chun; Ramanathan, Subhadra; Zuppan, Craig; Sabo, Aniko; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard; Liu, Pengfei; Lewis, Richard A.; Banin, Eyal; Lupski, James R.; Clark, Robin; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Homozygosity for a recurrent 290 kb deletion of NPHP1 is the most frequent cause of isolated nephronophthisis (NPHP) in humans. A deletion of the same genomic interval has also been detected in individuals with Joubert syndrome (JBTS), and in the mouse, Nphp1 interacts genetically with Ahi1, a known JBTS locus. Given these observations, we investigated the contribution of NPHP1 in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), a ciliopathy of intermediate severity. By using a combination of array-comparative genomic hybridization, TaqMan copy number assays, and sequencing, we studied 200 families affected by BBS. We report a homozygous NPHP1 deletion CNV in a family with classical BBS that is transmitted with autosomal-recessive inheritance. Further, we identified heterozygous NPHP1 deletions in two more unrelated persons with BBS who bear primary mutations at another BBS locus. In parallel, we identified five families harboring an SNV in NPHP1 resulting in a conserved missense change, c.14G>T (p.Arg5Leu), that is enriched in our Hispanic pedigrees; in each case, affected individuals carried additional bona fide pathogenic alleles in another BBS gene. In vivo functional modeling in zebrafish embryos demonstrated that c.14G>T is a loss-of-function variant, and suppression of nphp1 in concert with each of the primary BBS loci found in our NPHP1-positive pedigrees exacerbated the severity of the phenotype. These results suggest that NPHP1 mutations are probably rare primary causes of BBS that contribute to the mutational burden of the disorder. PMID:24746959

  1. Mutations in a guanylate cyclase GCY-35/GCY-36 modify Bardet-Biedl syndrome-associated phenotypes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Mok, Calvin A; Healey, Michael P; Shekhar, Tanvi; Leroux, Michel R; Héon, Elise; Zhen, Mei

    2011-10-01

    Ciliopathies are pleiotropic and genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by defective development and function of the primary cilium. Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) proteins localize to the base of cilia and undergo intraflagellar transport, and the loss of their functions leads to a multisystemic ciliopathy. Here we report the identification of mutations in guanylate cyclases (GCYs) as modifiers of Caenorhabditis elegans bbs endophenotypes. The loss of GCY-35 or GCY-36 results in suppression of the small body size, developmental delay, and exploration defects exhibited by multiple bbs mutants. Moreover, an effector of cGMP signalling, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase, EGL-4, also modifies bbs mutant defects. We propose that a misregulation of cGMP signalling, which underlies developmental and some behavioural defects of C. elegans bbs mutants, may also contribute to some BBS features in other organisms. PMID:22022287

  2. Brain tissue- and region-specific abnormalities on volumetric MRI scans in 21 patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a heterogeneous human disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, and characterized by the primary findings of obesity, polydactyly, hypogonadism, and learning and behavioural problems. BBS mouse models have a neuroanatomical phenotype consisting of third and lateral ventriculomegaly, thinning of the cerebral cortex, and reduction in the size of the corpus striatum and hippocampus. These abnormalities raise the question of whether humans with BBS have a characteristic morphologic brain phenotype. Further, although behavioral, developmental, neurological and motor defects have been noted in patients with BBS, to date, there are limited reports of brain findings in BBS. The present study represents the largest systematic evaluation for the presence of structural brain malformations and/or progressive changes, which may contribute to these functional problems. Methods A case-control study of 21 patients, most aged 13-35 years, except for 2 patients aged 4 and 8 years, who were diagnosed with BBS by clinical criteria and genetic analysis of known BBS genes, and were evaluated by qualitative and volumetric brain MRI scans. Healthy controls were matched 3:1 by age, sex and race. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS language with SAS STAT procedures. Results All 21 patients with BBS were found to have statistically significant region- and tissue-specific patterns of brain abnormalities. There was 1) normal intracranial volume; 2) reduced white matter in all regions of the brain, but most in the occipital region; 3) preserved gray matter volume, with increased cerebral cortex volume in only the occipital lobe; 4) reduced gray matter in the subcortical regions of the brain, including the caudate, putamen and thalamus, but not in the cerebellum; and 5) increased cerebrospinal fluid volume. Conclusions There are distinct and characteristic abnormalities in tissue- and region- specific volumes of the brain in patients

  3. A Splice Variant of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome 5 (BBS5) Protein that Is Selectively Expressed in Retina

    PubMed Central

    Bolch, Susan N.; Dugger, Donald R.; Chong, Timothy; McDowell, J. Hugh; Smith, W. Clay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Bardet-Biedl syndrome is a complex ciliopathy that usually manifests with some form of retinal degeneration, amongst other ciliary-related deficiencies. One of the genetic causes of this syndrome results from a defect in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome 5 (BBS5) protein. BBS5 is one component of the BBSome, a complex of proteins that regulates the protein composition in cilia. In this study, we identify a smaller molecular mass form of BBS5 as a variant formed by alternative splicing and show that expression of this splice variant is restricted to the retina. Methods Reverse transcription PCR from RNA was used to isolate and identify potential alternative transcripts of Bbs5. A peptide unique to the C-terminus of the BBS5 splice variant was synthesized and used to prepare antibodies that selectively recognized the BBS5 splice variant. These antibodies were used on immunoblots of tissue extracts to determine the extent of expression of the alternative transcript and on tissue slices to determine the localization of expressed protein. Pull-down of fluorescently labeled arrestin1 by immunoprecipitation of the BBS5 splice variant was performed to assess functional interaction between the two proteins. Results PCR from mouse retinal cDNA using Bbs5-specific primers amplified a unique cDNA that was shown to be a splice variant of BBS5 resulting from the use of cryptic splicing sites in Intron 7. The resulting transcript codes for a truncated form of the BBS5 protein with a unique 24 amino acid C-terminus, and predicted 26.5 kD molecular mass. PCR screening of RNA isolated from various ciliated tissues and immunoblots of protein extracts from these same tissues showed that this splice variant was expressed in retina, but not brain, heart, kidney, or testes. Quantitative PCR showed that the splice variant transcript is 8.9-fold (+/- 1.1-fold) less abundant than the full-length transcript. In the retina, the splice variant of BBS5 appears to be most abundant in the connecting

  4. Pitfalls of homozygosity mapping: an extended consanguineous Bardet-Biedl syndrome family with two mutant genes (BBS2, BBS10), three mutations, but no triallelism.

    PubMed

    Laurier, Virginie; Stoetzel, Corinne; Muller, Jean; Thibault, Christelle; Corbani, Sandra; Jalkh, Nadine; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Poch, Olivier; Licaire, Serge; Danse, Jean-Marc; Amati-Bonneau, Patricia; Bonneau, Dominique; Mégarbané, André; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Dollfus, Hélène

    2006-11-01

    The extensive genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is documented by the identification, by classical linkage analysis complemented recently by comparative genomic approaches, of nine genes (BBS1-9) that account cumulatively for about 50% of patients. The BBS genes appear implicated in cilia and basal body assembly or function. In order to find new BBS genes, we performed SNP homozygosity mapping analysis in an extended consanguineous family living in a small Lebanese village. This uncovered an unexpectedly complex pattern of mutations, and led us to identify a novel BBS gene (BBS10). In one sibship of the pedigree, a BBS2 homozygous mutation was identified, while in three other sibships, a homozygous missense mutation was identified in a gene encoding a vertebrate-specific chaperonine-like protein (BBS10). The single patient in the last sibship was a compound heterozygote for the above BBS10 mutation and another one in the same gene. Although triallelism (three deleterious alleles in the same patient) has been described in some BBS families, we have to date no evidence that this is the case in the present family. The analysis of this family challenged linkage analysis based on the expectation of a single locus and mutation. The very high informativeness of SNP arrays was instrumental in elucidating this case, which illustrates possible pitfalls of homozygosity mapping in extended families, and that can be explained by the rather high prevalence of heterozygous carriers of BBS mutations (estimated at one in 50 in Europeans). PMID:16823392

  5. Identification of a novel BBS gene (BBS12) highlights the major role of a vertebrate-specific branch of chaperonin-related proteins in Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoetzel, Corinne; Muller, Jean; Laurier, Virginie; Davis, Erica E; Zaghloul, Norann A; Vicaire, Serge; Jacquelin, Cecile; Plewniak, Frederic; Leitch, Carmen C; Sarda, Pierre; Hamel, Christian; de Ravel, Thomy J L; Lewis, Richard Alan; Friederich, Evelyne; Thibault, Christelle; Danse, Jean-Marc; Verloes, Alain; Bonneau, Dominique; Katsanis, Nicholas; Poch, Olivier; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Dollfus, Helene

    2007-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is primarily an autosomal recessive ciliopathy characterized by progressive retinal degeneration, obesity, cognitive impairment, polydactyly, and kidney anomalies. The disorder is genetically heterogeneous, with 11 BBS genes identified to date, which account for ~70% of affected families. We have combined single-nucleotide-polymorphism array homozygosity mapping with in silico analysis to identify a new BBS gene, BBS12. Patients from two Gypsy families were homozygous and haploidentical in a 6-Mb region of chromosome 4q27. FLJ35630 was selected as a candidate gene, because it was predicted to encode a protein with similarity to members of the type II chaperonin superfamily, which includes BBS6 and BBS10. We found pathogenic mutations in both Gypsy families, as well as in 14 other families of various ethnic backgrounds, indicating that BBS12 accounts for approximately 5% of all BBS cases. BBS12 is vertebrate specific and, together with BBS6 and BBS10, defines a novel branch of the type II chaperonin superfamily. These three genes are characterized by unusually rapid evolution and are likely to perform ciliary functions specific to vertebrates that are important in the pathophysiology of the syndrome, and together they account for about one-third of the total BBS mutational load. Consistent with this notion, suppression of each family member in zebrafish yielded gastrulation-movement defects characteristic of other BBS morphants, whereas simultaneous suppression of all three members resulted in severely affected embryos, possibly hinting at partial functional redundancy within this protein family. PMID:17160889

  6. Identification of 28 novel mutations in the Bardet-Biedl syndrome genes: the burden of private mutations in an extensively heterogeneous disease.

    PubMed

    Muller, Jean; Stoetzel, C; Vincent, M C; Leitch, C C; Laurier, V; Danse, J M; Hellé, S; Marion, V; Bennouna-Greene, V; Vicaire, S; Megarbane, A; Kaplan, J; Drouin-Garraud, V; Hamdani, M; Sigaudy, S; Francannet, C; Roume, J; Bitoun, P; Goldenberg, A; Philip, N; Odent, S; Green, J; Cossée, M; Davis, E E; Katsanis, N; Bonneau, D; Verloes, A; Poch, O; Mandel, J L; Dollfus, H

    2010-03-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), an emblematic disease in the rapidly evolving field of ciliopathies, is characterized by pleiotropic clinical features and extensive genetic heterogeneity. To date, 14 BBS genes have been identified, 3 of which have been found mutated only in a single BBS family each (BBS11/TRIM32, BBS13/MKS1 and BBS14/MKS4/NPHP6). Previous reports of systematic mutation detection in large cohorts of BBS families (n > 90) have dealt only with a single gene, or at most small subsets of the known BBS genes. Here we report extensive analysis of a cohort of 174 BBS families for 12/14 genes, leading to the identification of 28 novel mutations. Two pathogenic mutations in a single gene have been found in 117 families, and a single heterozygous mutation in 17 families (of which 8 involve the BBS1 recurrent mutation, M390R). We confirm that BBS1 and BBS10 are the most frequently mutated genes, followed by BBS12. No mutations have been found in BBS11/TRIM32, the identification of which as a BBS gene only relies on a single missense mutation in a single consanguineous family. While a third variant allele has been observed in a few families, they are in most cases missenses of uncertain pathogenicity, contrasting with the type of mutations observed as two alleles in a single gene. We discuss the various strategies for diagnostic mutation detection, including homozygosity mapping and targeted arrays for the detection of previously reported mutations. PMID:20177705

  7. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Institute Resources & Support Resources & Support Living with Vision Loss Newly Diagnosed FFB in Your Area Stories of Hope Videos Resources Low Vision Specialists Retinal Physicians My Retina Tracker Registry Genetic ...

  8. C8orf37 is mutated in Bardet-Biedl syndrome and constitutes a locus allelic to non-syndromic retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arif O; Decker, Eva; Bachmann, Nadine; Bolz, Hanno J; Bergmann, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a pleiotropic and clinically and genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy. Primary features are early-onset retinal dystrophy that is typically rod-cone, obesity, polydactyly, renal abnormalities, hypogonadism, and learning difficulties, but most patients do not present with the full clinical picture. In a BBS patient from a consanguineous marriage we performed next-generation sequencing targeting all known BBS genes and other genes known or hypothesized to cause ciliopathies. While no mutation was present in any of the recognized genes for BBS, we were able to identify the homozygous non-conservative mutation c.529C>T (p.Arg177Trp) in C8orf37 that segregated with the phenotype, affects an evolutionarily highly conserved residue, and is bioinformatically predicted to be pathogenic. The same mutation has been described in unrelated patients with non-syndromic cone-rod dystrophy and other C8orf37 changes were found in individuals with retinitis pigmentosa. We conclude that C8orf37 should be added to BBS screening panels as a probable rare cause of the disease and that individuals with C8orf37-related retinal dystrophy should be screened for BBS features. PMID:26854863

  9. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Mapping of a new locus to chromosome 3 and fine-mapping of the chromosome 16 linked locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kwitek-Black, A.E.; Rokhlina, T.; Nishimura, D.Y.

    1994-09-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by mental retardation, post-axial polydactyly, obesity, retinitis pigmentosa, and hypogonadism. Other features of this disease include renal and cardiovascular abnormalities and an increased incidence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The molecular etiology for BBS is not known. We previously linked BBS to chromosome 16q13 in a large inbred Bedouin family, and excluded this locus in a second large inbred Bedouin family. We now report linkage of this second family to markers on chromosome 3q, proving non-allelic, genetic heterogeneity in the Bedouin population. A third large inbred Bedouin family was excluded from the 3q and 16q BBS loci. In addition to the identification of a new BBS locus on chromosome 3, we have identified and utilized additional short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) in the 16q BBS region to narrow the candidate interval to 3 cM. Additional recombinant individuals will allow further refinement of the interval. Identification of genes causing BBS has the potential to provide insight into diverse genetic traits and disease processes including obesity, hypertension, diabetes, retinal degeneration, and abnormal limb, renal and cardiac development.

  10. Homozygosity mapping with SNP arrays identifies TRIM32, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, as a Bardet-Biedl syndrome gene (BBS11).

    PubMed

    Chiang, Annie P; Beck, John S; Yen, Hsan-Jan; Tayeh, Marwan K; Scheetz, Todd E; Swiderski, Ruth E; Nishimura, Darryl Y; Braun, Terry A; Kim, Kwang-Youn A; Huang, Jian; Elbedour, Khalil; Carmi, Rivka; Slusarski, Diane C; Casavant, Thomas L; Stone, Edwin M; Sheffield, Val C

    2006-04-18

    The identification of mutations in genes that cause human diseases has largely been accomplished through the use of positional cloning, which relies on linkage mapping. In studies of rare diseases, the resolution of linkage mapping is limited by the number of available meioses and informative marker density. One recent advance is the development of high-density SNP microarrays for genotyping. The SNP arrays overcome low marker informativity by using a large number of markers to achieve greater coverage at finer resolution. We used SNP microarray genotyping for homozygosity mapping in a small consanguineous Israeli Bedouin family with autosomal recessive Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS; obesity, pigmentary retinopathy, polydactyly, hypogonadism, renal and cardiac abnormalities, and cognitive impairment) in which previous linkage studies using short tandem repeat polymorphisms failed to identify a disease locus. SNP genotyping revealed a homozygous candidate region. Mutation analysis in the region of homozygosity identified a conserved homozygous missense mutation in the TRIM32 gene, a gene coding for an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Functional analysis of this gene in zebrafish and expression correlation analyses among other BBS genes in an expression quantitative trait loci data set demonstrate that TRIM32 is a BBS gene. This study shows the value of high-density SNP genotyping for homozygosity mapping and the use of expression correlation data for evaluation of candidate genes and identifies the proteasome degradation pathway as a pathway involved in BBS. PMID:16606853

  11. New mutations in BBS genes in small consanguineous families with Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Detection of candidate regions by homozygosity mapping

    PubMed Central

    Pereiro, Ines; Piñeiro-Gallego, Teresa; Baiget, Montserrat; Borrego, Salud; Ayuso, Carmen; Searby, Charles; Nishimura, Darryl

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS, OMIM 209900) is a rare multi-organ disorder in which BBS patients manifest a variable phenotype that includes retinal dystrophy, polydactyly, mental delay, obesity, and also reproductive tract and renal abnormalities. Mutations in 14 genes (BBS1–BBS14) are found in 70% of the patients, indicating that additional mutations in known and new BBS genes remain to be identified. Therefore, the molecular diagnosis of this complex disorder is a challenging task. Methods In this study we show the use of the genome-wide homozygosity mapping strategy in the mutation detection of nine Caucasian BBS families, eight of them consanguineous and one from the same geographic area with no proven consanguinity. Results We identified the disease-causing mutation in six of the families studied, five of which had novel sequence variants in BBS3, BBS6, and BBS12. This is the first null mutation reported in BBS3. Furthermore, this approach defined homozygous candidate regions that could harbor potential candidate genes for BBS in three of the families. Conclusions These findings further underline the importance of homozygosity mapping as a useful technology for diagnosis in small consanguineous families with a complex disease like BBS. PMID:20142850

  12. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel and a Recurrent Mutation in BBS2 Gene in a Family with Bardet-Biedl Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Yong Mong; Chawla, Mayank; Zhao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder known to be caused by mutations in at least 19 BBS genes. We report the genetic analysis of a patient with indisputable features of BBS including cardinal features such as postaxial polydactyly, retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, and kidney failure. Taking advantage of next-generation sequencing technology, we applied whole exome sequencing (WES) with Sanger direct sequencing to the proband and her unaffected mother. A pair of heterozygous nonsense mutations in BBS2 gene was identified in the proband, one being novel and the other recurrent. The novel mutation, p.Y644X, resides in exon 16 and was also found in the heterozygous state in the mother. This mutation is not currently found in the dsSNP and 1000 Genome SNP databases and is predicted to be disease causing by in silico analysis. This study highlights the potential for a rapid and precise detection of disease causing gene using WES in genetically heterogeneous disorders such as BBS. PMID:26078953

  13. Targeted high-throughput sequencing for diagnosis of genetically heterogeneous diseases: efficient mutation detection in Bardet-Biedl and Alström Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Redin, Claire; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Mhamdi, Oussema; Geoffroy, Véronique; Stoetzel, Corinne; Vincent, Marie-Claire; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Lacombe, Didier; Ouertani, Ines; Petit, Florence; Till, Marianne; Verloes, Alain; Jost, Bernard; Chaabouni, Habiba Bouhamed; Dollfus, Helene; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Muller, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Background Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a pleiotropic recessive disorder that belongs to the rapidly growing family of ciliopathies. It shares phenotypic traits with other ciliopathies, such as Alström syndrome (ALMS), nephronophthisis (NPHP) or Joubert syndrome. BBS mutations have been detected in 16 different genes (BBS1-BBS16) without clear genotype-to-phenotype correlation. This extensive genetic heterogeneity is a major concern for molecular diagnosis and genetic counselling. While various strategies have been recently proposed to optimise mutation detection, they either fail to detect mutations in a majority of patients or are time consuming and costly. Method We tested a targeted exon-capture strategy coupled with multiplexing and high-throughput sequencing on 52 patients: 14 with known mutations as proof-of-principle and 38 with no previously detected mutation. Thirty genes were targeted in total including the 16 BBS genes, the 12 known NPHP genes, the single ALMS gene ALMS1 and the proposed modifier CCDC28B. Results This strategy allowed the reliable detection of causative mutations (including homozygous/heterozygous exon deletions) in 68% of BBS patients without previous molecular diagnosis and in all proof-of-principle samples. Three probands carried homozygous truncating mutations in ALMS1 confirming the major phenotypic overlap between both disorders. The efficiency of detecting mutations in patients was positively correlated with their compliance with the classical BBS phenotype (mutations were identified in 81% of ‘classical’ BBS patients) suggesting that only a few true BBS genes remain to be identified. We illustrate some interpretation problems encountered due to the multiplicity of identified variants. Conclusion This strategy is highly efficient and cost effective for diseases with high genetic heterogeneity, and guarantees a quality of coverage in coding sequences of target genes suited for diagnosis purposes. PMID:22773737

  14. Mutations in SDCCAG8/NPHP10 Cause Bardet-Biedl Syndrome and Are Associated with Penetrant Renal Disease and Absent Polydactyly

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, E.; Zaloszyc, A.; Lauer, J.; Durand, M.; Stutzmann, F.; Perdomo-Trujillo, Y.; Redin, C.; Bennouna Greene, V.; Toutain, A.; Perrin, L.; Gérard, M.; Caillard, S.; Bei, X.; Lewis, R.A.; Christmann, D.; Letsch, J.; Kribs, M.; Mutter, C.; Muller, J.; Stoetzel, C.; Fischbach, M.; Marion, V.; Katsanis, N.; Dollfus, H.

    2011-01-01

    The ciliopathies are an expanding group of disorders caused by mutations in genes implicated in the biogenesis and function of primary cilia. Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a model ciliopathy characterized by progressive retinal degeneration, obesity, polydactyly, cognitive impairment, kidney anomalies and hypogonadism. Mutations in SDCCAG8(NPHP10) were described recently in patients with nephronophthisis and retinal degeneration (Senior-Loken syndrome; SLS). Given the phenotypic and genetic overlap between known ciliopathy genes, we hypothesized that mutations in SDCCAG8 might also contribute alleles to more severe, multisystemic ciliopathies. We performed genetic and phenotypic analyses of 2 independent BBS cohorts. Subsequent to mutation screening, we made a detailed phenotypic analysis of 5 families mutated for SDCCAG8 (3 homozygous and 2 compound heterozygous mutations) and conducted statistical analyses across both cohorts to examine possible phenotype-genotype correlations with mutations at this locus. All patients with mutations in SDCCAG8 fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for BBS (retinal degeneration, obesity, cognitive defects, renal failure, hypogonadism). Interestingly, none of the patients with primary SDCCAG8 mutations had polydactyly, a frequent but not obligatory BBS feature. In contrast, the same patients displayed early-onset renal failure, obesity, as well as recurrent pulmonary and ENT infections. Comparison of the phenotypes of these families with our entire BBS cohort indicated that renal impairment and absent polydactyly correlated significantly with causal SDCCAG8 mutations. Thus, SDCCAG8 mutations are sufficient to cause BBS in 1–2% of our combined cohorts, and define this gene as the sixteenth BBS locus (BBS16). The absence of polydactyly and the concomitant, apparently fully penetrant association with early kidney failure represents the first significant genotype-phenotype correlation in BBS that potentially represents an indicator for

  15. Mutations in SDCCAG8/NPHP10 Cause Bardet-Biedl Syndrome and Are Associated with Penetrant Renal Disease and Absent Polydactyly.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, E; Zaloszyc, A; Lauer, J; Durand, M; Stutzmann, F; Perdomo-Trujillo, Y; Redin, C; Bennouna Greene, V; Toutain, A; Perrin, L; Gérard, M; Caillard, S; Bei, X; Lewis, R A; Christmann, D; Letsch, J; Kribs, M; Mutter, C; Muller, J; Stoetzel, C; Fischbach, M; Marion, V; Katsanis, N; Dollfus, H

    2011-09-01

    The ciliopathies are an expanding group of disorders caused by mutations in genes implicated in the biogenesis and function of primary cilia. Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a model ciliopathy characterized by progressive retinal degeneration, obesity, polydactyly, cognitive impairment, kidney anomalies and hypogonadism. Mutations in SDCCAG8(NPHP10) were described recently in patients with nephronophthisis and retinal degeneration (Senior-Loken syndrome; SLS). Given the phenotypic and genetic overlap between known ciliopathy genes, we hypothesized that mutations in SDCCAG8 might also contribute alleles to more severe, multisystemic ciliopathies. We performed genetic and phenotypic analyses of 2 independent BBS cohorts. Subsequent to mutation screening, we made a detailed phenotypic analysis of 5 families mutated for SDCCAG8 (3 homozygous and 2 compound heterozygous mutations) and conducted statistical analyses across both cohorts to examine possible phenotype-genotype correlations with mutations at this locus. All patients with mutations in SDCCAG8 fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for BBS (retinal degeneration, obesity, cognitive defects, renal failure, hypogonadism). Interestingly, none of the patients with primary SDCCAG8 mutations had polydactyly, a frequent but not obligatory BBS feature. In contrast, the same patients displayed early-onset renal failure, obesity, as well as recurrent pulmonary and ENT infections. Comparison of the phenotypes of these families with our entire BBS cohort indicated that renal impairment and absent polydactyly correlated significantly with causal SDCCAG8 mutations. Thus, SDCCAG8 mutations are sufficient to cause BBS in 1-2% of our combined cohorts, and define this gene as the sixteenth BBS locus (BBS16). The absence of polydactyly and the concomitant, apparently fully penetrant association with early kidney failure represents the first significant genotype-phenotype correlation in BBS that potentially represents an indicator for

  16. Targeted multi-gene panel testing for the diagnosis of Bardet Biedl syndrome: Identification of nine novel mutations across BBS1, BBS2, BBS4, BBS7, BBS9, BBS10 genes.

    PubMed

    Ece Solmaz, Asli; Onay, Huseyin; Atik, Tahir; Aykut, Ayca; Cerrah Gunes, Meltem; Ozalp Yuregir, Ozge; Bas, Veysel Nijat; Hazan, Filiz; Kirbiyik, Ozgur; Ozkinay, Ferda

    2015-12-01

    Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS) is a rare, autosomal-recessive ciliopathy characterized by obesity, rod-cone dystrophy, postaxial polydactyly, renal abnormalities, genital abnormalities and learning difficulties. To date, mutations in 21 different genes have been described as being responsible for BBS. Recently sequential gene sequencing has been replaced by next generation sequencing (NGS) applications. In this study, 15 patients with clinically diagnosed BBS were investigated using a next generation sequencing panel which included 17 known BBS causing genes (BBS1, BBS2, ARL6, BBS4, BBS5, MKKS, BBS7, TTC8, BBS9, BBS10, TRIM32, BBS12, MKS1, NPHP6, WDPCP, SDCCAG8, NPHP1). A genetic diagnosis was achieved in 13 patients (86.6%) and involved 9 novel and 3 previously described pathogenic variants in 6 of 17 BBS causing genes. BBS10 and BBS1 were the most commonly involved genes with frequencies of 31% and 23% respectively. Three of the 13 patients had an affected sibling. All affected siblings were found to be homozygous for the mutation detected in the proband. No evidence of triallelic inheritance was detected. Although limited association between certain genes and phenotypic features has been observed in this study, it is considered that additional studies are needed to better characterize the genotype-phenotype correlation of BBS. Our results demonstrate that NGS panels are feasible and effective method for providing high diagnostic yields in the diseases caused by multiple genes such as BBS. PMID:26518167

  17. A novel H395R mutation in MKKS/BBS6 causes retinitis pigmentosa and polydactyly without other findings of Bardet-Biedl or McKusick-Kaufman syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hulleman, John D.; Nguyen, Annie; Ramprasad, V.L.; Murugan, Sakthivel; Gupta, Ravi; Mahindrakar, Avinash; Angara, Ravi; Sankurathri, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the causative mutation in two siblings from a consanguineous family in India with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and polydactyly without other findings of Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS). We also performed functional characterization of the mutant protein to explore its role in this limited form of BBS. Methods The siblings underwent a thorough ophthalmological examination, including retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging, and an extensive physical examination with abdominal ultrasonography to characterize the disease phenotype. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) using a panel targeting retinal degeneration genes was performed on genomic DNA samples from the siblings and parents. Upon identification of the causative mutation, functional characterization was accomplished by performing protein–protein interaction studies in human embryonic kidney (HEK-293T) and human adult retinal pigmented epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. Results The two siblings showed signs of RP and polydactyly. The patients did not have truncal obesity, renal anomalies, hydrometrocolpos, congenital heart disease, or overt cognitive defects. NGS identified a homozygous c.1184A>G mutation in the MKKS/BBS6 gene in both patients resulting in a p.H395R substitution in the MKKS/BBS6 protein. This mutant protein decreased the interaction of MKKS/BBS6 with BBS12 but did so to a different extent in the HEK-293T versus ARPE-19 cells. Nonetheless, the effect of the H395R variant on disrupting interactions with BBS12 was not as profound as other reported MKKS/BBS6 mutations associated with syndromic RP. Conclusions We identified a novel H395R substitution in MKKS/BBS6 that results in a unique phenotype of only RP and polydactyly. Our observations reaffirm the notion that mutations in MKKS/BBS6 cause phenotypic heterogeneity and do not always result in classic MKKS or BBS findings. PMID:26900326

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Bardet-Biedl syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... signaling pathways. Cilia are also necessary for the perception of sensory input (such as sight, hearing, and ... during development and lead to abnormalities of sensory perception. Researchers believe that defective cilia are responsible for ...

  19. Interaction with the Bardet-Biedl gene product TRIM32/BBS11 modifies the half-life and localization of Glis2/NPHP7.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Haribaskar; Schäfer, Tobias; Kim, Yunhee; Herfurth, Konstantin; Hoff, Sylvia; Lienkamp, Soeren S; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht; Walz, Gerd

    2014-03-21

    Although the two ciliopathies Bardet-Biedl syndrome and nephronophthisis share multiple clinical manifestations, the molecular basis for this overlap remains largely unknown. Both BBS11 and NPHP7 are unusual members of their respective gene families. Although BBS11/TRIM32 represents a RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase also involved in hereditary forms of muscular dystrophy, NPHP7/Glis2 is a Gli-like transcriptional repressor that localizes to the nucleus, deviating from the ciliary localization of most other ciliopathy-associated gene products. We found that BBS11/TRIM32 and NPHP7/Glis2 can physically interact with each other, suggesting that both proteins form a functionally relevant protein complex in vivo. This hypothesis was further supported by the genetic interaction and synergist cyst formation in the zebrafish pronephros model. However, contrary to our expectation, the E3 ubiquitin ligase BBS11/TRIM32 was not responsible for the short half-life of NPHP7/Glis2 but instead promoted the accumulation of mixed Lys(48)/Lys(63)-polyubiquitylated NPHP7/Glis2 species. This modification not only prolonged the half-life of NPHP7/Glis2, but also altered the subnuclear localization and the transcriptional activity of NPHP7/Glis2. Thus, physical and functional interactions between NPHP and Bardet-Biedl syndrome gene products, demonstrated for Glis2 and TRIM32, may help to explain the phenotypic similarities between these two syndromes. PMID:24500717

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of McKusick-Kaufman/Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parlakgumus, Ayse; Yalcinkaya, Cem; Kilicdag, Esra

    2011-01-01

    A 24-year-old primigravid women with no remarkable history and antenatal follow-up was referred to our clinic with the diagnosis of fetal megacystis. Ultrasound examination revealed an oval shaped hypoechoic cystic mass measuring 80×55×50 mm occupying the fetal pelvis in a female fetus. The fluid inside the cyst was heterogeneous giving a two level appearance. A normal looking urinary bladder was visualised separately which was located in normal position. Further sonographic evaluation revealed postaxial polydactyly in both hands. The fetal echocardiography and amniotic fluid index was normal. An obstetrical MRI was done for the suspicion of a hydrometrocolpos and confirmed the diagnosis. The infant was delivered by vaginal route at term. Physical examination of neonate confirmed postaxial polydactyly in hands. After birth a cystoscopy performed by the paediatric surgeons revealed a urogenital sinus and vaginal atresia. A catheter was placed in the uterine cavity to drain it. Nine months later the baby went on a 'vaginal pull through' operation to reconstruct the vagina and the urethra. The baby is now 3 years old and doing well. PMID:22699466

  1. Genetic obesity syndromes.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Anthony P; Beales, Philip L

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous reports of multi-system genetic disorders with obesity. Many have a characteristic presentation and several, an overlapping phenotype indicating the likelihood of a shared common underlying mechanism or pathway. By understanding the genetic causes and functional perturbations of such syndromes we stand to gain tremendous insight into obesogenic pathways. In this review we focus particularly on Bardet-Biedl syndrome, whose molecular genetics and cell biology has been elucidated recently, and Prader-Willi syndrome, the commonest obesity syndrome due to loss of imprinted genes on 15q11-13. We also discuss highlights of other genetic obesity syndromes including Alstrom syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (pseudohypoparathyroidism), Carpenter syndrome, MOMO syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, cases with deletions of 6q16, 1p36, 2q37 and 9q34, maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14, fragile X syndrome and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome. PMID:18230893

  2. MOMO Syndrome with Holoprosencephaly and Cryptorchidism: Expanding the Spectrum of the New Obesity Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sharda, Sheetal; Panigrahi, Inusha; Marwaha, Ram Kumar

    2011-01-01

    There are multiple genetic disorders with known or unknown etiology grouped under obesity syndromes. Inspite of having multisystem involvement and often having a characteristic presentation, the understanding of the genetic causes in the majority of these syndromes is still lacking. The common obesity syndromes are Bardet-Biedl, Prader-Willi, Alstrom, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy, Carpenter, Rubinstein-Taybi, Fragile X, and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome. The list is ever increasing as new syndromes are being added to it. One of the recent additions is MOMO syndrome, with about five such cases being reported in literature. Expanding the spectrum of clinical features, we report the first case of MOMO syndrome from India with lobar variant of holoprosencephaly and cryptorchidism, which have not been reported previously. PMID:23074680

  3. Screening for Hormonal, Monogenic, and Syndromic Disorders in Obese Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Kelly; Page, Laura; Balikcioglu, Pinar Gumus

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of pediatric obesity in the United States is nearly 17%. Most cases are “exogenous”, resulting from excess energy intake relative to energy expenditure over a prolonged period of time. However, some cases of obesity are “endogenous”, associated with hormonal, genetic, or syndromic disorders such as hypothyroidism, Cushing’s syndrome, growth hormone deficiency, defective leptin signaling, mutations in the melanocortin 4 receptor, and Prader-Willi and Bardet-Biedl syndromes. This article reviews the hormonal, monogenic, and syndromic causes of childhood obesity and identifies critical features that distinguish “endogenous” obesity disorders from the more common exogenous obesity. Findings that raise suspicion for endogenous obesity include onset in infancy, lack of satiety, poor linear growth, dysmorphic features, and cognitive dysfunction. Selection and interpretation of appropriate laboratory tests and indications for subspecialist referral are also discussed. PMID:25198446

  4. Light-Dependent Phosphorylation of Bardet Biedl Syndrome 5 in Photoreceptor Cells Modulates its Interaction with Arrestin1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tyler S.; Spitzbarth, Benjamin; Li, Jian; Dugger, Donald R.; Stern-Schneider, Gabi; Sehn, Elisabeth; Bolch, Susan N.; McDowell, J. Hugh; Tipton, Jeremiah; Wolfrum, Uwe; Smith, W. Clay

    2013-01-01

    Arrestins are dynamic proteins which move between cell compartments triggered by stimulation of G-protein-coupled receptors. Even more dynamically in vertebrate photoreceptors, arrestin1 (Arr1) moves between the inner and outer segments according to the lighting conditions. Previous studies have shown that the light-driven translocation of Arr1 in rod photoreceptors is initiated by rhodopsin through a phospholipase C/protein kinase C (PKC) signaling cascade. The purpose of this study is to identify the PKC substrate that regulates the translocation of Arr1. Mass spectrometry was used to identify the primary phosphorylated proteins in extracts prepared from PKC-stimulated mouse eye cups, confirming the finding with in vitro phosphorylation assays. Our results show that BBS5 is the principal protein phosphorylated either by phorbol ester stimulation or by light stimulation of PKC. Via immunoprecipitation of BBS5 in rod outer segments, Arr1 was pulled down; phosphorylation of BBS5 reduced this co-precipitation of Arr1. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy showed that BBS5 principally localizes along the axonemes of rods and cones, but also in photoreceptor inner segments, and synaptic regions. Our principal findings in this study are three-fold. First, we demonstrate that BBS5 is post-translationally regulated by phosphorylation via PKC, an event that is triggered by light in photoreceptor cells. Second, we find a direct interaction between BBS5 and Arr1, an interaction that is modulated by phosphorylation of BBS5. Finally, we show that BBS5 is distributed along the photoreceptor axoneme, co-localizing with Arr1 in the dark. These findings suggest a role for BBS5 in regulating light-dependent translocation of Arr1 and a model describing its role in Arr1 translocation is proposed. PMID:23817741

  5. Impaired IGF1-GH axis and new therapeutic options in Alström Syndrome patients: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Defects of the primary cilium and its anchoring structure, the basal body, cause a number of human genetic disorders, collectively termed ciliopathies: primary ciliary dyskinesia, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, polycystic kidney and liver disease, nephronophthisis, Alström syndrome, Meckel-Gruber syndrome and some forms of retinal degeneration. Alström syndrome is an extremely rare, autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by a group of signs and symptoms including infantile onset dilated cardiomyopathy, blindness, hearing impairment/loss, obesity, diabetes, hepatic and renal dysfunction. Because adult growth hormone deficiency and Alström Syndrome share some clinical and metabolic features, we studied the GH-IGF1 axis, using MRI techniques and dynamic tests in 3 unrelated patients with Alström syndrome. Case presentation The patients were hospitalized and the growth hormone stimulatory tests were made, as well as brain MRI. Insulin provocative test revealed a severe GH deficiency in these patients, defined by a peak response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia less than 3 ng/dl and IGF1 concentrations less than – 2SDS. We didn't find multiple pituitary hormone deficiency and we noticed only a severe GH deficiency in all three patients. The MRI study of the diencephalic and pituitary region was suggestive for the diagnosis of empty sella in one patient. One patient received Recombinant-GH replacement for one year with very good results, one underwent a gastric sleeve with a satisfactory outcome, one patient died due to the progression of the cardiac myopathy. Conclusion Future studies are needed to assses if the substitution therapy with Recombinant Growth hormone is cost-effective and without risk in such patients with Alström Syndrome and severe insulin resistance, despite our good results in one patient. Also, careful clinical and genetic studies can contribute to a better understanding of the evolution after different therapeutical attempt in

  6. Ciliary disturbances in syndromal and non-syndromal obesity

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Tamar I.; van Haelst, Mieke M.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an increasing global health problem. Although it is mainly thought to be due to the changing obesogenic environment, the genetic contribution has been estimated between 40–70%. A number of genes have been identified that cause obesity in animals as well as in humans. Rare highly penetrant monogenic forms of obesity can cause both syndromal and non-syndromal forms of obesity. Bardet-Biedl syndrome and Alström syndrome are well known monogenic obesity syndromes caused by primary cilia defects. The pathogenesis of the obesity phenotype in these disorders is however not fully understood. Disturbance of the appetite regulation system, abnormalities in body composition and decreased energy expenditure have been suggested to cause obesity in these ciliopathies. There are currently 19 known genes associated with Bardet-Biedl syndrome and one Alström syndrome gene. Although ciliopathy genes have been described primarily in these syndromal obesity disorders, non-syndromal obesity may also result from disturbed cilia function. There are multiple genes associated with both obesity and ciliary function. Here we provide an overview of the current knowledge of the clinical, pathophysiological and genetic aspects of obesity in patients with ciliary defects.

  7. Chromosomal and related Mendelian syndromes associated with Hirschsprung's disease.

    PubMed

    Moore, S W

    2012-11-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) is a fairly frequent cause of intestinal obstruction in children. It is characterized as a sex-linked heterogonous disorder with variable severity and incomplete penetrance giving rise to a variable pattern of inheritance. Although Hirschsprung's disease occurs as an isolated phenotype in at least 70% of cases, it is not infrequently associated with a number of congenital abnormalities and associated syndromes, demonstrating a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Certain of these syndromic phenotypes have been linked to distinct genetic sites, indicating underlying genetic associations of the disease and probable gene-gene interaction, in its pathogenesis. These associations with HSCR include Down's syndrome and other chromosomal anomalies, Waardenburg syndrome and other Dominant sensorineural deafness, the Congenital Central Hypoventilation and Mowat-Wilson and other brain-related syndromes, as well as the MEN2 and other tumour associations. A number of other autosomal recessive syndromes include the Shah-Waardenburg, the Bardet-Biedl and Cartilage-hair hypoplasia, Goldberg-Shprintzen syndromes and other syndromes related to cholesterol and fat metabolism among others. The genetics of Hirschsprung's disease are highly complex with the majority of known genetic sites relating to the main susceptibility pathways (RET an EDNRB). Non-syndromic non-familial, short-segment HSCR appears to represent a non-Mendelian condition with variable expression and sex-dependent penetrance. Syndromic and familial forms, on the other hand, have complex patterns of inheritance and being reported as autosomal dominant, recessive and polygenic patterns of inheritance. The phenotypic variability and incomplete penetrance observed in Hirschsprung's disease could also be explained by the involvement of modifier genes, especially in its syndromic forms. In this review, we look at the chromosomal and Mendelian associations and their underlying signalling pathways

  8. UAB HRFD Core Center: Core A: The Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Diseases Translational Resource

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Hepato/Renal Fibrocystic Disease; Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease; Joubert Syndrome; Bardet Biedl Syndrome; Meckel-Gruber Syndrome; Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis; Caroli Syndrome; Oro-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type I; Nephronophthisis; Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease

  9. Clinical and Molecular Investigations Into Ciliopathies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease; Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis; Caroli's Disease; Polycystic Kidney Disease; Joubert Syndrome; Cerebro-Oculo-Renal Syndromes; COACH Syndrome; Senior-Loken Syndrome; Dekaban-Arima Syndrome; Cogan Oculomotor Apraxia; Nephronophthisis; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Alstrom Syndrome; Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome

  10. Klinefelter syndrome: Case report

    PubMed Central

    CAPASSO, F.; PANETTA, F.; IERARDO, G.; PARISELLA, V.; POLIMENI, A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives. The aim of this work is to describe the problems of child dentistry affected by Klinefelter's syndrome. Methodos. Through the presentation of a clinical case that was followed by a Pediatric Dentistry, University Sapienza of Rome. Result. Interceptive therapy aims to eliminate the functional interference that occurs during growth. Conclusion. For this reason it’s a must for the dentist to carefully monitor the oral health of the small patient immediately. PMID:23285366

  11. Apert Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chatra, Laxmikanth; Shenai, Prashanth; Veena, KM

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, midfacial malformation and symmetrical syndactyly. We present a 10-month-old infant having all the features of classical Apert syndrome. How to cite this article: Khan S, Chatra L, Shenai P, Veena KM. Apert Syndrome: A Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012; 5(3):203-206. PMID:25206168

  12. Asperger's syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Carol M.

    1987-01-01

    A case report is presented of an 11-year-old boy who has been diagnosed as having Asperger's syndrome. There follows a review of the clinical features, course, prognosis and management of this condition. PMID:2453672

  13. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  14. Hurler syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S; Tandon, S

    2000-01-01

    Hurler syndrome is an inherited disorder of mucopolysaceharide metabolism, which is caused by a defect in genetically controlled pathways of lysosomal degradation. It represents the classical prototype of mucopolysaccharide disorder. An interesting case of a three and a half-year old boy with a rare combination of skeletal, neurological, ophthalmologic, and dental findings is presented. It is a rare syndrome with a very low prevalence of 1:100,000 births and as such the clinician should be aware of this syndrome. PMID:11314421

  15. [Jeune's syndrome (3 case reports)].

    PubMed

    Novaković, I; Kostić, M; Popović-Rolović, M; Sindjić, M; Peco-Antić, A; Jovanović, O; Krscić, D

    1996-01-01

    Jeune's syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy is an autosomal recessive osteochondrodysplasia with multisystem involvement. In patients who survive neonatal period in the main clinical feature progressive renal failure is. Renal lesions are variable but is familial juvenile nephronophtisis the most frequent one. We present three patients with Jeune's syndrome phenotype and chronic tubulointerstitial disease. All patients developed terminal renal failure in the eyrly childhood. Renal histology, examined in two cases, was consistent with juvenile nephronophtisis in one case and with renal dysplasia in other case. All our patients had hepatic fibrosis and two of them had pigmentary retinophaty. We want to underline the importance of regular check-up of children with typical phenotype by pediatrician-nephrologist as wel as possibility of prenatal diagnosis of Jeune's syndrome. PMID:9102920

  16. Gullo's Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhat; Ghosh, Anindya; Tandon, Vaibhav; Sahoo, Ratnakar

    2016-02-01

    Benign Pancreatic Hyperenzymemia (BPH) or Gullo's Syndrome is a new entity with only few reported cases till date. It is characterized by persistently elevated pancreatic enzymes without any clinical or pathological evidence of pancreatic disease. Gullo's syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion and clinician should be aware of various other conditions which can cause elevation of pancreatic enzymes. There are no reported cases of Gullo's syndrome from Indian subcontinent till date. A 42-year-old lady presented to us with complaints of fever and cough for which she was evaluated and diagnosed to be having left upper zone pneumonia. However, her routine investigations showed persistently elevated serum amylase and lipase levels. She was extensively worked up for pancreatic hyperenzymemia but no pancreatic disease was detected. She was followed up for a period of one year and raised levels of serum lipase and amylase persisted even after a year. PMID:27042510

  17. Delleman (Oculocerebrocutaneous) Syndrome: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Basso, Tomás; Vigo, Rodolfo; Iacouzzi, Sebastián; Prémoli, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Delleman syndrome is an unusual entity, characterized by ocular cysts or microphthalmia, focal dermal anomalies and cerebral malformations. In the following article, we carry out a review of the disease and we present the case of a patient with microphthalmos and palpebral coloboma. As we could not put orbital expanders at an early stage, we performed reconstructive surgery. PMID:25005212

  18. A Case of Hepatopulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sindhuja, R.; Natarajan, M.; Rajamurugan, P.S. Arul; Palanikumar, B.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 52-year-old female, a known case of Chronic Liver Disease with portal hypertension. She presented with dyspnoea, platypnoea, melena, cyanosis, clubbing and orthodeoxia. She had oesophageal varices and splenomegaly indicating portal hypertension. Her arterial blood gas revealed hypoxaemia and orthodeoxia. From this clinical background and investigation, a diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome was made. Patient was managed conservatively as she was not willing for liver transplantation. PMID:27134920

  19. [Kartagener's syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Thiam, M; Gning, S B; Faye, M B; Fall, P D; Mbaye, A; Charpentier, P

    2002-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of Kartagener's syndrome in 8 years old girl revelated by congenital cardiopathy with chronic bronchitis and severe heart failure. Incomplet endocardial cushion defect with single atrium was found and situs inversus suspected, confirmed by ultrasonography. She undergone cardiac surgery in Europe: atrial septation and mitralvalve repair. Surgery redux was neccessary formitral insufficency and residual shunt. Persistent atelectasia in lower inferior lobe indicated bronchoscopy. Lung biopsy confirmed Kartagener's syndrome. Now, she has no cardiac symptom, but bronchitis and chronic pansinusitis. PMID:15776606

  20. SUBSCAPULARIS SYNDROME: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Donatelli, Robert A.; Bascharon, Randa

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunction of the subscapularis muscle is introduced in this case report as a potential factor for consideration in the etiology and/or consequential sequelae of subacromial impingement syndrome. Although dysfunction of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus are implicated as being most commonly involved with subacromial impingement pathology, the subscapularis is often overlooked and therefore undertreated. Identifying the subscapularis' potential involvement in patients with subacromial impingement pathology may offer insight into shoulder impingement dysfunction and injury treatment options available to specifically address subscapularis dysfunction. In this manuscript, a case report is presented to highlight the signs and symptoms of subscapularis pathology concordant with subacromial impingement syndrome and provide a clinical rationale for treatment. The purpose of this case report is not to suggest a new approach to shoulder rehabilitation, but rather to prompt the consideration of subscapularis dysfunction when evaluating and treating patients with subacromial impingement pathology. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:24377073

  1. Glucagonoma syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Glucagonoma syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic phenomenon, with an estimated incidence of one in 20 million, characterized by necrolytic migratory erythema, hyperglucagonemia, diabetes mellitus, anemia, weight loss, glossitis, cheilitis, steatorrhea, diarrhea, venous thrombosis and neuropsychiatric disturbances in the setting of a glucagon-producing alpha-cell tumor of the pancreas. Necrolytic migratory erythema is the presenting manifestation in the majority of cases, so its early suspicion and correct diagnosis is a key factor in the management of the patient. Case presentation We present the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian woman with glucagonoma syndrome due to an alpha-cell tumor located in the tail of the pancreas, successfully treated with surgical resection. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware of the unusual initial manifestations of glucagonoma. Early diagnosis allows complete surgical resection of the neoplasm and provides the only chance of a cure. PMID:21859461

  2. Crouzon's Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jyothsna, M; Ahmed, Syed Basheer; Lakshmi, K Sree

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Crouzon's syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal dominant condition with multiple mutations of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR2) gene, which accounts for 4.8% of all cases of craniosynostosis. It is characterized by premature closure of cranial sutures, cranial deformities, midface hypoplasia, relative mandibular prognathism, hypertelorism, proptosis, strabismus and short upper lip, crowding of teeth, pseudocleft or sometimes cleft palate and other associated abnormalities. The CS can vary in severity from mild presentation to severe forms involving multiple cranial sutures. We report a case of CS in 11-year-old boy. How to cite this article: Kumar GR, Jyothsna M, Ahmed SB, Lakshmi KS, Crouzon's Syndrome: A Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(1):33-37. PMID:25206185

  3. A Case of Wolfram Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Naderian, Gholamali; Ashtari, Fereshteh; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kia; Sajjadi, Valleh

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of Wolfram syndrome characterized by early onset diabetes mellitus and progressive optic atrophy. Case Report A 20-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus type I presented with best corrected visual acuity of 1/10 in both eyes with correction of −0.25+1.50@55 and −0.25+1.50@131 in his right and left eyes, respectively. Bilateral optic atrophy was evident on fundus examination. The patient also had diabetes insipidus, neurosensory deafness, neurogenic bladder, polyuria and extra-residual voiding indicating atony of the urinary tract, combined with delayed sexual maturity. Conclusion One should consider Wolfram syndrome in patients with juvenile onset diabetes mellitus and hearing loss. Ophthalmological examination may disclose optic atrophy; urologic examinations are vital in such patients. PMID:22737327

  4. Witkop's syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Varuni; Agrawal, Kaushal Kishor; Mishra, Apurva; Chandra, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Witkop's syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by tooth and nail abnormalities. It is a variant of ectodermal dysplasia, which is thought to occur in approximately 1 in 100,000 live births. Thus, such a low occurrence and paucity of clearly delineating features make its identification in general population a real challenge. This case report aims to add to the existing literature a commonsense approach of identifying the uncommon thing. PMID:26937375

  5. Kousseff syndrome: A fifth case?

    SciTech Connect

    Laux, R.A.; Hamilton, W.; Pinette, M.

    1994-09-01

    Kousseff originally described three siblings with an open sacral myelomeningocele, conotruncal cardiac malformations, low-set, posteriorly rotated ears, retrognathia, a short neck with a low posterior hairline, and renal agenesis as a new autosomal recessive condition. Open neural tube lesions and complex conotruncal cardiac defects are relatively common malformations, both as isolated defects and individually as components of syndromes, but they have been found together only rarely, as part of chromosomal syndromes or following maternal exposures. Toriello et al. reported a fourth case and suggested the eponym Kousseff syndrome for myelomeningcocele, conotruncal defects and minor facial abnormalies. We report a fifth probable case. This male infant was born by spontaneous vaginal delivery at 38 weeks gestation to a 23-year-old G{sub 2}P{sub 1001} mother. Pregnancy was complicated by an elevated alpha-fetoprotein at 16 weeks gestation, followed by an ultrasound diagnosis of an open disease. After birth, physical examination also revealed dysmorphic facies, with a bulbous nose and low-set, posteriorly rotated ears, bilateral 5th finger clinodactyly and hypotonia. Echocardiogram demonstrated complex conotruncal malformations. The patient underwent closure of the myelomeningocele but died at one month of age. Chromosomal analysis was normal (46,XY). Because conotruncal heart defects have been associated with deletions on chromosome 22, FISH analysis using a probe for the DiGeorge syndrome on the long arm of chromosome 22 was performed. It indicated no detectable deletion within this critical region on 22q11. Nonetheless there remains the possibility of a gene (or genes) located on 22q that could produce findings of this rare multiple congenital anomaly syndrome when disrupted. Therefore, further investigation on this chromosome is warranted.

  6. Antisynthetase syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hoey, Edward; Fletcher, Timothy; Ahmed, Zubair

    2016-01-01

    The case is about a 48-year-old man with one week history of progressively worsening shortness of breath and reduced exercise tolerance. Laboratory investigations revealed raised ESR, creatine kinase (CK) and positive anti-aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase. High resolution computed tomography (HRCT) chest showed prominent mediastinal lymph nodes and scattered lung nodules. These findings along with clinical features and investigations confirmed the diagnosis of antisynthetase syndrome (ASS). The radiological investigations proved to be the key step in diagnosis and management of this case. PMID:27190773

  7. Antisynthetase syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Mehwish Asif; Hoey, Edward; Fletcher, Timothy; Ahmed, Zubair

    2016-04-01

    The case is about a 48-year-old man with one week history of progressively worsening shortness of breath and reduced exercise tolerance. Laboratory investigations revealed raised ESR, creatine kinase (CK) and positive anti-aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase. High resolution computed tomography (HRCT) chest showed prominent mediastinal lymph nodes and scattered lung nodules. These findings along with clinical features and investigations confirmed the diagnosis of antisynthetase syndrome (ASS). The radiological investigations proved to be the key step in diagnosis and management of this case. PMID:27190773

  8. Glucagonoma syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WEI, JISHU; LIN, SHIBO; WANG, CONG; WU, JUNLI; QIAN, ZHUYIN; DAI, CUNCAI; JIANG, KUIRONG; MIAO, YI

    2015-01-01

    Necrolytic migratory erythema (NME), diabetes mellitus and glucagon-secreting tumors form the hallmarks of glucagonoma syndrome, and represent the major clinical manifestations of glucagonoma. NME is usually presented as the initial complaint of patients. Due to the rare incidence of glucagonoma, its diagnosis is often delayed, which leads to its progression. Here, we report a case of NME with a typical skin rash, which was misdiagnosed and treated with corticosteroids for two years. Removal of the tumor in the pancreatic body led to the rapid relief of the symptoms. The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the typical characteristics of glucagonoma syndrome to clinicians in order to improve its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26622635

  9. A case of Griscelli syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kerketta, Joshi Anand; Lodh, Moushumi; Mandal, Krishanu

    2014-11-01

    A hallmark of Griscelli syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive disorder, is hair hypopigmentation characterized by a silver-gray sheen and the presence of large clusters of pigment unevenly distributed in the hair shaft. Either a primary neurological impairment or immune abnormalities are associated with this phenotype. We report the case of a 10-year-old child of consanguineous parents. He presented with abdominal pain and fever and was noted to have silvery hair, eyelashes, and eyebrows. Bone marrow studies indicated hemophagocytosis, whilst microscopic examination of the hair showed irregular agglomerations of pigment in hair shafts. The prognosis, treatment, and genetic counseling needs differ considerably among the various forms of Griscelli Syndrome. PMID:25419745

  10. Cilium transition zone proteome reveals compartmentalization and differential dynamics of ciliopathy complexes.

    PubMed

    Dean, Samuel; Moreira-Leite, Flavia; Varga, Vladimir; Gull, Keith

    2016-08-30

    The transition zone (TZ) of eukaryotic cilia and flagella is a structural intermediate between the basal body and the axoneme that regulates ciliary traffic. Mutations in genes encoding TZ proteins (TZPs) cause human inherited diseases (ciliopathies). Here, we use the trypanosome to identify TZ components and localize them to TZ subdomains, showing that the Bardet-Biedl syndrome complex (BBSome) is more distal in the TZ than the Meckel syndrome (MKS) complex. Several of the TZPs identified here have human orthologs. Functional analysis shows essential roles for TZPs in motility, in building the axoneme central pair apparatus and in flagellum biogenesis. Analysis using RNAi and HaloTag fusion protein approaches reveals that most TZPs (including the MKS ciliopathy complex) show long-term stable association with the TZ, whereas the BBSome is dynamic. We propose that some Bardet-Biedl syndrome and MKS pleiotropy may be caused by mutations that impact TZP complex dynamics. PMID:27519801

  11. Eagle's syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Chang-Sig; Lee, Baek-Soo; Kwon, Yong-Dae; Choi, Byung-Jun; Lee, Jung-Woo; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Yun, Sun-Ung

    2014-01-01

    Eagle's syndrome is a disease caused by an elongated styloid process or calcified stylohyoid ligament. Eagle defined the disorder in 1937 by describing clinical findings related to an elongated styloid process, which is one of the numerous causes of pain in the craniofacial and cervical region. The prevalence of individuals with this anatomic abnormality in the adult population is estimated to be 4% with 0.16% of these individuals reported to be symptomatic. Eagle's syndrome is usually characterized by neck, throat, or ear pain; pharyngeal foreign body sensation; dysphagia; pain upon head movement; and headache. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome must be made in association with data from the clinical history, physical examination, and imaging studies. Patients with increased symptom severity require surgical excision of the styloid process, which can be performed through an intraoral or an extraoral approach. Here, we report a rare case of stylohyoid ligament bilaterally elongated to more than 60 mm in a 51-year-old female. We did a surgery by extraoral approach and patient's symptom was improved. PMID:24627843

  12. [Hurler syndrome (a case report)].

    PubMed

    Zeng, L; Xu, F; Ma, Q; Chen, Y

    1992-12-01

    A case of Hurler syndrome diagnosed by clinical and laboratory examination is reported. The patient's roentgenograms showed the dystrophies of bones, lace-shaped ribs, boat-shaped cranium, fishhook-shaped forefront protrusion of silla trucica. Corneal opacities and high ocular pressure were found in both eyes. VEP measurement suggested the defects of optic nerve. The authors emphasized that visual electric physiological examinations should be used to estimate the visual functions when the patient's refractive medium is opqaue. The differential diagnosis was also briefly discussed. PMID:1306502

  13. Stress in a case of SAPHO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wohl, Yonit; Bergman, R; Sprecher, E; Brenner, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    In this article, we describe a case of seemingly stress-induced SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis) syndrome in a man who exhibited the central features of palmoplantar psoriasis and anterior chest involvement. We also review the etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of SAPHO syndrome and emphasize the important differences between this syndrome and psoriatic arthritis. PMID:12553632

  14. Laugier-Hunziker syndrome - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Lalosevic, Jovan; Zivanovic, Dubravka; Skiljevic, Dusan; Medenica, Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome is a rare, acquired disorder characterized by lenticular hyperpigmentation of the oral mucosa and longitudinal melanonychia. We present the case of a 63-year-old female with progressive, asymptomatic hyperpigmentation of buccal mucosa and a 7-year history of hyperpigmentation in several fingernails. Laugier-Hunziker syndrome was diagnosed based on the clinical features presented, dermoscopic findings and exclusion of underlying systemic diseases. Laugier-Hunziker syndrome is regarded as a diagnosis of exclusion. By identifying Laugier-Hunziker syndrome, other, more severe syndromes associated with hyperpigmentations can be excluded, namely Addison’s disease and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. PMID:26312723

  15. The slipping rib syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    van Delft, E.A.K.; van Pul, K.M.; Bloemers, F.W.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report and review of literature about slipping rib syndrome, a syndrome rarely recognized and often un or misdiagnosed. In literature there is no clear consensus about the diagnosis and treatment. We present a case of a 47 year old man who was diagnosed with slipping rib syndrome after a cycling incident 8 years ago. Also, we developed a flow chart according the diagnostic and therapeutic steps in the treatment of slipping rib syndrome. Central massage Knowledge and treatment of the slipping rib syndrome can prevent chronic complaints and unnecessary comprehensive treatment. PMID:27082995

  16. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome: case presentation.

    PubMed

    Costa, J

    1977-07-01

    The different aspects of the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome are discussed following a case presentation of a 36-year-old woman with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, sex cord tumor with annular tubules of Scully, mucinous metaplasia of tubal epithelium, and adenocarcinoma of the endocervix. The latter two findings have not been described with the syndrome and an attempt is made to correlate them with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. PMID:876533

  17. [Moyamoya and Down syndrome: about 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Sfaihi Ben Mansour, L; Ayedi, A; Chaari, W; Aloulou, H; Kammoun, T; Mnif, Z; Mahfoudh, A; Triki, C; Hachicha, M

    2008-07-01

    Moyamoya syndrome has rarely been reported in association with Down syndrome. We report on 2 cases in 3-year-old and 6-year-old female children with Down syndrome, who presented with neurological deficit. Imaging (magnetic-resonance angiography and digital-subtraction angiography) revealed the classical Moyamoya pattern. The neurological deficits persisted in both cases. One patient has developed epilepsy. PMID:18508248

  18. Active Transport and Diffusion Barriers Restrict Joubert Syndrome-Associated ARL13B/ARL-13 to an Inv-like Ciliary Membrane Subdomain

    PubMed Central

    Cevik, Sebiha; Clarke, Lara; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Hori, Yuji; Horn, Nicola; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Wdowicz, Anita; Mullins, Andrea; Kida, Katarzyna; Kaplan, Oktay I.; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Man Wu, Ka; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Mans, Dorus A.; Katada, Toshiaki; Kontani, Kenji; Ueffing, Marius; Roepman, Ronald; Kremer, Hannie; Blacque, Oliver E.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based cell appendages, serving motility, chemo-/mechano-/photo- sensation, and developmental signaling functions. Cilia are comprised of distinct structural and functional subregions including the basal body, transition zone (TZ) and inversin (Inv) compartments, and defects in this organelle are associated with an expanding spectrum of inherited disorders including Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), Meckel-Gruber Syndrome (MKS), Joubert Syndrome (JS) and Nephronophthisis (NPHP). Despite major advances in understanding ciliary trafficking pathways such as intraflagellar transport (IFT), how proteins are transported to subciliary membranes remains poorly understood. Using Caenorhabditis elegans and mammalian cells, we investigated the transport mechanisms underlying compartmentalization of JS-associated ARL13B/ARL-13, which we previously found is restricted at proximal ciliary membranes. We now show evolutionary conservation of ARL13B/ARL-13 localisation to an Inv-like subciliary membrane compartment, excluding the TZ, in many C. elegans ciliated neurons and in a subset of mammalian ciliary subtypes. Compartmentalisation of C. elegans ARL-13 requires a C-terminal RVVP motif and membrane anchoring to prevent distal cilium and nuclear targeting, respectively. Quantitative imaging in more than 20 mutants revealed differential contributions for IFT and ciliopathy modules in defining the ARL-13 compartment; IFT-A/B, IFT-dynein and BBS genes prevent ARL-13 accumulation at periciliary membranes, whereas MKS/NPHP modules additionally inhibit ARL-13 association with TZ membranes. Furthermore, in vivo FRAP analyses revealed distinct roles for IFT and MKS/NPHP genes in regulating a TZ barrier to ARL-13 diffusion, and intraciliary ARL-13 diffusion. Finally, C. elegans ARL-13 undergoes IFT-like motility and quantitative protein complex analysis of human ARL13B identified functional associations with IFT-B complexes, mapped to IFT46 and IFT74 interactions. Together

  19. [A case of Sneddon's syndrome associated with Moskowitz's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bel Feki, N; Dieudonné, L

    2015-11-01

    Sneddon's syndrome is a rare vascular disease affecting mainly skin and brain arterioles leading to their occlusion. The two main features of this syndrome are livedo racemosa and ischemic stroke. Here, we describe the case of a 37-year-old woman with a past medical history of Moskowitz's syndrome and migraine, and a 2-year history of livedo racemosa and Raynaud's phenomenon. She presented with acute aphasia related to cortical ischemic stroke. Extensive diagnostic workup allowed to diagnose a Sneddon's syndrome. Her symptoms improved on a platelet aggregation inhibitor (aspirin), and speech therapy. This condition can be associated with other disorders affecting small vessels such as illustrated in this case with Moskowitz's syndrome. PMID:26738265

  20. Reported Cases of HPS (Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Reported Cases of HPS HPS in ... 6, 2016, a total of 690 cases of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome have been reported in the United ...

  1. Lemierre Syndrome: A Case of Postanginal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young Tak; Kim, Ji Hoon; Ha, Byung Wook; Choi, Hyo Sun; Kim, Yong Tai; Ham, Young Hwan

    2007-01-01

    Lemierre syndrome is a rare disease that's characterized by internal jugular vein thrombosis and septic emboli. These symptoms typically develop after acute oropharyngeal infection by Fusobacterium necrophorum1). Although this syndrome is less frequently seen in modern times due to the availability of antibiotics, physicians must be aware of the syndrome in order to initiate prompt antibiotics therapy, including coverage of the anerobic organisms. We discuss here the case of an 18-year-old female with Lemierre syndrome and we review the relevant literature on this syndrome. PMID:17939341

  2. Goldbloom's syndrome - a case report.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sónia; Estanqueiro, Paula; Salgado, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The Goldbloom's syndrome (GS) is a rare clinical condition of unknown aetiology, occurring exclusively in the pediatric population. It consists in an idiopathic periosteal hyperostosis with dysproteinemia, whose symptoms can mimic a neoplastic disease. We present a case report illustrating the diagnostic challenge of this condition. The exclusion of the common causes of bone pain, associated with generalized periostitis and increased gammaglobulins suggested the diagnosis of GS. The self-limited symptoms, the resolution of radiological findings in four months and the normalization of laboratory abnormalities within ten months, allowed to establish definitely the diagnosis of GS. GS must be considered when diffuse bone pain, prolonged fever and weight loss are present after exclusion of malignant disease with bone involvement. PMID:24131913

  3. Waardenburg syndrome: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Ghosh, Arghyaprasun; Biswas, Surajit Kumar; Mandal, Rajesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomally inherited and genetically heterogeneous disorder of neural crest cell development with distinct cutaneous manifestations. Based on the clinical presentations, four subtypes of the disease are recognized. A careful clinical evaluation is required to differentiate various types of WS and other associated auditory-pigmentary syndromes. We describe a case series of WS to highlight the wide spectrum of manifestations of the syndrome including a rare association. PMID:20826997

  4. The eye as a window to rare endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Rupali; Chander, Ashish; Jacob, Jubbin J

    2012-05-01

    The human eye, as an organ, can offer critical clues to the diagnosis of various systemic illnesses. Ocular changes are common in various endocrine disorders such as diabetes mellitus and Graves' disease. However there exist a large number of lesser known endocrine disorders where ocular involvement is significant. Awareness of these associations is the first step in the diagnosis and management of these complex patients. The rare syndromes involving the pituitary hypothalamic axis with significant ocular involvement include Septo-optic dysplasia, Kallman's syndrome, and Empty Sella syndrome all affecting the optic nerve at the optic chiasa. The syndromes involving the thyroid and parathyroid glands that have ocular manifestations and are rare include Mc Cune Albright syndrome wherein optic nerve decompression may occur due to fibrous dysplasia, primary hyperparathyroidism that may present as red eye due to scleritis and Ascher syndrome wherein ptosis occurs. Allgrove's syndrome, Cushing's disease, and Addison's disease are the rare endocrine syndromes discussed involving the adrenals and eye. Ocular involvement is also seen in gonadal syndromes such as Bardet Biedl, Turner's, Rothmund's, and Klinefelter's syndrome. This review also highlights the ocular manifestation of miscellaneous syndromes such as Werner's, Cockayne's, Wolfram's, Kearns Sayre's, and Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome. The knowledge of these relatively uncommon endocrine disorders and their ocular manifestations will help an endocrinologist reach a diagnosis and will alert an ophthalmologist to seek specialty consultation of an endocrinologist when encountered with such cases. PMID:22629495

  5. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem. PMID:22927862

  6. Seckel syndrome: a report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, K; Kaliyamurthy, S D; Govindarajan, M; Swathi, S

    2012-01-01

    Seckel syndrome, first defined by Seckel in 1960, is a rare (incidence 1:10,000), genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder presenting at birth. This syndrome is characterized by a proportionate dwarfism of prenatal onset, a severe microcephaly with a "bird-headed" like appearance (beaked nose, receding forehead, prominent eyes, and micrognathia), and mental retardation. The significance of dental alterations in this syndrome resides in the defect, hypoplastic enamel, being limited to the primary dentition; in most instances the second primary molar tooth is not affected. A case of the Seckel syndrome is presented. PMID:23263432

  7. A Bad Case of Good's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tachdjian, Raffi; Keller, Janet J; Pfeffer, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Good's syndrome is a relatively rare immunodeficiency condition that presents in the fourth or fifth decade of life and is defined by hypogammaglobulinemia in the setting of a thymoma. The humoral defect may be severe enough to cause an absence in B cells, with a consequent recurrence of sinopulmonary disease, chronic non-infectious diarrhea and opportunistic infections. The prognosis in patients with Good's syndrome appears to be worse than in those with X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) and common variable immune deficiency (CVID). There have only been three cases of Good's syndrome associated with mycobacterium, and only one case with a cavitary lesion in the lungs. We present here a unique case of Good's syndrome with a non-mycobacterial cavitary lesion. PMID:25287948

  8. Neu-Laxova syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Begum, J; Sharifunnaher, B; Saha, A K; Afroza, S; Islam, M Z

    2014-01-01

    Neu-Laxova syndrome (NLS) is a rare lethal syndrome found in both consanguinous and non-consanguinous couple. This is characterized by terrible face with unusual craniofacial appearance with exophthalmos, spectrum of central nervous system malformation, like microcaphaly, hypoplastic cerebellum, cleft lip/palate, ichthyosis and oedema. The diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical parameter. We report a 4 hour old male term newborn with IUGR of Neu-Laxova syndrome presented with anencephaly, rudimentary cerebellum, exophthalmos of right eye, bilateral cleft lip and palate and cryptorchidism. Anencephaly and cryptorchidism are two recently reported findings of NLS. We are presenting this case in addition from Bangladesh to lend further support to those two new findings as component of Neu-Laxova syndrome. Outcome of this syndrome is not good. Most of the patients are died of infection within hours to days. PMID:24584393

  9. [Case of Fisher syndrome with ocular flutter].

    PubMed

    Nakayasu, Koki; Sakimoto, Tohru; Minami, Masayuki; Shigihara, Syuntaro; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    We report a case of Fisher syndrome accompanied by ocular flutter. A 19-year-old man presented with diplopia and vertigo, associated with preceding symptoms of common cold. Since symmetric weakness of abduction in both eyes, truncal ataxia, diminution of tendon reflexes, and gaze nystagmus were noted, he was diagnosed as having Fisher syndrome. Ocular flutter also was noticed during horizontal gaze. Serum anti-GQ1b antibody and anti-GM1 antibody were detected. He was followed without therapy and the symptoms resolved. The accompanying ocular flutter may suggest that a central nervous system disorder may also be present in Fisher syndrome. PMID:20593660

  10. Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Donders, Jacobus; Mullarkey, Sr Kathryn; Allchin, Joel

    2009-02-01

    We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with bilateral congenital perisylvian syndrome as evidenced by polymicrogyria in the left and right frontotemporal regions, pseudobulbar paresis, seizures, and spastic diplegia. This is the first description of comprehensive neuropsychological assessment in a child with this syndrome. The results reflect significant impairments in auditory processing and independent learning and retention, but relatively preserved cognitive performance on interactive tasks involving frequent feedback and redirection. The findings are interpreted in the context of the neuropathology of this syndrome, with an emphasis on pragmatic implications for rehabilitation. PMID:18618376

  11. Case series on tropical diabetic hand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ezeani, I U; Edo, A E

    2014-01-01

    Tropical diabetic hand syndrome is a term used to describe diabetes complication of the hand affecting people in the tropics. It consists of localized cellulitis with variable swelling and ulceration of the hands, progressive, fulminant hand sepsis and gangrene in extreme cases. This syndrome is not well-recognized and is therefore less frequently reported. The authors describe three different female patients who were known diabetics of varying duration presenting with this syndrome at our tertiary health center and who were successfully managed by both the surgical and medical units. The need for early diagnosis and aggressive management is emphasized. PMID:24909485

  12. Sturge-Weber syndrome - A case report.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Shahid M; Goswami, Mousumi; Singh, Sanjay; Singh, Darrel

    2015-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS), also called as encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis is an uncommon congenital neurological disorder & frequent among the neurocutaneous syndromes specifically with vascular predominance. This disorder is characterized by facial capillary malformation & other neurological condition. The oral manifestations are gingival hemangiomatosis restricting to either side in upper and lower jaw, sometimes bilateral. We report a case of SWS with oral, ocular and neurological features. PMID:25853049

  13. An unusual case of nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, M.; Vali, P. S.; Ismal, K.; Gowrishankar, S.; Padua, M. D.; Swain, M.

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome can be rarely due to inherited disorders of enzymes. One such variety is lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency. It leads to accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in the eye and other organs. We report a case of nephrotic syndrome with cloudy cornea and hypocholesterolemia with foam cells and lipid deposits on renal biopsy. Awareness about this rare disease may help in the early institution of specific measures to prevent progression to end-stage renal disease. PMID:26937082

  14. Filippi Syndrome: Report of a Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Lata; Bhakhri, Bhanu Kiran; Chug, Ashi

    2015-01-01

    Filippi syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by syndactyly of fingers and toes, microcephaly, growth retardation and abnormal facies. We are describing a boy who presented with syndactyly, mental retardation, microcephaly, depressed nasal bridge and growth retardation. In addition he had some dental abnormalities like missing bilateral lateral incisors and delayed eruption of teeth. We concluded it to be Filippi syndrome by studying pathognomic clinical features and reviewed the literature. This is the second case report from India. PMID:26813917

  15. [Purple glove syndrome - a case report].

    PubMed

    Warnecke, I C; Raute-Kreinsen, U; Schirmer, S; Kretschmer, F; Fansa, H

    2010-08-01

    The purple glove syndrome (PGS) is a soft tissue injury after peripheral intravenous phenytoin administration or oral overdosage. The incidence of PGS is described with 0-6%. Typical symptoms are purple discoloration, oedema, pain, and a decrease of range of motion. In severe cases PGS may lead to abscess, skin loss and compartment syndrome. The established treatment of PGS is immediate interruption of phenytoin injections, splinting, elevation, and close observation. In cases of severe complications (e. g., compartment syndrome), surgical intervention is necessary. The case of a 40-year-old female patient is reported who was transferred to our department 4 days after intravenous phenytoin administration and who underwent successful surgical revision. PMID:19847748

  16. Klippel Feil Syndrome: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ashok Kumar; Goel, Mohit; Bajpai, Jeetendra; Shukla, Sourav; Sachdeva, Nikhil

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In Klippel Feil syndrome, classically there is a triad of short neck, a low posterior hairline and a limited range of neck movements especially of lateral bending. In fewer than 50% of cases have all the three elements. Case Report: In the present case we have found congenital Scoliosis, Sprengel deformity and there were no evidence of renal disease, congenital heart disease and neurological impairment. The present case has classical triad low posterior hairline, short neck and limited cervical range of motion. Conclusion: A rare case of Klippel Feil Syndrome is being presented with the aim that such cases should be identified and treated at an early stage to minimize cosmetic & social stigma to her and to her parents. PMID:27298984

  17. Cockayne syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, F C; Ginsberg, B

    1994-08-01

    A 4-year-old female with Cockayne syndrome presented for cataract extraction under general anesthesia. She was thin and frail; her neck, epiglottis and larynx were stiff; she was deaf and blind; and she could not speak, sit unaided, or perspire. At the time of her admission, she weighed 5.5 kg. Cockayne syndrome is a disease of childhood characterized by mental retardation and premature aging. Although the underlying abnormality appears to be autosomal recessive inheritance or metabolic (possibly thymic) dysfunction, there is no consensus on etiology. The multiple organ involvement carries significant implications for the anesthetist. Intubation can be technically difficult, and care of the skin can be problematic. Essential hypertension, hepatic deficiencies, osteoporosis, deafness, blindness, and other effects of premature aging may be encountered making perioperative management a challenge. PMID:7810287

  18. [Malignant hyperthermia syndrome: case report].

    PubMed

    Taffarel, Pedro; Koffman, Fernando; Zifferman, Andrea; Degiuseppe, Sebastián; Mansilla, Alejandro; Darduin, Marcelo; Acerenza, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    Malignant hyperthermia syndrome is a family myopathy of pharmacogenetic nature, which appears as a skeletal muscle hypercatabolic syndrome linked to anesthesia. The incidence in pediatrics is 1 event per 10 000 surgeries. The clinical picture may have a rapid onset associated with succinylcholine, or a late onset related to inhalation agents. The clinical picture includes tachycardia, hyperthermia, hypercapnia, acidosis, muscle rigidity, hyperkalemia, renal failure and arrhythmia. Mortality without specific treatment is of 80% and drops to 7% with the use of dantrolene sodium. We report an 8-year-old patient admitted for phimosis surgery; having tachycardia, hypercapnia and muscle rigidity, he started treatment with dantrolene sodium in the operating room, which was maintained for 72 hours. He evolved the first 12 hours with low cardiac output and creatine phosphokinase maximum of 155,147 U/L. He remained with mechanical ventilation for 48 hours. Discharge was given on the sixth day without sequelae. PMID:25727836

  19. Rapunzel Syndrome: A Rare Postpartum Case

    PubMed Central

    Tegene, Teshome; Foda, Yahia; Hussain, Omar; Manikonda, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    The Rapunzel syndrome describes a disorder in which a significant amount of hair is swallowed, forming a trichobezoar that extends past the stomach into the small intestines. Given the indigestible nature of hair, it subsequently leads to obstruction within the gastrointestinal system. Clinically, patients may present with symptoms of gastrointestinal obstruction, including abdominal complaints such as pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. However, due to its broad and nonspecific presenting symptoms, the diagnosis of Rapunzel syndrome warrants consideration once other common etiologies have been excluded. Surgical intervention is often required to remove the abdominal mass. This unusual syndrome is often associated with psychiatric disorders, affecting young women most commonly. In this report, we will discuss a unique case of Rapunzel syndrome in a one-month postpartum woman. PMID:24171124

  20. [Sweet's syndrome: report of 5 cases].

    PubMed

    Rjeibi, I; Zeglaoui, F; El Fekih, N; Ezzine, N; Fazaa, B; Kamoun, M R

    2006-12-01

    Sweet's syndrome is an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatoses. Cutaneous signs are the main manifestations. The objective of this study is to deal with the epidemiological and clinical aspects of the disease and its treatment. It is a retrospective study over a period of 5 years (2000- 2004). We have included all the patients with characteristic clinical, biological and histological features. Five patients had been identified. They were all females. Their mean age was 42, 2 years. All patients had typical clinical, histological and biological features. Crohn disease was associated in one case. Sweet's syndrome responds rapidly to systemic therapy with corticosteroids and/or nonsteridal anti-inflammatory agents. Sweet's syndrome is a rare disease which occurs mainly in middle-aged women. This was found in our study. Corticosteroids are the standard therapy. Several diseases, particularly neoplasms and inflammatory diseases, can bee associated with Sweet's syndrome and condition the prognosis. PMID:17313120

  1. Kleine–Levin Syndrome: A case report☆

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Lima, Taís Figueiredo; da Silva Behrens, Nilce Sanny Costa; Lopes, Eduardo; Pereira, Danielle; de Almeida Fonseca, Hassana; Cavalcanti, Paola Oliveira; Pradella-Hallinan, Marcia; Castro, Juliana; Tufik, Sergio; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho Santos

    2014-01-01

    The Kleine–Levin Syndrome is a differential diagnosis for patients with diurnal excessive sleepiness and a suspicion of narcolepsy. It is characterized by paroxysmal attacks of diurnal excessive sleepiness, associated with one or more symptoms of hyperphagia, hypersexuality, coprolalia and copropraxia. During crisis intervals, there are no symptoms. This pathology predominantly manifests itself in teenagers, being more frequent among males. The course of this disease is unpredictable, with variable duration and frequency. The most accepted physiopathology is that of a hypothalamic dysfunction, although and recently, there has appeared a hypothesis of a post-infectious autoimmune disorder. These patients show an elevated body mass index, which can predispose to association with comorbidities such as the sleep obstructive apnea syndrome. Treatment involves medications with different effects, but there is no specific and effective therapy. Our article shows a classic case of Kleine–Levin Syndrome associated with sleep obstructive apnea syndrome, a rare association in the literature. PMID:26483915

  2. Rapunzel syndrome: a rare postpartum case.

    PubMed

    Tegene, Teshome; Foda, Yahia; Hussain, Omar; Oloniyo, Kolawole; Ha, Ngoc-Tram; Manikonda, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    The Rapunzel syndrome describes a disorder in which a significant amount of hair is swallowed, forming a trichobezoar that extends past the stomach into the small intestines. Given the indigestible nature of hair, it subsequently leads to obstruction within the gastrointestinal system. Clinically, patients may present with symptoms of gastrointestinal obstruction, including abdominal complaints such as pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. However, due to its broad and nonspecific presenting symptoms, the diagnosis of Rapunzel syndrome warrants consideration once other common etiologies have been excluded. Surgical intervention is often required to remove the abdominal mass. This unusual syndrome is often associated with psychiatric disorders, affecting young women most commonly. In this report, we will discuss a unique case of Rapunzel syndrome in a one-month postpartum woman. PMID:24171124

  3. A Second Case of Gobello Nevus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tadini, Gianluca; Rossi, Luisa Carlotta; Faure, Elisa; Besagni, Francesca; Boneschi, Vinicio; Esposito, Susanna; Brena, Michela

    2016-01-01

    An uncommon type of epidermal nevus characterized by hyperpigmented hyperkeratotic bands following a Blaschko-linear pattern and generalized follicular hyperkeratosis were observed in a 17-year-old male patient who additionally showed tufted hair folliculitis on the scalp and clinodactyly of the fifth finger of both hands. The combination of epidermal nevus with skeletal abnormalities was first described by Gobello et al. [Dermatology 2000;201:51–55] as a new epidermal nevus syndrome that was named after the first author of this work. Our case shows identical clinical and histopathological features and represents the second case of this rare syndrome reported in the literature. PMID:27194976

  4. A Second Case of Gobello Nevus Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tadini, Gianluca; Rossi, Luisa Carlotta; Faure, Elisa; Besagni, Francesca; Boneschi, Vinicio; Esposito, Susanna; Brena, Michela

    2016-01-01

    An uncommon type of epidermal nevus characterized by hyperpigmented hyperkeratotic bands following a Blaschko-linear pattern and generalized follicular hyperkeratosis were observed in a 17-year-old male patient who additionally showed tufted hair folliculitis on the scalp and clinodactyly of the fifth finger of both hands. The combination of epidermal nevus with skeletal abnormalities was first described by Gobello et al. [Dermatology 2000;201:51-55] as a new epidermal nevus syndrome that was named after the first author of this work. Our case shows identical clinical and histopathological features and represents the second case of this rare syndrome reported in the literature. PMID:27194976

  5. Angelman Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafzadeh, Farah; Sadrnabavi, Arianeh; Akhondian, Javad; Beiraghi Toosi, Mehran; Mohammadi, Mohammadhassan; Hassanpour, Kazem

    2016-01-01

    Objective Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder presented by jerky movement, speech delay and cognitive disability epilepsy as well as dysmorphic features. It occurs due to an expression deletion in 15q11-q13 chromosome. In this article, we present an eight yr boy referred to Pediatrics Neurologic Clinic Mashhad, Iran for speech delay. He had abnormal behavior ataxia unusual laughing facial expression intellectual disability and mandibular prognathism. Metabolic screening tests and brain MRI were normal. Genetic analysis was pathognomonic for AS. PMID:27247589

  6. [Sapho syndrome: 2 case reports].

    PubMed

    Brandt, J; Braun, J; König, H; Sieper, J

    1995-01-01

    We report on two patients with painful hyperostosis of the mandible and the thoracic skeleton. Other symptoms were arthralgia, arthritis, osteitis, and palmoplantar pustulosis. Radiographic analysis revealed regions of circumscribed hyperostosis which showed in increased uptake in scintiscan. Metastasis, chronic osteomyelitis, Ewing's sarcoma, or Paget's disease were excluded and the diagnosis Sapho syndrome was made. This recently introduced acronym describes a disease with Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis and Osteitis. Because of the possible axial skeleton involvement, an association to the spondylathropathy group is still being discussed. The etiopathogenesis of this rheumatologic disease is not known. PMID:7888432

  7. Stiff limb syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Stiff limb syndrome is a clinical feature of the stiff person syndrome, which is a rare and disabling neurologic disorder characterized by muscle rigidity and episodic spasms that involve axial and limb musculature. It is an autoimmune disorder resulting in a malfunction of aminobutyric acid mediated inhibitory networks in the central nervous system. We describe a patient diagnosed by neurological symptoms of stiff limb syndrome with a good outcome after treatment, and a review of the related literature. Case presentation A 49-year-old male patient presented with a progressive stiffness and painful spasms of his both legs resulting in a difficulty of standing up and walking. The diagnosis of stiff limb syndrome was supported by the dramatically positive response to treatment using diazepam 25 mg/day and baclofen 30 mg/day. Conclusion This clinical case highlights the importance of a therapeutic test to confirm the diagnosis of stiff limb syndrome especially when there is a high clinical suspicion with unremarkable electromyography PMID:20205913

  8. Seckel syndrome: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Sisodia, Rinky; Raj, Ravi Kadur Sundar; Goel, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    Seckel syndrome (SS) is a rare, autosomal recessive syndrome; characterized by severe intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, mental retardation, and typical facial appearance with beaklike protrusion of the midface (bird headed). In addition to the characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism and skeletal defects, abnormalities have been described in the cardiovascular, hematopoietic, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems. Usually such patients have poor psychomotor development. This case report presents an 8-year-old child with SS born to parents, exposed in Bhopal gas disaster. PMID:24739918

  9. [Anticonvulsant Hypersensitivity Syndrome: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Valderrama Escudero, Felipe; Montoya González, Laura Elisa

    2014-01-01

    DRESS syndrome (skin reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is an idiosyncratic drug reaction characterized by rash, fever, lymphadenopathy, and internal organ dysfunction. This case report is on a patient with bipolar affective disorder who presented with a systemic inflammatory response associated with the use of valproic acid, and an important activation of symptoms when used with other drugs with a different pharmacological action mechanism. The diagnosis of DRESS syndrome is primarily by exclusion, and its detection may be difficult, which could potentially become fatal for the patient. PMID:26574080

  10. [The Currarino syndrome: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Di Meglio, D; Capobianco, A; Tramontano, A; Gaglione, G; Saggiomo, G

    2005-06-01

    The association of congenital anal stenosis, or other anal and rectal malformation, sacral defect and a presacral mass is known as the Currarino syndrome described for the first time in 1981. Currarino et al. proposed that abnormal endoectodermal adhesions and notochordal defects in early fetal life may result in a fistula between the gut and the spinal canal with enteric elements ventrally and neural elements dorsally. This abnormality appears to be a variant of the split notochord syndrome. The occurrence of Currarino's triad of anomalies is familial in more than 50% of cases. The most important suggested hypothesis of transmission is an X-linked dominant pattern, but most of the other reports are consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The medical therapy is poorly successful and, therefore, the surgical treatment is recommended for Currarino's syndrome. PMID:16170300

  11. Azathioprine hypersensitivity syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fenaux, S; Tintillier, M; Cuvelier, Ch; Migali, G; Pochet, J M

    2013-01-01

    We report here the case of a 51-year-old man presenting to the Emergency Department with a febrile cutaneous eruption with diffuse arthralgia 10 days after the onset of azathioprine therapy. The clinical examination did not reveal any inflammatory syndrome and the results of all bacteriological tests were negative. A skin biopsy was performed, which revealed a granulocytary pustula with superficial dermal oedema and a neutrophil infiltration without sign of vasculitis. A side effect of azathioprine was suspected, and treatment was discontinued. Fortunately, the patient recovered within a few days. Azathioprine hypersensitivity syndrome is a rare side effect of azathioprine. Hypersensitivity syndrome is an idiosyncratic, non-IgE-mediated reaction that appears to be unrelated to thiopurine methyltransferase levels. Diagnosis is mainly clinical and requires an exclusion of other processes. The only treatment option available is to stop azathioprine intake. PMID:24156226

  12. A Case of Laugier-Hunziker Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jung; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2008-01-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome is a rare idiopathic acquired hyperpigmentation of oral mucosa and lips which is often associated with longitudinal melanonychia. This condition is known to be an entirely benign disease with no systemic manifestations. Herein we report a case of a 54-year-old woman presenting with a 7-year history of asymptomatic oral pigmentation and linear pigmented streaks of several fingernails. Histological examination taken from the mucosal lesion of tongue revealed increased pigmentation at the epithelial basal layer and a few melanophages in the submucosa. The lack of a family history coupled with the absence of any polyps on the endoscopic examinations of upper and lower bowel as well as the clinical features with late onset were all in favor of a diagnosis of Laugier-Hunziker syndrome. The significance of this disease is due to the need to differentiate this disorder from other pigmentary disorders of the oral mucosa, especially Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. PMID:27303175

  13. Case Report: Atypical Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leanza, Vito; Rubbino, Gabriella; Leanza, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) (also called Bushy Syndrome or Amsterdam dwarfism), is a genetic disorder that can lead to several alterations. This disease affects both physical and neuropsychiatric development. The various abnormalities include facial dysmorphia (arched eyebrows, synophrys, depressed nasal bridge, long philtrum, down-turned angles of the mouth), upper-extremity malformations, hirsutism, cardiac defects, and gastrointestinal alterations. The prevalence of this syndrome is approximately one per 15,000. Ultrasound is not the perfect means to diagnose CdLS, however, many abnormalities can be detected prenatally by scrupulous image observation. We report an atypical CdLS case characterized by increased nuchal translucency in the first trimester, normal karyotype, saddle nose, micrognathia with receding jaw, low set ears, facies senilis, arthrogryposis of the hands, absence of the Aranzio ductus venous, dilatation of gallbladder and bowel, a unique umbilical artery, increased volume of amniotic fluid, and intrauterine growth retardation ending with the interruption of pregnancy. PMID:26834972

  14. [Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Mtar, Aida; Charfeddine, Bassem; Braham, Imen; Ben Abdallah, Jihene; Neffati, Souhir; Smach, Mohamed Ali; Bourfifa, Zouhaier; Ksouri, Monia; Dridi, Hedi; Limem, Khalifa

    2011-01-01

    The Maroteaux-Lamy disease, or mucopolysaccharidosis type VI is an inherited metabolic disorder severe and rare. It is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme arylsulfatase B. It is characterized by a heterogeneous clinical, radiological and genetic. We report the case of a Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome of in a child aged 7 years whose diagnosis was suspected clinically by the combination of a dysmorphic syndrome, a failure to thrive not harmonious, hepatomegaly and normal intelligence. Radiological exams have objectified dysostosis multiplex. Biochemical analysis of urine showed the abnormal presence of dermatan sulfate. The determination of leukocyte enzyme activity confirmed the diagnosis by showing arylsulfatase B deficiency. Hence the diagnosis of syndrome Maroteaux-Lamy in its mild form (type B) was selected. PMID:22123570

  15. PLATEAU IRIS SYNDROME--CASE SERIES.

    PubMed

    Feraru, Crenguta Ioana; Pantalon, Anca Delia; Chiselita, Dorin; Branisteanu, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Plateau iris is characterized by closing the anterior chamber angle due to a large ciliary body or due to its anterior insertion that alters the position of iris periphery in respect to the trabecular meshwork. There are two aspects that need to be differentiated: plateau iris configuration and plateau iris syndrome. The first describes a situation when the iris root is flat and the anterior chamber is not shallow, the latter refers to a post laser iridotomy condition in which a patent iridotomy has removed the relative pupillary block, but goniscopically confirmed angle closure recurs without central shallowing of the anterior chamber. Isolated plateau iris syndrome is rare compared to plateau iris configuration. We hereby present two case reports of plateau iris syndrome in young patients who came to an ophthalmologic consult by chance. PMID:26978890

  16. Case Report: Atypical Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leanza, Vito; Rubbino, Gabriella; Leanza, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) (also called Bushy Syndrome or Amsterdam dwarfism), is a genetic disorder that can lead to several alterations. This disease affects both physical and neuropsychiatric development. The various abnormalities include facial dysmorphia (arched eyebrows, synophrys, depressed nasal bridge, long philtrum, down-turned angles of the mouth), upper-extremity malformations, hirsutism, cardiac defects, and gastrointestinal alterations. The prevalence of this syndrome is approximately one per 15,000. Ultrasound is not the perfect means to diagnose CdLS, however, many abnormalities can be detected prenatally by scrupulous image observation. We report an atypical CdLS case characterized by increased nuchal translucency in the first trimester, normal karyotype, saddle nose, micrognathia with receding jaw, low set ears, facies senilis, arthrogryposis of the hands, absence of the Aranzio ductus venous, dilatation of gallbladder and bowel, a unique umbilical artery, increased volume of amniotic fluid, and intrauterine growth retardation ending with the interruption of pregnancy. PMID:26834972

  17. A case of encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis syndrome with epilepsy (Haberland syndrome).

    PubMed

    Zahariev, Zahari Iv; Peycheva, Marieta V; Dobrev, Hristo P

    2009-01-01

    Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis is a rare congenital neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by scalp, facial, and ocular lesions and multiple intracranial malformations. Approximately 50 cases have been described in the literature. We report a 34-year-old woman with a 6-year history of epilepsy, without mental retardation, with predominantly ipsilateral skin lesions evident at birth, with limbal lipodermoid of the left eye and multiple non-progressive, ipsilateral intracranial structures of soft, cystic components. The described malformations are congenital, mostly unilaterally located and with similar lipomatous structure. PMID:20232658

  18. [Waardenburg syndrome type I: case report].

    PubMed

    Silva, Patricia Capua Vieira da; Rangel, Paula; Couto Jr, Abelardo

    2011-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type I is a non-progressive auditory-pigmentary disorder comprising congenital sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary disturbances of the iris, hair, and skin, along with dystopia canthorum (lateral displacement of the inner canthi). Affected individuals may have higher risk of: neural tube defects, cleft lip and palate, limb abnormalities, and Hirschsprung disease. The diagnosis is clinical and should be considered if the individual has two major or one major plus two minor criteria. PAX3 is the only known gene associated to the syndrome. Nevertheless, its use is mostly for genetic counseling. Regarding different diagnosis, we may list: other causes of non-progressive auditory-pigmentary disorder comprising congenital sensorineural hearing loss, other types of Waardenburg syndrome, piebaldism, albinism, vitiligo and Teitz syndrome. This paper presents a case of an eleven year old boy with deafness and ophthalmologic alterations, based on his files and exams. It reinforced the importance of the ophthalmologist contributing for the diagnosis of this rare systemic disease, as it includes some ophthalmologic alterations. We remind that the early diagnosis allows adequate stimulation for the hearing loss, as well as preventive measures in case of pregnant women affected by genetic counseling. PMID:21915450

  19. Intrapartum diagnostic of Roberts syndrome - case presentation.

    PubMed

    Socolov, Răzvan Vladimir; Andreescu, Nicoleta Ioana; Haliciu, Ana Maria; Gorduza, Eusebiu Vlad; Dumitrache, Florentin; Balan, Raluca Anca; Puiu, Maria; Dobrescu, Mihaela Amelia; Socolov, Demetra Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Roberts syndrome is a rare disease, with multiple limb and skeletal abnormalities (called "pseudothalidomide disease"). There are only around 150 cases described in literature. We present a case of Roberts syndrome, diagnosed in moment of delivery, after a pregnancy without prenatal follow-up. The stillborn baby was naturally delivered by a 17-year-old primiparous woman at 38 weeks of amenorrhea. The pregnancy was not followed due to socioeconomic and family situation, and no prenatal ultrasound was performed. The male baby has 2650 g and presented several morphological abnormalities and tight double umbilical abdominal loop. The macroscopic evaluation showed: dolichocephaly, hypoplastic inferior maxilla with micrognathia, antimongoloid palpebral slant, pterygium colli, abnormal and lower implanted ears, superior limbs phocomelia, syndactyly at lower left limb and tetradactyly in all limbs, bilateral cryptorchidism, pancreatic aplasia. Roberts syndrome is a rare genetic disease with recessive autosomal transmission generated by mutations in ESCO2 gene, located on chromosome 8. The disease should be easy to diagnose by antenatal ultrasound examination, but in our case, the lack of prenatal follow-up determined the diagnostic at term. We believe consider this case is an argument towards introducing ultrasound-screening compulsory to all pregnancies. To identify a possible genetic mutation, further investigations of the parents are in progress, but classically the disease has a recessive autosomal transmission. PMID:26193234

  20. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Tabar, A I; Alvarez, M J; Acero, S; Olaguíbel, J M; García, B E; Quirce, S

    1998-01-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) is a type of asthma that develops in subjects without prior pulmonary disease, following single or multiple exposure to high levels of nonimmunogenic irritants. The main difference from classic occupational asthma is the absence of a latency period. Non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness is characteristic of the disease and usually persists after cessation of exposure. We report the cases of two subjects in whom RADS developed after occupational exposure to irritants. PMID:9615307

  1. Rare case of orofaciodigital syndrome type I

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhishek Bahadur; Girhotra, Manish; Goel, Medha; Bhatia, Shilpee

    2013-01-01

    Orofaciodigital syndrome (OFDS) is a group of congenital anomalies which affects the face, oral structures and digits. There are nine subtypes with different modes of inheritance. OFDS type I is an X-linked dominant trait with lethality in the vast majority of affected males. We report a case of OFDS type I in an Indian girl at the age of seven who had most of the typical features of OFDS type I and nephrocalcinosis. PMID:23417374

  2. A Pediatric Case of Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Derin, Serhan; Derin, Hatice; Sahan, Murat; Çaksen, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS) is characterized by facial paralysis, inner ear dysfunction, periauricular pain, and herpetiform vesicles. The reported incidence in children is 2.7/100,000. The pathogenesis involves the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) in the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. The recovery rate is better in children than in adults. This paper discusses a 12-year-old girl with a rare case of peripheral facial paralysis caused by RHS and reviews the literature. PMID:25276457

  3. Moebius syndrome and narcolepsy: A case dissertation☆

    PubMed Central

    Sabaneeff, Lídia; Mendes Motta, Henrique; Castro, Juliana; Tufik, Sergio; Santos Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho

    2014-01-01

    Moebius syndrome (MS) is a congenital syndrome characterized by unilateral or bilateral aplasia of the VI and VII cranial nerves, with consequent convergent strabismus and bilateral peripheral facial paralysis. This syndrome might be associated with diurnal excessive sleepiness and muscular hypotony, mimetizing in this manner, narcolepsy. The diagnostic criteria for narcolepsy depend on the presence of REM sleep during the day. As with patients with MS we do not have ocular movements due to the VI nerve paralysis, the absence of horizontal ocular movements might make it difficult to confirm narcolepsy in these patients. The common clinical characteristics of these patients are due to a possible impairment of the same structures that are affected in the central nervous system. However, the mechanism by which it occurs remains to be fully understood. Further electrophysiological researches are necessary to better clarify the association of these two diseases. The objective of this dissertation is to describe and discuss a case of Moebius syndrome with diurnal excessive sleepiness as a differential diagnosis for narcolepsy. PMID:26483899

  4. Moebius syndrome and narcolepsy: A case dissertation.

    PubMed

    Sabaneeff, Lídia; Mendes Motta, Henrique; Castro, Juliana; Tufik, Sergio; Santos Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho

    2014-03-01

    Moebius syndrome (MS) is a congenital syndrome characterized by unilateral or bilateral aplasia of the VI and VII cranial nerves, with consequent convergent strabismus and bilateral peripheral facial paralysis. This syndrome might be associated with diurnal excessive sleepiness and muscular hypotony, mimetizing in this manner, narcolepsy. The diagnostic criteria for narcolepsy depend on the presence of REM sleep during the day. As with patients with MS we do not have ocular movements due to the VI nerve paralysis, the absence of horizontal ocular movements might make it difficult to confirm narcolepsy in these patients. The common clinical characteristics of these patients are due to a possible impairment of the same structures that are affected in the central nervous system. However, the mechanism by which it occurs remains to be fully understood. Further electrophysiological researches are necessary to better clarify the association of these two diseases. The objective of this dissertation is to describe and discuss a case of Moebius syndrome with diurnal excessive sleepiness as a differential diagnosis for narcolepsy. PMID:26483899

  5. De Lange Syndrome: Report of 20 Cases

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, R. G.; Edwards, J. H.

    1967-01-01

    Typus Degenerativus Amstelodamensis or Amsterdam dwarfism, a syndrome of unknown etiology characterized by mental retardation, a distinctive face, characteristic hands and feet, defective growth and other minor malformations, was first described by Cornelia de Lange in 1933. Approximately 69 cases, including nine autopsies, have been reported in the literature. In this paper we present a further 20, with illustrations of the syndrome from infancy to puberty (including de Lange's original three cases). The historical, physical, laboratory and radiographic findings of de Lange's three patients and our 20 are tabulated. Autopsy findings in one of our patients are reported and the literature is briefly reviewed. Although some observers have recently reported chromosome abnormalities in de Lange's syndrome, we feel that the diagnosis is made from the history and physical examination and that there are no definitive laboratory aids which can confirm the diagnosis. Chromosome studies in all 20 of our patients were normal and the genetic implications are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 9Fig. 11p1197-a PMID:6022788

  6. Cockayne's syndrome: a case report. Literature review.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Sordo, María de la Luz; Hernández-Zamora, Edgar; Montoya-Pérez, Luis Alberto; Aldape-Barrios, Beatriz Catalina

    2006-05-01

    Cockayne s syndrome is a genetic disorder with a recessive autosomal inheritance, described first by Cockayne in 1936. Patients with this syndrome present failure to thrive, short stature, premature aging, neurological alterations, photosensitivity, delayed eruption of the primary teeth, congenitally absent of some permanent teeth, partial macrodontia, atrophy of the alveolar process and caries. It could be caused by two gene mutations, CNK1 (ERCC8) and ERCC6, located on the 5 and 10 chromosomes respectively, causing two variations of Cockayne s syndrome, CS-A, secondary to a ERCC8 mutation and CS-B with ERCC6 mutation, the last one causes hypersensitivity to the ultraviolet light secondary to a DNA repair defect. The syndrome is also associated with mutations of the XPB, XPD and XPG genes. In this report we present a 9 year and 4 month old patient. He had a height of 94 cm, weight of 8.6 Kg, head circumference of 42 cm. and blood pressure of 120/80. Cachectic habitus, kyphosis, microcephaly, oval face, sunken eyes, a thin and beaklike nose, lack of subcutaneous facial fat (especially in the middle of the face), and large ears give the patient a birdlike appearance. It is notorious the photosensitivity in all the sun-exposed skin. The patient also displays delayed psychomotor skills and mental retardation. In the oral cavity we found deficient hygiene, gingivitis, cervical caries, enamel hipoplasia, abnormal position of the upper and inferior lateral incisors, macrodontia of the upper central teeth, the left one presented a caries. In the x-ray we observed congenital absence of 14, 23 and 24 teeth and mandibular hipoplasia. The aim of this review is to show the dentistry community the characteristics of the Cockayne s syndrome by means of a clinical case. PMID:16648759

  7. Robinow Syndrome: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Soman, Cristalle; Lingappa, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Robinow syndrome is an extremely rare genetic disorder. Short-limbed dwarfism, abnormalities in the head, face, and external genitalia, as well as vertebral defects comprise its distinct features. This disorder exists in dominant and recessive patterns. Patients with the dominant pattern exhibit moderate symptoms. More physical characteristics and skeletal abnormalities characterize the recessive group. The syndrome is also known as Robinow-Silverman-Smith syndrome, Robinow dwarfism, fetal face, fetal face syndrome, fetal facies syndrome, acral dysostosis with facial and genital abnormalities, or mesomelic dwarfism-small genitalia syndrome. Covesdem syndrome was the name entitled for the recessive form previously. Here, we report a case of 8-year-old female with a autosomal recessive Robinow syndrome having skeletal and vertebral defects. How to cite this article: Soman C, Lingappa A. Robinow Syndrome: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):149-152. PMID:26379386

  8. Robinow Syndrome: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lingappa, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Robinow syndrome is an extremely rare genetic disorder. Short-limbed dwarfism, abnormalities in the head, face, and external genitalia, as well as vertebral defects comprise its distinct features. This disorder exists in dominant and recessive patterns. Patients with the dominant pattern exhibit moderate symptoms. More physical characteristics and skeletal abnormalities characterize the recessive group. The syndrome is also known as Robinow-Silverman-Smith syndrome, Robinow dwarfism, fetal face, fetal face syndrome, fetal facies syndrome, acral dysostosis with facial and genital abnormalities, or mesomelic dwarfism-small genitalia syndrome. Covesdem syndrome was the name entitled for the recessive form previously. Here, we report a case of 8-year-old female with a autosomal recessive Robinow syndrome having skeletal and vertebral defects. How to cite this article: Soman C, Lingappa A. Robinow Syndrome: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):149-152. PMID:26379386

  9. Prune Belly syndrome: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sunil Kumar; Rathod, Setu

    2015-01-01

    Prune Belly syndrome (PBS) is a rare congenital anomaly of uncertain etiology almost exclusive to males. We report a case of term male baby born to a 39-year-old grand multipara with previous four normal vaginal births. There was no history of genetic or congenital anomaly in her family. Examination of the baby revealed hypotonia, deficient abdominal muscle, cryptorchidism, palpable kidney, and bladder. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen revealed bilateral gross hydronephrosis and megaureter. Provisional diagnosis of PBS was made and the baby was admitted in neonatal intensive care units for further management. Routine antenatal care with ultrasonography will help in detecting renal anomalies, which can be followed postnatally. Early diagnosis of this syndrome and determining its optimal treatment are very important in helping to avoid its fatal course. PMID:25810678

  10. Stewart–Treves syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Benmansour, Anis; Laanaz, Saad; Bougtab, Abdeslam

    2014-01-01

    The Stewart-Treves syndrome was first described in 1948, it's an angiosarcoma developed on a longstanding lymphadenomatous limb, more often after radical mastectomy. Diagnosis is made on skin biopsy and the prognosis is poor when radical surgery can't be performed. We report the case on a Stewart-Treves syndrome in a sixty-six years old woman who underwent radical mastectomy for breast carcinoma ten years earlier. Surgery was not feasible at the time of diagnosis, and we lost touch of the patient even if chemotherapy was decided. Radical surgery is the best treatment to date for this rare disease. Conservative surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy is also possible. Systemic chemotherapy is reserved for locally advanced unresectable and metastatic forms. We advocate long term follow-up for every post mastectomy lymphedema to diagnosis this fatal disease when curable. PMID:25574331

  11. Stewart-Treves syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Benmansour, Anis; Laanaz, Saad; Bougtab, Abdeslam

    2014-01-01

    The Stewart-Treves syndrome was first described in 1948, it's an angiosarcoma developed on a longstanding lymphadenomatous limb, more often after radical mastectomy. Diagnosis is made on skin biopsy and the prognosis is poor when radical surgery can't be performed. We report the case on a Stewart-Treves syndrome in a sixty-six years old woman who underwent radical mastectomy for breast carcinoma ten years earlier. Surgery was not feasible at the time of diagnosis, and we lost touch of the patient even if chemotherapy was decided. Radical surgery is the best treatment to date for this rare disease. Conservative surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy is also possible. Systemic chemotherapy is reserved for locally advanced unresectable and metastatic forms. We advocate long term follow-up for every post mastectomy lymphedema to diagnosis this fatal disease when curable. PMID:25574331

  12. Cornelia de Lange syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kalal, Goud Iravathy; Raina, Vimarsh P; Nayak, Veerabhadra S; Teotia, Pooja; Gupta, Bhushan V

    2009-02-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CDLS) is a relatively common multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation disorder with an unknown genetic and molecular pathogenesis. The essential features of this developmental malformation syndrome are retardation in growth, developmental delay, various structural limb abnormalities, and distinctive facial features. Most cases are sporadic and are thought to result from a new dominant mutation. Consequently, hypotheses regarding the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the two distinct phenotypes, classic and mild, are purely speculative. The recent discovery of molecular techniques and identification of the NIPBL gene has allowed etiologic diagnosis of this disorder. In this article, we describe a patient with CDLS in whom conventional cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and NIPBL gene mutation analysis determined an etiologic diagnosis, providing precise genetic counseling and facilitated the family to make an evidence-based decision for conception and also alleviated the extreme degree of anxiety associated with the thought of having a second child in this set of circumstances. PMID:19309268

  13. Cornelia de Lange syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grau Carbó, Joaquim; López Jiménez, Julian; Giménez Prats, Maria José; Sànchez Molins, Meritxell

    2007-10-01

    Cornelia de Lange is a genetic syndrome which affects between 1/10.000 and 1/60.000 neonates, but its genetic bases are still not clear. Its principal clinical characteristics are the delay in growth and development, hirsute, structural anomalies in the limbs and distinctive facial characteristic. Dental problems are frequent and include: ogival palate, micrognathia, dental malalignment, delayed teething, microdontic teeth, periodontal disease and dental erosion produced by gastric reflux. Discussed is the case of a 29 year old patient affected by the syndrome in question, which presents the principal clinical characteristics. The patient's general state of health is acceptable, without cardiac or respiratory alterations. The intraoral exploration shows policaries, periodontal disease, persistence of the temporal teeth and ectopic molars. After completing the necessary pre-operatory preparations, the entire odontological treatment was carried out under general aesthesia, due to the patient's total lack of collaboration. PMID:17909511

  14. A Rare Case of Mucopolysaccharidosis: Hunter Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Anekar, Jayaprasad; A.C., Raj; N.C., Sandeepa; Nappalli, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Hunter syndrome, or mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II), is a member of a group of inherited metabolic disorders together termed mucopolysaccharidosis (MPSs). It is a rare, X-linked disorder caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. The prevalence of this syndrome is 1:100,000 births. Insufficient enzyme activity results in accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGS) in the lysosomes of various tissues and organs and leading to progressive multisystem pathologies. Here, we report a case of 13-year-old boy who presented with typical facial, skeletal and dental features without corneal clouding. It is possible that thorough and systematic clinical and radiological examination alone can help in diagnosis of this complex disorder. PMID:26023658

  15. The Rapunzel syndrome. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, P; Di Lascio, P; Crocoli, A; Del Prete, I

    2016-01-01

    Trichobezoar is a rare pathology in which swallowed hairs accumulate in the stomach. An unusual form of bezoar extending from the stomach to the small intestine or beyond has been described as Rapunzel syndrome. Trichobezoars typically cause abdominal pain and nausea, but can also present as an asymptomatic abdominal mass, progressing to abdominal obstruction and perforation. Trichobezoar with Rapunzel syndrome is an uncommon diagnosis. It is predominantly found in emotionally disturbed or mentally retarded young people. The diagnosis may be suspected in young females with abdominal pain, epigastric mass and malnutrition, who have a history of trichophagia. The Authors present a case of successful laparotomy removal of a giant gastro-duodenal trichobezoar in a 9-year-old girl with a history of trichotillophagia. Physical examination revealed diffuse abdominal pain and an epigastric mass. Psychodynamic aspects, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapautic strategies are discussed. PMID:27381697

  16. The Rapunzel syndrome. Report of a case

    PubMed Central

    CAIAZZO, P.; DI LASCIO, P.; CROCOLI, A.; DEL PRETE, I.

    2016-01-01

    Trichobezoar is a rare pathology in which swallowed hairs accumulate in the stomach. An unusual form of bezoar extending from the stomach to the small intestine or beyond has been described as Rapunzel syndrome. Trichobezoars typically cause abdominal pain and nausea, but can also present as an asymptomatic abdominal mass, progressing to abdominal obstruction and perforation. Trichobezoar with Rapunzel syndrome is an uncommon diagnosis. It is predominantly found in emotionally disturbed or mentally retarded young people. The diagnosis may be suspected in young females with abdominal pain, epigastric mass and malnutrition, who have a history of trichophagia. The Authors present a case of successful laparotomy removal of a giant gastro-duodenal trichobezoar in a 9-year-old girl with a history of trichotillophagia. Physical examination revealed diffuse abdominal pain and an epigastric mass. Psychodynamic aspects, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapautic strategies are discussed. PMID:27381697

  17. Rubinstein-taybi syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Münevveroglu, A P; Akgöl, B B

    2012-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome or Broad Thumb-Hallux syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by facial dysmorphism, growth retardation, and mental deficiency. A seven-year-old girl had come to the Department of Pedodontics, Istanbul Medipol University, Faculty of Dentistry, Turkey, with a complaint of caries and bleeding of gingivae. The patient was mentally retarded. Extraoral features revealed distinctive facial appearance with a broad fore head, hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, and beaked nose. Intraoral features observed were talons cusps in the upper lateral incisors, carious teeth, and plaque accumulation. Since the patient was mentally retarded, the dental treatment was done under GA. The treatment plan and dental management of this patient are discussed in this case report. PMID:22991675

  18. Three cases of triple A syndrome (Allgrove syndrome) in pediatric surgeons' view.

    PubMed

    Erginel, Başak; Gün, Feryal; Kocaman, Hakan; Çelik, Alaadin; Salman, Tansu

    2016-04-01

    Triple A syndrome, also known as Allgrove syndrome, is a rare disease, and presents mainly in children. Its cardinal symptoms are achalasia, alacrima, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) insensitivity. We report three cases of Triple A syndrome. Our aim is to inform pediatric surgeons about the existence of this rare syndrome and to highlight the need for suspicion of alacrima and ACTH insensitivity in cases of pediatric achalasia. Triple A syndrome should be considered in patients presenting with achalasia. Alacrima should be investigated by a Schirmer test, and adrenal dysfunction should be tested in cases of suspected triple A. PMID:27385299

  19. A case of Cushing's syndrome in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grażyna; Kubicka, Eliza; Sicińska-Werner, Teresa; Kazimierczak, Anna; Winowski, Jacek; Tupikowska, Małgorzata; Janczyszyn, Maria; Bolanowski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome (also known as hypercortisolemia) is rare in pregnant women due to the menstrual disturbances and infertility in women with hypercortisolism. A diagnosis of pathological hypercortisolism in pregnant women is often difficult as some symptoms of the disease may be associated with a complicated pregnancy. Hypercortisolemia leads to serious complications for mother and foetus, and is associated with premature labour and high foetal mortality. Hormonal and radiological diagnostics in pregnancy are limited. The results of hormonal measurements and dynamic tests are difficult to interpret due to the physiological changes in the hypothalamo-pituitaryadrenal axis connected with pregnancy. The optimal time and method of treatment should be chosen cautiously case by case because of the possibility of maternal and foetal complications. In this paper, we present a case of Cushing's syndrome secondary to adrenal adenoma in which the diagnosis was made in the 22(nd) week of pregnancy. Due to the advanced gestational status and mild symptoms of hypercortisolism, only symptomatic treatment was introduced. The patient was under continuous obstetric and endocrinological care. At 35 weeks of gestation, the pregnancy was terminated by emergency caesarean section because of premature detachment of the placenta. A male infant weighing 2,450 g was delivered; neither adrenal insufficiency in the child nor hypercortisolemia complications in the mother were observed. PMID:21528482

  20. Meningitis-retention Syndrome; A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Gen; Hata, Kenichi; Aoki, Soichiro; Suzuki, Masayasu; Kimura, Takahiro; Egawa, Shin

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of meningitis-retention syndrome followed by urodynamic tests. A 48-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for an undiagnosed fever with headache and urinary retention. Aseptic meningitis was suspected according to cerebrospinal fluid analyses, and urodynamic test showed an underactive detrusor, leading to inadequate contraction of the bladder on voiding in spite of a normal sensation during bladder filling. Clean intermittent self-catheterization was required temporarily, but normal urinary voiding without the need for medication was restored in 2 weeks after discharge from the hospital, when urodynamic tests showed normal contractility of the bladder during voiding. PMID:27175342

  1. Meningitis-retention Syndrome; A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Gen; Hata, Kenichi; Aoki, Soichiro; Suzuki, Masayasu; Kimura, Takahiro; Egawa, Shin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of meningitis-retention syndrome followed by urodynamic tests. A 48-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for an undiagnosed fever with headache and urinary retention. Aseptic meningitis was suspected according to cerebrospinal fluid analyses, and urodynamic test showed an underactive detrusor, leading to inadequate contraction of the bladder on voiding in spite of a normal sensation during bladder filling. Clean intermittent self-catheterization was required temporarily, but normal urinary voiding without the need for medication was restored in 2 weeks after discharge from the hospital, when urodynamic tests showed normal contractility of the bladder during voiding. PMID:27175342

  2. Unusual Cases of Hypothenar Hammer Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arworn, Supapong; Wisetborisut, Anawat

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Hypothenar hammer syndrome (HHS) is a rare occupational disease. The risk group of HHS is patient whose dominate hand used as a hammer. Our study report unusually cases in Chiang Mai University Hospital. Result: 19 year-old basketball player had right ulnar artery aneurysm for two months. After operation, his symptom was relieved and returned to play basketball again. 65 year-old housekeeper had non-dominated hand ulnar artery aneurysm for two years. After operation she still had hand claudication due to poor run-off vessel. Conclusion: HHS is previously state in risk group. But from our report there was a risk in different occupation. PMID:26421080

  3. Apropos of an Olfactory Reference Syndrome case.

    PubMed

    Cruzado, Lizardo; Cáceres-Taco, Elisa; Calizaya, Jesús R

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory Reference Syndrome (ORS) is one of the varieties of the somatic type of the Delusional Disorder, and it is characterized by the mistaken statement of a patient who declares the issuance of a foul odor coming from his own body and that others may notice. In the upcoming edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) it has been proposed to break off ORS as an independent pathology. From an illustrative case report, we review the relevant literature and discuss this proposal. PMID:22851484

  4. A case of acquired Gitelman syndrome presenting as hypokalemic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, M.; Kadri, P.; Pinto, R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a young female patient who presented with weakness of upper and lower limbs. On evaluation, she had hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, metabolic alkalosis and hypocalciuria. Anti-Ro (SSA) antibody was positive. She had an acquired Gitelman syndrome due to primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS). SS presenting with features of Gitelman syndrome is very rare. PMID:26199478

  5. A case of acquired Gitelman syndrome presenting as hypokalemic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, M; Kadri, P; Pinto, R

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a young female patient who presented with weakness of upper and lower limbs. On evaluation, she had hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, metabolic alkalosis and hypocalciuria. Anti-Ro (SSA) antibody was positive. She had an acquired Gitelman syndrome due to primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS). SS presenting with features of Gitelman syndrome is very rare. PMID:26199478

  6. A Case with Repeated Recurrent Acute Coronary Syndrome due to Pseudoephedrine Use: Kounis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Çeliker, Metin; Tuncer, Mustafa; Şekeralmaz, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Allergic reaction-associated acute coronary syndrome picture is defined as Kounis syndrome. Although drug use is the most common cause of allergic reaction, foods and environmental factors may also play a role in the etiology. Herein, a case with acute coronary syndrome that developed two times at 8-month interval due to pseudoephedrine use for upper respiratory tract infection is presented. PMID:25435880

  7. Asplenia Syndrome in a Neonate: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Kapil; Yadav, Jaivinder; Mehra, Suchi

    2016-01-01

    Asplenia syndrome is a syndrome of right isomerism or attempted bilateral right sidedness. It includes congenital asplenia in association with complex congenital cyanotic heart disease and situs anomalies of the other thoracoabdominal organs. Herein we report a case of asplenia syndrome so as to highlight and refocus attention on the possibility of this rare syndrome that must be considered in a neonate presenting with congenital cyanotic heart disease.

  8. Asplenia Syndrome in a Neonate: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Kapil; Singh, Jasbir; Yadav, Jaivinder; Mehra, Suchi

    2016-06-01

    Asplenia syndrome is a syndrome of right isomerism or attempted bilateral right sidedness. It includes congenital asplenia in association with complex congenital cyanotic heart disease and situs anomalies of the other thoracoabdominal organs. Herein we report a case of asplenia syndrome so as to highlight and refocus attention on the possibility of this rare syndrome that must be considered in a neonate presenting with congenital cyanotic heart disease. PMID:27504371

  9. Detection of TRIM32 deletions in LGMD patients analyzed by a combined strategy of CGH array and massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nectoux, Juliette; de Cid, Rafael; Baulande, Sylvain; Leturcq, France; Urtizberea, Jon Andoni; Penisson-Besnier, Isabelle; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Roudaut, Carinne; Criqui, Audrey; Orhant, Lucie; Peyroulan, Delphine; Ben Yaou, Raba; Nelson, Isabelle; Cobo, Anna Maria; Arné-Bes, Marie-Christine; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Nitschke, Patrick; Claustres, Mireille; Bonne, Gisèle; Lévy, Nicolas; Chelly, Jamel; Richard, Isabelle; Cossée, Mireille

    2015-07-01

    Defects in TRIM32 were reported in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H), sarcotubular myopathies (STM) and in Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Few cases have been described to date in LGMD2H/STM, but this gene is not systematically analysed because of the absence of specific signs and difficulties in protein analysis. By using high-throughput variants screening techniques, we identified variants in TRIM32 in two patients presenting nonspecific LGMD. We report the first case of total inactivation by homozygous deletion of the entire TRIM32 gene. Of interest, the deletion removes part of the ASTN2 gene, a large gene in which TRIM32 is nested. Despite the total TRIM32 gene inactivation, the patient does not present a more severe phenotype. However, he developed a mild progressive cognitive impairment that may be related to the loss of function of ASTN2 because association between ASTN2 heterozygous deletions and neurobehavioral disorders was previously reported. Regarding genomic characteristics at breakpoint of the deleted regions of TRIM32, we found a high density of repeated elements, suggesting a possible hotspot. These observations illustrate the importance of high-throughput technologies for identifying molecular defects in LGMD, confirm that total loss of function of TRIM32 is not associated with a specific phenotype and that TRIM32/ASTN2 inactivation could be associated with cognitive impairment. PMID:25351777

  10. Case study: Ganser syndrome in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Miller, P; Bramble, D; Buxton, N

    1997-01-01

    Six cases of the Ganser syndrome have been previously described in the literature and are reviewed here. They are imperfect representations of the originally described syndrome. This article describes a case of the Ganser syndrome in a 12-year-old boy who, after a mild head injury, presented with three of four of the core symptoms. The nature of the Ganser syndrome remains unclear, but this case study highlights dissociation and abnormal illness behavior as being important in the production of the symptoms. Classically the course is short-lived, although this report raises the possibilities of a much more chronic course. PMID:9000788

  11. Pseudo subclavian steal syndrome: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Konda, Sneha; Dayawansa, Samantha; Singel, Soren; Huang, Jason H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) is a condition that results from restricted blood flow to the posterior portions of the brain, which are primarily served by the vertebral and basilar arteries. It is the most common cause of vertigo in the elderly and is usually accompanied by impaired vision and sensation. Congenital abnormalities, atherosclerosis, stroke and/or trauma may all lead to decreased vertebrobasilar circulation. A syndrome called Subclavian Steal Syndrome (SSS), which manifests with similar neurological symptoms but with a different pathophysiology, may also cause VBI. Case presentation A middle-aged female presented with gradual onset fainting and vertigo attacks. Cardiac, auditory and autonomic etiologies were investigated and excluded. Clinical findings and presentation were highly suggestive of subclavian steal. However, subsequent CT angiography showed normal subclavian arteries. Instead, findings included a persistent right trigeminal artery (PTA), stenosis of the right proximal internal carotid artery, atresis of the left vertebral artery and distal segment of right vertebral artery, congenitally compromised changes in vertebral circulation (bilateral absence of the posterior communicating arteries (PCOMs)) and an absent anterograde vertebrobasilar circulation. Symptoms resolved after carotid endarterectomy. Discussion Due to the absence of a normally developed posterior circulation, the PTA was the main source of blood supply for the patient. Development of recent artheromatous changes in the right internal carotid artery, however, resulted in decreased blood through PTA, further compromising posterior circulation. This resulted in vertebrobasilar insufficiency, and manifested in symptomology similar to SSS. Conclusions This clinical encounter illustrates the relative contribution of anatomical and vasoocclusive factors in closely mimicking symptoms of subclavian steal syndrome. PMID:26479783

  12. Joubert syndrome: report of 11 cases

    PubMed Central

    İncecik, Faruk; Hergüner, M. Özlem; Altunbaşak, Şakir; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Joubert syndrome (JS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by hypotonia, ataxia, psychomotor delay, and variable occurrence of oculomotor apraxia and neonatal breathing abnormalities. The 11 cases were searched according to their clinic, radiologic, and mutation analysis findings, according to which they were diagnosed as JS. Physical, neurological and fundus examinations were performed in all patients. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging scan, abdominal ultrasonography, and if necessary, echocardiography were performed. CC2D2A and ARL13B mutations were analyzed in our 11 JS patients. The mean age was 31.09±37.49 months (range: 1 month – 10 years). Two of the cases were siblings. Nine of the cases had a history of episodic hyperpnea. The other findings were hypotonia, ataxia, psychomotor retardation, and nystagmus. In all patients, the “molar tooth sign” was observed with scanning methods. In addition, cerebellar cortical dysplasia was established in one of the cases. Macrocephaly (1 patient), multiple renal cysts (1 patient), ocular coloboma (2 patients), ptosis (1 patient), congenital heart disease (1 patient), polydactyly (2 patients), and congenital hip dislocation (2 patients) were also determined. We identified mutation (c.C4452T → p.R1518W) in CC2D2A in two patients. JS can show heterogeneity clinically, neuroradiologically and genetically. Determination of the symptoms, early diagnosis and genetic consultation are the goals for decision-making to begin treatment and rehabilitation programs. PMID:23692786

  13. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome: A Report on Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Roongpiboonsopit, Duangnapa; Kongbunkiat, Kannikar; Phanthumchinda, Kammant

    2016-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), a recently recognized syndrome, is defined as an intermittent segmental vasospasm of cerebral arteries accompanied by thunderclap headache. The major complications of RCVS include ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, which may cause morbidity and mortality. It is important to detect RCVS in clinical practice because misdiagnosis may lead to inappropriate treatment. In Thailand, there are only two reported cases of RCVS, which may reflect an underdiagnosis of this syndrome. To raise awareness of RCVS, we reported a case series of three RCVS cases. Two of the presented cases had interesting precipitating factors, and two cases had an unusual delayed clinical course. PMID:27455831

  14. Recurrent Hypothenar Hammer Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nicholas S; Ford, Ronald D

    2016-10-01

    Hypothenar hammer syndrome (HHS) is a rare cause of digital ischemia and pain caused from repetitive trauma to the palm. Often related to occupational practices, thrombosis and embolization can occur. Treatment is often surgical and involves excision with or without reconstruction. We describe a 55 year-old, male pipe fitter previously diagnosed and treated for HHS with excision and repair using a reversed interpositional vein graft in the mid-1980's. He continued to work in the profession, which he regularly used his palm as a hammer and returned approximately 30 years later with recurrent symptoms of cold intolerance and pain. Angiography confirmed occlusion of the ulnar artery with emboli present distally. The patient was again treated with excision and reconstruction. HHS is an uncommon cause of digital ischemia. Its recurrence is even more rare. To our knowledge, this is the first described case of diagnosed and treated recurrent HHS. PMID:27595964

  15. [Mucopolysaccharidosis I, Hurler syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Amorín, Milagros; Carlin, Andrea; Prötzel, Ana

    2012-10-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) is a rare, recessively inherited, lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency on the enzyme a-L-iduronidase. This defect results in accumulation of heparan and dermatan sulfate in different tissues and organs due to a deficiency in the catabolism of glycosaminoglycans. The overall incidence of MPS I is 0.99-1.99/100.000 live births. There are three clinical presentations: Hurler (severe), Hurler Scheie (mild) and Scheie (mild). We report the case of a 10-years-old male patient diagnosed with Hurler syndrome, the severe presentation, 5 years ago by enzyme a-L-iduronidase activity measurement in leukocytes; with a history of recurrent respiratory infections, umbilical hernia, corneal opacity, coarse facial features, macroglossia, hearing loss, stiffness of joints, cardiac compromise, claw hands, mental retardation and stunted growth. After enzyme replacement therapy the patient has shown improvement of visceral symptoms, but the neurological damage continuous in progress. PMID:23070190

  16. Two cases of orbital infarction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yang, S W; Kim, S Y; Chung, J; Kim, K B

    2000-12-01

    Orbital infarction syndrome is defined as ischemia of all intraorbital and intraocular structures. It is a rare disease caused by rich anastomotic vascularization of the orbit. It can occur secondary to different conditions, such as, acute perfusion failure, systemic vasculitis, orbital cellulitis and vasculitis. It results in orbital and ocular pain, total ophthalmoplegia, anterior and posterior segment ischemia, and acute blindness. We report here upon two cases of orbital infarction with similar presentations but with different causes, namely, mucormycosis and as a postoperative complication of intracranial aneurysm, discuss the possible mechanisms of orbital infarction, and present a review of the literature on the topic. The prompt recognition of clinical pictures and rapid diagnosis is essential for the early treatment of orbital infarction, since its progression is very rapid and it can be even fatal. PMID:11213734

  17. Opercular syndrome: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Soaham Dilip; Patel, Dipen; Bharani, Sheela; Kharod, Nikhil

    2013-01-01

    We present a 9-year-old boy with history of perinatal asphyxia and neonatal seizures; who presented with delayed development of speech, with predominant dysarthria, dysphagia, and drooling of saliva and unable to protrude tongue along with delayed motor and mental milestones. He had complex partial seizures since last 3 years requiring multiple anti-epileptic drugs. He had dysarthria, nasal twang, and drooling of saliva with difficulty in chewing and swallowing. Hearing and understanding were normal. Bilateral trigemino-facio-linguo-pharyngeal palsy was noticed on voluntary movements with normal jaw jerk with preserved automatic and emotional motor movements. Electroencephalography revealed focal left fronto-temporal epileptiform discharges and brain imaging was suggestive of bilateral cortical and subcortical region encephalomalacia, predominantly involving bilateral opercular region. The clinical and neuroimaging features correspond to bilateral opercular syndrome which could have resulted from the perinatal insult in this case. PMID:24082930

  18. [Post-polio syndrome - a case report].

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stępień, Adam

    2015-07-01

    Post-polio syndrome occurs 30-40 years after polio virus infection. The main symptoms of PPS are slowly progressive muscle limbs paresis with muscle atrophy, joints pain, paresthesia. In 90% of patients the main symptom is fatigue that leads to physical and mental activity deterioration. The cause of disease remains unknown. Probably it is an effect of motoneurons damage during acute virus polio infection, their overloading and degeneration of remaining ones. In this study we described a case of man who developed PPS 36 years after Heine-Medin disease. The main symptom was intensification of right limb paresis and muscle atrophy. In electromyography there were damage features of muscle clinically affected and unaffected. Changes in lifestyle made possible to continue occupational activity. PMID:26277176

  19. Forensic issues in cases of Diogenes syndrome.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W; Tsokos, Michael

    2007-06-01

    Diogenes syndrome is a syndrome described in the clinical literature in elderly individuals characterized by social isolation and extreme squalor. A number of typical features are found in the forensic evaluation of these deaths as the cases usually initiate medicolegal investigations due to the circumstances and the lack of recorded medical histories. Examinations of the death scenes are often difficult as victim's houses are in a state of disrepair, with filth and clutter, and pet dogs may resent the intrusion of strangers. Bodies are often filthy, with parasitic infestations, and are often putrefied due to the social isolation of the deceased and the delay in the finding of the corpse. Bodies may be traumatized from postmortem animal depredation by rodents or pets (eg, cats, dogs), and injuries such as bruises and lacerations may be present from falls associated with terminal illnesses or alcoholism. Blood or putrefactive fluids may be spread throughout the house by pets. Treatable medical conditions are often present in advanced stages, and features of hypothermia may be found. Attending police may suspect robbery due to disarray of the house and homicide due to apparent "bleeding" around the body from purging of putrefactive fluids, injuries from falls, or postmortem animal activity and "blood stains" throughout the house from antemortem injuries and/or fluid spread by animals. Finally, the identification of the deceased may be compromised by decay and/or postmortem animal activity. Thus, in addition to having typical clinical manifestations, such individuals appear to form a distinct subset of forensic cases having characteristic death scene and autopsy features and presenting particular difficulties in postmortem evaluations. PMID:17525574

  20. [Prune-Belly Syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tattoli, Fabio; De Prisco, Ornella; Gherzi, Maurizio; Falconi, Daniela; Marazzi, Federico; Marengo, Marita; Serra, Ilaria; Tamagnone, Michela; Formica, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Prune-Belly Syndrome (PBS) is a rare congenital syndrome characterized by the absence of abdominal muscles, anomalies in the urinary tract, megaureter, cryptorchidism or testicular agenesis, hypertension and worsening chronic kidney disease (CKD). The incidence is estimated between 1 out of 35,000 and 1 out of 50,000 born alive, and it affects males in prevalence (97%). In the present study we describe the case of a 38 year old male patient (followed since May 2011) affected by PBS, CKD, one functional kidney at the scintigraphy, pediatric testicular implants, bladder surgery and correction of pectus excavatum. At the beginning of the observation, renal function was deteriorated, with a creatinine 3.3 mg/dl, GFR calculated at MDRD 23 ml/min, proteinuria in nephrotic range (4 g/day), high blood pressure, anemia and hyperparathyroidism. In the following examinations renal function framework worsened, despite the adoption of a low-protein diet. Due to the functional trend, the patient was prescribed hemodialysis as substitute treatment. In January 2013 a first attempt of artero-venous fistula (AVF) did not succeed, while a new AVF in March 2013 resulted effective. In July hemodialysis was started. In the future, we expect to insert the patient in the Kidney Transplant List (since surgical feasibility has already been positively evaluated). Our case is quite peculiar due to the late beginning of substitute treatment. Further, SPB represents a challenge that, in the absence of a prompt and effective treatment, inevitably it leads to terminal uremia; nevertheless, given a proper treatment, a transplant with good chances of success can be envisaged. PMID:25030009

  1. [Cluster-tic syndrome: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Monzillo, P H; Sanvito, W L; Peres, M F

    1996-06-01

    Two patients with cluster-tic syndrome are reported. The first, a 43-years-old man, complaining of trigeminal pain in the right side of the face, accompanied by homolateral autonomic signs, such as ocular injection, sweating and drooped eyelid. The cluster attack was triggered by chewing, shaving and washing the face. The periodicity of bouts was six months. The pain was relieved by carbamazepine (800 mg/day). The second patient, a 43-year-old man, with an excruciant, neuralgic pain in the left side of the face, accompanied by tearing, conjuntival injection, drooped eyelid, rhinorrhea, photophobia and phonophobia. The neurologic examination showed triggered points in the first and second division of the trigeminal nerve. The patient was treated with verapamil (160 mg/day) and prednisone (60 mg/day), with relief of his symptoms. The periodicity of bouts was once a year. The literature was reviewed and 37 cases previosly reported are considered. We conclude that there are two different groups of patients. In the first group, the patients had cluster and trigeminal bouts in different time. In the second group, with only nine cases, the patients presented both cluster and trigeminal type of pain at the same time, as in the two cases reported here. PMID:8984987

  2. Central pontine myelinolysis in a case of alcohol dependence syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Kaushik; Fernandes, Austin B.; Goyal, Sunil; Shanker, Sunitha

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome includes Central Pontine Myelinolysis and Extrapontine Myelinolysis. This condition has been described in cases of chronic Alcohol Dependence Syndrome and in rapid correction of hyponatremia. Though we frequently see patients with Alcohol Dependence Syndrome presenting with complicated withdrawal, Central Pontine Myelinolysis remains largely undetected and under-reported in literature. We present here a case of protracted Delirium Tremens where MRI brain revealed Central Pontine Myelinolysis. Subsequently cognitive assessment revealed significant dysfunction and brain SPECT showed hypo-perfusion of the frontal lobes. Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome should be suspected in protracted Delirium Tremens.

  3. Central pontine myelinolysis in a case of alcohol dependence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kaushik; Fernandes, Austin B; Goyal, Sunil; Shanker, Sunitha

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome includes Central Pontine Myelinolysis and Extrapontine Myelinolysis. This condition has been described in cases of chronic Alcohol Dependence Syndrome and in rapid correction of hyponatremia. Though we frequently see patients with Alcohol Dependence Syndrome presenting with complicated withdrawal, Central Pontine Myelinolysis remains largely undetected and under-reported in literature. We present here a case of protracted Delirium Tremens where MRI brain revealed Central Pontine Myelinolysis. Subsequently cognitive assessment revealed significant dysfunction and brain SPECT showed hypo-perfusion of the frontal lobes. Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome should be suspected in protracted Delirium Tremens. PMID:27212829

  4. Red ear syndrome: literature review and a pediatric case report.

    PubMed

    Moitri, Misha O; Banglawala, Sarfaraz M; Archibald, Jason

    2015-03-01

    Red ear syndrome (RES) is characterized by recurrent unilateral or bilateral painful attacks of the external ear, accompanied by ear redness, burning, or warmth. Proposed etiologies of this rare condition include dysregulation of sympathetic outflow, upper cervical pathology, glossopharyngeal and trigeminal neuralgia, TMJ dysfunction, thalamic syndrome, and primary headache syndromes. Idiopathic cases also exist in the literature. Pediatric cases are particularly rare and more commonly associated with migraine. Given the various potential etiologies, no single treatment is effective in all cases. This paper summarizes the current understanding and management of RES, and describes a case of idiopathic pediatric RES. PMID:25583087

  5. [Families with recurrent cases of Waardenburg-Klein syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bliumina, M G; Moskovkina, A G

    1985-06-01

    Deaf children with the type I Waardenburg--Klein syndrome were studied. Secondary cases were found in 14 unrelated and 1 incest families. In 10 families probands and all their affected relatives had the type I Waardenburg--Klein syndrome. In 4 families patients were discovered with both type I and type II syndromes. In an incest family the proband seemed to have the type III, while his mother and father (sibs) had type II and their grandmother the type I syndrome. These results contradict the hypothesis claiming the origin of different types of Waardenburg--Klein syndrome to be due to the action of different genes. It is proposed that types I and II, or all types of the syndrome are caused by a single dominant gene. Potential mechanisms for clinical polymorphism of Waardenburg--Klein syndrome are related to incomplete penetrance and varying expression of this gene. PMID:4029612

  6. Parry Romberg syndrome with localized scleroderma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohsin; Khan, Mubeen; Negi, Raju

    2014-01-01

    Parry Romberg syndrome(PRS) is a rare acquired poorly understood neurocutaneous syndrome of unknown etiology characterized by slow progressive atrophic changes commonly affecting one half of the face. The exact incidence and etiology towards the syndrome remains unclear. Apart from the multifactorial etiology proposed, the possible primary cause is mainly attributed to the cerebral disturbance of the fat metabolism. The syndrome overlaps with “en coup de sabre” morphea, with an ill defined relationship existing between the two. Parry Romberg Syndrome is an invalidating lesion that may be associated with different neurological, cutaneous, ocular, dental and autoimmune abnormalities. This report presents one rare case of 22 years old female patient with Parry Romberg syndrome associated with localized scleroderma, accompanied by a brief review of literature with classical clinical, radiographic, histological findings and the treatment of progressive hemifacial atrophy. Key words:Parry Romberg syndrome, progressive facial hemiatrophy, morphea, localized scleroderma. PMID:25136439

  7. Genetics of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Apurva; Srivastava, Neena; Mittal, Balraj

    2016-10-01

    Numerous classical genetic studies have proved that genes are contributory factors for obesity. Genes are directly responsible for obesity associated disorders such as Bardet-Biedl and Prader-Willi syndromes. However, both genes as well as environment are associated with obesity in the general population. Genetic epidemiological approaches, particularly genome-wide association studies, have unraveled many genes which play important roles in human obesity. Elucidation of their biological functions can be very useful for understanding pathobiology of obesity. In the near future, further exploration of obesity genetics may help to develop useful diagnostic and predictive tests for obesity treatment. PMID:27605733

  8. BBS10 encodes a vertebrate-specific chaperonin-like protein and is a major BBS locus.

    PubMed

    Stoetzel, Corinne; Laurier, Virginie; Davis, Erica E; Muller, Jean; Rix, Suzanne; Badano, José L; Leitch, Carmen C; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Corbani, Sandra; Jalk, Nadine; Vicaire, Serge; Sarda, Pierre; Hamel, Christian; Lacombe, Didier; Holder, Muriel; Odent, Sylvie; Holder, Susan; Brooks, Alice S; Elcioglu, Nursel H; Silva, Eduardo D; Da Silva, Eduardo; Rossillion, Béatrice; Sigaudy, Sabine; de Ravel, Thomy J L; Lewis, Richard Alan; Leheup, Bruno; Verloes, Alain; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Mégarbané, André; Poch, Olivier; Bonneau, Dominique; Beales, Philip L; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Katsanis, Nicholas; Dollfus, Hélène

    2006-05-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy. Although nine BBS genes have been cloned, they explain only 40-50% of the total mutational load. Here we report a major new BBS locus, BBS10, that encodes a previously unknown, rapidly evolving vertebrate-specific chaperonin-like protein. We found BBS10 to be mutated in about 20% of an unselected cohort of families of various ethnic origins, including some families with mutations in other BBS genes, consistent with oligogenic inheritance. In zebrafish, mild suppression of bbs10 exacerbated the phenotypes of other bbs morphants. PMID:16582908

  9. Hurler syndrome: orofacial, dental, and skeletal findings of a case.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Arpita Rai; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G; Sattur, Atul

    2015-04-01

    Hurler syndrome is a disorder of mucopolysaccharide metabolism caused due to inherited deficiencies of lysosomal α-l-iduronidase activity. We present a case of a 15-year-old male patient presenting with clinical and laboratory characteristics of the syndrome. A rare combination of skeletal, ophthalmologic, and dental findings was observed in this patient. Mucopolysaccharides excretion spot test of urine was positive and an assay of alpha-l-iduronidase enzyme was deficient, confirming the clinical diagnosis of Hurler syndrome. PMID:25134498

  10. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome: Report of four Alberta cases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ameeta E; Werker, Denise H; Boychuk, Lesia R; Miedzinski, Lilly J

    1995-01-01

    Four Alberta cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome are reported. Three cases required intensive care, with one experiencing a fulminant course resulting in death. A fourth case with milder illness was identified after epidemiological investigations. Ribavirin was used in one patient who experienced a successful outcome. A recent open label trial has not supported the efficacy of this drug. The epidemiology of Peromyscus maniculatus, the primary rodent host, and the clinical features of this syndrome are summarized. PMID:22514394

  11. Megacystis-Microcolon-Intestinal Hypoperistalsis Syndrome Associated With Prune Belly Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Alladi, Anand; Siddappa, OS

    2012-01-01

    Megacystis Microcolon Intestinal Hypoperistalsis Syndrome is a quite rare congenital anomaly that presents with a functional obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract which is usually fatal. It is three to four times more prevalent in females. We present a case of a rare association of a male neonate with Megacystis Microcolon Intestinal Hypoperistalsis Syndrome who in addition had the classical triad of Prune Belly Syndrome and thus suggest a possibility of different spectrums with a common pathogenesis. PMID:26023385

  12. [Gorlin syndrome with osteoma in the maxillary sinus (case report)].

    PubMed

    Sevinç, Halil; Oztürk, Mustafa; Mavili, Ertuğrul; Ozyazgan, Irfan

    2004-12-01

    Gorlin syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas of the skin, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, various skeletal abnormalities, and lamellar falx calsifications. Many associated lesions have been reported. In this report, we present a case of Gorlin syndrome with an osteoma in the maxillary sinus which has never been reported in the literature. PMID:15611914

  13. [A case of Sweet's syndrome associated with Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Gonzálvez Perales, J L; Tamarit Ortí, R; Ballester Fayos, J; Jiménez Martínez, A; Antón Conejero, M D; Rodríguez Gil, F J; Moreno Osset, E; González Martínez, M A

    1997-03-01

    The Sweet syndrome or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis is a well characterized cutaneous disease from a clinical and histological point of view and is frequently associated with systemic diseases. Prognosis is favorable with good response to corticoid therapy. A well documented case of Sweet syndrome associated with an outbreak of Crohn's disease with peculiar good therapeutic response is reported. PMID:9162534

  14. Nine Years with Munchausen Syndrome: A Case of Psychogenic Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Mirac A.; Sahin, Sevki; Cinar, Nilgun; Tiyekli, Utkan; Karsidag, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Background Munchausen syndrome presenting with psychogenic dystonia is a rare condition. Phenomenology Shown A psychogenic dystonia case presenting with an acute onset of retrocollis, lower limb dystonia and bizarre gait was diagnosed as Munchausen syndrome. Educational Value Recognizing psychogenic dystonia avoids unnecessary investigations and provides successful treatment.

  15. Unusual manifestation of the yellow nail syndrome - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Papaiordanou, Francine; Epstein, Marina Gabrielle; Miyaoka, Mariana Yumi; Yang, Jeane Jeong Hoon; Pires, Mario Cezar

    2014-01-01

    The yellow nail syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the classic triad of yellow and dystrophic nails, lymphedema and pleural effusion. We report in this paper a case of yellow nail syndrome, presenting the classic triad of the disease, associated with an unusual lymph accumulation in the abdomen region. PMID:24937826

  16. The retinal ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Adams, N A; Awadein, Ahmed; Toma, Hassanain S

    2007-09-01

    While the functions of many of the proteins located in or associated with the photoreceptor cilia are poorly understood, disruption of the function of these proteins may result in a wide variety of phenotypes ranging from isolated retinal degeneration to more pleiotropic phenotypes. Systemic findings include neurosensory hearing loss, developmental delay, situs-inversus, infertility, disorders of limb and digit development, obesity, kidney disease, liver disease, and respiratory disease. The concept of "retinal ciliopathies" brings to attention the importance of further molecular analysis of this organelle as well as provides a potential common target for therapies for these disorders. The retinal ciliopathies include retinitis pigmentosa, macular degeneration, cone-dystrophy, cone-rod dystrophy, Leber congenital amaurosis, as well as retinal degenerations associated with Usher syndrome, primary ciliary dyskinesia, Senior-Loken syndrome, Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Laurence-Moon syndrome, McKusick-Kaufman syndrome, and Biemond syndrome. Mutations for these disorders have been found in retinitis pigmentosa-1 (RP1), retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR), retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein (RPGR-IP), as well as the Usher, Bardet-Biedl, and nephronophthisis genes. Other systemic disorders associated with retinal degenerations that may also involve ciliary abnormalities include: Alstrom, Edwards-Sethi, Ellis-van Creveld, Jeune, Meckel-Gruber, Orofaciodigital Type 9, and Gurrieri syndromes. Understanding these conditions as ciliopathies may help the ophthalmologist to recognize associations between seemingly unrelated diseases and have a high degree of suspicion that a systemic finding may be present. PMID:17896309

  17. A Case Report of Reiter's Syndrome with Progressive Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Kyoung; An, Jae Young; Park, Min Soo; Kim, Byoung Joon

    2007-12-01

    Reiter's syndrome belongs to the family of spondyloarthropathies that usually present with a triad of arthritis, urethritis, and uveitis. The diagnostic criteria include clinical, radiological, and genetic findings, and the response to treatment. Nervous system involvement in Reiter's syndrome is extremely rare. We report here on a 36-year-old man who initially presented with progressive cervical myelopathy and was diagnosed as Reiter's syndrome 2 years later. The myelopathy was stable after treatment with methotrexate and sulfasalazine. This case suggests that Reiter's syndrome can present as progressive myelopathy and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of treatable myelopathies. PMID:19513137

  18. [Munchausen's syndrome: a factitious disorder? A case report].

    PubMed

    Reich, E; Kajosh, H; Verbanck, P; Kornreich, C

    2013-01-01

    Munchausen's syndrome is classified as a chronic factitious disorder with predominant physical signs and symptoms. Several symptoms are specific to this disorder, such as travelling and pseudologia fantastica. Others symptoms, such as multiple physical complaints with no organic substrate, are shared with somatoform disorders. We report a case showing how difficult it is to diagnose a Munchausen syndrome. We discuss also the opportunity to classify such a syndrome as a factitious disorder. Indeed, several authors suggest classifying Munchausen syndrome as a subtype of somatoform disorders, as those two disorders share a lot of characteristics. PMID:24505869

  19. A case of Sheehan's syndrome with delirium.

    PubMed

    Umekawa, T; Yoshida, T; Sakane, N; Kondo, M

    1996-12-01

    A 53 year old woman was brought to a psychiatric clinic because of delirium. Upon immediate examination, severe hyponatremia (105 mEq/L) was detected. She was suspected of having internal diseases and referred to our university hospital. When she reached our hospital she was delirious and showed excitement and agitation. Her electroencephalogram showed low voltage theta waves (20 microV) in all leads. She was hospitalized and diagnosed with acute tonsillar abscess and panhypopituitarism based on various endocrine tests. Her past history suggested that Sheehan's syndrome had developed after child-bearing at age 31, resulting in panhypopituitarism. After administration of antibiotics, the fever and tonsillar abscess gradually recovered, and the correction of electrolytes improved the level of consciousness, suggesting that the hyponatremia had been closely related to the clouding of consciousness. As the subsequent administration of cortisol kept the patient's serum sodium levels within the normal range, a decrease in plasma cortisol seemed to be the major cause of the hyponatremia. Psychological symptoms of panhypopituitarism often included abulia, apathy and occasionally coma. However, it is rare for a patient with panhypopituitarism to be misdiagnosed as having a psychiatric disease with delirium. This rare case is presented. PMID:9014231

  20. Goldenhar Syndrome: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Ruchi; Pati, Abhishek Ranjan; Bhuyan, Sanat Kumar; Nayak, Bikash Bishwadarshee

    2016-01-01

    Goldenhar Syndrome or oculoauriculovertebral spectrum is a complex syndrome characterized by an association of maxillomandibular hypoplasia, deformity of the ear, ocular dermoid and vertebral anomalies and the most severe form of hemifacial microsomia. Here, we describe a 26-year-old male patient with unilateral hemifacial microsomia, preauricular ear tags, macrosomia on the right side of the face. PMID:27601832

  1. [Yunis-Varon syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Elizondo-Dueñaz, Ricardo; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo; Marcos Abdala, Hernán; López-Altamirano, Marcelo; Martínez-Menchaca, Héctor R

    2012-01-01

    In 1980, Yunis-Varon described this disease. Yunis-Varon syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease. This cleidocranial dysplasia is characterized by bone and tooth disorders, in addition tends to affect the cardiovascular system and tissues from ectoderm. This report describes the radiologic image of a patient with Yunis-Varon syndrome. PMID:22367312

  2. Goldenhar Syndrome: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Bhuyan, Ruchi; Pati, Abhishek Ranjan; Bhuyan, Sanat Kumar; Nayak, Bikash Bishwadarshee

    2016-01-01

    Goldenhar Syndrome or oculoauriculovertebral spectrum is a complex syndrome characterized by an association of maxillomandibular hypoplasia, deformity of the ear, ocular dermoid and vertebral anomalies and the most severe form of hemifacial microsomia. Here, we describe a 26-year-old male patient with unilateral hemifacial microsomia, preauricular ear tags, macrosomia on the right side of the face. PMID:27601832

  3. Double crush syndrome in the lower extremity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Borgia, Anthony V; Hruska, Jerome K; Braun, Karina

    2012-01-01

    Upton and McComas first described double crush syndrome in 1973. The theory behind double crush syndrome postulated that a proximal lesion in a nerve would make that same nerve more vulnerable to additional distal lesions. Many of the studies investigating the possibility of the double crush syndrome involve lesions in the upper extremity with very few articles written specifically about double crush syndrome in the lower extremity. We present the case of a 33-year-old massage therapist who uses her feet to provide therapy to clients who presented to our clinic with symptoms consistent with tarsal tunnel syndrome. Her failure to progress in a satisfactory manner after a variety of therapies made us search for additional etiologies for her foot pain. In cases where tarsal tunnel persists after surgical therapy, the treating physician should search for more proximal lesions along the course of the nerve. PMID:22826333

  4. Karyotype revealed 47, xxy chromosome (Klinefelter syndrome): a case report.

    PubMed

    Jha, Chandra Bhushan; Dhungel, Shaligram; Rai, Dilip

    2007-09-01

    The Klinefelter syndrome is most common chromosomal cause of male infertility. However, the many cases of the syndrome remain undiagnosed due to variations in clinical presentation. A patient attended to surgical OPD with complaints of loss of secondary sexual characteristics and infertility. Physical examination revealed tall stature, thin built, small testes size, and absence of beard and pubic hairs. Karyotype and biochemical tests were performed to detect chromosomal abnormality as well hormonal level to confirm the diagnosis of androgen deficiency syndrome. Chromosomal complement confirmed the case of Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY) causing androgen deficiency. Timely detection of Klinefelter syndrome is important to formulate further treatment modalities for the benefit of the patient. PMID:18092444

  5. [Brown-Vialleto-van Laere syndrome: report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, J T; Moreira, P R; Cardoso, F; Perpétuo, F O

    1995-12-01

    Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome is a rare hereditary or sporadic degenerative disorder characterised by progressive sensoryneural deafness, followed or accompanied by cranial nerve palsies. The anterior horn cells and the optic pathways may be involved in some cases. We report two cases, and comment the differential diagnosis and the relationships of this syndrome to the muscle spinal atrophies and the hereditary deafness. PMID:8729774

  6. Intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Palla, Viktoria-Varvara; Karaolanis, Georgios; Pentazos, Panagiotis; Ladopoulos, Alexios; Papageorgiou, Evaggelos

    2015-06-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a clinical entity that includes loss of energy, fluid, electrolytes or micronutrient balance because of inadequate functional intestinal length. This case report demonstrates the case of a woman who compensated for short bowel syndrome through intestinal adaptation, which is a complex process worthy of further investigation for the avoidance of dependence on total parenteral nutrition and of intestinal transplantation in such patients. PMID:26206429

  7. Fahr's Syndrome Associated with Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Umit; Kahilogullari, Gökmen; Demirel, Altan; Arat, Anıl; Unlu, Agahan

    2016-01-01

    Fahr's Syndrome is characterized by the presence of intracerebral, bilateral and symmetrical calcifications located in bilateral basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. The etiology is not exactly known. The authors reported a very rare case who had Fahr's Syndrome and intracerebral aneurysms simultaneously. The patient was female and presented with headache. Her examinations revealed aneurysms on the middle cerebral artery, internal carotid artery and ophthalmic artery. That is the first case reported in the literature having multiple intracranial aneurysms and Fahr's Syndrome together. PMID:27400114

  8. Battered Child Syndrome; a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Pezeshki, Arastoo; Rahmani, Farzad; Ebrahimi Bakhtavar, Hanieh; Fekri, Sanaz

    2015-01-01

    One of the important and usual missed causes of pediatric traumas is child abuse. This ominous phenomenon, which can be presented physically, psychologically, sexually, and emotionally has grown significantly in recent years. Many children are not diagnosed in the early stages of evaluation. Battered Child Syndrome is used to describe the clinical condition of the child serious physical abuse by parents or caregivers. Medical staff should always keep the syndrome in their mind for those brought to the emergency department with trauma. In this report, we described a patient complained of dysphagia following a falling from a height and multiple epidural hematomas and final diagnosis of battered child syndrome. PMID:26495388

  9. [Wilkie syndrome: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Fernández López, Ma T; López Otero, Ma J; Bardasco Alonso, Ma L; Álvarez Vázquez, P; Rivero Luis, Ma T; García Barros, G

    2011-01-01

    Wilkie syndrome is an unusual form of high gastrointestinal obstruction resulting from compression of the duodenum between the abdominal aorta and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The conditions that cause this syndrome can be classified into five categories: severe wasting diseases, severe injuries, diseases, deformity or trauma to the spine, dietary disorders and posoperative state. The symptoms include nausea, vomiting, distention postprandrial, epigastric pain and weight loss. Barium meal and arteriography were used as diagnostic tools, now CT-angiography is being used and shown higher diagnostic sensitivity. The diagnostic criteria are: dilated duodenum, compression of the duodenum by the SMA and aortomesenteric angle <20 degrees. Patients with acute syndrome often respond to conservative treatment (decompression, correction of dehydration and electrolyte imbalance and nutrition support). Most of the patients with chronic syndrome require surgical intervention. Duodenojejunostomy is the most effective surgical option, with a success rate of 90%. PMID:21892587

  10. Anaesthesia and Rett syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maguire, D; Bachman, C

    1989-07-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder of females characterized by dementia, autism, movement disorders and an abnormality of respiratory control. A 14-year-old girl with Rett Syndrome underwent spinal fusion surgery under general anaesthesia. No exacerbation of the respiratory control defect with surgery and anaesthesia was observed. Hypothermia, ongoing blood loss and a normal anion gap acidosis were encountered, but were not attributable to features of this disorder. PMID:2758549

  11. [Nephrotic syndrome revealed by pulmonary embolism: about four cases].

    PubMed

    Chaudesaygues, E; Grasse, M; Marchand, L; Villar, E; Aupetit, J-F

    2014-11-01

    Nephrotic syndrom is an association of proteinuria>3g/d or 50mg/kg/d, an hypoalbuminemia<30g/L and a hypoproteinemia<60g/L. Primary etiologies are minimal glomerular injury, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and non membranous glomerulonephritis. Secondary etiologies are diabetes, high blood pressure and amyloidosis. We present four cases about nephrotic syndrome after thromboembolic disease. In every case, patients show a pulmonary embolism symptomatic of a nephrotic syndrom, whose diagnostic could be delayed up to six months after first pulmonary symptoms. This raised the problem of renal biopsy in these patients who need anticoagulation. In minimal change nephrosis, without hematuria, high blood pressure or renal dysfonction, a corticosteroid therapy test could be done assuming that is corticosensitive minimal glomerular injury. In every case, anticoagulation course must be completed and maintained in case of patent nephrotic syndrom with an albuminemia under 20g/L. In case of pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis, idiopathic-looking, a nephrotic syndrome must be sought-after. The two diagnosis ways are the proteinuria on the urine dipstick and the hypoproteinemia on usual biology. The main mechanism is the coagulation factor leak, side effect of the nephrotic syndrom, notably because of the antithrombin III. PMID:25281996

  12. Syndromic odontogenic keratocyst: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Fazil

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) may occur in two different forms, either as solitary (nonsyndromic OKCs) or as multiple OKCs (syndromic OKCs). Multiple OKCs usually occur as one of the findings in Gorlin–Goltz syndrome with other features such as skin carcinomas and rib, eye, and neurologic abnormalities. We report a rare case of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with a slow growing swelling on lower right and left back teeth region since 2 months. Apart from these, other findings were frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, ocular hypertelorism, prominent supra orbital ridge, and mild mandibular prognathism. Excision was done and microscopic study revealed OKC and the follow-up could not be carried out for the complete management. We also presented a review of its pathogenesis, criterion, and differences between syndromic and nonsyndromic OKCs and suggest to thoroughly examine any patient who presents with multiple OKCs to rule out syndromic variety. PMID:27011939

  13. Lemierre's syndrome and genetic polymorphisms: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Constantin, Jean-Michel; Mira, Jean-Paul; Guerin, Renaud; Cayot-Constantin, Sophie; Lesens, Olivier; Gourdon, Florence; Romaszko, Jean-Pierre; Linval, Philippe; Laurichesse, Henri; Bazin, Jean-Etienne

    2006-01-01

    Background Lemierre's syndrome presents a classic clinical picture, the pathophysiology of which remains obscure. Attempts have been made to trace genetic predispositions that modify the host detection of pathogen or the resultant systemic reaction. Case presentation A 17-year old female, with no previous medical history, was admitted to the intensive care unit for septic shock, acute respiratory distress syndrome and Lemierre's syndrome. Her DNA was assayed for single nucleotide polymorphisms previously incriminated in the detection of the pathogen, the inflammatory response and the coagulation cascade. We observed functional variations in her Toll like 5 receptor (TLR 5) gene and two coagulation variations (Tissue Factor (TF) 603 and Plasminogen-Activator-Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) 4G-4G homozygosity) associated with thrombotic events. Conclusion The innate immune response and the prothrombogenic mutations could explain, at least in part, the symptoms of Lemierre's syndrome. Genomic study of several patients with Lemierre's syndrome may reveal its pathophysiology. PMID:16846490

  14. A Case of Good's Syndrome Presenting with Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Arunabha Datta; Tapadar, Sumit Roy; Dhua, Aparup; Dhara, Palash Nandan; Nandi, Saumen; Choudhury, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01

    Adult onset immunodeficiency associated with thymoma is a rare condition. The combination of hypogammaglobulinemia, reduced number of peripheral B and CD4+ T cells, along with thymoma constitutes Good's syndrome (GS). This immunodeficiency condition is often complicated with opportunistic infection with organisms, like bacteria (Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumonia etc), viruses (Cytomegalovirus, Herpes simplex etc), fungi and protozoa. We present an unusual case of Good's syndrome with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). A 40-year-old man presented with sputum-positive PTB and was started on anti-tuberculosis treatment. Subsequently, he developed symptoms and findings consistent with thymoma and other components of Good's syndrome. Although patients of Good's syndrome are susceptible to various opportunistic infections, infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is uncommon. Evidence of recurrent infections or some opportunistic infection in a thymoma patient should trigger a suspicion of Good's syndrome. PMID:27164735

  15. [Skin reaction to carbamazepine or DRESS syndrome: a case presentation].

    PubMed

    Cabrera Fundora, Emigdio Jesús; Cabrera Osorio, Yuliet; Cabrera Osorio, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carbamazepine is a frequently used drug that can produce adverse reactions like vertigo, somnolence and severe skin reactions like Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms Syndrome (DRESS Syndrome). This syndrome is characterized by a late-appearing, slow-progressing cutaneous eruption accompanied by atypical lymphocytes, eosinophilia, and systemic symptoms such as fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatic compromise, and renal dysfunction that can be severe enough to cause death. We present a case that aims to highlight the importance of an early diagnosis of DRESS syndrome to adjust therapy and improve survival. The patient is a female patient prescribed carbamazepine for trigeminal neuralgia who presented with skin lesions, which were initially attributed to a hypersensitivity reaction. The lesions worsened in spite of treatment and systemic symptoms ensued. A diagnosis of DRESS syndrome was proposed and steroid treatment was initiated with rapid improvement. PMID:26938717

  16. [A case of Williams syndrome who exhibited fetishism].

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Masayuki; Kato, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a rare congenital disease in which the etiological locus is a micro-deletion in chromosome 7. Here, we describe the case of a 22-year-old male who was diagnosed with Williams syndrome at the age of 3 years. As a child, the patient exhibited patterns of behavior characteristic of this syndrome including hyperactivity, attention deficit, and over-friendliness. He also showed persistent interest in construction vehicles, playgrounds, and gloves. He became interested in gloves after watching a television program in which the heroine fought her enemies while wearing gloves. Watching pornographic movies allowed him to attach strong sexual significance to gloves when he was 19 years old. Since that time, he has assaulted women wearing gloves four times to rob them of the gloves. The current paper discusses both the role of the cognitive profile unique to Williams syndrome and that of environmental factors in the development of fetishism in this case. PMID:15669216

  17. Adolescent with Tourette Syndrome and Bipolar Disorder: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Young-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome consists of multiple motor tics and one or more vocal tics. Psychopathology occurs in approximately 90% of Tourette syndrome patients, with attention-deficit/hyperactivity, mood, and obsessive-compulsive disorders being common. Additionally, Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder may be related in some individuals. However, it is unclear why bipolar disorder may be overrepresented in Tourette syndrome patients, and more research is needed. Herein, we report the case of a 15-year-old boy diagnosed with both Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder, whose symptoms improved with aripiprazole, atomoxetine, and valproate. The patient was diagnosed with Tourette syndrome at 8 years of age when he developed tics and experienced his first depressive episode. The patient had a poor response to a variety of antidepressants and anti-tic medications. A combination of valproate and aripiprazole stabilized both the patient's tics and mood symptoms. It is important to assess individuals with Tourette syndrome for other disorders, including bipolar disorder. The treatment of children and adolescents with both Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder is an important clinical issue. PMID:25598829

  18. Sjögren's syndrome complicated with Fanconi syndrome and Hashimoto's thyroiditis: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingmin; Chen, Lei

    2016-06-01

    We report a unique case of Sjögren's syndrome complicated with Fanconi syndrome and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in a 53-year-old Chinese woman, initially found to have proteinuria, fatigue and multiple old costal fractures. Distal tubular dysfunction is the most common renal damage in Sjögren's syndrome, while Fanconi syndrome (which is caused by proximal tubular dysfunction) and Hypothyroidism are rare complications of Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:26966155

  19. Dual intersection syndrome of the forearm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhari, Bouchra; Edderai, Meryem; Boumdine, Hassan; Amil, Touriya; En-nouali, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    The intersection syndrome, described since the 19th century, is an uncommon disorder associated with rubbing at the crossing point between the first dorsal compartment muscles and the radial wrist extensor muscles. Imaging modalities used to diagnosis this syndrome includes ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. We reported a case of a 60-year-old man presented to our formation with painful swelling on the dorsum of the wrist and forearm. An MRI and an ultrasound were performed, and objectified a dual cross syndrome of the forearm. PMID:26587172

  20. Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: a case study and disease overview.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Regina

    2014-10-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is caused by a deletion of a segment on the short arm (p) of chromosome 4. The major features of this disorder include a characteristic facial appearance known as the "Greek helmet," delayed growth and development; prenatally and postnatally, intellectual disabilities, and seizures. To provide comprehensive and appropriate nursing and medical care to infants with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, it is imperative to know and understand the disorder. A case study of a 36 weeks' gestational age white-Hispanic male infant with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is presented with the purpose of increasing clinical knowledge and the implications for the clinical nurse and neonatal nurse practitioner. PMID:25137600

  1. Early onset marfan syndrome: Atypical clinical presentation of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Ozyurt, A; Baykan, A; Argun, M; Pamukcu, O; Halis, H; Korkut, S; Yuksel, Z; Gunes, T; Narin, N

    2015-01-01

    Early onset Marfan Syndrome (eoMFS) is a rare, severe form of Marfan Syndrome (MFS). The disease has a poor prognosis and most patients present with resistance to heart failure treatment during the newborn period. This report presents two cases of eoMFS with similar clinical features diagnosed in the newborn period and who died at an early age due to the complications related to the involvement of the cardiovascular system. PMID:26929908

  2. Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome treated with azathioprine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jonathan; Lee, Nicole; Sami, Naveed

    2015-01-01

    Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome (HSS) is a rare histologic variation of Sweet syndrome (SS) predominantly exhibiting mononuclear histiocytoid cells instead of neutrophils. We report a 22-year-old woman with HSS, who, after minimal improvement with colchicine and dapsone, had significant improvement of her cutaneous eruption and systemic symptoms following empiric treatment with azathioprine. Since azathioprine has historically been known to cause SS, this case highlights a previously unreported treatment response for the histiocytoid variant. PMID:26436977

  3. Dhat syndrome in a female- a case report.

    PubMed

    Singh, G; Avasthi, A; Pravin, D

    2001-10-01

    Dhat syndrome is a commonly diagnosed disorder in Indian male patients. Patients present with various physical and mental symptoms which are attributed to the passage of "Dhat"(commonly semen) in urine. A case of an adult female is described who presented with complaints of aches and pains, headaches and poor concentration which she attributed to "wetness" experienced per vaginum during sexual intercourse. Arguments are presented for the existence of "Female Dhat Syndrome" PMID:21407885

  4. Meckel-Gruber syndrome: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Panduranga, C; Kangle, Ranjit; Badami, Rajshree; Patil, Prakash V

    2012-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by a combination of renal cysts and variably associated with features including developmental anomalies of the central nervous system (typically encephalocele), hepatic ductal dysplasia, cysts, and polydactyly. It is a rare syndrome with highest incidence in Gujarati Indians and Finnish population. We report two such cases of MKS in non-Gujarati Indian which were diagnosed by neonatal autopsy. PMID:22346195

  5. Sheehan's Syndrome A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Errarhay, S; Kamaoui, I; Bouchikhi, C; Châara, H; Bouguern, H; Tizniti, S; Melhouf, A; Banani, A

    2009-01-01

    Post-partum pituitary necrosis (Sheehan's syndrome) is a rare complication of post-partum hemorrhage. The diagnosis can be erratic and often delayed. In this case report of Sheehan's syndrome in the post-partum period, the signs were characterized by agalactia, severe hypoglycemia, and low serum levels of thyroid hormones, cortico-adrenal hormones, and gonadotrophin (FSH, LH). The hypophyseal magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of hypopituitarism secondary to pituitary necrosis. PMID:21483515

  6. Sheehan's Syndrome A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Errarhay, S; Kamaoui, I; Bouchikhi, C; Châara, H; Bouguern, H; Tizniti, S; Melhouf, A; Banani, A

    2009-01-01

    Post-partum pituitary necrosis (Sheehan's syndrome) is a rare complication of post-partum hemorrhage. The diagnosis can be erratic and often delayed. In this case report of Sheehan's syndrome in the post-partum period, the signs were characterized by agalactia, severe hypoglycemia, and low serum levels of thyroid hormones, cortico-adrenal hormones, and gonadotrophin (FSH, LH). The hypophyseal magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of hypopituitarism secondary to pituitary necrosis. PMID:21483515

  7. Bleeding ears: a case of Munchausen syndrome by proxy.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, H; Cuddihy, P J; Marnane, C

    2001-03-01

    A case is presented of a child who initially presented with genuine aural symptoms and pathology. Over a period of time it became apparent that the persistent aural bleeding, which is an uncommon feature of Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media, was the result of trauma inflicted by its mother; a case of Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSBP). PMID:11223457

  8. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Maya; Krishnan, Ramesh; Chalakkal, Paul; Paul, George

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) is an infrequent multisystemic disease with an autosomal dominant trait, with complete penetrance and variable expressivity, though sporadic cases have been described. This article includes a case report and an extensive review of the GGS with regard to its history, incidence, etiology, features, investigations, diagnostic criteria, keratocystic odontogenic tumor and treatment modalities. PMID:26604511

  9. Antisynthetase syndrome: two cases presenting orofacial manifestations.

    PubMed

    Gormley, M; Scully, C

    2014-03-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome is a rare autoimmune disease that is characterised by inflammatory myositis, and interstitial lung disease or chronic arthropathy, or both. To the best of our knowledge, orofacial manifestations have not previously been reported. We present 2 patients with orofacial disease: one with aphthous-like oral ulceration and the other with hyposalivation. PMID:24377442

  10. Kasabach – Merritt syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Nader M

    2013-01-01

    Kasabach-Merritt syndrome is characterised by the combination of rapidly growing vascular tumour, thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia and consumptive coagulopathy. The blood clotting disorder results from platelets and other clotting factors of the blood being used up within the tumor. We report a two- and- half month old Saudi female infant who presented with epistaxis, conjunctival haemorrage and bilateral periorbital ecchymosis.

  11. [Klinefelter's syndrome: diagnosis and treatment. Case report].

    PubMed

    Martini, R

    2001-10-01

    Klinefelter's syndrome affects 1 in 500 men across all ethnic groups but the diagnosis is often delayed because of substantial variations in clinical presentation. A 26 year-old male came to observation for chronic fatigue. His laboratory data and radiological examination were negative. Examination showed eunuchoidal body habitus with sparse facial hair, small and firm testes and no gynecomastia. The patient had heterosexual orientation with regular sexual intercourses but diminished libido. Serum gonadotropin concentrations were raised while serum testosterone concentration was low-normal level. Serum PRL concentration and thyroid function were normal. Seminal analysis revealed azoospermia and peripheral lymphocyte karyotyping showed a 47,XXY karyotype, confirming diagnostic suspicion. Patient was given testosterone enanthate 200 mg intramuscularly every 2 weeks. He noted improvements in fatigue and libido and increase of muscle mass. Since the true prevalence of Klinefelter's syndrome is very high, the diagnosis of this disease should be considered in every men with complaints related to hypogonadism (fatigue, weakness, gynecomastia, infertility, erectile dysfunction, small testis and osteoporosis). Testosterone replacement therapy should be started early to minimize the physical and psychological effects of androgen deficiency. There have been recent advances in the options for the treatment of infertility in patients with Klinefelter's syndrome: however findings that this syndrome may be transmitted by the new assisted reproductive techniques is cause for concern. PMID:11675582

  12. Churg-Strauss syndrome: a case report*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Gabriel Lacerda; Teixeira, Arivaldo Araújo; Antón, Ana Graziela Santana; Reis, Alan Timóteo Rodrigues; de Freitas, Ana Carolina Rezende; Basílio, Dunya Bachour

    2014-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a rare systemic disease primarily characterized by hypereosinophilia, asthma and vasculitis. The lung is the organ most frequently involved. In the present report, the authors describe a relatively rare finding in this disease - the presence of a pulmonary nodule -, while recalling the main radiological findings and the most relevant differential diagnoses. PMID:25741095

  13. Rett Syndrome: A Longitudinal Developmental Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, Norman; Veydt, Nicole

    1990-01-01

    The clinical course of development of a 14-year-old girl with Rett Syndrome is outlined. Results indicated a general stagnation in gross and fine motor skills, self-help skills, communication, and cognition, beginning at approximately 15 months. No skills progressed beyond the 2-year level despite several years of intensive intervention.…

  14. Alagille syndrome case report: implications for forensic pathology and anthropology.

    PubMed

    Petaros, Anja; Miletic, Damir; Stifter, Sanja; Slaus, Mario; Stemberga, Valter

    2015-05-01

    This case report offers a multidisciplinary interpretation of the violent death of a 4-year-old girl suffering from Alagille syndrome who died after a low-height fall that resulted in temporal bone fracture and a large epidural hematoma. The article evidences the macroscopical and microscopical characteristics of the syndrome, focusing especially on the skeletal findings that emerged during autopsy. In the case report, distinction is made between a possible accidental or non-accidental nature of the injuries and the characteristics of the injury have been interpreted in the light of the existing data on Alagille syndrome. In conclusion, the death was documented as accidental since abnormalities in the skeletal system evidenced during autopsy have predisposed the death of the child albeit through a very mild head trauma. The case report evidences the importance of studying features of skull macro- and microstructure in patients with Alagille syndrome, which have been, until now, underreported in literature and which might contribute to fracture vulnerability in these patients. Although rare, Alagille syndrome is a condition that should be known to forensic medicine practitioners and whose features and peculiarities must be taken into consideration in pediatric autopsy and suspected child abuse cases. PMID:25194709

  15. Mirizzi syndrome associated with hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Oliver; Faroug, Radwane; Davidson, Brian R; Goode, J Antony

    2008-01-01

    Introduction This is the first case report of Mirizzi syndrome associated with hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm. Case presentation A 54-year-old man presented with painful obstructive jaundice and weight loss. Computed tomography showed a hilar mass in the liver. Following an episode of haemobilia, angiography demonstrated a pseudoaneurysm of a branch of the right hepatic artery that was embolised. At surgery, a gallstone causing Mirizzi type II syndrome was found to be responsible for the biliary obstruction and a necrotic inflammatory mass and haematoma were found to be extending into the liver. The mass was debrided and drained, the obstructing stones removed and the bile duct drained with a t-tube. The patient made a full recovery. Conclusion This case highlights another situation where there may be difficulty in differentiating Mirizzi syndrome from biliary tract cancer. PMID:19014690

  16. Two Cases of Heerfordt's Syndrome: A Rare Manifestation of Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Yasushi; Fukuda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Heerfordt's syndrome is a rare manifestation of sarcoidosis characterized by the presence of facial nerve palsy, parotid gland enlargement, anterior uveitis, and low grade fever. Two cases of Heerfordt's syndrome and a literature review are presented. Case  1. A 53-year-old man presented with swelling of his right eyelid, right facial nerve palsy, and swelling of his right parotid gland. A biopsy specimen from the swollen eyelid indicated sarcoidosis and he was diagnosed with incomplete Heerfordt's syndrome based on the absence of uveitis. His symptoms were improved by corticosteroid therapy. Case  2. A 55-year-old woman presented with left facial nerve palsy, bilateral hearing loss, and swelling of her bilateral parotid glands. She had been previously diagnosed with uveitis and bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy. Although no histological confirmation was performed, she was diagnosed with complete Heerfordt's syndrome on the basis of her clinical symptoms. Swelling of the bilateral parotid glands and left facial nerve palsy were improved immediately by corticosteroid therapy. Sarcoidosis is a relatively uncommon disease for the otolaryngologist. However, the otolaryngologist may encounter Heerfordt's syndrome as this syndrome presents with facial nerve palsy and swelling of the parotid gland. Therefore, we otolaryngologists should diagnose and treat Heerfordt's syndrome appropriately in cooperation with pneumologists and ophthalmologists. PMID:26885424

  17. Waardenburg syndrome--a case report.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Yuvika; Jain, Parul; Goyal, Gaurav; Singh, Malvika; Mishra, Chittranjan

    2013-02-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by varying degree of deafness associated with pigmentary anomaly and defects of neural crest cell derived structures. Four subtypes (I-IV) with variable penetrance and gene expression of different clinical features have been described. We report a patient showing constellation of complete heterochromia, dystopia canthorum, white forelock, and synophrys. Other affected family relatives with heterochromia have been depicted in pedigree. PMID:23121842

  18. Waardenburg Syndrome type 1: A case report.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Gulsen Tukenmez; Atıs, Guldehan; Altunay, Ilknur Kıvanc

    2011-01-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is a rare hereditary disorder that is characterized by the clinical manifestations of oculocutaneous anomalies of pigmentation, congenital deafness, dystopia canthorum, and broad nasal root. It demonstrates both genetically and clinically heterogenous characteristics. In this article, we report an 11-month-old boy with WS1, one of four clinicat types of WS. He exhibited white forelock, hypopigmented macules and patches, heterochromia irides, and dystopia canthorum. PMID:22136859

  19. Wallenberg's Syndrome: An Unusual Case of Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Aurora Loaeza-del; Barahona-Garrido, Josué; Criales, Sergio; Chang-Menéndez, Sergio; Torre, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with sudden-onset oropharyngeal dysphagia and vomiting of central etiology. Neurological evaluation showed uvula deviation to the left, paresis of the mid-right portion of the soft palate, lateralization of gaze to the right side, and dysphonia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an infarction in the left lateral medullary region, therefore the diagnosis of Wallenberg's syndrome was established. The neurological issues along with the dysphagia gradually improved and the patient was discharged. PMID:21487559

  20. Kabuki syndrome: a new case associated with Becker nevus.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Laura; Betlloch, Isabel; Toledo, Fernando; Latorre, Nuria; Monteagudo, Almudena Flavia

    2011-01-01

    Kabuki syndrome or Kabuki makeup syndrome was first described in 1981 in Japan by two different groups of authors. These investigators described a group of patients sharing typical facial features, skeletal anomalies, mental retardation, short stature, and dermatoglyphic anomalies. The term Kabuki makeup syndrome was coined because the peculiar facial features of the patients were reminiscent of the Japanese Kabuki theater masks. In 1988, Niikawa et al, after studying 62 patients, proposed five diagnostic criteria for this disease: peculiar facies (in 100% of all patients), skeletal anomalies (92%), dermatoglyphic anomalies (93%), medium to moderate mental retardation (92%), and short stature (83% of all cases). In addition to these findings, a variety of anomalies have been associated with this syndrome - the most serious being cardiac, renal, and urogenital abnormalities. We present a case of Kabuki syndrome in a 6-year-old boy who, in addition to the various features typical of the disease, also exhibited a Becker nevus - a condition not previously associated with this syndrome. The usefulness of dermoscopy in studying alterations in the dermatoglyphic patterns is also discussed. PMID:21906481

  1. Dental management of patient with Williams Syndrome - A case report.

    PubMed

    Wong, Daniel; Ramachandra, Srinivas Sulugodu; Singh, Ashish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a multisystemic rare genetic disorder caused by deletion of 26-28 genes in the long arm of chromosome 7. It is characterized by developmental and physical abnormalities including congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, mental retardation, neurological features, growth deficiency, genitourinary manifestations, gastrointestinal problems, musculoskeletal problems, unique behavioral characteristics, and dental problems. Dental abnormalities include malocclusion, hypodontia, malformed teeth, taurodontism, pulp stones, increased space between teeth, enamel hypoplasia, and high prevalence of dental caries. Authors report a 17-year-old female patient with underlying Williams syndrome. Oral features and problems seen in the patient are listed. Malocclusion and screwdriver shaped teeth were noticed. Generalized widening of the periodontal ligament space with vital teeth was seen. This finding has not been reported in cases of Williams syndrome earlier. Precautions taken during dental treatment in patients with Williams syndrome are also discussed. PMID:26321847

  2. A case of nephrotic syndrome associated with hydatiform mole

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadjafari, Razieh; Abedi, Parvin; Belady, Syfolah; Hamidehkho, Tarlan; Razi, Taghi

    2010-01-01

    The present case study is on a 16-year-old woman who was suffering from nephrotic syndrome after recovery from complete type of hydatiform mole. She was admitted in hospital because of proteinurea and hematuria. Then she was showing a generalized edema compatible with neprhotic syndrome. In her past medical history she had a suction curettage for hydatiform mole. After she received 4 courses chemotherapy, she completely recovered and βhCG has fallen from 12127 IU/L to under 10 IU/mL. Then she showed generalized edema, proteinurea and hematuria compatible with nephritic syndrome. After six courses chemotherapy the symptoms of nephrotic syndrome and invasive mole diminished, she released from hospital and scheduled for follow-up. PMID:21234253

  3. [A rare case of thermoregulation disorder: Shapiro syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Júlia; Zádori, Dénes; Varga, Edina Tímea; Vécsei, László

    2016-02-14

    Anomalies of the corpus callosum are the most frequent malformations of the central nervous system. The triad of spontaneous periodic hypothermia and hyperhydrosis with the agenesis of corpus callosum is described as Shapiro syndrome. Shapiro syndrome is a very rare condition and it can occur in every age group. The presence of agenesis of corpus callosum is not a strict criteria of the syndrome; the most important presenting symptom is paroxysmal hypothermia. Although the definite cause of recurrent hypothermia is unknown, dysfunction of the hypothalamus is suspected. From therapeutic aspects, only supportive therapy is available. In this report the authors present the first Shapiro syndrome case diagnosed in Hungary. The main symptoms of the 21-year-old male patient were recurrent hyperhydrosis with hypothermia resulting in severe general malaise. The skull magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated agenesis of corpus callosum. The patient was treated with clonidine resulting in significant improvement of symptoms. PMID:26853729

  4. Langer-Giedion Syndrome: a Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Katge, Farhin Ali; Rusawat, Bhavesh Dahyabhai; Shivasharan, Pooja Ravindra; Patil, Devendra Pandurang

    2016-01-01

    Langer-Giedion syndrome is a very uncommon autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by the deletion of chromosomal material. It is characterized by multiple bony exostosis, short stature, mental retardation, and typical facial features. The characteristic appearance of individuals includes sparse scalp hair, rounded nose, prominent philtral area and thin upper lip. Some cases with this condition have loose skin in childhood which typically resolves with age. Oral and dental manifestations include micrognathia, retrognathia, hypodontia, and malocclusion based on cephalometric analysis. This report presents a case of Langer-Giedion syndrome in a 10-year-old child. PMID:27602401

  5. Histopathologic features in a case of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pace, Sarah; Bingham, Jonathan; Royer, Michael

    2015-12-01

    We describe a case of Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency (MKD) also known as Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D Syndrome (HIDS) presenting as a Sweet-like syndrome in a 5-week-old with multiple erythematous plaques, fever, aseptic meningitis, and bronchiolitis. The locations of the predominant plaques were periumbilical and periocular, which originally prompted concern for omphalitis and preseptal cellulitis. Histopathology demonstrated a neutrophilic and histiocytic dermatitis with prominent squamous syringometaplasia and leukocytoclasis in the absence of a vasculitis. This case is reported here due to the unique findings of a prominent histiocytic component in addition to the typically described neutrophilic infiltrate. PMID:26904447

  6. Steinert's syndrome presenting as anal incontinence: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Myotonic dystrophy (MD) or Steinert's syndrome is a rare cause of chronic diarrhea and anal incontinence. In the presence of chronic diarrhea and fecal incontinence with muscle weakness, neuromuscular disorders such as myotonic dystrophy should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Case Presentation We present the case of a 45-year-old Turkish man with Steinert's syndrome, who was not diagnosed until the age of 45. Conclusions In clinical practice, the persistence of diarrhea and fecal incontinence with muscle weakness should suggest that the physician perform an anal manometric study and electromyography. Neuromuscular disorders such as myotonic dystrophy should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:21838873

  7. Langer-Giedion Syndrome: a Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Katge, Farhin Ali; Rusawat, Bhavesh Dahyabhai; Shivasharan, Pooja Ravindra; Patil, Devendra Pandurang

    2016-09-01

    Langer-Giedion syndrome is a very uncommon autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by the deletion of chromosomal material. It is characterized by multiple bony exostosis, short stature, mental retardation, and typical facial features. The characteristic appearance of individuals includes sparse scalp hair, rounded nose, prominent philtral area and thin upper lip. Some cases with this condition have loose skin in childhood which typically resolves with age. Oral and dental manifestations include micrognathia, retrognathia, hypodontia, and malocclusion based on cephalometric analysis. This report presents a case of Langer-Giedion syndrome in a 10-year-old child. PMID:27602401

  8. Histopathologic features in a case of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Sarah; Bingham, Jonathan; Royer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency (MKD) also known as Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D Syndrome (HIDS) presenting as a Sweet-like syndrome in a 5-week-old with multiple erythematous plaques, fever, aseptic meningitis, and bronchiolitis. The locations of the predominant plaques were periumbilical and periocular, which originally prompted concern for omphalitis and preseptal cellulitis. Histopathology demonstrated a neutrophilic and histiocytic dermatitis with prominent squamous syringometaplasia and leukocytoclasis in the absence of a vasculitis. This case is reported here due to the unique findings of a prominent histiocytic component in addition to the typically described neutrophilic infiltrate. PMID:26904447

  9. Eagle Syndrome Causing Vascular Compression with Cervical Rotation: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Demirtaş, Hakan; Kayan, Mustafa; Koyuncuoğlu, Hasan Rıfat; Çelik, Ahmet Orhan; Kara, Mustafa; Şengeze, Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Eagle syndrome is a condition caused by an elongated styloid process. Unilateral face, neck and ear pain, stinging pain, foreign body sensation and dysphagia can be observed with this syndrome. Rarely, the elongated styloid process may cause pain by compressing the cervical segment of the internal carotid and the surrounding sympathetic plexus, and that pain spreading along the artery can cause neurological symptoms such as vertigo and syncope. Case Report In this case report we presented a very rare eagle syndrome with neurological symptoms that occurred suddenly with cervical rotation. The symptoms disappeared as suddenly as they occurred, with the release of pressure in neutral position. We also discussed CT angiographic findings of this case. Conclusions Radiological diagnosis of the Eagle syndrome that is manifested with a wide variety of symptoms and causes diagnostic difficulties when it is not considered in the differential diagnosis is easy in patients with specific findings. CT angiography is a fast and effective examination in terms of showing compression in patients with the Eagle syndrome that is considered to be atypical and causes vascular compression. PMID:27354882

  10. [Moebius syndrome : one case (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Legrand, J; Gillot, F

    1980-01-01

    The Moebius syndrome is a congenital anomaly characterized by paralysis of the sixth and seventh nerves. In some instances, there may be weakness of the adductors. The other muscles are normal. Visual acuity is not affected. Other congenital defects may be associated: polydactyly, defects of the ear and of the tongue. Etiology is probably an embryonal egression, cause of aplasia of the facial and abducens nucleï. The impossibility to move the eyes laterally in either direction, points to supranucleus involvement by defective development of the medial longitudinal fasciculus. Some people suggest that a myogen disturbance should be the principal and unique etiology. No evolution. No treatment. PMID:7451821

  11. Gingival Enlargement in a Case of Variant Jones Syndrome: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    DA, Roopa; Singh, Shinkhala; Gupta, Ira; Gopal, Saumiya

    2016-01-01

    Gingival enlargement can be caused by a variety of etiological factors like inflammation, drugs, and systemic diseases or can be presented as a part of a syndrome. One such syndrome is Jones Syndrome, which is associated with gingival enlargement and progressive hearing loss. We present here a case of fifteen-year-old boy with gingival enlargement, hearing loss, and generalized alveolar bone loss and diagnosed as Jones syndrome. The diagnosis was made based on history, clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings. Gingival enlargement was surgically managed using gingivectomy and no recurrence was observed. The patient showed remarkable esthetical and functional improvement. PMID:26966711

  12. Gingival Enlargement in a Case of Variant Jones Syndrome: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    DA, Roopa; Singh, Shinkhala; Gupta, Ira; Gopal, Saumiya

    2016-03-01

    Gingival enlargement can be caused by a variety of etiological factors like inflammation, drugs, and systemic diseases or can be presented as a part of a syndrome. One such syndrome is Jones Syndrome, which is associated with gingival enlargement and progressive hearing loss. We present here a case of fifteen-year-old boy with gingival enlargement, hearing loss, and generalized alveolar bone loss and diagnosed as Jones syndrome. The diagnosis was made based on history, clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings. Gingival enlargement was surgically managed using gingivectomy and no recurrence was observed. The patient showed remarkable esthetical and functional improvement. PMID:26966711

  13. [A case of Aicardi syndrome with moderate psychomotor retardation].

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Mitsudome, A; Ogata, H; Ohfu, M; Takakusaki, M

    1990-07-01

    A five-year-old girl of Aicardi syndrome showed moderate psychomotor retardation. She could walk and communicate. At six months of age, she developed salaam convulsion with series. Convulsions disappeared immediately after ACTH treatment. At eighteen months of age, she developed myoclonic seizures. From three years of age, head-nodding seizures with series relapsed and could not be controlled. But she could walk alone at two years old and speak a word at one and half years old. A degree of her psychomotor retardation was more slightly than others published cases of Aicardi syndrome. There were eleven reports, included our case, with mild retardation in Aicardi syndrome. The features of these are 1) late onset of seizures, 2) good response to ACTH therapy, 3) no significant abnormalities of brain except for agenesis of corpus callosum. PMID:2169275

  14. Lemierre's Syndrome: A Rare Case of Pulmonic Valve Vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Clara; Mastrine, Lou; Moskovits, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an uncommon complication of pharyngitis commonly associated with an anaerobic gram negative bacterium, Fusobacterium necrophorum. The syndrome usually affects young healthy adults with the mean age of 20 and is characterized by recent pharyngitis followed by ipsilateral internal jugular vein thrombosis and septic thromboembolism. The treatment is at least 6 weeks of antibiotics; the role of anticoagulation is unclear. The following presentation is a case of Lemierre's syndrome in a 23-year-old healthy individual who is infected by a rare species: Fusobacterium nucleatum. The case is complicated by septic emboli to the lungs and impressive seeding vegetation to the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) at the pulmonic valve of the heart. PMID:23573433

  15. Lemierre's Syndrome: A Rare Case of Pulmonic Valve Vegetation.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Clara; Mastrine, Lou; Moskovits, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an uncommon complication of pharyngitis commonly associated with an anaerobic gram negative bacterium, Fusobacterium necrophorum. The syndrome usually affects young healthy adults with the mean age of 20 and is characterized by recent pharyngitis followed by ipsilateral internal jugular vein thrombosis and septic thromboembolism. The treatment is at least 6 weeks of antibiotics; the role of anticoagulation is unclear. The following presentation is a case of Lemierre's syndrome in a 23-year-old healthy individual who is infected by a rare species: Fusobacterium nucleatum. The case is complicated by septic emboli to the lungs and impressive seeding vegetation to the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) at the pulmonic valve of the heart. PMID:23573433

  16. Joubert Syndrome: Imaging Features and Illustration of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Richa

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Joubert Syndrome (JS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised clinically by neonatal breathing dysregulation, developmental delay, intellectual disability, hypotonia, ataxia, nystagmus. Case Report We present another case of this uncommon syndrome in a 12 years old patient presenting with classical complaints of developmental delay, intellectual impairment, weakness in both lower limbs, ataxia and abnormal facies and diagnosed on Computed Tomography. Conclusions Joubert Syndrome should be ruled out in all patients presenting with hypotonia, ataxia, nystagmus, breathing abnormalities and developmental delay. Its neuroimaging hallmarks include molar tooth sign and batwing shaped fourth ventricle. As JS is associated with multiorgan involvement, these patients should enter a diagnostic protocol to assess systemic abnormalities. Extreme caution should be taken while administering drugs in these patients as they are prone to respiratory depression. PMID:25360184

  17. A Case of Vander Woude Syndrome with Rare Phenotypic Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Brijesh; Gupta, Shalini; Patil, Ranjit; Khanna, Vikram

    2014-01-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is a rare developmental disorder with an autosomal dominant inheritance. The prevalence of VWS varies from 1:100,000 to 1:40,000 still born or live births. It has variable expressivity and generally expressed as orofacial manifestations like lower lip pits, cleft lip and/or cleft palate, hypodontia, cleft or bifid uvula, ankyloglossia and some extraoral anomalies involving hand, foot and genitalia. Thorough family history, clinical examination and genetic counseling helps in correct diagnosis of VWS as Popliteal pterygium syndrome has overlapping clinical manifestations. Most cases of Van der Woude syndrome have been associated with mutations and genetic changes. The current case has classical features of VWS with some rare features like undescended small testis and unreported finding of syndactyly of second and third toe adds on to the existing knowledge of VWS presentation. PMID:25478421

  18. Case Report: Cervical chondrocalcinosis as a complication of Gitelman syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Zahra; Mead, Paul; Sayer, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome is an inherited tubulopathy leading to a hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis with hypomagnesaemia and hypocalciuria. Most cases are due to mutations in SLC12A3, encoding the apical thiazide sensitive co-transporter in the distal convoluted tubule. Musculoskeletal effects of Gitelman syndrome are common, including muscle weakness, tetany and cramps. Chronic hypomagnesaemia can lead to chondrocalcinosis, which often affects knees but can affect other joints. Here we present a case of Gitelman syndrome complicated by cervical chondrocalcinosis leading to neck pain and numbness of the fingers. Treatments directed at correcting both hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia were initiated and allowed conservative non-surgical management of the neck pain. Recognition of chondrocalcinosis is important and treatments must be individualised to correct the underlying hypomagnesaemia. PMID:27303630

  19. Case Report: Cervical chondrocalcinosis as a complication of Gitelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zahra; Mead, Paul; Sayer, John A

    2016-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome is an inherited tubulopathy leading to a hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis with hypomagnesaemia and hypocalciuria. Most cases are due to mutations in SLC12A3, encoding the apical thiazide sensitive co-transporter in the distal convoluted tubule. Musculoskeletal effects of Gitelman syndrome are common, including muscle weakness, tetany and cramps. Chronic hypomagnesaemia can lead to chondrocalcinosis, which often affects knees but can affect other joints. Here we present a case of Gitelman syndrome complicated by cervical chondrocalcinosis leading to neck pain and numbness of the fingers. Treatments directed at correcting both hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia were initiated and allowed conservative non-surgical management of the neck pain. Recognition of chondrocalcinosis is important and treatments must be individualised to correct the underlying hypomagnesaemia. PMID:27303630

  20. [Primary lymphedema in the nephrotic syndrome: case report].

    PubMed

    Wagner, U; Balzar, E; Khoss, A; Partsch, H

    1987-09-25

    The aim of this case report is to discuss possible connections between the development of a hypoproteinaemic oedema due to the nephrotic syndrome and the occurrence of lymphoedema. Two patients (a three year-old girl and a seven year-old boy) developed lymphoedema of one leg one year after the onset of the nephrotic syndrome. The case of the six year-old girl is presented. Malignancy was excluded by clinical investigation. Direct lymphography failed to show any peripheral lymph-vessels; indirect lymphography (i.c. infusion of a newly-developed contrast medium) revealed hypoplasia of the peripheral lymph-collectors. The development of lymphoedema 12-18 months after the appearance of the nephrotic syndrome supports the hypothesis that the increase in extravascular fluid, which is caused by a reduced oncotic pressure in the plasma, may trigger off the development of lymphoedema if there is a primary defect of the lymphatic system. PMID:3687024

  1. A case of metastatic testicular cancer complicated by tumour lysis syndrome and choriocarcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Koji; Takaoka, Ei-Ichiro; Naoi, Makito; Mori, Kensaku; Minami, Manabu; Shimazui, Toru; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2006-10-01

    A 26-year-old man was referred to our hospital for treatment of metastatic testicular cancer. The pathological diagnosis was choriocarcinoma with seminoma. Sequential computerized tomography examinations revealed rapidly progressing bulky liver metastases and a lung metastasis. Chemotherapy with bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin (BEP) was started on the day of admission. Subsequently, the patient suffered from tumour lysis syndrome (TLS) and massive haemorrhage at metastatic sites. The latter complication is also called choriocarcinoma syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of testicular cancer complicated with both critical conditions. Intensive care and radiological intervention barely prevented a fatal outcome. The urological oncologist should be aware of the potential complications TLS and choriocarcinoma syndrome in cases of rapidly progressive and high-volume choriocarcinoma. PMID:16935862

  2. A case of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

    PubMed

    von Elten, Kelley; Sawyer, Taylor; Lentz-Kapua, Sarah; Kanis, Adam; Studer, Matthew

    2013-06-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome (WHS) is a genetic syndrome that includes a typical facial appearance, mental retardation, growth delay, seizures, and congenital cardiac defects. A deletion of the terminal band of the short arm of chromosome 4, with a breakpoint at the 4p15 to 4p16 region, is the most common genetic mutation causing WHS. Congenital heart disease associated with WHS typically includes atrial and ventricular septal defects, though there are a few case reports of associated complex congenital heart disease. Here we report a case of an infant with a large 4p deletion, with a breakpoint at the 4p12 region, and hypoplasic left heart syndrome. We discuss a possible link between the size of the chromosomal deletion in WHS and the severity of the cardiac defect. PMID:22639003

  3. Savant Syndrome: Case Studies, Hypotheses, and Implications for Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Susan Klug; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The concept of savant syndrome, encompassing those individuals historically known as "idiot savants," is reviewed. Case studies demonstrating special abilities in the areas of calendar calculating, musical ability, artistic talent, memorization, mathematical skills, mechanical achievement, and fine sensory discrimination are discussed, as well as…

  4. A case of Kartagener syndrome with rhinolalia clausa.

    PubMed

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Sator, Hicham; Lahma, Jawad; El Ayoubi, Ali; Nitassi, Sophia; Oujilal, Abdelilah; Benbouzid, Mohammed Anas; Essakalli, Leila; Elouazzani, Hanane; Rhorfi, Ismail Abderrahmane; Abid, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Kartagener syndrome is an autosomal recessive genetic ciliary disorder comprising of a classic triad of sinusitis, situs inversus and bronchiectasis. It's the one of primary ciliary dyskinesia disorders with manifestations present from childhood. Most patients of PCD have situs inversus. We present a case of 18 year-old women with recurrent lower and upper respiratory tracts infections, and rhinolalia clausa. PMID:27375831

  5. Etofenamate associated with Lyell syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Golcuk, Yalcin; Oray, Deniz; Atilla, Ozge Duman; Tefennioglu, Nilay

    2010-06-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (Lyell syndrome) is a rare, acute, and potentially life-threatening mucocutaneous disease that is most often triggered by drugs. This is the first case of toxic epidermal necrolysis because of treatment with etofenamate of which we are aware. PMID:20586575

  6. Longevity of a Woman with Down Syndrome: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicoine, Brian; McGuire, Dennis

    1997-01-01

    This case study of an 83-year-old woman with Down syndrome suggests she is the longest surviving person with the condition. Also noted is the lack of decline in mental function and performance of activities of daily living despite the apparently universal presence of the neuropathologic changes of Alzheimer's disease in persons with Down syndrome…

  7. Lemierre's syndrome after evacuation of the uterus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hedengran, Katrine Kaare; Hertz, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Even minor surgical interventions can have serious complications. Lemierre's syndrome is rare and to our best knowledge never before described after gynecological surgery; however, it should be considered in case of rapidly developing respiratory problems after even simple surgical procedures. PMID:25356246

  8. Naegeli–Franceschetti–Jadassohn syndrome: A rare case

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Bela J.; Jagati, Ashish K.; Gupta, Neha P.; Dhamale, Suyog S.

    2015-01-01

    Naegeli–Franceschetti–Jadassohn Syndrome (NFJS) is a rare, autosomal dominant inherited form of ectodermal dysplasia, caused by mutation in the KRT14 gene. We report here a case of NFJS in a 27-year-old male who presented with reticulate hyperpigmentation over skin, dental changes, absence of dermatoglyphics, hypohidrosis, and hair changes. PMID:26753140

  9. Ortner’s syndrome: a case report and literature review*

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Bruno Landim; Campos, Lenilton da Costa; Marques, Hélder de Castro; Vilela, Vagner Moysés; Carvalho, Rodolfo Elias Diniz da Silva; Duque, André Geraldo da Silva

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 55-year-old female, hypertensive, smoker patient presenting with dysphonia, dysphagia and persistent dry cough. Laryngoscopy diagnosed left vocal cord paralysis. Computed tomography demonstrated saccular aneurysm of the inferior wall of the aortic arch, stretching the left recurrent laryngeal nerve, a finding compatible with Ortner’s syndrome. PMID:26379325

  10. A case of Kartagener syndrome with rhinolalia clausa

    PubMed Central

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Sator, Hicham; Lahma, Jawad; El Ayoubi, Ali; Nitassi, Sophia; Oujilal, Abdelilah; Benbouzid, Mohammed Anas; Essakalli, Leila; Elouazzani, Hanane; Rhorfi, Ismail Abderrahmane; Abid, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Kartagener syndrome is an autosomal recessive genetic ciliary disorder comprising of a classic triad of sinusitis, situs inversus and bronchiectasis. It's the one of primary ciliary dyskinesia disorders with manifestations present from childhood. Most patients of PCD have situs inversus. We present a case of 18 year-old women with recurrent lower and upper respiratory tracts infections, and rhinolalia clausa. PMID:27375831

  11. A case of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Jyoti; Singh, Pragnya; Bhat, P. S.; Srivastava, K.; Gupta, Vikash

    2015-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome is an uncommon illness associated with repetitive un-voluntary abnormal movements and utterance. It is often associated with other psychiatric morbidities. Management requires awareness of this uncommon illness, keen observation, relevant evaluation, and combination of pharmacology and psychotherapy for an optimal outcome. This case is brought out here for florid presentation and nuances of management. PMID:27212827

  12. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome in adductor pollicis muscle: case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hun; Lee, Kwang-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Hun; Kim, Yee-Suk; Chung, Ung-Seo

    2012-11-01

    We report a case of chronic exertional compartment syndrome in the adductor pollicis that was confirmed by measuring elevated compartment pressure. Specific finding of magnetic resonance imaging, increased T2 signal intensity in the involved compartment, was also useful for the diagnosis. Pain was relieved by fasciotomy through a volar approach. PMID:23040640

  13. A case of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jyoti; Singh, Pragnya; Bhat, P S; Srivastava, K; Gupta, Vikash

    2015-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome is an uncommon illness associated with repetitive un-voluntary abnormal movements and utterance. It is often associated with other psychiatric morbidities. Management requires awareness of this uncommon illness, keen observation, relevant evaluation, and combination of pharmacology and psychotherapy for an optimal outcome. This case is brought out here for florid presentation and nuances of management. PMID:27212827

  14. Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS): a case report.

    PubMed

    Chung, M Y; Huang, C B; Chuang, J H; Ko, S F; Chen, L

    1998-03-01

    Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by a massively enlarged urinary bladder without mechanical outlet obstruction and microcolon, as well as a hypoperistaltic bowel with normal ganglion cell distribution. We report one such case to discuss the findings of antenatal ultrasound and the radiologic and pathologic features of this condition. PMID:9607272

  15. Othello Syndrome Secondary to Ropinirole: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Kakali; Smith, Abigail; Hayes, Joseph; Chakraborty, Apu

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes a forty-two-year-old man with no previous psychiatric history who developed delusional jealousy (Othello Syndrome) associated with ropinirole treatment. Ropinirole is a commonly used dopamine receptor agonist, which was being used to treat his Parkinson's disease, and his delusional symptoms resolved entirely with ropinirole dose reduction. PMID:22953148

  16. Bilateral Anterior Opercular Syndrome With Partial Kluver–Bucy Syndrome in a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral anterior opercular syndrome and partial Kluver–Bucy syndrome are associated with bilateral middle cerebral artery lesions. The combination of these two syndromes has only been reported in a child with limbic encephalitis. In this case, a 44-year-old woman with bilateral middle cerebral artery infarction, which occurred 2 years prior, could walk independently. However, she showed automatic-voluntary dissociation and anarthria with preserved writing skills. She also presented hypersexuality, hypermetamorphosis, and memory disturbances. Here, we report a case of an adult stroke patient who suffered from bilateral anterior opercular syndrome accompanied by partial Kluver–Bucy syndrome. PMID:27446793

  17. Bilateral Anterior Opercular Syndrome With Partial Kluver-Bucy Syndrome in a Stroke Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ah-Ra; Lim, Young-Ho; Chung, Sae-Hoon; Choi, Eun-Hi; Lim, Jong Youb

    2016-06-01

    Bilateral anterior opercular syndrome and partial Kluver-Bucy syndrome are associated with bilateral middle cerebral artery lesions. The combination of these two syndromes has only been reported in a child with limbic encephalitis. In this case, a 44-year-old woman with bilateral middle cerebral artery infarction, which occurred 2 years prior, could walk independently. However, she showed automatic-voluntary dissociation and anarthria with preserved writing skills. She also presented hypersexuality, hypermetamorphosis, and memory disturbances. Here, we report a case of an adult stroke patient who suffered from bilateral anterior opercular syndrome accompanied by partial Kluver-Bucy syndrome. PMID:27446793

  18. Parry-Romberg Syndrome: a Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Subhas Gogineni; Thomas, Priya Sara; Shetty, Shishir Ram

    2011-01-01

    REFERENCES Background The purpose of this report is to present a rare entity of Parry-Romberg syndrome. This poorly understood degenerative condition is characterised by atrophic changes affecting one side of the face. The cause of these changes remains obscure. Methods The authors report one rare case of a 31 year old female patient with Parry-Romberg syndrome, accompanied by a brief review of literature. Results Clinical examination of the patient revealed evident facial asymmetry, malar hypoplasia, atrophy of skin and other tissues on the left side, hyperpigmentation of skin on the left side of the face. Final diagnosis of a Parry-Romberg syndrome (“progressive hemifacial atrophy”) was based on thorough clinical and a radiological examination. Treatment using alloplastic implants to improve facial disfigurement was suggested to the patient. Conclusions In most cases, Parry-Romberg syndrome appears to occur randomly for unknown reasons. The pathophysiology of the syndrome remains unknown. There is no definitive treatment for this condition but an attempt to use restorative plastic surgery which includes fat or silicone implants, flap/pedicle grafts, or bone implants can be done to improve facial disfigurement. PMID:24421992

  19. Rehabilitation of Susac Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ramey, Lindsay N; Lopez, Edrick; Young, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    A 43-yr-old man presented with headaches, forgetfulness, and personality changes. Based on imaging, there was concern for acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. He improved with steroids and immunoglobulin. When symptoms recurred, magnetic resonance imaging showed new scattered gray and white matter lesions, many within the corpus callosum. Angiogram showed multiple branch retinal artery occlusions, pathognomonic for Susac syndrome. He was treated with steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, and cytoxan and was sent to acute rehabilitation. Functional Independence Measure score improved from 65 to 108. Follow-up at 6 and 10 mos showed continued improvement, with full return to his premorbid roles at home and work. The adjunct of acute rehabilitation to traditional treatment may have promoted faster recovery than expected based on previous reports. PMID:26829078

  20. [Tolosa-Hunt syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kovacić, Marijan; Kovacić, Ivan; Krvavica, Ana; Nekić, Ivica; Harapin, Mladen

    2010-01-01

    Tolosa-Hunt syndrome is a nonspecific granulomatous inflammation of the cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure and apex of the orbit. It involves episodes of unilateral orbital pain which may last several weeks, lesions of cranial nerve III, IV or VI, and rarely II, V, VII and VIII. It is characterized by remissions and exacerbations, and can cause permanent neurological disorder of the affected nerves. We present the course of the disease in a patient whose initial symptom was gradual visual loss in the right eye, followed by neuralgic pain in the right orbit and face. The diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy and corticosteroid therapy was administered. Exacerbation of the disease required repeated surgery, excision of the fibrous tissue of the cavernous sinus, as well as prolonged corticosteroid therapy. PMID:20677620

  1. A Case of May-Thurner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Calvaresi, Emilia; Swaminathan, Mahesh; Jokela, Janet

    2016-01-01

    May-Thurner syndrome is the condition of the left common iliac vein being compressed between the right common iliac artery and the associated vertebral body. This condition has been linked to spontaneous episodes of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), especially in women aged 20–50, and it may contribute to the slightly higher tendency to develop left-sided (~56%) versus right-sided DVTs. A 50-year-old morbidly obese (BMI 42.7 kg/m2) female presented to the emergency room with acute left leg pain. Past medical history included asthma. Patient is employed as a helper in home health services; no recent history of travel and no history suggestive of hereditary thrombophilia. Prior tobacco use was noted. Patient was admitted to the medical floors and investigated for DVT. Ultrasound Doppler imaging of both legs demonstrated left-sided occlusive DVT in the popliteal, superficial femoral, common femoral veins with extension into the external iliac vein. Imaging in the right leg was unremarkable. Patient was treated with enoxaparin (Lovenox). A hypercoagulation panel was unremarkable. A left lower extremity venogram showed a thrombus at the level of the common femoral vein extending into the iliac vein with stasis of contrast within the right external iliac vein. Following that, she had venoplasty and thrombolytic therapy. The next day, she underwent left iliofemoral mechanical thrombectomy, venoplasty, and left common iliac vein stenting. After an uneventful recovery, the patient was discharged on rivaroxaban for 3 months. In summary, while this patient was initially thought to have unprovoked DVT, absence of any hypercoagulable disorders and the findings in venogram favored the diagnosis of May-Thurner syndrome. For women in this age group with this type of presentation, this is an important diagnosis to keep in mind. PMID:27489392

  2. Contrasting Case Definitions for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Jason, Leonard A.; Brown, Abigail; Clyne, Erin; Bartgis, Lindsey; Evans, Meredyth; Brown, Molly

    2013-01-01

    This article uses data from patients recruited using the 1994 case definition of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) to contrast those meeting criteria for the Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) Canadian case definition with those that did not meet these criteria. The study also contrasts those meeting criteria for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) based on criteria from Ramsay and other theorists with those that did not meet the ME criteria. The ME/CFS case definition criteria identified a subset of patients with more functional impairments and physical, mental, and cognitive problems than the subset not meeting these criteria. The ME subset had more functional impairments, and more severe physical and cognitive symptoms than the subset not meeting ME criteria. When applied to a population meeting the 1994 CFS case definition, both ME/CFS and ME criteria appear to select a more severe subset of patients. PMID:22158691

  3. [Waardenburg Syndrome: a review of literature and case reports].

    PubMed

    Salvatore, S; Carnevale, C; Infussi, R; Arrico, L; Mafrici, M; Plateroti, A M; Vingolo, E M

    2012-01-01

    Waadernburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant disease clinically and genetically heterogeneous. It is characterized by non-progressive sensorineuronal hearing loss of variable degree and anomalous pigmentation (of the eyes, skin and stria vascularis of cochlear duct) caused by melanocytes absence. The syndrome is caused by mutations in genes that regulate the melanocytes differentiation from the neural crest during embriogenetic development. This study will review the literature on WS and explain more in detail the ocular findings in WS, while reporting new findings on two newly diagnosed cases. PMID:22555841

  4. Systemic Inflammatory Syndrome Associated with a Case of Jugular Paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Sokabe, Ayuko; Mizooka, Masafumi; Sakemi, Rinne; Kobayashi, Tomoki; Kishikawa, Nobusuke; Yokobayashi, Kenichi; Kanno, Keishi; Tazuma, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Jugular paraganlioma is a benign, slow-growing tumor originating from the paraganglion cells and it is associated with catecholamine secretion. Paragangliomas can secrete Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and present as a systemic inflammatory syndrome; these characteristics have not been previously associated with jugular paragangliomas. A 63-year-old man with a jugular tumor in the skull base was referred to our hospital for an evaluation of pyrexia, back pain, and acute inflammation. His serum IL-6 level was elevated on admission and it decreased after radiotherapy. This is the first known case of a jugular paraganglioma exhibiting systemic inflammatory syndrome. PMID:27477424

  5. A case of Jacobsen syndrome with multifocal white matter lesions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang; Carter, John E; Bazan, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome is a rare disorder caused by partial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 11. The phenotype is variable with involvement of multiple organ systems, resulting in congenital heart defects, blood dyscrasias, and impaired growth. We describe a case of a 30-year-old man with multiple ophthalmic manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that was remarkable for multiple T2-hyperintense subcortical white matter lesions. It is important to be aware that patients with Jacobsen syndrome may have nonspecific white changes seen on MRI. PMID:27317214

  6. Lowe syndrome: clinical and neuropathological studies of an adult case.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulos, P; Bouras, C; Vallet, P; Constantinidis, J

    1990-12-01

    A 23-year-old male with clinically diagnosed Lowe syndrome had bilateral cataracts, glaucoma, pendulous nystagmus, severe mental and growth retardation, hypotonia, areflexia, joints hyperextensibility, proteinuria, aminoaciduria, and metabolic acidosis. There was also severe epileptic activity (Lennox-Gastaut syndrome). The neuropathological examination revealed a marked cerebellar atrophy and central chromatolysis in the cerebral cortex. These observations do not confirm the hypothesis of dysmyelination as formulated in previous studies. The reported case rather suggests the existence of a dynamic process starting as a still-undefined metabolic abnormality that, in turn, causes various and inconsistent lesions at the microscopic level. PMID:2077136

  7. Six cases of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fernando, S J

    1976-05-01

    Six cases of Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome are discussed in the light of conflicting views on the aetiology of the condition. It is hypothesized that the onset of coprolalia in patients with persistent childhood tics indicates a disturbances of the normal balance between a need for tension relief by swearing and a capacity to control such vocal activity. Some conclusions are drawn on the management of the syndrome by the use of butyrophenones, massed practice of tics, and the promotion of personality development. A flexible approach geared to the individual patient's particular needs is recommended. PMID:1064460

  8. Carotid Stump Syndrome: Case Report and Endovascular Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dakhoul, Lara Toufic; Tawk, Rabih

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To highlight the case of a patient with multiple transient ischemic attacks and visual disturbances diagnosed with carotid stump syndrome and managed with endovascular approach. Case Presentation. We present the case of a carotid stump syndrome in an elderly patient found to have moderate left internal carotid artery stenosis in response to an advertisement for carotid screening. After a medical therapeutic approach and a close follow-up, transient ischemic attacks recurred. Computed tomographic angiography showed an occlusion of the left internal carotid artery and the presence of moderate stenosis in the right internal carotid artery, which was treated by endovascular stenting and balloon insertion. One month later, the patient presented with visual disturbances due to the left carotid stump and severe stenosis of the left external carotid artery that was reapproached by endovascular stenting. Conclusion. Considerations should be given to the carotid stump syndrome as a source of emboli for ischemic strokes, and vascular assessment could be used to detect and treat this syndrome. PMID:26425620

  9. [The Sotos syndrome. Clinical and neuropsychiatric considerations in 1 case].

    PubMed

    Trizio, M; Intino, M T; Lanzi, C; Krajewska, G; Perniola, T

    1983-01-01

    A case of Sotos' syndrome or cerebral gigantism is described. The main clinical features of this syndrome are macrocrania, accelerated skeleton maturation and somatic development, cranio-facial dysmorfism, psychomotor retardation in 80% of the cases. Less frequently other skeleton abnormalities associated with neurological and/or endocrinological disorders are reported. In our patient the typical features of the syndrome are accompanied by several neurological signs (mental retardtion, strabism, hypothonia, motor impairment, seizures, CT scan abnormalities) and ophtalmological changes as optic disk pallor. The above mentioned range of symptoms should be considered as a direct consequence of the primary defect which characterizes the Sotos' syndrome. In our case the cerebral nervous system seems to be more specifically involved. Besides, important behavioural difficulties have emerged with regard to the double relation mother-daughter and in the familiar environment as well. For this reason we emphasize the necessity of evaluating and clearing up all problems which often arise in connection with various pathological conditions in childhood. This should be done in order to grant the families an appropriate support. PMID:6680796

  10. Unilateral, Linear Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome (Bean's syndrome): An Unfamiliar Presentation: First Case from India

    PubMed Central

    Sancheti, Karan; Podder, Indrashis; Das, Anupam; Choudhury, Sourav; Chandra, Somodyuti; Gharami, Ramesh Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS) also called Bean's syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by multiple cutaneous venous malformations in association with visceral lesions, most commonly affecting the gastrointestinal tract. We report here, a 21-year-old woman patient, who presented with unilateral, blaschkoid distribution of cutaneous venous malformations along with blue rubber bleb nevus and recurrent episodes of hematochezia due to vascular lesions in the sigmoid colon; likely to be a case of BRBNS. The unusual unilateral, blaschkoid distribution of BRBNS prompted this present report. PMID:26677281

  11. An Apparently Classical Case Report of Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Della Marca, Giacomo; Vollono, Catello

    2015-10-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a rare, sporadic, congenital neurocutaneous syndrome, likely due to abnormal development of the cephalic microvasculature. Symptoms and signs depend on the extent and location of the venous dysplasia. We describe a case of a 33-year-old woman presenting with drug-resistant epilepsy, chronic headache, and recurring nonepileptic seizures. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans showed severe frontoparietal right hemisphere atrophy, prevalent right frontoparietal leptomeningeal enhancement, circumscribed angioma of the left rolandic sulcus, and prominent deep venous system. We report an apparently classical Sturge-Weber syndrome and hypothesize a shared pathophysiologic mechanism for clinical symptoms. We speculate that all the main symptoms observed in our patient could be the expression of a functional imbalance between the atrophic right hemisphere and the hyperexcitable left cortex. PMID:25392004

  12. Embryo with XYY syndrome presenting with clubfoot: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Tsakalidis, Christos; Tampakoudis, George P; Papastergiou, Maria N; Tzevelekis, Fillipos; Pados, George; Assimakopoulos, Efstratios A

    2009-01-01

    Talipes equinovarus (clubfoot) is a skeletal anomaly of the embryo’s legs, with a frequency of 1-3:1000 living born babies. It may occur as an independent anomaly, or as part of a syndrome with concomitant chromosomal abnormalities. XYY syndrome is a quite rare sex chromosomal abnormality with 47, XYY karyotype. Prenatal diagnosis is usually accidental because the syndrome is not associated with increased prevalence of sonographically detectable defects. The possibility of co-existence of skeletal anomalies in embryos with 47, XYY karyotype is scant, with only a few cases reported in the literature. An amniocentesis was performed in an embryo at the 21st week of gestation because clubfoot was detected in the 2nd trimester scan, and the embryo was found to have abnormal karyotype of 47, XYY. Current opinions and management dilemmas are discussed. PMID:19918427

  13. Embryo with XYY syndrome presenting with clubfoot: a case report.

    PubMed

    Athanatos, Dimitrios; Tsakalidis, Christos; Tampakoudis, George P; Papastergiou, Maria N; Tzevelekis, Fillipos; Pados, George; Assimakopoulos, Efstratios A

    2009-01-01

    Talipes equinovarus (clubfoot) is a skeletal anomaly of the embryo's legs, with a frequency of 1-3:1000 living born babies. It may occur as an independent anomaly, or as part of a syndrome with concomitant chromosomal abnormalities.XYY syndrome is a quite rare sex chromosomal abnormality with 47, XYY karyotype. Prenatal diagnosis is usually accidental because the syndrome is not associated with increased prevalence of sonographically detectable defects. The possibility of co-existence of skeletal anomalies in embryos with 47, XYY karyotype is scant, with only a few cases reported in the literature.An amniocentesis was performed in an embryo at the 21(st) week of gestation because clubfoot was detected in the 2(nd) trimester scan, and the embryo was found to have abnormal karyotype of 47, XYY. Current opinions and management dilemmas are discussed. PMID:19918427

  14. A rare case of Turner's syndrome presenting with Mullerian agenesis.

    PubMed

    Vaddadi, Suresh; Murthy, Ramana S V; Rahul, C H; Kumar, Vinod L

    2013-10-01

    Turner's syndrome also called as Ullrich Turner's syndrome, is a disease of unclear pathogenesis characterized by complete or partial absence of one sex chromosome, with or without cell line mosaicism in a phenotypic female with short stature. Various anomalies result in a constellation of features, of which the most disturbing is primary amenorrhea due to gonadal dysgenesis. Hormone therapy in these patients can often result in successful menstruation, and scope for subsequent pregnancy because of anatomically normal uterus and vagina. Coexisting Mullerian agenesis in these patients can jeopardize the chances of future pregnancy as they have associated structural abnormalities of the uterus and vagina. We report a rare case of middle-aged female with Turner's syndrome and Mullerian agenesis having absent secondary sexual characters and missing uterus with incompletely formed vagina. PMID:24672170

  15. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by lipoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Benzarti, Sofien; Msek, Hichem; Boussen, Monia; Khorbi, Adel

    2015-01-01

    Lipoma is a relatively frequent, benign soft-tissue tumor rarely located in the hand. A lipoma of the hand causing a carpal tunnel syndrome by compression of the median nerve is exceptional. We report the case of a 70-year-old female presenting with a carpal tunnel syndrome. A compression of the median nerve by a lipoma was discovered during surgery. Transverse carpal ligament release with lipoma excision and neurolysis of the median nerve were performed. Histopathological study of the resected mass was consistent with a lipoma. Two-month postoperatively, the patient recovered full hand function with entire disappearance of acroparesthesia. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by space occupying lesions is rare. Diagnosis is difficult, usually based on the clinical study, electrophysiology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Transverse carpal ligament release and excision of lipoma provides excellent functional recovery. PMID:26664552

  16. Unexplained neuropsychiatric symptoms in intensive care: A Fahr Syndrome case.

    PubMed

    Calili, Duygu Kayar; Mutlu, Nevzat Mehmet; Mutlu Titiz, Ayse Pinar; Akcaboy, Zeynep Nur; Aydin, Eda Macit; Turan, Isil Ozkocak

    2016-08-01

    Fahr Syndrome is a rare disease where calcium and other minerals are stored bilaterally and symmetrically in the basal ganglia, cerebellar dentate nucleus and white matter. Fahr Syndrome is associated with various metabolic disorders, mainly parathyroid disorders. The presented case discusses a 64-year old male patient admitted to the intensive care unit of our hospital diagnosed with aspiration pneumonia and urosepsis. The cranial tomography examination to explain his nonspecific neurological symptoms showed bilateral calcifications in the temporal, parietal, frontal, occipital lobes, basal ganglia, cerebellar hemisphere and medulla oblongata posteriorly. His biochemical test results also indicated parathormone-calcium metabolic abnormalities. Fahr Syndrome must be considered for a definitive diagnosis in patients with nonspecific neuropsychiatric symptoms and accompanying calcium metabolism disorders in order to control serious morbidity and complications because of neurological damage. PMID:27524543

  17. The York Platelet Syndrome: a third case.

    PubMed

    White, James G; Gunay-Aygun, Meral

    2011-01-01

    Our present study has described a third patient with the York Platelet Syndrome (YPS). The condition consists of a mitochondrial myopathy associated with unique platelet pathology. Their mitochondrial myopathy has not been completely delineated and will be the subject of further study. Platelet pathology in the new patient is essentially identical to that described in the first two patients. Thin sections of her thrombocytes reveal a normal complement of α and δ granules (dense bodies) in some, a decreased number in others and complete absence in a few. The unique pathological feature is the presence of giant organelles, including an intensely electron dense, huge body, the opaque organelle (OO) and a multilayered large body, the target organelle. In addition platelets from the new patient contain large masses and coils of smooth endoplasmic reticulum present infrequently in platelets of the first two patients. The giant opaque and target organelles appear to develop in rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum of the parent megakaryocyte and mature in the dense tubular system of circulating platelets. The relationship of the unique platelet pathology and mitochondrial myopathy has not been defined. PMID:21117861

  18. Sirenomelia: The mermaid syndrome: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sunil Kumar; Rathod, Setu

    2015-01-01

    Sirenomelia (mermaid syndrome) is a rare congenital fetal anomaly with characteristic feature of complete or partial fusion of lower limbs. Although, this syndrome is incompatible with life due to the association of several congenital visceral abnormalities; however, there are few reports of surviving infants. Our first case was a live born, normally delivered at term by a 27-year-old third gravida of lower socioeconomic status with history of tobacco use. Examination of the baby revealed caudal dysgenesis having fusion of lower limbs, single leg with 1 foot and 5 toes. There was no identifiable external genitalia and anus. The second case was a 34 week, 1.6 kg preterm infant of unidentified sex born to a 28-year-old primigravida mother with overt diabetes mellitus. Incidentally, both the infants died few hours after birth and we report these cases due to their rarity and term live birth. PMID:25810681

  19. Sirenomelia: The mermaid syndrome: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sunil Kumar; Rathod, Setu

    2015-01-01

    Sirenomelia (mermaid syndrome) is a rare congenital fetal anomaly with characteristic feature of complete or partial fusion of lower limbs. Although, this syndrome is incompatible with life due to the association of several congenital visceral abnormalities; however, there are few reports of surviving infants. Our first case was a live born, normally delivered at term by a 27-year-old third gravida of lower socioeconomic status with history of tobacco use. Examination of the baby revealed caudal dysgenesis having fusion of lower limbs, single leg with 1 foot and 5 toes. There was no identifiable external genitalia and anus. The second case was a 34 week, 1.6 kg preterm infant of unidentified sex born to a 28-year-old primigravida mother with overt diabetes mellitus. Incidentally, both the infants died few hours after birth and we report these cases due to their rarity and term live birth. PMID:25810681

  20. [Hodgkin disease revealed by a nephrotic syndrome: A case report].

    PubMed

    Cheptou, M; Pichault, V; Campagni, R; Vodoff, M-V; Fischbach, M; Paillard, C

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric nephrotic syndrome (NS) is most often idiopathic or primary but in rare cases, it can be secondary to neoplasia. We report on a case of steroid-resistant NS revealing as a paraneoplastic syndrome of Hodgkin disease (HD) in a 12-year-old boy. The onset of the NS can be earlier, later, or simultaneous to the HD. Treatment of the lymphoma allows the disappearance of the NS. In the case we observed, the diagnosis of HD was delayed because HD presented with an isolated, hilar adenopathy in the absence of retroperitoneal or peripheral locations. In children aged 10 years or more presenting with NS, steroid-resistant or otherwise, a possible paraneoplastic origin such as Hodgkin lymphoma should always be taken into consideration and eventually eliminated. PMID:26598043

  1. Case report of sump syndrome after laser conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchi; Kishore, Divya; Kumar, Sushil; Agarwal, Tushar; Nagpal, Smriti; Apoorva, A G

    2015-01-01

    The sump syndrome was initially described in relation to patients who had undergone external dacryocystorhinostomy. Here we report a case of sump syndrome that developed following laser conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy (CDCR) due to tube displacement after a bout of forceful sneezing. Unlike cases of external dacryocystorhinostomy where flaps are sutured, there is a potential space created by the sac remnants in laser CDCR. Hence, any displacement of the tube will lead to the improper drainage of secretions with superadded infections of the contents (as occurred in this case). Therefore, in laser CDCR, it is imperative to create an appropriately placed osteotomy with a correctly sized tube that is well secured to avoid displacement along with patient education regarding tube care. PMID:25960734

  2. Case Report of Sump Syndrome after Laser Conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Ruchi; Kishore, Divya; Kumar, Sushil; Agarwal, Tushar; Nagpal, Smriti; Apoorva, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    The sump syndrome was initially described in relation to patients who had undergone external dacryocystorhinostomy. Here we report a case of sump syndrome that developed following laser conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy (CDCR) due to tube displacement after a bout of forceful sneezing. Unlike cases of external dacryocystorhinostomy where flaps are sutured, there is a potential space created by the sac remnants in laser CDCR. Hence, any displacement of the tube will lead to the improper drainage of secretions with superadded infections of the contents (as occurred in this case). Therefore, in laser CDCR, it is imperative to create an appropriately placed osteotomy with a correctly sized tube that is well secured to avoid displacement along with patient education regarding tube care. PMID:25960734

  3. Case Report: Bazex Syndrome Associated With Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Xilin; Chen, Zhuo; Wu, Jian-hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bazex syndrome, a rare paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by psoriasiform eruptions, palmoplantar keratosis, and symmetric onychodystrophy, is most prevalent with squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract. Here, we reported an uncommon case of Bazex syndrome about an 83-year-old man with pulmonary adenocarcinoma and osseous metastasis, Physical examination found psoriasiform eruptions on the nose, cheeks, ears, knees, and the dorsa of interphalangeal joints, along with plantar keratosis and symmetric onychodystrophy involving hands and feet. Imaging analyses pulmonary adenocarcinoma with both local metastatic nodules and osseous metastasis. Symptomatic treatment with topical corticosteroids and oral retinoids showed no improvement. A 4-month follow-up showed that Gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, successfully reduced primary tumor size and alleviated cutaneous lesions. Our report here highlighted a potential correlation between pulmonary adenocarcinoma and Bazex syndrome, which is characterized by hallmark nail destruction and preferential involvement of body extremities. Moreover, etiological therapy against underlying malignancy is essential for treating paraneoplastic Bazex syndrome. PMID:26765420

  4. [Case of prolonged recovery from serotonin syndrome caused by paroxetine].

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Yusuke; Katsu, Hisatoshi; Okino, Shinji; Wakutsu, Noriyuki; Nakayama, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of serotonin syndrome in a patient being treated with paroxetine for depression. Despite prompt discontinuation of medication, his serotonin syndrome continued for 10 days before full consciousness was restored. The patient was a 48-year-old male with chief complaints of hypobulia and suicidal thoughts. He consulted as a psychiatric outpatient, and oral paroxetine 20 mg/day, etizolam 1.0 mg/day, and brotizolam 0.25 mg/day were immediately started. Upsurge of feeling and disinhibition state were noted the following day, then on treatment day 6 his condition deteriorated to substupor state and he was admitted for further treatment. On admission, change of mental condition (consciousness disturbance), perspiration, hyperreflexia, myoclonus and tremor were seen, and serotonin syndrome caused by paroxetine was suspected. Paroxetine was thus discontinued, and under intravenous drip his condition gradually improved. However, it was not until the 10th hospital day that he became fully alert. In examinations, no infectious, metabolic or organic diseases were detected. The patient's condition often improves with in 24 hours of discontinuation of the causative medication in serotonin syndrome. Symptoms continued for 10 days in this patient, however, perhaps because paroxetine was administered for 6 days before discontinuation. In addition, interaction with other medications may have occurred. Therefore, when serotonin syndrome is suspected, prompt discontinuation of the suspected causative medication, followed by close monitoring of the pharmacokinetics is warranted. PMID:15027311

  5. Case Report: Bazex Syndrome Associated With Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Xilin; Chen, Zhuo; Wu, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Bazex syndrome, a rare paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by psoriasiform eruptions, palmoplantar keratosis, and symmetric onychodystrophy, is most prevalent with squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract.Here, we reported an uncommon case of Bazex syndrome about an 83-year-old man with pulmonary adenocarcinoma and osseous metastasis, Physical examination found psoriasiform eruptions on the nose, cheeks, ears, knees, and the dorsa of interphalangeal joints, along with plantar keratosis and symmetric onychodystrophy involving hands and feet. Imaging analyses pulmonary adenocarcinoma with both local metastatic nodules and osseous metastasis.Symptomatic treatment with topical corticosteroids and oral retinoids showed no improvement. A 4-month follow-up showed that Gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, successfully reduced primary tumor size and alleviated cutaneous lesions.Our report here highlighted a potential correlation between pulmonary adenocarcinoma and Bazex syndrome, which is characterized by hallmark nail destruction and preferential involvement of body extremities. Moreover, etiological therapy against underlying malignancy is essential for treating paraneoplastic Bazex syndrome. PMID:26765420

  6. Associated congenital anomalies among cases with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common congenital anomaly widely studied for at least 150 years. However, the type and the frequency of congenital anomalies associated with DS are still controversial. Despite prenatal diagnosis and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies, in Europe, from 2008 to 2012 the live birth prevalence of DS per 10,000 was 10. 2. The objectives of this study were to examine the major congenital anomalies occurring in infants and fetuses with Down syndrome. The material for this study came from 402,532 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome registered by our registry of congenital anomalies between 1979 and 2008. Four hundred sixty seven (64%) out of the 728 cases with DS registered had at least one major associated congenital anomaly. The most common associated anomalies were cardiac anomalies, 323 cases (44%), followed by digestive system anomalies, 42 cases (6%), musculoskeletal system anomalies, 35 cases (5%), urinary system anomalies, 28 cases (4%), respiratory system anomalies, 13 cases (2%), and other system anomalies, 26 cases (3.6%). Among the cases with DS with congenital heart defects, the most common cardiac anomaly was atrioventricular septal defect (30%) followed by atrial septum defect (25%), ventricular septal defect (22%), patent ductus arteriosus (5%), coarctation of aorta (5%), and tetralogy of Fallot (3%). Among the cases with DS with a digestive system anomaly recorded, duodenal atresia (67%), Hirschsprung disease (14%), and tracheo-esophageal atresia (10%) were the most common. Fourteen (2%) of the cases with DS had an obstructive anomaly of the renal pelvis, including hydronephrosis. The other most common anomalies associated with cases with DS were syndactyly, club foot, polydactyly, limb reduction, cataract, hydrocephaly, cleft palate, hypospadias and diaphragmatic hernia. Many studies to assess the anomalies associated with DS have reported various results. There is no agreement in the literature as to

  7. A case of congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Yoshinobu; Wagatsuma, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Miho; Kurosawa, Shin; Saito, Koji; Hoshi, Kunihiko

    2012-12-01

    We encountered a 2-year-old female infant with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) who underwent an abdominal operation for strangulated ileus. Prior to the surgery, at home, the infant had been receiving non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) support only during sleep. However, after postoperative extubation, the blood oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) decreased to approximately 90 % with NPPV during sleep alone, necessitating the use of biphasic cuirass ventilation (BCV) along with NPPV for 2 days. The infant was weaned from the BCV on hospital day 9, and was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU) on hospital day 13. Although it has been said that CCHS is not under the control of the respiratory center, there are no reports of the true CO(2) response curves in these patients. Therefore, during respiratory management in the ICU post-surgery, we examined (with the consent of the mother) the relationship of the end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO(2)) to the tidal volume and respiratory rate, for a period of 6 min in the absence of sedation, using a respiratory profile monitor. Electrocardiographic and SpO(2) monitoring was also conducted at the same time, to ensure the patient's safety. In this patient, while the ETCO(2) increased, the tidal volume and respiratory rate remained unchanged. No relationship was found between the tidal volume and the respiratory rate. Various modalities have been used for the treatment of CCHS (tracheotomy, NPPV, and diaphragmatic pacing). Treatment of these patients in the ICU should be tailored to the needs of individual patients and their families. PMID:22790414

  8. [Purple urine bag syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Lazimy, Yaël; Delotte, Jérôme; Machiavello, Jean-Christophe; Lallement, Michel; Imbenotte, Michel; Bongain, André

    2007-06-01

    The authors report a case of dark purple urine in a woman with bowel obstruction and bilateral percutaneous nephrostomy urinary diversion for 30 years. This colour was due to the presence of high urinary concentrations of 3-indoxyl sulphate due to the enzymatic activity of Providencia rettgeri. A favourable course was observed in response to antibiotics. PMID:17634003

  9. Propofol Infusion Syndrome or Not? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, James H.; Roberts, Cory A.; Oliver, Josh J.; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-01-01

    Background Propofol is commonly used and well tolerated for induction of general anesthesia and is also used as a sedative in the intensive care unit. However, in rare cases, the agent may cause a fatal condition known as propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS). Case Report We present a case of PRIS that could have been fatal in a previously healthy male patient with multiple gunshot wounds. Conclusion Because patients typically exhibit other potentially fatal comorbidities, PRIS is always a diagnosis of exclusion. The true incidence of PRIS remains unknown, and more objective criteria for its diagnosis need to be established. PMID:25249811

  10. Waardenburg Syndrome: A Case Study of Two Patients.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Karan; Arora, Archana

    2015-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder with an incidence of 1 in 40,000 that manifests with sensorineural deafness, pigmentation defects of the skin, hair and iris and various defects of neural crest-derived tissues. This genetically heterogeneous disease accounts for >2 % of the congenitally deaf population. Mutations in the EDN3, EDNRB, MITF, PAX3, SNAI2, and SOX10 genes can cause Waardenburg syndrome. We here report a case of 12 year old female who presented with chief complaint of decreased hearing in both ears and had clinical features consistent with Waardenburg syndrome. She had a distinct white forelock of hair in the midline along with striking bilateral blue iris. Also a white depigmented patch was present on the right forearm. Both eyes had bright red fundal reflex with choroidal depigmentation. Her younger brother, the second case in this study, had similar blue eyes, white forelock of hair, depigmented skin patch and choroidal depigmentation but with normal hearing. Their father had a history of premature graying of hair. All the primary care physicians coming across a child with blue eyes and white forelock of hair should get the child's hearing tested at the first instance, if not already tested. An early diagnosis and improvement of hearing impairment with timely intervention are the most important for psychological and intellectual development of children with Waardenburg syndrome. PMID:26405672

  11. Gorlin and Goltz Syndrome: A Case Report with Surgical Review

    PubMed Central

    Surendraji Jain, Eesha; P Badole, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gorlin and Goltz syndrome are a very complex syndrome and a multisystemic process that is characterized by the presence of multiple pigmented basocellular carcinomas, keratocysts in the jaws, palmar and/or plantar pits and calcification of the falx cerebri. Along with these major features a great number minor features have also been described which involves numerous skeletical, dermatology related, neurological, ophthalmological and reproductive anomalies. It exhibits high penetrance and variable expressivity. Presented here is the case of Gorlin-Goltz in a 12 years old male patient which was diagnosed through its oral and maxillofacial manifestations. Treatment of odontogenic keratocyst was done by enucleation without primary suturing. Iodoform dressing was kept to enhance the healing and to reduce the recurrence of the lesion. It is important to provide the early diagnosis for detection of clinical and radiological manifestations in young patients and for provision of advice concerning preventive treatment like protection of the skin from the sunlight and genetic sensitivity testing so that possible complications associated with this syndrome can be prevented. How to cite this article: Bahadure RN, Jain ES, Badole GP. Gorlin and Goltz Syndrome: A Case Report with Surgical Review. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(2):104-108. PMID:25206202

  12. Goodpasture's Syndrome and Silica: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Dahlgren, James; Wardenburg, Marla; Peckham, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of Goodpasture's syndrome following chronic low level and an acute, high level of exposure to crystalline silica. A 38-year-old male tilesetter was admitted to the emergency room with dyspnea and respiratory failure. He reported that his symptoms had developed over the previous week after inhaling a large amount of dust while dry-sanding and sweeping a silica-based product used to fill cracks in a cement floor. Over the following days, his pulmonary function declined and he developed acute renal failure. Tests of antiglomerular basement membrane antibody were positive and renal biopsy revealed global glomerulonephritis. He was diagnosed with Goodpasture's syndrome and treated with steroids, plasmapheresis, and hemodialysis. This man had a history of childhood asthma and a remote, one pack-year history of cigarette use. He used the flooring product for seven years prior to the inciting event, however, previous jobs had utilized significantly smaller amounts. Goodpasture's syndrome and other autoimmune diseases have been reported in association with silica exposure. The acute onset following high level silica exposure in this previously healthy man, suggest that clinicians should investigate silica exposure as a causal factor in cases of Goodpasture's syndrome. PMID:20886021

  13. Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Autoimmunity: A Case Report of an Unusual Presentation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Andrea L.; Smith, Hedy

    2011-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) commonly presents asymptomatically or with symptomatic cytopenias. However, autoimmune phenomena in association with MDS have been well described in several case reports and case series. Typically, these autoimmune phenomena take the form of vasculitides, arthritis, connective tissue diseases, pulmonary infiltrates, or polymyalgia rheumatica. We present the case of a woman with MDS (karyotype 46,XX,+1,der(1;7)(q10;p10)[20], that evolved with an additional trisomy 8 clone) and a novel spectrum of autoimmune diseases including acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) and lacrimal gland pseudotumor. PMID:22937307

  14. Adams-Oliver Syndrome: A Case with Full Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dehdashtian, Amir; Dehdashtian, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is characterized by the combination of congenital scalp defects (aplasia cutis congenita) and terminal transverse limb defects of variable severity. It is believed that Adams-Oliver syndrome without major organ abnormalities does not necessarily alter the normal lifespan. We present a case without detectable major organ abnormality contrary to life but with poor weight gain. A male infant with scalp and skin cutis aplasia, generalized cutis aplasia, dilated veins over scalp and trunk, hypoplastic toes and nails of feet, glaucoma, poor feeding and poor weight gain. This report shows a case of AOS without major multiple organ abnormalities but with poor feeding and abnormal weight gain that may be alter the normal lifespan. PMID:27433307

  15. An Unusual Case of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Hemophagocytic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sharmeen, Saika; Hussain, Nazia

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HS) or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an immune mediated phenomenon that can occur in the setting of an autoimmune disease, chronic immunosuppression, malignancy, or infection. It has been more commonly described in the pediatric population and less commonly in adults. We describe a case of a 52-year-old male who presented with a rash. He simultaneously met the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria for the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the diagnostic criteria of HS as described in the hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) 2004 trial. The bone marrow on autopsy showed the presence of abundant hemosiderophages with focal hemophagocytosis. SLE-associated HS might be underdiagnosed due to the overlap in clinical findings. This case represents the importance of prompt diagnosis and treatment of such a potentially fatal clinical syndrome. PMID:26981305

  16. A Case of Capgras Syndrome Related to Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hines, Aisha; Stewart, Jonathan T; Catalano, Glenn

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroidism is commonly associated with a variety of psychiatric conditions, most commonly depression and cognitive impairment, but up to 5% to 15% of symptomatically hypothyroid patients may develop a nonaffective psychosis, classically referred to as "myxedema madness." We report the case of a woman who developed Capgras syndrome in the context of hypothyroidism, and whose psychosis rapidly resolved with levothyroxine supplementation. To date, very few cases of Capgras syndrome related to hypothyroidism have been reported. The pathophysiology of this condition remains unclear but it may be related to global cerebral hypometabolism or possibly to increased cerebral dopamine. Given the robust response of "myxedema madness" to thyroid replacement, psychiatrists should remain vigilant for covert hypothyroidism in patients with psychosis and atypical histories or presentations. PMID:26554328

  17. [A case of Lemierre's syndrome with septic pulmonary embolisms].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoichi; Takayanagi, Noboru; Sugita, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    A 41-year-old-man with sore throat and fever visited a nearby clinic. He was given antibiotics, but on disease day 11, the left side of his neck had swollen. Because chest CT on disease day 16 showed bilateral multiple pulmonary nodules, he was admitted to our hospital. He had septic pulmonary embolisms and thrombophlebitis of the left internal jugular vein, and Fusobacterium necrophorum was isolated from the blood and neck pus culture, and we diagnosed him as having Lemierre's syndrome. We administered piperacillin/ tazobactam and heparin, and his symptoms improved thereafter. Lemierre's syndrome is relatively rare but is increasing in recent years. We report herein this case and compare reported cases in Japan with those from overseas. PMID:25672140

  18. A Case of Femoral Fracture in Klippel Trenaunay Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, Sam; Wong, Fabian; Back, Diane

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of Klippel Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) who presented with severe bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA). Preoperative planning was commenced for a total knee replacement (TKR). Whilst on the waiting list the patient suffered a fall and sustained a complete femoral diaphysis fracture. Conservative management in the form of skin traction was initially chosen as significant extra- and intramedullary vascular malformations posed an increased risk of perioperative bleeding. This failed to progress to union, and so open reduction and internal fixation was performed. This subsequently resulted in on-going delayed union, which was subsequently managed with low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS, otherwise known as Exogen (Bioventus. exogen. Secondary exogen, 2012)). There are only two previous documented cases of femoral fracture in KTS. This is the first report of a patient with this rare syndrome receiving this treatment. We discuss the management of fracture in this challenging group of patients. PMID:25478269

  19. Idiopathic Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Bulent; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome (ISCLS) is rarely seen, and presents with recurrent episodes of hypotension, shock, hemoconcentration, and hypoproteinemia. The main pathology is the dysfunction of the vascular endothelium, and it is characterized by an increase of capillary permeability that is accompanied by the loss of intravascular fluid and protein. Case Presentation We present a 58-year-old female who presented with peripheral edema, leg pain, and syncope at the emergency department. Interestingly demyemilising neuropathy, which is a rare finding, ensued on day 4. She is still being treated using intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Conclusions The early signs and symptoms of ISCLS may be subtle; therefore the diagnosis can easily be missed and prompt treatment of the syndrome may be postponed. Thus, the clinician must consider ISCLS in differential diagnosis in cases of hypotension, hemoconcentration, and hypoalbuminemia. PMID:27195144

  20. Psychogenic Foreign Accent Syndrome: A New Case

    PubMed Central

    Keulen, Stefanie; Verhoeven, Jo; De Page, Louis; Jonkers, Roel; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Mariën, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the case of a 33-year-old, right-handed, French-speaking Belgian lady who was involved in a car accident as a pedestrian. Six months after the incident she developed a German/Flemish-like accent. The patient's medical history, the onset of the FAS and the possible psychological causes of the accent change are analyzed. Relevant neuropsychological, neurolinguistic, and psychodiagnostic test results are presented and discussed. The psychodiagnostic interview and testing will receive special attention, because these have been underreported in previous FAS case reports. Furthermore, an accent rating experiment was carried out in order to assess the foreign quality of the patient's speech. Pre- and post-morbid spontaneous speech samples were analyzed phonetically to identify the pronunciation characteristics associated with this type of FAS. Several findings were considered essential in the diagnosis of psychogenic FAS: the psychological assessments as well as the clinical interview confirmed the presence of psychological problems, while neurological damage was excluded by means of repeated neuroimaging and neurological examinations. The type and nature of the speech symptoms and the accent fluctuations associated with the patient's psychological state cannot be explained by a neurological disorder. Moreover, the indifference of the patient toward her condition may also suggest a psychogenic etiology, as the opposite is usually observed in neurogenic FAS patients. PMID:27148003

  1. Susac syndrome: a case report and PET imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Dielman, Charlotte; Laureys, Guy; Meurs, Alfred; Bissay, Veronique; Ebinger, Guy

    2009-09-01

    We describe the case of a twenty-year-old woman with subacute encephalopathy, who subsequently developed hearing loss and ophtalmopathy. The clinical triad and typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis led to the diagnosis of Susac syndrome. Brain positron emission tomography showed abnormalities which are comparable with other types of central nervous system vasculitis, and distinct from those found in multiple sclerosis. PMID:19902818

  2. Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, S C A T; Wijnen, R M H; van den Berg, P

    2004-08-01

    Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by a dilated, non-obstructive urinary bladder and hypoperistalsis of the gastrointestinal tract, which is considered lethal. About 90 patients have been reported, predominantly female. We present the case of a female newborn with MMIHS in whom antenatal ultrasound was suggestive for the diagnosis, which was confirmed after delivery. Diagnostic features by antenatal ultrasound are described. PMID:15512727

  3. Double seronegative myasthenia gravis with antiphospholipid syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by fluctuating muscle weakness. It is often associated with other autoimmune disorders, such as thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and antiphospholipid syndrome. Many aspects of autoimmune diseases are not completely understood, particularly when they occur in association, which suggests a common pathogenetic mechanism. Case presentation We report a case of a 42-year-old Caucasian woman with antiphospholipid syndrome, in whom myasthenia gravis developed years later. She tested negative for both antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor and against muscle-specific receptor tyrosine-kinase, but had typical decremental responses at the repetitive nerve stimulation testing, so that a generalized myasthenia gravis was diagnosed. Her thromboplastin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were high, anticardiolipin and anti-β2 glycoprotein-I antibodies were slightly elevated, as a manifestation of the antiphospholipid syndrome. She had a good clinical response when treated with a combination of pyridostigmine, prednisone and azathioprine. Conclusions Many patients with myasthenia gravis test positive for a large variety of auto-antibodies, testifying of an immune dysregulation, and some display mild T-cell lymphopenia associated with hypergammaglobulinemia and B-cell hyper-reactivity. Both of these mechanisms could explain the occurrence of another autoimmune condition, such as antiphospholipid syndrome, but further studies are necessary to shed light on this matter. Clinicians should be aware that patients with an autoimmune diagnosis such as antiphospholipid syndrome who develop signs and neurological symptoms suggestive of myasthenia gravis are at risk and should prompt an emergent evaluation by a specialist. PMID:24380508

  4. Trisomy 4p syndrome: A case report with review

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.V.; Dagnew, H.; Parekh, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    We present a case with trisomy of the short arm of chromosome 4, i.e., 46,XX,der(22)t(4;22)(p12;11.2). The most notable clinical findings included: prominent forehead, hypertelorism, small, bulbous nose with depressed and broad bridge, low hairline, retrognathia, notched auricular helix, rocker-bottom feet with prominent heel, arachnodactyly and comptodactyly. An additional, unique finding in our case is the presence of 13 ribs. In the past, the precise characterization of cases with trisomy for the 4p segment has been difficult by routine cytogenetic techniques because the bands involved in this abnormality are quite variable. We used the FISH technique, applying a battery of probes to delineate the genomic morbidity at the molecular level. In our case, the entire short arm is in the trisomic state, yet it could not be identified as a distinct syndrome prior to cytogenetic evaluation. The phenotypic spectrum associated with this gross chromosomal abnormality has been the subject of debate and scrutiny. We provided a comprehensive review of 64 cases and it is concluded that the clinical manifestations of the pure trisomy 4p syndrome are associated with trisomy of the distal two thirds to the entire p arm and that the additional material does not cause a more severe phenotype. Therefore, the molecular characterization of the short arm of chromosome 4 (4p) may be imperative in order to correlate the clinical expression with chromosome bands and ultimately with specific gene(s) in future cases.

  5. [Withdrawal syndrome from antidepressive drugs. Report of 5 cases].

    PubMed

    Lejoyeux, M; Rodière-Rein, C; Adès, J

    1992-01-01

    Antidepressant withdrawal symptoms, following abrupt or gradual discontinuation of antidepressants, include general somatic distress (flu-like syndromes, gastro-intestinal disturbances, myalgias, headache, chills, weakness and rhinorrhea), anxiety, agitation, sleep disturbances, movement disorders, cardiac arrhythmias, delirium and manic reactions. Two cases of delirium, an hypomanic reaction and two general distress and movement disorders are reported. Cases 1 and 2 required admission to a general hospital. The etiology of the delirium was difficult to assess as long as the clinicians did not know that patients were taking antidepressants. Case 3 corresponds to the paradoxical activation following antidepressant interruption. Cases 4 and 5 constitutes light withdrawal syndromes. Most of cases are probably unrecognized. These cases reflect the importance in daily practice of the phenomena. It can be concluded from our study that: antidepressants must not be abruptly discontinued when a somatic disease appears. When a patient treated with a psychotropic drug develops delirium, the withdrawal of antidepressant must be suspected and the prescribing physician contacted to know what kind of psychoactive medication was prescribed. PMID:1299596

  6. A case study of delayed serotonin syndrome: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Shannon; Ahned, Nasiva; Varas, Grace M

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a potentially life-threatening condition that results from excessive serotonin agonism of the central and peripheral nervous system. Though serotonin syndrome is most often associated with ingestion of more than one serotonergic drug, many other mechanisms have been associated with serotonergic excess. This case study presents a 79-year-old African-American female, an assisted living resident, who presented to the emergency department with altered mental status, acute onset of "chills," reduced appetite, urinary incontinence, and an elevated temperature of 103 degrees F (39.4 degrees C). Extensive initial diagnostic findings were negative for urinary tract infection, systemic infection, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Despite aggressive medical management, including intravenous hydration and broad-spectrum antibiotics, the patient continued to become more confused, agitated, and despondent over the subsequent 24 hours. The initial working diagnosis did not include serotonin syndrome, but once other studies did not reveal an etiology of the symptoms and the patient continued to be delirious, paroxetine was discontinued and all symptoms resolved within 48 hours of last dose. Voluntary reporting, postmarketing surveillance, and implementation of well-designed randomized clinical trials are all mechanisms to gather data on serotonin syndrome. These practices will provide future researchers with needed information to solidify diagnostic criteria, educate health care professionals, and safeguard the public against this preventable and potentially lethal drug-drug interaction. PMID:19275460

  7. One glasses too many: A case report of Benson's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Shivani; Amitava, Abadan Khan; Kumari, Namita

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Benson's Syndrome, a form of occipital Alzheimer's disease, with posterior cortical atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging, in a 62-year-old male, who presented with visual problems, ascribed to the eyes, and had even undergone cataract/intraocular lens surgery in the right eye; and change of glasses 21 times over the past 2 years, with no apparent benefit. This case is of interest both on account of its rarity, and to highlight its features since the diagnosis may be missed in an ophthalmological setting where such patient may go for first consult. PMID:25971180

  8. Constitutional trisomy 8 mosaicism syndrome: case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Achandira M.; Al-Kindy, Adila

    2013-01-01

    Trisomy 8 mosaicism (Warkany syndrome) is a rare viable condition with variable phenotypes, ranging from mild dysmorphic features to severe malformations. Karyotyping and fluorescence in-situ hybridization potentially help detecting this low mosaic clone to confirm the diagnosis of patients with classical and unusual clinical presentations. This report reviews few previous cases to describe our case - a boy who had trisomy 8 mosaicism with severe dysmorphic features, born to a consanguineous Arabic couple. This study concludes that careful cytogenetic diagnoses of trisomy 8 mosaicism is essential for appropriate management and follow up of this rare disorder.

  9. The laparoscopic management of Swyer syndrome: Case series

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Neena; Dadhwal, Vatsla; Sharma, Kandala Aparna; Gupta, Deepika; Agarwal, Sumita; Deka, Dipika

    2015-01-01

    Swyer syndrome, also known as 46 XY pure gonadal dysgenesis, is a rare endocrine disorder. Affected individuals are phenotypically female with female genitalia, normal Mullerian structures, absent testicular tissue, and a 46 XY chromosomal constitution. We report a series of eight cases of Swyer syndrome, of which six were managed by laparoscopic gonadectomy. The two other cases had to undergo an exploratory laparotomy in view of their presentation with adnexal masses. Two of the girls were siblings. The chief presenting complaint was primary amenorrhea. Four girls also presented with a history of poor development of secondary sexual characters. The average age at presentation was 16.19±2.85 years. The average height was 158.33 ±4.63 cm, and the average weight was 49.33±8.44 kg. Breast development was either Tanner 2 or 3 in four girls, whereas three girls had a Tanner 1 underdeveloped breasts. Axillary and pelvic hair was sparse in all the girls. The vagina was well canalized in all the girls. Hormonal evaluation revealed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism with a mean follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) level of 95.81 mIU/L and a mean luteinizing (LH) level of 24.15 mIU/L. Imaging analysis revealed the presence of a small uterus in all the cases, except one. Bilateral ovaries were either not visualized or streak gonads were present. Adnexal mass was detected in two of the six cases with raised carcinoembryonic antigen (CA) 125 levels in one case. Genetic analysis revealed a karyotype of 46 XY in six girls, 46 XY/45 X in one, and the culture repeatedly failed in one girl. Because of the risk of malignancy, bilateral gonadectomy was performed in all cases. Histopathological analysis revealed that three of the six cases had dysgerminoma. The patients have been started on hormone replacement therapy. Laparoscopy is a minimally invasive modality for the definitive diagnosis and treatment of cases with Swyer syndrome. An early diagnosis of Swyer syndrome is possible

  10. Macular edema-like change and pseudopapilledema in a case of Scheie syndrome.

    PubMed

    Usui, T; Shirakashi, M; Takagi, M; Abe, H; Iwata, K

    1991-09-01

    We reported a case of Scheie syndrome in which diffuse fine corneal deposits, pigmentary retinal degeneration, pseudopapilledema, and macular edema-like change were observed bilaterally. This is the first report describing macular change in Scheie syndrome. PMID:1836802

  11. First Japanese case of atypical progeroid syndrome/atypical Werner syndrome with heterozygous LMNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yokoyama, Yoko; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Ogino, Sachiko; Takeuchi, Yuko; Yamada, Kazuya; Hattori, Tomoyasu; Hashizume, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Goto, Makoto; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    Atypical progeroid syndrome (APS), including atypical Werner syndrome (AWS), is a progeroid syndrome involving heterozygous mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear protein lamin A/C. We report the first Japanese case of APS/AWS with a LMNA mutation (p.D300N). A 53-year-old Japanese man had a history of recurrent severe cardiovascular diseases as well as brain infarction and hemorrhages. Although our APS/AWS patient had overlapping features with Werner syndrome (WS), such as high-pitched voice, scleroderma, lipoatrophy and atherosclerosis, several cardinal features of WS, including short stature, premature graying/alopecia, cataract, bird-like face, flat feet, hyperkeratosis on the soles and diabetes mellitus, were absent. In immunofluorescence staining and electron microscopic analyses of the patient's cultured fibroblasts, abnormal nuclear morphology, an increase in small aggregation of heterochromatin and a decrease in interchromatin granules in nuclei of fibroblasts were observed, suggesting that abnormal nuclear morphology and chromatin disorganization may be associated with the pathogenesis of APS/AWS. PMID:25327215

  12. Antiphospholipid syndrome presenting as progressive neuropsychiatric disorders: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chien-Hsun; Chou, Mei-Chuan; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Lai, Chiou-Lian

    2013-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a rare form of autoimmune coagulopathy. In this syndrome, the most common neurologic abnormality is transient ischemic attack. This can be easily overlooked if a patient presents with progressive neuropsychiatric disorders, such as depression or dementia. We report two cases of young women, aged 35 and 22 years, presenting with progressive depression and mental decline over a certain period. The neuropsychological diagnoses of the two patients were, respectively, dementia with disinhibition and borderline dementia with depression. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple old infarcts with encephalomalacia in the former case, and only one cortical hemorrhagic infarction, over the right temporoparietal lobe, observed in the latter case. The outcomes of the two cases were also very different. Progressive neuropsychiatric disorders are increasingly observed in the young; therefore, APS and other autoimmune diseases should be considered during the differential diagnosis. Brain imaging examinations may prevent a delay in the detection of a structural lesion and facilitate the early intervention with good prognosis. Careful investigations by experts from different disciplines are always encouraged in complicated cases. PMID:23723705

  13. A Case of Beare-Stevenson Syndrome with Unusual Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Nitin; Leung, Samuel; Carney, Erin; Gerber, Alexis; David, Karen Laurie

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: — Final Diagnosis: Beare-Stevenson syndrome Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Genetic analysis Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Beare-Stevenson syndrome (BSS) is an extremely rare genetic disorder, with fewer than 25 cases reported worldwide. This autosomal dominant syndrome has been linked to two mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2), Tyr375Cys and Ser372Cys, both causing amino acid changes. Case Report: BSS is characterized by a range of morphological features, some more classically associated than others, of which craniosynostosis has been almost uniformly present. Other common features include cutis gyrata, acanthosis nigricans, ear and eye defects, skin/mucosal tissue tags, prominent umbilical stump, and anogenital anomalies. This account reports what we believe to be the 25th case of BSS, and exhibits a constellation of the characteristic features similar to those previously described, including the presence of cutis gyrata, proptosis, a bifid scrotum, and hypospadias. However, craniosynostosis was not detected prenatally by ultrasound or at birth. Prenatal ultrasound may detect some dysmorphic features of BSS. Many of these features have also been associated with other genetic disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Our case presented with the unusual features of a natal tooth and absence of craniosynostosis at birth. At birth, a diagnosis of BSS was suspected based on clinical features despite the absence of craniosynostosis. This was later confirmed with the use of molecular analysis, revealing a Tyr375Cys mutation of exon 9 of the FGFR2 gene. Conclusions: We suggest that a normal antenatal ultrasound scan and the absence of craniosynostosis at birth should not preclude further workup for BSS if this possibility is clinically suspected. PMID:27079505

  14. Small bowel adenocarcinoma in Lynch syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ke-Kang; Liu, Gang; Shen, Xiaojun; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinoma is part of the tumor spectrum of Lynch syndrome, which is caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes. The present study describes the case of a 51-year-old man fulfilling the Amsterdam II criteria for Lynch syndrome, who had a 15-mm early-stage colorectal cancer resected endoscopically from the ascending colon. Due to upper abdominal discomfort after eating and consequent anorexia, a computed tomography scan performed 1 month later showed a tumoral mass of the upper jejunum with local lymphadenopathy. The laparotomy revealed a completely obstructing mass. Intraoperative frozen section showed a small bowel adenocarcinoma. Subsequent genetic testing confirmed the germline mutation of mutL homolog 1. The patient received 6 cycles of an adjuvant folinic acid, fluorouracil and ocaliplatin chemotherapy regimen. The latest CT scan, 16 months after the chemotherapy, did not show any recurrence. This case highlights the importance of considering the possibility of small bowel adenocarcinoma in patients with upper bowel obstruction, particularly for patients with Lynch syndrome. PMID:27446478

  15. [A case of serotonin syndrome following minimum doses of sertraline].

    PubMed

    Kan, Rumiko; Endou, Masatoshi; Unno, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    We report a 75-year-old woman developing serotonin syndrome following minimum doses of sertraline. She showed a depressed mood, insomnia, and general fatigue and was taking sulpiride at 300 mg/day, alprazolam at 1.2 mg/day, zopiclone at 7.5 mg/day, and etizolam at 1 mg/day. As she remained symptomatic, sertraline at 25 mg/day was added. Within 14 hours of starting sertraline, the patient began to experience delirium, impaired coordination, diaphoresis, tremulousness of the upper limbs bilaterally, and agitation. Sertraline was thus discontinued, and all of the above-mentioned symptoms disappeared rapidly. Serotonin syndrome is rarely reported in patients taking sertraline in Japan. To our knowledge, ours is the second case of serotonin syndrome associated with sertraline in Japan. According to Drug in Japan, sertraline must be started at the lowest efficacious dose with slow titration and is contraindicated for patients who are taking pimozide or monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Also, the coadministration of sertraline with other agents such as lithium, tricyclic antidepressants, and triptans necessitates the close observation of symptoms and signs. However, our case didn't take any of these combinations, and she was administered 25 mg/day, the lowest efficacious dose. This report emphasizes that caution is needed when prescribing sertraline to elderly patients and on its coadministration. PMID:19999561

  16. [A case of Klinefelter's syndrome with schizophrenia-like symptoms].

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, H; Asakawa, O; Koyama, K; Takahashi, Y; Atsumi, Y; Kumakura, T

    2000-06-01

    A case of Klinefelter's syndrome with schizophrenia-like symptoms is reported. He was given a diagnosis of schizophrenia at the age of 39. After being treated with medication for many years, he stopped taking them at the age of seventy-two and involuntary movements appeared in his limbs and the trunk. Upon admission to our hospital, he was experiencing delusion and psychosocial excitement. A physical examination showed him to be a thin man of 175.5 cm height, suffering from a mild degree of gynecomastia, testicular atrophy. Serum LH and FSH were both high 10.9 and 47.8 mU/ml respectively. Serum testosterone concentration was 0.2 ng/ml, much lower than the normal range (2.7-10.7 ng/ml). On the Wechsler adult intelligence scale (Revision), his total IQ was 103 (performance IQ 100, verbal IQ105). Karyotype analysis revealed an XXY pattern. Although slight auditory hallucinations remained, the delusional symptoms as well as the involuntary movements diminished after the administration of psychotrophics. Personality changes such as apathy and abulia was subsided. The psychological symptoms were very similar to these of cases in other reports of Klinefelter's syndrome associated with schizophrenia-like symptoms. Some reports about the relationships between sex hormones and schizophrenia including other psychotic disorders suggest that the X-chromosome plays an important part in the mechanism of psychosocial symptoms and in the prognosis in Klinefelter's syndrome. PMID:10998933

  17. Pyomyositis in Nodding Syndrome (NS) patient--a case report.

    PubMed

    Kitara, David Lagoro; Mwaka, Amos Deogratius; Wabinga, Henry R; Bwangamoi, Paul Okot

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of Pyomyositis in a 13-year-old boy diagnosed using WHO surveillance definition of Probable Nodding syndrome. Complete blood count showed Leukocytosis with immature granulocytes and atypical lymphocytes. Except for the liver enzymes which were high the renal functions and serum electrolytes were within normal range values. Culture of a pus-swab grew Staphylococcus aureus. Abdominal ultrasound scan showed a focal mass on the internal and external oblique muscles of the right abdominal wall. Incision and drainage was performed. Histology of the muscle showed non-specific inflammation of the external and internal oblique muscles. This finding may highlight some of the other tropical diseases that occur in children with Nodding syndrome. PMID:24711865

  18. Case of pituitary stalk transection syndrome ascertained after breech delivery.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Kaori; Hidaka, Takao; Ono, Yosuke; Kochi, Keiko; Yasoshima, Kuniaki; Arai, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Pituitary stalk transection syndrome (PSTS) is a rare complication that can accompany breech delivery. Early diagnosis of this syndrome is difficult, and it may cause a serious delay in the diagnosis. We present a case of PSTS ascertained after breech delivery. A 20-year-old woman presented with primary amenorrhea. The patient was born by breech delivery and had a history of treatment for pituitary dwarfism. Her laboratory findings showed pituitary hypothyroidism, and hormone replacement therapy was initiated. At 28 years old, she became pregnant and had a normal delivery at 38 weeks' gestation. One year after delivery, her thyroid hormone level changed. Laboratory test showed adrenocortical insufficiency, and magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary gland showed transection of the pituitary stalk and development of an ectopic posterior lobe. These findings were compatible with PSTS. When a patient who has been born by breech delivery presents with symptoms of pituitary deficiency, PSTS should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26631915

  19. Neuropsychological rehabilitation in a case of Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cossu, M C; Nava, I; Leoni, S; Piccardi, L

    2005-05-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome is a rare congenital disorder. Symptoms include a characteristic facial structure, pre- and post-natal growth deficiency, hypertrichosis, and visceral and cardiovascular anomalies. Behavioural problems and moderate to severe mental retardation are also present. In this paper, we report a mild case of Cornelia de Lange syndrome. The neuropsychological rehabilitation of this patient is also described. It was structured on the patient's specific areas of strength and weakness in order to facilitate the development of adaptive cognitive abilities. To maximise the learning potential of these children, we recommend specific interventions with a multidimensional neuropsychological approach, which considers developmental abilities and disabilities as related to the global reality of the child. PMID:16353507

  20. Brown syndrome with severe amblyopia: a case report from Africa

    PubMed Central

    Olusanya, Bolutife Ayokunnu

    2015-01-01

    Brown syndrome is a rare form of strabismus that is characterised by restriction of elevation of the eye in adduction. This is a case report of an eleven year old Nigerian girl who presented with a history of squint and poor vision. She had visual acuities of 6/24 and counting fingers in her right and left eyes respectively. There was a left hypotropia in the primary position of gaze with associated marked restriction of elevation in adduction and a positive forced duction test. Refraction revealed a refractive error of +4.50 diopters in each eye. The right visual acuity improved significantly to 6/9 with the refractive correction while the left visual acuity improved marginally to 6/60. This report demonstrates the occurrence of Brown syndrome with associated severe amblyopia in Africa. Health care providers are encouraged to promptly refer all patients, especially children, who have ocular motility disorders for early specialist intervention. PMID:26090014

  1. [The anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Milants, C; Wang, F C; Gomulinski, L; Ledon, F; Petrover, D; Bonnet, R; Crielaard, J M; Kaux, J F

    2015-01-01

    The anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome is a rare entrapment neuropathy of the deep peroneal nerve beneath the inferior extensor retinaculum of the ankle. It is frequently unrecognized and may lead to misdiagnosis and delayed treatment. We report the case of a 77 year old patient complaining of symptoms of an anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome with neuropathic pain located at the dorsal part of the foot, without any sensorimotor loss. The ENMG was in favour of a motor impairment of the deep peroneal nerve. MRI exploration of the ankle showed a millimetric bony overgrowth of the upper pole of the navicular bone, irritative to the deep peroneal nerve. Infiltration at overgrowth of the navicular provided a partial and temporary decrease in pain symptoms. Surgical nerve decompression was then considered. PMID:26376569

  2. [A special case of 'deafness'; Landau-Kleffner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stroink, H; Van Dongen, H R; Meulstee, J; Scheltens-de Boer, M; Geesink, H H

    1997-08-16

    A boy aged 5 had displayed from the age of 3 a fluctuating deficit in understanding spoken language. Audiometric testing proved his hearing to be normal. After 18 months, the parents noticed minor attacks of 'absence'. An EEG showed a normal background pattern and frequent spikes and spike waves complexes; CT-scanning of the brain revealed no abnormalities. On the basis of the acquired language disorder, the seizures and the features of the nocturnal EEG, the diagnosis the syndrome of Landau-Kleffner was made. After treatment with ethosuximide a temporary improvement of the aphasia occurred. A permanent improvement however was realized by treatment with prednisone. The boy could attend a primary school. The syndrome runs a fluctuating course; the patient may recover, but he may also undergo general mental deterioration. Antiepileptic agents only may have a brief favorable effect on the aphasia. In case of failure corticosteroids or even subpial cortical transsection are indicated. PMID:9543768

  3. Surviving anaphylactoid syndrome of pregnancy: A case study.

    PubMed

    Healy, Brandon R; Leclair, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Anaphylactoid Syndrome of Pregnancy (ASP) is a rare complication of delivery in mother and/or infant during the process of birth. Known as either Anaphylactoid Syndrome of Pregnancy or Amniotic Fluid Embolism, the maternal mortality rate worldwide for this complication is between 10 and 16% while the fetal mortality rate is upwards of 30%. The majority of maternal survivors are expected to have long - term neurologic deficit. While the majority of infants will survive, the majority will also incur some form of neurologic defect. This report is of a case in which both the mother and infant survived with discharge occurring at eleven days for the mother and eighteen days for the infant. PMID:23772472

  4. Metronidazole Toxicity in Cockayne Syndrome: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brian T; Strong, Andrew; O'Kelly, Sean; Munkley, Jennifer; Stark, Zornitza

    2015-09-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by small stature, intellectual disability, and accelerated pathologic aging. Through the Cockayne Syndrome Natural History Study, we have identified 8 cases of acute hepatic failure after metronidazole administration (8% of our cohort), 3 of which were fatal. The interval between initial administration and death was 6 to 11 days. Two of these patients also experienced acute neurologic deficit. Both hepatotoxicity and acute neurologic deficit have been reported previously as extremely rare adverse events after metronidazole administration. However, we have not identified any patients with CS who have received metronidazole without serious adverse effects. We recommend that a diagnosis of CS be considered an absolute contraindication to the use of metronidazole. PMID:26304821

  5. Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Mikhail; Castillo, Carlos Cuellar; Barber, Melissa S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can be comorbidities that are difficult to treat. In this patient, an evidence-informed treatment pathway guided by laboratory biomarkers was used to address both conditions. Case Presentation A 69-y-old female patient presented with a 50-y history of sinusitis that was worse in the winter, postnasal drip, frequent sore throats, gastrointestinal complaints, headaches, and yeast infections. Two sinus surgeries (in years 2000 and 2002) and multiple courses of antibiotics had not resolved her sinus symptoms. In addition to CRS and IBS, this patient was noted to have intestinal overgrowth of Candida albicans, multiple food sensitivities, and leaky gut syndrome. Conclusion Antifungal medication and dietary changes in the course of 8 mo resulted in the resolution of her CRS and IBS. PMID:27547167

  6. [Case of obstructed hemivagina and ipsilateral renal anomaly (OHVIRA) syndrome].

    PubMed

    Horioka, Keiko; Kataoka, Keiko; Ooishi, Hiroko; Tsunematsu, Ryousuke; Okugawa, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Kato, Kiyoko

    2014-03-01

    We report the case of 23 year-old woman with OHVIRA syndrome (obstructed hemivagina and ipisilateral renal anomaly) discovered during management for right renal failure. Non-specific symptoms such as lower abdominal pain, dysmenorrhea, and genital bleeding sometimes occur with congenital uterine anomalies such as this. It is very difficult to diagnose OHVIRA syndrome accurately without ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, and patients can develop severe complications as a result of delays in diagnosis: endometriosis, pelvic adhesions, or infertility can occur through backflow of genital bleeding because of vaginal septum. In our patient we managed to avoid severe complications by surgically resecting the vaginal septum. She was treated within an appropriate time frame and without complications. Fortunately, after the surgery she managed to become pregnant in the left side of the uterus. PMID:25000661

  7. Bobble-head doll syndrome associated with Dandy-Walker syndrome. Case report.

    PubMed

    de Brito Henriques, José Gilberto; Henriques, Karina Santos Wandeck; Filho, Geraldo Pianetti; Fonseca, Luiz Fernando; Cardoso, Francisco; Da Silva, Márcia Cristina

    2007-09-01

    Bobble-head doll syndrome (BHDS) presents in childhood and is usually associated with lesions of the third ventricle. This disorder is characterized by stereotypical head movements of the type "yes-yes" (up and down) at a frequency of 2 to 3 Hz. Rarely, movements of the type "no-no" (side-to-side) are described. There are a few hypotheses to explain the mechanism responsible for BHDS, but its real pathophysiological characteristics are still unknown. The authors describe the case of a child born with hydrocephalus and Dandy-Walker syndrome. A ventriculoperitoneal shunt was implanted in the child because of progressive head enlargement. One year after shunt placement, she began making frequent horizontal head movements of the type "no-no". There were no other signs or symptoms. Imaging studies demonstrated small ventricles and a posterior fossa cyst with no signs of hypertension. The child's growth, development, and head circumference (within the 5th percentile) remained satisfactory. Three aspects of this case were of interest: the association of BHDS with Dandy-Walker syndrome, the rare occurrence of BHDS of the "no-no" type, and the absence of third ventricle dilation. The authors' findings support the hypothesis that cerebellar malformations themselves can PMID:17918536

  8. Metabolic Syndrome in Childhood: Rare Case of Alstrom Syndrome with Blindness.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Afzal; D'Souza, Benedicta; Yadav, Charu; Agarwal, Ashish; Kumar, Anand; Nandini, M; D'Souza, Vivian; Poornima, A M; Kamath, Nutan

    2016-10-01

    Alstrom's syndrome (AS) is a rare autosomal recessive ciliopathic condition affecting 1:10,00,000 children. It's a single gene disorder of ALMS1 on chromosome 2 with multisystem involvement with cone-rod retinal dystrophy causing juvenile blindness, obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 Diabetes mellitus, hypogonadism and sensorineural hearing loss. Till now only 800 patients with this disorder has been identified so far. In this report, we describe the case of a 9-year old male boy from south India. He had been initially referred for polyphagia, polyuria, polydipsia, generalized weakness from 1 weeks. On examination he was demonstrated features suggestive of AS, including blindness, obesity, type 2 diabetes, altered lipid profile, hypogonadism, acanthosis nigricans, seborrheic dermatitis, right ear discharge and episodes of respiratory tract infections. So, diagnosis of AS is critical as it can easily be overlooked because of the many features associated with metabolic syndrome starting at age 7, a relatively early age. PMID:27605748

  9. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Jianhua; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare and serious syndrome of central nervous system that can develop in both adults and children. It is characterized by acute onset of headache, confusion, seizures or focal neurological deficits along with radiological findings of white matter abnormalities in the parietal and occipital lobes. In the past ten years, this syndrome has been described mainly in adults, rare in children. Here, we report a case of PRES presenting in a 12-year-old girl with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Her neurological symptom was rapidly recovered after control of hypertension without discontinuation of cyclosporine A. PMID:25120830

  10. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Jianhua; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare and serious syndrome of central nervous system that can develop in both adults and children. It is characterized by acute onset of headache, confusion, seizures or focal neurological deficits along with radiological findings of white matter abnormalities in the parietal and occipital lobes. In the past ten years, this syndrome has been described mainly in adults, rare in children. Here, we report a case of PRES presenting in a 12-year-old girl with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Her neurological symptom was rapidly recovered after control of hypertension without discontinuation of cyclosporine A. PMID:25120830

  11. Use of SNP array analysis to identify a novel TRIM32 mutation in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H.

    PubMed

    Cossée, Mireille; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Seguela, Claire; Mohr, Michel; Leturcq, France; Gundesli, Hulya; Chelly, Jamel; Tranchant, Christine; Koenig, Michel; Mandel, Jean-Louis

    2009-04-01

    Molecular diagnosis of monogenic diseases with high genetic heterogeneity is usually challenging. In the case of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, multiplex Western blot analysis is a very useful initial step, but that often fails to identify the primarily affected protein. We report how homozygosity analysis using a genome-wide SNP array allowed us to solve the diagnostic enigma in a patient with a moderate form of LGMD, born from consanguineous parents. The genome-wide scan performed on the patient's DNA revealed several regions of homozygosity, that were compared to the location of known LGMD genes. One such region indeed contained the TRIM32 gene. This gene was previously found mutated in families with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H), a mild autosomal recessive myopathy described in Hutterite populations and in 4 patients with a diagnosis of sarcotubular myopathy. A single missense mutation was found in all these patients, located in a conserved domain of the C-terminal part of the protein. Another missense mutation affecting the N-terminal part of TRIM32, observed in a single consanguineous Bedouin family, was reported to cause the phenotypically unrelated and genetically heterogeneous Bardet-Biedl syndrome, defining the BBS11 locus. Sequencing of TRIM32 in our patient revealed a distal frameshift mutation, c.1753_1766dup14 (p.Ile590Leu fsX38). Together with two recently reported mutations, this novel mutation confirms that integrity of the C-terminal domain of TRIM32 is necessary for muscle maintenance. PMID:19303295

  12. The HELLP syndrome in the antiphospholipid syndrome: retrospective study of 16 cases in 15 women

    PubMed Central

    Le Thi, Thuong D; Tieulie, N; Costedoat, N; Andreu, M; Wechsler, B; Vauthier-Brouzes, D; Aumaitre, O; Piette, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the characteristics of the haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome in the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and its influence on the subsequent pregnancies. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of 16 episodes of HELLP complicating APS in 15 women. Results: HELLP was complete in 10 cases and partial in six. It occurred during the second trimester in seven cases (the earliest at 18 weeks' gestation), the third trimester in seven cases, and the day following delivery in two cases. Pre-eclampsia was present in six cases and eclampsia in five. Outcome of pregnancies was: live birth (n = 8), stillbirth (n = 2) and fetal death (n = 6). APS was primary in nine women and secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in six. HELLP revealed primary APS in six cases. Seven women were not treated. Low dose aspirin was empirically prescribed in one woman whose APS had been undiagnosed despite a history of two fetal deaths. In the other women, therapy consisted of aspirin (n = 8), low molecular weight heparin with a dose varying between 3000 and 12 000 U daily (n = 5), and high dose immunoglobulin every 4 weeks (n = 2), hydroxychloroquine (n = 4), and prednisone (n = 6). Six women had seven subsequent pregnancies, 3–6 years after the complicated pregnancy. HELLP recurred at 33 weeks' gestation in one woman with SLE treated with prednisone, hydroxychloroquine, aspirin, and enoxaparin, and pregnancy ended in live birth. One woman became pregnant after in vitro fertilisation and embryo transfer, but pregnancy ended in fetal death despite prednisone, hydroxychloroquine, and enoxaparin. Four women had five uneventful pregnancies with 100 mg daily aspirin and heparin. Conclusions: APS may be revealed by HELLP. In APS, HELLP is associated with pre-eclampsia/eclampsia in most cases and seems to occur earlier than in the general population. Heparin plus aspirin may prevent obstetric complications in the subsequent pregnancies. PMID

  13. Cracked tooth syndrome: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Sadasiva, Kadandale; Ramalingam, Sathishmuthukumar; Rajaram, Krishnaraj; Meiyappan, Alagappan

    2015-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome (CTS), the term was coined by Cameron in 1964, which refers to an incomplete fracture of a vital posterior tooth extending to the dentin and occasionally into the pulp. CTS has always been a nightmare to the patient because of its unpredictable symptoms and a diagnostic dilemma for the dental practitioner due to its variable, bizarre clinical presentation. The treatment planning and management of CTS has also given problems and challenges the dentist as there is no specific treatment option. The management of CTS varies from one case to another or from one tooth to another in the same individual based on the severity of the symptoms and depth of tooth structure involved. After all, the prognosis of such tooth is still questionable and requires continuous evaluation. This article aims at presenting a series three cases of CTS with an overview on the clinical presentation, diagnosis and the different treatment options that varies from one case to another. PMID:26538947

  14. Leg Weakness Caused by Bilateral Piriformis Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hee Bong; Kwon, Bum Sun; Park, Jin Woo; Ryu, Gi Hyeong; Lee, Ho Jun; Kim, Chang Jae

    2015-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome (PS) is an uncommon neuromuscular disorder caused by the piriformis muscle (PM) compressing the sciatic nerve (SN). The main symptom of PS is sciatica, which worsens with certain triggering conditions. Because the pathophysiology is poorly understood, there are no definite diagnostic and therapeutic choices for PS. This case report presents a young woman who mainly complained of bilateral leg weakness. Electromyography revealed bilateral sciatic neuropathy and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed structural lesions causing entrapment of the bilateral SNs. After a laborious diagnosis of bilateral PS, she underwent PM releasing surgery. Few PS cases present with bilateral symptoms and leg weakness. Therefore, in such cases, a high level of suspicion is necessary for accurate and prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26798622

  15. Wells' Syndrome Mimicking Facial Cellulitis: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Cormerais, Maxence; Poizeau, Florence; Darrieux, Laure; Tisseau, Laurent; Safa, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Wells' syndrome (WS), or eosinophilic cellulitis, is an uncommon inflammatory dermatosis of unknown etiology that typically presents with pruritic cellulitis-like plaques on the extremities. Therefore, WS is often misdiagnosed as bacterial cellulitis due to its similarity in presentation. Here, we report two cases of WS that masqueraded as bacterial facial cellulitis. Under treatment with oral prednisone and/or a combination therapy with levocetirizine and hydroxyzine, both patients showed a dramatic improvement of the skin lesions. These cases highlight the need for clinicians to consider WS in the differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with facial cellulitis that does not respond to an initial antimicrobial regimen. In addition, our cases suggest that combination therapy with levocetirizine and hydroxyzine may be successfully used as corticosteroid-sparing treatment or to prevent relapse after the discontinuation of corticosteroid treatment. PMID:26120307

  16. Segregation and sporadic cases in families with Hunter's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Machill, G; Barbujani, G; Danieli, G A; Herrmann, F H

    1991-01-01

    Segregation analysis on five samples of families with Hunter's syndrome (158 cases overall) shows that the mutant allele segregates in agreement with Mendelian expectations for an X linked recessive disease, but the proportion of sporadic cases is significantly lower than expected under mutation-selection equilibrium. Heterogeneity among the samples is apparent, but it is caused entirely by a sample of Ashkenazi families, whose segregation pattern has previously been interpreted as supporting the hypothesis of prenatal selection in favour of the pathological allele. Conversely, our joint analysis of the five samples by a maximum likelihood approach does not suggest segregation distortion. Possible reasons for the apparent lack of sporadic cases include the effect of ascertainment bias. PMID:1908009

  17. Megacystis-Microcolon-Intestinal Hypoperistalsis Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Melek, Mehmet; Edirne, Yesim; Beger, Burhan; Cetin, Mecnun

    2009-01-01

    Megacystis Microcolon Intestinal Hypoperistalsis Syndrom (MMIHS) is a quite rare congenital and fatal disease which was firstly defined by Berdon and his colleagues. It appears through a widely enlarged bladder and microcolon and its cause is unknown (Berdon et al., 1976; Carmelo et al., 2005; Makhija et al., 1999; Loening-Baucke and Kimura 1999; Redman et al., 1984; Hsu et al., 2003; Yigit et al., 1996; Srikanth et al., 1993). The disease is found in females three or four times more than in males (Srikanth et al., 1993; Sen et al., 1993; Hirato et al., 2003). Most of the cases die within the early months of their lives (Yigit et al., 1996; Srikanth et al., 1993; Sen et al., 1993; Hirato et al., 2003). We present the case of a female newborn with antenatal ultrasound revealing intestinal mass and bilateral hydroureteronephrosis. The case was admitted for intestinal obstruction after birth. PMID:19794822

  18. Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Melek, Mehmet; Edirne, Yesim; Beger, Burhan; Cetin, Mecnun

    2009-01-01

    Megacystis Microcolon Intestinal Hypoperistalsis Syndrom (MMIHS) is a quite rare congenital and fatal disease which was firstly defined by Berdon and his colleagues. It appears through a widely enlarged bladder and microcolon and its cause is unknown (Berdon et al., 1976; Carmelo et al., 2005; Makhija et al., 1999; Loening-Baucke and Kimura 1999; Redman et al., 1984; Hsu et al., 2003; Yigit et al., 1996; Srikanth et al., 1993). The disease is found in females three or four times more than in males (Srikanth et al., 1993; Sen et al., 1993; Hirato et al., 2003). Most of the cases die within the early months of their lives (Yigit et al., 1996; Srikanth et al., 1993; Sen et al., 1993; Hirato et al., 2003). We present the case of a female newborn with antenatal ultrasound revealing intestinal mass and bilateral hydroureteronephrosis. The case was admitted for intestinal obstruction after birth. PMID:19794822

  19. A Case of IFAP Syndrome with Severe Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Catarina; Gonçalves-Rocha, Miguel; Resende, Cristina; Vieira, Ana Paula; Brito, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The IFAP syndrome is a rare X-linked genetic disorder characterized by the triad of follicular ichthyosis, atrichia, and photophobia. Case Report. A three-month-old Caucasian, male patient was observed with noncicatricial universal alopecia and persistent eczema from birth. He had dystrophic nails, spiky follicular hyperkeratosis, and photophobia which became apparent at the first year of life. Short stature and psychomotor developmental delay were also noticed. Histopathological examination of skin biopsy on left thigh showed epidermis with irregular acanthosis, lamellar orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis, and hair follicles fulfilled by parakeratotic hyperkeratosis. The chromosomal study showed a karyotype 46, XY. Total IgE was 374 IU/mL. One missense mutation c.1360G>C (p.Ala454Pro) in hemizygosity was detected on the MBTPS2 gene thus confirming the diagnosis of IFAP syndrome. Conclusions. We describe a boy with a typical clinical presentation of IFAP syndrome and severe atopic manifestations. A novel missense mutation c.1360G>C (p.Ala454Pro) in MBTPS2 gene was observed. The phenotypic expression of disease is quantitatively related to a reduced function of a key cellular regulatory system affecting cholesterol and endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. It can cause epithelial disturbance with failure in differentiation of epidermal structures and abnormal skin permeability barrier. However, no correlation phenotype/genotype could be established. PMID:25685152

  20. Capsular block syndrome: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, Mauricio; Velásquez, Luis F; Rojas, Sebastián; Montoya, Laura; Zuluaga, Katherine; Balparda, Kepa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the case of a patient who developed late capsular block syndrome and to review the current literature regarding this complication of phacoemulsification procedures. Methods The literature was reviewed to summarize the diagnosis, classification, use of diagnostic aids, and the current treatments for this complication. Results A 69-year-old patient complained of decreased visual acuity 11 months after undergoing phacoemulsification. She was found to have a secondary myopization. Anterior segment ultrabiomicroscopy confirmed the diagnosis of capsular block syndrome. The patient underwent neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser posterior capsulotomy, which resulted in complete resolution of her symptoms. Conclusion Capsular block syndrome is a fairly rare complication of phacoemulsification procedures that, depending primarily on the timing of its occurrence following surgery, can develop into one of the three following possible clinical scenarios: intraoperatory, early postoperatory, and late postoperatory. In this patient, Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy was shown to be a safe and effective treatment option for this type of complication. PMID:25152612

  1. [A case report on Waardenburg syndrome with cleft lip].

    PubMed

    Traoré, H; Traoré, D; Ouane, O; Simpara, B; Ongoiba, N

    2011-01-01

    The syndrome of Waardenburg is a congenital plurimal formatif unit rare described and individualized for the first time by Waardenburg in 1951. It associates in its form most typical dystopie canthale intern, a widening of the base of the nose, disorders of the pigmentation. We wanted brought back this case because of its scarcity. It was about a 18 month old infant without particular antecedents, which was drawn up to us for correction of congenital malformation. The interrogation did not make it possible to find signs functional notable. With the examination it had a general good state. t presented a bilateral iridal hypochromy, a dystopie canthale, a canitie, a bilateral labial slit. The diagnosis of presumption was the Syndrome of Waardenburg because of the description of at least 2 major signs: dystopie canthale and disorders of the pigmentation. The complementary examinations carried out were those of the preoperative assessment which returned normal. The biological diagnosis which rests on the search for change of gene was not made for reasons of technical order and financier. The surgery is centered on the treatment of the labial slit. A chéiloplastie according to Millard was carried out. The continuations were simple. The Syndrome of Waardenburg is a rare, hereditary entity. A neurosensory deafness, musculo-skeletal anomalies, thus qu' a disease of Hirschsprung will have to be systematically required. The surgery of the slit or the télécanthus allows an social integration of the subjects reached. PMID:22766441

  2. Sweet syndrome: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Contrucci, Robert B; Martin, Donna Bilu

    2015-07-01

    Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is a disorder of unknown etiology. It has been associated with autoimmune processes, malignancies, infections, drug reactions, and gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. We describe the case of a 51-year-old man who presented with severe pain in his tongue and throat and referred pain in his right ear, along with odynophagia, fever, and hoarseness of 48 hours'duration. An oral and oropharyngeal examination revealed the presence of aphthous ulcerations, as well as a 3 × 3-cm raised inflammatory lesion on the right anterior lateral tongue and a 5 × 5-mm bulla on the hard palate in the midline. In addition, erythematous papules and macules were noted on his face, neck, and extremities. Cultures, a biopsy, and laboratory tests yielded a diagnosis of Sweet syndrome. The patient was prescribed oral prednisone, and his signs and symptoms resolved within 2 months. Although Sweet syndrome is uncommon, even in dermatology practice, its head and neck and oral manifestations and its association with paraneoplastic disease warrant the need for otolaryngologists to be aware of the condition. PMID:26214670

  3. [Two cases of solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome].

    PubMed

    Catania, P; Conti, C; Poggi, G M; Bardelli, T; Lasagni, D; De Martino, M

    2010-02-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI) syndrome is a unique developmental abnormality arising from an unknown event occurring between the 35th and 38th days in utero, and involving mieline structure of the head including the cranial bones, the maxilla and its container dentition (specifically the central incisor tooth germ), together with other midline structures of the body. The SMMCI tooth may be possibly occur as an isolated trait or in association with many other midline developmental anomalies. It is estimated to occur in 1:50000 live births. There is a wide variability in the phenotypic spectrum. SMMCI is considered one of the most minimal expressions of the holoprosencephaly spectrum. Mutation in the Sonic Hedgehog homolog (SHH) gene may be associated with SSMMCI, but recent studies suggests the existence of several other candidate genes. We described two patients with SMMCI. They presented a solitary median maxillary incisor, short stature, hipotelorism and corpus callosus anomalies found on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They also present severe hiponatremia. At the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of cases of SMMCI with hiponatremia. We suggest that the sodium disorder may be secondary to syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). PMID:20212404

  4. Marfan syndrome and symptomatic sacral cyst: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Paul M.; Teuber, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Context Meningeal abnormalities such as dural ectasia are seen in Marfan syndrome, but spinal meningeal cysts are rarely seen. These cysts usually asymptomatic and often found incidentally on magnetic resonance imaging, large cysts may cause neurological deficits and pain secondary to nerve root compression. Design Case reports. Findings Two patients with Marfan syndrome presented with urinary symptoms secondary to dural ectasia and sacral cysts. Patient 1 had a history of low back pain, erectile dysfunction, and occasional urinary incontinence and groin pain with recent symptom worsening. He underwent L5 partial laminectomy and S1-S2 laminectomy with sacral cyst decompression. Nine weeks later, he underwent drainage of a sacral pseudomeningocele. Pain and urinary symptoms resolved, and he remains neurologically normal 2 years after surgery. Patient 2 presented after a fall on his tailbone, complaining of low back pain and difficulty urinating. Physical therapy was implemented, but after 4 weeks, urinary retention had not improved. He then underwent resection of the sacral cyst and S1-S3 laminectomy. Pain and paresthesias resolved and bowel function returned to normal. Other than needing intermittent self-catheterization, all other neurologic findings were normal 30 months after surgery. Conclusion/clinical relevance Surgical goals for sacral cysts include resection as well as closure of the dura, which can be challenging due to thinning from ectasia. Neurosurgical intervention in Marfan syndrome is associated with a high risk of dural tears and osseous complications, and should be performed only when symptoms are severe. PMID:23941798

  5. A Case of Overlapping Choriocapillaritis Syndromes: Multimodal Imaging Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetcova, Tatiana; Jeannin, Bruno; Herbort, Carl P

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To present a patient with overlapping choriocapillaritis syndromes who first presented as a typical case of multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS) and later with characteristic findings compatible with multifocal choroiditis (MFC). Case Report: A 40-year-old myopic woman presented with a paracentral scotoma OS. Fundus examination revealed pale discolored areas around the optic disc corresponding to faintly hyperfluorescent areas on fluorescein angiography (FA). On indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) there was extensive peripapillary hypofluorescence and confluent hypofluorescent dots superiorly. According to the clinical picture, a diagnosis of MEWDS was made. In 4 weeks, the visual field reverted to normal together with almost complete regression of hypofluorescence on ICGA. However, 4 months later fundus examination revealed some scars, a finding not typical for MEWDS. Besides, she developed another scotoma 12 months later accompanied by photopsia and the fundus illustrated more numerous scars than one year earlier. ICGA showed hypofluorescent areas corresponding to the scotoma delineated by visual field testing. The pattern of this recurrence clearly corresponded to MFC. Conclusion: This case illustrates an overlap between two entities, MEWDS and MFC in two sequential episodes. FA and fundus autofluorescence accounted for the lesions and optical coherence tomography showed damage to the photoreceptor outer segments, but only ICGA correlated well with functional evolution. PMID:22737390

  6. Choledochal cyst mimicking Mirizzi's syndrome A case report.

    PubMed

    Frattaroli, Fabrizio Maria; Coiro, Saverio; Nunziale, Aldo; De Lucia, Francesco; Frattaroli, Jacopo Maria; Pappalardo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Choledochal cysts are cystic dilatations of the intra or extra-hepatic biliary tract with an incidence of 1 case per 150.000 live births. Cysts usually are diagnosed in childhood, but diagnosis can be delayed until adulthood in the 20-50% of cases. Clinical manifestations comprise abdominal pain with biliary or pancreatic features. Mirizzi's syndrome is a late and rare complication, that occurs in 1% of patients with cholelithiasis due to extrinsic compression of the common bile duct by stones impacted either in the gallbladder or in the cystic duct. Clinical symptoms include extrahepatic obstructive jaundice, ascending cholangitis, or, in the later course, cholecystocholedocal fistula. For both pathologies the Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio Pancreatography and the Magnetic Resonance Cholangio Pancreatography should lead to the diagnosis with a sensibility and a specificity up to 100%. We report the case of a 66 year old patient admitted to the Emergency Department of our hospital for jaundice and abdominal pain, whom both the endoscopic and radiologic examination showed a Mirizzi's syndrome but surgery revealed a type I choledocal cyst. PMID:25600242

  7. Choledochal cyst mimicking Mirizzi's syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Frattaroli, Fabrizio Maria; Coiro, Saverio; Nunziale, Aldo; De Lucia, Francesco; Frattaroli, Jacopo Maria; Pappalardo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Choledochal cysts are cystic dilatations of the intra or extra-hepatic biliary tract with an incidence of 1 case per 150.000 live births. Cysts usually are diagnosed in childhood, but diagnosis can be delayed until adulthood in the 20-50% of cases. Clinical manifestations comprise abdominal pain with biliary or pancreatic features. Mirizzi's syndrome is a late and rare complication, that occurs in 1% of patients with cholelithiasis due to extrinsic compression of the common bile duct by stones impacted either in the gallbladder or in the cystic duct. Clinical symptoms include extrahepatic obstructive jaundice, ascending cholangitis, or, in the later course, cholecystocholedocal fistula. For both pathologies the Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio Pancreatography and the Magnetic Resonance Cholangio Pancreatography should lead to the diagnosis with a sensibility and a specificity up to 100%. We report the case of a 66 year old patient admitted to the Emergency Department of our hospital for jaundice and abdominal pain, whom both the endoscopic and radiologic examination showed a Mirizzi's syndrome but surgery revealed a type I choledocal cyst. PMID:25336283

  8. [Case report Brown-Vialetto-Van laere syndrome].

    PubMed

    Introini, S; Sasso, G M; Moioli, G; Morandini, W L

    2003-01-01

    A case of a young man (36 years old) suffering from a progressive bulbo-pontine palsy, bilateral central deafness and respiratory failure, clinically known as Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome (BVVL) is reported. The illness occurred at 24 years and, after a period of quiescence of 12 years, led to a serious dependence from mechanical ventilation. In tyhis report the most important points of view about resuscitation and intensive treatment, such as neuromuscular failure and locked-in condition, are discussed. PMID:12677164

  9. Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Pedro Salomao; Doski, John

    2015-04-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a rare congenital disorder of the Müllerian ducts in which there is uterus didelphys, obstructed hemivagina and unilateral renal agenesis. The most common presentation is an abdominal mass secondary to hematocolpos, pain and dysmenorrhea. However, in some cases, such as the one we present here, menses are normal due to an obstructed hemivagina, and diagnosis can be delayed. We describe evaluation and surgical management of a 13-year-old girl with this condition who was diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) scan and confirmed by pelvic ultrasound and surgical exploration, as well as a review of the literature. PMID:25992503

  10. Cluster-tic syndrome: report of five new cases.

    PubMed

    Monzillo, P H; Sanvito, W L; Da Costa, A R

    2000-06-01

    The so-called short lasting primary headaches include heterogenic entities that can be divided between those without pronounced autonomic activation and those where this activation is evident, which includes the cluster-tic syndrome. We report five new cases with age closer to the trigeminal neuralgia's one, and concomitance of cluster headache and trigeminal neuralgia, which is less frequent in the literature. We also discuss briefly the pathophysiology of these clinical entities, suggesting that the trigeminus nerve is a common pathway of pain manifestation. PMID:10920416

  11. Tinea Incognita in a Patient with Crest Syndrome: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gorgievska-Sukarovska, Biljana; Skerlev, Mihael; Žele-Starčević, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Tinea incognita is a dermatophytic infection that is difficult to diagnose, usually modified by inappropriate topical or systemic corticosteroid therapy. We report an extensive case of tinea incognita caused by the zoophilic dermatophyte Trichophyton mentagrophytes (var. granulosa) in a 49-year-old female patient with CREST (Calcinosis; Raynaud phenomenon; Esophageal involvement; Sclerodactyly; Teleangiectasia) syndrome. Immunocompromised patients, as well as patients with keratinization disorders, seem to be especially susceptible to dermatophytic infections with atypical clinical presentation that is sometimes bizarre and difficult to recognize. Therefore, close monitoring and mycological skin examination is recommended in order to avoid misdiagnosis and to give the patient the best chance of recovery. PMID:26476904

  12. Guillain-Barré syndrome following chickenpox: a case series.

    PubMed

    Tatarelli, P; Garnero, M; Del Bono, V; Camera, M; Schenone, A; Grandis, M; Benedetti, L; Viscoli, C

    2016-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute, immune-mediated polyradiculoneuropathy, usually triggered by an infectious episode, mostly of viral origin. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a rare cause of GBS, mainly in the case of latent infection reactivation. We report on three adult patients who developed GBS following chickenpox, after a short period of latency. They were promptly treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, and the first one with plasma exchange additionally. All the patients experienced almost complete clinical recovery. Our experience suggests that primary VZV infection constitutes a GBS triggering event. PMID:26000930

  13. Sonozaki syndrome: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia; Bergler-Czop, Beata; Lis-Święty, Anna

    2012-02-01

    Sonozaki syndrome--pustulotic arthro-osteitis (PAO) is a relatively rare, chronic illness. This disease belongs to the group of psoriatic arthritis (psoriasis arthropatica, artropatia psoriatica) which in turn belongs to the group of seronegative arthritis. Sonozaki syndrome includes palmoplantar pustulosis, PPP as well as arthro-osteitis. Clinically, symmetrically localised pustulae are observed on feet and hands. Effected joints are painful, swollen with a visible inflammation. Here, we describe a case of a woman aged 55 with a diagnosis of Sonozaki syndrome and hyperthyroidism. At the moment of admission multiple changes in the form of pustulae were observed on hands and soles, filled with pus and blood of the erythemal basis. Oral and genital mucosa were free from changes. The oedema within clavicle and sternum joints was without features of the severe inflammation and tactical tenderness. In additional tests, increased BSR 36/62 was found. Bone scintigraphy-focuses of increased accumulation of MDP-Tc-99 m were found in the sternal projection of the clavicle ends at both sides, and the left-side change is bigger and more strongly saturated and can probably progress to the sternum's manubrium. As a result of the used treatment during hospitalisation, (cyclosporine 3 mg/kg and steroid external therapy upon the skin changes) the improvement of the local changes was observed as well as no progression in the joints' changes. At the moment, the patient is treated in the dermatological and rheumatological out-clinic. Early and correct diagnostics allows for efficient treatment of Sonozaki syndrome and decreases the risk of potential complications, such as the described systemic amyloidosis. PMID:20049447

  14. Four Case Histories and a Literature Review of Williams Syndrome and Autistic Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher; Rasmussen, Peder

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the case histories of four young children with concurrent autistic disorder and Williams syndrome. Williams syndrome comprises a peculiar facial appearance, learning disorder, and often hypercalcemia, mild microcephaly, large blood vessel stenosis, and a specific behavioral phenotype. Literature on Williams syndrome is…

  15. PHACES syndrome--report of two cases and their evolution over time.

    PubMed

    Browne, Fiona; Rickard, Caroline; Smith, Robert A; Lyon, Calum

    2009-01-01

    We describe two cases of PHACES syndrome that illustrate the importance of recognizing this rare syndrome. As children with this syndrome can present to general pediatricians, dermatologists, pediatric cardiologists, ophthalmologists, and neurologists, it is important that all are aware of the spectrum of associated abnormalities. PMID:20199451

  16. Anesthetic management of Shah-Waardenburg syndrome: Experience of two cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ambi, Uday S; Adarsh, E S; Hatti, Ramesh; Samalad, Vijaymahantesh

    2012-04-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomally inherited and genetically heterogeneous disorder of neural crest cell development. Literature regarding the anesthetic management of these cases is limited. We present 2 cases of Shah-Waardenburg syndrome and discuss them in the context of review of previously published cases. PMID:22754447

  17. Ross Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of Cases from India.

    PubMed

    Agarwala, Manoj Kumar; George, Leni; Parmar, Harshad; Mathew, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Ross syndrome is a rare dysautonomia characterized by a clinical complex of segmental anhidrosis or hypohidrosis, areflexia, and tonic pupils. A very few cases (≃50) have been reported in literature since its original description in 1958. Here, we report the case of a middle-aged homemaker from Odisha, India, who presented with complaints of segmental hypohidrosis for the past 7 years. PMID:27293279

  18. Ross Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of Cases from India

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Manoj Kumar; George, Leni; Parmar, Harshad; Mathew, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Ross syndrome is a rare dysautonomia characterized by a clinical complex of segmental anhidrosis or hypohidrosis, areflexia, and tonic pupils. A very few cases (≃50) have been reported in literature since its original description in 1958. Here, we report the case of a middle-aged homemaker from Odisha, India, who presented with complaints of segmental hypohidrosis for the past 7 years. PMID:27293279

  19. [Biopercular syndrome: report of two cases and literature review].

    PubMed

    Millán, Paula Andrea; Montes, María Isabel; Uribe, Carlos Santiago; Cabrera, Dagoberto; Arboleda, Alejandra

    2008-06-01

    The anterior opercular or biopercular syndrome is a cortical pseudobulbar palsy due to bilateral lesions of the anterior brain operculum. It is characterized by preservation of reflex function and automatic activity, without mental impairment. Two cases are reported herein and the relevant literature reviewed. The first case was a 73-year-old female with a history of a stroke occurring seven years previously, without sequelae in the interim. She presented with sudden loss of consciousness. The neurological examination showed a right facial central palsy and anarthria, with reflex acts such as smiling, blinking and yawning, not elicited by commands; she also had a right hemiparesis and walking impairment. A brain CT scan showed an old ischemic infarction in the region of the right medial cerebral artery. Because the right motor involvement did not correlate with the findings of the initial CT scan, another CT scan two days later showed an acute brain infarction in the vicinity of the left medial cerebral artery. The second case was an 8-year-old girl with mental retardation and impairment of verbal development, caused by of biopercular pachygyria. Facio-pharyngo-glosso-masticatory diplegia and volitional selective palsy of the oro-facial muscles was seen in both patients. The neuropsychological assessment showed cognitive, emotional and social interaction impairment in both cases -as part of the frontal convexity syndrome in the first case and of mental retardation in the second. The two patients had difficulty in mastication and swallowing. The prognosis for recovery of verbal capacity is poor, although generally most patients recover the ability to swallow. PMID:18719720

  20. [A case of nephrotic syndrome achieving remission with cyclosporine monotherapy].

    PubMed

    Nagatoya, Katsuyuki

    2010-01-01

    The case was a female in her early 80's. Due to abdominal bloating and lower limb edema, she visited a nearby doctor, was diagnosed to have nephrotic syndrome, and then was referred to our department. Upon initial consultation, TP of 4.1 g/dl, Alb of 1.7 g/dl, UN of 73 mg/dl, and Cr of 1.43 mg/dl, along with pleural effusion were observed by chest X-ray. A renal biopsy was not performed because permission could not be obtained. Despite the fact that management of the edema was performed using diuretic agents and albumin preparations, a reduced renal function and deterioration of the fluid retention were gradually observed. She originally displayed lower back pain and digestive symptoms and, therefore, cyclosporine monotherapy was initiated in order to address concerns of side effects such as osteoporosis and peptic ulcer due to adrenocortical steroid drugs (hereinafter abbreviated as steroid). Subsequently, hemodialysis was temporarily required but reduced urine protein and an improved renal function were gradually observed and she eventually achieved a complete remission. The possibility of a spontaneous remission of membranous nephropathy, etc. was considered, but a relapse occurred when the amount of cyclosporine was reduced. Thereafter, a complete remission was obtained with an increased dosage. As a result, the effectiveness of cyclosporine was thus confirmed. In treating nephrotic syndrome, steroid therapy is commonly performed and it is common for cyclosporine to be limited to steroid-resistant cases and/or steroid-dependent cases. However, it is believed that monotherapy could also be an option in cases in which the use of steroids is difficult, such as in cases of elderly patients. PMID:21116092

  1. [Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders as initial presentation of Sjögren's syndrome: A case report].

    PubMed

    Alva Díaz, Carlos; Andamayo Villalba, Luis; Mori, Nicanor; Ventura Chilón, Jésica Janet; Romero, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder (NMOSD) is a rare systemic autoimmune disease which is sometimes found in association with other autoimmune disorders including Sjogren's syndrome. Neurological manifestations occur in 20% to 25% of diagnosed cases of Sjögren's syndrome; however, less than 5% of patients with Sjögren's syndrome have neurological manifestations as the initial presenting feature of Sjögren's syndrome. We report the case of an elderly female with longitudinal myelitis as a presenting feature who had positive antibody to aquaporin-4 (NMO-IgG) and Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:26938585

  2. Compartment Syndrome of the Gluteus Medius Occurred without Bleeding or Trauma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Gyu-Min; Park, Jun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is an ischemic change resulting from an increase in compartment pressure. Initially, patients present with direct tenderness and swelling, and the weak circulation secondary to compartment syndrome can eventually lead to motor and sensory impairment. If the increase in pressure results in neurological impairment, emergency intervention is required to decompress the compartment. Typically, compartment syndrome develops on forearms or lower legs. The gluteal compartment is rarely the location of compartment syndrome and only a few cases have been presented in the literature with trauma or hematoma. We have treated a patient with gluteal compartment syndrome who presented with no history of trauma or hemorrhage and present that case report here.

  3. A case report with Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome, what does it mean?

    PubMed

    Muschart, X

    2015-10-01

    Fitz-Hugh-Curtis (FHC) syndrome, also known as acute perihepatitis, was discovered in 1930 and is a rare disorder characterised by inflammation of the peritoneum and the tissues surrounding the liver. This syndrome can arise as a potential complication from a pelvic inflammatory disease caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Chlamydia trachomatis. This syndrome is not well known in the medical community and is often underdiagnosed. In this case report, we revisit FHC syndrome, particularly its noninvasive diagnosis and complications. PMID:26743574

  4. Refeeding syndrome in a vegan patient with stage IV gastric cancer: a novel case.

    PubMed

    Brown, Teresa V; Moss, Rebecca A

    2015-03-01

    The refeeding syndrome encompasses the complex physiologic state that occurs in malnourished patients who receive nutrition after a period of decreased oral intake. The hallmark of the syndrome is hypophosphatemia, though other electrolyte imbalances and severe fluid shifts are commonly involved. Patients with newly diagnosed malignancies and those undergoing treatment for malignancies are at increased risk for developing the refeeding syndrome, however there are few reported cases or other data in the oncology literature regarding this syndrome in cancer patients. PMID:25880674

  5. Morvan Syndrome: A Case Report With Patient Narrative and Video.

    PubMed

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire; Emsley, Hedley C A

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  6. Reversible Pisa syndrome associated to subdural haematoma: case-report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pisa Syndrome or Pleurothotonus is a relatively rare truncal dystonia, characterized by tonic flexion of the trunk and head to one side with slight rotation of the body. Since frequently associated to specific drugs such as antipsychotics and cholinesterase inhibitors or to Parkinson Disease, a pathophysiological role of cholinergic-dopaminergic imbalance has been suggested. We report here the first case of Pisa Syndrome due to an extracerebral pathology as subdural haematoma. Case presentation A hypertensive patient was admitted to Our Department for subacute onset of tonic flexion and slight rotation of the trunk associated to progressive motor deficit in left upper limb after a mild head trauma without loss of consciousness occurred around three month before. No previous or current pharmacological interventions with antidepressant, neuroleptic or anticholinergic drugs were anamnestically retrieved. Familiar and personal history was negative for neurological disorders other than acute cerebrovascular diseases. Acutely performed cerebral MRI with DWI showed a voluminous right subdural haematoma with mild shift of median line. After surgical evacuation, both motor deficit and truncal dystonia were dramatically resolved. At one-year follow up, the patient did not develop any extrapyramidal and cognitive signs or symptoms. Conclusions According to many Authors, the occurrence of truncal dystonia during several pharmacologic treatments and neurodegenerative disorders (such as Alzheimer disease and parkinsonian syndromes) supported the hypothesis that a complex dysregulation of multiple neurotransmitter systems are involved. We suggest a possible role of basal ganglia compression in pathogenesis of truncal dystonia by means of thalamo-cortical trait functional disruption and loss of proprioceptive integration. A further contribution of the subcortical structure displacement that alters motor cortex connectivity to basal ganglia may be postulated. PMID

  7. Sturge-Weber Syndrome: A Report of 14 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Lucia; La Grutta, Sabina; Lo Baido, Rosa; Epifanio, Maria Stella; Esposito, Maria; Carotenuto, Marco; Roccella, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Sturge-Weber-Krabe syndrome (SWS), also known as encephalotrigeminalangiomatosis and named the forthfacomatosis, recall the names of the authors who first describedit in its basic clinical, radiological andanatomopathological aspects. We report here 14 cases of Sturge-Weber disease. In 6 of these, despite what had been previously described in literature, an extension of the angioma has been noted in other parts of the body. The study of these subjects stresses not only the need for a pharmacological/neuropsychomotor intervention, but alsothe need of a psychotherapeutic approach, for the emotional and affective implications thatcould derive from this syndrome. The reported cases are similar to those presented in literature for their main features. In particular, two elements are interesting: i) the exceptional diffusion of the red nevousto the whole hemicorpo; and ii) the evaluation of the way the patients live the disease, which has not beenpreviously considered in literature. We can conclude that SWS is a multisystem disorder that requires the neurologist to be aware of the possible endocrine, psychiatric, ophthalmological, and other medical issues that can arise and impact on the neurological status of the patients. PMID:25478131

  8. Conservative management of a case of tarsal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hudes, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This case study was conducted to evaluate the treatment and management of a patient presenting with chronic foot pain, diagnosed as tarsal tunnel syndrome. Case: 61 year old female presenting with plantar and dorsal foot pain and burning sensation of 6 months duration. Treatment: Treatment was initiated using custom orthotics only for the first ten weeks of care as the patient did not follow up or initially respond to follow up calls placed by the practitioner. A course of high-velocity, low-amplitude adjustments using a toggle board to the cuboid and the talonavicular joint and fascial stripping was added upon report from the patient that the orthotic therapy alone did not resolve the symptoms. Improvement of pain reported on the Verbal Rating Scale was noted with a complete resolution of the condition at the conclusion of treatment. No pain was reported on a ten month follow up with the patient. Conclusion: Conservative management, including orthotics, manipulation, and fascial stripping may be beneficial in the treatment of tarsal tunnel syndrome. PMID:20520754

  9. [A new case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chaabane, M; Bidat, E; Chevallier, B

    2010-05-01

    We report a case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) with milk whose signs of milk intolerance began in the 1st days of life, consisting in minor and nonspecific symptoms. The 3 foods in question were cow's milk, soja, and wheat. The diagnosis of FPIES was suspected at the age of 9 months, after 3 hospitalizations for vomiting, sometimes associated with lethargy and hypotension, which occurred around 2h after cow's milk ingestion. Symptoms were not associated with positive specific IgE and cutaneous tests. Signs then occurred with soja and wheat. Because of the late diagnosis, 3 anaphylactic shock episodes occurred. FPIES is an uncommon cell-mediated food allergy reaction. This syndrome is characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms, especially severe vomiting, sometimes associated with anaphylactic shock. Usually signs occur 2h after ingestion. These reactions begin early, in the 1st months of life, and regress by the age of 3 years in 38-100% of cases depending on the responsible food. They are usually induced by cow's milk and soy proteins. Diagnosis is difficult and delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Oral food challenge is the only examination that confirms the diagnosis. Treatment involves the exclusion of the specific food involved. Severe reactions require treatment of shock and adjunction of corticosteroids. PMID:20346636

  10. Pulmonary Renal Syndrome After Streptococcal Pharyngitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mara-Koosham, Gopi; Stoltze, Karl; Aday, Jeffrey; Rendon, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary renal syndrome is a class of small vessel vasculitides that are characterized by the dual presentation of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and glomerulonephritis. Pulmonary renal syndrome has multiple etiologies, but its development has been rarely reported following infection with group A streptococcus. We present the case of a 36-year-old Native American male who was transferred to our facility due to refractory hypoxic respiratory failure. He had been diagnosed with streptococcal pharyngitis 2 weeks prior to admission. Given the presence of hemoptysis, bronchoscopy was performed and was consistent with DAH. Urinalysis demonstrated hematuria and proteinuria, in the setting of elevated creatinine and blood urea nitrogen. Additionally, antistreptolysin O titer was positive. Given the constellation of laboratory findings and history of streptococcal pharyngitis, the patient was diagnosed with PRS secondary to streptococcal infection. High-dose methylprednisolone was initiated with concomitant plasmapheresis. He was extubated successfully after his respiratory status improved and was eventually discharged home after making a full recovery within 2 weeks after admission. This case illustrates the importance of clinically relevant sequelae of streptococcal infection as well as the appropriate treatment of PRS secondary to streptococcal pharyngitis with plasmapheresis and intravenous corticosteroids. PMID:27231692

  11. Tourette syndrome: clinical and psychological aspects of 250 cases.

    PubMed

    Comings, D E; Comings, B G

    1985-05-01

    Tourette syndrome is a common hereditary neuropsychiatric disorder consisting of multiple tics and vocal noises. We summarize here clinical aspects of 250 consecutive cases seen over a period of 3 years. The sex ratio was four males to one female, and the mean age of onset was 6.9 years. Only 10% were Jewish, indicating that it is not more prevalent in Ashkenazi Jews. Only 33% had compulsive swearing (coprolalia), indicating that this is not necessary for the diagnosis. The most frequent initial symptoms were rapid eye-blinking, facial grimacing, and throat-clearing. In this series, it was clear that Tourette syndrome is a psychiatric as well as a neurological disorder. Significant discipline problems and/or problems with anger and violence occurred in 61%, and 54% had attention-deficit disorder with hyperactivity. Some degree of exhibitionism was present in 15.9% of males and 6.1% of females. Obsessive-compulsive behavior was seen in 32%. Other than tics and vocal noises, the most common parental complaints were of short temper and everything being a confrontation. There were no significant clinical differences between familial and sporadic cases. Whenever a child presents with a learning disorder, attention-deficit disorder, or significant discipline or emotional problems, the parents should be questioned about the presence of tics or vocal noises in the patient and other family members. PMID:3859204

  12. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shah, B; Ashok, L; Sujatha, G P

    2008-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a disease complex, where all the three embryonic layers appear to be involved. This disorder is also called as Chondroectodermal dysplasia. EvC is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from mutations in these patients. Mutations in the two genes EVC and EVC2, have been identified to cause the condition. It has been considered as a skeletal dysplasia with an incidence of approximately 1 out of 1,50,000 live births. A high prevalence has been reported among certain populations like Amish and Arabs of Gaza strip. There are more than 300 cases of EvC reported into the literature. About 50-60% of cases have been reported with congenital cardiac malformations. PMID:18974540

  13. Preejaculatory illness syndrome: Two cases of a rare psychosomatic disorder.

    PubMed

    Mohsen, Adel; Elawdy, Mohamed Mohamed; Faix, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Human ejaculation happens in the orgasmic phase of the human sexual response cycle. Among psychosomatic ejaculatory disorders that may happen before ejaculation, we present two cases of preejaculatory illness syndrome. The two cases shared common symptoms of sympathetic over activity, the sensation of impending death, and muscle atonia with subsequent failure to ejaculate. Depression, anxiety disorders, and family histories of psychiatric problems were noticed as risk factors. Medical conditions that may lead to panic attack type symptoms were eliminated before the final diagnosis. After the failure of empirical medications, symptoms became controlled with fluoxetine. Patients reported a recurrence of the symptoms on trying to stop the prescribed medication. On the last follow-up, they still take fluoxetine on a regular base with satisfactory sexual life. PMID:26834413

  14. A case report of pornography addiction with dhat syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Darshan, M. S.; Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Manickam, Sam; Tandon, Abhinav; Ram, Dushad

    2014-01-01

    A case of pornography addiction with dhat syndrome was diagnosed applying the existing criteria for substance dependence in International Classification for Diseases-10 and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition, Text Revision. There is a lack of clear-cut criteria for identifying and defining such behavioural addictions and also lack of medical documents on pornography addiction. An applied strategy in lines with any substance addiction is used, and we found it helped our patient to gradually deaddict and then completely quit watching pornography. This is one of the few cases being reported scientifically, and we hope more work will be carried out in this ever increasing pornography addiction problem. PMID:25568482

  15. A case report of pornography addiction with dhat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Darshan, M S; Sathyanarayana Rao, T S; Manickam, Sam; Tandon, Abhinav; Ram, Dushad

    2014-10-01

    A case of pornography addiction with dhat syndrome was diagnosed applying the existing criteria for substance dependence in International Classification for Diseases-10 and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fourth Edition, Text Revision. There is a lack of clear-cut criteria for identifying and defining such behavioural addictions and also lack of medical documents on pornography addiction. An applied strategy in lines with any substance addiction is used, and we found it helped our patient to gradually deaddict and then completely quit watching pornography. This is one of the few cases being reported scientifically, and we hope more work will be carried out in this ever increasing pornography addiction problem. PMID:25568482

  16. Ectodermal Dysplasia-Skin Fragility Syndrome: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Subhash; Shanker, Vinay; Sharma, Neelam

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia/skin fragility syndrome (ED-SFS) is a newly described autosomal recessive disorder characterized by skin fragility and blistering, palmoplantar keratoderma, abnormal hair growth, nail dystrophy, and occasionally defective sweating. It results from mutations in the PKP1 gene encoding plakophilin 1 (PKP1), which is an important component of stratifying epithelial desmosomes and a nuclear component of many cell types. Only 12 cases of this rare genodermatosis have been reported so far. We present an unusual case of ED-SFS in a 12-year boy who was normal at birth but subsequently developed skin fragility, hair and nail deformities, abnormal dentition, palmoplantar keratoderma, and abnormal sweating but no systemic abnormality. PMID:26288439

  17. Preejaculatory illness syndrome: Two cases of a rare psychosomatic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mohsen, Adel; Elawdy, Mohamed Mohamed; Faix, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Human ejaculation happens in the orgasmic phase of the human sexual response cycle. Among psychosomatic ejaculatory disorders that may happen before ejaculation, we present two cases of preejaculatory illness syndrome. The two cases shared common symptoms of sympathetic over activity, the sensation of impending death, and muscle atonia with subsequent failure to ejaculate. Depression, anxiety disorders, and family histories of psychiatric problems were noticed as risk factors. Medical conditions that may lead to panic attack type symptoms were eliminated before the final diagnosis. After the failure of empirical medications, symptoms became controlled with fluoxetine. Patients reported a recurrence of the symptoms on trying to stop the prescribed medication. On the last follow-up, they still take fluoxetine on a regular base with satisfactory sexual life. PMID:26834413

  18. Hypereosinophilic syndrome in cats: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    McEwen, S A; Valli, V E; Hulland, T J

    1985-07-01

    The clinical, clinicopathological and pathological findings in three cats with hypereosinophilic syndrome are described. The cats chosen for the study had marked eosinophilia and evidence of tissue infiltration by eosinophils. Necropsies were performed on two cats, biopsy and blood samples were provided for the third cat. At necropsy, there was diffuse reddening of femoral bone marrow with ulceration and thickening of the duodenum. The livers had an enhanced lobular pattern with multiple, white, 1-3 mm nodules throughout the parenchyma. One cat had splenomegaly and the other had several enlarged, white, firm lymph nodes. Histopathologically, there was eosinophil infiltration of intestine, lymph nodes, liver, spleen, adrenal medulla and beneath the endocardium. Ultrastructurally, the eosinophils from lymph node and bone marrow of cat II were morphologically normal. The rigid criteria for eosinophilic leukemia were not fulfilled by these cases and the etiology of the eosinophilia in each case is not known. Possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:4041970

  19. Chediak-Higashi Syndrome: A Case Series from Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Rudramurthy, Pradeep; Lokanatha, Hemalata

    2015-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by partial oculocutaneous albinism, frequent pyogenic infections, and the presence of abnormal large granules in leukocytes and other granulecontaining cells. The abnormal granules are readily seen in blood and marrow granulocytes. Other clinical features include silvery hair, photophobia, nystagmus and hepatosplenomegaly. However, the presence of abnormal giant intracytoplasmic granules in neutrophils and their precursors are diagnostic of CHS. Here, we present a series of five cases, out of which four presented in the accelerated phase. In all the five cases, the giant granules were noted predominantly in the cytoplasm of lymphocytes, which is a rare occurrence compared to those present in the granulocytes. PMID:26538743

  20. Pediatric Ramsay Hunt Syndrome: Analysis of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Aydoğdu, İmran; Ataç, Enes; Saltürk, Ziya; Atar, Yavuz; Özdemir, Erdi; Uyar, Yavuz; Arslanoğlu, Ahmet; Berkiten, Güler

    2015-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS) is a disorder characterized by herpetic eruptions on the auricle, facial paralysis, and vestibulocochlear dysfunction and is attributed to varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection in the geniculate ganglion. Although it is a common cause of acute peripheral facial paralysis, children are not usually affected. The diagnosis is based on history and physical findings. Treatment of RHS uses a combination of high-dose corticosteroids and acyclovir. This paper presents three cases diagnosed as RHS in the pediatric age group in association with the literature review. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the importance of careful examination and early initiation of therapy in suspected cases of RHS. PMID:26435868

  1. Paracetamol induced Steven-Johnson syndrome: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Rajan; Sagari, Shitalkumar; Durgavanshi, Astha; Kanwar, Alpana

    2015-01-01

    In the contemporary era, use of drugs is the dominant paradigm of health care. The most quotidian drug used for fever and pain is paracetamol. Although adverse reactions to paracetamol in India are rare, at times they can cause life-threatening situations. Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is one such potentially lethal adverse drug reaction. The most reported cases of analgesic-induced SJS were due to oxicams or propionic acid derivatives. There are very few detailed reports of SJS due to the use of paracetamol. We report a case of SJS, which occurred due to the use of paracetamol. The clinical features of this condition and multidisciplinary management of the patient are described in brief. PMID:26604588

  2. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Case Definitions and Diagnostic Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Yolonda J.; Jantke, Rachel L.; Jason, Leonard A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a chronic, debilitating illness that has posed considerable challenges for both patients and health care providers. Individuals with CFS often deal with considerable stigma and difficulties accessing appropriate care. Many medical professionals are increasingly recognizing the devastating nature of this illness, but at this time, few health care workers are knowledgeable and experienced enough to provide adequate patient care. There is a need for further efforts to educate health care workers on CFS diagnostic, assessment, and treatment issues. The present article reviews controversies regarding CFS case definitions, diagnostic criteria, the name of the illness, and epidemiological and treatment studies. We conclude that an imprecise case definition underlies many of the problems with diagnostic and treatment issues..

  3. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Soo-Hoo, Sarah; Porten, Brandon R; Engstrom, Bjorn I; Skeik, Nedaa

    2016-04-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) encompasses a group of rare genetic connective tissue disorders. The vascular type (type IV) poses the most serious risk to patients. Diagnosis is usually difficult, especially if patients lack a family history. Life-threatening vascular emergency such as dissection or rupture can be the first presenting symptom. Management of the disease can pose a clinical challenge due to the emergency of presentation, tissue friability, and lack of clear management recommendations. We report a unique case of a 40-year-old man who presented with a ruptured celiac artery and a strong family history of EDS. This case highlights the difficulties and complications associated with treating this uncommon and serious disease. PMID:26975607

  4. The shaken baby syndrome: review of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Lee; So; Fong; Luk

    1999-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the characteristics of the shaken baby syndrome from 10 cases in Hong Kong. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Regional public hospital, Hong Kong. PATIENTS: Six boys and four girls (mean age, 0.54 years; range, 0.18-1.42 years) in whom the shaken baby syndrome was diagnosed between January 1994 and June 1998. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical features at presentation, radiological findings, management, and outcome. RESULTS: All 10 patients presented with coma: the mean score on the Glasgow coma scale was 4.8 (range, 3-10). In all 10 cases, the history provided by the carers were incompatible with the patient's presentation. Nine patients presented with seizures. Retinal haemorrhages were detected in all patients, but peripheral signs of bruising were observed in only three. Acute subdural haematoma was found in eight patients; one of the remaining two children had subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhages, whereas the other had subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhages. Skeletal fractures were detected in two patients. The suspected abusers included either or both parents (n=3), childminders (n=3), and maids (n=2); the identity of the abusers were unknown in two cases. Prosecution by the police was initiated in three cases and two abusers were found to be guilty. Three children died of the abuse; the seven survivors had significant neurological handicaps. CONCLUSION: Medical practitioners should be alert to the occurrence of abusive head injury in children. Peripheral signs are uncommon and a high degree of suspicion is needed for the management to be successful. PMID:10870159

  5. A Case of Beare-Stevenson Syndrome with Unusual Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Ron, Nitin; Leung, Samuel; Carney, Erin; Gerber, Alexis; David, Karen Laurie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Beare-Stevenson syndrome (BSS) is an extremely rare genetic disorder, with fewer than 25 cases reported worldwide. This autosomal dominant syndrome has been linked to two mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2), Tyr375Cys and Ser372Cys, both causing amino acid changes. CASE REPORT BSS is characterized by a range of morphological features, some more classically associated than others, of which craniosynostosis has been almost uniformly present. Other common features include cutis gyrata, acanthosis nigricans, ear and eye defects, skin/mucosal tissue tags, prominent umbilical stump, and anogenital anomalies. This account reports what we believe to be the 25th case of BSS, and exhibits a constellation of the characteristic features similar to those previously described, including the presence of cutis gyrata, proptosis, a bifid scrotum, and hypospadias. However, craniosynostosis was not detected prenatally by ultrasound or at birth. Prenatal ultrasound may detect some dysmorphic features of BSS. Many of these features have also been associated with other genetic disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Our case presented with the unusual features of a natal tooth and absence of craniosynostosis at birth. At birth, a diagnosis of BSS was suspected based on clinical features despite the absence of craniosynostosis. This was later confirmed with the use of molecular analysis, revealing a Tyr375Cys mutation of exon 9 of the FGFR2 gene. CONCLUSIONS We suggest that a normal antenatal ultrasound scan and the absence of craniosynostosis at birth should not preclude further workup for BSS if this possibility is clinically suspected. PMID:27079505

  6. [Genetic analysis of Turner syndrome: 89 cases in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Kammoun, I; Chaabouni, M; Trabelsi, M; Ouertani, I; Kraoua, L; Chelly, I; M'rad, R; Ben Jemaa, L; Maâzoul, F; Chaabouni, H

    2008-11-01

    Turner's syndrome (TS) affects about 1/2500 female infants born alive. The syndrome results from total or partial absence of one of the two X chromosomes normally present in females. We report the results of a retrospective analysis of 89 cases of TS observed during a six-year period (2000-2005). The patients' age ranged from two days to 51 years at the time of this analysis. Most patients were adults (48%). The aim of this study is to ascertain the principal clinical features leading to a request for a karyotype, searching for a possible relationship between chromosomal anomalies and clinical expression of TS. Pediatric patients were referred for statural retardation or dysmorphic features, while reproduction anomalies were the main indication for karyotyping in patients aged over 20 years. Mosaicism was prevalent (47%), whereas the homogeneous karyotype 45,X was found in only 32% of the patients; structural anomalies were found in 21%. Regarding the advanced age of our patients, we established a relationship between chromosome anomalies and the clinical expression of TS, based on an analysis of stature and reproduction disorders. Short stature and primary amenorrhea were correlated with total deletion of one chromosome X or imbalanced gene dosage due to structural X anomalies. Whereas cases of infertility, recurrent miscarriages and secondary amenorrhea were associated with a mosaic karyotype pattern (45,X/46,XX or 45,X/46,XX/47,XXX ...), with a slight mosaicism in most cases. Thus, chromosome investigations should be performed in cases of reproduction failure even for women with normal stature. PMID:18541220

  7. Oculo-ectodermal syndrome: A case report and further delineation of the syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Fajish; Elsaid, Mahmoud F.; Salem, Khalid Yacout; Ibrahim, Khalid Omer; Mohamed, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Oculo-ectodermal syndrome (OES - OMIM 600628), also known as Toriello Lacassie Droste syndrome, is a very rare condition, first described by Toriello et al., in 1993. OES has been proposed to be a mild variant of encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL). It is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita (ACC), epibulbar dermoids, coarctation of the aorta, arachnoid cysts in the brain, seizure disorder, hyperpigmented nevi, non-ossifying fibromas and a predisposition to develop giant cell tumors of the jaw. There are few reported cases of OES worldwide but with no definite diagnostic criteria yet. We present a case in a child with unilateral hyperpigmented nevi and ACC on the scalp, ocular lesions (lipodermoid cysts and coloboma), temporal arachnoid cyst, spinal lipomatosis and aortic coarctation with the aim of enhancing the foundation to establish diagnostic criteria for this condition. It additionally serves as a teaching point to emphasize the importance of pursuing a definite diagnosis when faced with such a multisystem illness, to counsel patients and their parents regarding long term morbidity and overall prognosis. PMID:25745601

  8. Diogenes syndrome or isolated syllogomania? Four heterogeneous clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Zuliani, Giovanni; Soavi, Cecilia; Dainese, Anna; Milani, Paola; Gatti, Marino

    2013-08-01

    Diogenes syndrome (DS) is an acquired behavioural disturbance more often affecting elderly patients, but possible in all ages. It is characterised by social withdrawal, extreme self and house neglect, tendency to hoard any kind of objects/rubbish (syllogomania), and rejection against external help for lack of concern about one's condition. It is considered infrequent, but with quite high mortality. DS might be divided into several forms including Active (the patient gathers objects outside and accumulates them inside his house), Passive (patient invaded by his own rubbish), "à deux" (DS sharing between two people), and "under-threshold" (DS "blocked" by precocious intervention). Four cases are here presented. In case 1 (passive DS) alcoholism and cognitive impairment could be trigger factors for DS, predisposed by a "personality alteration". In case 2 (active, "à trois") superimposed psychosis could be the trigger, borderline intelligence being the predisposing factor. In case 3 (active), fronto-parietal internal hyperostosis might support an organic aetiology. Finally, case 4 was an example of isolated syllogomania in patient with evolving Alzheimer's dementia. Despite being heterogeneous, our casuistry suggest that DS can develop in both sexes, is prevalent in geriatric age and often associated with cognitive impairment/psychiatric disturbances, which are not specific, nor sufficient to justify DS. Isolated syllogomania only shares the characteristic hoarding with DS; although cognitive impairment might be present, the other DS typical aspects (social isolation, help refusal, characterial aspects, personal hygiene neglect) are absent. PMID:23846849

  9. Crouzon syndrome with primary optic nerve atrophy and normal brain functions: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Uma Shankar; Gupta, Chandan; Chellappa, Arul A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Background This report and review of literature aimed to assess an unusual case of Crouzon syndrome characterized by distinctive disfigurement of craniofacial skeletal and soft tissue structures with primary optic nerve atropy. Methods We present a case of a 12-year-old girl with Crouzon syndrome displaying classic facial abnormalities with reduced vision and hearing loss. Conclusion Crouzon syndrome should be managed as early as possible as it results in airway obstruction, decreased vision, mental retardation and poor cosmetic appearance. PMID:25737846

  10. Ganser syndrome after solitary confinement in prison: a short review and a case report.

    PubMed

    Andersen, H S; Sestoft, D; Lillebaek, T

    2001-01-01

    A short review of the Ganser syndrome is given. The condition is a rare, probably dissociative, disorder with transient Vorbeireden as the central symptom. The case of a middle-aged man developing a transient Ganser syndrome after long-term solitary confinement in a remand prison is presented. Systematic investigation of 268 remand prisoners confirms the rarity of the syndrome, as only the case subject had this disorder. PMID:11827615

  11. Rupture of a flexor pollicis longus tendon in Scheie's syndrome. Case report.

    PubMed

    Weiss, G G; Ritt, M J; Bos, K E

    1997-09-01

    We describe a case of Scheie's syndrome with a closed rupture of the flexor pollicis longus tendon, probably caused by a combination of extrinsic and intrinsic tendon changes. Early detection of carpal tunnel syndrome in all patients who have some form of mucopolysaccharidosis in which this is a universal occurrence (such as Scheie's syndrome), is recommended. Release of the carpal tunnel prevents long term complications, as described in this case report. PMID:9299691

  12. Perrault syndrome: report of four new cases, review and exclusion of candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Marlin, Sandrine; Lacombe, Didier; Jonard, Laurence; Leboulanger, Nicolas; Bonneau, Dominique; Goizet, Cyril; de Villemeur, Thierry Billette; Cabrol, Sylvie; Houang, Muriel; Moatti, Lucien; Feldmann, Delphine; Denoyelle, Françoise

    2008-03-01

    We report on two sporadic and two familial new cases with sensorineural hearing impairment and ovarian dysgenesis which are the cardinal signs of Perrault syndrome in females. Only one of them has a nervous system defect. We reviewed all the published cases of Perrault syndrome in order to define the clinical variability and to evaluate the frequency of the neurological anomalies in this clinical entity. Moreover we excluded GJB2, POLG, and FOXL2 as candidate genes in Perrault syndrome. PMID:18241061

  13. Classic Case Report of Donohue Syndrome (Leprechaunism; OMIM ∗246200)

    PubMed Central

    Nijim, Yousif; Awni, Youssef; Adawi, Amin; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Donohue syndrome ([DS]; leprechaunism) describes a genetic autosomal recessive disorder that results from the presence of homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the insulin receptor gene (INSR; 19p13.3–p13.2). Donohue syndrome is associated with a fatal congenital form of dwarfism with features of intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, exaggerated hyperglycemia with hyperinsulinism and dysmorphic abnormalities. We present a case of DS owing to the rarity of this syndrome (1 case in every million births). We discuss how the disease presents, its genetic underpinning, and its prevention. The case was encountered in an Arab male born on 1 September, 2014, for consanguineous parents. The delivery was via cesarean section at 37 weeks gestation due to severe intrauterine growth restriction and nonprogress labor term. The patient was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit due to infection, and jaundice. Dysmorphic features, abnormalities of the craniofacial region, low birth weight, skin abnormalities, abdominal distension and hypertrichosis were observed. Laboratory examinations showed, hyperinsulinism, increased C-peptide, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, and anemia. The diagnosis of DS was done based on the combinations of typical dysmorphic characteristics, clinical evaluation, supported by genetic analysis and exaggerated biochemical results. Genetic diagnosis of DS was performed through analysis of DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A qualitative real-time PCR was used, to monitor the amplification of a targeted DNA molecule during the PCR. Other technique using sequencing of the INSR gene, which permits genetic diagnosis, counseling, and antenatal diagnoses in subsequent pregnancies, were also performed. Treatment of DS is supportive and requires the combined efforts of a multidisciplinary team, which include pediatricians, endocrinologists, dermatologists, and other health care professionals. Currently, treatment with

  14. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by tropical eosinophilic lung disease: a case in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Chani, M; Iken, M; Eljahiri, Y; Nzenze, J R; Mion, G

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the case of a 28-year-old woman in whom acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following cholecystectomy led to the discovery of eosinophilic lung disease. Outcome was favorable after oxygenotherapy and medical treatment using ivermectin and corticosteroids. The case shows that hypereosinophilic syndrome can be the underlying cause of ARDS. PMID:21695880

  15. Brown's syndrome with ocular albinism: Case report of a rare presentation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Soumya; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Swaminathan, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of Brown's syndrome associated with ocular albinism in a 10-year-old boy. This report highlights the importance of further analysis of cases of Brown's syndrome and throws some light on the etiology and association of this rare condition. PMID:26622141

  16. Reduction of Stereotypical Hand Movements in Girls with Rett Syndrome: Two Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotan, Meir; Roth, Dana

    This study explains the characteristics and treatment of individuals with Rett Syndrome and presents two case studies that investigated the use of interventions in reducing stereotypical hand movements (SHM). The case studies involve two girls (ages 5 and 7) with Rett Syndrome who were enrolled in a special education school. Information was…

  17. Brown's syndrome with ocular albinism: Case report of a rare presentation and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Soumya; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Swaminathan, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of Brown's syndrome associated with ocular albinism in a 10-year-old boy. This report highlights the importance of further analysis of cases of Brown's syndrome and throws some light on the etiology and association of this rare condition. PMID:26622141

  18. A Boy with a Mild Case of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome with Above Average Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacassie, Yves; Bobadilla, Olga; Cambias, Ron D., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of an 11-year-old boy who represents the only documented case of an individual with Cornelia de Lange syndrome who also has above average cognitive functioning. Major diagnostic criteria for de Lange syndrome and comparisons with other severe and mild cases are discussed. (Author/CR)

  19. Fat Embolism Syndrome After Femur Fracture Fixation: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Akoh, Craig C; Schick, Cameron; Otero, Jesse; Karam, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a multi-organ disorder with potentially serious sequelae that is commonly seen in the orthopaedic patient population after femur fractures. The major clinical features of FES include hypoxia, pulmonary dysfunction, mental status changes, petechiae, tachycardia, fever, thrombocytopenia, and anemia. Due to technological advances in supportive care and intramedullary reaming techniques, the incidence of FES has been reported as low as 0.5 percent. Here, we present a rare case of FES with cerebral manifestations. A previously healthy 24-year old nonsmoking male was admitted to our hospital after an unrestrained head-on motor vehicle collision. The patient's injuries included a left olecranon fracture and closed bilateral comminuted midshaft femur fractures. The patient went on to develop cerebral fat embolism syndrome (CFES) twelve hours after immediate bilateral intramedullary nail fixation. His symptoms included unresponsiveness, disconjugate gaze, seizures, respiratory distress, fever, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and visual changes. Head computed tomography and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed pathognomonic white-matter punctate lesions and watershed involvement. With early recognition and supportive therapy and seizure therapy, the patient went on to have complete resolution of symptoms without cognitive sequelae. PMID:25328460

  20. [Above-standard proceeding in nephrotic syndrome - case report].

    PubMed

    Matyjek, Anna; Brodowska-Kania, Dorota; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2016-03-01

    The nephrotic syndrome is characterized by the loss of many proteins, via the urinary system. It exceeds the bodies compensatory abilities and results in abnormalities in blood clotting system, particularly due to antithrombin deficiency. It significantly increases the risk of thromboembolic complications. A loss of erythropoietin and transferrin leads to anemia. Polycythemia is a rarely reported phenomenon. The case describes a 20-years old patient with massive nephrotic syndrome and polycythemia, complicated by a pulmonary embolism. The patient had a steroid-dependent submicroscopic glomerulonephritis with a severe episode of nephrotic syndrome associated with centralization of circulation, proteinuria 40.9 g/day, deep hypoproteinemia (albumin=1.2 g/dl), hyperlipidemia, hypercoagulable state (antithrombin activity 29%), polycythemia (Hb=21.1 g/dl, HTC=60%). Kidney function parameters were normal. We started the immunosupression (glycocorticosteroids i.v., continuated p.o. and cyclosporine A) and intensive symptomatic treatment. To reverse hypovolemia and polycythemia, 20% albumin solutions, intravenous infusions and diuretics were used. There was no effect. Due to intensive polycythemia the erythroapheresis procedure was performed. It resulted in normalization of the red blood cell count (Hb=13.4 g/dl, HCT=37%) and the improvement of blood circulation. To prevent the patient from thromboembolism, the prophylactic dose of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) was administered (dalteparin 5000 IU subcutaneously, once a day). Despite the prophylaxis, an episode of dyspnea with tachycardia occured. It was connected with elevated Ddimer and troponin levels and a right ventricle overload in echocardiographic imaging. The pulmonary embolism was suspected. Perfusion lung scintigraphy confirmed this diagnosis. We supposed that the heparin was ineffective due to an antithrombin deficiency. Therefore, apart from a therapeutic dose of LMWH, intravenous antithrombin concentrate

  1. A Case of Fisher-Bickerstaff Syndrome Overlapped by Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Daiki; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Takahasi, Yosiaki; Narai, Hisashi; Omori, Nobuhiko; Kusunoki, Susumu; Abe, Koji

    2012-01-01

    We report a 72-year-old woman with overlapping Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE). She developed diplopia and unsteady gait a week after an upper respiratory infection on day 1. She had weakness of both upper limbs on day 3 and became drowsy, and her respiratory status worsened on day 5. Neurologic examination revealed ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, symmetrical weakness, areflexia, and consciousness disturbance. We diagnosed her with MFS on day 1, GBS on day 3 and overlapping BBE on day 5. She underwent immunoadsorption therapy and two courses of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Ten months after onset, her symptoms had fully recovered. Anti-GM1 IgG, GD1a IgG, GQ1b IgG, and GT1a IgG antibodies were positive. Our case supports the notion that MFS, GBS, and BBE are all part of a continuous clinical spectrum, which is an antibody-mediated process. PMID:23275783

  2. [Ballantyne syndrome caused by materno-fetal Parvovirus B19 infection: about two cases].

    PubMed

    Desvignes, F; Bourdel, N; Laurichesse-Delmas, H; Savary, D; Gallot, D

    2011-05-01

    Ballantyne's syndrome also known as Mirror syndrome is the association of fetal hydrops and maternal hydric retention. The maternal condition is often misdiagnosed as preeclampsia. We report two cases of Ballantyne syndrome associated with materno-fetal Parvovirus B19 infection. In the first case, the syndrome occurred at 26GW in a context of premature rupture of membranes. Parents and medical staff opted for termination of pregnancy because of the poor fetal prognosis. Maternal symptoms regressed after delivery. In the second case, the patient presented a Ballantyne's syndrome at 25GW. Intrauterine transfusions reversed symptomatology. Fetal hydrops of any etiology can be associated with this syndrome. Specific treatment of the fetus can avoid maternal complication allowing continuation of the pregnancy. PMID:21273007

  3. [Hadju-Cheney syndrome: kidney disturbs in a case report].

    PubMed

    Dantas, Élida Lívia Rafael; Pontes, Mário Lima; Fernandes, Paula Francinetti Camurça Castelo Branco; Ribeiro, Erlane Marques; Daher, Elizabeth de Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Hajdu-Cheney disease is characterized by craniofacial dimorphisms and skeletal changes. Renal disturbs; such as renal cortical cysts, vesico-ureteral reflux and renal failure are rarely related but it is included as a less common feature. The diagnosis is not yet available and the pathogenesis it is related with mutations in the NOTCH gene. The authors report a case of a 26-years-old boy; but with phenotypic characteristics of a pediatric patient. He presented nephrotic syndrome, hypertension, renal cortical cysts, nephrotic range proteinuria and acute renal failure requiring hemodialysis. The renal tissue showed global and segmental glomerulosclerosis and the treatment to this patient it was supporting with hemodialysis. The diagnosis of Hadju-Cheney disease was given during investigation of renal function. PMID:23812575

  4. An Unusual Case Presentation of the May–Thurner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    O’Laughlin, Michael C.; Levens, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: A 56-year-old woman underwent abdominoplasty with no immediate complications. She had no known bleeding history nor any relevant past surgical history. Adequate preventive measures for venous thromboembolism were performed, including sequential compression devices, good hydration, and early ambulation. At 17 days post operation, the patient presented to the emergency room complaining of left leg swelling and sharp, shooting pain radiating down her left leg. Workup in the Emergency Room revealed significant venous thrombosis involving complete occlusion of the major veins of the left leg. There were no indications of cardiopulmonary compromise. Angiography revealed an anatomical variant consistent with May-Thurner Syndrome (MTS). This variant first described in 1957 may present in up to one-quarter of patients, more commonly in young women. This case appears to the first reported of MTS occurring in association with a postoperative complication of abdominoplasty. Diagnosis and management considerations are discussed. PMID:27482484

  5. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with neurological sequelae - a case report.

    PubMed

    Nesteruk, Marta; Kurdyła, Anna; Nesteruk, Tomasz; Dorobek, Małgorzata

    2016-04-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a set of neurological symptoms including impaired consciousness, cognitive disorders, seizures, blurred vision, dizziness and headache. The symptoms are closely related to the location of pathological changes in the brain; bilateral occipitto-parietal region is most often affected. Both focal neurological symptoms and encephalopathy are usually transient. We present the case of 64-year-old woman with PRES. She suffered from many internal diseases and was admitted to the hospital due to impaired consciousness, speech disorders, balance disorders. Significant neurological deterioration was observed within several days from the onset. Differential diagnosis included stroke and viral neuroinfection (cytosis 23 cells /ul, protein level of 93 mg/dl); magnetic resonance examination revealed lesions typical for posterior reversible encephalopathy.After 6 weeks of hospitalization patient condition improved, but did not restore to the premorbid state. The patient was discharged with generalized cognitive impairment. PMID:27137827

  6. Anisometropic amblyopia in a case of type 2 Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akal, Ali; Göncü, Tugba; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Yılmaz, Ömer Faruk

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a case of an 8-year-old boy with iris heterochromia and anisometropic amblyopia who was diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type 2. An ophthalmic examination revealed iris heterochromia and anisometropic amblyopia in our patient. In the systemic examination, a white forelock and vitiligo on the arms and body were observed and neurosensory hearing loss was revealed, for which the patient used hearing aids. Identification and typing of patients with WS is crucial to address neurosensory hearing loss, glaucoma and fundus changes. While it might be challenging to communicate with a patient with speech and hearing problems, visual acuity should be examined carefully and probable amblyopia should be identified. Anterior segment changes and signs of glaucoma should also be evaluated in detail. PMID:24351514

  7. First Case Report of Turcot Syndrome Type 1 in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Dora, Vallejo; Diego, Garnica; Rómulo, Bonilla; Natalia, Olaya

    2012-01-01

    Turcot syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder clinically characterized by the occurrence of primary tumors of the central nervous system and adenomatous colonic polyps during the first or second decades of life, with a spectrum of clinical features such as “café-au-lait” spots, axillary freckling, and hyperpigmented spots. Currently its prevalence globally and in Colombia remains unknown. We present the case of a 20-year-old male with a clinical presentation of both glioblastoma multiforme and multiple adenomatous colonic polyps. The molecular genetics study revealed a mutation in KrasAsp12 gene and altered expression of HMSH2 and HMSH6 proteins encoded by the DNA mismatch repair genes in two of the colonic polyps. Even though this clinical presentation may suggest a shorter survival rate, this patient is still alive after seven months of treatment. A literature review complements this report. PMID:23320220

  8. Hepatorenal Syndrome with Cirrhotic Cardiomyopathy: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mocarzel, Luis; Lanzieri, Pedro; Nascimento, Juliana; Peixoto, Clara; Ribeiro, Mário; Mesquita, Evandro

    2015-01-01

    The hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is defined as a potentially reversible kidney failure in patients with cirrhosis and ascites. An association of HRS and cirrhotic cardiomyopathy has been reported recently, but there are no result studies about the use of positive inotropes as part of the acute phase treatment. We report the case of a patient diagnosed with HRS, with high levels of NT pro-BNP, but with normal ejection fraction of the left ventricle, which showed abnormalities in systolic function through speckle tracking in echocardiography, reversible after the infusion of dobutamine. The patient showed clinical and laboratory improvement of his renal function after the infusion of dobutamine. Clinical studies are needed on HRS therapeutic approach taking into account the myocardial dysfunction as a major contributing factor to renal dysfunction. PMID:25874140

  9. [Paradoxical transtentorial herniation, extreme trephined syndrome sign: A case report].

    PubMed

    Narro-Donate, Jose Maria; Huete-Allut, Antonio; Escribano-Mesa, Jose A; Rodríguez-Martínez, Virginia; Contreras-Jiménez, Ascensión; Masegosa-González, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The current increasing use of decompressive craniectomy carries the implicit appearance of complications due to alterations in both intracranial pressure and in the hydrostatic-hemodynamic equilibrium. Paradoxical transtentorial herniation represents a rare manifestation, included in "trephine syndrome", extremely critical but with relatively simple treatment. We present the case of a 56-year-old woman with no interesting medical history, who, after an olfactory groove meningioma surgery, presented a haemorrhage located in the surgical area with an important oedema. The patient required a second emergency surgery without any chance of conserving the cranial vault. During the post-operational period, great neurological deterioration in orthostatic position was noticed, which resolved spontaneously in decubitus. This deficit was resolved with bone replacement afterwards. We discuss possible predisposing factors and aetiologies of this pathology. PMID:25455761

  10. Inspiratory muscle training in Morquio's syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Savci, Sema; Ozturk, Melda; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Gultekin, Zuhal; Arikan, Hulya; Sivri, H Serap Kalkanoglu

    2006-12-01

    We reported a case of MPS IV A presented with dyspnea on exertion and respiratory muscle weakness. The patient underwent inspiratory muscle training (IMT) using threshold loading for 18 weeks. After 6 weeks of initial IMT, aerobic exercise training consisting of walking was added to the treatment program. Inspiratory muscle strength increased 70%, and 6-minute walk test (6MWT) distance increased to 47 m. With the inclusion of aerobic exercise training, additional increases in inspiratory muscle strength (7%) and 6MWT distance (26.5 m) were obtained. Exertional dyspnea improved from severe to slight after 6 weeks of IMT, and to very slight after additional 12 weeks of combined aerobic training and IMT. Health-related quality of life improved especially in social function, emotional function, vitality, and physical role. In conclusion, inspiratory muscles can be trained with the improvement of muscle strength in a patient with Morquio's syndrome. PMID:16998925

  11. Intramuscular hemangioma mimicking myofascial pain syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hwee; Hwang, Miriam; Kang, Yoon Kyoo; Kim, In Jong; Park, Yoon Kun

    2007-06-01

    Intramuscular hemangioma, an infrequent but important cause of musculoskeletal pain, is often difficult to establish the diagnosis clinically. This report describes a case of a 32-yr-old woman who presented with severe left calf pain for 10 yr. Initial conservative treatments consisting of intramuscular electrical stimulation, herb medication, acupuncture, and intramuscular lidocaine injection under the diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome in other facilities, failed to alleviate the symptoms. On physical examination, there was no motor weakness or sensory change. Conventional radiography of the leg revealed a soft tissue phlebolith. Conventional angiography study showed hemangioma. Intramuscular hemangioma within the soleus muscle was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Following surgical excision of the hemangioma, the patient's symptom resolved completely. Intramuscular hemangioma is a rare cause of calf pain and should be considered in the differential diagnosis if a patient with muscle pain, particularly if associated with a soft tissue mass, fails to respond to conservative treatment. PMID:17596677

  12. Intramuscular Hemangioma Mimicking Myofascial Pain Syndrome : A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Miriam; Kang, Yoon Kyoo; Kim, In Jong; Park, Yoon Kun

    2007-01-01

    Intramuscular hemangioma, an infrequent but important cause of musculoskeletal pain, is often difficult to establish the diagnosis clinically. This report describes a case of a 32-yr-old woman who presented with severe left calf pain for 10 yr. Initial conservative treatments consisting of intramuscular electrical stimulation, herb medication, acupuncture, and intramuscular lidocaine injection under the diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome in other facilities, failed to alleviate the symptoms. On physical examination, there was no motor weakness or sensory change. Conventional radiography of the leg revealed a soft tissue phlebolith. Conventional angiography study showed hemangioma. Intramuscular hemangioma within the soleus muscle was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Following surgical excision of the hemangioma, the patient's symptom resolved completely. Intramuscular hemangioma is a rare cause of calf pain and should be considered in the differential diagnosis if a patient with muscle pain, particularly if associated with a soft tissue mass, fails to respond to conservative treatment. PMID:17596677

  13. [Hand-foot syndrome induced by chemotherapy: a case study].

    PubMed

    Simão, Delma Aurélia da Silva; Lima, Elenice Dias Ribeiro de Paula; Souza, Raíssa Silva de; Faria, Tiago Vitervo; Azevedo, Geraldo Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    The study was aimed at reporting a case of a patient who developed Hand-Foot Syndrome (HFS) grade 3 due the use of capecitabine and for which massage was used with aqueous-based moisturizer, aloe vera. The patient's functional capacity was assessed using the ECOG Performance Scale and the lesions were photographed during nursing appointment that occurred at intervals of ten days, totaling forty days of monitoring. There was significant improvement in tissue integrity, with total regression of symptoms, an important gain in quality of life, and immediate return to chemotherapy. It is believed that aloe vera can be an important component in nursing care in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. PMID:22911424

  14. Zinsser-Cole-Engman Syndrome: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jampanapalli, Sharada Reddy; Bezawada, Sushma; Birapu, Uday Kumar Chowdary; Radharapu, Vasantha Kumari

    2016-01-01

    Zinsser-Cole-Engmann syndrome also called Dyskeratosis Congenita (DKC) is a rare genodermatosis first described by Zinsser in 1906. Mutations in DKC1 gene is responsible for DKC. It is usually inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, resulting in a striking male predilection. It is characterized by a triad of reticular skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy and mucosal leukoplakia. Complications include predisposition to malignancy and bone marrow failure. Here, we report a case of DKC in a 9-year-old boy with classic triad of signs. Special investigations like endoscopy, barium swallow and bone-marrow aspiration study confirmed the diagnosis. There is no effective treatment for DKC. Some preventive measures can be adopted and the only long term cure for the haematological abnormalities is allogenic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27504423

  15. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type VIIC: A Mexican Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rincón-Sánchez, Ana Rosa; Arce, Irma Elia; Tostado-Rabago, Enrique Alejandro; Vargas, Alberto; Padilla-Gómez, Luis Alfredo; Bolaños, Alejandro; Barrios-Guyot, Selenne; Anguiano-Alvarez, Víctor Manuel; Ledezma-Rodríguez, Víctor Chistian; Islas-Carbajal, María Cristina; Rivas-Estilla, Ana María; Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; Dávalos, Nory Omayra

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders whose primary clinical features include soft and extensible skin, articular hypermobility and tissue fragility. EDS type VIIC or 'human dermatosparaxis' is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by severe skin fragility and sagging redundant skin (major criteria) with a soft, doughy texture, easy bruising, premature rupture of fetal membranes and large hernias (minor criteria). Dermatosparaxis (meaning 'tearing of skin'), which has been described in several non-human species, is a disorder of the connective tissue resulting from a deficiency of the enzyme that cleaves the registration peptide off the N-terminal end of collagen after it has been secreted from fibroblasts. We describe a Mexican case from consanguineous parents with all the phenotypical characteristics previously described, plus skeletal abnormalities. PMID:22787447

  16. A case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome diagnosed after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Min; Kim, Da Rae; Park, Ji Yoon; Kim, Seul Ki; Kim, Se Yun; Kim, Jin Sug; Lee, Yu Ho; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Moon, Ju-Young; Lee, Sang-Ho; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo; Lee, Tae-Won

    2015-12-01

    We report the first case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS) diagnosed after kidney transplantation in Korea. RHS is a disease caused by latent varicella-zoster characterized to involve geniculate ganglion of the seventh cranial nerve. Patients who have undergone kidney transplantation can be easily affected by viral infections because of their immune-compromised status. A 35-year-old man with hypertensive end-stage renal disease underwent kidney transplantation. Two months after surgery, the recipient was diagnosed with RHS and treated with antivirals and steroids. However, after using the antiviral agents for the recommended duration, facial paralysis occurred as a new presentation and he required further treatment. Otalgia and periauricular vesicles improved, but the facial palsy remained. PMID:26779429

  17. Zinsser-Cole-Engman Syndrome: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Penmatsa, Chaitanya; Jampanapalli, Sharada Reddy; Bezawada, Sushma; Birapu, Uday Kumar Chowdary; Radharapu, Vasantha Kumari

    2016-06-01

    Zinsser-Cole-Engmann syndrome also called Dyskeratosis Congenita (DKC) is a rare genodermatosis first described by Zinsser in 1906. Mutations in DKC1 gene is responsible for DKC. It is usually inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, resulting in a striking male predilection. It is characterized by a triad of reticular skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy and mucosal leukoplakia. Complications include predisposition to malignancy and bone marrow failure. Here, we report a case of DKC in a 9-year-old boy with classic triad of signs. Special investigations like endoscopy, barium swallow and bone-marrow aspiration study confirmed the diagnosis. There is no effective treatment for DKC. Some preventive measures can be adopted and the only long term cure for the haematological abnormalities is allogenic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27504423

  18. Sensory Guillain-Barré syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Na; Zhang, Zhe-Cheng; Zheng, Rui-Zhi; Li, Qian

    2014-12-01

    A 58-year-old female exhibited the onset of symmetrical sensory abnormalities of the face and extremities. The neurological examination revealed normal muscle strength with abated or absent tendon reflexes. The patient experienced symmetrical glove- and stocking-type pinprick sensations in the distal extremities and a loss of temperature sensation, but had normal proprioception and vibration senses and joint topesthesia. The lumbar puncture showed protein cell separation at the fifth week after the onset of symptoms. At the same time-point, the electrophysiological examination showed demyelination changes involving the trigeminal nerve and the somatic motor nerve. Needle electromyography revealed normal results. The clinical symptoms ceased progression at the fourth week after symptom onset, and began to improve from the sixth. This case was considered to be sensory Guillain-Barré syndrome, which was characterized by its cranial nerve involvement. PMID:25371720

  19. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). Case report and family history.

    PubMed

    Ries, F; Ferster, A; Rieux-Laucat, F; Biwer, A; Dicato, M

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disease caused by defective lymphocyte apoptosis and is characterized by non-malignant lymphoproliferation, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune manifestations and increased risk of both Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Most forms of the disease are due to germ line mutations of the FAS gene and manifest during the first years of life with fluctuating lymphadenopathies, hemolysis, immune thrombocytopenia. During the second decade of life disease manifestations improve spontaneously but autoimmune problems still occur and there is an increased risk of lymphoproliferative malignancy. We describe a typical case of ALPS in a now 44 year old man, followed since the age of 2 for disease manifestations that were unclear at the beginning. PMID:20882745

  20. An Unusual Case Presentation of the May-Thurner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Laughlin, Michael C; Levens, Benjamin J; Levens, David J; Ring, David H

    2016-06-01

    A 56-year-old woman underwent abdominoplasty with no immediate complications. She had no known bleeding history nor any relevant past surgical history. Adequate preventive measures for venous thromboembolism were performed, including sequential compression devices, good hydration, and early ambulation. At 17 days post operation, the patient presented to the emergency room complaining of left leg swelling and sharp, shooting pain radiating down her left leg. Workup in the Emergency Room revealed significant venous thrombosis involving complete occlusion of the major veins of the left leg. There were no indications of cardiopulmonary compromise. Angiography revealed an anatomical variant consistent with May-Thurner Syndrome (MTS). This variant first described in 1957 may present in up to one-quarter of patients, more commonly in young women. This case appears to the first reported of MTS occurring in association with a postoperative complication of abdominoplasty. Diagnosis and management considerations are discussed. PMID:27482484

  1. A severe case of vascular thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bucek, R A; Schnürer, G; Ahmadi, A; Maca, T H; Meissl, G; Minar, E

    2000-11-24

    We report a 21-year-old patient who presented at the outpatient department of angiology with incipient necroses in the fingertips of the right hand. Colour-coded duplex sonography and angiography demonstrated occlusion of the right brachial, ulnar and radial arteries, obviously resulting from an embolism from the subclavian artery narrowed by a cervical rib. After partly successful local thrombolysis this accessory rib was resected. We review angiologic signs and neurological symptoms of the thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) and analyse the current literature regarding diagnostic procedures and treatment. This complicated and severe case of TOS in a young patient ending with paresis of the right arm and partial finger amputation emphasises the importance of early diagnosis of this condition. PMID:11142135

  2. Molecular diagnosis reveals genetic heterogeneity for the overlapping MKKS and BBS phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Elise; Durand, Myriam; Stoetzel, Corinne; Doray, Bérénice; Viville, Brigitte; Hellé, Sophie; Danse, Jean-Marc; Hamel, Christian; Bitoun, Pierre; Goldenberg, Alice; Finck, Sonia; Faivre, Laurence; Sigaudy, Sabine; Holder, Muriel; Vincent, Marie-Claire; Marion, Vincent; Bonneau, Dominique; Verloes, Alain; Nisand, Israël; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Dollfus, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    Hydrometrocolpos and polydactyly diagnosed in the prenatal period or early childhood may raise diagnostic dilemmas especially in distinguishing McKusick-Kaufman syndrome (MKKS) and the Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS). These two conditions can initially overlap. With time, the additional features of BBS appearing in childhood, such as retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, learning disabilities and progressive renal dysfunction allow clear differentiation between BBS and MKKS. Genotype overlap also exists, as mutations in the MKKS-BBS6 gene are found in both syndromes. We report 7 patients diagnosed in the neonatal period with hydrometrocolpos and polydactyly who carry mutations in various BBS genes (BBS6, BBS2, BBS10, BBS8 and BBS12), stressing the importance of wide BBS genotyping in patients with this clinical association for diagnosis, prognosis and genetic counselling. PMID:21044901

  3. Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, S; O'Sullivan, S; Nicolson, A; Tilley, P J; Shaw, P J

    2000-09-01

    We describe a case of the Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome, which is a rare disorder characterized by progressive pontobulbar palsy associated with sensorineural deafness. More than 30 cases have been reported since the first case was described in 1894. We review the literature of this condition, comparing our case with those reported in the literature and emphasizing important features to improve our understanding of this syndrome. PMID:11465021

  4. A case of Meigs syndrome mimicking metastatic breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lanitis, Sophocles; Sivakumar, Sivahamy; Behranwala, Kasim; Zacharakis, Emmanouil; Al Mufti, Ragheed; Hadjiminas, Dimitri J

    2009-01-01

    Background Adnexal masses are not uncommon in patients with breast cancer. Breast cancer and ovarian malignancies are known to be associated. In patients with breast cancer and co-existing pleural effusions, ascites and adnexal masses, the probability of disseminated disease is high. Nevertheless, benign ovarian masses can mimic this clinical picture when they are associated with Meigs' syndrome making the work-up and management of these patients challenging. To our knowledge, there are no similar reports in the literature and therefore we present this case to highlight this entity. Case presentation A 56-year old woman presented with a 4 cm, grade 2, invasive ductal carcinoma of her left breast. Pre-treatment staging investigations showed a 13.5 cm mass in her left ovary, a small amount of ascites and a large right pleural effusion. Serum tumour markers showed a raised CA125 supporting the malignant nature of the ovarian mass. The cytology from the pleural effusion was indeterminate but thoracoscopic biopsy failed to show malignancy. The patient was strongly against mastectomy and she was commenced on neo-adjuvant Letrozole 2.5 mg daily with a view to perform breast conserving surgery. After a good response to the hormone manipulation, the patient had breast conserving surgery, axillary sampling and laparoscopic excision of the ovarian mass which was eventually found to be a benign ovarian fibroma. Conclusion Despite the high probability of disseminated malignancy when an ovarian mass associated with ascites if found in a patient with a breast cancer and pleural effusion, clinicians should be aware about rare benign syndromes, like Meigs', which may mimic a similar picture and mislead the diagnosis and management plan. PMID:19161612

  5. [Rare syndromes in intensive care medicine : Presentation of two cases].

    PubMed

    Gierlinger, A; Siostrzonek, P; Reisinger, J

    2016-06-01

    This article presents two cases of young women with spontaneous life-threatening bleeding events. Both had a history of gastrointestinal rupture or arterial dissection. Based on their medical history and genetic testing, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) IV (vascular type) was diagnosed. In this very rare disorder which accounts for only 5 % of all EDS cases, fibroblasts synthesize reduced and abnormal procollagen type III. This is caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene coding for type III procollagen. Life expectancy in these patients is significantly reduced. In many cases spontaneous arterial ruptures or dissections and organ ruptures are the first manifestations of this disease. More than 80 % of patients with EDS IV suffer from a severe complication before 40 years of age. Treatment options are very limited. Most important is to avoid invasive procedures (open surgery as well as endovascular interventions) because of its high morbidity and mortality. Celiprolol, a cardioselective β‑blocker, seems to have a beneficial effect by reducing the incidence of vascular complications. PMID:27259332

  6. [Two Surgical Cases of Loeys-Dietz Syndrome in Childhood].

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Masaaki; Oguma, Fumiaki; Hirahara, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome( LDS) is a recently recognized autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder. Mutations in the genes encoding transforming growth factor-beta( TGF-β) receptor 1 and (2 TGFBR1, TGFBR2)have been associated with LDS. We report here 2 cases of LDS in childhood. Case 1 was a 10-year-old man, who had aneurysm of both the pulmonary trunk and the ascending aorta, associated with pulmonary and aortic valve insufficiency. Surgical repair was performed successfully at the age of 17. The aortic valve was replaced with a mechanical valve. The aneurysmal ascending aorta was replaced with a Dacron graft. Pulmonary valvuloplasty and pulmonary arterioplasty was performed. Case 2 was a 3-month-old female infant, who had a patent ductus arteriosus( PDA) and aortic root dilation. A detailed physical examination revealed hypertelorism, bifid uvula, retrognathia, talipes equinovarus, and camptodactyly. Computed tomography and echocardiography demonstrated PDA, Valsalva sinus dilation, and arterial tortuosity. These findings were consistent with the clinical manifestations of LDS. Surgical ligation and clipping of the PDA was performed with good results. A molecular genetic analysis subsequently demonstrated a heterozygous missense mutation of the TGFBR2. Since aortic dissection occurs at smaller aortic diameters, early diagnosis and close monitoring are important for patients with LDS. PMID:27476563

  7. Dancing with Down Syndrome: A Phenomenological Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinders, Nicole; Bryden, Pamela J.; Fletcher, Paula C.

    2015-01-01

    "Dance for individuals with Down syndrome has many benefits; however, there is little research on this topic." Down syndrome is the most common "genetic condition," resulting in psychological, physical, and social impairments. There is research to suggest that dance may be a beneficial activity for people with Down syndrome;…

  8. Naturalistic Intervention for Asperger Syndrome: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Serene Hyun-Jin; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of their cognitive abilities, children with Asperger syndrome are attractive candidates for inclusive education and, in Australia, most are in integrated settings. However, social interaction between children with Asperger syndrome and their peers remains problematic, with the children with Asperger syndrome often being left alone…

  9. Parainfluenza virus infection associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinical and radiological entity. The most accepted theory of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a loss of autoregulation in cerebral blood flow with a subsequent increase in vascular permeability and leakage of blood plasma and erythrocytes, producing vasogenic edema. In infection-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, a clinical pattern consistent with systemic inflammatory response syndrome develops. Parainfluenza virus has not been reported in the medical literature to be associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Case presentation We report herein the case of a 54-year-old Caucasian woman with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome associated with parainfluenza virus infection who presented with generalized headache, blurring of vision, new-onset seizure and flu-like symptoms. Conclusion Infection-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome as well as hypertension-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome favor the contribution of endothelial dysfunction to the pathophysiology of this clinicoradiological syndrome. In view of the reversible nature of this clinical entity, it is important that all physicians are well aware of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in patients presenting with headache and seizure activity. A detailed clinical assessment leading to the recognition of precipitant factors in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is paramount. PMID:22448715

  10. Skin symptoms in four ectodermal dysplasia syndromes including two case reports of Rapp-Hodgkin-Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Knaudt, Björn; Volz, Thomas; Krug, Markus; Burgdorf, Walter; Röcken, Martin; Berneburg, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The skin, hair and nail changes in four distinct ectodermal dysplasia syndromes are compared and reviewed. These syndromes comprise Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome; ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate syndrome; ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome and Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome. A comprehensive overview of the dermatological signs and symptoms in these syndromes was generated from the database of the Ectodermal Dysplasia Network Germany, the clinical findings in the patients seen in our department and an extensive review of the literature. The findings included abnormalities of skin, sweating, hair and nails. These clinical findings are discussed in relation to the underlying molecular defects known to play a role in these four ectodermal dysplasia syndromes. PMID:22759387

  11. Exercise-induced Pediatric Lumbar Paravertebral Compartment Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Verena M; Ward, W Timothy

    2015-09-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is described as an elevation of interstitial pressure in a closed fascial compartment that can lead to damage of the microvasculature with subsequent tissue necrosis. Although paravertebral compartment syndrome has been described there is no case of paravertebral compartment syndrome that has been described in the pediatric population. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy who presented at our institution with severe, acute-onset low back pain that started shortly after a rigorous 4-hour workout. He was diagnosed with acute lumbar paravertebral compartment syndrome and underwent emergent fasciotomy with 2 more debridements. PMID:25887821

  12. A rare case of Lemierre`s syndrome caused by Porphyromonas asaccharolytica.

    PubMed

    Takeda, K; Kenzaka, T; Morita, Y; Kuroki, S; Kajii, E

    2013-08-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is only very rarely caused by Porphyromonas asaccharolytica. Here, we report the case of a 35-year-old man who developed a left peritonsillar abscess, thrombophlebitis of the left internal jugular vein, and septic embolization of both lungs. Anaerobic P. asaccharolytica was isolated in the blood cultures, and we subsequently confirmed the diagnosis as Lemierre's syndrome. Our case indicates that although P. asaccharolytica is not commonly found in oral cavities, this organism may still cause Lemierre's syndrome. Consequently, when it is detected in blood cultures, the treating physician should perform the medical examination while keeping in mind the possibility that the patient could have Lemierre's syndrome. PMID:23435719

  13. A rare case of Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome with multiple leiomyomas in hypoplastic uterus

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Maithili Mandar; Deshmukh, Sanjay D.; Hol, Kishor; Nene, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is a rare disorder described as aplasia or hypoplasia of uterus and vagina due to an early arrest in development of mullerian ducts. Women with this syndrome are characterized by the presence of 46 XX karyotype, normal female secondary sex characters, normal ovarian functions, and underdeveloped vagina. The presence of leiomyoma in MRKH syndrome is very rare, and only few cases have been reported in the literature. Here, we report a case of MRKH syndrome with multiple leiomyomas originating from the rudimentary horn of uterus in 25 years married, phenotypically female patient. PMID:26752861

  14. A rare case report of Ellis Van Creveld syndrome in an Indian patient and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Prashanth; Shetty, Deepthi; Priyadarshana, P.S.; Bhat, Smitha

    2015-01-01

    Ellis Van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a rare genetic disorder having autosomal recessive inheritance affecting the Amish population of Pennsylvania in USA with incidence of 1:244,000 for the general population. This syndrome consists of characteristic features such as bilateral postaxial polydactyly, chondroectodermal dysplasia, congenital heart defects and hypoplastic nails and teeth. There are few case reports of this syndrome reported in dental literature. We report a case of a 17 year old female presenting typical features of this syndrome and the oral findings of this patient which are the key diagnostic features. PMID:26258022

  15. A Rare Case of Crowned Dens Syndrome Mimicking Aseptic Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Teruyuki; Minakata, Yugo; Tamura, Masato; Takasu, Toshiaki; Murakami, Marohito

    2013-01-01

    Background Crowned dens syndrome (CDS), related to microcrystalline deposition in the periodontoid process, is the main cause of acute or chronic cervical pain. Microcrystal-line deposition most often consists of calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals and/or hydroxyapatite crystals. Case Presentation This report describes the case of an 89-year-old woman who presented with sudden onset, high fever, severe occipital headache, and neck stiffness. A laboratory examination revealed a markedly elevated white blood cell count (11,100/µl) and C-reactive protein level (23.8 mg/dl). These clinical findings suggested severe infection such as meningitis with sepsis. However, the results of blood culture, serum endotoxin, and procalcitonin were all negative, and cerebrospinal fluid studies revealed only a slight abnormality. The patient was first diagnosed with meningitis and treated with antiviral and antibiotic agents as well as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but they only had limited effects. A cervical plain computed tomography (CT) scan and its three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction detected a remarkable crown-like calcification surrounding the odontoid process. On the basis of the CT findings, the patient was diagnosed as a severe case of CDS and was immediately treated with corticosteroids. The patient's condition drastically improved within a week after one course of corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion Some atypical symptoms of CDS are misleading and may be misdiagnosed as meningitis, as happened in our case. A CT scan, especially a 3D-CT scan, is necessary and useful for a definitive diagnosis of CDS. CDS should be considered as a differential diagnosis of a possible etiology for fever, headache, and cervical pain of unknown origin. PMID:23569451

  16. Double Cortex Syndrome (Subcortical Band Heterotopia): A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Momen, Ali Akbar; Momen, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Approximately 5-10% of preschool age children are considered developmentally disabled. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the diagnostic evaluation in these children. Many congenital or acquired brain anomalies are revealed with MRIs. Although the majority of these abnormalities are sporadic but patients with subcortical band heterotopia or double cortex syndrome have sex-linked inheritance. We are going to present the first case in Iran from Ahvaz city, which was presented with status epilepticus associated with developmental delay and finally diagnosed as double cortex syndrome, because band heterotopia cases especially for continuous or generalized form is rare. A 4.5-year-old developmentally delayed girl was admitted for generalized tonic clonic seizure attack of 1 hr, upward gaze, locked mouth, and urinary incontinence (status epilepticus) in the child neurology ward. She had a history of recurrent seizures that started as febrile seizures since she was 12 months of age and had frequent admissions for having recurrent seizure attacks. She was the only child of consanguineous parents with negative family history of any neurologic problems. She was a product of uneventful term pregnancy, vaginal delivery with a low Apgar score at birth who was admitted for six days in the neonatal ward for hypotonia and cyanosis. At 4.5 years of age, she had HC: 45cm (<3%) Length: 102 cm (25-75%), and BW: 18kg (75%). She was able to sit, walk with support, speak a few words, and communicate with others. A physical exam was unremarkable. Lab data including CBC, blood biochemical, and urinalysis results were all within normal limits, but the electroencephalography (EEG) revealed generalized poly spike-wave discharges. A brain MRI showed corpus callosal dysplasia, generalized band heterotopia, and polymicrogyria. She was discharged home with oral valproate and regular outpatient follow-ups. In the diagnostic evaluation of developmentally delayed

  17. Hepatocutaneous syndrome in Shih Tzus: 31 cases (1996-2014).

    PubMed

    Hall-Fonte, Deborah L; Center, Sharon A; McDonough, Sean P; Peters-Kennedy, Jeanine; Trotter, Thomas S; Lucy, John M; Berger, Elyse; Byers, Christopher; Cummings, Clifford G; Burke, Elizabeth; Stegemen, Julie; Pintar, Jason; Kantrowitz, Larry; Sharpe, Kristopher; Weinkle, Tristan

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize findings in Shih Tzus with progressive superficial necrolytic dermatitis and degenerative vacuolar hepatopathy consistent with hepatocutaneous syndrome. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 31 Shih Tzus. PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed to obtain information on signalment, history, treatment, outcome, and results of clinicopathologic testing, abdominal ultrasonography, and histologic examination of skin and liver specimens. A pedigree analysis was performed. RESULTS There were 16 males and 15 females. Median age at the time of diagnosis was 8 years (range, 5 to 14 years). Common clinical signs included lethargy, inappetence, weight loss, and lameness. Twenty-five dogs had cutaneous lesions consistent with hepatocutaneous syndrome; the remaining 6 initially only had hepatic abnormalities, but 3 of the 6 subsequently developed cutaneous lesions. Common clinicopathologic abnormalities included microcytosis (15/24 [63%] dogs) and high serum alkaline phosphatase activity (24/24 [100%] dogs). Hepatic ultrasonographic findings included a hyperechoic or heteroechoic appearance to the parenchyma with innumerable hypoechoic nodules. Histologic hepatic lesions consisted of degenerative vacuolar (glycogen and lipid) hepatopathy associated with minimally fibrotic to nonfibrotic, noninflammatory, proliferative nodules. Pedigree analysis confirmed a common ancestry in 12 of 18 dogs. Median survival time was 3 months (range, 1 to 36 months). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that HCS may have a heritable component in Shih Tzus, although the condition may also be identified in Shih Tzus without affected relatives. Clinical, clinicopathologic, ultrasonographic, and histologic abnormalities in affected Shih Tzus were similar to those previously reported for dogs of other breeds with HCS. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2016;248:802-813). PMID:27003022

  18. [A case of Churg-Strauss syndrome with subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ito, Miiko; Kato, Naoki; Su, Ching-Chan; Kayama, Takamasa

    2014-03-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a vasculitis syndromes and is only rarely complicated by subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the current report, we describe a case of CSS with subarachnoid hemorrhage, which showed a favorable outcome following conservative treatment. A 68-year-old man with CSS on maintenance steroid therapy underwent MRI/A during tinnitus aggravation, and showed dilation of the left middle cerebral artery and stenosis of the peripheral area of the right vertebral artery. After 2 months, he presented sudden pain in the occipitocervical area, and CT revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Intracranial 3D CT-A and MRI/A showed the development of a protrusion at the base of the left anterior cerebral artery. Although both findings suggested cerebral artery dissection, the source of hemorrhage could not be identified. The 2009 Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke recommends early diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhagic cerebral artery dissection because of the high risk of re-bleeding. However, considering the risks of vasculitis aggravation, development of systemic complications, and recurrence, conservative treatment was selected. In addition, owing to the risk of complications associated with the frequent use of iodinated contrast agents and angiography procedures, patient was followed up using MRI. His course was favorable, and he was discharged despite mild right abducens paralysis. When patients with hemorrhagic cerebral artery dissection have a history of allergic diseases, CCS should be considered; conservative treatment consisting of rest, strict blood pressure control, and steroid therapy may be the most appropriate option for certain patients. PMID:24607952

  19. Combination of Klinefelter Syndrome and Acromegaly: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hongjuan; Xu, Jian; Wu, Huanwen; Fan, Hong; Zhong, Liyong

    2016-04-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is the most common chromosomal aneuploidy in male population, which demonstrates an unusual association with acromegaly. We herein present a rare case involving the confirmation of KS 2 years after surgical treatment for acromegaly.A 27-year-old man presented with an acromegalic appearance. Endocrinological examination revealed a high growth hormone (GH) concentration, low testosterone concentration, and high follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone concentration. Brain imaging revealed a 9 × 6 × 7- mm sellar low-density nodule suggestive of a microadenoma. Trans-sphenoidal surgery was undertaken, and immunohistochemistry revealed GH positivity. Two years after surgery, the patient underwent examination for infertility. He presented with diminished pubic hair, and small and firm testes. Hormonal assay revealed hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism on the basis of decreased serum total testosterone (<0.2 ng/mL), and elevated luteinizing hormone (14.71 mIU/mL) and follicle-stimulating hormone (21.8 mIU/mL). A chromosomal karyotype examination showed 47,XXY, confirming the diagnosis of KS. Replacement therapy with oral testosterone undecanoate was begun. Brain imaging showed no delayed enhancement in the saddle region of the pituitary gland, but the concentration of plasma insulin-like growth factor maintained a high level. The patient's GH concentration was not significantly suppressed by the GH glucose suppression test. In this consideration, he was referred for postoperative somatostatin analogue treatment to control GH hypersecretion.The misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis of KS is mainly because of substantial variations in clinical presentation and insufficient professional awareness of the syndrome itself. As the simultaneous occurrence of KS and acromegaly is rare, and the association between them remains unclear, we suggest that complete pituitary hormonal screening and conventional pituitary MRI should be

  20. A case of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, En Hyung; Jeong, Seon-Yong; Kim, Hyon J; Kim, You Chan

    2008-04-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by cutaneous hair follicle tumors (fibrofolliculoma or trichodiscoma), pulmonary cysts, and increased risk of renal neoplasia. The genetic alteration for BHDS has been mapped to chromosome 17p12q11, and the gene in this region has been cloned and believed to be responsible for the BHDS. Mutations in the BHD gene (also known as FLCN) have been described in the patients with BHDS. We present a case of a 30-yr-old Korean woman with multiple mildly pruritic papules on her face and neck area. The patient had several firm, flesh-colored, dome-shaped, papular lesions measuring between 2 to 5 mm. Except for a history of pneumothorax her medical records were not remarkable. Mutation analysis of the BHD gene was performed, and a novel deletion mutation (p.F519LfsX17 [c.1557delT]) causing truncation of the gene product, folliculin, was found in the exon 14. The actual incidence of BHDS is unknown, but it is most likely underdiagnosed. So it is imperative that doctors recognize the skin lesions of BHDS and institute proper screening to detect other manifestations of the disease. Here, we report a case of BHDS with a novel mutation, which is the first report in Korea. PMID:18437022

  1. Adrenal adenocarcinoma with Kartagener's syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HU, WANLI; CHENG, LONG; CHENG, BEI; ZHANG, PENG; XIAO, HE; WU, WENBO; WANG, XINGHUAN

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports the case of a 44-year-old woman with an adrenal tumor, complicated by Kartagener's syndrome (KS). The patient was admitted to Zhongnan Hospital (Wuhan, China), and presented with an 8-week history of vertigo and extended history of a recurrent cough, accompanied by sputum and a congested nose. Computed tomography indicated a mass on the right adrenal gland and situs inversus. A right adrenal tumor combined with KS was diagnosed, and resection of the tumor was performed following relief of respiratory symptoms and control of blood pressure. During six months of follow up the patient recovered well from surgery and blood pressure remained stable. This case revealed that patients exhibiting KS may suffer from serious respiratory infections as a result of impaired defense mechanisms against microbes in the airway. Therefore, comprehensive management of infection, safe anesthesia and appropriate surgical procedures for the avoidance of inflammation and trauma are the most significant factors required for the success of the treatment. PMID:26788182

  2. Systemic capillary leak syndrome under general anesthesia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Ki; Kim, Se-Hun; Lee, Chang-Hee; Kim, Jin-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS) is very rare and lethal disease and only 150 cases have been reported after the first publication of its report in 1960 by Clarkson. SCLS is characterized by hemoconcentation and hypoalbuminemia caused by reversible plasma extravasation. Its mechanism is unknown, but transient dysfunction of the endothelium is the most suspected cause and trigger of this event may cause immunologic disarrangement. After recovery of endothelial function, fluid injected during the shock period is redistributed and can cause severe pulmonary edema. SCLS should be considered in patients with acute and severe hypotension with hemoconcentration and hypoalbuminemia without obvious cardiac dysfunction. Especially we should take into account the possibility of SCLS if fluid replacement does not work or the shock state is aggravated despite aggressive fluid resuscitation and vasopressor administration. SCLS itself is a very rare disease; furthermore, SCLS that develops during well-controlled surgery is even more rare. So we report this case with review of the literature. PMID:25006371

  3. A Case of Occult Compartment Syndrome and Nonresolving Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Minnema, Brian J.; Neligan, Peter C.; Quraishi, Nasir A.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    Case report A 32-year-old African male presented with 10 hours of severe back pain. Initial computed tomography scan of the back showed no abnormality, and initial laboratory investigations were consistent with rhabdomyolysis. Despite stopping potential causative medications, aggressive intravenous hydration, and urine alkalinization, his creatinine kinase continued to steadily climb. Thirty-six hours after admission, a magnetic resonance imaging of his back was done because of new swelling over the right paraspinal muscles and loss of sensation in this region. Marked swelling of the right erector spinae muscles was observed, and right and left compartment pressure measurements were 108 and 21 mm Hg, respectively. He had urgent fasciotomy after which his rhabdomyolysis and pain recovered. Conclusion Our case highlights the need for early consideration of compartment syndrome as a possible cause of back pain in the setting of rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis can present in the absence of late complications such as neurological and vascular compromise. PMID:18350340

  4. A case of Madelung's disease accompanied by Klinefelter's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ozderya, Aysenur; Aydin Tezcan, Kadriye; Ozturk, Feyza Yener; Altuntas, Yuksel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Madelung's disease is a rare fat metabolism disorder characterised by benign multiple symmetric, encapsulated lipomatosis. The exact cause of the disease is unknown; it may be associated with chronic alcoholism and mutations in mitochondrial DNA (A8344G), but there have been cases without these factors reported in the literature. A 29-year-old man with a 6-year history of diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital for poorly regulated diabetes and decreased libido. He was not an alcohol consumer. His family history was unremarkable. Physical examination revealed that he had a eunuchoid body shape. There was a symmetric excess fat accumulation in his submandibular, deltoid, nuchal, suprapubic and inguinal areas. He was diagnosed with Madelung's disease, and imaging studies supported the diagnosis. Hormonal evaluation revealed a hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Karyotype analysis revealed a 47,XXY mutation. Genetic research showed no mitochondrial DNA mutation. Metabolic disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidaemia, hyperuricaemia and liver disease, endocrine gland diseases, such as hypothyroidism, and neurological diseases, such as polyneuropathy and cognitive disorders, may accompany Madelung's disease. The present study represents the first reported case of Madelung's disease accompanied by Klinefelter's syndrome. Learning points Madelung's disease is a rare fat metabolism disorder characterised by benign multiple symmetric and encapsulated lipid accumulation.The exact cause of the disease is unknown.Metabolic disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidaemia, hyperuricaemia and liver disease, endocrine gland diseases, such as hypothyroidism, and neurological diseases, such as polyneuropathy and cognitive disorders, may accompany Madelung's disease. PMID:25945255

  5. Neuroectodermal (CHIME) syndrome: an additional case with long term follow up of all reported cases.

    PubMed Central

    Shashi, V; Zunich, J; Kelly, T E; Fryburg, J S

    1995-01-01

    A new neuroectodermal syndrome (designated CHIME syndrome) was described in 1983 with a total of four patients reported, it is presumed to be an autosomal recessive disorder because of recurrence in sibs. The main features include ocular colobomas, congenital heart disease, early onset migratory ichthyosiform dermatosis, mental retardation, conductive hearing loss, seizures, and typical facial features. We report a fifth child with the condition, confirming the unique nature of the condition. Long term follow up information on this patient, as well as the previously described cases, provides information regarding the outcome for these patients, which includes general good health, severe mental retardation, seizures that worsen after puberty, conductive hearing loss, and chronic migratory ichthyosiform skin rash without scarring. Images PMID:7666399

  6. Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and the Urinary Tract (CAKUT).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Maria M

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the majority of Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract (CAKUT) with emphasis in Pediatric Pathology describing and illustrating lesions as varied as ureteral duplications, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, horseshoe kidney, posterior urethral valve and prune belly syndrome, obstructive renal dysplasia, nonmotile ciliopathies and several syndromes associated with renal malformations (Meckel-Joubert, short rib, Bardet-Biedl, asplenia/polysplenia, hereditary renal adysplasia, Zellweger, trisomies, VACTER-L, Potter, caudal dysplasia, and sirenomelia), as well as ADPK, and ARPK. The purpose of this review is not only to describe the congenital renal anomalies, but also to analyze the more recent therapeutic interventions that may modify the natural history of some of these severe conditions. PMID:25313840

  7. Inherited retinal disorders in South Africa and the clinical impact of evolving technologies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, L; Goliath, R; Rebello, G; Bardien, S; September, A V; Bartmann, L; Loubser, F; Greenberg, L J; Ramesar, R S

    2016-01-01

    Retinal degenerative disorders (RDDs) encompass a group of inherited diseases characterised by vision loss. The genetic and clinical complexity poses a challenge in unravelling the molecular genetic aetiology of this group of disorders. Furthermore, the population diversity in South Africa (SA) presents researchers with a particularly complicated task. Rapid advances in the development of cutting-edge technological platforms over the past two decades, however, have assisted in overcoming some of the challenges. The RDD research team has utilised these escalating technologies, which has facilitated a corresponding increase in molecular diagnoses. A biorepository has been established and comprises ~3 200 patient DNA samples archived with many forms of RDD (including retinitis pigmentosa, macular dystrophies, Stargardt disease, Leber congenital amaurosis, Usher syndrome and Bardet Biedl syndrome). A comprehensive review is presented of the SA journey spanning 25 years, into elucidating the molecular genetic basis of various forms of RDD in SA. PMID:27245521

  8. Specialized Cilia in Mammalian Sensory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Nathalie; Lösl, Marlene; Schröder, Nadja; Gießl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are highly conserved and important microtubule-based organelles that project from the surface of eukaryotic cells and act as antennae to sense extracellular signals. Moreover, cilia have emerged as key players in numerous physiological, developmental, and sensory processes such as hearing, olfaction, and photoreception. Genetic defects in ciliary proteins responsible for cilia formation, maintenance, or function underlie a wide array of human diseases like deafness, anosmia, and retinal degeneration in sensory systems. Impairment of more than one sensory organ results in numerous syndromic ciliary disorders like the autosomal recessive genetic diseases Bardet-Biedl and Usher syndrome. Here we describe the structure and distinct functional roles of cilia in sensory organs like the inner ear, the olfactory epithelium, and the retina of the mouse. The spectrum of ciliary function in fundamental cellular processes highlights the importance of elucidating ciliopathy-related proteins in order to find novel potential therapies. PMID:26378583

  9. Sick sinus syndrome associated with hypopituitarism: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongsheng; Zhang, Qing; Lu, Jingping; Zhang, Gang; Lu, Huihe; Huang, Jianfei; Shan, Qijun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Though an association between autoimmune diseases and sick sinus syndrome has been reported, there has been no report on the association of hypopituitarism and sick sinus syndrome. Herein, we provide the first case report of hypopituitarism accompanying sick sinus syndrome in a 51-year-old woman presented to our hospital with syncope due to cardiac arrest. The patient was successfully managed by pacemaker installation and hormone replacement therapy. PMID:25332716

  10. Holt Oram syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Virdis, G; Dessole, M; Dessole, S; Ambrosini, G; Cosmi, E; Cherchil, P L; Capobianco, G

    2016-01-01

    Holt Oram syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome on average, of varying severity, which may result in heterogeneous pictures, predominantly with involvement of the bony segments of the upper limbs and the cardiovascular system. The syndrome is caused by mutations in two genes of the T-box (TBX5, 601 620 and TBX 3) located on the 12q24.1p. The authors report a case and review the literature. PMID:27048037

  11. Arthrogryposis, renal tubular acidosis and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome: two new cases and review.

    PubMed

    Abu-Sa'da, Omar; Barbar, Maha; Al-Harbi, Naffaa; Taha, Doris

    2005-10-01

    ARC syndrome, the association of arthrogryposis, renal tubular dysfunction and cholestasis, is a rare genetic disorder. We report two Saudi infants from two different families with ARC syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain of one of the infants showed lissencephaly, a previously unreported finding in this syndrome. We also review 39 ARC cases reported in the literature using the Medline database from January 1966 to September 2004. PMID:16155421

  12. Clear otorrhea: a case of Munchausen syndrome in a pediatric patient

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Ömer Afşin; Yılmaz, Taner

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports a case of Munchausen syndrome in a pediatric patient. An 11-year-old girl presented with the complaint of clear fluid otorrhea. She underwent numerous investigations with deception of the physicians. The literature with respect to Munchausen syndrome in the pediatric patient is reviewed. Diagnosis of Munchausen syndrome is difficult especially during the initial assessment, although suspicion might be aroused by inconsistencies in the patient’s history and discrepancies between signs and symptoms. PMID:18030485

  13. Crooked fingers and sparse hair: an interesting case of trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Ramakrishna; Chennareddy, Srinivasa

    2015-01-01

    Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type 1 is a rare skeletal dysplasia of autosomal-dominant inheritance due to defects in the TRPS-1 gene. The syndrome is characterised by sparse slow-growing hair, a bulbous pear-shaped nose, cone-shaped epiphyses and deformities of the interphalangeal joints resembling those in rheumatoid arthritis. We present a case of trichorhinophalangeal syndrome in a 23-year-old man who presented with symmetrical painless progressive deformity of the fingers in both hands. PMID:25628322

  14. Amyloidosis and Reiter's syndrome: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Anderson, C J; Gregory, M C; Groggel, G C; Clegg, D O

    1989-10-01

    Reiter's syndrome is classically described as the triad of urethritis, conjunctivitis, and arthritis, It has many manifestations and has rarely been reported to occur in association with amyloidosis. Four cases of systemic amyloidosis have previously been reported. This case describes a patient who developed progressive renal amyloidosis after a 17-year history of severe Reiter's syndrome. Immunofluorescent staining of the renal biopsy was strongly positive for AA protein, the type of protein found in secondary amyloidosis. This is the first case in which amyloidosis has been proven to be secondary to Reiter's syndrome and not merely the coincidental occurrence of two rare diseases. PMID:2679059

  15. Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome: report of one case.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ni-Chung; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Soong, Wen-Jue; Tsen, Chiou-Liang; Hwang, Be-Tau; Wei, Chou-Fu

    2003-01-01

    Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a very rare congenital disease characterized by abdominal distension due to a dilated urinary bladder, microcolon and decreased or absent intestinal peristalsis. Most patients die at an early age. We report on a female baby with this syndrome which was associated with duodenal web and tracheobronchial malacia. The literature on this syndrome is also reviewed. PMID:14674230

  16. Treatment of Hyperthyroidism in Down Syndrome: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Fawzi E.; Al-Busairi, Waleed A.; Al-Mulla, Fatema A.

    1999-01-01

    A case of an institutionalized adult male with Down syndrome and hyperthyroidism is reported. After treatment with radioactive iodine, he was found to be markedly hypothyroid when he was reviewed 11 weeks later. Three treatment options for hyperthyroidism in Down syndrome are reviewed: surgery, medical treatments, and radiotherapy. (Author/CR)

  17. A Rare Case of Azathioprine-Induced Sweet's Syndrome in a Patient with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Salem, Chaker B; Larif, Sofiene; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Aounallah, Amina; Sakhri, Jaballah; Hmouda, Houssem

    2015-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome has been reported in association with inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease. It has also been reported in association with several drugs. Here, we report a rare case of Sweet's syndrome induced by azathioprine in a patient with Crohn's disease. PMID:26219289

  18. Grammatical Constructions in Cri du Chat Syndrome--Findings from a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil

    2009-01-01

    The literature on grammatical skills in persons with Cri du chat syndrome (CCS) is very limited, and the need for more knowledge in this area is thus evident, in particular for speech and language therapists working with individuals with this syndrome. This case study report describes the syntactic skills of a 14-year-old Norwegian girl with CCS.…

  19. Solitary median maxillary central incisor in association with Goldenhar's syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Garcia de Paula e Silva, Francisco Wanderley; de Carvalho, Fabricio Kitazono; Diaz-Serrano, Kranya Victória; de Freitas, Aldevina Campos; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino

    2007-01-01

    Goldenhar's syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by several anomalies that include dermal epibulbar cysts, auricular appendices and malformations and vertebral anomalies. In this article, the authors report a case of Goldenhar's syndrome in a 10-year-old child who presented with the classical signs of this condition and a solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI). PMID:17658185

  20. [The Melnick-Needless syndrome (osteodysplasia). Report of a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Tripi, T R

    1997-12-01

    The case of a girl with Melnick-Needles syndrome is reported. The face is characterized by prominent sopraorbital ridges, prominent eyes, full cheeks, large pinna, marked micrognathia, strabism, blue sclerae. Lateral and postero-anterior cephalometric measurements are presented and odontostomatologic features of the syndrome are described. PMID:9567619

  1. An Extraordinary Case Associated with an Allergic Reaction to Clopidogrel: Coronary Artery Spasm or Kounis Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Liping, Zhang; Bin, Hui; Qiming, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Kounis syndrome is the concurrence of acute coronary syndrome with allergic reactions, such as anaphylaxis or anaphylactoid reactions. Here, we describe a unique case: CASs (coronary artery spasms) with both non-hypersensitivity and hypersensitivity aetiology (associated with clopidogrel hypersensitivity) were observed in a 61 year-old patient. Herein, the mechanism and clinical implications of this association are discussed. PMID:26138623

  2. Manifestations, Treatment Implications and Speech-Language Consideration in Gorlin Syndrome: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Alice E.; Stonestreet, Ruth H.

    This paper presents a case study of Gorlin Syndrome, also known as Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder characterized by widespread developmental defects. Criteria for diagnosis are listed, noting the presence of frequent basal cell carcinomas at a relatively young age and multiple cysts of the jaw. Speech and/or language impairments…

  3. Familial gigantiform cementoma with Ehlers - Danlos syndrome: A report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Şakar, Olcay; Aren, Gamze; Mumcu, Zeynep; Ünalan, Fatma; Aksakallı, Nihan; Tolgay, Ceren Güney

    2015-04-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue, while familial gigantiform cementoma is a condition that usually manifests as multiple radiopaque cementum-like masses throughout the jaws. This case report discusses the oral management and prosthetic rehabilitation of two patients presenting familial gigantiform cementoma with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. PMID:25932318

  4. Familial gigantiform cementoma with Ehlers - Danlos syndrome: A report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue, while familial gigantiform cementoma is a condition that usually manifests as multiple radiopaque cementum-like masses throughout the jaws. This case report discusses the oral management and prosthetic rehabilitation of two patients presenting familial gigantiform cementoma with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. PMID:25932318

  5. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of Korean Cases

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun-Joo; Shin, Hyokeun; Baek, Jin-A; Leem, Dae-Ho; Ko, Seung-O

    2014-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a rare autosomal genetic disease caused by a PTCH mutation. The disease is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas of the skin, multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) in the jaw, palmar and/or plantar pits, bifid ribs, ectopic calcification of the falx cerebri, and skeletal abnormalities. Early diagnosis is difficult in many cases because there may be a number of systemic symptoms. The purpose of this study is to report the case of a 12-year-old girl who was hospitalized with multiple KCOTs that occurred in the upper and lower jaws. Through characteristic clinical symptoms and radiologic findings, she was finally diagnosed as having NBCCS. This study also aims to organize the symptoms often observed in Korea using previously published case reports to provide useful information for the early diagnosis of NBCCS. PMID:27489849

  6. Construction of a YAC contig in the region of three retinal degeneration genes in 11q13

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, J.; Wang, J.

    1994-09-01

    We have previously isolated a large number of bacteriophage clones specific for human chromosome 11. Seventy-two clones map to distal 11q13, a region haboring a number of human disease genes. Among them are genes for Best macular degeneration (BMD), Usher`s syndrome type 1B, autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy (ADNIV) and a form of Bardet-Biedl syndrome; all diseases involve retinal degenerations. From the genetic mapping it is clear the BMD and Bardet-Biedl syndrome are located in the proximal portion of the band, while Usher`s syndrome 1B and ADNIV are in the distal portion of 11q13. As the first step towards the cloning of the latter two disease genes, we set out to isolate this region of the chromosome as yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). The 72 clones, as well as two transcribed genes, were assigned into 4 segregation groups with radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrids. We have shown previously that this high probe density can result in the development of large YAC contigs. We chose to use two complementing strategies to screen three different YAC libraries. The two strategies are: (1) the generation of Alu-primed products from the bacteriophage clones that are then used as probes against filters from individual YAC library pools; (2) the sequencing of the bacteriophage clones, STS development and screening YAC libraries by the method of Green and Olson (1990). The former has the advantage of speed, while the latter of specificity. We have identified a total of 140 YACs from 50 screens. Approximately 50% of the markers are already in small contigs. The largest contig has 10 markers and is {approximately}1 mbp. This approach results in fairly rapid development of YAC contigs without additional application of labor-intensive, locus-specific manipulation. We expect to complete the contig within a year.

  7. Metabolic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis: case control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of classical cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, obesity, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia is highly prevalent in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of metabolic syndrome (MS) in RA patients, and to evaluate the relationships between metabolic syndrome and RA. Methods The study was conducted on 120 RA patients according to the 1987 revised American College of Rheumatology classification criteria, and 100 age and sex matched apparently healthy controls. The frequency of metabolic syndrome was assessed using six Metabolic Syndrome definitions (Joint Consensus 2009, National Cholesterol Education Programme 2004 and 2001, International Diabetes Federation, World Health Organisation and European Group for Study of Insulin Resistance). Logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of metabolic Syndrome. Results The frequency of metabolic syndrome varied from 18 to 48.6% in RA according to the definition used and was significantly higher than controls (for all definitions p<0.05). In multivariate analysis, higher ESR was independently associated with the presence of Met S (OR =1.36; CI: 1.18–2.12; p = 0.03). Glucocorticoid use, but not other disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), values remained significant independent predictors of the presence of metabolic syndrome in RA patients (OR = 1.45; CI: 1.12–2.14; p = 0.04). Conclusions In summary, the frequency of metabolic syndrome in RA varies according to the definition used and was significantly higher compared to controls (for all definitions p<0.05). Higher systemic inflammatory marker, and glucocorticoids use were independent predictors associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome in patients with RA. These findings suggest that physicians should screen for metabolic syndrome in patients with RA to control its components and therefore reduce the risk of

  8. Severe constipation in a patient with Myhre syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bassett, John K; Douzgou, Sofia; Kerr, Bronwyn

    2016-04-01

    Myhre syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant genetic condition characterized by short stature, distinctive facial dysmorphisms, generalized muscle hypertrophy, skeletal abnormalities, decreased joint motility, developmental delay, deafness and cardiac defects. Myhre syndrome and the allelic laryngeal stenosis, arthropathy, prognathism and short stature syndrome are caused by a missense mutation of SMAD4, resulting in altered expression of transforming growth factor β and bone morphogenic protein, affecting cell growth and differentiation. Here, we report on the case of a 7-year-old girl showing symptoms of Myhre syndrome and with a known SMAD4 mutation presenting with the novel symptom of severe constipation. PMID:26636501

  9. A Case of Undiagnosed Harlequin Syndrome Presenting in General Dental Practice.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kathryn; Schaefer, Andrew; Greenwood, Mark; Staines, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Harlequin syndrome is a rare, clinically striking syndrome characterized by distinctly demarcated asymmetric facial flushing and sweating. It may be of idiopathic aetiology or caused by demonstrable ipsilateral damage to the sympathetic nervous system. A case is described where a patient presented to her general dental practitioner complaining of distinctly demarcated unilateral facial flushing and sweating. Onward referral resulted in a diagnosis of Harlequin syndrome. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This article highlights the neurological signs and symptoms of Harlequin syndrome, making it easier to recognize if it presents in general dental practice. PMID:27024906

  10. Risk factors for neuroleptic malignant syndrome. A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Keck, P E; Pope, H G; Cohen, B M; McElroy, S L; Nierenberg, A A

    1989-10-01

    A number of risk factors have been proposed for the development of neuroleptic malignant syndrome, but these have not been subjected to controlled study. To address this problem, we performed a case-control study comparing 18 patients with neuroleptic malignant syndrome and 36 matched neuroleptic-treated control patients with no known history of the syndrome to identify potential risk factors. Patients with neuroleptic malignant syndrome displayed significantly greater psychomotor agitation, received significantly higher doses of neuroleptics at greater rates of dosage increase, and received a greater number of intramuscular injections than controls. PMID:2572206

  11. A case of type I variant Kounis syndrome with Samter-Beer triad.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Jayesh S; Virpariya, Kapil M; Thakkar, Ashok S; Abhyankar, Atul D

    2013-04-26

    Kounis syndrome is defined as the coexistence of acute coronary syndromes with situations associated with allergy or hypersensitivity, as well as anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions, to a variety of medical conditions, environmental and medication exposures. We report a case of Kounis-Zavras syndrome type I variant in the setting of aspirin-induced asthma, or the Samter-Beer triad of asthma, nasal polyps and aspirin allergy. When there is a young individual with no predisposing factors of atherosclerosis and apparent coronary lesion, with or without electrocardiography and biochemical markers of infarction, the possibility of Kounis syndrome should be kept in mind. PMID:23675559

  12. Cotard's syndrome: Two case reports and a brief review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Aneja, Jitender; Mahajan, Sonali; Varma, Sannidhya

    2014-01-01

    Cotard's syndrome is a rare neuropsychiatric condition in which the patient denies existence of one's own body to the extent of delusions of immortality. One of the consequences of Cotard's syndrome is self-starvation because of negation of existence of self. Although Cotard's syndrome has been reported to be associated with various organic conditions and other forms of psychopathology, it is less often reported to be seen in patients with catatonia. In this report we present two cases of Cotard's syndrome, both of whom had associated self-starvation and nutritional deficiencies and one of whom had associated catatonia. PMID:25540544

  13. Cotard's syndrome: Two case reports and a brief review of literature.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sandeep; Aneja, Jitender; Mahajan, Sonali; Varma, Sannidhya

    2014-11-01

    Cotard's syndrome is a rare neuropsychiatric condition in which the patient denies existence of one's own body to the extent of delusions of immortality. One of the consequences of Cotard's syndrome is self-starvation because of negation of existence of self. Although Cotard's syndrome has been reported to be associated with various organic conditions and other forms of psychopathology, it is less often reported to be seen in patients with catatonia. In this report we present two cases of Cotard's syndrome, both of whom had associated self-starvation and nutritional deficiencies and one of whom had associated catatonia. PMID:25540544

  14. Oral and dental manifestations in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome: report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Gunashekhar, Madiraju; Hameed, Mohammad Shahul; Bokhari, Syed Kamran

    2012-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, or broad thumb-hallux syndrome, is a well-defined rare congenital disorder characterised by postnatal growth deficiency, craniofacial dysmorphism, broad thumbs and great toes, and mental retardation (intellectual disability). Occurrence may be either sporadic or through autosomal dominant inheritance. Reports of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome are scarce in the literature. This case report describes the oral and dentofacial findings of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome affecting a 13-year-old Indian female, including the uncommon presence of talon cusps and an unerupted supernumerary tooth. PMID:22244492

  15. Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome as a Consequence of Delusional Food Refusal: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, David D; Schroeder, Ryan W; Heinrichs, Robin J; Baade, Lyle E

    2015-12-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency, typically resulting from malnutrition secondary to chronic alcohol abuse. Less often, other conditions can lead to malnutrition and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We describe a 35-year-old man who developed Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome with a typical neurologic and neuropsychological presentation after somatic delusions led him to refuse to eat. Cases like his serve to heighten awareness of the interplay between psychiatric and neurologic conditions, their sometimes atypical pathogenesis, and the value to primary care providers of consulting with psychiatrists, neurologists, and neuropsychologists when managing patients with possible Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. PMID:26705268

  16. A Rare Case of Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Refractory Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Jehangir, Waqas; Webb, John; Singh, Shilpi; Arshed, Sabrina; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent a variety of clonal abnormalities, possibly preleukemic and display numerous phenotypic manifestations. Specific mutations carry high morbidity and mortality rates due to cell line dysplasia. MDS commonly presents with symptoms related to anemia, and approximately two-thirds will develop thrombocytopenia, a rare, but potentially lethal complication that increases complexity in treatment and morbidity, and may be due to unique genetic mutations leading to refractory thrombocytopenia, ultimately leading to an overall reduction in survival. Careful identification and monitoring of this patient subdivision can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality, and potential identification of specific gene mutations and advances in treatment options will hopefully provide guidance on detecting at-risk patients in the future. We present a case of a man with MDS-U (karyotype 46, XY, del (20) (q11.2q13.3) (20) with no detected JAK2 V617F mutation), who in despite of appropriate evidenced based treatment, continued to exhibit refractory thrombocytopenia. PMID:26487931

  17. A Rare Case of Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Refractory Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Jehangir, Waqas; Webb, John; Singh, Shilpi; Arshed, Sabrina; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla

    2015-09-23

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent a variety of clonal abnormalities, possibly preleukemic and display numerous phenotypic manifestations. Specific mutations carry high morbidity and mortality rates due to cell line dysplasia. MDS commonly presents with symptoms related to anemia, and approximately two-thirds will develop thrombocytopenia, a rare, but potentially lethal complication that increases complexity in treatment and morbidity, and may be due to unique genetic mutations leading to refractory thrombocytopenia, ultimately leading to an overall reduction in survival. Careful identification and monitoring of this patient subdivision can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality, and potential identification of specific gene mutations and advances in treatment options will hopefully provide guidance on detecting at-risk patients in the future. We present a case of a man with MDS-U (karyotype 46, XY, del (20) (q11.2q13.3) (20) with no detected JAK2 V617F mutation), who in despite of appropriate evidenced based treatment, continued to exhibit refractory thrombocytopenia. PMID:26487931

  18. Fanconi syndrome induced by tenofovir: A case report.

    PubMed

    Lify, Bouchra; Dabo, G; Nascimento, O; Iraqui, S; Elkhayat, S; Zamd, M; Medkouri, G; Benghanem, M; Ramdani, B; Sodqi, M M; Marih, L; Chakib, A; El FilaliMarhoum, K

    2016-01-01

    Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) is a nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor discovered in the USA in 2001. It is currently the treatment of choice for patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus. Its antiretroviral efficacy and good tolerance are responsible for the higher frequency of prescriptions compared with other nucleoside analogs. However, it can induce acute renal toxicity causing impairment of the proximal tubular function of the kidney. This is highly dependent on factors such as associated co-prescription didanosine or a protease inhibitor "boosted" with ritonavir, preexisting renal insufficiency, low body weight, or presence of associated diabetes. In contrast, long-term renal toxicity remains highly debated. Some studies describe a decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate during prolonged treatment with TDF. Others reported renal safety even during prolonged use. The differences between patients enrolled in the different studies, the measured parameters and their interpretation could explain these discrepancies. We describe a case of a patient infected with HIV, who presented with Fanconi syndrome with acute renal failure six months after starting antiretroviral treatment including tenofovir. PMID:27424704

  19. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate withdrawal syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction To raise awareness among health care workers of the risk of withdrawal symptoms after longstanding and intense abuse of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid. Case presentation A 23 year old Caucasian woman presented with gamma-hydroxybutyric addiction and withdrawal syndrome. The symptoms of gamma-hydroxybutyric withdrawal in this patient initially went unrecognized, upon which her situation deteriorated in such a way that she needed to be admitted to the Intensive Care Unit for airway protection and mechanical ventilation. Treatment with high doses of benzodiazepines led to liberation of the ventilator and further recovery. Conclusion Withdrawal symptoms of gamma-hydroxybutyric addiction are often not well recognized and the responsible physicians at Emergency Department, Intensive Care Unit and the Psychiatry ward need better understanding of diagnose and treatment. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid withdrawal is potentially life threatening and its management may require a multidisciplinary approach. Early recognition of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid withdrawal may lead to better management of these patients. PMID:20181164

  20. A case of hypereosinophilic syndrome presenting with intractable gastric ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Young; Choi, Chang Hwan; Yang, Suh Yoon; Oh, In Soo; Song, In-Do; Lee, Hyun Woong; Kim, Hyung Joon; Do, Jae Hyuk; Chang, Sae Kyung; Cho, Ah Ra; Cha, Young Joo

    2009-01-01

    We report a rare case of hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) presenting with intractable gastric ulcers. A 71-year-old man was admitted with epigastric pain. Initial endoscopic findings revealed multiple, active gastric ulcers in the gastric antrum. He underwent Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication therapy followed by proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. However, follow-up endoscopy at 4, 6, 10 and 14 mo revealed persistent multiple gastric ulcers without significant improvement. The proportion of his eosinophil count increased to 43% (total count: 7903/mm3). Abdominal-pelvic and chest computed tomography scans showed multiple small nodules in the liver and both lungs. The endoscopic biopsy specimen taken from the gastric antrum revealed prominent eosinophilic infiltration, and the liver biopsy specimen also showed eosinophilic infiltration in the portal tract and sinusoid. A bone marrow biopsy disclosed eosinophilic hyperplasia as well as increased cellularity of 70%. The patient was finally diagnosed with HES involving the stomach, liver, lung, and bone marrow. When gastric ulcers do not improve despite H pylori eradication and prolonged PPI therapy, infiltrative gastric disorders such as HES should be considered. PMID:20027690

  1. CF Tucanae: Another Case of Coronal MAD Syndrome?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Stern, R. A.; Drake, J. J.; Kuerster, M.

    1996-06-01

    We present and discuss an extreme-ultraviolet spectrum of the RS CVn binary CF Tuc obtained with the short-wavelength (5W) spectrometer on board the Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite. In addition to a continuum, only two spectral lines attributed to Fe XXII and Fe XXIII are detected. We show that the EUVE data can be reconciled with a solar abundance plasma only if most of CF Tuc's emission measure is located at temperatures of ≍108 K; alternatively, the plasma must be iron depleted with most of the emission measure located at the peak temperature of the observed line contribution functions. A comparison with previously obtained ROSAT PSPC spectra argues strongly in favor of the latter situation. As a consequence, we are forced to the conclusion that the iron abundance in the corona of CF Tuc is reduced with respect to solar values by factors between 5 and 10. The reasons for the occurrence of this metal abundance deficiency syndrome (MADS) are unclear at present; however, for the specific case of CF Tuc, the extremely low coronal iron abundance might possibly result from an anomalously low photo spheric iron abundance.

  2. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome with intact atrial septum: case report

    PubMed Central

    Cester, Maddalena; Nanhorngue, Kimta; Pascoli, Irene; Garofano, Greta; Surico, Nicola; Paternoster, Delia Maria

    2007-01-01

    Summary Objectives Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) with an intact atrial septum (IAS) is a rare finding, reported in only 1% of pathologic specimens with hypoplasia of the aortic tract complex. In newborns with left heart obstruction, the existence of an interatrial communication is very important for oxygenated blood to be distributed to the body and to prevent pulmonary congestion. The ability to predict prenatally restriction of the atrial defect may allow earlier surgery to be planned. Methods We report a case of prenatal diagnosis of HLHS with a complete premature closure of the foramen ovale that was not detected by prenatal echocardiography. Results and conclusion The management of neonates with HLHS in the first days of life is crucial to the results of the first stage of the Norwood procedure. We suggest that delivery of the mother close to surgical centre and avoiding neonatal transfer improve the results, but stabilisation with prostaglandins and balancing of the systemic and pulmonary resistances are also important. A restrictive or closed atrial septal defect may contribute to haemodynamic instability in the first days of life. The ability to predict this complication prenatally may help in the immediate postnatal management of the affected infant. PMID:22470823

  3. Serial transverse enteroplasty for short bowel syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Bae; Lee, Patricia W; Garza, Jennifer; Duggan, Christopher; Fauza, Dario; Jaksic, Tom

    2003-06-01

    The patient is a 2-year-old boy born with gastroschisis and midgut volvulus that left him dependent on total parenteral nutrition (TPN). At 11 months of age, a Bianchi procedure was performed increasing the total length of bowel from 72 cm to 130 cm. Although he appeared to have sufficient bowel length, he continued to have malabsorption and could only tolerate 10% of his caloric requirement enterally. A barium study found significant dilatation of the lengthened small bowel. At 23 months, we performed a novel bowel lengthening procedure that we have reported previously in an animal model. The serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) operation increased the 83 cm of dilated and previously lengthened bowel to 147 cm, making the total small bowel length 200 cm. The patient tolerated the procedure well and began to have semisolid bowel movements. Small intestinal absorptive capacity measured by D-xylose absorption showed a substantial increase from 5 to 12 mg/dL (normal range, >20), implying improved but not completely normal small bowel function. This case shows that the STEP procedure increases intestinal length, can be used after a prior Bianchi, and may result in improved intestinal absorptive capacity. The STEP procedure should be considered a surgical option for children with short bowel syndrome. PMID:12778385

  4. Neurofeedback training for tourette syndrome: an uncontrolled single case study.

    PubMed

    Messerotti Benvenuti, Simone; Buodo, Giulia; Leone, Valentino; Palomba, Daniela

    2011-12-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by motor and vocal tic manifestations, often accompanied by behavioral, cognitive and affective dysfunctions. Electroencephalography of patients with TS has revealed reduced Sensorimotor Rhythm (SMR) and excessive fronto-central Theta activity, that presumably underlie motor and cognitive disturbances in TS. Some evidence exists that neurofeedback (NFB) training aimed at enhancing SMR amplitude is effective for reducing tics. The present report is an uncontrolled single case study where a NFB training protocol, involving combined SMR uptraining/Theta downtraining was delivered to a 17-year-old male with TS. After sixteen SMR-Theta sessions, six additional sessions were administered with SMR uptraining alone. SMR increase was better obtained when SMR uptraining was administered alone, whereas Theta decrease was observed after both trainings. The patient showed a reduction of tics and affective symptoms, and improvement of cognitive performance after both trainings. Overall, these findings suggest that Theta decrease might account for some clinical effects seen in conjunction with SMR uptraining. Future studies should clarify the feasibility of NFB protocols for patients with TS beyond SMR uptraining alone. PMID:21915704

  5. Not so silent sinus syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Ashley; Basyuni, Shadi; Santhanam, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Silent sinus syndrome (SSS) is a rare disorder with protean manifestations. An absence of familiarity with ambiguous and atypical presentations may complicate diagnosis and delay management. Case presentation A 28 year old female patient presented with a chronic history of headache, post-nasal discharge and recurrent facial pain refractory to analgesics. Enophthalmos and hypoglobus progressed over a period of 2 months, and a diagnosis of SSS was confirmed via imaging. Definitive treatment was withheld given the patient’s postpartum state and improvement of symptoms. Discussion SSS typically manifests with painless and progressive, unilateral, enophthalmos and hypoglobus. Since presentation is dominated by ophthalmologic complaints, the ordinary route by which SSS is diagnosed is through ophthalmology review. The predominant complaint in our patient was chronic headaches with facial pain, and mild enophthalmos and hypoglobus were only noted 2 months later at follow-up. This represents an atypical presentation of SSS, and exemplifies the subtle and often ambiguous presenting features of this disorder. Conclusion The protean manifestations of SSS mean that patients may initially present to specialities other than ophthalmology. To ensure rapid diagnosis and appropriate management, it is important that clinicians, particularly in ophthalmology, maxillofacial surgery, and ears, nose and throat (ENT), are familiar with this obscure condition. PMID:27078866

  6. Bobble head doll syndrome: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Onteddoo Joji; Gafoor, Jamkhana Abdul; Suresh, Balla; Prasad, P. Obuleswar

    2014-01-01

    Bobble – head syndrome (BHDS) is a complex and rare syndrome with repetitive anteroposterior head movements. It is usually associated with expansile lesions in the third ventricular region. We present a 9 year old child with a giant suprasellar arachnoid cyst causing involuntary head movements. PMID:25250081

  7. Bobble head doll syndrome: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Onteddoo Joji; Gafoor, Jamkhana Abdul; Suresh, Balla; Prasad, P Obuleswar

    2014-05-01

    Bobble - head syndrome (BHDS) is a complex and rare syndrome with repetitive anteroposterior head movements. It is usually associated with expansile lesions in the third ventricular region. We present a 9 year old child with a giant suprasellar arachnoid cyst causing involuntary head movements. PMID:25250081

  8. [Münchausen syndrome by proxy. A case report].

    PubMed

    Moussaoui, A; Fejjal, N; Ababou, K; Tourabi, K; Ennouhi, A; Ribag, Y; Slaoui, A; Sqalli, J; Ihrai, H

    2009-02-01

    The plastic surgeon rarely encounters patients with factitious disorders. The syndrome of Münchausen by proxy is a part of it. We put the point on this syndrome through a clinical observation of an eight-year-old girl victim of parental abuse. PMID:18938018

  9. [Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: a case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia-peng; Lu, Xin-tian; Zhao, Wei-hong; Hua, Ying

    2015-12-18

    We described 1 case of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), first diagnosed in our hospital, and reviewed the recent literature. The 11-month old male patient presented with a history of splenomegaly and hepatomegaly since 1 month after birth. He suffered recurrent infectious diseases including cytomegalovirus infection, parvovirus B19 infection and chronic diarrhea disease. Besides, his symptoms included hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. The laboratory abnormality indicated an expanded population of alpha/beta double-negative T cells (DNTs) (27.18% of lymphocytes, 35.16% of CD3+ T lymphocytes) in peripheral blood, and autoantibodies including antinuclear antibody, double-stranded DNA and rheumatic factor were positive. Hyper gamma globulinemia and positive direct Coombs tests were seen in the patient. His parents were both healthy and denied autoimmune diseases. We identified a heterozygous point mutation in exon 3 of the FAS gene carrying c.309 A>C, resulting in a single base pair substitution in exon 3 of FAS gene which changed the codon of Arg103 to Ser103. Unfortunately, we were unable to obtain the gene results of the child's parents. The patient was treated with glucocorticoids in our hospital and with mycophenolatemofetil in other hospital. And we were informed that his anemia condition relieved through the telephone follow-up, but he still suffered recurrent infections, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly still existed. As we all know ALPS is characterized by defective lymphocyte apoptosis, and thus cause lymphoproliferative disease and autoimmune disease, and increase the risk of lymphoma. It is more likely to be misdiagnosed as other diseases. ALPS should be suspected in the case of chronic lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and autoimmune features. Flow cytometry approach is helpful for the diagnosis. Immunosuppressive drugs are the necessary treatment. PMID:26679669

  10. Child maltreatment syndrome: demographics and developmental issues of inpatient cases

    PubMed Central

    Ngiam, Xin Ying; Kang, Ying Qi; Aishworiya, Ramkumar; Kiing, Jennifer; Law, Evelyn Chung Ning

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to describe the demographic, social, developmental and behavioural profile of children hospitalised for alleged child maltreatment syndrome (CMS). METHODS This study was a retrospective review of the consecutive inpatient records of children (0–16 years) admitted to the National University Hospital, Singapore, for alleged CMS over a three-year period. Descriptive data on the demographic characteristics, alleged maltreatment, medical and developmental histories, and family background of these children were collected and analysed. Chi-square statistics were used to test whether family factors were associated with the type of maltreatment and the presence of developmental disorders. RESULTS A total of 89 children, who accounted for 90 admission cases, were studied. Physical abuse (70.0%) was the most common, followed by neglect (11.1%) and sexual abuse (7.8%). Child protection services had already been involved in 29.2% of the cases prior to the child’s admission. Children who were victims of abuse were more likely to come from homes with a prior history of domestic violence (p = 0.028). Financial difficulty was found to be a risk factor for neglect (p = 0.005). Among the 89 children, 15.7% were found to have developmental disorders and 10.1% had mental health diagnoses. Children who had developmental disorders were more likely to have a parent with a mental health disorder (p = 0.002). CONCLUSION A sizeable proportion of the children admitted for alleged CMS had developmental or behavioural disorders. Clinicians have a role in ensuring that these children have appropriate follow-up plans. Children from high-risk families should be screened for maltreatment. PMID:26668405

  11. Lemierre syndrome with thrombosis of sigmoid sinus following dental extraction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taeyun

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre syndrome is caused by an infection in the oropharyngeal region with subsequent thrombophlebitis in the internal jugular vein. The thrombus from the thrombophlebitis can invade other vital organs, such as liver, lungs, or joints, resulting in secondary infection, which further exacerbates the fatal prognosis of this syndrome. Lemierre syndrome, also called postanginal sepsis or necrobacillosis, was first reported by Dr. Lemierre in 1936. In his report, Lemierre mentioned that out of 20 patients who suffered from this syndrome, only two survived. He also stated that all of the 20 patients complained of infections in the palatine tonsils and developed sepsis and thrombophlebitis in the internal jugular vein. Once called a "forgotten disease," this syndrome showed a very high mortality rate until usage of antibiotics became prevalent. In this case report, the authors present a 71-year-old female patient who suffered from Lemierre syndrome with thrombosis extended to the right sigmoid sinus. PMID:24471023

  12. Twiddler syndrome in a patient with tremor dominant Parkinson's disease. A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sobstyl, Michał; Ząbek, Mirosław; Górecki, Wojciech; Brzuszkiewicz-Kuźmicka, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    Twiddler syndrome is described as a spontaneous rotation or intentional external manipulation of implanted cardiac or occasionally deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices. We report this hardware related complication in a patient with tremor dominant Parkinson's disease (PD), who underwent unilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS and subsequently developed twiddler syndrome. The clinical course of twiddler syndrome in this patient is described. Some surgical nuances which may prevent its occurrence are suggested. Our case report indicates that twiddler syndrome occurs in DBS patients. Impedance check of DBS hardware, plain chest X-ray, or palpation for a knobbly extension lead through the skin above the IPG allows the correct diagnosis and subsequently a prompt surgical revision. Our subsequent literature review revealed only 10 patients with twiddler syndrome in DBS patient population worldwide. This number may suggest that this syndrome may be unrecognized or underreported, given the number of patients with movement disorders implanted with DBS hardware worldwide. PMID:26652885

  13. Orthopedic Manifestations of Mobius Syndrome: Case Series and Survey Study.

    PubMed

    McClure, Philip; Booy, David; Katarincic, Julia; Eberson, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mobius Syndrome is a rare disease defined by bilateral congenital 7th nerve palsy. We focus on reporting the prevalence of orthopedic disease in this population. Methods. Twenty-three individuals with Mobius Syndrome underwent orthopedic physical examination, and additional 96 patients filled out a survey for self-reported orthopedic diagnoses. Results. Clubfoot was present in 60% of individuals in the physical exam series and 42% of those in the survey. Scoliosis was present in 26% and 28%, respectively. Poland's Syndrome was present in 17% and 30%. In addition to these findings, 27% of patients reported having difficulty with anesthesia, including difficulty in intubation and airway problems. Conclusion. An increased prevalence of scoliosis, clubfoot, transverse limb deficiencies, and Poland's Syndrome is identified in the setting of Mobius Syndrome. In the setting of several deformities often requiring surgical correction, a high incidence of anesthetic difficulty is noted and should be discussed with patients and other providers during surgical planning. PMID:26977161

  14. Orthopedic Manifestations of Mobius Syndrome: Case Series and Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Philip; Booy, David; Katarincic, Julia; Eberson, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mobius Syndrome is a rare disease defined by bilateral congenital 7th nerve palsy. We focus on reporting the prevalence of orthopedic disease in this population. Methods. Twenty-three individuals with Mobius Syndrome underwent orthopedic physical examination, and additional 96 patients filled out a survey for self-reported orthopedic diagnoses. Results. Clubfoot was present in 60% of individuals in the physical exam series and 42% of those in the survey. Scoliosis was present in 26% and 28%, respectively. Poland's Syndrome was present in 17% and 30%. In addition to these findings, 27% of patients reported having difficulty with anesthesia, including difficulty in intubation and airway problems. Conclusion. An increased prevalence of scoliosis, clubfoot, transverse limb deficiencies, and Poland's Syndrome is identified in the setting of Mobius Syndrome. In the setting of several deformities often requiring surgical correction, a high incidence of anesthetic difficulty is noted and should be discussed with patients and other providers during surgical planning. PMID:26977161

  15. Rituximab for refractory subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HASHEMI, SEYED MEHDI; FAZELI, SEYED AMIRHOSSEIN; VAHEDI, ABDOLBASET; GOLABCHIFARD, REZA

    2016-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome is a neutrophilic dermatosis characterised by sudden onset of fever, neutrophilia, erythematous skin rashes and neutrophilic infiltration of the dermis. Subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome, or Sweet's panniculitis, is an uncommon variant of the classic syndrome, with hypodermal neutrophilic infiltration. The association of Sweet's syndrome with various malignancies has been reported. The most common underlying hematological malignancies are of myeloid origin; however, there have been several reports of the classic Sweet's syndrome in patients with a lymphoproliferative disorder, although the association of subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome with lymphoproliferative disorders has not been well-documented thus far. Herein, we present the case of a 48-year-old man with a 2-year history of chronic lymphocytic leukemia who developed fever and skin rashes, without any evidence of a relapse. The clinical and pathological investigation resulted in the diagnosis of subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome. The patient exhibited no significant response to conventional therapeutic measures; however, following two subsequent doses of rituximab, his general condition and skin rash improved. The follow-up skin biopsy demonstrated dermal neutrophilic infiltrations in conjunction with prior mixed lobular and septal panniculitis, suggesting evolution of subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome to its classic form. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first reports of rituximab as a novel biological treatment for Sweet's syndrome. However, further randomized trials are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of such biological therapies for Sweet's syndrome. PMID:26998300

  16. Stimulant medication and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome: a tale of two cases.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, William P

    2016-06-01

    Stimulant medication may mimic the tachycardia of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. Two case histories illustrate how missing the clinical distinction between a primary dysautonomia and a medication effect may have avoidable adverse consequences. PMID:26968177

  17. Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: A case demonstrated by a cytogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Pokale, Yamini S; Jadhav, Ajinkya M; Kate, Ushang

    2012-01-01

    We present a case with a 4p terminal deletion, evidenced in GTG-banded chromosome study. Phenotypic signs described in the classical Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome were found on clinical examination of our patient. PMID:22754235

  18. Refractory Case of Paroxysmal Autonomic Instability With Dystonia Syndrome Secondary to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kern, John; Bodek, Daniel; Niazi, Osama Tariq; Maher, James

    2016-02-01

    Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) is a syndrome commonly related to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and rarely to anoxia associated with symptoms of dystonia, tachycardia, tachypnea, and diaphoresis. This is a case of a 20-year-old man who was stabbed in the heart. He underwent surgical repair of a ventricular septal defect and mitral valve replacement. Postoperatively, he developed dystonia with tachycardia and tachypnea consistent with PAID syndrome, secondary to prolonged hypoxia. Traditionally, this poorly understood syndrome is treated with morphine, clonazepam, and nonselective β-blockers. Second-line medications commonly used are baclofen, dantrolene, and gabapentin, which are aimed at the dystonia itself. In this case, both first- and second-line agents were ineffective. A 72-hour dexmedetomidine infusion resulted in complete resolution of symptoms. This is the first case of anoxia-induced PAID syndrome to be effectively treated with dexmedetomidine, which was previously used in a case induced by TBI. PMID:26867852

  19. Enamel renal syndrome with associated amelogenesis imperfecta, nephrolithiasis, and hypocitraturia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Bhesania, Dhvani; Arora, Ankit; Kapoor, Sonali

    2015-09-01

    Numerous cases of enamel renal syndrome have been previously reported. Various terms, such as enamel renal syndrome, amelogenesis imperfecta and gingival fibromatosis syndrome, and enamel-renal-gingival syndrome, have been used for patients presenting with the dental phenotype characteristic of this condition, nephrocalcinosis or nephrolithiasis, and gingival findings. This report describes a case of amelogenesis imperfecta of the enamel agenesis variety with nephrolithiasis in a 21-year-old male patient who complained of small teeth. The imaging modalities employed were conventional radiography, cone-beam computed tomography, and renal sonography. Such cases are first encountered by dentists, as other organ or metabolic diseases are generally hidden. Hence, cases of amelogenesis imperfecta should be subjected to advanced diagnostic modalities, incorporating both dental and medical criteria, in order to facilitate comprehensive long-term management. PMID:26389061

  20. LEG'S COMPARTMENT SYNDROME AFTER RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Jorge Sayum; Ramos, Leonardo Adeo; Sayum, Jorge; de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Ejnisman, Benno; Matsuda, Marcelo Mitsuro; Nicolini, Alexandre; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient that was submitted to a surgery of reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and collateral medial ligament repair of the left knee that complicated to a compartment syndrome. PMID:27047834