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Sample records for bariatric surgery risks

  1. Kidney Stone Risk Following Modern Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Ricardo D.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, a variety of reports have linked bariatric surgery to metabolic changes that alter kidney stone risk. Most of these studies were retrospective, lacked appropriate controls, or involved bariatric patients with a variety of inclusion criteria. Despite these limitations, recent clinical and experimental research has contributed to our understanding of the pathophysiology of stone disease in this high-risk population. This review summarizes the urinary chemistry profiles that may be responsible for the increased kidney stone incidence seen in contemporary epidemiological bariatric studies, outlines the mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and potential therapies through a newly described experimental bariatric animal model, and provides a focused appraisal of recommendations for reducing stone risk in bariatric stone formers. PMID:24658828

  2. Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To conduct an evidence-based analysis of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery. Background Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at last 30 kg/m2.1 Morbid obesity is defined as a BMI of at least 40 kg/m2 or at least 35 kg/m2 with comorbid conditions. Comorbid conditions associated with obesity include diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemias, obstructive sleep apnea, weight-related arthropathies, and stress urinary incontinence. It is also associated with depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Obesity is also associated with higher all-cause mortality at any age, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors like smoking. A person with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 has about a 50% higher risk of dying than does someone with a healthy BMI. The risk more than doubles at a BMI of 35 kg/m2. An expert estimated that about 160,000 people are morbidly obese in Ontario. In the United States, the prevalence of morbid obesity is 4.7% (1999–2000). In Ontario, the 2004 Chief Medical Officer of Health Report said that in 2003, almost one-half of Ontario adults were overweight (BMI 25–29.9 kg/m2) or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2). About 57% of Ontario men and 42% of Ontario women were overweight or obese. The proportion of the population that was overweight or obese increased gradually from 44% in 1990 to 49% in 2000, and it appears to have stabilized at 49% in 2003. The report also noted that the tendency to be overweight and obese increases with age up to 64 years. BMI should be used cautiously for people aged 65 years and older, because the “normal” range may begin at slightly above 18.5 kg/m2 and extend into the “overweight” range. The Chief Medical Officer of Health cautioned that these data may underestimate the true extent of the problem, because they were based on self reports, and people tend to over-report their

  3. Bariatric surgery: three surgical techniques, patient care, risks, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Carrie A; Wool, Daniel B

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States is a serious health concern. Bariatric surgery is a recognized and accepted approach for addressing weight loss and health conditions that occur as a result of morbid or severe obesity. Lifestyle changes, dietary modifications, and regular exercise are required for optimal and lasting surgical weight loss. Perioperative care of bariatric patients requires the use of interventions that differ from those used for nonobese patients, including bariatric-specific equipment, intraoperative monitoring of blood glucose, and postoperative monitoring for respiratory compromise. This articles outlines the risks and typical outcomes associated with three common bariatric procedures-laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass-to help perioperative nurses and other health care providers successfully advise patients and monitor their care for optimal outcomes. PMID:26227518

  4. Possible Risk Factors for Increased Suicide Following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, James E.; Crosby, Ross; de Zwaan, Martina; Engel, Scott; Roerig, James; Steffen, Kristine; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Karr, Trisha; Lavender, Jason; Wonderlich, Steve

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing research literature suggesting that there may be elevated risk of suicide following bariatric surgery. Most of the data reported thus far has been cross-sectional and observational, and very little is known about the possible specific causal variables involved. The purpose of this report is to review this literature and to review possible risk factors for increased suicidal risk following bariatric surgery, in order to delineate future research directions. First a variety of medical, biological, and genetic factors, including the persistence of recurrence of medical comorbidities after bariatric surgery, the disinhibition and impulsivity secondary to changes in the absorption of alcohol, hypoglycemia, as well as pharmacokinetic changes that may affect the absorption of various medications including antidepressant medications are reviewed. Also reviewed are possible mediating factors involving changes in various peptidergic systems such as GLP-1 and Ghrelin. A number of psychosocial issues that might be involved are discussed, including lack of improvement in quality of life after surgery, continued or recurrent physical mobility restrictions, persistence or recurrence of sexual dysfunction and relationship problems, low self-esteem, and a history of child maltreatment. Inadequate weight loss or weight regain are also discussed. Possible theoretical models involved and directions for research are suggested. PMID:23404774

  5. Endoscopy after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Malli, Chrysoula P.; Sioulas, Athanasios D.; Emmanouil, Theodoros; Dimitriadis, George D.; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic with significant morbidity and mortality. Weight loss results in reduction of health risks and improvement in quality of life, thus representing a goal of paramount importance. Bariatric surgery is the most efficacious choice compared to conservative alternatives including diet, exercise, drugs and behavioral modification to treat obese patients. Following bariatric operations, patients may present with upper gastrointestinal tract complaints that warrant endoscopic evaluation and the various bariatric surgery types are often linked to complications. A subset of these complications necessitates endoscopic interventions for accurate diagnosis and effective, minimal invasive treatment. This review aims to highlight the role of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in patients who have undergone bariatric surgery to evaluate and potentially treat surgery-related complications and upper gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:27366025

  6. Pregnancy management following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Uzoma, A; Keriakos, R

    2013-02-01

    Bariatric surgery is gaining in popularity, due to globally increasing rates of obesity. In the UK, this has manifested as a 14-fold increase in bariatric surgery between 2004 and 2010, making it necessary to develop strategies to manage women who become pregnant following bariatric surgery. This review paper has explored all the current evidence in the literature and provided a comprehensive management strategy for pregnant women following bariatric surgery. The emphasis is on a multidisciplinary team approach to all aspects of care. Adequate pre-conception and antenatal and postnatal care is essential to good pregnancy outcomes with emphasis on appropriate nutritional supplementation. This is especially important following malabsorptive procedures. There is no evidence to suggest that pregnancy outcome is worse after bariatric surgery, though women who remain obese are prone to obesity-related risks in pregnancy. Neonatal outcome post-bariatric surgery is no different from the general population. PMID:23445128

  7. Psychiatric aspects of bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Yung-Chieh; Huang, Chih-Kuan; Tai, Chi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Bariatric surgery has been consistently shown to be effective in long-term marked weight loss and in bringing significant improvement to medical comorbidities such as metabolic syndrome. Empirical data suggest a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders among bariatric surgery candidates. In this review, we focus on the studies published recently with a high impact on our understanding of the role of psychiatry in bariatric surgery. Recent findings This article reviews the specific psychopathologies before surgery, changes in psychopathologies after surgery, suicide risk related to bariatric surgery, factors associated with weight loss, and recommendations for presurgical and postsurgical assessment and management. Research indicates a decrease in certain psychiatric symptoms after weight loss with bariatric surgery. However, the risk of suicide and unsuccessful weight loss in some bariatric surgery patients make monitoring following surgery as important as careful assessment and management before surgery. Specific considerations for youth and older populations and future potential research foci are discussed. Summary Recent publications suggest new directions for psychiatric evaluation and interventions for bariatric surgery patients. Future research on outcomes of specific populations, effectiveness of psychopharmacotherapy, and underlying pathophysiology are warranted for the advancement of treating bariatric surgery patients. PMID:25036421

  8. Hyperoxaluria and Bariatric Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplin, John R.

    2007-04-01

    Bariatric surgery as a means to treat obesity is becoming increasingly common in the United States. An early form of bariatric surgery, the jejunoileal bypass, had to be abandoned in 1980 due to numerous complications, including hyperoxaluria and kidney stones. Current bariatric procedures have not been systematically evaluated to determine if they cause hyperoxaluria. Presented here are data showing that hyperoxaluria is the major metabolic abnormality in patients with bariatric surgery who form kidney stones. Further studies are needed to assess the prevalence of hyperoxaluria in all patients with bariatric surgery.

  9. The risk of kidney stones following bariatric surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Vijayvargiya, Priya; Anthanont, Pimjai; Erickson, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Background With rising prevalence of morbid obesity, the number of bariatric surgeries performed each year has been increasing worldwide. The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the risk of kidney stones following bariatric surgery. Methods A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from inception through July 2015. Only studies reporting relative risks, odd ratios or hazard ratios (HRs) to compare risk of kidney stones in patients who underwent bariatric surgery versus no surgery were included. Pooled risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Results Four studies (One randomized controlled trial and three cohort studies) with 11,348 patients were included in analysis to assess the risk of kidney stones following bariatric surgery. The pooled RR of kidney stones in patients undergoing bariatric surgery was 1.22 (95% CI, 0.63-2.35). The type of bariatric surgery subgroup analysis demonstrated an increased risk of kidney stones in patients following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) with the pooled RR of 1.73 (95% CI, 1.30-2.30) and a decreased risk of kidney stones in patients following restrictive procedures including laparoscopic banding or sleeve gastrectomy with the pooled RR of 0.37 (95% CI, 0.16-0.85). Conclusions Our meta-analysis demonstrates an association between RYGB and increased risk of kidney stones. Restrictive bariatric surgery, on the other hand, may decrease kidney stone risk. Future study with long-term follow-up data is needed to confirm this potential benefit of restrictive bariatric surgery. PMID:26803902

  10. Bariatric Surgery and Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieske, John C.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2008-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment strategy for patients with morbid obesity that can result in effective weight loss, resolution of diabetes mellitus and other weight related complications, and even improved mortality. However, it also appears that hyperoxaluria is common after modern bariatric surgery, perhaps occurring in up to 50% of patients after Rouxen-Y gastric bypass. Although increasing numbers of patients are being seen with calcium oxalate kidney stones after bariatric surgery, and even a few with oxalosis and renal failure, the true risk of these outcomes remains unknown. The mechanisms that contribute to this enteric hyperoxaluria are also incompletely defined, although fat malabsorption may be an important component. Since increasing numbers of these procedures are likely to be performed in the coming years, further study regarding the prevalence and mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and kidney stones after bariatric surgery is needed to devise effective methods of treatment in order to prevent such complications.

  11. Change in fracture risk and fracture pattern after bariatric surgery: nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Catherine; Jean, Sonia; Gamache, Philippe; Lebel, Stéfane; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Biertho, Laurent; Michou, Laëtitia

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether bariatric surgery increases the risk of fracture. Design Retrospective nested case-control study. Setting Patients who underwent bariatric surgery in the province of Quebec, Canada, between 2001 and 2014, selected using healthcare administrative databases. Participants 12 676 patients who underwent bariatric surgery, age and sex matched with 38 028 obese and 126 760 non-obese controls. Main outcome measures Incidence and sites of fracture in patients who had undergone bariatric surgery compared with obese and non-obese controls. Fracture risk was also compared before and after surgery (index date) within each group and by type of surgery from 2006 to 2014. Multivariate conditional Poisson regression models were adjusted for fracture history, number of comorbidities, sociomaterial deprivation, and area of residence. Results Before surgery, patients undergoing bariatric surgery (9169 (72.3%) women; mean age 42 (SD 11) years) were more likely to fracture (1326; 10.5%) than were obese (3065; 8.1%) or non-obese (8329; 6.6%) controls. A mean of 4.4 years after surgery, bariatric patients were more susceptible to fracture (514; 4.1%) than were obese (1013; 2.7%) and non-obese (3008; 2.4%) controls. Postoperative adjusted fracture risk was higher in the bariatric group than in the obese (relative risk 1.38, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.55) and non-obese (1.44, 1.29 to 1.59) groups. Before surgery, the risk of distal lower limb fracture was higher, upper limb fracture risk was lower, and risk of clinical spine, hip, femur, or pelvic fractures was similar in the bariatric and obese groups compared with the non-obese group. After surgery, risk of distal lower limb fracture decreased (relative risk 0.66, 0.56 to 0.78), whereas risk of upper limb (1.64, 1.40 to 1.93), clinical spine (1.78, 1.08 to 2.93), pelvic, hip, or femur (2.52, 1.78 to 3.59) fractures increased. The increase in risk of fracture reached significance only for

  12. Fracture Risk After Bariatric Surgery: A 12-Year Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chia-Wen; Chang, Yu-Kang; Chang, Hao-Hsiang; Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Huang, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Kuo-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bariatric surgery has been shown to impair bone health. This study aimed to investigate the fracture risk in patients after bariatric surgery versus propensity score-matched controls. The authors used the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan and identified 2064 patients who underwent bariatric surgery during 2001 to 2009. These patients were matched to 5027 obese patients who did not receive bariatric surgery, using propensity score matching accounting for age, sex, Charlson Comorbidity Index, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and the year morbid obesity was diagnosed. The authors followed the surgical and control cohorts to death, any diagnosis of fracture, or December 31, 2012, whichever occurred first. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate relative rates of fractures in the surgical group and control group. At the end of the 12-year study period, there were 183 fractures in the surgical group (mean follow-up 4.8 years) and 374 fractures in the matched control group (mean follow-up 4.9 years). Overall, there was a 1.21-fold [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02–1.43] significantly increased risk of fracture in the surgical group compared with the control group. Stratified by surgical procedures, malabsorptive procedures showed a significantly higher fracture risk (1.47, 95% CI: 1.01–2.15). The Kaplan-Meier estimated fracture rates were 1.60% at 1 year, 2.37% at 2 years, 1.69% at 5 years, and 2.06% after 5 years for the surgical patients, compared with 1.51%, 1.65%, 1.53%, and 1.42%, respectively, for the matched controls. Adjusted analysis showed a trend towards an increased fracture risk, 1 to 2 years after bariatric surgery. (1.42, 95% CI: 0.99–2.05). Bariatric surgery was significantly associated with an increased risk of fractures, mainly with malabsorptive procedures, with a trend of an increased fracture risk 1 to 2 years after surgery. These results provide further evidence for the adverse

  13. Fracture Risk After Bariatric Surgery: A 12-Year Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Wen; Chang, Yu-Kang; Chang, Hao-Hsiang; Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Huang, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Kuo-Chin

    2015-12-01

    Bariatric surgery has been shown to impair bone health. This study aimed to investigate the fracture risk in patients after bariatric surgery versus propensity score-matched controls. The authors used the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan and identified 2064 patients who underwent bariatric surgery during 2001 to 2009. These patients were matched to 5027 obese patients who did not receive bariatric surgery, using propensity score matching accounting for age, sex, Charlson Comorbidity Index, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and the year morbid obesity was diagnosed. The authors followed the surgical and control cohorts to death, any diagnosis of fracture, or December 31, 2012, whichever occurred first. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate relative rates of fractures in the surgical group and control group. At the end of the 12-year study period, there were 183 fractures in the surgical group (mean follow-up 4.8 years) and 374 fractures in the matched control group (mean follow-up 4.9 years). Overall, there was a 1.21-fold [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.43] significantly increased risk of fracture in the surgical group compared with the control group. Stratified by surgical procedures, malabsorptive procedures showed a significantly higher fracture risk (1.47, 95% CI: 1.01-2.15). The Kaplan-Meier estimated fracture rates were 1.60% at 1 year, 2.37% at 2 years, 1.69% at 5 years, and 2.06% after 5 years for the surgical patients, compared with 1.51%, 1.65%, 1.53%, and 1.42%, respectively, for the matched controls. Adjusted analysis showed a trend towards an increased fracture risk, 1 to 2 years after bariatric surgery. (1.42, 95% CI: 0.99-2.05). Bariatric surgery was significantly associated with an increased risk of fractures, mainly with malabsorptive procedures, with a trend of an increased fracture risk 1 to 2 years after surgery. These results provide further evidence for the adverse effects of bariatric

  14. Bariatric Surgery in Youth.

    PubMed

    Mirensky, Tamar L

    2016-06-01

    Bariatric surgery provides a clinically effective and cost-effective means of achieving sustained weight reduction and management of associated comorbidities and has been met with increasing enthusiasm for application in obese youth. Following trends seen among obese adults, carefully selected obese youth are now undergoing bariatric surgical procedures with excellent short-term and intermediate-term outcomes. Although long-term data are not yet available, the results thus far hold great promise in the management of this population. PMID:27241972

  15. Laparoscopic revolution in bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sundbom, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    The history of bariatric surgery is investigational. Dedicated surgeons have continuously sought for an ideal procedure to relieve morbidly obese patients from their burden of comorbid conditions, reduced life expectancy and low quality of life. The ideal procedure must have low complication risk, both in short- and long term, as well as minimal impact on daily life. The revolution of laparoscopic techniques in bariatric surgery is described in this summary. Advances in minimal invasive techniques have contributed to reduced operative time, length of stay, and complications. The development in bariatric surgery has been exceptional, resulting in a dramatic increase of the number of procedures performed world wide during the last decades. Although, a complex bariatric procedure can be performed with operative mortality no greater than cholecystectomy, specific procedure-related complications and other drawbacks must be taken into account. The evolution of laparoscopy will be the legacy of the 21st century and at present, day-care surgery and further reduction of the operative trauma is in focus. The impressive effects on comorbid conditions have prompted the adoption of minimal invasive bariatric procedures into the field of metabolic surgery. PMID:25386062

  16. Genetics of Bariatric Surgery Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Noel, Olivier F; Still, Christopher D; Gerhard, Glenn S

    2016-09-01

    Outcomes after bariatric surgery can vary widely and seem to have a significant genetic component. Only a small number of candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have analyzed bariatric surgery outcomes. The role of bile acids in mediating the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery implicate genes regulated by the farnesoid X receptor transcription factor. PMID:27519134

  17. Psychopharmacology and Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Roerig, James L; Steffen, Kristine

    2015-11-01

    Currently, it has been demonstrated that psychotropic drugs, particularly antidepressants, are frequently prescribed for patients who seek bariatric surgery. Many bariatric surgery patients have a history of a mood disorder. Unlike medications for diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidemia, which are generally reduced and at times discontinued, postsurgery antidepressants use is only slightly reduced. The Roux-en-Y procedure is most frequently associated with alteration in drug exposure. Medication disintegration, dissolution, absorption, metabolism and excretion have been found to be altered in postbariatric patients, although data are sparse at this time. This paper will review the current evidence regarding the effect of bariatric surgery on drug treatment including mechanism of interference as well as the extent of changes identified to date. Data will be presented as controlled trials followed by case series and reports. PMID:26338011

  18. BARIATRIC SURGERY REVERSES METABOLIC RISK IN PATIENTS TREATED IN OUTPATIENT LEVEL

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA-NETO, Epifânio Feitosa; VÁZQUEZ, Cecília Mª Passos; SOARES, Fabiana Melo; da SILVA, Danielle Góes; de SOUZA, Márcia Ferreira Cândido; BARBOSA, Kiriaque Barra Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Background The conventional treatment of obesity presents unsatisfactory results on weight loss and its long-term sustainability, therefore bariatric surgery has been suggested as an effective therapy, determining sustainable long-term weight loss, reversal of components of cardiometabolic risk and improved quality and life expectancy. Aim To investigate the clinical component of the cardiometabolic risk in patients undergoing bariatric surgery assisted on outpatient basis. Methods The sample consisted of 47 patients with ages between 18 and 60 years, 72% females. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia were prospectively evaluated by using the Assessment of Obesity-Related Co-morbidities scale. Results Occurred improvement in these co-morbidities within 12 months after surgery. Co-morbidities resolved were greater than those improved. Conclusion The study revealed that the Assessment of Obesity-Related Co-morbidities is a system that can be effectively used to quantify the degree of reduction of the severity of the cardiometabolic risk in response to bariatric surgery. PMID:24676297

  19. Bariatric surgery: to whom and when?

    PubMed

    Benaiges, D; Goday, A; Pedro-Botet, J; Más, A; Chillarón, J J; Flores-Le Roux, J A

    2015-06-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for obesity. Its effects go beyond weight loss, in a high percentage of cases achieving remission of comorbidities associated with obesity and reducing mortality. However, not all patients achieve satisfactory weight loss or resolution of comorbidities and perioperative complications are a constant risk. Correct preoperative evaluation is essential to predict the likelihood of success and choose the most appropriate surgical technique for this purpose. The aim of this review was to ascertain which obese subjects will benefit from bariatric surgery taking into account body mass index, age, comorbidities, risk of complications and the impact of different bariatric surgery techniques. PMID:25665592

  20. Endocrine and Metabolic Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jammah, Anwar A.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapeutic option for obese patients; however, it carries substantial risks, including procedure-related complications, malabsorption, and hormonal disturbance. Recent years have seen an increase in the bariatric surgeries performed utilizing either an independent or a combination of restrictive and malabsorptive procedures. We review some complications of bariatric procedures more specifically, hypoglycemia and osteoporosis, the recommended preoperative assessment and then regular follow up, and the therapeutic options. Surgeon, internist, and the patient must be aware of the multiple risks of this kind of surgery and the needed assessment and follow up. PMID:26458852

  1. Body Contouring After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Jo M; Steffen, Kristine J; Sarwer, David B

    2015-11-01

    Individuals who undergo bariatric surgery generally experience rapid and dramatic weight loss. While the weight loss typically confers significant health benefits, an undesirable consequence is often excessive quantities of hanging, surplus skin. Some patients undergo body-contouring surgery (BCS) in order to improve health, mobility, appearance and psychological adjustment. While the majority of post-bariatric patients desire BCS in one or more body regions, a small percentage of patients receive such surgeries. Lack of knowledge about procedures, cost and (in the USA and several other countries) difficulty obtaining insurance reimbursement likely prevents many patients from undergoing BCS. Those who do undergo BCS appear to be at heightened risk for wound-healing complications. Despite these complications, the majority of patients report satisfactory BCS outcomes. The extant literature in this area provides a great deal of information about these issues; nevertheless, additional research is needed to further inform clinical management and improve patient outcomes. PMID:26395601

  2. Bariatric Surgery for Severe Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... switch, less often. Each type of surgery has advantages and disadvantages. ​ ​​​​ Bariatric Surgery Benefits Bariatric surgery can ... basic and clinical research into many disorders. ​ Additional Reading Active at Any Size! Binge Eating Disorder Dieting ...

  3. Bariatric Surgery and the Endocrine System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endocrine System Fact Sheet Bariatric Surgery and the Endocrine System February, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors John ... could have both benefits and risks for your endocrine system—the network of glands that produce, store, and ...

  4. [Pregnancy following bariatric surgery requires special attention].

    PubMed

    Renault, Kristina; Andersen, Lise Lotte; Kjær, Mette Mandrup; Lauenborg, Jeanette; Gjerris, Anne Cathrine; Berlac, Janne Foss; Jensen, Dorte Møller; Damm, Peter

    2012-04-16

    In the latest years the number of pregnant women having undergone bariatric surgery before pregnancy has increased rapidly. In pregnancy, they seem to have a reduced risk of obesity-related complications but an increased risk of mechanical complications causing small bowel obstruction and complications due to malabsorption. This article reviews the effect of bariatric surgery before pregnancy on obstetric and neonatal outcomes and provides, based on the limited available evidence, recommendations for the management of pregnancy in these women. PMID:22510546

  5. Type 2 diabetes, bariatric surgery and the risk of subsequent gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Steven, S; Woodcock, S; Small, P K; Taylor, R

    2011-01-01

    Women with pre-existing abnormal glucose regulation are certain to develop gestational diabetes in pregnancy and pre-gestational type 2 diabetes will become more difficult to control. However, an increasing number of women with type 2 diabetes have had bariatric surgery. In this group, the effect of pregnancy on glucose metabolism is unknown. We report two women with type 2 diabetes who underwent laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery with normalization of plasma glucose levels. During subsequent pregnancy, maternal blood glucose levels remained completely normal throughout. This is remarkable given the predisposition to abnormal glucose tolerance and the ongoing obesity, in the face of the insulin resistance of pregnancy. Women with prior type 2 diabetes reversed by gastric bypass surgery are not at high risk for gestational diabetes.

  6. Preconception counseling after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Riordan, Joan Katherine

    2016-06-19

    Obesity has increased exponentially in the United States, affecting over 78 million individuals. As the rates of obesity increase, providers encounter more women with a history of bariatric surgery. Certain bariatric procedures can change how essential nutrients are absorbed. Preconception counseling assists in identifying potential deficiencies early. PMID:27203454

  7. Skin changes after bariatric surgery*

    PubMed Central

    Manzoni, Ana Paula Dornelles da Silva; Weber, Magda Blessmann

    2015-01-01

    Today, obesity is considered an epidemic all over the world and it is recognized as one of the major public health problems. Bariatric surgery is considered an appropriate therapeutic option for obesity with progressively increasing demands. The changes resulting from massive weight loss after bariatric surgery are related to numerous complications. This article will present the dermatological alterations that can be found after bariatric surgery. They will be subdivided into dermatoses that are secondary to metabolic and nutritional disorders, those derived from cutaneous structural modifications after major weight loss and the influence the latter may have in improving of certain dermatoses. PMID:25830984

  8. Bariatric Surgery for Severe Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jul;114(1):217-23. 2. Wilson ST, Thomas HI, Randall SB. Bariatric surgery in adolescents: recent ... School of Medicine at East Carolina University; and Thomas Inge, M.D., Ph.D., FACS, FAAP, Assistant ...

  9. Reduction of the risk of rhabdomyolysis after bariatric surgery with lower fluid administration in the perioperative period: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Matłok, Maciej; Major, Piotr; Małczak, Piotr; Wysocki, Michał; Hynnekleiv, Leif; Nowak, Mateusz; Karcz, Konrad; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2016-04-13

    INTRODUCTION    Obesity is a growing worldwide problem. One of the most effective treatments is a bariatric procedure; however, surgery is associated with the risk of complications, such as staple line leakage, suture line bleeding, and rhabdomyolysis (RML). OBJECTIVES    The objective of our study was to assess the risk of RML after bariatric surgery related to intravenous fluid administration in the perioperative period. PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study involved 194 patients who underwent a bariatric surgery (laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy or laparoscopic gastric bypass). We studied an association between the development of RML and sex, age, weight, duration of surgery, type of surgery, and the volume of intravenously administered fluids during the perioperative period. RESULTS    The median duration of surgery was 132.5 minutes. The median volume of administered fluids was 3150 ml from the introduction of anesthesia to 24 hours after surgery. Biochemical RML (creatine phosphokinase >1000 U/l) was observed in 30 patients (15.46%). RML with clinical manifestations developed in 6 patients. Multivariate logistic regression revealed an increase in the odds ratio of biochemical RML with an increase of weight on the day of surgery, operative time, and volume of intravenous fluids. A multiple regression model showed that every 500 ml of transfused fluid over the median volume increases creatine phosphokinase concentrations in the first postoperative day by 241.77 U/l over the median level, with the operative time and patient's weight remaining at median values. CONCLUSIONS    We observed an association between the administration of lower fluid volumes and a lower risk of RML. We postulate that decreasing intravenous fluid administration may reduce the risk of RML after bariatric surgery. PMID:27074693

  10. Childhood verbal abuse: a risk factor for depression in pre-bariatric surgery psychological evaluations.

    PubMed

    Salwen, Jessica K; Hymowitz, Genna F; O'Leary, K Daniel; Pryor, Aurora D; Vivian, Dina

    2014-09-01

    The present study evaluated the importance of multimodal assessment of childhood verbal abuse (CVA) in pre-bariatric surgery psychological evaluations, and the role of CVA as a predictor of depression. Data from the psychological evaluations of 184 pre-bariatric surgery patients were retrospectively examined. Using two self-report measures and an interview-based screen, 52.2 % of participants reported experiencing some form of CVA; conversely, assessments of CVA based on only one measure yielded significantly lower prevalence rates. Endorsement of CVA on multiple measures was associated with more severe depressive symptomatology and greater likelihood of mood disorder diagnosis. Based on these data, a self-report measure and interview-based screen for CVA should be included in pre-bariatric psychological evaluations; either of these assessments may be conducted via a single-item screen. Lastly, patients who endorse CVA on multiple measures should be monitored closely for symptoms of depression post-surgery. PMID:24858597

  11. Stone formation and management after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Tarplin, Sarah; Ganesan, Vishnu; Monga, Manoj

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is a significant health concern and is associated with an increased risk of nephrolithiasis, particularly in women. The underlying pathophysiology of stone formation in obese patients is thought to be related to insulin resistance, dietary factors, and a lithogenic urinary profile. Uric acid stones and calcium oxalate stones are common in these patients. Use of surgical procedures for obesity (bariatric surgery) has risen over the past two decades. Although such procedures effectively manage obesity-dependent comorbidities, several large, controlled studies have revealed that modern bariatric surgeries increase the risk of nephrolithiasis by approximately twofold. In patients who have undergone bariatric surgery, fat malabsorption leads to hyperabsorption of oxalate, which is exacerbated by an increased permeability of the gut to oxalate. Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery show characteristic 24 h urine parameters including low urine volume, low urinary pH, hypocitraturia, hyperoxaluria and hyperuricosuria. Prevention of stones with dietary limitation of oxalate and sodium and a high intake of fluids is critical, and calcium supplementation with calcium citrate is typically required. Potassium citrate is valuable for treating the common metabolic derangements as it raises urinary pH, enhances the activity of stone inhibitors, reduces the supersaturation of calcium oxalate, and corrects hypokalaemia. Both pyridoxine and probiotics have been shown in small studies to reduce hyperoxaluria, but further study is necessary to clarify their effects on stone morbidity in the bariatric surgery population. PMID:25850790

  12. Influence of obesity and bariatric surgery on gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Anna Carolina Batista; Santo, Marco Aurelio; de Cleva, Roberto; Sallum, Rubens Antônio Aissar; Cecconello, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancer (GC) are related to obesity and bariatric surgery. Risk factors, such as gastroesophageal reflux and Helicobacter pylori, must be investigated and treated in obese population. After surgery, GC reports are anecdotal and treatment is not standardized. This review aims to discuss GC related to obesity before and after bariatric surgery. PMID:27458534

  13. Bone Metabolism after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Elaine W.

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is a popular and effective treatment for severe obesity, but may have negative effects on the skeleton. This review summarizes changes in bone density and bone metabolism from animal and clinical studies of bariatric surgery, with specific attention to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), adjustable gastric banding (AGB), and sleeve gastrectomy (SG). Skeletal imaging artifacts from obesity and weight loss are also considered. Despite challenges in bone density imaging, the preponderance of evidence suggests that bariatric surgery procedures have negative skeletal effects that persist beyond the first year of surgery, and that these effects vary by surgical type. The long-term clinical implications and current clinical recommendations are presented. Further study is required to determine mechanisms of bone loss after bariatric surgery. Although early studies focused on calcium/vitamin D metabolism and mechanical unloading of the skeleton, it seems likely that surgically-induced changes in the hormonal and metabolic profile may be responsible for the skeletal phenotypes observed after bariatric surgery. PMID:24677277

  14. Endocrine and Nutritional Management After Bariatric Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Endocrine and Nutritional Management After Bariatric Surgery A Patient’s Guide Bariatric (weight loss) surgery is a treatment ... This guide for patients is based on The Endocrine Society’s practice guidelines for physicians that focus on ...

  15. Treatment of Adult Obesity with Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Robin; Harrison, T Daniel; McGraw, Shaniqua L

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, approximately 179,000 bariatric surgery procedures were performed in the United States, including the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (42.1%), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (34.2%), and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (14.0%). Choice of procedure depends on the medical conditions of the patient, patient preference, and expertise of the surgeon. On average, weight loss of 60% to 70% of excess body weight is achieved in the short term, and up to 50% at 10 years. Remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus occurs in 60% to 80% of patients two years after surgery and persists in about 30% of patients 15 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Other obesity-related comorbidities are greatly reduced, and health-related quality of life improves. The Roux-en-Y procedure carries an increased risk of malabsorption sequelae, which can be minimized with nutritional supplementation and surveillance. Overall, these procedures have a mortality risk of less than 0.5%. Cohort studies show that bariatric surgery reduces all-cause mortality by 30% to 50% at seven to 15 years postsurgery compared with patients with obesity who did not have surgery. Dietary changes, such as consuming protein first at every meal, and regular physical activity are critical for patient success after bariatric surgery. The family physician is well positioned to counsel patients about bariatric surgical options, the risks and benefits of surgery, and to provide long-term support and medical management postsurgery. PMID:26760838

  16. Gastrointestinal changes after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Quercia, I; Dutia, R; Kotler, D P; Belsley, S; Laferrère, B

    2014-04-01

    Severe obesity is a preeminent health care problem that impacts overall health and survival. The most effective treatment for severe obesity is bariatric surgery, an intervention that not only maintains long-term weight loss but also is associated with improvement or remission of several comorbidies including type 2 diabetes mellitus. Some weight loss surgeries modify the gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology, including the secretions and actions of gut peptides. This review describes how bariatric surgery alters the patterns of gastrointestinal motility, nutrient digestion and absorption, gut peptide release, bile acids and the gut microflora, and how these changes alter energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism. PMID:24359701

  17. Update on Adolescent Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Desai, Nirav K; Wulkan, Mark L; Inge, Thomas H

    2016-09-01

    Childhood obesity remains a significant public health issue. Approximately 8% of adolescent girls and 7% of adolescent boys have severe (≥class 2) obesity. Adolescent severe obesity is associated with numerous comorbidities, and persists into adulthood. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment available, resulting in major weight loss and resolution of important comorbid conditions. Clinical practice guidelines for pediatric obesity treatment recommend consideration of surgery after failure of behavioral approaches. Careful screening and postoperative management of patients by a multidisciplinary team is required. Long-term studies are needed to assess the impact of adolescent bariatric surgery. PMID:27519138

  18. Gastrointestinal changes after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Quercia, I.; Dutia, R.; Kotler, D.P.; Belsley, S.; Laferrère, B.

    2015-01-01

    Severe obesity is a preeminent health care problem that impacts overall health and survival. The most effective treatment for severe obesity is bariatric surgery, an intervention that not only maintains long-term weight loss but also is associated with improvement or remission of several comorbidies including type 2 diabetes mellitus. Some weight loss surgeries modify the gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology, including the secretions and actions of gut peptides. This review describes how bariatric surgery alters the patterns of gastrointestinal motility, nutrient digestion and absorption, gut peptide release, bile acids and the gut microflora, and how these changes alter energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism. PMID:24359701

  19. Treatment of adult obesity with bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Robin; Garrison, Jordan M; Johnson, Mark S

    2011-10-01

    Bariatric surgery procedures, including laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, result in an average weight loss of 50 percent of excess body weight. Remission of diabetes mellitus occurs in approximately 80 percent of patients after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Other obesity-related comorbidities are greatly reduced, and health-related quality of life improves. The Obesity Surgery Mortality Risk Score can help identify patients with increased mortality risk from bariatric surgery. Complications and adverse effects are lowest with laparoscopic surgery, and vary by procedure and presurgical risk. The Roux-en-Y procedure carries an increased risk of malabsorption sequelae, which can be minimized with standard nutritional supplementation. Outcomes are also influenced by the experience of the surgeon and surgical facility. Overall, these procedures have a mortality risk of less than 0.5 percent. Although there have been no long-term randomized controlled trials, existing studies show that bariatric surgery has a beneficial effect on mortality. The family physician is well positioned to care for obese patients by discussing surgery as an option for long-term weight loss. Counseling about the procedure options, risks and benefits of surgery, and the potential reduction in comorbid conditions is important. Patient selection, presurgical risk reduction, and postsurgical medical management, with nutrition and exercise support, are valuable roles for the family physician. PMID:22010619

  20. Receptivity to Bariatric Surgery in Qualified Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Michael; Wharton, Sean; Macpherson, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective intervention for weight loss and diabetes management. Despite this, many patients qualified for bariatric surgery are not interested in undergoing the procedure. The objective of this study is to determine the factors influencing receptivity to bariatric surgery among those who qualify for the procedure. Methods. Patients attending a publicly funded weight management clinic who qualified for bariatric surgery were asked to complete an elective questionnaire between February 2013 and April 2014. Results. A total of 371 patients (72% female) completed the questionnaire. Only 87 of 371 (23%) participants were interested in bariatric surgery. Individuals interested in bariatric surgery had a higher BMI (48.0 versus 46.2 kg/m2, P = 0.03) and believed that they would lose more weight with surgery (51 versus 44 kg, P = 0.0069). Those who scored highly on past weight loss success and financial concerns were less likely to be interested in bariatric surgery, whereas those who scored highly on high receptivity to surgery and positive social support were more likely to be interested in bariatric surgery. Conclusion. Although participants overestimated the effect of bariatric surgery on weight loss, most were still not interested in bariatric surgery. PMID:27516900

  1. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: no problem?

    PubMed Central

    Gidiri, Muchabayiwa; Greer, Ian A

    2009-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is highly effective for weight loss in morbid obesity. With the high prevalence of severe obesity in the developed world, and the acknowledgement of the effectiveness of these procedures by National Institute for Clinical Excellence (in the UK) and the Food and Drug Administration (in the USA), women with severe obesity will increasingly seek such treatment. As the majority of these patients are women of reproductive age, obstetricians will encounter these patients frequently during pregnancy. It is therefore important for obstetricians to gain an insight into the types of surgery performed, the potential complications, including nutritional deficiency, and appropriate management of pregnancy following weight-loss surgery. In general, bariatric surgery is associated with a reduction in obesity related complication, with no apparent increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes.

  2. Improved Memory Function Two Years After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Paul, Robert; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Gunstad, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective Obesity is as an independent risk factor for poor neurocognitive outcomes, including Alzheimer’s disease. Bariatric surgery has recently been shown to result in improved memory at 12-weeks post-operatively. However, the long-term effects of bariatric surgery on cognitive function remain unclear. Design and Methods 86 individuals (63 bariatric surgery patients, 23 obese controls) were recruited from a prospective study examining the neurocognitive effects of bariatric surgery. All participants completed self-report measurements and a computerized cognitive test battery prior to surgery and at 12-week and 24-month follow-up; obese controls completed measures at equivalent time points. Results Bariatric surgery patients exhibited high rates of pre-operative cognitive impairments in attention, executive function, memory, and language. Relative to obese controls, repeated measures ANOVA showed improvements in memory from baseline to 12-weeks and 24-months post-operatively (p < .05). Regression analyses controlling for baseline factors revealed that a lower BMI at 24-months demonstrated a trend toward significance for improved memory (β = -.30, p = .075). Conclusion These findings suggest that cognitive benefits of bariatric surgery may extend to 24-months post-operatively. Larger prospective studies with extended follow-up periods are needed to elucidate whether bariatric surgery decreases risk for cognitive decline and possibly the development of dementia. PMID:23625587

  3. Adding Chemoprophylaxis to Sequential Compression May Not Reduce the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gagner, Michel; Selzer, Faith; Belle, Steve H.; Bessler, Marc; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Dakin, Gregory; Davis, Dan; Inabnet, William B.; Mitchell, James E.; Pomp, Alfons; Strain, Gladys; Pories, Walter J.; Wolfe, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation, the use of sequential compression devices on lower extremities peri-operatively, and early ambulation are thought to reduce venous thromboembolism (VTE) postoperatively and are recommended to reduce VTE risk. However, the evidence upon which this recommendation is based is not particularly strong. We demonstrate that even a large, multi-center cohort with carefully collected prospective data is inadequate to provide sufficient evidence to support, or refute, this recommendation. Methods The Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS) participants from 10 centers in the United States who underwent their first bariatric surgery between March, 2005 and December, 2007 comprise the study group. We examined the ability to address the question of whether anti-coagulation therapy, in addition to sequential compression, reduces the 30 day incidence of VTE or death sufficiently to recommend the use of prophylactic anticoagulation, a therapy that is not without risk. Results Of 4416 patients, 396 (9.0%) received sequential compression alone, while the others also received anticoagulation therapy. The incidence of VTE within 30 days of surgery was small (0.25% among those receiving sequential compression alone, 0.47% when anticoagulation therapy was added), and the 30 days incidence of death was also small (0.25% vs. 0.34%, p = 0.76, for sequential compression alone vs. sequential compression plus anticoagulation therapy). Estimates of the number of cases required to address the question of whether there is a difference in outcome related to VTE chemoprophylaxis, or whether the outcome rates are equivalent, range from 13,680 to at least 35,760 patients, depending upon whether superiority or equivalence is being analyzed. Conclusion Sufficient evidence from a clinical trial study to determine whether prophylactic anticoagulation added to compression devices further prevents VTEs is not available and such a trial is likely to be impractical

  4. [Assessment of bariatric surgery results].

    PubMed

    Barros, Lívia Moreira; Frota, Natasha Marques; Moreira, Rosa Aparecida Nogueira; de Araújo, Thiago Moura; Caetano, Joselany Áfio

    2015-03-01

    The objective was to evaluate the results of bariatric surgery in patients in the late postoperative period using the Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS). This cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2011 to June 2012 at a hospital in the state of Ceará, Brazil. Data were collected from 92 patients using the BAROS protocol, which analyzes weight loss, improved comorbidities, complications, reoperations and Quality of Life (QoL). Data were analysed using the chi-squared test, Fischer's exact test and the Mann-Whitney test. There was a reduction in the Body Mass Index (47.2±6.8 kg/m2 in the pre-operatory and 31.3±5.0 kg/m2 after surgery, p<0.001). The comorbidity with the highest resolution was arterial hypertension (p<0.001), and QV improved in 94.6% of patients. The main complications were hair loss, incisional hernia and cholelithiasis. The surgery provided satisfactory weight loss and improvements in the comorbidities associated to a better QL. Use of the BAROS protocol allows nurses to plan interventions and maintain the good results. PMID:26098798

  5. A role for exercise after bariatric surgery?

    PubMed

    Coen, Paul M; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2016-01-01

    Obesity predisposes an individual to develop numerous comorbidities, including type 2 diabetes, and represents a major healthcare issue in many countries worldwide. Bariatric surgery can be an effective treatment option, resulting in profound weight loss and improvements in metabolic health; however, not all patients achieve similar weight loss or metabolic improvements. Exercise is an excellent way to improve health, with well-characterized physiological and psychological benefits. In the present paper we review the evidence to determine whether there may be a role for exercise as a complementary adjunct therapy to bariatric surgery. Objectively measured physical activity data indicate that most patients who undergo bariatric surgery do not exercise enough to reap the health benefits of exercise. While there is a dearth of data on the effects of exercise on weight loss and weight loss maintenance after surgery, evidence from studies of caloric restriction and exercise suggest that similar adjunctive benefits may be extended to patients who perform exercise after bariatric surgery. Recent evidence from exercise interventions after bariatric surgery suggests that exercise may provide further improvements in metabolic health compared with surgery-induced weight loss alone. Additional randomized controlled exercise trials are now needed as the next step to more clearly define the potential for exercise to provide additional health benefits after bariatric surgery. This valuable evidence will inform clinical practice regarding much-needed guidelines for exercise after bariatric surgery. PMID:26228356

  6. Psychosocial Interventions Pre and Post Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kalarchian, Melissa A; Marcus, Marsha D

    2015-11-01

    Despite positive results overall, a substantial number of patients experience poor long-term outcomes following bariatric surgery. One reason for variability in weight loss may be difficulty in making and sustaining changes in dietary intake and physical activity; post-surgery binge eating has also been associated with poorer weight outcomes. In this paper, we review available evidence on adjunctive psychosocial interventions for bariatric surgery patients. Although the literature is limited, evidence suggests that bariatric surgery patients may benefit from a comprehensive approach targeting diet, activity and psychological factors. We think the optimal time to initiate adjunctive intervention is after surgery, but before significant weight regain has occurred. Adaptive interventions incorporating advances in technology may prove to be effective for promoting behavioural self-management and psychosocial adjustment following bariatric surgery. For some patients, pharmacotherapy and reoperation may also play a role in a personalized approach to post-surgery care. PMID:26364715

  7. [Bariatric surgery--indication and contraindication].

    PubMed

    Kasama, Kazunori; Seki, Yosuke

    2013-02-01

    The field of obesity surgery (bariatric surgery) expands as a consequence of the rapid increase of overweight and obesity not only in the western countries but also in Asia. Japan is still far behind the western progression but the problem of obesity is rising in our country so that necessity for bariatric surgery will also rise in Japan. A few statements of indication of bariatric surgery for Asian are published recently. According to the statements from IFSO-APC (International Federation of Surgery for Obesity and Metabolic Disorders, Asian Pacific Chapter) consensus 2011, bariatric surgery for Asian should be considered for the patient with BMI over 35 without co-morbidity and for the patient with BMI over 30 with co-morbidities. PMID:23631217

  8. Effects of bariatric surgery on bone.

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Brigitte

    2016-05-01

    Bariatric surgery currently relies on combinations of restrictive and malabsorptive procedures. Early decreases in bone mineral density (BMD) have been reported. However, the accuracy of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry used to measure BMD can be diminished by the major weight loss, whereas quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measurements are less affected. The nutritional deficiencies induced by mixed bariatric surgery procedures, together with changes in hormones produced by adipocytes and/or the gastrointestinal tract, are often associated with elevations in serum levels of bone resorption markers. Although the data are limited, the incidence of fractures does not seem higher after bariatric surgery than in non-operated obese patients. PMID:26992952

  9. Bariatric surgery: the indications in metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Neff, K J; le Roux, C W

    2014-01-01

    As well as the pronounced effect on body mass index (BMI), bariatric surgery is increasingly recognized as being associated with improvements in morbidity and mortality in a range of conditions, from airways disease to cancer. In metabolic disease, the impact of bariatric surgery is particularly obvious with marked improvements in glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, to the point of effecting diabetes remission in some. Hypertension and dyslipidemia, key components of the metabolic syndrome, also respond to bariatric surgery. Despite the increasing evidence of benefit in metabolic disease, the major national guidelines for selecting candidates for bariatric surgery retain their emphasis on body weight. In these guidelines, a BMI ≥35 kg/m(2) is needed to indicate surgery, even in those with profound metabolic disturbance. The recent International Diabetes Federation guidelines have identified the need to reorientate our focus from BMI to metabolic disease. In this review, we examine the developing indications for the use of bariatric surgery in metabolic disease. We will focus on type 2 diabetes mellitus and the metabolic syndrome. Within this, we will outline the data for using bariatric surgery as metabolic surgery, including those with a BMI <35 kg/m(2). PMID:23838610

  10. Nephrolithiasis after bariatric surgery for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lieske, John C.; Kumar, Rajiv; Collazo-Clavell, Maria L.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical intervention has become an accepted therapeutic alternative for the patient with medically complicated obesity. Multiple investigators have reported significant and sustained weight loss after bariatric surgery that is associated with improvement of many weight related medical co-morbidities, and statistically-significant decreased overall mortality for surgically-treated as compared to medically-treated subjects. Although the Roux-en-Y Gastric bypass (RYGB) is considered an acceptably safe treatment, an increasing number of patients are being recognized with nephrolithiasis after this, the most common bariatric surgery currently performed. The main risk factor appears to be hyperoxaluria, although low urine volume and citrate concentrations may contribute. The incidence of these urinary risk factors amongst the total post-RYGB population is unknown, but may be more than previously suspected based upon small pilot studies. The etiology of the hyperoxaluria is unknown, but may be related to subtle and seemingly sub clinical fat malabsorption. Clearly, further study is needed, especially to define better treatment options than the standard advice for a low fat, low oxalate diet, and use of calcium as an oxalate binder. PMID:18359397

  11. Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence and Associations in a Bariatric Surgery Cohort from the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Selzer, Faith; Smith, Mark D.; Berk, Paul D.; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Inabnet, William B.; King, Wendy C.; Pender, John; Pomp, Alfons; Raum, William J.; Schrope, Beth; Steffen, Kristine J.; Wolfe, Bruce M.; Patterson, Emma J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Metabolic syndrome is associated with higher risk for cardiovascular disease, sleep apnea, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, all common conditions in patients referred for bariatric surgery, and it may predict early postoperative complications. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, defined using updated National Cholesterol Education Program criteria, in adults undergoing bariatric surgery and compare the prevalence of baseline co-morbid conditions and select operative and 30-day postoperative outcomes by metabolic syndrome status. Methods: Complete metabolic syndrome data were available for 2275 of 2458 participants enrolled in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 (LABS-2), an observational cohort study designed to evaluate long-term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in obese adults. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 79.9%. Compared to those without metabolic syndrome, those with metabolic syndrome were significantly more likely to be men, to have a higher prevalence of diabetes and prior cardiac events, to have enlarged livers and higher median levels of liver enzymes, a history of sleep apnea, and a longer length of stay after surgery following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and gastric sleeves but not open RYGB or laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. Metabolic syndrome status was not significantly related to duration of surgery or rates of composite end points of intraoperative events and 30-day major adverse surgical outcomes. Conclusions: Nearly four in five participants undergoing bariatric surgery presented with metabolic syndrome. Establishing a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in bariatric surgery patients may identify a high-risk patient profile, but does not in itself confer a higher risk for short-term adverse postsurgery outcomes. PMID:24380645

  12. Role of endoscopy in the bariatric surgery of patients.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Forestieri, Pietro

    2014-06-28

    Obesity is an increasingly serious health problem in nearly all Western countries. It represents an important risk factor for several gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, hiatal hernia, Barrett's esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, Helicobacter pylori infection, colorectal polyps and cancer, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Surgery is the most effective treatment to date, resulting in sustainable and significant weight loss, along with the resolution of metabolic comorbidities in up to 80% of cases. Many of these conditions can be clinically relevant and have a significant impact on patients undergoing bariatric surgery. There is evidence that the chosen procedure might be changed if specific pathological upper gastrointestinal findings, such as large hiatal hernia or Barrett's esophagus, are detected preoperatively. The value of a routine endoscopy before bariatric surgery in asymptomatic patients (screening esophagogastroduodenoscopy) remains controversial. The common indications for endoscopy in the postoperative bariatric patient include the evaluation of symptoms, the management of complications, and the evaluation of weight loss failure. It is of critical importance for the endoscopist to be familiar with the postoperative anatomy and to work in close collaboration with bariatric surgery colleagues in order to maximize the outcome and safety of endoscopy in this setting. The purpose of this article is to review the role of the endoscopist in a multidisciplinary obesity center as it pertains to the preoperative and postoperative management of bariatric surgery patients. PMID:24976715

  13. New-Onset Mania Following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Mukul; Agustin, Erie T.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has become a major public health problem over the past two decades. Non-surgical management of obesity does not often achieve its long term goals. Surgical treatment is roaring in popularity because of dramatic and durable results. However, outcomes from bariatric surgery have become a significant area of scrutiny because it is also associated with several medical and psychological complications. Out of those complications, there are descriptions of neuropsychiatric disorders and psycho-behavioral symptoms after surgery. Meanwhile, few reports of acute psychosis are described but to our knowledge, our case is the first case report of primary mania following bariatric surgery. We present an unusual and challenging case of primary mania in a 57 year old female who underwent bariatric surgery two months ago. Patient responded well initially to antipsychotic followed by mood stabilizer. PMID:25670960

  14. Bariatric surgery: assessing opportunities for value innovation.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, David P; Smith, Darlene B

    2005-03-01

    Obesity has been increasing over the past two decades, and the amount of medical and media attention given to bariatric surgery as a promising option for morbidly obese individuals is growing. The growth of bariatric surgery also has been attributed to improved surgical technique, the increase in surgeons trained in laparoscopic procedures, as well increased public awareness with celebrities having successfully undergone surgery. The number of surgeons and hospitals offering bariatric services is increasing. How then does a surgeon or a hospital develop a competitive strategy? The first step is to understand the health-care industry. The key forces are rivalry among present competitors, and the bargaining power of suppliers and buyers. While bariatric surgery currently is in a growth phase, time and competition will force practitioners to compete on the basis of price, unless they find true competitive advantage. Value innovation, is a means of creating new marketing space by looking across the conventionally defined boundaries of business--across substitute industries, across strategic groups, across buyer groups, across complementary product and service offerings, and across the functional-emotional orientation of an industry. One can compete by offering similar services focusing primarily on cost efficiencies as the key to profitability. Alternatively, one can break free from the pack by innovating and focusing on delivering superior value to the customer. As the market for bariatric surgery becomes increasingly overcrowded, profitable growth is not sustainable without developing a clear differential advantage in the market. Value innovation allows you to develop that advantage. PMID:15846452

  15. Assessing Sexual Abuse/Attack Histories with Bariatric Surgery Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahony, David

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed sexual abuse/attack histories in 537 bariatric surgery patients using the PsyBari. The prevalence rates found were lower (15.5%, 19.3% of women, 5.2% of men) than other studies that used bariatric surgery patients but consistent with studies that used nonbariatric obese subjects. Furthermore, bariatric surgery patients who…

  16. Bariatric surgery, safety and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Spanakis, Elias; Gragnoli, Claudia

    2009-03-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) represent major health concerns in the USA. Weight loss is the most important aspect in T2D management, as it reduces both morbidity and mortality. Available lifestyle, behavioral, and pharmacological strategies provide just mild to moderate weight loss. The greatest degree of T2D prevention or T2D amelioration in obese subjects has been reported in subjects who underwent bariatric surgery. In the current review, we will describe various types of bariatric surgery, related safety profiles, and their effect on T2D, as well as the potential mechanisms involved in the remission of T2D. Finally, we hereby examine whether bariatric surgery may be considered a treatment for T2D in pregnant women, children, adolescents and subjects at least 65 years old. PMID:18830788

  17. Parkinsonism as a Complication of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Walaa A.; Hashel, Jasem Y. Al; Kilany, Ayman; Altailji, Samira

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between Parkinsonism and BS has already been reported in only three patients worldwide. CASE SUMMARY: We report a 39-years old Kuwaiti female who presented with parkinsonian features and mononeuropathy (carpal tunnel syndrome) 3 years after a vertical sleeve gastrectomy operation. CONCLUSION: We conclude that with the increasing popularity of bariatric surgery, clinicians will need to recognize and manage neurologic complications that may appear soon after or years to decades later. Thorough evaluation is essential for any patient who has undergone bariatric surgery and develops neurologic symptoms.

  18. Bariatric Surgery: Overview of Procedures and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John Magaña

    2016-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most efficient and long-lasting weight loss therapy available. Its safety has improved over tenfold over the last decade. With the advent of laparoscopy, mortality rates of are now under 1 per 1400 cases in accredited centers. Gastric bypass reduces diabetes-related mortality by 92% over 7 years and long lasting remission has been demonstrated in observational studies covering >10,000 patients and multiple randomized control trials. The benefit of bariatric surgery on diabetes is so substantial that these procedures should be considered in all type 2 diabetic patients with a BMI > 35 kg/m(2). PMID:27519136

  19. Pregnancy Following Bariatric Surgery-Medical Complications and Management.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Ram Prakash; Syed, Akheel A

    2016-10-01

    Bariatric surgery is most commonly carried out in women of childbearing age. Whilst fertility rates are improved, pregnancy following bariatric surgery poses several challenges. Whilst rates of many adverse maternal and foetal outcomes in obese women are reduced after bariatric surgery, pregnancy is best avoided for 12-24 months to reduce the potential risk of intrauterine growth retardation. Dumping syndromes are common after bariatric surgery and can present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in pregnancy. Early dumping occurs due to osmotic fluid shifts resulting from rapid gastrointestinal food transit, whilst late dumping is characterized by a hyperinsulinemic response to rapid absorption of simple carbohydrates. Dietary measures are the mainstay of management of dumping syndromes but pharmacotherapy may sometimes become necessary. Acarbose is the least hazardous pharmacological option for the management of postprandial hypoglycemia in pregnancy. Nutrient deficiencies may vary depending on the type of surgery; it is important to optimize the nutritional status of women prior to and during pregnancy. Dietary management should include adequate protein and calorie intake and supplementation of vitamins and micronutrients. A high clinical index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis of surgical complications of prior weight loss procedures during pregnancy, including small bowel obstruction, internal hernias, gastric band erosion or migration and cholelithiasis. PMID:27488114

  20. Bariatric surgery for obesity and metabolic conditions in adults.

    PubMed

    Arterburn, David E; Courcoulas, Anita P

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes recent evidence related to the safety, efficacy, and metabolic outcomes of bariatric surgery to guide clinical decision making. Several short term randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of bariatric procedures for inducing weight loss and initial remission of type 2 diabetes. Observational studies have linked bariatric procedures with long term improvements in body weight, type 2 diabetes, survival, cardiovascular events, incident cancer, and quality of life. Perioperative mortality for the average patient is low but varies greatly across subgroups. The incidence of major complications after surgery also varies widely, and emerging data show that some procedures are associated with a greater risk of substance misuse disorders, suicide, and nutritional deficiencies. More research is needed to enable long term outcomes to be compared across various procedures and subpopulations, and to identify those most likely to benefit from surgical intervention. Given uncertainties about the balance between the risks and benefits of bariatric surgery in the long term, the decision to undergo surgery should be based on a high quality shared decision making process. PMID:25164369

  1. Bariatric surgery for obesity and metabolic conditions in adults

    PubMed Central

    Courcoulas, Anita P

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes recent evidence related to the safety, efficacy, and metabolic outcomes of bariatric surgery to guide clinical decision making. Several short term randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of bariatric procedures for inducing weight loss and initial remission of type 2 diabetes. Observational studies have linked bariatric procedures with long term improvements in body weight, type 2 diabetes, survival, cardiovascular events, incident cancer, and quality of life. Perioperative mortality for the average patient is low but varies greatly across subgroups. The incidence of major complications after surgery also varies widely, and emerging data show that some procedures are associated with a greater risk of substance misuse disorders, suicide, and nutritional deficiencies. More research is needed to enable long term outcomes to be compared across various procedures and subpopulations, and to identify those most likely to benefit from surgical intervention. Given uncertainties about the balance between the risks and benefits of bariatric surgery in the long term, the decision to undergo surgery should be based on a high quality shared decision making process. PMID:25164369

  2. Treatment of Obesity: Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Bruce M; Kvach, Elizaveta; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-05-27

    This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying, and indications for, bariatric surgery in the reduction of cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as other expected benefits of this intervention. The fundamental basis for bariatric surgery for the purpose of accomplishing weight loss is the determination that severe obesity is a disease associated with multiple adverse effects on health, which can be reversed or improved by successful weight loss in patients who have been unable to sustain weight loss by nonsurgical means. An explanation of possible indications for weight loss surgery as well as specific bariatric surgical procedures is presented, along with review of the safety literature of such procedures. Procedures that are less invasive or those that involve less gastrointestinal rearrangement accomplish considerably less weight loss but have substantially lower perioperative and longer-term risk. The ultimate benefit of weight reduction relates to the reduction of the comorbidities, quality of life, and all-cause mortality. With weight loss being the underlying justification for bariatric surgery in ameliorating CVD risk, current evidence-based research is discussed concerning body fat distribution, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, inflammation, obstructive sleep apnea, and others. The rationale for bariatric surgery reducing CVD events is discussed and juxtaposed with impacts on all-cause mortalities. Given the improvement of established obesity-related CVD risk factors after weight loss, it is reasonable to expect a reduction of CVD events and related mortality after weight loss in populations with obesity. The quality of the current evidence is reviewed, and future research opportunities and summaries are stated. PMID:27230645

  3. Nutrition and Pregnancy after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kaska, Lukasz; Kobiela, Jarek; Abacjew-Chmylko, Anna; Chmylko, Lukasz; Wojanowska-Pindel, Magdalena; Kobiela, Paulina; Walerzak, Anna; Makarewicz, Wojciech; Proczko-Markuszewska, Monika; Stefaniak, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an escalating problem in all age groups and it is observed to be more common in females than males. About 25% of women meet the criteria of obesity and one-third of them are in the reproductive age. Because morbid obesity requiring surgical treatment is observed with increasing frequency, surgeons and gynecologists are undergoing new challenges. It is not only a matter of women's health and their quality of life but also proper development of the fetus, which should be a concern during bariatric treatment. Therefore complex perinatal care has to be provided for morbid obesity patients. The paper reviews pregnancy and fertility issues in bariatric surgery patients. PMID:24555146

  4. Bariatric surgery and implications for stoma care.

    PubMed

    Swash, Carolyn

    In the UK, 62% of the population are now described as being either overweight or obese. People with weight-management issues are more likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as having an increased risk of cancer, including bowel cancer. Following the initial National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance in 2006, revised in 2014, health professionals have a more proactive role in identifying people with weight-management issues and supporting them to achieve a weight that helps reduce their health risks. This includes referrals to bariatric surgeons for consideration for surgery if appropriate. One particular surgical procedure, the Roux-en-Y, is not reversible and alters the capacity of the stomach and function of the small bowel in order to achieve weight loss. Using a case study, this article will highlight the role of the stoma nurse in managing a patient, who previously had a Roux-en-Y procedure for weight loss and subsequently needed formation of a loop ileostomy after surgery for bowel cancer. PMID:26973009

  5. The Intestinal Microbiome in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Peat, Christine M.; Kleiman, Susan C.; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Carroll, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    With nearly 39% of the worldwide adult population classified as obese, much of the globe is facing a serious public health challenge. Increasing rates of obesity, coupled with the failure of many behavioral and pharmacological interventions, have contributed to a rise in popularity of bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity. Surgery-mediated weight loss was initially thought to be a direct result of mechanical alterations causing restriction and calorie malabsorption. However, the mounting evidence suggests that indirect factors influence the accumulation and storage of fat in patients that have undergone this procedure. Given the established impact the intestinal microbiota has on adiposity, it is likely that this complex enteric microbial community contributes to surgery-mediated weight loss and maintenance of weight loss post-surgery. In this review, we discuss the physiological and psychological traits exhibited by bariatric surgery candidates that can be influenced by the intestinal microbiota. Additionally, we detail the studies that investigated the impact of bariatric surgery on the intestinal microbiota in humans and mouse models of this procedure. PMID:26426680

  6. The Intestinal Microbiome in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Peat, Christine M; Kleiman, Susan C; Bulik, Cynthia M; Carroll, Ian M

    2015-11-01

    With nearly 39% of the worldwide adult population classified as obese, much of the globe is facing a serious public health challenge. Increasing rates of obesity, coupled with the failure of many behavioural and pharmacological interventions, have contributed to a rise in popularity of bariatric surgery as a treatment for obesity. Surgery-mediated weight loss was initially thought to be a direct result of mechanical alterations causing restriction and calorie malabsorption. However, the mounting evidence suggests that indirect factors influence the accumulation and storage of fat in patients that have undergone this procedure. Given the established impact the intestinal microbiota has on adiposity, it is likely that this complex enteric microbial community contributes to surgery-mediated weight loss and maintenance of weight loss postsurgery. In this review, we discuss the physiological and psychological traits exhibited by bariatric surgery candidates that can be influenced by the intestinal microbiota. Additionally, we detail the studies that investigated the impact of bariatric surgery on the intestinal microbiota in humans and mouse models of this procedure. PMID:26426680

  7. Does bariatric surgery improve adipose tissue function?

    PubMed

    Frikke-Schmidt, H; O'Rourke, R W; Lumeng, C N; Sandoval, D A; Seeley, R J

    2016-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for obesity. Not only do these types of surgeries produce significant weight loss but also they improve insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolic function. The aim of this review is to explore how altered physiology of adipose tissue may contribute to the potent metabolic effects of some of these procedures. This includes specific effects on various fat depots, the function of individual adipocytes and the interaction between adipose tissue and other key metabolic tissues. Besides a dramatic loss of fat mass, bariatric surgery shifts the distribution of fat from visceral to the subcutaneous compartment favoring metabolic improvement. The sensitivity towards lipolysis controlled by insulin and catecholamines is improved, adipokine secretion is altered and local adipose inflammation as well as systemic inflammatory markers decreases. Some of these changes have been shown to be weight loss independent, and novel hypothesis for these effects includes include changes in bile acid metabolism, gut microbiota and central regulation of metabolism. In conclusion bariatric surgery is capable of improving aspects of adipose tissue function and do so in some cases in ways that are not entirely explained by the potent effect of surgery. © 2016 World Obesity. PMID:27272117

  8. Panniculectomy Combined with Bariatric Surgery by Laparotomy: An Analysis of 325 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Colabianchi, Vincenzo; de Bernardinis, Giancarlo; Giovannini, Matteo; Langella, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Surgical treatment of obese patients is much debated in the literature because of the significant intraoperative risks related to comorbidities presented by this type of patients. Recent literature suggests that panniculectomy should follow bariatric surgery after the patient's weight loss has been stabilized. However, when performed by laparotomy, bariatric surgery can be combined with panniculectomy. This paper presents the analysis of 325 cases of patients undergoing abdominal panniculectomy combined with bariatric surgery. The study highlights the risks, complications, and benefits of the combined procedure and describes a standardized technique for excision of a large abdominal panniculus in a short operating time. PMID:26682282

  9. [Clinical Practice after Bariatric Surgery: Problems and Complications].

    PubMed

    Gebhart, Martina

    2015-12-01

    The number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery because of morbid obesity is increasing rapidly. Therefore, it is an important issue to be aware of outcome and complications after bariatric surgery. This mini-review presents a compilation of important gastrointestinal symptoms, as pain, diarrhea and dumping, and includes treatment options. It characterizes possible micronutrient deficiencies, gives instructions concerning the adaptation of drugs and illustrates possible adverse outcomes, such as excessive weight loss, insufficient weight loss and weight gain after bariatric surgery. PMID:26649955

  10. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2-part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on data published through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2-part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on cardiovascular disease; and finally (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the executive summary of part 1. PMID:26892119

  11. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: FULL REPORT.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2 part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents the contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on published data through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2 part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the full report of part 1. PMID:26892120

  12. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Metabolic effects of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Corcelles, Ricard; Daigle, Christopher R; Schauer, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, osteoarthritis, numerous cancers and increased mortality. It is estimated that at least 2.8 million adults die each year due to obesity-related cardiovascular disease. Increasing in parallel with the global obesity problem is metabolic syndrome, which has also reached epidemic levels. Numerous studies have demonstrated that bariatric surgery is associated with significant and durable weight loss with associated improvement of obesity-related comorbidities. This review aims to summarize the effects of bariatric surgery on the components of metabolic syndrome (hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and hypertension), weight loss, perioperative morbidity and mortality, and the long-term impact on cardiovascular risk and mortality. PMID:26340972

  13. Recent advances in metabolic and bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Vance L.; Flynn, C. Robb; Tamboli, Robyn A.; Abumrad, Naji N.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and its associated medical conditions continue to increase and add significant burden to patients, as well as health-care systems, worldwide. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity and its comorbidities, and resolution of diabetes is weight loss-independent in the case of some operations. Although these weight-independent effects are frequently described clinically, the mechanisms behind them are not well understood and remain an intense area of focus in the growing field of metabolic and bariatric surgery. Perceptions of the mechanisms responsible for the beneficial metabolic effects of metabolic/bariatric operations have shifted from being mostly restrictive and malabsorption over the last 10 to 15 years to being more neuro-hormonal in origin. In this review, we describe recent basic and clinical findings of the major clinical procedures (adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and biliopancreatic diversion) as well as other experimental procedures (ileal interposition and bile diversion) that recapitulate many of the metabolic effects of these complex operations in a simpler fashion. As the role of bile acids and the gut microbiome on metabolism is becoming increasingly well described, their potential roles in these improvements following metabolic surgery are becoming better appreciated. Bile acid and gut microbiome changes, in light of recent developments, are discussed in the context of these surgical procedures, as well as their implications for future study. PMID:27239296

  14. Recent advances in metabolic and bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Albaugh, Vance L; Flynn, C Robb; Tamboli, Robyn A; Abumrad, Naji N

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and its associated medical conditions continue to increase and add significant burden to patients, as well as health-care systems, worldwide. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity and its comorbidities, and resolution of diabetes is weight loss-independent in the case of some operations. Although these weight-independent effects are frequently described clinically, the mechanisms behind them are not well understood and remain an intense area of focus in the growing field of metabolic and bariatric surgery. Perceptions of the mechanisms responsible for the beneficial metabolic effects of metabolic/bariatric operations have shifted from being mostly restrictive and malabsorption over the last 10 to 15 years to being more neuro-hormonal in origin. In this review, we describe recent basic and clinical findings of the major clinical procedures (adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and biliopancreatic diversion) as well as other experimental procedures (ileal interposition and bile diversion) that recapitulate many of the metabolic effects of these complex operations in a simpler fashion. As the role of bile acids and the gut microbiome on metabolism is becoming increasingly well described, their potential roles in these improvements following metabolic surgery are becoming better appreciated. Bile acid and gut microbiome changes, in light of recent developments, are discussed in the context of these surgical procedures, as well as their implications for future study. PMID:27239296

  15. The effect of bariatric surgery on echocardiographic indices: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Grapsa, Julia; Tan, Timothy C; Paschou, Stavroula A; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas S; Shimony, Avi; Kaier, Thomas; Demir, Ozan M; Mikhail, Sameh; Hakky, Sherif; Purkayastha, Sanjay; Ahmed, Ahmed R; Cousins, Jonathan; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2013-11-01

    Obesity is the new epidemic and is associated with an increased risk of diastolic and systolic heart failure. Effective treatment options with drastic results such as bariatric surgery have raised interest in the possible reversal of some of the cardiovascular sequelae. Many studies have assessed individually the effect of weight loss on specific echocardiographic indices, mostly employing nonhomogeneous groups. The purpose of this narrative review is to summarise the effect of bariatric surgery on echocardiographic indices of biventricular function and to help in the understanding of the expected echocardiographic changes in bariatric patients after weight-loss surgery. PMID:24117129

  16. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Facial Features

    PubMed Central

    Papoian, Vardan; Mardirossian, Vartan; Hess, Donald Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgeries performed in the USA has increased twelve-fold in the past two decades. The effects of rapid weight loss on facial features has not been previously studied. We hypothesized that bariatric surgery will mimic the effects of aging thus giving the patient an older and less attractive appearance. Methods Consecutive patients were enrolled from the bariatric surgical clinic at our institution. Pre and post weight loss photographs were taken and used to generate two surveys. The surveys were distributed through social media to assess the difference between the preoperative and postoperative facial photos, in terms of patients' perceived age and overall attractiveness. 102 respondents completed the first survey and 95 respondents completed the second survey. Results Of the 14 patients, five showed statistically significant change in perceived age (three more likely to be perceived older and two less likely to be perceived older). The patients were assessed to be more attractive postoperatively, which showed statistical significance. Conclusions Weight loss does affect facial aesthetics. Mild weight loss is perceived by survey respondents to give the appearance of a younger but less attractive patient, while substantial weight loss is perceived to give the appearance of an older but more attractive patient. PMID:26430627

  17. Bile Acids, FXR, and Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Olivier F.; Still, Christopher D.; Argyropoulos, George; Edwards, Michael; Gerhard, Glenn S.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity represent major risk factors for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Obesity is associated with a chronic and progressive inflammatory response leading to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus, although the precise mechanism mediating this inflammatory process remains poorly understood. The most effective intervention for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery, leads to glucose normalization and remission of T2D. Recent work in both clinical studies and animal models supports bile acids (BAs) as key mediators of these effects. BAs are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis primarily via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) transcription factor. BAs are also involved in regulating genes involved in inflammation, obesity, and lipid metabolism. Here, we review the novel role of BAs in bariatric surgery and the intersection between BAs and immune, obesity, weight loss, and lipid metabolism genes. PMID:27006824

  18. Management and Prevention of Surgical and Nutritional Complications After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Marcotte, Eric; Chand, Bipan

    2016-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is well-recognized for its effects on health, beyond weight-loss. It underwent a revolution recently with the growing performance of laparoscopic procedures, leading to enhanced recovery and a reduction in procedural risk. However, surgical complications, although rare, do develop. It is important to recognize the complications, and ideally prevent them from happening. This article reviews the risks of the four most commonly performed bariatric procedures, with an emphasis on technique and management in the intraoperative and postoperative period. The nutritional aspect of bariatric surgery is of the utmost importance, because catastrophic consequences have been linked to malnutrition and vitamin deficiencies. PMID:27473805

  19. Development of a Pilot Telehealth Bariatric Surgery Support Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Carin K.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States continues to grow. Bariatric surgery is becoming more common and accepted in the treatment of obesity. Clinical candidates for bariatric surgery should have a BMI > 40 kg/m[superscript 2] alone, or a BMI > 35 kg/m[superscript 2] plus one comorbidity. A trend is emerging in the literature showing…

  20. Bariatric Surgery as Potential Treatment for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Future Treatment by Choice or by Chance?

    PubMed Central

    Hafeez, Shuja; Ahmed, Mohamed H.

    2013-01-01

    Morbid obesity is strongly associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which is one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. The current best treatment of NAFLD and NASH is weight reduction through life style modifications, antiobesity medication, and bariatric surgery. Importantly, bariatric surgery is the best alternative option for weight reduction if lifestyle modifications and pharmacological therapy have not yielded long-term success. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment option for individuals who are grossly obese and associated with marked decrease in obesity-related morbidity and mortality. The most common performed bariatric surgery is Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). The current evidence suggests that bariatric surgery in these patients will decrease the grade of steatosis, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis. NAFLD per se is not an indication for bariatric surgery. Further research is urgently needed to determine (i) the benefit of bariatric surgery in NAFLD patients at high risk of developing liver cirrhosis (ii) the role of bariatric surgery in modulation of complications of NAFLD like diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The outcomes of the future research will determine whether bariatric surgery will be one of the recommended choice for treatment of the most progressive type of NAFLD. PMID:23431426

  1. Walking Capacity of Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    PubMed Central

    King, WC; Engel, SG; Elder, KA; Chapman, WH; Eid, GM; Wolfe, BM; Belle, SH

    2011-01-01

    Background This study characterizes the walking limitations of bariatric surgery candidates by age and body mass index (BMI) and determines factors independently associated with walking capacity. Setting Multi-institutional at research university hospitals in the United States. Methods 2458 participants of the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery study (age: 18-78 y, BMI: 33-94 kg/m2) attended a pre-operative research visit. Walking capacity was measured via self-report and the 400 meter Long Distance Corridor Walk (LDCW). Results Almost two-thirds (64%) of subjects reported limitations walking several blocks, 48% had an objectively-defined mobility deficit, and 16% reported at least some walking aid use. In multivariable analysis, BMI, older age, lower income and greater bodily pain were independently associated (p<.05) with walking aid use, physical discomfort during the LDCW, inability to complete the LDCW, and slower time to complete the LDCW. Female sex, Hispanic ethnicity (but not race), higher resting heart rate, history of smoking, several comoribidities (history of stroke, ischemic heart disease, diabetes, asthma, sleep apnea, venous edema with ulcerations), and depressive symptoms were also independently related (p<.05) to at least one measure of reduced walking capacity. Conclusions Walking limitations are common in bariatric surgery candidates, even among the least severely obese and youngest patients. Physical activity counseling must be tailored to individuals' abilities. While several factors identified in this study (e.g., BMI, age, pain, comorbidities) should be considered, directly assessing walking capacity will facilitate appropriate goal-setting. PMID:21937285

  2. Bariatric surgery is associated with improvement in kidney outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex R; Chen, Yuan; Still, Christopher; Wood, G Craig; Kirchner, H Lester; Lewis, Meredith; Kramer, Holly; Hartle, James E; Carey, David; Appel, Lawrence J; Grams, Morgan E

    2016-07-01

    Severe obesity is associated with increased risk of kidney disease. Whether bariatric surgery reduces the risk of adverse kidney outcomes is uncertain. To resolve this we compared the risk of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline of ≥30% and doubling of serum creatinine or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 985 patients who underwent bariatric surgery with 985 patients who did not undergo such surgery. Patients were matched on demographics, baseline body mass index, eGFR, comorbidities, and previous nutrition clinic use. Mean age was 45 years, 97% were white, 80% were female, and 33% had baseline eGFR <90 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Mean 1-year weight loss was 40.4 kg in the surgery group compared with 1.4 kg in the matched cohort. Over a median follow-up of 4.4 years, 85 surgery patients had an eGFR decline of ≥30% (22 had doubling of serum creatinine/ESRD). Over a median follow-up of 3.8 years, 177 patients in the matched cohort had an eGFR decline of ≥30% (50 had doubling of serum creatinine/ESRD). In adjusted analysis, bariatric surgery patients had a significant 58% lower risk for an eGFR decline of ≥30% (hazard ratio 0.42, 95% confidence interval 0.32-0.55) and 57% lower risk of doubling of serum creatinine or ESRD (hazard ratio 0.43, 95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.71) compared with the matched cohort. Results were generally consistent among subgroups of patients with and without eGFR <90 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), hypertension, and diabetes. Thus, bariatric surgery may be an option to prevent kidney function decline in severely obese individuals. PMID:27181999

  3. [Bariatric surgery and pregnancy: literature review].

    PubMed

    Ferrand Miranda, Pedro; Contreras Rivas, Tomas; Leigh Pacciarini, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has currently reached epidemic proportions, both in Chile and in the world. This condition is associated to a variety of maternal complications in all stages of the vital cycle and during pregnancy. Medical treatment has not proved successful thus resulting in an increase in bariatric surgery in recent years, even when it is not first line treatment. This literature review aims to report updated results of surgical treatment for obesity before and during pregnancy with respect to fertility, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension. It also looks into the possible effects of surgery on fetal development, and its relation to premature delivery, fetal macrosomy, low birth weight and neural tube defects, as well as effects on maternal and fetal outcomes, mainly in nutrition. Lastly, we suggest some recommendations that arise from this review on the role of contraception, nutrition and time between surgery and pregnancy. PMID:25192021

  4. Review of nutritional guidelines for patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Cheri Rebecca; Luning, Alyssa

    2015-08-01

    Health care providers often supply patients who are undergoing bariatric surgery with varying and sometimes conflicting information regarding nutrition before and after surgery. Nurses and other care providers can benefit from applying current nutritional guidelines to increase patients' understanding, compliance, nutrition, hydration, protein needs, and satisfaction. This article summarizes basic recommendations to help health care providers understand the patients' nutritional requirements and diet recommendations from two weeks before bariatric surgery to four to six weeks after surgery. PMID:26227519

  5. Major Increase in Microbiota-Dependent Proatherogenic Metabolite TMAO One Year After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hov, Johannes R.; Nestvold, Torunn Kristin; Thoresen, Hanne; Berge, Rolf K.; Svardal, Asbjørn; Lappegård, Knut Tore

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) is formed in the liver from trimethylamine (TMA), a product exclusively generated by the gut microbiota from dietary phosphatidylcholine and carnitine. An alternative pathway of TMAO formation from carnitine is via the microbiota-dependent intermediate γ-butyrobetaine (γBB). Elevated TMAO levels are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but little is known about TMAO in obesity. Given the proposed contribution of microbiota alterations in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), we investigated the potential impact of obesity, lifestyle-induced weight loss, and bariatric surgery on plasma levels of TMAO, its microbiota-dependent intermediate γBB, and its diet-dependent precursors carnitine and choline. Methods: TMAO, γBB, carnitine, and choline were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in 34 obese individuals (17 with and 17 without T2D) undergoing bariatric surgery and 17 controls. Results: TMAO was not elevated in obese patients or reduced by lifestyle interventions but increased approximately twofold after bariatric surgery. Similar to TMAO, plasma levels of γBB were not influenced by lifestyle interventions but increased moderately after bariatric surgery. In contrast, carnitine and choline, which are abundant in nutrients, such as in red meat and eggs, and not microbiota dependent, were reduced after lifestyle interventions and rebounded after bariatric surgery. Conclusions: The major increase in TMAO after bariatric surgery was unexpected because high TMAO levels have been linked to CVD, whereas bariatric surgery is known to reduce CVD risk. Prospective studies of gut microbiota composition and related metabolites in relation to long-term cardiovascular risk after bariatric surgery are warranted. PMID:27081744

  6. Internet marketing of bariatric surgery: contemporary trends in the medicalization of obesity.

    PubMed

    Salant, Talya; Santry, Heena P

    2006-05-01

    In the context of political, economic, and scientific anxiety around the 'epidemic' rise in obesity in the US, the social and historical forces engendering the medicalization of obesity have been widely discussed. However, the recent growth of bariatric-weight loss-surgery and the expanding presence of advertising for bariatric surgery on the Internet suggest the possible emergence of new loci and languages of medicalization. We sought to identify the nature and extent to which web advertising of bariatric surgery contributes to the medicalization of obesity by examining the design and textual content of 100 bariatric surgery center websites. We found that websites, through strategic use of text and images, consistently describe obesity as a serious disease that requires professional ascertainment and supervision, entails substantial individual suffering, and is remedied through the transformative yet low risk effects of bariatric surgery. In the process, social normalcy and risk reduction come to replace physical criteria as the basis for determining health. Further, websites draw upon contradictory discourses of medicalization; that is, they insist upon 'external' (e.g. genetics, environment) causes of obesity to legitimize surgical intervention while implicating individual behaviors in surgical failure. From this, we suggest that the economic and professional motivations underlying website advertisements for bariatric surgery may result in confusing messages being sent to prospective patients as well as the perpetuation of gendered notions of obesity and the entrenchment of health disparities. PMID:16289735

  7. Ethical issues in the psychosocial assessment of bariatric surgery candidates.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Codie R; Rash, Joshua A; Mothersill, Kerry J

    2016-07-01

    Psychosocial evaluation is recommended prior to bariatric surgery. Practice guidelines have been published on assessment methods for bariatric surgery candidates, but they have not emphasized ethical issues with this population. This review outlines ethical and professional considerations for behavioral healthcare providers who conduct pre-surgical assessments of bariatric surgery candidates by merging ethical principles for mental health professionals with current practices in pre-surgical assessments. Issues discussed include the following: (a) establishing and maintaining competence, (b) obtaining informed consent, (c) respecting confidentiality, (d) avoiding bias and discrimination, (e) avoiding and addressing dual roles, (f) selecting and using psychological tests, and (g) acknowledging limitations of psychosocial assessments. PMID:25411197

  8. Malabsorption as a Therapeutic Approach in Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Billeter, Adrian T.; Fischer, Lars; Wekerle, Anna-Laura; Senft, Jonas; Müller-Stich, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The increasing prevalence of obese patients will lead to a more frequent use of bariatric procedures in the future. Compared to conservative medical therapy, bariatric procedures achieve greater weight loss and superior control of comorbidities, resulting in improved overall mortality. Methods A search for current literature regarding mechanisms, indications, and outcomes of bariatric surgery was performed. Results In order to care for patients after bariatric surgery properly, it is important to understand its mechanisms of action and effects on gastrointestinal physiology. Recent investigations indicate that the beneficial effects of bariatric procedures are much more complex than simply limiting food intake or an associated malabsorption. Changes in gastrointestinal hormone secretion, energy expenditure, intestinal bacterial colonization, bile acid metabolism, and epigenetic modifications resulting in altered gene expression are likely responsible for the majority of the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery. Malabsorptive bariatric procedures divert the flow of bile and pancreatic enzymes from food and therefore limit the digestion and absorption of nutrients, resulting in reduced calorie intake and subsequent weight loss. Essential micronutrients such as vitamins and trace elements are also absorbed to a lesser extent, potentially leading to severe side effects. Conclusion To prevent malnutrition, dietary supplementation and regular control of micronutrient levels are mandatory for patients undergoing malabsorptive bariatric procedures, in whom the fat-soluble vitamins A and D are commonly deficient. PMID:26288594

  9. Temperament and Personality in Bariatric Surgery-Resisting Temptations?

    PubMed

    Claes, Laurence; Müller, Astrid

    2015-11-01

    Temperament and personality traits can serve as both risk factors as well as protective factors in the development of morbid obesity. In the present review, we present an overview of studies focusing on the relationship between temperament/personality and morbid obesity in pre-operative and postoperative bariatric surgery patients. We consider studies that focus on both a categorical and dimensional point of view on temperament/personality, as well as studies based on cross-sectional and longitudinal designs. Finally, we will integrate the research findings, discuss the implications for assessment and treatment and formulate suggestions for future research. PMID:26290134

  10. Adolescent bariatric surgery--thoughts and perspectives from the UK.

    PubMed

    Penna, Marta; Markar, Sheraz; Hewes, James; Fiennes, Alberic; Jones, Niall; Hashemi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Opinions of healthcare professionals in the United Kingdom regarding bariatric surgery in adolescents are largely unknown. This study aims to explore the perspectives of medical professionals regarding adolescent bariatric surgery. Members of the British Obesity and Metabolic Surgery Society and groups of primary care practitioners based in London were contacted by electronic mail and invited to complete an anonymous online survey consisting of 21 questions. Ninety-four out of 324 questionnaires were completed. 66% of professionals felt that adolescents with a body mass index (BMI) >40 or BMI >35 with significant co-morbidities can be offered surgery. Amongst pre-requisites, parental psychological counseling was chosen most frequently. 58% stated 12 months as an appropriate period for weight management programs, with 24% regarding 6 months as sufficient. Most participants believed bariatric surgery should only be offered ≥ 16 years of age. However, 17% of bariatric surgeons marked no minimum age limit. Over 80% of the healthcare professionals surveyed consider bariatric surgery in adolescents to be acceptable practice. Most healthcare professionals surveyed feel that adolescent bariatric surgery is an acceptable therapeutic option for adolescent obesity. These views can guide towards a consensus opinion and further development of selection criteria and care pathways. PMID:24384777

  11. 30-day Mortality after Bariatric Surgery: Independently Adjudicated Causes of Death in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Mark D.; Patterson, Emma; Wahed, Abdus S.; Belle, Steven H.; Berk, Paul D.; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Dakin, Gregory F.; Flum, David R.; Machado, Laura; Mitchell, James E.; Pender, John; Pomp, Alfons; Pories, Walter; Ramanathan, Ramesh; Schrope, Beth; Staten, Myrlene; Ude, Akuezunkpa; Wolfe, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Mortality following bariatric surgery is a rare event in contemporary series, making it difficult for any single center to draw meaningful conclusions as to cause of death. Nevertheless, much of the published mortality data come from single center case series and reviews of administrative databases. These sources tend to produce lower mortality estimates than those obtained from controlled clinical trials. Furthermore, information about the causes of death and how they were determined is not always available. The aim of the present report is to describe in detail all deaths occurring within 30-days of surgery in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS). Methods LABS is a 10-center observational cohort study of bariatric surgical outcomes. Data were collected prospectively for bariatric surgeries performed between March 2005 and April 2009. All deaths occurring within 30-days of surgery were identified, and cause of death assigned by an independent Adjudication Subcommittee, blinded to operating surgeon and site. Results 6118 patients underwent primary bariatric surgery. 18 deaths (0.3%) occurred within 30-days of surgery. The most common cause of death was sepsis (33% of deaths), followed by cardiac causes (28%) and pulmonary embolism (17%). For one patient cause of death could not be determined despite examination of all available information. Conclusions This study confirms the low 30-day mortality rate following bariatric surgery. The recognized complications of anastomotic leak, cardiac events, and pulmonary emboli accounted for the majority of 30-day deaths. PMID:21866378

  12. Acute Abdominal Pain in the Bariatric Surgery Patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kyle D; Takenaka, Katrin Y; Luber, Samuel D

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is present in epidemic proportions in the United States, and bariatric surgery has become more common. Thus, emergency physicians will undoubtedly encounter many patients who have undergone one of these procedures. Knowledge of the anatomic changes specific to these procedures aids the clinician in understanding potential complications and devising an organized differential diagnosis. This article reviews common bariatric surgery procedures, their complications, and the approach to acute abdominal pain in these patients. PMID:27133251

  13. Imaging of patients treated with bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lemanowicz, Adam; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Summary Over the past few years, obesity has become a major clinical and population concern in the majority of developed countries. Obesity leads to significant systemic disorders, such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, and also increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke), metabolic diseases (type 2 diabetes), certain types of cancer, and degenerative bone disorders (osteoarthritis). Health hazards associated with epidemic of obesity and potential benefits of weight loss have spurred interest in new treatment methods. Bariatric surgical procedures constitute a recognized alternative in cases where conservative management of obesity fails. Several bariatric operations can be distinguished: restrictive procedures, such as adjustable gastric band (AGB) and vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG); predominantly malabsorptive procedures, such as biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), and a combination of both methods, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The adverse consequences of surgical treatment of obesity include i.a.: intestinal anastomotic leakage, impaired intestinal permeability and internal hernia, dilatation of the stomach, gastrointestinal anastomotic stenosis, marginal ulceration, incisional hernia. Basic knowledge of procedures in the surgical treatment of obesity is of vital importance for the radiologist during evaluation of upper gastrointestinal tract in the early and late postoperative period, allowing correct interpretation of acquired images as well as recognition of typical complications. PMID:24497896

  14. The Meaning of Awaiting Bariatric Surgery Due to Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Engström, My; Wiklund, Malin; Olsén, Monika Fagevik; Lönroth, Hans; Forsberg, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Background: The understanding of the association between the objective conditions of health and the subjective perceptions of morbidly obese patients appears to be poor. The use of objective indicators alone produces results totally unrelated to the feelings and experiences of the bariatric patients studied. No study has approached the bariatric patient from both an inside and a preoperative perspective. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the meaning of awaiting bariatric surgery due to morbid obesity. Method: Twenty-three patients admitted to a Swedish University Hospital for bariatric surgery were included. Data were collected by interviews and the analysis was performed using the phenomenological hermeneutics method developed by Lindseth and Norberg. Main Findings: Two structural thematic analyses revealed six main themes: experiencing food as a complex element in life, feeling hopeless regarding weight loss, living in fear of future sickness and death, living a restricted life, being ignored by health care professionals and hoping for control and opportunities. The informants experienced addiction to food and dependence on others for managing their daily life, which constituted an infringement of their freedom. Loss of control meant giving in to the desire for food, but also being subjected to stigmatizing remarks from persons in their environment or uncaring approaches from health care professionals. Conclusion: Being scheduled for bariatric surgery meant developing an awareness of how completely dependent they were on surgery for their survival and prospective health. The scheduled bariatric surgery constituted tangible confirmation that weight loss and restored health were possible. PMID:21660178

  15. Bariatric surgery and diabetes remission: Who would have thought it?

    PubMed

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu; Kota, Sunil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity are increasingly common and major global health problems. The Edmonton obesity staging system clearly pointed towards increased mortality proportionate to the severity of obesity. Obesity itself triggers insulin resistance and thereby poses the risk of T2DM. Both obesity and T2DM have been associated with higher morbidity and mortality and this calls for institution of effective therapies to deal with the rising trend of complications arising out of this dual menace. Although lifestyle changes form the cornerstone of therapy for both the ailments, sustained results from this modalities is far from satisfactory. While Look AHEAD (action for HEAalth in diabetes) study showed significant weight loss, reduction in glycated hemoglobin and higher remission rate of T2DM at 1(st) year following intensive lifestyle measures; recurrence and relapse rate bounced back in half of subjects at 4 years, thereby indicating that weight loss and glycemic control is difficult to maintain in the long term with lifestyle interventions. Same recurrence phenomenon was also observed with pharmacotherapy with rimonabant, sibutramine and orlistat. Bariatric surgery has been seen to associate with substantial and sustained weight loss in morbidly obese patients. Interestingly, bariatric surgeries also induce higher rates of short and long-term diabetes remission. Although the exact mechanism behinds this diabetes remission are not well understood; improved insulin action, beta-cell function and complex interplay of hormones in the entero-insular axis appears to play a major role. This article reviews the effectiveness of bariatric procedures on remission or improvement in diabetes and put a perspective on its implicated mechanisms. PMID:26425464

  16. Bariatric surgery and diabetes remission: Who would have thought it?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu; Kota, Sunil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity are increasingly common and major global health problems. The Edmonton obesity staging system clearly pointed towards increased mortality proportionate to the severity of obesity. Obesity itself triggers insulin resistance and thereby poses the risk of T2DM. Both obesity and T2DM have been associated with higher morbidity and mortality and this calls for institution of effective therapies to deal with the rising trend of complications arising out of this dual menace. Although lifestyle changes form the cornerstone of therapy for both the ailments, sustained results from this modalities is far from satisfactory. While Look AHEAD (action for HEAalth in diabetes) study showed significant weight loss, reduction in glycated hemoglobin and higher remission rate of T2DM at 1st year following intensive lifestyle measures; recurrence and relapse rate bounced back in half of subjects at 4 years, thereby indicating that weight loss and glycemic control is difficult to maintain in the long term with lifestyle interventions. Same recurrence phenomenon was also observed with pharmacotherapy with rimonabant, sibutramine and orlistat. Bariatric surgery has been seen to associate with substantial and sustained weight loss in morbidly obese patients. Interestingly, bariatric surgeries also induce higher rates of short and long-term diabetes remission. Although the exact mechanism behinds this diabetes remission are not well understood; improved insulin action, beta-cell function and complex interplay of hormones in the entero-insular axis appears to play a major role. This article reviews the effectiveness of bariatric procedures on remission or improvement in diabetes and put a perspective on its implicated mechanisms. PMID:26425464

  17. Emotional and Affective Temperaments in Smoking Candidates for Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mombach, Karin Daniele; de Souza Brito, Cesar Luis; Padoin, Alexandre Vontobel; Casagrande, Daniela Schaan; Mottin, Claudio Cora

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of smoking habits in severe obesity is higher than in the general population. There is some evidence that smokers have different temperaments compared to non-smokers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the associations between smoking status (smokers, ex-smokers and non-smokers) and temperament characteristics in bariatric surgery candidates. Methods We analyzed data on temperament of 420 bariatric surgery candidates, as assessed by the AFECTS scale, in an exploratory cross-sectional survey of bariatric surgery candidates who have been grouped into smokers, ex-smokers and non-smokers. Results We detected significant statistical differences in temperament related to the smoking status in this population after controlling the current use of psychiatric medication. Smokers had higher anxiety and lower control than non-smokers. Ex-smokers with BMI >50 kg/m2 presented higher coping and control characteristics than smokers. Conclusions Smoking in bariatric surgery candidates was associated with lower control and higher anxious temperament, when controlled by current use of psychiatric medication. Smokers with BMI >50 kg/m2 presented lower coping and control than ex-smokers. Assessment of temperament in bariatric surgery candidates may help in decisions about smoking cessation treatment and prevention of smoking relapse after surgery. PMID:26987115

  18. Review of contemporary role of robotics in bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Vivek; Bhatia, Parveen; Dudeja, Usha; Kalhan, Sudhir; Khetan, Mukund; John, Suviraj; Wadhera, Sushant

    2015-01-01

    With the rise in a number of bariatric procedures, surgeons are facing more complex and technically demanding surgical situations. Robotic digital platforms potentially provide a solution to better address these challenges. This review examines the published literature on the outcomes and complications of bariatric surgery using a robotic platform. Use of robotics to perform adjustable gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy, roux-en-y gastric bypass (RYGB), biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch and revisional bariatric procedures (RBP) is assessed. A search on PubMed was performed for the most relevant articles in robotic bariatric surgery. A total of 23 articles was selected and reviewed in this article. The review showed that the use of robotics led to similar or lower complication rate in bariatric surgery when compared with laparoscopy. Two studies found a significantly lower leak rate for robotic gastric bypass when compared to laparoscopic method. The learning curve for RYGB seems to be shorter for robotic technique. Three studies revealed a significantly shorter operative time, while four studies found a longer operative time for robotic technique of gastric bypass. As for the outcomes of RBP, one study found a lower complication rate in robotic arm versus laparoscopic and open arms. Most authors stated that the use of robotics provides superior visualisation, more degrees of freedom and better ergonomics. The application of robotics in bariatric surgery seems to be a safe and feasible option. Use of robotics may provide specific advantages in some situations, and overcome limitations of laparoscopic surgery. Large and well-designed randomised clinical trials with long follow-up are needed to further define the role of digital platforms in bariatric surgery. PMID:25598594

  19. Bariatric surgery in elderly patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Salvatore; Victorzon, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the effectiveness and safety of bariatric/metabolic surgery in elderly patients. We performed a systematic review on this issue in patients aged 60 years or older. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched until August 2015 for studies on outcomes of bariatric surgery in elderly patients. The results were expressed as pooled proportions (%) with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity across the studies was evaluated by the I2 test, and a random-effects model was used. Twenty-six articles encompassing 8,149 patients were pertinent with this issue and included data on bariatric surgery outcomes in elderly population. Fourteen patients died during the 30-day postoperative period, with a pooled mortality of 0.01%. Pooled overall complication rate was 14.7%. At 1-year follow-up, pooled mean excess weight loss was 53.77%, pooled diabetes resolution was 54.5%, and pooled hypertension resolution was 42.5%, while pooled lipid disorder resolution was 41.2%. Outcomes and complication rates of bariatric surgery in patients older than 60 years are comparable to those in a younger population, independent of the type of procedure performed. Patients should not be denied bariatric surgery because of their age alone. PMID:26508845

  20. Interest, views and perceived barriers to bariatric surgery in patients with morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Wharton, S; Serodio, K J; Kuk, J L; Sivapalan, N; Craik, A; Aarts, M-A

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the interest, views and patient-perceived barriers to bariatric surgery among surgery-eligible patients. Surveys were completed at a weight management clinic and local hospital in Ontario, Canada. Patients were ≥18 years of age with a body mass index (BMI) >40 kg m(-2) or BMI > 35 kg m(-2) with ≥1 comorbidity. The sample included 105 participants, 73.3% female, with a mean BMI of 46.6 ± 7.1 kg m(-2) . Only 33.3% of participants were interested in surgery; 50.5% of participants were not interested and 16.2% had mixed feelings. Participants identified risks (69.5%) and side effects (57.1%) as significant surgical barriers. Interested participants were more likely to perceive themselves as obese, were unhappy with their current weight loss method and were less likely to fear surgery (P < 0.05). The prevalence of comorbidities was not different by surgical interest (P = 0.17). Despite the effectiveness of bariatric surgery, the majority of qualified patients are not interested in surgery mainly due to the perceived risk of surgery in general and satisfaction with current non-surgical weight loss efforts. The self-perception of obesity, as opposed to medical comorbidities, may be a stronger driver of the decision to have bariatric surgery. It is unclear if patients are aware of the effectiveness of bariatric surgery to help improve comorbidities or if bariatric surgery is perceived as being more cosmetic in nature. PMID:26910303

  1. Energetic adaptations persist after bariatric surgery in severely obese adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energetic adaptations induced by bariatric surgery have not been studied in adolescents or for extended periods postsurgery. Energetic, metabolic, and neuroendocrine responses to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery were investigated in extremely obese adolescents. At baseline and at 1.5, 6, and...

  2. Prevalence and Predictors of Atrial Fibrillation among Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, M. Benjamin; Gidfar, Sanaz; Pipilas, Daniel C.; Tamboli, Robyn A.; Galimberti, Eleonora Savio; Williams, D. Brandon; Clements, Ronald H.; Darbar, Dawood

    2013-01-01

    Introduction/Purpose While AF is a disease of the elderly, it can occur earlier in the presence of risk factors such as obesity. Bariatric surgery patients are significantly younger and more obese than previously described populations with AF. Therefore, it remains to be determined whether current estimates of the prevalence and predictors for AF remain true in the bariatric surgery population. Materials and Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 1341 consecutive patients who underwent bariatric surgery from 1/2008 to 10/2012. Baseline characteristics were compared between patients with and without AF. For additional comparison, 176 patients with AF and body mass index (BMI) >40 kg/m2 were identified from the Vanderbilt AF Registry. A multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of AF within the bariatric surgery cohort. Results The prevalence of AF in the bariatric surgery cohort was 1.9% (25/1341). Patients with AF were older (median 56 years (Interquartile range [52-64) vs.46 [38-56] years, p<0.001), were more often male (48% vs. 23%, p=0.004), had more comorbidities, but had no difference in BMI (50 kg/m2 [44-58] vs. 48 [43-54], p=0.4). In multivariable analysis, the odds of AF increased 2.2-fold by age per decade (95% CI: 1.4-3.5, p<0.001) and 2.4-fold by male gender (1.1-5.4, p=0.03) when adjusted for BMI. BMI was not independently associated with AF (OR 1.15 [95% CI: 0.98-1.41], p=0.09). Conclusions The prevalence of AF is 1.9% among patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Risk of AF was found to increase with age and male gender, but not with higher BMI. PMID:24214203

  3. Bariatric surgery for obese children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Black, J A; White, B; Viner, R M; Simmons, R K

    2013-08-01

    The number of obese young people continues to rise, with a corresponding increase in extreme obesity and paediatric-adolescent bariatric surgery. We aimed to (i) systematically review the literature on bariatric surgery in children and adolescents; (ii) meta-analyse change in body mass index (BMI) 1-year post-surgery and (iii) report complications, co-morbidity resolution and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A systematic literature search (1955-2013) was performed to examine adjustable gastric band, sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or biliopancreatic diversions operations among obese children and adolescents. Change in BMI a year after surgery was meta-analysed using a random effects model. In total, 637 patients from 23 studies were included in the meta-analysis. There were significant decreases in BMI at 1 year (average weighted mean BMI difference: -13.5 kg m(-2) ; 95% confidence interval [CI] -14.1 to -11.9). Complications were inconsistently reported. There was some evidence of co-morbidity resolution and improvements in HRQol post-surgery. Bariatric surgery leads to significant short-term weight loss in obese children and adolescents. However, the risks of complications are not well defined in the literature. Long-term, prospectively designed studies, with clear reporting of complications and co-morbidity resolution, alongside measures of HRQol, are needed to firmly establish the harms and benefits of bariatric surgery in children and adolescents. PMID:23577666

  4. Insulinoma After Bariatric Surgery: Diagnostic Dilemma and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mulla, Christopher M; Storino, Alessandra; Yee, Eric U; Lautz, David; Sawnhey, Mandeep S; Moser, A James; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    Hypoglycemia is increasingly recognized as a complication of bariatric surgery. Typically, hypoglycemia does not appear immediately postoperatively, but rather more than 1 year later, and usually occurs 1-3 h after meals. While rare, insulinoma has been reported after bariatric surgery. Clinical factors which should raise suspicion for insulinoma and the need for comprehensive clinical and biochemical evaluation include hypoglycemia occurring in the fasting state, predating bariatric surgery, and/or worsening immediately postoperatively, and lack of response to conservative therapy. Localization and successful resection of insulinoma can be achieved using novel endoscopic ultrasound and surgical approaches. In summary, hypoglycemia presenting shortly after gastric bypass or with a dominant fasting pattern should be fully evaluated to exclude insulinoma. Additionally, evaluation prior to gastric bypass should include screening for history of hypoglycemia symptoms. PMID:26846121

  5. Binge Eating Disorder and Medical Comorbidities in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, James E.; King, Wendy C.; Pories, Walter; Wolfe, Bruce; Flum, David R.; Spaniolas, Konstatinos; Bessler, Mark; Devlin, Michael; Marcus, Marsha D.; Kalarchian, Melissa; Engel, Scott; Khandelwal, Saurobh; Yanovski, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether binge eating disorder (BED) status is associated with medical comorbidities in obese adults scheduled for bariatric surgery. Method The study utilized Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 data obtained from 6 clinical centers around the United States. This is a well-phenotyped cohort of individuals who were evaluated within 30 days prior to their scheduled surgery using standardized protocols. In the cohort, 350 participants were classified as having BED and 1875 as not having BED (non-BED). Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether BED status was independently related to medical comorbidities. As an exploratory analysis, significance was based on nominal P-values (p<.05). Holm-adjusted P-values were also reported. Results After adjusting for age, sex, education and body mass index, BED status was independently associated with 4 of 15 comorbidities (i.e., impaired glucose levels (odds ratio [OR]=1.45 (95%CI: 1.12–1.87), high triglycerides (OR=1.28 (95%CI: 1.002–1.63) and urinary incontinence (OR=1.30 (95%CI: 1.02,1.66) all being more common among the BED sample, and severe walking limitations being less common in the BED sample (OR=0.53 (95%CI: 0.29–0.96)). With further adjustment for psychiatric/emotional health indicators, BED status was independently associated with 3 comorbidities (impaired glucose levels (OR=1.36 (95%CI: 1.04–1.79), cardiovascular disease (OR=0.50 (95%CI: 0.30–0.86) and severe walking limitations (OR=0.38 (95%CI: 0.19–0.77)). However, Holm’s adjusted P-values for all variables were greater than .05. Discussion The results suggest the possibility of a contribution of BED to risk of specific medical comorbidities in severely obese adults. PMID:25778499

  6. Lipids and bariatric procedures Part 2 of 2: scientific statement from the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and Obesity Medicine Association (OMA).

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold; Kothari, Shanu N; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John M; Nguyen, Ninh T; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures generally improve dyslipidemia, sometimes substantially so. Bariatric procedures also improve other major cardiovascular risk factors. This 2-part Scientific Statement examines the lipid effects of bariatric procedures and reflects contributions from authors representing the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and the Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). Part 1 was published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology, and reviewed the impact of bariatric procedures upon adipose tissue endocrine and immune factors, adipose tissue lipid metabolism, as well as the lipid effects of bariatric procedures relative to bile acids and intestinal microbiota. This Part 2 reviews: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies, that may occur after bariatric procedures. PMID:27050404

  7. Bariatric surgery versus medications in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fanin, A; Benetti, A; Ceriani, V; Pontiroli, A E

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with increased risk of severe comorbidities and mortality; its prevalence is increasing worldwide, linked with the increasing prevalence of obesity. Weight loss prevents the development of T2DM in obese subjects, and can reverse T2DM in morbid obesity. This paper reviews bariatric surgery as a means for prevention and treatment of T2DM and its complications, in comparison with medical treatment, and analyzes the possible mechanisms involved. In morbidly obese patients bariatric surgery results in stable weight loss and long-term reduction in incidence and prevalence of obesity-related comorbidities, especially T2DM. The efficacy of bariatric surgery in improving and normalizing glucose levels has been confirmed by a large number of studies, comparing surgery with medical therapy. When compared to each other, malabsorptive and mixed malabsorptive/restrictive surgery techniques have shown better outcomes than restrictive techniques in terms of T2DM remission. However it is demonstrated that T2DM can reappear in the following years, especially in patients with advanced age, female sex, longer duration of T2DM, poorer glycemic control, use of insulin before surgery and weight regain. Bariatric surgery is superior to conventional medical therapy in inducing significant weight loss and control of T2DM. Weight loss has pleiotropic effects: T2DM can disappear and then re-appear as a result of persistent beta-cells impairment, while other effects last much longer, as reduction of blood pressure and improvement of lipids and of kidney function. This is probably the reason for long-term prevention of cardiovascular events and of mortality in obese and in obese-diabetic patients. The effect of bariatric surgery on diabetic retinopathy is still controversial. PMID:26365477

  8. The Night Eating Syndrome (NES) in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    de Zwaan, Martina; Marschollek, Michael; Allison, Kelly C

    2015-11-01

    The night eating syndrome (NES) has been included into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 as an example of an 'other-specified feeding or eating disorder'. The prevalence of NES has found to be higher in obese populations than in the general population and seems to rise with increasing body mass index. Recent studies suggest a prevalence of 2%-20% in bariatric surgery samples. Given that the core feature of this eating disorder may involve a shift in the circadian pattern of eating that disrupts sleep, and not the ingestion of objectively large amounts of food, it is a pattern that can continue after bariatric surgery. Nonetheless, symptoms of NES appear to decrease after weight loss surgery, and there is no evidence that pre-surgery NES negatively impacts weight loss following surgery. Prospective and longitudinal studies of the course of night eating symptoms are warranted using clear criteria and standardized assessment instruments. PMID:26395455

  9. Gastrointestinal Hormones and Bariatric Surgery-induced Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Ionut, Viorica; Burch, Miguel; Youdim, Adrienne; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity continues to be a major public health problem in the United States and worldwide. While recent statistics have demonstrated that obesity rates have begun to plateau, more severe classes of obesity are accelerating at a faster pace with important implications in regards to treatment. Bariatric surgery has a profound and durable effect on weight loss, being to date one of the most successful interventions for obesity. Objective To provide updates to the possible role of gut hormones in post bariatric surgery weight loss and weight loss maintenance. Design and Methods The current review examines the changes in gastro-intestinal hormones with bariatric surgery and the potential mechanisms by which these changes could result in decreased weight and adiposity. Results The mechanism by which bariatric surgery results in body weight changes is incompletely elucidated, but it clearly goes beyond caloric restriction and malabsorption. Conclusion Changes in gastro-intestinal hormones, including increases in GLP-1, PYY, and oxyntomodulin, decreases in GIP and ghrelin, or the combined action of all these hormones might play a role in induction and long-term maintenance of weight loss. PMID:23512841

  10. Bariatric surgery for obesity-associated decline in kidney function: filling the knowledge gap?

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Varun; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2016-07-01

    Chang et al. (2016) report a significantly lower risk of decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate among obese adults who underwent bariatric surgery compared with a matched nonsurgical cohort. In this propensity-matched analysis, data on confounding variables such as albuminuria, psychosocial, and medical conditions that precluded surgery in the comparator arm and health insurance are lacking. Furthermore, creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate is not an accurate measure of kidney function after intentional weight loss. Although the study is interesting, physicians need to carefully weigh the risks versus benefits of bariatric surgery among obese adults at risk of kidney disease. PMID:27312446

  11. The application of laparoscopic bariatric surgery for treatment of severe obesity in adolescents using a multidisciplinary adolescent bariatric program.

    PubMed

    Warman, Juanita L

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of laparoscopic surgery has made bariatric surgery acceptable for weight loss; however, much controversy exists about its appropriateness for adolescents. Despite the controversial issues, the growing epidemic in adolescent obesity has resulted in rising numbers of applications for bariatric surgery. There are few bariatric surgical programs designed for adolescents. Pediatric settings face high start-up costs and poor reimbursement and lack established bariatric surgeons. Even so, bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed on adolescents in alarming numbers. To avoid adverse physical and psychosocial outcomes, the application of the principles of growth and development is essential. The program should be established as a multidisciplinary approach to management of adolescents and should be in institutions capable of meeting the guidelines for surgical treatment outlined by the American Society of Bariatric Surgery. To prevent postoperative complication, a multidisciplinary team of experienced medical and surgical specialists is needed for optimal preoperative decision making and postoperative management and long-term follow-up. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is a safe procedure and an effective means to treat obesity-related morbidity in the adolescent. Results have been excellent and justify a clinical trial to confirm the safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in the adolescent population. PMID:16041228

  12. Mechanisms of Diabetes Improvement Following Bariatric/Metabolic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Batterham, Rachel L; Cummings, David E

    2016-06-01

    More than 20 years ago, Pories et al. published a seminal article, "Who Would Have Thought It? An Operation Proves to Be the Most Effective Therapy for Adult-Onset Diabetes Mellitus." This was based on their observation that bariatric surgery rapidly normalized blood glucose levels in obese people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and 10 years later, almost 90% remained diabetes free. Pories et al. suggested that caloric restriction played a key role and that the relative contributions of proximal intestinal nutrient exclusion, rapid distal gut nutrient delivery, and the role of gut hormones required further investigation. These findings of T2DM improvement/remission after bariatric surgery have been widely replicated, together with the observation that bariatric surgery prevents or delays incident T2DM. Over the ensuing two decades, important glucoregulatory roles of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract have been firmly established. However, the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial glycemic effects of bariatric surgery remain incompletely understood. In addition to the mechanisms proposed by Pories et al., changes in bile acid metabolism, GI tract nutrient sensing and glucose utilization, incretins, possible anti-incretin(s), and the intestinal microbiome are implicated. These changes, acting through peripheral and/or central pathways, lead to reduced hepatic glucose production, increased tissue glucose uptake, improved insulin sensitivity, and enhanced β-cell function. A constellation of factors, rather than a single overarching mechanism, likely mediate postoperative glycemic improvement, with the contributing factors varying according to the surgical procedure. Thus, different bariatric/metabolic procedures provide us with experimental tools to probe GI tract physiology. Embracing this approach through the application of detailed phenotyping, genomics, metabolomics, and gut microbiome studies will enhance our understanding of

  13. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Human Small Artery Function

    PubMed Central

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Greenstein, Adam S.; Yadav, Rahul; Jeziorska, Maria; Hama, Salam; Soltani, Fardad; Pemberton, Phil W.; Ammori, Basil; Malik, Rayaz A.; Soran, Handrean; Heagerty, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of bariatric surgery on small artery function and the mechanisms underlying this. Background In lean healthy humans, perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) exerts an anticontractile effect on adjacent small arteries, but this is lost in obesity-associated conditions such as the metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes where there is evidence of adipocyte inflammation and increased oxidative stress. Methods Segments of small subcutaneous artery and perivascular fat were harvested from severely obese individuals before (n = 20) and 6 months after bariatric surgery (n = 15). Small artery contractile function was examined in vitro with wire myography, and perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) morphology was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Results The anticontractile activity of PVAT was lost in obese patients before surgery when compared with healthy volunteers and was restored 6 months after bariatric surgery. In vitro protocols with superoxide dismutase and catalase rescued PVAT anticontractile function in tissue from obese individuals before surgery. The improvement in anticontractile function after surgery was accompanied by improvements in insulin sensitivity, serum glycemic indexes, inflammatory cytokines, adipokine profile, and systolic blood pressure together with increased PVAT adiponectin and nitric oxide bioavailability and reduced macrophage infiltration and inflammation. These changes were observed despite the patients remaining severely obese. Conclusions Bariatric surgery and its attendant improvements in weight, blood pressure, inflammation, and metabolism collectively reverse the obesity-induced alteration to PVAT anticontractile function. This reversal is attributable to reductions in local adipose inflammation and oxidative stress with improved adiponectin and nitric oxide bioavailability. PMID:23665100

  14. Resolution of Comorbidities and Impact on Longevity Following Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fouse, Tammy; Brethauer, Stacy

    2016-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective and durable treatment of severe obesity. In addition to weight loss, these operations result in significant improvement or resolution of many obesity-related comorbid diseases. There are now numerous studies demonstrating that bariatric surgery decreases all-cause mortality long-term compared with cohorts of patients who did not undergo surgery. Decreases in cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular-related mortality are major contributors to this overall effect on life expectancy after bariatric surgery. PMID:27473797

  15. [Treatment of anemia in patients undergoing bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Basora Macaya, M

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency in patients with morbid obesity can occur before bariatric surgery due to its inflammatory component and after surgery as the result of implementing the malabsorptive techniques. For patients with morbid obesity, micronutrient deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, iron and folate, should be suspected. Iron deficiency and other hematinics should be corrected, even when anemia has not been established. Normal ferritin levels do not allow us to rule out a possible iron deficiency, given that ferritin can increase due to the chronic inflammatory condition of obesity. After bariatric surgery, patients should take iron supplements; however, these supplements are frequently poorly tolerated. Rapid and effective correction of hemoglobin levels might require the intravenous administration of iron preparations. PMID:26320349

  16. NUTRITIONAL REPERCUSSIONS IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    SILVEIRA-JÚNIOR, Sérgio; de ALBUQUERQUE, Maurício Mendes; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis; da ROSA, Luisa Salvagni; HYGIDIO, Daniel de Andrade; ZAPELINI, Raphaela Mazon

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies evaluated the association between nutritional disorders, quality of life and weight loss in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Aim To identify nutritional changes in patients undergoing bariatric surgery and correlate them with weight loss, control of comorbidities and quality of life. Method A prospective cohort, analytical and descriptive study involving 59 patients undergoing bariatric surgery was done. Data were collected preoperatively at three and six months postoperatively, evaluating nutritional aspects and outcomes using BAROS questionnaire. The data had a confidence interval of 95%. Results The majority of patients was composed of women, 47 (79.7%), with 55.9% of the series with BMI between 40 to 49.9 kg/m². In the sixth month after surgery scores of quality of life were significantly higher than preoperatively (p<0.05) and 27 (67.5 %) patients had comorbidities resolved, 48 (81.3 %) presented BAROS scores of very good or excellent. After three and six months of surgery 16 and 23 presented some nutritional disorder, respectively. There was no relationship between the loss of excess weight and quality of life among patients with or without nutritional disorders. Conclusions Nutritional disorders are uncommon in the early postoperative period and, when present, have little or no influence on quality of life and loss of excess weight. PMID:25861070

  17. Complications of bariatric surgery: Presentation and emergency management.

    PubMed

    Kassir, Radwan; Debs, Tarek; Blanc, Pierre; Gugenheim, Jean; Ben Amor, Imed; Boutet, Claire; Tiffet, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The epidemic in obesity has led to an increase in number of so called bariatric procedures. Doctors are less comfortable managing an obese patient after bariatric surgery. Peri-operative mortality is less than 1%. The specific feature in the obese patient is that the classical signs of peritoneal irritation are never present as there is no abdominal wall and therefore no guarding or rigidity. Simple post-operative tachycardia in obese patients should be taken seriously as it is a WARNING SIGNAL. The most common complication after surgery is peritonitis due to anastomotic fistula formation. This occurs typically as an early complication within the first 10 days post-operatively and has an incidence of 1-6% after gastric bypass and 3-7% after sleeve gastrectomy. Post-operative malnutrition is extremely rare after restrictive surgery (ring, sleeve gastrectomy) although may occur after malabsorbative surgery (bypass, biliary pancreatic shunt) and is due to the restriction and change in absorption. Prophylactic cholecystectomy is not routinely carried out during the same procedure as the bypass. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis after bariatric surgery is a diagnosis which should be considered in the presence of any postoperative abdominal pain. Initially a first etiological assessment is performed (measurement of antithrombin III and of protein C and protein S, testing for activated protein C resistance). If the least doubt is present, a medical or surgical consultation should be requested with a specialist practitioner in the management of obese patients as death rates increase with delayed diagnosis. PMID:26808323

  18. Bariatric surgery for obese children and adolescents: a review of the moral challenges

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery for children and adolescents is becoming widespread. However, the evidence is still scarce and of poor quality, and many of the patients are too young to consent. This poses a series of moral challenges, which have to be addressed both when considering bariatric surgery introduced as a health care service and when deciding for treatment for young individuals. A question based (Socratic) approach is applied to reveal underlying moral issues that can be relevant to an open and transparent decision making process. Discussion A wide range of moral issues with bariatric surgery for children and adolescents is identified in the literature. There is a moral imperative to help obese minors avoiding serious health problems, but there is little high quality evidence on safety, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness for bariatric surgery in this group. Lack of maturity and family relations poses a series of challenges with autonomy, informed consent, assent, and assessing the best interest of children and adolescents. Social aspects of obesity, such as medicalization, prejudice, and discrimination, raise problems with justice and trust in health professionals. Conceptual issues, such as definition of obesity and treatment end-points, present moral problems. Hidden interests of patients, parents, professionals, industry, and society need to be revealed. Summary Performing bariatric surgery for obese children and adolescents in order to discipline their behavior warrants reflection and caution. More evidence on outcomes is needed to be able to balance benefits and risks, to provide information for a valid consent or assent, and to advise minors and parents. PMID:23631445

  19. Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery in Mouse Models of Circadian Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Arble, Deanna M.; Sandoval, Darleen A.; Turek, Fred W.; Woods, Stephen C.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Mounting evidence supports a link between circadian disruption and metabolic disease. Humans with circadian disruption (e.g., night-shift workers) have an increased risk of obesity and cardiometabolic diseases compared to the non-disrupted population. However, it is unclear if the obesity and obesity-related disorders associated with circadian disruption respond to therapeutic treatments as well as individuals with other types of obesity. Subjects/Methods Here, we test the effectiveness of the commonly used bariatric surgical procedure, Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy (VSG) in mouse models of genetic and environmental circadian disruption. Results VSG led to a reduction in body weight and fat mass in both ClockΔ19 mutant and constant-light mouse models (P < .05), resulting in an overall metabolic improvement independent of circadian disruption. Interestingly, the decrease in body weight occurred without altering diurnal feeding or activity patterns (P > .05). Within circadian-disrupted models, VSG also led to improved glucose tolerance and lipid handling (P < .05). Conclusions Together these data demonstrate that VSG is an effective treatment for the obesity associated with circadian disruption, and that the potent effects of bariatric surgery are orthogonal to circadian biology. However, since the effects of bariatric surgery are independent of circadian disruption, VSG cannot be considered a cure for circadian disruption. These data have important implications for circadian-disrupted obese patients. Moreover, these results reveal new information about the metabolic pathways governing the effects of bariatric surgery as well as of circadian disruption. PMID:25869599

  20. Bariatric Bypass Surgery to Resolve Complicated Childhood Morbid Obesity: Case Report Study.

    PubMed

    Elbanna, Abduh; Eldin, Mohammed Tag; Fathy, Mohammad; Osman, Osama; Abdelfattah, Mohammed; Safwat, Abdelrahman; Elkader, Mohammed Sedki Abd; Bilasy, Shymaa E; Salama, Khaled; Elnour, Asim A; Shehab, Abdullah; Baghdady, Shazly; Amer, Mohamed; Alboraie, Mohamed; Ragb, Aly; Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek

    2015-12-01

    Children obesity has become one of the most important public health problems in many countries worldwide. Although the awareness of childhood obesity as a modifiable health risk is high, but many societies do not prioritize this issue as a health care problem, which may lead to comorbidities and even premature death. Despite the rising interest in bariatric surgery for children, only laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is being considered in resolving childhood obesity who failed other dietary or drug therapies; however many of LSG procedures failed to reduce the weight in children or resulted in complications postsurgery.Here, we present a novel bariatric procedure to clue out a female child 13 years old presented with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease-associated morbid obesity. The surgical bariatric technique applied both fundal resection and surgical bypass in pediatric obesity using the Elbanna novel bariatric technique.Bariatric surgical bypass may be considered in complicated-childhood cases who failed all other options. PMID:26656361

  1. Weighing in on bariatric surgery: who and when?

    PubMed Central

    Lodhia, N A; Morton, J M

    2012-01-01

    Over two-thirds of the United States is overweight or obese, and over 5% of the country is morbidly obese. Numerous public health preventative measures have been established to help battle this public health epidemic. Surgical obesity treatment, although now gaining popularity, has been an underutilized treatment option for obesity. Patients with a body mass index (BMI) of >40 or >35 kg m−2 with two or more comorbid conditions are eligible for bariatric surgery. Currently, the three most popular bariatric surgeries are Roux-en-y gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding procedures, all overwhelmingly performed laparoscopically. The purpose of this article is to discuss the heterogeneity of bariatric surgery. In our practice, among 834 patients operated over a 4-year period (2006–2010), patients were of an average age of 45 years (16–73 years), 80.4% were female patients, 82.5% had private insurance, 61% were White, 17% were Hispanic and 9% were Black. Patients had an average BMI of 46.2 kg m−2 (30.1–75.3 kg m−2), waist circumference of 133.6 cm (68.6–207.8 cm) and four preoperative comorbidities (0–11 comorbidities). Variation exists in surgeon practice patterns for preoperative weight-loss recommendations and complication rates based on surgery case volume. Despite variation in patient, surgeon and hospital characteristics, bariatric surgery outcomes are generally highly safe and effective. PMID:25018871

  2. Is Bariatric Surgery a Trigger Factor for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases?

    PubMed

    Cañas, Carlos A; Echeverri, Andrés F; Ospina, Fabio E; Suso, Juan-Pablo; Agualimpia, Andrés; Echeverri, Alex; Bonilla-Abadía, Fabio; Tobón, Gabriel J

    2016-03-01

    Bariatric procedures are an effective option for weight loss and control of comorbidities in obese patients. Obesity is a proinflammatory condition in which some cytokines such as leptin, a proinflammatory protein, is elevated and adiponectin, an anti-inflammatory protein, is decreased. In patients undergoing weight reduction surgeries, these hormone levels behave paradoxically. It is not known whether bariatric surgery protects against development of autoinflammatory or autoimmune conditions; nevertheless, changes occurring in the immune system are incompletely understood. In this case series, we describe 4 patients undergoing bariatric surgery, who subsequently developed systemic autoimmune diseases. Patients in our case series were asymptomatic before surgery and developed an autoimmune disease within 11.2 months. Two women fulfilled criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (one associated with antiphospholipid syndrome), and 2 men developed rheumatoid arthritis. A causal relationship is difficult to establish because factors that could trigger these diseases are multiple, including genetic susceptibility, time elapsed until achievement of ideal weight, and vitamin deficiencies, among others. However, clinicians must be attentive to this possible association. PMID:26906303

  3. Revisional Bariatric/Metabolic Surgery: What Dictates Its Indications?

    PubMed

    Ma, Pearl; Reddy, Subhash; Higa, Kelvin D

    2016-07-01

    Bariatric/metabolic surgery is currently the only effective long-term treatment for morbid obesity- and obesity-related diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, and dyslipidemia. In addition, bariatric/metabolic surgery has been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of diabetes and cancer and prolong life when compared to non-surgical therapies. However, as obesity is a chronic disease, recidivism of weight and comorbid conditions can occur. In addition, the surgical construct can lead to long-term consequences such as marginal ulceration, bowel obstruction, reflux, and nutritional deficiencies. Despite these drawbacks, prospective randomized controlled studies and long-term longitudinal population-based comparative studies greatly favor surgical intervention as opposed to traditional lifestyle, diet, and exercise programs. Revisional surgery can be quite complex and technically challenging and may offer the patient a wide variety of solutions for treatment of weight recidivism and complications after primary operations. Given the paucity of high quality published data, we have endeavored to provide indications for revisions after bariatric surgery. PMID:27221504

  4. Economic considerations for bariatric surgery and morbid obesity

    PubMed Central

    Frezza, Eldo E; Wacthell, Mitchell; Ewing, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is also an economic tragedy. This analysis evaluates the economic effects and the potential to improve the well-being of both individual and societal wealth. Econometric techniques should carefully assess the degree to which obesity affects declines in business output, employment, income, and tax revenues at the regional and national levels. Microeconomics assesses lost productivity and associated wages and profit. Macroeconomics assesses trends associated with employment, inflation, interest rates, money supply, and output. To decrease the adverse economic consequences of the obesity epidemic, policy makers must emphasize bariatric surgery as a cost-effective option for qualified patients. Early intervention, education, and tax rebates for obese individuals who undergo bariatric surgery and for medical centers and doctors would likely have positive economic effects on the whole economy in a few years. PMID:21935309

  5. Economic considerations for bariatric surgery and morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Frezza, Eldo E; Wacthell, Mitchell; Ewing, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is also an economic tragedy. This analysis evaluates the economic effects and the potential to improve the well-being of both individual and societal wealth. Econometric techniques should carefully assess the degree to which obesity affects declines in business output, employment, income, and tax revenues at the regional and national levels. Microeconomics assesses lost productivity and associated wages and profit. Macroeconomics assesses trends associated with employment, inflation, interest rates, money supply, and output. To decrease the adverse economic consequences of the obesity epidemic, policy makers must emphasize bariatric surgery as a cost-effective option for qualified patients. Early intervention, education, and tax rebates for obese individuals who undergo bariatric surgery and for medical centers and doctors would likely have positive economic effects on the whole economy in a few years. PMID:21935309

  6. News media reports of patient deaths following 'medical tourism' for cosmetic surgery and bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Turner, Leigh

    2012-04-01

    Contemporary scholarship examining clinical outcomes in medical travel for cosmetic surgery identifies cases in which patients traveled abroad for medical procedures and subsequently returned home with infections and other surgical complications. Though there are peer-reviewed articles identifying patient deaths in cases where patients traveled abroad for commercial kidney transplantation or stem cell injections, no scholarly publications document deaths of patients who traveled abroad for cosmetic surgery or bariatric surgery. Drawing upon news media reports extending from 1993 to 2011, this article identifies and describes twenty-six reported cases of deaths of individuals who traveled abroad for cosmetic surgery or bariatric surgery. Over half of the reported deaths occurred in two countries. Analysis of these news reports cannot be used to make causal claims about why the patients died. In addition, cases identified in news media accounts do not provide a basis for establishing the relative risk of traveling abroad for care instead of seeking elective cosmetic surgery at domestic health care facilities. Acknowledging these limitations, the case reports suggest the possibility that contemporary peer-reviewed scholarship is underreporting patient mortality in medical travel. The paper makes a strong case for promoting normative analyses and empirical studies of medical travel. In particular, the paper argues that empirically informed ethical analysis of 'medical tourism' will benefit from rigorous studies tracking global flows of medical travelers and the clinical outcomes they experience. The paper contains practical recommendations intended to promote debate concerning how to promote patient safety and quality of care in medical travel. PMID:22420449

  7. STAMPEDE: Bariatric surgery gains more evidence based support

    PubMed Central

    Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and obesity are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Recent large-scale trials of intensive medical management for obesity and diabetes have been disappointing. Observational studies and small-scale trials of bariatric surgery on DM patients have shown promising results. The effects of sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass in a larger cohort of patients with DM and obesity was tested in the STAMPEDE trial over a 3-year follow-up. PMID:25054119

  8. Vitamin, Mineral, and Drug Absorption Following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Jaffe, Jane; Friedenberg, Lindsay; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity continues to rise throughout the world. Increasingly, bariatric surgery is used for those with morbid obesity as a pivotal approach to achieve weight loss. Along with substantial weight loss, malabsorption of essential vitamins, minerals, and drugs also occurs. Therefore, more than ever, a better understanding of the physiology and mechanisms by which these deficiencies occur is essential. We review the normal physiology of vitamin, mineral, and drug absorption. This is followed by a description of currently performed bariatric surgeries in the United States. A detailed review of specific nutrient and mineral deficiency states is presented, based on the most significant studies published in the last two decades. Of note, screening and supplementation recommendations have been included. Drug absorption data after these procedures is presented and discussed. Studies were identified by searching the Cochrane Registry and MEDLINE using relevant search terms, as well as through review of the reference section of included manuscripts. Conclusions Bariatric surgery can be effectively used to achieve sustainable weight-loss in morbidly obese patients. It simultaneously brings forth important functional consequences on nutrient deficiencies and drug absorption that clinician’s must be aware of. Further prospective, randomized research on specific procedures and deficiencies is required. PMID:22746302

  9. Through Thick and Thin: Identifying Barriers to Bariatric Surgery, Weight Loss Maintenance, and Tailoring Obesity Treatment for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Westerveld, Donevan; Yang, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    More than one-third of the adults in the United States are obese. This complex metabolic disorder is associated with multiple comorbidities and increased all-cause mortality. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be more effective than medical therapy and has been associated with weight loss maintenance and decreased mortality. In spite of these well-established benefits, less than 1% of candidates undergo surgery due to multiple factors, such as patient and physician perceptions and attitudes, patient-physician interaction, lack of resources, and cost burden. Furthermore, even in patients who do undergo bariatric surgery and/or alternate weight loss interventions, long-term weight control is associated with high-risk failure and weight regain. In this review, we highlight some of the current barriers to bariatric surgery and long-term weight loss maintenance and underscore the importance of an individualized multidisciplinary longitudinal strategy for the treatment of obesity. PMID:27314062

  10. Retraction Note: Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Incidence of Obesity-Related Cancers: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiang-Wu; Li, Peng-Zhou; Zhu, Li-Yong; Zhu, Shaihong

    2016-01-01

    In the article entitled, "Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Incidence of Obesity-Related Cancers: A Meta-Analysis" which was published in Medical Science Monitor 2015;21: 1350-1357, sections in the text have been directly copied from a previously published article, entitled, "The Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Colorectal Cancer Risk: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis", Sorena Afshar, Seamus B. Kelly, Keith Seymour, Jose Lara, Sean Woodcock, John C. Mathers  in Obesity Surgery 2014; 24(10):1793-1799. Thus owing to duplicity of text, the article is being retracted. Reference: 1. Xiang-wu Yang, Peng-zhou Li, Li-yong Zhu, Shaihong Zhu Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Incidence of Obesity-Related Cancers: A Meta-Analysis Medical Science Monitor 2015;21: 1350-1357 DOI: 10.12659/MSM.893553. PMID:27215479

  11. Implementing enhanced recovery after bariatric surgery protocol: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Proczko, Monika; Kaska, Lukasz; Twardowski, Pawel; Stepaniak, Pieter

    2016-02-01

    While the demand for bariatric surgery is increasing, hospital capacity remains limited. The ERABS (Enhanced Recovery After Bariatric Surgery) protocol has been implemented in a number of bariatric centers. We retrospectively compared the operating room logistics and postoperative complications between pre-ERABS and ERABS periods in an academic hospital. The primary endpoint was the length of stay in hospital. The secondary endpoints were turnover times-the time required for preparing the operating room for the next case, induction time (from induction of anesthesia until a patient is ready for surgery), surgical time (duration of surgery), procedure time (duration of stay in the operating room), and the incidence of re-admissions, re-operations and complications during admission and within 30 days after surgery. Of a total of 374 patients, 228 and 146 received surgery following the pre-ERABS and ERABS protocols, respectively. The length of hospital stay was significantly shortened from 3.7 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.1-4.7) days to 2.1 (95 % CI 1.6-2.6) days (P < 0.001). Procedure (surgical) times were shortened by 15 (7) min and 12 (5) min for gastric bypass and gastric sleeve surgery, respectively (P < 0.001 for both), by introducing the ERABS protocol. Induction times were reduced from 15.2 (95 % CI 14.3-16.1) min to 12.5 (95 % CI 11.7-13.3) min (P < 0.001).Turnover times were shortened significantly from 38 (95 % CI 44-32) min to 11 (95 % CI 8-14) min. The incidence of re-operations, re-admissions and complications did not change. PMID:26499320

  12. Genetic modifiers of obesity and bariatric surgery outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Samantha; Hubal, Monica J

    2014-02-01

    Obesity is a highly heritable trait. While acute and chronic changes in body weight or obesity-related comorbidities are heavily influenced by environmental factors, there are still strong genomic modifiers that help account for inter-subject variability in baseline traits and in response to interventions. This review is intended to provide an up-to-date overview of our current understanding of genetic influences on obesity, with emphasis on genetic modifiers of baseline traits and responses to intervention. We begin by reviewing how genetic variants can influence obesity. We then examine genetic modifiers of weight loss via different intervention strategies, focusing on known and potential modifiers of surgical weight loss outcomes. We will pay particular attention to the effects of patient age on outcomes, addressing the risks and benefits of adopting early intervention strategies. Finally, we will discuss how the field of bariatric surgery can leverage knowledge of genetic modifiers to adopt a personalized medicine approach for optimal outcomes across this widespread and diverse patient population. PMID:24491368

  13. Chronic Dieting Among Extremely Obese Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Masheb, Robin M.; White, Marney A.; Rothschild, Bruce S.; Burke-Martindale, Carolyn H.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Extremely obese bariatric surgery candidates report numerous episodes of both successful and unsuccessful dieting attempts, but little is known about the clinical significance of frequent dieting attempts in this patient group. Methods The current study examined psychological and weight-related correlates of self-reported dieting frequency in 219 bariatric surgery candidates (29 men and 190 women). Prior to surgery, patients completed a battery of established self-report assessments. Patients were dichotomized into chronic dieters (n=109) and intermittent dieters (n=110) based on a median split of self-reported percent time spent dieting during adulthood. The two dieting groups were compared on demographics, eating and weight history, eating disorder psychopathology, and global functioning. Results Chronic dieters had significantly lower pre-operative body mass indexes (BMIs), lower highest-ever BMIs, more episodes of weight cycling, and earlier ages of onset for overweight and dieting than intermittent dieters. After controlling for differences in BMI, chronic dieters were found to have statistically but not clinically significant elevations in eating concerns, dietary restraint, and body dissatisfaction than infrequent dieters. The two groups, however, did not differ significantly on depressive symptoms, self-esteem, or health-related quality of life; nor did they differ in binge-eating status. Conclusions Chronic dieting is commonly reported among extremely obese bariatric candidates and is not associated with poorer psychological functioning or binge eating and may be beneficial in attenuating even greater weight gain. Our findings provide preliminary data to suggest that requiring additional presurgical weight loss attempts may not be warranted for the vast majority of extremely obese bariatric candidates. PMID:19495894

  14. Impact of commissioning weight-loss surgery for bariatric patients.

    PubMed

    Petty, Natasha

    Obesity is a major UK public health issue that is increasingly costly to an individual's personal health, the NHS and society. It requires an immediate intervention, as well as a long-term strategy to decrease the rising rates of obesity. NHS England (2013) has published a policy to commission bariatric surgery for carefully selected individuals according to National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines (NICE, 2006). This has been shown to be a clinically and cost effective weight-loss treatment option (Picot et al, 2009), but is invasive and expensive compared with non-surgical weight-loss programmes. In addition, there remains inequality in access to bariatric care services across England, thereby preventing potentially eligible patients from getting the treatment they need. Further clarity is required regarding the commissioning responsibilities across the four tiers of the obesity care services. This clarity would help to achieve a more 'joined-up' clinical pathway that is focused at a local level to improve access. However, there is criticism that too much funding is currently being invested in the provision of bariatric surgery when it could be better spent on national roll-out programmes for intensive lifestyle interventions that promote more sustainable weight loss across England. PMID:26266444

  15. Bariatric Surgery in Women: A Boon Needs Special Care During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Archana; Nigam, Aruna

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is one of the leading causes of health related disorder and has reached epidemic proportions not only in developed nations but also in developing countries like India. Bariatric surgery has become a popular alternative for obese women planning pregnancy. A multidisciplinary approach involving the obstetrician, the bariatric surgeon and the nutritionist is required to manage pregnancy following bariatric surgery. Early consultation should be done to determine baseline nutritional status and the importance of regular check-ups must be explained. Nutritional supplementation should be tailored to the patient's status and the type of bariatric surgery performed. PMID:26672514

  16. Bariatric Surgery in Women: A Boon Needs Special Care During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is one of the leading causes of health related disorder and has reached epidemic proportions not only in developed nations but also in developing countries like India. Bariatric surgery has become a popular alternative for obese women planning pregnancy. A multidisciplinary approach involving the obstetrician, the bariatric surgeon and the nutritionist is required to manage pregnancy following bariatric surgery. Early consultation should be done to determine baseline nutritional status and the importance of regular check-ups must be explained. Nutritional supplementation should be tailored to the patient’s status and the type of bariatric surgery performed. PMID:26672514

  17. Patient Expectations of Bariatric and Body Contouring Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Klassen, Anne; Jhanwar, Sabrina; Pusic, Andrea; Roessler, Kirsten K.; Rose, Michael; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient expectations are important in bariatric and body contouring surgery because the goals include improvements in health-related quality of life, appearance, and body image. The aim of this study was to identify patient expectations along the weight loss journey and/or body contouring surgery. Methods: This qualitative study took an interpretive description approach. Between September 2009 and February 2012, 49 patients were interviewed postbody contouring surgery. Data were analyzed using a line-by-line approach whereby expectations were identified and labeled as expected, unexpected, or neutral. Constant comparison was used to ensure coding was done consistently. Interviews continued until no new themes emerged. Results: Participants described expectations according to appearance, health-related quality of life, and patient experience of care. Two areas stood out in terms of unmet expectations and included appearance and physical health, ie, recovery from body contouring surgery. Most participants, who underwent bariatric surgery, expected neither the extent of excess skin after weight loss nor how the excess skin would make them look and feel. For recovery, participants did not expect that it would be as long or as hard as it was in reality. Conclusions: A full understanding of outcomes and expectations for this patient population is needed to enhance patient education and improve shared medical decision making. Education materials should be informed by the collection of evidence-based patient-reported outcome information using measures such as the BODY-Q. A patient-reported outcome scale measuring patient expectations is needed for obese and bariatric patients. PMID:27200256

  18. Bariatric surgery: an IDF statement for obese Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, J B; Zimmet, P; Alberti, K G; Rubino, F

    2011-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation Taskforce on Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes convened a consensus working group of diabetologists, endocrinologists, surgeons and public health experts to review the appropriate role of surgery and other gastrointestinal interventions in the treatment and prevention of Type 2 diabetes. The specific goals were: to develop practical recommendations for clinicians on patient selection; to identify barriers to surgical access and suggest interventions for health policy changes that ensure equitable access to surgery when indicated; and to identify priorities for research. Bariatric surgery can significantly improve glycaemic control in severely obese patients with Type 2 diabetes. It is an effective, safe and cost-effective therapy for obese Type 2 diabetes. Surgery can be considered an appropriate treatment for people with Type 2 diabetes and obesity not achieving recommended treatment targets with medical therapies, especially in the presence of other major co-morbidities. The procedures must be performed within accepted guidelines and require appropriate multidisciplinary assessment for the procedure, comprehensive patient education and ongoing care, as well as safe and standardized surgical procedures. National guidelines for bariatric surgery need to be developed for people with Type 2 diabetes and a BMI of 35 kg/m2 or more. PMID:21480973

  19. Inferior vena cava filters and postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing bariatric surgery: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaw, Roop; Pasupuleti, Vinay; Wayne Overby, D; Deshpande, Abhishek; Coleman, Craig I; Ioannidis, John P A; Hernandez, Adrian V

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary embolism(PE)accounts for almost 40% of perioperative deaths after bariatric surgery.Placement of prophylactic inferior vena cava(IVC) filter before bariatric surgery to improve outcomes has shown varied results. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate post- operative outcomes associated with the preoperative placement of IVC filters in these patients. Methods: A systematic review was conducted by three investigators independently in PubMed, EMBASE, the Web of Science and Scopus until February 28,2013.Our search was restricted to studies in adult patients undergoing bariatric surgery with and without IVC filters. Primary outcomes were postoperative deep vein thrombosis(DVT),pulmonary embolism (PE),and postoperative mortality. Meta-analysis used random effects models to account for heterogeneity,and Sidik- Jonkman method to account for scarcity of outcomes and studies. Associations are shown as Relative Risks(RR) and 95% Confidence Intervals(CI). Results: Seven observational studies were identified (n=102,767), with weighted average inci- dences of DVT(0.9%),PE(1.6%),and mortality(1.0%)for a follow-up ranging from 3 weeks to 3 months. Use of IVC filters was associated with an approximately 3-fold higher risk of DVT and death that was nominally significant for the former outcome, but not the latter (RR2.81,95%CI 1.33-5.97, p=0.007; and RR 3.27,95%CI0.78-13.64, p=0.1, respectively);there was no difference in the risk of PE(RR1.02,95%CI0.31-3.77,p=0.9). Moderate to high heterogeneity of effects was noted across studies. Conclusions: Placement of IVC filter before bariatric surgery Is associated with higher risk of postoperative DVT and mortality. A similar risk of PE inpatients with and without IVC filter placement cannot exclude a benefit, given the potential large imbalance in risk at baseline.Ran- domized trials are needed before IVC placement can be recommended. (SurgObesRelatDis 2015;11:268-269.) r 2015 American Society for Metabolic and

  20. Bariatric Surgery for People with Diabetes and Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In June 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began work on the Diabetes Strategy Evidence Project, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding strategies for successful management and treatment of diabetes. This project came about when the Health System Strategy Division at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care subsequently asked the secretariat to provide an evidentiary platform for the Ministry’s newly released Diabetes Strategy. After an initial review of the strategy and consultation with experts, the secretariat identified five key areas in which evidence was needed. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these five areas: insulin pumps, behavioural interventions, bariatric surgery, home telemonitoring, and community based care. For each area, an economic analysis was completed where appropriate and is described in a separate report. To review these titles within the Diabetes Strategy Evidence series, please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/masabout.html, Diabetes Strategy Evidence Platform: Summary of Evidence-Based Analyses Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Pumps for Type 1 and Type 2 Adult Diabetics: An Evidence-Based Analysis Behavioural Interventions for Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Bariatric Surgery for People with Diabetes and Morbid Obesity: An Evidence-Based Summary Community-Based Care for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Home Telemonitoring for Type 2 Diabetes: An Evidence-Based Analysis Application of the Ontario Diabetes Economic Model (ODEM) to Determine the Cost-effectiveness and Budget Impact of Selected Type 2 Diabetes Interventions in Ontario Objective The purpose of this evidence-based analysis was to examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery for the management of diabetes in morbidly obese people. This report summarized evidence specific

  1. Food quality in the late postoperative period of bariatric surgery: an evaluation using the bariatric food pyramid.

    PubMed

    Soares, Fernando Lucas; Bissoni de Sousa, Larissa; Corradi-Perini, Carla; Ramos da Cruz, Magda Rosa; Nunes, Mario Gilberto Jesus; Branco-Filho, Alcides José

    2014-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective intervention in the treatment of obesity, but lifestyle and diet should be monitored after this procedure to ensure success. The Bariatric Food Pyramid was created basing on long-term nutritional care that proposes a standard of healthy living and eating habits considering gastric capacity and specific nutritional needs. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate the life habits and diet quality of patients who have undergone bariatric surgery (who have been recovering for at least 6 months) based on the specific food pyramid. Retrospective data analysis was performed using medical records of patients who had been followed for at least 6 months after bariatric surgery. The following data were collected from patient records: age, gender, education level (years), BMI (preoperative and postoperative), percentage of excess weight loss (EWL) relative to the time of surgery, frequency of physical activity, use of nutritional supplements, usual dietary intake history, and fluid intake. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. We evaluated 172 patient records. In this study, there was a low prevalence of physical activity, use of vitamin-mineral supplements, and water intake. There also was low consumption of protein, fruit, vegetables, and vegetable oils. In addition, intake of carbohydrates, sugars, and fats were higher than the recommendations established by the pyramid. The results indicate that patients who have undergone bariatric surgery have an inadequate diet according to food evaluation with the specific pyramid. In the long term, this may lead to weight gain and vitamin and mineral deficiencies. PMID:24500225

  2. The influence of methods of bariatric surgery for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bužga, Marek; Maresova, Petra; Seidlerova, Adela; Zonča, Pavel; Holéczy, Pavol; Kuča, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    The constantly growing incidence of obesity represents a risk of health complications for individuals, and is a growing economic burden for health care systems and society. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of bariatric surgery, specifically laparoscopic greater curve plication, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The effect of bariatric surgery on the changes in blood pressure before, and 12 months after, surgery and in pharmacotherapy in the 12 months after surgery was analyzed. For achieving this purpose, 74 patients from the Obesity and Surgery Department of Vitkovice Hospital in Ostrava in the Czech Republic, were monitored. They were operated in 2011 and 2012. The Bonferroni method was used to test hypotheses about the impact of surgery on blood pressure and pharmacotherapy. One year after the surgery, systolic and diastolic blood pressure values decreased, both with no statistically significant difference between surgery types. Improvement was observed in 68% of cases, with 25% of patients discontinuing pharmacotherapy entirely. PMID:27143901

  3. Actual Situation of Thromboembolic Prophylaxis in Obesity Surgery: Data of Quality Assurance in Bariatric Surgery in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Stroh, Christine; Luderer, D.; Weiner, R.; Horbach, T.; Ludwig, K.; Benedix, F.; Wolff, Stefanie; Knoll, C.; Lippert, H.; Manger, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Evidence-based data on optimal approach for prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis (VTE) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in bariatric operations is discussed. Using antithrombotic prophylaxis weight adjusted the risk of VTE and its complications have to be balanced with the increased bleeding risk. Methods. Since 2005 the current situation for bariatric surgery has been examined by quality assurance study in Germany. As a prospective multicenter observational study, data on the type, regimen, and time course of VTE prophylaxis were documented. The incidences of clinically diagnosed VTE or PE were derived during the in-hospital course and follow up. Results. Overall, 11,835 bariatric procedures were performed between January 2005 and December 2010. Most performed procedures were 2730 gastric banding (GB); 4901 Roux-en-Y-gastric bypass (RYGBP) procedures, and 3026 sleeve gastrectomies (SG). Study collective includes 72.5% (mean BMI 48.1 kg/m2) female and 27.5% (mean BMI 50.5 kg/m2) male patients. Incidence of VTE was 0.06% and of PE 0.08%. Conclusion. VTE prophylaxis regimen depends on BMI and the type of procedure. Despite the low incidence of VTE and PE there is a lack of evidence. Therefore, prospective randomized studies are necessary to determine the optimal VTE prophylaxis for bariatric surgical patients. PMID:22848807

  4. Baropodometric analyses of patients before and after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bacha, Ivan Leo; Benetti, Fernanda Antico; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andréa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the vertical component of the ground reaction force, plantar pressure, contact area of the feet and double-support time using static and dynamic (gait) baropodometry before and after bariatric surgery. METHODS: Sixteen individuals with a body mass index of between 35 and 55 were evaluated before and after bariatric surgery. Thirteen patients (81.3%) were female and three (18.8%) male and their average age was 46±10 (21-60) years. An FSCAN system (version 3848) was used for baropodometric analyses (1 km/h and 3 km/h). The peak plantar pressure and ground reaction force were measured for the rear foot and forefoot. The double-support time and foot contact area were measured during gait. RESULTS: There were reductions in the ground reaction force in the forefoot and rear foot and in the foot contact area in all evaluations and of the double-support time at 3 km/h, as well as a significant reduction in the body mass index at six months post-surgery. The peak pressure did not vary at 1 km/h and at 3 km/h, reductions in peak pressure were observed in the left and right rear feet and left forefoot. CONCLUSIONS: Weight loss after bariatric surgery resulted in decreases in the ground reaction force and contact area of the foot. Plantar pressure was decreased at 3 km/h, especially in the forefoot. There was an increase in rhythm because of a reduction in the double-support time at 3 km/h. PMID:26602521

  5. The Importance of Pre and Postoperative Physical Activity Counseling in Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    King, Wendy C; Bond, Dale S

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that physical activity (PA) can enhance weight loss and other outcomes after bariatric surgery. However, most preoperative patients are insufficiently active, and without support, fail to make substantial increases in their PA postoperatively. This review provides the rationale for PA counseling in bariatric surgery and describes how to appropriately tailor strategies to pre- and postoperative patients. PMID:22710705

  6. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  7. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Morbidly Obese Patients Treated with Bariatric Surgery: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Erik P.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Browne, James A.; Trousdale, Robert T.; Sarr, Michael; Lewallen, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to compare outcomes (anesthesia time, total operative time, tourniquet time, duration of hospital stay, 90-day complication rate and transfusion rates) of patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) who underwent bariatric surgery before or after TKA. One-hundred-twenty-five patients were included: TKA before bariatric surgery (group 1; n=39); TKA within two years of bariatric surgery (group 2; n=25); and TKA more than 2 years after bariatric surgery (group 3; n=61). Patients with TKA more than 2 years after bariatric surgery had shorter anesthesia, total operative and tourniquet times than other groups; differences were significant between groups. Ninety-day complication and transfusion rates approached but did not meet statistical significance. Ninety-day complication rates and duration of hospital stay did not differ significantly between the three groups. PMID:22554730

  8. Family history of Alzheimer’s disease limits improvement in cognitive function after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Crosby, Ross D; Mitchell, James E

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective: Bariatric surgery can reverse cognitive impairments associated with obesity. However, such benefits may be attenuated in individuals with a predisposing risk for cognitive impairment such as family history of Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: In all, 94 bariatric surgery participants completed a computerized cognitive test battery before and 12 weeks after surgery. Family history of Alzheimer’s disease was obtained through self-report. Results: In the overall sample, cognitive function improved in memory and attention/executive function 12 weeks post-surgery. Repeated measures showed similar rates of improvements in attention/executive function between patients with and without a family history of Alzheimer’s disease. In contrast, only individuals without a family history of Alzheimer’s disease exhibited post-operative improvements in memory. A family history of Alzheimer’s disease was associated with greater post-surgery rates of cognitive impairment. Conclusions: Family history of Alzheimer’s disease may limit post-surgery cognitive benefits. Future studies should examine whether weight loss can modify the course of cognitive decline in patients at-risk for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26770731

  9. Chronic Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) Blockade May Not Induce Hypotension During Anaesthesia for Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Guido; Di Salvo, Claudio; Ceccarini, Giovanni; Abramo, Antonio; Fierabracci, Paola; Magno, Silvia; Piaggi, Paolo; Vitti, Paolo; Santini, Ferruccio

    2016-06-01

    The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) for the treatment of hypertensive obese patients is steadily increasing. Some studies have reported that the use of these drugs was associated with an increased risk of hypotensive episodes, during general anaesthesia. The number of bariatric procedures is also increasing worldwide, but there is a lack of studies investigating the hypotensive effect of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers in severely obese patients during general anaesthesia for bariatric surgery. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate hemodynamic changes induced by general anaesthesia in obese patients chronically treated with ACE-I or ARB compared to a control group not treated with antihypertensive therapy. Fourteen obese subjects (mean body mass index (BMI) 47.5 kg/m(2)) treated with ACE-I or ARB and twelve obese (mean BMI 45.7 kg/m2) controls not treated with antihypertensive therapy underwent general anaesthesia to perform laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were monitored continuously and registered at different time points: T0 before induction, then at 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 min after induction, and the last time point taken following recovery from anaesthesia. A progressive reduction of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure values was observed without significant differences between the two groups. A similar trend of heart rate values was observed. In conclusion, our pilot study suggests that RAS blockers may be continued during the perioperative period in patients undergoing bariatric surgery, without increasing the risk of hypotensive episodes. PMID:26328531

  10. Wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Engström, My; Forsberg, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was an in-depth investigation of the change process experienced by patients undergoing bariatric surgery. A prospective interview study was performed prior to as well as 1 and 2 years after surgery. Data analyses of the transcribed interviews were performed by means of the Grounded Theory method. A core category was identified: Wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control over eating and weight, comprising three related categories: hoping for deburdening and control through surgery, feeling deburdened and practising control through physical restriction, and feeling deburdened and trying to maintain control by own willpower. Before surgery, the participants experienced little or no control in relation to food and eating and hoped that the bariatric procedure would be the first brick in the building of a foundation that would lead to control in this area. The control thus achieved in turn affected the participants' relationship to themselves, their roles in society, and the family as well as to health care. One year after surgery they reported established routines regarding eating as well as higher self-esteem due to weight loss. In family and society they set limits and in relation to health care staff they felt their concern and reported satisfaction with the surgery. After 2 years, fear of weight gain resurfaced and their self-image was modified to be more realistic. They were no longer totally self-confident about their condition, but realised that maintaining control was a matter of struggle to obtaining a foundation of sustainable control. Between 1 and 2 years after surgery, the physical control mechanism over eating habits started to more or less fade for all participants. An implication is that when this occurs, health care professionals need to provide interventions that help to maintain the weight loss in order to achieve a good long-term outcome. PMID:21339891

  11. [Dealing with surgical complications after bariatric gastric bypass surgery].

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Nis Hallundbæk; Naver, Lars

    2013-11-25

    The subject of this article is surgical complications to Roux-en-Y-gastric bypass and how to deal with them. The article addresses doctors, who are on duty in hospitals without bariatric surgery and who often deal with this patient category in the acute situation. Managing complications is challenging due to both the patient's physiognomy and the wide-ranged change in anatomy. The article gives a review of the literature and hands-on-recommendations for treating anastomotic leak, post-operative bleeding, internal herniation, bowel obstruction and biliary complications. PMID:24629437

  12. Lithium toxicity after Roux-en-Y bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Musfeldt, Deanna; Levinson, Andrew; Nykiel, Jennifer; Carino, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman with medical history significant for morbid obesity, type II diabetes mellitus, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and bipolar disorder, had been stable on lithium carbonate therapy for several years. She had undergone a Roux-en-Y bypass surgery and, at the time of her surgery, her lithium level was found to be 0.61 mEq/L on a maintenance dose of 600 mg orally twice per day. She was discharged 8 days postoperatively on the same lithium dose, but presented to the emergency department 12 days postoperatively with signs of lithium toxicity. Her lithium level was elevated to 1.51 mEq/L and she was treated for lithium toxicity with supportive care and, ultimately, reduction of her lithium dose. Clinicians should be aware that dramatic and poorly understood changes in drug absorption may occur after bariatric surgery. PMID:26994048

  13. An Untargeted Metabolomics Approach to Characterize Short-Term and Long-Term Metabolic Changes after Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Narath, Sophie H; Mautner, Selma I; Svehlikova, Eva; Schultes, Bernd; Pieber, Thomas R; Sinner, Frank M; Gander, Edgar; Libiseller, Gunnar; Schimek, Michael G; Sourij, Harald; Magnes, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently one of the most effective treatments for obesity and leads to significant weight reduction, improved cardiovascular risk factors and overall survival in treated patients. To date, most studies focused on short-term effects of bariatric surgery on the metabolic profile and found high variation in the individual responses to surgery. The aim of this study was to identify relevant metabolic changes not only shortly after bariatric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass) but also up to one year after the intervention by using untargeted metabolomics. 132 serum samples taken from 44 patients before surgery, after hospital discharge (1-3 weeks after surgery) and at a 1-year follow-up during a prospective study (NCT01271062) performed at two study centers (Austria and Switzerland). The samples included 24 patients with type 2 diabetes at baseline, thereof 9 with diabetes remission after one year. The samples were analyzed by using liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS, HILIC-QExactive). Raw data was processed with XCMS and drift-corrected through quantile regression based on quality controls. 177 relevant metabolic features were selected through Random Forests and univariate testing and 36 metabolites were identified. Identified metabolites included trimethylamine-N-oxide, alanine, phenylalanine and indoxyl-sulfate which are known markers for cardiovascular risk. In addition we found a significant decrease in alanine after one year in the group of patients with diabetes remission relative to non-remission. Our analysis highlights the importance of assessing multiple points in time in subjects undergoing bariatric surgery to enable the identification of biomarkers for treatment response, cardiovascular benefit and diabetes remission. Key-findings include different trend pattern over time for various metabolites and demonstrated that short term changes should not necessarily be used to identify important long

  14. [Is the morbid obesity surgery profitable in times of crisis? A cost-benefit analysis of bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Santos, Raquel; Sabench Pereferrer, Fátima; Estévez Fernandez, Sergio; del Castillo Dejardin, Daniel; Vilarrasa, Nuria; Frutos Bernal, Dolores; Ruiz de Adana, Juan Carlos; Masdevall Noguera, Carlos; Torres García, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Morbid obesity is a serious health problem whose prevalence is increasing. Expensive co-morbidities are associated to these patients, as well as a reduction in the survival. Bariatric surgery resolves the co-morbidities (type 2 diabetes mellitus, 86.6%; cardiovascular risk, 79.0%; obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, 83.6%; hypertension, 61.7%), reduces the mortality rate (among 31-40%), and increases the morbid obese patients survival over a 10-years period. It provides significant savings for the National Health System. The obese patients consume a 20% plus of health resources and 68% plus of drugs than general population. Bariatric surgery requires an initial investment (diagnosis-related group cost: 7,468 €), but it is recovered in a cost-effectiveness ratio of 2.5 years. Significant savings are obtained from the third year. To the direct economic benefits associated with reduced health expenditures it should be added an increase in tax collection (sick leave and unemployment reduction is estimated in 18%, with a productivity increase of 57% for self-employed people). Bariatric surgery is one of the most cost-effective procedures in the healthcare system. PMID:23628503

  15. Bariatric Surgery in the United Kingdom: A Cohort Study of Weight Loss and Clinical Outcomes in Routine Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Ian J.; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Batterham, Rachel L.; Smeeth, Liam

    2015-01-01

    hypertension, with a HR of 5.64 (95% CI 2.65–11.99). No association was detected between bariatric surgery and fractures, cancer, or stroke. Effect estimates for mortality found no protective association with bariatric surgery overall, with a HR of 0.97 (95% CI 0.66–1.43). The data used were recorded for the management of patients in primary care and may be subject to inaccuracy, which would tend to lead to underestimates of true relative effect sizes. Conclusions Bariatric surgery as delivered in the UK healthcare system is associated with dramatic weight loss, sustained at least 4 y after surgery. This weight loss is accompanied by substantial improvements in pre-existing T2DM and hypertension, as well as a reduced risk of incident T2DM, hypertension, angina, MI, and obstructive sleep apnoea. Widening the availability of bariatric surgery could lead to substantial health benefits for many people who are morbidly obese. PMID:26694640

  16. Adiposopathy and bariatric surgery: is ‘sick fat’ a surgical disease?

    PubMed Central

    Bays, H E; Laferrère, B; Dixon, J; Aronne, L; González-Campoy, J M; Apovian, C; Wolfe, B M

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To review how bariatric surgery in obese patients may effectively treat adiposopathy (pathogenic adipose tissue or ‘sick fat’), and to provide clinicians a rationale as to why bariatric surgery is a potential treatment option for overweight patients with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia. Methods: A group of clinicians, researchers, and surgeons, all with a background in treating obesity and the adverse metabolic consequences of excessive body fat, reviewed the medical literature regarding the improvement in metabolic disease with bariatric surgery. Results: Bariatric surgery improves metabolic disease through multiple, likely interrelated mechanisms including: (i) initial acute fasting and diminished caloric intake inherent with many gastrointestinal surgical procedures; (ii) favourable alterations in gastrointestinal endocrine and immune responses, especially with bariatric surgeries that reroute nutrient gastrointestinal delivery such as gastric bypass procedures; and (iii) a decrease in adipose tissue mass. Regarding adipose tissue mass, during positive caloric balance, impaired adipogenesis (resulting in limitations in adipocyte number or size) and visceral adiposity are anatomic manifestations of pathogenic adipose tissue (adiposopathy). This may cause adverse adipose tissue endocrine and immune responses that lead to metabolic disease. A decrease in adipocyte size and decrease in visceral adiposity, as often occurs with bariatric surgery, may effectively improve adiposopathy, and thus effectively treat metabolic disease. It is the relationship between bariatric surgery and its effects upon pathogenic adipose tissue that is the focus of this discussion. Conclusions: In selective obese patients with metabolic disease who are refractory to medical management, adiposopathy is a surgical disease. PMID:19691612

  17. IMPACT OF DEFICIENT NUTRITION IN BONE MASS AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    COSTA, Tatiana Munhoz da Rocha Lemos; PAGANOTO, Mariana; RADOMINSKI, Rosana Bento; BORBA, Victoria Zeghbi Cochenski

    2016-01-01

    Background: Essential nutrients are considered for the prevention of the bone loss that occurs after bariatric surgery. Aim: Evaluate nutrients involved in bone metabolism, and relate to serum concentrations of calcium, vitamin D, and parathyroid hormone, and the use of supplements and sun exposure on the bone mass of patients who had undergone gastric bypass surgery. Methods: An observational study, with patients who had undergone the surgery 12 or more months previously, operated group (OG), compared to a control group (CG). Results: Were included 56 in OG and 27 in the CG. The mean age was 36.4±8.5 years. The individuals in the OG, compared to CG, consumed inadequate amounts of protein and daily calcium. The OG had a higher prevalence of low sun exposure, lower levels of 25OH Vitamin D (21.3±10.9 vs. 32.1±11.8 ng/dl), and increased serum levels of parathyroid hormone (68.1±32.9 vs. 39.9±11.9 pg/ml, p<0.001). Secondary hyperparathyroidism was present only in the OG (41.7%). The mean lumbar spine bone mineral density was lower in the OG. Four individuals from the OG had low bone mineral density for chronological age, and no one from the CG. Conclusion: The dietary components that affect bone mass in patients undergoing bariatric surgery were inadequate. The supplementation was insufficient and the sun exposure was low. These changes were accompanied by secondary hyperparathyroidism and a high prevalence of low bone mass in lumbar spine in these subjects. PMID:27120738

  18. Potential mechanisms mediating improved glycemic control after bariatric/metabolic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kaida, Sachiko; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Murata, Satoshi; Tani, Masaji; Tani, Tohru

    2016-03-01

    Conservative medical treatment for morbid obesity generally fails to sustain weight loss. On the other hand, surgical operations, so-called bariatric surgery, have evolved due to their long-term effects. The global increase in the overweight population and the introduction of laparoscopic surgery have resulted in the use of bariatric surgery spreading quickly worldwide in recent years. Recent clinical evidence suggests that bariatric surgery not only reduces body weight, but also improves secondary serious diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, in so-called metabolic surgery. Moreover, several potential mechanisms mediating the improvement in glycemic control after bariatric/metabolic surgery have been proposed based on the animal and human studies. These mechanisms include changes in the levels of gastrointestinal hormones, bacterial flora, bile acids, intestinal gluconeogenesis and gastrointestinal motility as well as adipose tissue and inflammatory mediators after surgery. The mechanisms underlying improved glycemic control are expected to accelerate the promotion of both metabolic and bariatric surgery. This article describes the current status of bariatric surgery worldwide and in Japan, reviews the accumulated data for weight loss and diabetic improvements after surgery and discusses the potential mechanisms mediating improved glycemic control. PMID:25700844

  19. The Use of Rat and Mouse Models in Bariatric Surgery Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Thomas A.; Bueter, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Animal models have been proven to be a crucial tool for investigating the physiological mechanisms underlying bariatric surgery in general and individual techniques in particular. By using a translational approach, most of these studies have been performed in rodents and have helped to understand how bariatric surgery may or may not work. However, data from studies using animal models should always be critically evaluated for their transferability to the human physiology. It is, therefore, the aim of this review to summarize both advantages and limitations of data generated by animal based experiments designed to investigate and understand the physiological mechanisms at the root of bariatric surgery. PMID:27547753

  20. School and Cognitive Functioning Problems in Adolescent Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Freidl, Eve Khlyavich; Sysko, Robyn; Devlin, Michael J.; Zitsman, Jeffrey L.; Kaplan, Simona C.; Timothy Walsh, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies have found that students with overweight and obesity have impairments in performance IQ and executive function, and worse school functioning in comparison to normal weight peers. Objectives The current study assessed school and cognitive functioning in a sample of adolescents with severe obesity being evaluated for laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. Setting: Psychiatry Department, University Medical Center, United States. Methods Eligible candidates for bariatric surgery were referred for psychiatric evaluation which included a semi-structured clinical interview measuring school functioning and the vocabulary and matrix reasoning subtests of the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI). Results Self-reported school problems were common, with 55.5% of adolescents failing a grade or subject, 38.7% attending summer school, and 17.8% failing a citywide exam. A significant relationship was observed between body mass index (BMI),estimated WASI IQ(r= −0.250, p=0.005), and the vocabulary subtest (r= −0.241, p=0.006), but not matrix reasoning (r= −0.126, p=NS). Conclusions Even among a sample of adolescents with severe obesity, increased BMI was associated with lower WASI IQ and vocabulary subtest scores. Increasing awareness of potential cognitive and school problems in bariatric candidates among teachers, school counselors, and other mental health providers is an important first step to improving academic support and educational systems deficiencies for students with overweight and obesity. PMID:23932993

  1. Effect of Weight Loss, Diet, Exercise, and Bariatric Surgery on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Hannah, William N; Harrison, Stephen A

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD is the most common liver disease in developed countries. Weight reduction of 3% to 5% is associated with improved steatosis; reductions of 5% to 7% are necessary for decreased inflammation; with 7% to 10%, individuals may experience NAFLD/NASH remission and regression of fibrosis. No specific dietary intervention has proven beneficial beyond calorie restriction. Physical activity without weight loss seems to decrease hepatic steatosis. Bariatric surgery is associated with decreased cardiovascular risk and improved overall mortality in addition to reduction in hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. PMID:27063273

  2. Mandatory weight loss during the wait for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Nicole M; Raine, Kim D; Spence, John C

    2015-01-01

    Mandatory presurgical, behavior-induced weight loss, although not standard, is a relatively common practice among bariatric surgical clinics. We explore the patient's experience of this practice using phenomenology. We gathered experiential accounts from 7 individuals waiting to have the procedure at a large publically funded clinic in western Canada. In writing this article, we focused on four phenomenological themes: "just nod your head and carry on"-silencing through the ideal; waiting and weighing-promoting weight consciousness to the weight conscious; paying for surgical approval through weight loss; and presurgical weight loss and questioning the need for weight loss surgery altogether. We contrast the experiential findings with the clinical literature to question the impact and possible (unintended or unexpected) effects the practice might have, particularly on patients' lives. We situate this article within a larger discussion about the possible contribution of experiential knowledge to clinical guidelines, practices, and pedagogies. PMID:25185162

  3. Nutritional Optic Neuropathy Caused by Copper Deficiency After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Yuna; Lavin, Patrick J M

    2016-06-01

    A 47-year-old woman developed severe bilateral visual loss 4 years after a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 24 years after vertical banded gastroplasty. Her serum copper level was 35 μg/dL (normal, 80-155 μg/dL). She was prescribed elemental copper tablets. Because her methylmalonic acid was slightly elevated, she received vitamin B12 injections as well. Five weeks later, she reported that her vision had improved and, at 10 months, her vision had recovered from 20/400 bilaterally to 20/25 in each eye. This case highlights the importance of checking copper levels in addition to the "more routine" vitamin levels, such as B1, B6, B12, E, and serum folate in patients with suspected nutritional optic neuropathy after bariatric surgery, particularly if it involved a bypass procedure. PMID:26828841

  4. Appetite and body weight regulation after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Münzberg, Heike; Laque, Amanda; Yu, Sangho; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery continues to be remarkably efficient in treating obesity and T2DM and a debate has started whether it should remain the last resort only or also be used for the prevention of metabolic diseases. Intense research efforts in humans and rodent models are underway to identify the critical mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects with a view towards non-surgical treatment options. This non-systematic review summarizes and interprets some of this literature, with an emphasis on changes in the controls of appetite. Contrary to earlier views, surgery-induced reduction of energy intake and subsequent weight loss appear to be the main drivers for rapid improvements of glycemic control. The mechanisms responsible for suppression of appetite, particularly in the face of the large weight loss, are not well understood. Although a number of changes in food choice, taste functions, hedonic evaluation, motivation, and self-control have been documented in both humans and rodents after surgery, their importance and relative contribution to diminished appetite has not yet been demonstrated. Furthermore, none of the major candidate mechanisms postulated in mediating surgery induced changes from the gut and other organs to the brain, such as gut hormones and sensory neuronal pathways, have been confirmed yet. Future research efforts should focus on interventional rather than descriptive approaches in both humans and rodent models. PMID:25614206

  5. PS3-54: Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Chronic Use of Opioid Medications

    PubMed Central

    Raebel, Marsha; Newcomer, Sophia; Boudreau, Denise; Elliott, Thomas; Debar, Lynn; Ahmed, Ameena; Bayliss, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Opioids are used to manage chronic painful conditions associated with obesity. It is unknown whether weight loss attained after bariatric surgery results in a change in chronic opioid use and if so, over what timeframe. We explored the effect of bariatric surgery and associated weight loss on chronic opioid use. Methods This retrospective cohort study included patients from ten Scalable Partnering Network for Comparative Effectiveness Research (SPAN) sites who had bariatric surgery between 1/1/2005 and 12/31/2009. Patients had health plan enrollment and a drug benefit during the year before and after surgery. Patients were classified based on total oral or transdermal opioid days’ supply dispensed during the year prior to surgery as having no, some, or chronic use. To assess change in opioid use in the year following surgery relative to the year prior to surgery, total opioid use for each user was determined using morphine equivalents. Dispensings within 30 days post-surgery were excluded. Longitudinal mixed effects models were used to assess change in morphine equivalents dispensed before/after surgery. Results The cohort included 11,719 patients. Overall, 1016 had chronic opioid use in the year before surgery and 1222 had chronic opioid use in the year after surgery. Of the chronic users pre-surgery, 760 (74.8%) remained chronic users post-surgery. Of the 10,703 with some or no opioid use pre-surgery, 462 (4.3%) became chronic users post-surgery. The most commonly dispensed opioids were hydrocodone combinations, oxycodone, and codeine combinations. Among pre-surgery chronic users, median daily morphine equivalents increased from 22.36 pre-surgery to 25.22 post-surgery (paired sign test P <.0001). Conclusions During the year after bariatric surgery opioid use appears to increase in the overall bariatric surgery population or in those with pre-surgery chronic opioid use. Longer timeframes should also be evaluated.

  6. The effects of bariatric surgeries on type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerd Ng, Jia; Ortiz, Roberto; Hughes, Tyler; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Bouhali, Othmane; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Allen, Roland

    2012-10-01

    We consider a scientific mystery which is of central importance in treating the most rapidly emerging national and global health threat: type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mystery involves a surprising effect of certain bariatric surgeries, and specifically Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), a procedure which bypasses most of the stomach and upper intestine. An unanticipated result is that RYGB is usually found to contribute within only a few days to glucose homeostasis. This means the surgery can immediately cure patients even before they start losing weight. We are investigating this wondrous biochemical response with a quantitative model which includes the most important mechanisms. One of the major contributors is glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an incretin whose concentration is found to increase by a large amount right after the RYGB surgical procedure. However, our results, in conjunction with the experimental and medical data, indicate that other substances must also contribute. If these substances can be definitively identified, it may be possible to replace the surgery with pharmaceuticals as the preferred treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  7. Place of upper endoscopy before and after bariatric surgery: A multicenter experience with 3219 patients

    PubMed Central

    Abd Ellatif, Mohamed E; Alfalah, Haitham; Asker, Walid A; El Nakeeb, Ayman E; Magdy, Alaa; Thabet, Waleed; Ghaith, Mohamed A; Abdallah, Emad; Shahin, Rania; Shoma, Asharf; Dawoud, Ibraheim E; Abbas, Ashraf; Salama, Asaad F; Ali Gamal, Maged

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the preoperative and postoperative role of upper esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in morbidly obese patients. METHODS: This is a multicenter retrospective study by reviewing the database of patients who underwent bariatric surgery (laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass, or laparoscopic minigastric bypass) in the period between 2001 June and 2015 August (Jahra Hospital-Kuwait, Hafr Elbatin Hospital and King Saud Medical City-KSA, and Mansoura University Hospital - Egypt). Patients with age 18-65 years, body mass index (BMI) > 40, or > 35 with comorbidities after failure of many dietetic regimen and acceptable levels of surgical risk were included in the study after having an informed signed consent. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of all morbidly obese patients. The patients’ preoperative data included clinical history including upper digestive symptoms and preoperative full workup including EGD. Only patients whose charts revealed weather they were symptomatic or not were studied. We categorized patients accordingly into two groups; with (group A) or without (group B) upper digestive symptoms. The endoscopic findings were categorized into 4 groups based on predetermined criteria. The medical record of patients who developed stricture, leak or bleeding after bariatric surgery was reviewed. Logestic regression analysis was used to identify preoperative predictors that might be associated with abnormal endoscopic findings. RESULTS: Three thousand, two hundred and nineteen patients in the study period underwent bariatric surgery (75% LSG, 10% LRYDB, and 15% MGB). Mean BMI was 43 ± 13, mean age 37 ± 9 years, 79% were female. Twenty eight percent had presented with upper digestive symptoms (group A). EGD was considered normal in 2414 (75%) patients (9% group A vs 66% group B, P = 0.001). The abnormal endoscopic findings were found high in those patients with upper digestive symptoms. Abnormal findings (one

  8. Translating weight loss into agency: Men's experiences 5 years after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Natvik, Eli; Gjengedal, Eva; Moltu, Christian; Råheim, Målfrid

    2015-01-01

    Fewer men than women with severe obesity undergo bariatric surgery for weight loss, and knowledge about men's situation after surgery, beyond medical status, is lacking. Our aim was to explore men's experiences with life after bariatric surgery from a long-term perspective. We conducted in-depth interviews with 13 men, aged 28–60 years, between 5 and 7 years after surgery. The analysis was inspired by Giorgi's phenomenological method. We found that agency was pivotal for how the men understood themselves and their lives after surgery. Weight loss meant regaining opportunities for living and acting in unrestricted and independent daily lives, yet surgery remained a radical treatment with complex consequences. Turning to surgery had involved conceptualizing their own body size as illness, which the men had resisted doing for years. After surgery, the rapid and major weight loss and the feelings of being exhausted, weak, and helpless were intertwined. The profound intensity of the weight loss process took the men by surprise. Embodying weight loss and change involved an inevitable renegotiating of experiences connected to the large body. Having bariatric surgery was a long-term process that seemed unfinished 5 years after surgery. Restrictions and insecurity connected to health and illness persist, despite successful weight loss and embodied change. Bariatric surgery initiated a complex and long-lasting life-changing process, involving both increased capacity for agency and illness-like experiences. PMID:26066518

  9. New obesity classification criteria as a tool for bariatric surgery indication.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Antonino; Soldati, Laura; Sarlo, Francesca; Calvani, Menotti; Di Lorenzo, Nicola; Di Renzo, Laura

    2016-01-14

    Obesity plays relevant pathophysiological role in the development of health problems, arising as result of complex interaction of genetic, nutritional, and metabolic factors. Due to the role of adipose tissue in lipid and glucose metabolism, and low grade inflammation, it is necessary to classify obesity on the basis of body fat composition and distribution, rather than the simply increase of body weight, and the Body Mass Index. The new term of adiposopathy (''sick fat'') clearly defines the pathogenic role of adipose tissue. Four phenotypes of obese individuals have been described: (1) normal weight obese (NWO); (2) metabolically obese normal weight; (3) metabolically healthy obese; and (4) metabolically unhealthy obese or "at risk" obese. Moreover, sarcopenic obesity has been related to all the phenotypes. The category of normal weight lean, represented by metabolically healthy normal weight has been classified to distinguish from NWO. It is crucial to recommend a bariatric surgery taking into account adiposopathy and sick fat that occurs with the expansion of fat mass, changing the inflammatory and metabolic profile of the patient. Body fat percentage and genetic polymorphism have to be evaluated to personalize the best bariatric surgery intervention. PMID:26811617

  10. Country of origin and bariatric surgery in Sweden during 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Memarian, Ensieh; Sundquist, Kristina; Calling, Susanna; Sundquist, Jan; Li, Xinjun

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of obesity, as well as use of bariatric surgery, has increased worldwide. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential differences in the use of bariatric surgery among Swedes and immigrants in Sweden and whether the hypothesized differences remain after adjustment for socioeconomic factors. Methods A closed cohort of all individuals aged 20–64 years was followed during 2001–2010. Further analyses were performed in 2 periods separately (2001–2005 and 2006–2010). Age-standardized cumulative incidence rates (CR) of bariatric surgery were compared between Swedes and immigrants considering individual variables. Cox proportional hazards models were used in univariate and multivariate models for males and females. Results A total of 12,791 Swedes and 2060 immigrants underwent bariatric surgery. The lowest rates of bariatric surgery were found in immigrant men. The largest difference in CR between Swedes and immigrants was observed among low-income individuals (3.4 and 2.3 per 1000 individuals, respectively). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were lower for all immigrants compared with Swedes in the second period. The highest HRs were observed among immigrants from Chile and Lebanon and the lowest among immigrants from Bosnia. Except for Nordic countries, immigrants from all other European countries had a lower HR compared with Swedes. Conclusions Men in general and some immigrant groups had a lower HR of bariatric surgery. Moreover, the difference between Swedes and immigrants was more pronounced in individuals with low socioeconomic status (income). It is unclear if underlying barriers to receive bariatric surgery are due to patients’ preferences/lack of knowledge or healthcare structures. Future studies are needed to examine potential causes behind these differences. PMID:25979207

  11. Pre-Operative History of Depression and Cognitive Changes in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Obesity associated cognitive impairments may be partially reversible through bariatric surgery. Depression, a prevalent comorbidity in bariatric surgery candidates, is linked with cognitive impairment and poorer surgical outcomes in other populations. No study has examined the effects of pre-operative depression on cognitive changes in bariatric surgery patients. 67 bariatric surgery patients completed a computerized cognitive test battery prior to surgery and 12-months post-operatively. The Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I disorders assessed Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Pre-surgery history of MDD was found in 47.8% of patients, but was not associated with greater baseline cognitive impairments. Repeated measures revealed improved cognitive abilities 12-months after surgery. Pre-surgery history of MDD did not influence post-operative cognitive function. Pre-operative history of MDD did not limit post-operative cognitive improvements. Larger studies with extended follow-ups are needed to clarify our findings and identify factors (e.g., older age) that may modify cognitive changes following surgery. PMID:25222138

  12. Bariatric Surgery: A Potential Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes in Youth.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amy S; D'Alessio, David; Ford-Adams, Martha E; Desai, Ashish P; Inge, Thomas H

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes, once referred to as "adult-onset" diabetes, has now emerged as a formidable threat to the health of obese adolescents. Although there is growing evidence regarding the epidemiology of type 2 diabetes in youth and its multisystem health consequences, treatment options have lagged and progression of disease occurs even with aggressive medical therapy. Increasing interest in the application of bariatric surgery for adolescents with type 2 diabetes has evolved in part because of the evidence demonstrating improvement or remission in many adults with diabetes after surgery. Here, we review the burden of type 2 diabetes in youth including its associated complications, discuss the outcomes and complications of bariatric surgery in adolescents with diabetes, and conclude with recommendations for future research and options for refinement of the use of bariatric surgery in this patient population. PMID:27222551

  13. [Changes in the pattern of substance use after bariatric surgery: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Quevedo, Yamil; Kirsten, Kurt; Ponce de León, Consuelo; Fernández, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Even though the benefits of bariatric surgery are supported by scientific evidence, its indications and contraindications must be revised to avoid its indiscriminate use. Substance use is more common in patients subjected to bariatric surgery than in the general population. After surgery, an increase in alcohol abuse has been reported. We report a 41 years old male, with morbid obesity, alcohol and cocaine use. After bariatric surgery, his alcohol tolerance significantly decreased, increasing the doses of cocaine and starting to consume it without alcohol. His high anxiety level and paranoid delusions, motivated him to seek help in a rehabilitation center where a Substance Dependence Disorder was diagnosed and received initial treatment. The cause of this adverse effect needs further research. Functional and anatomic changes in the digestive tract lead to a greater alcohol absorption and reduced alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Also neurochemical alterations may produce a displacement from compulsive use of food to compulsive use of addictive substances. PMID:25860278

  14. A review of psychological assessment instruments for use in bariatric surgery evaluations.

    PubMed

    Marek, Ryan J; Heinberg, Leslie J; Lavery, Megan; Merrell Rish, Julie; Ashton, Kathleen

    2016-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is a viable treatment option for patients with extreme obesity and associated medical comorbidities; however, optimal surgical outcomes are not universal. Surgical societies, such as the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), recommend that patients undergo a presurgical psychological evaluation that includes reviewing patients' medical charts, conducting a comprehensive clinical interview, and employing some form of objective psychometric testing. Despite numerous societies recommending the inclusion of self-report assessments, only about 2/3 of clinics actively use psychological testing-some of which have limited empirical support to justify their use. This review aims to critically evaluate the psychometric properties of self-report measures when used in bariatric surgery settings and provide recommendations to help guide clinicians in selecting instruments to use in bariatric surgery evaluations. Recommended assessment batteries include use of a broadband instrument along with a narrowband eating measure. Suggestions for self-report measures to include in a presurgical psychological evaluation in bariatric surgery settings are also provided. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27537008

  15. Psychometric Evaluation of the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire for Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Hrabosky, Joshua I.; White, Marney A.; Masheb, Robin M.; Rothschild, Bruce S.; Burke-Martindale, Carolyn H.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite increasing use of the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) in bariatric surgery patients, little is known about the utility and psychometric performance of this self-report measure in this clinical group. The primary purpose of the current study was to evaluate the factor structure and construct validity of the EDE-Q in a large series of bariatric surgery candidates. Methods and Procedures Participants were 337 obese bariatric surgery candidates. Participants completed the EDE-Q and a battery of behavioral and psychological measures. Results Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) produced a 12-item, 4-factor structure of the EDE-Q. The four factors, interpreted as Dietary Restraint, Eating Disturbance, Appearance Concerns, and Shape/Weight Overvaluation, were found to be internally consistent and converged with other relevant measures of psychopathology. Discussion Factor analysis of the EDE-Q in bariatric surgery candidates did not replicate the original subscales but revealed an alternative factor structure. Future research must further evaluate the psychometric properties, including the factor structure, of the EDE-Q in this and other diverse populations and consider means of improving this measure's ability to best assess eating-related pathology in bariatric surgery patients. PMID:18379561

  16. Micronutrient Levels and Supplement Intake in Pregnancy after Bariatric Surgery: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Devlieger, Roland; Guelinckx, Isabelle; Jans, Goele; Voets, Willy; Vanholsbeke, Caroline; Vansant, Greet

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies report frequent micronutrient deficiencies after bariatric surgery, but less is known about micronutrient levels of pregnant women after bariatric surgery. Objective To prospectively evaluate micronutrient levels and supplement intake in pregnancy following bariatric surgery. Design A multicenter prospective cohort study including women with restrictive or malabsorptive types of bariatric surgery. Nutritional deficiencies, together with supplement intake, were screened during pregnancy. Results The total population included 18 women in the restrictive and 31 in the malabsorptive group. Most micronutrients were depleted and declined significantly during pregnancy. The proportion of women with low vitamin A and B-1 levels increased to respectively 58 and 17% at delivery (P = 0.005 and 0.002). The proportion of women with vitamin D deficiency decreased from 14% at trimester 1 to 6% at delivery (P = 0.030). Mild anemia was found in respectively 22 and 40% of the women at trimester 1 and delivery. In the first trimester, most women took a multivitamin (57.1%). In the second and third trimester, the majority took additional supplements (69.4 and 73.5%). No associations were found between supplement intake and micronutrient deficiencies. Conclusion Pregnant women with bariatric surgery show frequent low micronutrient levels. Supplementation partially normalizes low levels of micronutrients. PMID:25470614

  17. The role of bariatric surgery in the management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Olivos, Nancy E; Almeda-Valdes, Paloma; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2016-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. NAFLD is strongly associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Current treatment of NAFLD is based on weight reduction. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity and its associated metabolic comorbidities. There is evidence indicating that bariatric surgery improves histological and biochemical parameters of NAFLD, but currently is not considered a treatment option for NAFLD. The aim of this work is to review the evidence for the effects of bariatric surgery on NAFLD and the MetS. We found that insulin resistance, alterations in glucose metabolism, hypertension, plasma lipids, transaminases, liver steatosis, steatohepatitis and fibrosis improve after bariatric surgery. Weight loss and improvement of NAFLD are greater after RYGB than after other interventions. These findings were obtained from retrospective or cohort studies. There are no studies designed to evaluate liver-specific mortality, liver transplantation, or quality of life. Patients with indications for bariatric surgery will benefit from the improvements in the MetS and NAFLD. PMID:26435078

  18. The eating-related behaviours, disorders and expectations of candidates for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Opolski, M; Chur-Hansen, A; Wittert, G

    2015-08-01

    It is important that clinicians and researchers understand the possible eating-related difficulties experienced by pre-bariatric surgery candidates, as well as their expectations of how their eating and hunger will change after surgery. This review examines English-language publications related to the eating-related behaviours, disorders and expectations of bariatric candidates. Seventy-five articles related to binge eating disorder, grazing, night eating syndrome, emotional eating, food cravings and addiction, and pre-surgical expectations of post-surgical eating in this population were critically reviewed. A variety of often problematic eating behaviours appear more common in bariatric candidates than in non-obese populations. The literature suggests that 4-45% of candidates may have binge eating disorder, 20-60% may graze, 2-42% may have night eating syndrome, 38-59% may engage in emotional eating and 17-54% may fit criteria for food addiction. Binge eating may also be more prevalent in bariatric candidates than in similarly obese non-surgical individuals. Expectations of surgery are high, with pre-surgical candidates believing their bariatric procedure will virtually guarantee significantly improved eating behaviours. Study replications are needed, and further investigation into prevalence, impacts and candidate characteristics related to disordered eating behaviours, as well as candidates' expectations of eating after surgery, will be important. Further comparisons of bariatric candidates to similarly obese non-bariatric populations will be important to understand eating-related characteristics of candidates beyond those related to their weight. Future research may be improved by the use of validated measures, replicable methodologies, minimization of data collected in circumstances where respondents may been motivated to 'fake good', use of prospective data and consistent definitions of key terminology. PMID:26173752

  19. Quality of Life, Body Image and Sexual Functioning in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, David B; Steffen, Kristine J

    2015-11-01

    This article provides an overview of the literature on quality of life, body image and sexual behaviour in individuals with extreme obesity and who undergo bariatric surgery. Quality of life is a psychosocial construct that includes multiple domains, including health-related quality of life, weight-related quality of life, as well as other psychological constructs such as body image and sexual functioning. A large literature has documented the impairments in quality of life and these other domains in persons with obesity and extreme obesity in particular. These impairments are believed to play an influential role in the decision to undergo bariatric surgery. Individuals who undergo bariatric surgery typically report significant improvements in these and other areas of psychosocial functioning, often before they reach their maximum weight loss. The durability of these changes as patients maintain or regain weight, however, is largely unknown. PMID:26608946

  20. Analyses of balance and flexibility of obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Benetti, Fernanda Antico; Bacha, Ivan Leo; Junior, Arthur Belarmino Garrido; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andréa

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the postural control and flexibility of obese subjects before and both six and 12 months after bariatric surgery. To verify whether postural control is related to flexibility following weight reductions resulting from bariatric surgery. METHODS: The sample consisted of 16 subjects who had undergone bariatric surgery. All assessments were performed before and six and 12 months after bariatric surgery. Postural balance was assessed using an Accusuway® portable force platform, and flexibility was assessed using a standard chair sit and reach test (Wells' chair). RESULTS: With the force platform, no differences were observed in the displacement area or velocity from the center of pressure in the mediolateral and anteroposterior directions. The displacement speed from the center of pressure was decreased at the six month after the surgery; however, unchanged from baseline at 12 months post-surgery. Flexibility increased over time according to the three measurements tested. CONCLUSIONS: Static postural balance did not change. The velocity of postural adjustment responses were increased at six months after surgery. Therefore, weight loss promotes increased flexibility. Yet, improvements in flexibility are not related to improvements in balance. PMID:26934236

  1. KIDNEY STONE INCIDENCE AND METABOLIC URINARY CHANGES AFTER MODERN BARIATRIC SURGERY: REVIEW OF CLINICAL STUDIES, EXPERIMENTAL MODELS, AND PREVENTION STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Canales, Benjamin K.; Hatch, Marguerite

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has been associated with increased metabolic kidney stone risk and post-operative stone formation. A MEDLINE search, performed for articles published between January 2005 and November 2013, identified 24 pertinent studies containing 683 bariatric patients with 24-hour urine profiles, 6,777 bariatric patients with kidney stone incidence, and 7,089 non-stone forming controls. Of all procedures reviewed, only Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) was linked to post-operative kidney stone development, increasing stone incidence two-fold in non-stone formers (8.5%) and four-fold in patients with previous stone history (16.7%). High quality evidence from 7 studies (n=277 patients) before and after RYGB identified the following post-RYGB urinary lithogenic risk factors: 30% reduction in urine volume (the main driver of urinary crystal saturation), 40% reduction in urinary citrate (a potent stone inhibitor), and 50% increase in urinary oxalate (a stone promotor). Based on this, a summary of strategies to reduce calcium oxalate stone risk following RYGB is provided. Furthermore, recent experimental RYGB studies are assessed for insights into the pathophysiology of oxalate handling, and the literature in gut anion (oxalate) transport is reviewed. Finally, as a potential probiotic therapy for hyperoxaluria, primary data from our laboratory is presented, demonstrating a 70% reduction in urinary oxalate levels in four experimental RYGB animals after colonization with Oxalobacter formigines, a non-pathogenic gut commensal that uses oxalate as an energy source. Overall, urine profiles and kidney stone risk following bariatric surgery appear modifiable by dietary adjustments, appropriate supplementation, and lifestyle changes. For hyperoxaluria resistant to dietary oxalate restriction and calcium binding, well-designed human investigations are needed to identify additional means of lowering urinary oxalate, such as Oxalobacter colonization or empiric pyridoxine therapy

  2. Using lifestyle medicine in U.S. health care to treat obesity: too many bariatric surgeries?

    PubMed

    Trilk, Jennifer L; Kennedy, Ann Blair

    2015-01-01

    More than one-third of Americans are classified as obese. Many clinicians perform bariatric surgery (BSx) when it is said that lifestyle intervention failed. However, BSx is medically complex, with extremely variable success, certain failures, major complications, and sometimes death. Although many studies declare BSx as more effective for producing weight loss than nonsurgical lifestyle management, these conclusions are flawed when lifestyle management between cohorts are not identical. Lifestyle behavior change is essential to success for both surgical and nonsurgical weight loss, as over 50% of BSx patients regain weight without lifestyle modification. Indeed, programs that include self-reward and reinforcement are extremely effective. It is therefore possible that successful BSx is simply an intrinsic reward for an intensive change in lifestyle behavior. Accounting for the costs and risks associated with BSx, providing state and federal resources for lifestyle behavior change programs could provide a key opportunity for the war against obesity. PMID:25757003

  3. Weight loss by calorie restriction versus bariatric surgery differentially regulates the HPA axis in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Bernadette E.; Hakala-Finch, Andrew P.; Kekulawala, Melani; Laub, Holly; Egan, Ann E.; Ressler, Ilana B.; Woods, Stephen C.; Herman, James P.; Seeley, Randy J.; Benoit, Stephen C.; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral modifications for the treatment of obesity, including caloric restriction, have notoriously low long-term success rates relative to bariatric weight-loss surgery. The reasons for the difference in sustained weight loss are not clear. One possibility is that caloric restriction alone activates the stress-responsive hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, undermining the long-term maintenance of weight loss, and that this is abrogated after bariatric surgery. Accordingly, we compared the HPA response to weight loss in 5 groups of male rats: (1) high-fat diet-induced obese (DIO) rats treated with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB, n=7), (2) DIO rats treated with vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG, n=11), (3) DIO rats given sham surgery and subsequently restricted to the food intake of the VSG/RYGB groups (Pair-fed, n=11), (4) ad libitum-fed DIO rats given sham surgery (Obese, n=11) and (5) ad libitum chow-fed rats given sham surgery (Lean, n=12). Compared to Lean controls, food-restricted rats exhibited elevated morning (nadir) non-stress plasma corticosterone concentrations and increased hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone and vasopressin mRNA expression, indicative of basal HPA activation. This was largely prevented when weight loss was achieved by bariatric surgery. DIO increased HPA activation by acute (novel environment) stress and this was diminished by bariatric surgery-, but not pair-feeding-, induced weight loss. These results suggest that the HPA axis is differentially affected by weight loss from caloric restriction versus bariatric surgery, and this may contribute to the differing long-term effectiveness of these two weight-loss approaches. PMID:25238021

  4. Reoperative bariatric surgery. Lessons learned to improve patient selection and results.

    PubMed Central

    Behrns, K E; Smith, C D; Kelly, K A; Sarr, M G

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of presentation, safety, and efficacy of operative bariatric surgery. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The only lasting therapy for medically complicated clinically severe obesity is bariatric surgery. Several operative approaches have resulted in disappointing long-term weight loss or an unacceptable incidence of complications that require revisionary surgery. METHODS: Sixty-one consecutive patients who underwent reoperative bariatric surgery from 1985 to 1990 were observed prospectively. One, two, or three previous bariatric procedures had been performed in 77%, 18%, and 5% of patients, respectively. Reoperation was required for unsatisfactory weight loss after gastroplasty or gastric bypass (61%), metabolic complications of jejunoileal bypass (23%), or other complications (16%), including stomal obstruction, alkaline- or acid-reflux esophagitis, and anastomotic ulcer. Revisionary procedures included conversion to vertical banded gastroplasty (33% of operations) and vertical Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (52% of operations); partial pancreato-biliary bypass was used selectively in four patients with severe, medically complicated obesity. RESULTS: A single patient died postoperatively of a pulmonary embolus; serious morbidity occurred in 11%. Weight loss (mean +/- SEM) after reoperation for unsuccessful weight loss was greater with gastric bypass than with vertical banded gastroplasty (54 +/- 6% versus 24 +/- 6% of excess body weight). Metabolic complications of jejunoileal bypass were corrected, but 67% of the patients were dissatisfied with their postoperative lifestyle because of changes in eating habits or weight gain (64% of patients). Stomal complications and esophageal reflux symptoms were reversed in all patients. CONCLUSIONS: Reoperative bariatric surgery in selected patients is safe and effective for unsatisfactory weight loss or for complications of previous bariatric procedures. Conversion to

  5. Bariatric surgery outcomes: a single-center study in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Abusnana, Salah; Abdi, Sarah; Tagure, Brigette; Elbagir, Murtada; Maleckas, Almantas

    2015-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery has become an attractive treatment for severe obesity over the last decade, due to its impacts on weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In the United Arab Emirates, a country where the rate of obesity is dramatically increasing bariatric surgery has gained popularity in recent years; however, published data on its outcomes in the Emirati population are lacking. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 95 patients who underwent bariatric surgery (ie, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [RYGB] or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy) at the Rashid Center for Diabetes and Research in Ajman, United Arab Emirates. Weight outcomes and metabolic marker data were abstracted at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Results Laparoscopic RYGB was the main procedure performed by our bariatric unit. All variables demonstrated postoperative improvement. An average excess weight loss of 68% was observed at 12 months. Fat mass was the body component that decreased the most, with an average reduction of 46%. Additionally, lipid profiles were significantly different (P<0.01) at 12 months, with triglyceride levels improving by 27% and low-density lipoprotein levels improving by 21%. Similarly, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels decreased significantly (P<0.001) in patients with type 2 diabetes, with an average reduction of 73%. Conclusion Our results show that a substantial short-term reduction in weight and significant improvements in metabolic markers followed bariatric surgery in severely obese Emirati patients. Our results are consistent with the outcomes of other internationally published studies. Additional studies are warranted to determine whether the favorable impacts of bariatric surgery can be sustained over the long term. PMID:26425103

  6. Postprandial GLP-1 Secretion After Bariatric Surgery in Three Cases of Severe Obesity Related to Craniopharyngiomas.

    PubMed

    Bretault, Marion; Laroche, Suzanne; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Barsamian, Charles; Polak, Michel; Raffin-Sanson, Marie-Laure; Touraine, Philippe; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Czernichow, Sebastien; Carette, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are rare cerebral tumors associated with severe obesity after hypothalamic surgery. A meta-analysis showed significant weight loss at 1 year after bariatric surgery in these patients even though more modest than in common causes of obesity. We hypothesized that this discrepancy could be partly explained by differences in GLP-1 secretion after surgery since patients with craniopharyngioma present a significantly higher degree of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism than common obese control. We report three cases of bariatric surgery in patients presenting with hypothalamique obesity related to craniopharyngiomas. At 18 months, the mean weight loss was 20 kg with expected insulin resistance decrease. Before surgery, standardized test meal shows abolition of postprandial GLP-1 secretion in all patients with a progressive restoration in the patients with gastric bypass (GBP) surgery. PMID:26922186

  7. Perioperative Outcome of Adolescents Undergoing Bariatric Surgery: The Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Inge, T.H.; Zeller, M.H.; Jenkins, T.M.; Helmrath, M.; Brandt, M.L.; Michalsky, M.P.; Harmon, C.M.; Courcoulas, A.; Horlick, M.; Xanthakos, S.A.; Dolan, L.; Mitsnefes, M.; Barnett, S.J.; Buncher, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    -term complication profile, supporting the early postoperative safety of WLS in select adolescents. Further longitudinal study of this cohort will permit accurate assessment of long-term outcomes for adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery. PMID:24189578

  8. Conserved Metabolic Changes in Nondiabetic and Type 2 Diabetic Bariatric Surgery Patients: Global Metabolomic Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarosiek, Konrad; Pappan, Kirk L.; Gandhi, Ankit V.; Saxena, Shivam; Kang, Christopher Y.; McMahon, Heather; Chipitsyna, Galina I.; Tichansky, David S.; Arafat, Hwyda A.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide insight into the mechanism by which bariatric surgical procedures led to weight loss and improvement or resolution of diabetes. Global biochemical profiling was used to evaluate changes occurring in nondiabetic and type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients experiencing either less extreme sleeve gastrectomy or a full gastric bypass. We were able to identify changes in metabolism that were affected by standard preoperation liquid weight loss diet as well as by bariatric surgery itself. Preoperation weight-loss diet was associated with a strong lipid metabolism signature largely related to the consumption of adipose reserves for energy production. Glucose usage shift away from glycolytic pyruvate production toward pentose phosphate pathway, via glucose-6-phosphate, appeared to be shared across all patients regardless of T2D status or bariatric surgery procedure. Our results suggested that bariatric surgery might promote antioxidant defense and insulin sensitivity through both increased heme synthesis and HO activity or expression. Changes in histidine and its metabolites following surgery might be an indication of altered gut microbiome ecology or liver function. This initial study provided broad understanding of how metabolism changed globally in morbidly obese nondiabetic and T2D patients following weight-loss surgery. PMID:26881244

  9. Complications of bariatric surgery - What the general surgeon needs to know.

    PubMed

    Healy, Paul; Clarke, Christopher; Reynolds, Ian; Arumugasamy, Mayilone; McNamara, Deborah

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is an important cause of physical and psychosocial morbidity and it places a significant burden on health system costs and resources. Worldwide an estimated 200 million people over 20 years are obese and in the UK the Department of Health report that 61.3% of people in the UK are either overweight or obese. Surgery for obesity (bariatric surgery) is being performed with increasing frequency in specialist centres both in the UK and Ireland and abroad due to the phenomenon of health tourism. Its role and success in treating medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension in obese patients will likely lead to an even greater number of bariatric surgery procedures being performed. Patients with early postoperative complications may be managed in specialist centres but patients with later complications, occurring months or years after surgery, may present to local surgical units for assessment and management. This review will highlight the late complications of the 3 most commonly performed bariatric surgery procedures that the emergency general surgeon may encounter. It will also highlight the complications that require urgent intervention by the emergency general surgeon and those that can be safely referred to a bariatric surgeon for further management after initial assessment and investigations. PMID:26344739

  10. Conserved Metabolic Changes in Nondiabetic and Type 2 Diabetic Bariatric Surgery Patients: Global Metabolomic Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sarosiek, Konrad; Pappan, Kirk L; Gandhi, Ankit V; Saxena, Shivam; Kang, Christopher Y; McMahon, Heather; Chipitsyna, Galina I; Tichansky, David S; Arafat, Hwyda A

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide insight into the mechanism by which bariatric surgical procedures led to weight loss and improvement or resolution of diabetes. Global biochemical profiling was used to evaluate changes occurring in nondiabetic and type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients experiencing either less extreme sleeve gastrectomy or a full gastric bypass. We were able to identify changes in metabolism that were affected by standard preoperation liquid weight loss diet as well as by bariatric surgery itself. Preoperation weight-loss diet was associated with a strong lipid metabolism signature largely related to the consumption of adipose reserves for energy production. Glucose usage shift away from glycolytic pyruvate production toward pentose phosphate pathway, via glucose-6-phosphate, appeared to be shared across all patients regardless of T2D status or bariatric surgery procedure. Our results suggested that bariatric surgery might promote antioxidant defense and insulin sensitivity through both increased heme synthesis and HO activity or expression. Changes in histidine and its metabolites following surgery might be an indication of altered gut microbiome ecology or liver function. This initial study provided broad understanding of how metabolism changed globally in morbidly obese nondiabetic and T2D patients following weight-loss surgery. PMID:26881244

  11. Hepatic Pathology Among Patients Without Known Liver Disease Undergoing Bariatric Surgery: Observations and a Perspective from the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, David E.; Berk, Paul D.; Hsu, Jesse Y.; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Flum, David; Khandelwal, Saurabh; Pender, John; Pomp, Alfons; Roerig, James; Machado, Laura L.; Wolfe, Bruce M.; Belle, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Liver biopsy is not routine during bariatric surgery. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is widely used to screen for liver disease. We assessed the relationship between ALT and pathology in biopsies from Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS) patients with normal preoperative ALTs. Methods Biopsies from the LABS-1 and LABS-2 studies were scored using the NASH CRN and Ishak systems. Diagnosis and histology were examined in relation to ALT. Results 693 suitable biopsies were evaluated. Biopsied patients had a median age of 45 years; 78.6% were female and 35.1% diabetic; median BMI was 46 kg/m2. 635 biopsied patients had preoperative ALTs. Median ALT was 25 IU/L, (IQR 19–36 IU/L); 26.6% had an ALT >35 IU/L and 29.9% exceeded the more restrictive Prati criteria for normal. Using the Prati criteria, 7.9% of participants with normal ALT had steatohepatitis and 5.3% had ≥stage 2 fibrosis. Logistic regression models were used to predict the probabilities of having bridging fibrosis/cirrhosis or a diagnosis of borderline/definite steatohepatitis in the unbiopsied LABS-2 sample. The proportion of biopsied participants with these findings was very similar to the modeled results from the unbiopsied cohorts. We estimated that 86.0% of participants with advanced fibrosis and 88.1% of participants with borderline/definite steatohepatitis were not biopsied and went undiagnosed. Conclusion As ALT did not reliably exclude significant obesity-related liver disease in bariatric surgery patients, consideration should be given to routine liver biopsy during bariatric surgery and medical follow-up of significant hepatic pathology. PMID:24782263

  12. Expectations and patients’ experiences of obesity prior to bariatric surgery: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Catherine Verity; Thompson, Andrew R; Allmark, Peter; Goyder, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to understand the experiences and expectations of people seeking bariatric surgery in England and identify implications for behavioural and self-management interventions. Design A qualitative study using modified photovoice methods, triangulating photography with semistructured indepth interviews analysed using framework techniques. Setting Areas served by two bariatric surgery multidisciplinary teams in the north of England. Participants 18 adults (14 women and 4 men) who accepted for bariatric surgery, and were aged between 30 and 61 years. Participants were recruited through hospital-based tier 4 bariatric surgery multidisciplinary teams. Results The experiences of participants indicates the nature and extent of the burden of obesity. Problems included stigmatisation, shame, poor health, physical function and reliance on medications. Participants expected surgery to result in major physical and psychological improvement. They described how this expectation was rooted in their experiences of stigma and shame. These feelings were reinforced by previous unsuccessful weight loss attempts. Participants expected extreme and sometimes unrealistic levels of sustained weight loss, as well as improvements to physical and mental health. The overall desire and expectation of bariatric surgery was of ‘normality’. Participants had received previous support from clinicians and in weight management services. However, they reported that their expectations of surgery had not been reviewed by services, and expectations appeared to be unrealistic. Likewise, their experience of stigmatisation had not been addressed. Conclusions The unrealistic expectations identified here may negatively affect postoperative outcomes. The findings indicate the importance of services addressing feelings of shame and stigmatisation, and modifying patient's expectations and goals for the postoperative period. PMID:26857104

  13. Post-Bariatric Surgery Changes in Quinolinic and Xanthurenic Acid Concentrations Are Associated with Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pigeyre, Marie; Caiazzo, Robert; Raverdy, Violeta; Verkindt, Hélène; Leloire, Audrey; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Yengo, Loïc; Allorge, Delphine; Froguel, Philippe; Pattou, François

    2016-01-01

    Background An increase of plasma kynurenine concentrations, potentially bioactive metabolites of tryptophan, was found in subjects with obesity, resulting from low-grade inflammation of the white adipose tissue. Bariatric surgery decreases low-grade inflammation associated with obesity and improves glucose control. Objective Our goal was to determine the concentrations of all kynurenine metabolites after bariatric surgery and whether they were correlated with glucose control improvement. Design Kynurenine metabolite concentrations, analysed by liquid or gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, circulating inflammatory markers, metabolic traits, and BMI were measured before and one year after bariatric surgery in 44 normoglycemic and 47 diabetic women with obesity. Associations between changes in kynurenine metabolites concentrations and in glucose control and metabolic traits were analysed between baseline and twelve months after surgery. Results Tryptophan and kynurenine metabolite concentrations were significantly decreased one year after bariatric surgery and were correlated with the decrease of the usCRP in both groups. Among all the kynurenine metabolites evaluated, only quinolinic acid and xanthurenic acid were significantly associated with glucose control improvement. The one year delta of quinolinic acid concentrations was negatively associated with the delta of fasting glucose (p = 0.019) and HbA1c (p = 0.014), whereas the delta of xanthurenic acid was positively associated with the delta of insulin sensitivity index (p = 0.0018). Conclusion Bariatric surgery has induced a global down-regulation of kynurenine metabolites, associated with weight loss. Our results suggest that, since kynurenine monoxygenase diverts the kynurenine pathway toward the synthesis of xanthurenic acid, its inhibition may also contribute to glucose homeostasis. PMID:27327770

  14. Effective Ventilation Strategies for Obese Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin Yan

    2016-02-01

    Obesity causes major alterations in pulmonary mechanics. Obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery present mechanical ventilation-related challenges that may lead to perioperative complications. Databases were systematically searched for clinical trials of ventilation maneuvers for obese patients and bariatric surgery. Thirteen randomized controlled trials were selected. The quality of the studies was evaluated with the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool, and a matrix was developed to present the essential components of the studies. Eight strategies of ventilation maneuvers were identified. Recruitment maneuvers followed by positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) consistently demonstrated effectiveness in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Pressure-controlled ventilation and volume-controlled ventilation did not differ significantly in their efficacy. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) during induction was effective in preventing atelectasis and increasing the duration of safe apnea. Equal ratio ventilation can be a useful ventilation strategy. Recruitment maneuvers followed by PEEP are effective ventilation strategies for obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. During induction, NIPPV provides further benefit. Future studies are needed to examine the postoperative effects of recruitment maneuvers with PEEP as well as the efficacy and safety of equal ratio ventilation. PMID:26939387

  15. An Update on Less Invasive and Endoscopic Techniques Mimicking the Effect of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Verdam, Froukje J.; Schouten, Ruben; Greve, Jan Willem; Koek, Ger H.; Bouvy, Nicole D.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity (BMI 30–35 kg/m2) and its associated disorders such as type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and cardiovascular disease have reached pandemic proportions worldwide. For the morbidly obese population (BMI 35–50 kg/m2), bariatric surgery has proven to be the most effective treatment to achieve significant and sustained weight loss, with concomitant positive effects on the metabolic syndrome. However, only a minor percentage of eligible candidates are treated by means of bariatric surgery. In addition, the expanding obesity epidemic consists mostly of relatively less obese patients who are not (yet) eligible for bariatric surgery. Hence, less invasive techniques and devices are rapidly being developed. These novel entities mimic several aspects of bariatric surgery either by gastric restriction (gastric balloons, gastric plication), by influencing gastric function (gastric botulinum injections, gastric pacing, and vagal nerve stimulation), or by partial exclusion of the small intestine (duodenal-jejunal sleeve). In the last decade, several novel less invasive techniques have been introduced and some have been abandoned again. The aim of this paper is to discuss the safety, efficacy, complications, reversibility, and long-term results of these latest developments in the treatment of obesity. PMID:22957215

  16. Bariatric Surgery for Morbid Obesity: Tehran Obesity Treatment Study (TOTS) Rationale and Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinpanah, Farhad; Motamedi, Mohammad Ali; Shapoori, Parvin; Arian, Peyman; Daneshpour, Maryam Alsadat; Asghari, Golale; Teymoornejad, Ahmad; Eslamifar, Ali; Khalili, Davood; Jodeiri, Behzad; Alamdari, Shahram; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is a major health concern in the Middle East and worldwide. It is among the leading causes of morbidity, mortality, health care utilization, and costs. With bariatric surgery proving to be a more effective treatment option for overweight and obesity, the need for systematic assessment of different procedures and their outcomes becomes necessary. These procedures have not yet been described in detail in our region. Objective We aim to undertake a prospective study evaluating and comparing several surgical bariatric procedures in an Iranian population of morbid obese patients presenting to a specialized bariatric center. Methods In order to facilitate and accelerate understanding of obesity and its complications, the Tehran Obesity Treatment Study (TOTS) was planned and developed. This study is a longitudinal prospective cohort study in consecutive patients undergoing bariatric surgery. TOTS investigators use standardized definitions, high-fidelity data collection system, and validated instruments to gather data preoperatively, at the time of surgery, postoperatively, and in longer-term follow-up. Results This study has recruited 1050 participants as of September 2015 and is ongoing. Conclusions This study will ensure creation of high-level evidence to enable clinicians to make meaningful evidence-based decisions for patient evaluation, selection for surgery, and follow-up care. PMID:26792554

  17. 'Eisenbergiella massiliensis', a new species isolated from human stool collected after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Togo, A H; Khelaifia, S; Bittar, F; Maraninchi, M; Raoult, D; Million, M

    2016-09-01

    We report the principal characteristics of 'Eisenbergiella massiliensis' sp. nov. strain AT11 (CSURP = P2120, DSM = 101499) that was isolated from a stool sample collected after bariatric surgery of a 56-year-old obese French woman. PMID:27358742

  18. Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire Factor Structure and Construct Validity In Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Henderson, Kathryn E.; Bell, Robert L.; Crosby, Ross D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) is increasingly used in studies with bariatric surgery patients although little is known about psychometric properties of this self-report measure in this clinical group. The current study evaluated the factor structure and construct validity of the EDE-Q in bariatric surgery candidates. Methods Participants were a consecutive series of 174 obese bariatric surgery candidates who completed the EDE-Q and a battery of behavioral and psychological measures. Results Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) revealed an inadequate fit for the original EDE-Q structure but revealed a good fit for an alternative structure suggested by recent research with obese samples. CFA supported a 7-item, 3-factor structure; the three factors were interpreted as dietary restraint, shape/weight overvaluation, and body dissatisfaction. The three factors converged with other relevant collateral measures. Conclusions These factor analytic findings, which replicate recent findings from studies with diverse obese samples, demonstrated convergent validity. Implications of these findings for clinical assessment and research with bariatric surgery patients are discussed. PMID:23229951

  19. Bariatric Bypass Surgery to Resolve Complicated Childhood Morbid Obesity: Case Report Study: Erratum.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    In the article ''Bariatric Bypass Surgery to Resolve Complicated Childhood Morbid Obesity: Case Report Study'', which appeared in Volume 94, Issue 49 of Medicine, Dr. Elrazek's name was incorrectly presented as Abd Elrazek M. Ali Hussein when it should have read Abd Elrazek Abd Elrazek. The article has since been corrected online. PMID:27231816

  20. Answers to Clinical Questions in the Primary Care Management of People with Obesity: Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Braverman-Panza, Jill; Horn, Deborah Bade

    2016-07-01

    The role of bariatric surgery in the management of patients with obesity is expanding owing to the amount of data that are accumulating; these data demonstrate significant short- and long-term health benefits, including control or remission of obesity-related complications, as well as acceptable long-term safety. PMID:27565108

  1. A Qualitative Assessment of the My True Body Bariatric Surgery Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Tracy; Mamary, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Background: The My True Body (MTB) group intervention incorporates cognitive restructuring and social support into bariatric surgery preparation. Purpose: To identify and describe program components that support long-term behavioral modifications and influence confidence in healthy weight maintenance. Methods: Semistructured telephone interviews…

  2. Factors Associated with Suicide Ideation in Severely Obese Bariatric Surgery-Seeking Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Eunice Y.; Fettich, Karla C.; Tierney, Megan; Cummings, Hakeemah; Berona, Johnny; Weissman, Jessica; Ward, Amanda; Christensen, Kara; Southward, Matthew; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Mitchell, James; Coccaro, Emil

    2012-01-01

    There are high rates of suicide ideation and/or behavior in severely obese individuals. The potential contributors to suicide ideation in a sample of 334 severely obese bariatric surgery candidates was explored. Lack of college education, a history of suicide ideation and/or behavior, psychological distress, hopelessness, loneliness, history of…

  3. 'Negativicoccus massiliensis', a new species identified from human stool from an obese patient after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Togo, A H; Khelaifia, S; Valero, R; Cadoret, F; Raoult, D; Million, M

    2016-09-01

    We report here the main characteristics of 'Negativicoccus massiliensis' strain AT7 (CSURP = P2082, DSM = 100853) isolated from a stool sample collected from a 47-year-old obese French man before bariatric surgery. PMID:27408741

  4. Course of Depressive Symptoms and Treatment in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS-2) Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, James E.; King, Wendy C.; Chen, Jia-Yuh; Devlin, Michael J.; Flum, David; Garcia, Luis; Pender, John R.; Kalarchian, Melissa A.; Khandelwal, Saurabh; Marcus, Marsha D.; Schrope, Beth; Strain, Gladys; Wolfe, Bruce; Yanovski, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine changes in depressive symptoms and treatment in the first three years following bariatric surgery. Design and Methods The Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 is an observational cohort study of adults (n=2,458) who underwent a bariatric surgical procedure at one of ten US hospitals between 2006–9. This study includes 2,148 participants who completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at baseline and ≥ one follow-up visit in years 1–3. Results At baseline, 40.4% self-reported treatment for depression. At least mild depressive symptoms (BDI score≥10) were reported by 28.3%; moderate (BDI score 19–29) and severe (BDI score ≥30) symptoms were uncommon (4.2% and 0.5%, respectively). Mild-to-severe depressive symptoms independently increased the odds (OR=1.75; p=.03) of a major adverse event within 30 days of surgery. Compared with baseline, symptom severity was significantly lower at all follow-up time points (e.g., mild-to-severe symptomatology was 8.9%, 6 months; 8.4%, 1yr; 12.2%, 2yrs; 15.6%, 3yrs; ps<.001), but increased between 1 and 3 years postoperatively (p<.01). Change in depressive symptoms was significantly related to change in body mass index (r=.42; p<0001). Conclusion Bariatric surgery has a positive impact on depressive features. However, data suggest some deterioration in improvement after the first postoperative year. PMID:24634371

  5. Reduced Survival in Bariatric Surgery Candidates Delayed or Denied by Lack of Insurance Approval.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Eleisha; Ghaderi, Iman; Overby, D Wayne; Farrell, Timothy M

    2016-02-01

    Bariatric surgery reduces mortality for Americans who meet candidacy criteria and have insurance coverage. Unfortunately, some medically suitable candidates are denied or delayed during insurance approval processes. The long-term impact of such care delays on survival is unknown. Using a prospectively maintained bariatric intake database, we identified consecutive applicants who were evaluated and medically cleared by our multidisciplinary care team and for whom insurance approval was requested. We compared survival in those who were initially approved by their insurance carriers (controls) and those who were initially denied coverage (subjects). Mortality was determined using the Social Security Death Index. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted and the log-rank test for significance was applied. From August 2003 to December 2008, 463 patients (391 females, mean age 45 ± 10 years, mean body mass index 52.5 ± 9.4 kg/m(2)) were medically cleared for a bariatric procedure. Of these, 363 were approved by insurance on initial request, whereas 100 were denied. Given the study's intention to measure the aggregate impact of delays and denials, nine patients who later came to operation after appeal or coverage change were maintained in the subject cohort. During 0- to 113-month follow-up, six subjects (6%) died compared with seven controls (1.9%), corresponding to a statistically significant survival benefit for patients initially approved for bariatric surgery without delay or denial (P < 0.001). In conclusion, access to bariatric surgical care was impeded by insurance certification processes in 22 per cent of medically acceptable candidates. Processes that delay or restrict efficient access to bariatric surgery are associated with a 3-fold mortality increase. PMID:26874141

  6. Association between nutrient adequacy and psychosocial factors with overall rate of weight loss after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Vanoh, Divya; Shahar, Suzana; Mahmood, Nik Ritza Kosai Nik

    2015-01-01

    This was a cross-sectional study that investigated the relationship between nutrient intake and psychosocial factors with the overall rate of weight loss after bariatric surgery among patients who had undergone sleeve gastrectomy in University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC). Forty-three subjects (15 men and 28 women) were recruited for this study. Subjects completed assessment questionnaires including the Binge Eating Scale (BES), Beck Depression Inventory (BECK), Family Support Questionnaires, and the Index of Peer Relation (IPR). Results showed that the median overall rate of weight loss was 4.3±5.5 kg/month, which was lower when compared to the rate of weight loss at three months which was 5.0±5.6 kg/month. Pre-operative weight was the predictor of overall rate of weight loss (p<0.05, R²=0.52). Binge eating disorder (BED) and depression were also closely associated with each other after bariatric surgery (p<0.001, R²=0.46). Subjects with good compliance to dietary advice had lower scores on the binge eating scale. The mean caloric and protein intake was very low, only 562±310 kcal/day and 29.6±16.1 g/day. The intake of vitamin A, B-1, B-2, B-3, B-12, C, folate, and iron met the Malaysian Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI). However, the RNI for calcium, zinc, selenium, vitamin D, and vitamin E was not met. In conclusion, although bariatric surgery had many health benefits, several factors hindered weight loss after bariatric surgery. Health care professionals should closely monitor patients after bariatric surgery. PMID:26693745

  7. [Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity in childhood and adolescence: where do we stand in 2008?].

    PubMed

    Till, Holger; Bluher, Susann; Kiess, Wiel

    2009-01-01

    Bariatric surgery for children and adolescents with morbid obesity has not gained broad acceptance in Germany yet.Nevertheless, these children often fail to reduce weight despite intensive weight loss programmes and suffer from an associate metabolic syndrome, just like adults. Thus, bariatric surgery may be a favourable option. The present article compares national and international experiences concerning guidelines, surgical procedures, and results. It becomes obvious that Germany has neither specific guidelines for children and adolescents nor a central registry. Internationally,the recommendation from the Bariatric Scientific Collaborative Group (BSCG) should be taken as the standard. As in adults, most surgeons perform Roux-Y gastric bypass or gastric banding. Additionally, sleeve gastrectomy is gaining some popularity. These procedures are performed in designated pediatric centres especially in the US. Their success and complication rates are similar to those found in adults.The overall long-term consequences, however, remain unclear.Thus, for bariatric surgery in children and adolescents it may be concluded that a) these patients should be treated in designated centres that offer the full range of therapeutic options,b) specific guidelines should be established, especially in Germany, and c) a long-term postoperative study of all patients is necessary to collect all data and refine the techniques used. PMID:20124776

  8. Binge eating in bariatric surgery candidates: The role of insecure attachment and emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Shakory, Sharry; Van Exan, Jessica; Mills, Jennifer S; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Keating, Leah; Taube-Schiff, Marlene

    2015-08-01

    Binge eating has a high prevalence among bariatric patients and is associated with post-surgical weight gain. This study examined the potential mediating role of emotion regulation difficulties in the relation between attachment insecurity and binge eating among this population. Participants were 1388 adult pre-bariatric surgery candidates from an accredited bariatric surgery assessment centre in Toronto, Ontario. Participants completed measures of psychological functioning, including attachment style and emotion regulation. Mediation analyses revealed that difficulties with emotion regulation mediated a positive association between insecure-anxious attachment and binge eating. An insecure-avoidant attachment was found to have a non-significant association with binge eating when examining the total effect. However, when difficulties with emotion regulation were controlled for in the model to examine its role as a mediator, this association became significant, and emotion regulation difficulties also mediated the relationship between attachment avoidance and binge eating. These findings suggest that difficulties in emotion regulation may be an important clinical issue to address in order to reduce binge eating in adult bariatric surgery candidates. PMID:25828596

  9. Biological effects of bariatric surgery on obesity-related comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Noria, Sabrena F; Grantcharov, Teodor

    2013-02-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased so rapidly over the last few decades that it is now considered a global epidemic. Obesity, defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more, is associated with several comorbid conditions that decrease life expectancy and increase health care costs. Diet therapies have been reported to be ineffective in the long-term treatment of obesity, and guidelines for the surgical therapy of morbid obesity (BMI ≥ 40 or BMI ≥ 35 in the presence of substantial comorbidities) have since been established. Considering the number of bariatric surgical procedures has dramatically increased since these guidelines were established, we review the types of bariatric surgical procedures and their impact on diabetes, sleep apnea, dyslipidemia and hypertension - 4 major obesity-related comorbidities. PMID:23351555

  10. The anaesthetic assessment, management and risk factors of bariatric surgical patients requiring postoperative intensive care support: a state-wide, five-year cohort study.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D J R; Ho, K M

    2016-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is a rapidly growing and dynamic discipline necessitating a specialised anaesthetic approach coordinating high-risk patients with appropriate post-operative intensive care (ICU) support. The relationship between the anaesthetic and ICU utilisation after bariatric surgery is poorly understood. All adult bariatric surgery patients admitted to any ICU over a five-year period between 2007 and 2011 in Western Australia were identified from hospital admission records and cross-referenced against the Western Australian Department of Health Data Linkage Unit database. During the study period 12,062 patients under went bariatric surgery with 581 (4.8%) patients admitted to ICU immediately following surgery. The mean pre-operative ASA score was 3.3 [standard deviation 1.1] with 76.9% of patients were assessed by their anaesthetist for the first time on the day-of-surgery. Blood pathology (75%) and ECG (46.3%) were the most common preoperative investigations. Intra-operatively, 2.1% of patients had a grade 4 intubation with only 3.4% of patients requiring a videoscopic assisted intubation. Despite being deemed at high risk, 23.6% of patients were managed with 20 gauge or smaller intravenous access. Anaesthetic complications were extremely uncommon (0.5% of all bariatric cases) but accounted for 9.7% of all postoperative ICU admissions. Smoking history, but not body-mass-index (P=0.46), was the only significant prognostic factor for respiratory or airway related anaesthetic complications (P=0.012). In summary, the anaesthesia management of bariatric surgery varied widely in Western Australia, with smoking as the only significant preoperative risk factor for respiratory or airway related anaesthesia complications. PMID:27029656

  11. Bariatric to metabolic surgery: management options and experience at a tertiary centre.

    PubMed

    Raj, P Praveen; Chandramaliteeswaran, C; Senthilnathan, P; Asokan, S; Palanivelu, C

    2010-10-01

    Obesity proves to be a growing pandemic with severe health and economic implications. Bariatric surgeries are now recognised as metabolic surgeries given the excellent resolution of metabolic derangements accompanying obesity. This concept of metabolic surgery is now applied to non-obese population with metabolic disorders. The type II diabetes mellitus remission rates as high as 95% have been reported, least with restrictive procedures and maximum with malabsorptive procedures and such effect occurs even before substantial weight loss. This has led to increased understanding of diabetes pathophysiology and formulation of foregut and hindgut hypothesis. The aim of this study was to briefly review the management options for morbid obesity and present the results at a high volume centre. Data from 518 patients who underwent laparoscopic bariatric surgeries at this institute since 2002 were taken up for analysis retrospectively. Study population included 518 patients with 310 males and 208 females. Excess body weight loss and comorbidity resolution rates were analysed. Laparoscopic bariatric surgery is safe and effective for excess body weight loss and confers excellent resolution of associated comorbidities. PMID:21510546

  12. Becoming a normal guy: Men making sense of long-term bodily changes following bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Groven, Karen Synne; Galdas, Paul; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, research on bodily changes following bariatric surgery has focused predominantly on women, leaving the long-term experience of men relatively unexplored. In this paper, we draw on interviews with men who have undergone an irreversible gastric bypass procedure to explore their bodily changes more than 4 years post-surgery. We apply a phenomenological framework that draws on Leder's perspectives on the “disappearing” and “dys-appearing” body, combined with a gender-sensitive lens that draws on Connell's theory of hegemonic masculinity and Robertson's conceptions of embodied masculinity. Findings Our principal finding was that the men negotiated their bodily changes following bariatric surgery in profoundly ambivalent ways. Although they enthusiastically praised the surgery for improving their health, self-esteem, and social functioning, they also emphasized their efforts to cope with post-surgical side effects and life-threatening complications. Our analysis elaborates on their efforts to adjust to and come to terms with these changes, focusing on episodes of hypoglycemia, severe pain and internal herniation, and the significance of physical activity and exercise. Conclusions Our findings point to the need to acknowledge men's ways of making sense of profound and ongoing bodily changes following bariatric surgery and how these negotiations are closely intertwined with masculine ideals of embodiment and social value. PMID:26641203

  13. Guidelines for the follow-up of patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    O'Kane, Mary; Parretti, Helen M; Hughes, Carly A; Sharma, Manisha; Woodcock, Sean; Puplampu, Tamara; Blakemore, Alexandra I; Clare, Kenneth; MacMillan, Iris; Joyce, Jacqueline; Sethi, Su; Barth, Julian H

    2016-06-01

    Bariatric surgery can facilitate weight loss and improvement in medical comorbidities. It has a profound impact on nutrition, and patients need access to follow-up and aftercare. NICE CG189 Obesity emphasized the importance of a minimum of 2 years follow-up in the bariatric surgical service and recommended that following discharge from the surgical service, there should be annual monitoring as part of a shared care model of chronic disease management. NHS England Obesity Clinical Reference Group commissioned a multi-professional subgroup, which included patient representatives, to develop bariatric surgery follow-up guidelines. Terms of reference and scope were agreed upon. The group members took responsibility for different sections of the guidelines depending on their areas of expertise and experience. The quality of the evidence was rated and strength graded. Four different shared care models were proposed, taking into account the variation in access to bariatric surgical services and specialist teams across the country. The common features include annual review, ability for a GP to refer back to specialist centre, submission of follow-up data to the national data base to NBSR. Clinical commissioning groups need to ensure that a shared care model is implemented as patient safety and long-term follow-up are important. PMID:27166136

  14. The association between reduced inflammation and cognitive gains after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Misty A.W.; Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Gunstad, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective Bariatric surgery is associated with improved cognitive function, though the mechanisms are unclear. Elevated inflammation is common in obesity and associated with impaired cognition. Inflammation decreases after bariatric surgery, implicating it as a possible mechanism for cognitive improvement. The objective of this study was to examine whether reduced inflammation is a possible mechanism for post-operative cognitive improvement in bariatric surgery patients. Methods Participants were 77 bariatric surgery patients who completed cognitive testing before surgery and one year post-surgery. Cognitive domains assessed were attention/executive function, language, and memory. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was assessed at both time points. Results Patients exhibited pre-operative cognitive impairment, though attention/executive (M±SDbaseline= 53.57 ± 8.68 vs.M±SDfollow-up= 60.32 ± 8.19) and memory (M±SDbaseline= 44.96 ± 7.98 vs.M±SDfollow-up= 51.55 ± 8.25) improved one year post-surgery. CRP was elevated at baseline and fell into the normative range post-surgery (M±SDbaseline= 0.9 ± 0.7vs.M±SDfollow-up= 0.2 ± 0.3 mg/dL). Pre-operative CRP was not associated with baseline cognitive function (β-values = -0.10 to 0.02) and changes in CRP also did not correspond to changes in cognition post-surgery (β-values = 0.02 to β = 0.11; ps>0.05 for all domains). A trend was detected for smaller improvements in memory among participants with elevated baseline CRP (>0.30 mg/dL) versus those with normal levels (Group x Time: p=0.083). Conclusions Improvements in hs-CRP were not associated with post-operative cognitive benefits. Future studies are needed to explore other inflammatory markers and potential mechanisms of cognitive improvement after bariatric surgery, including improved glycemic control and neurohormone changes. PMID:25478707

  15. Differential Effects of Bariatric Surgery Versus Exercise on Excessive Visceral Fat Deposits.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fu-Zong; Huang, Yi-Luan; Wu, Carol C; Wang, Yen-Chi; Pan, Hsiang-Ju; Huang, Chin-Kun; Yeh, Lee-Ren; Wu, Ming-Ting

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare differential impacts of bariatric surgery and exercise-induced weight loss on excessive abdominal and cardiac fat deposition.Excessive fat accumulation around the heart may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Recent evidences have suggested that bariatric surgery results in relatively less decrease in epicardial fat compared with abdominal visceral fat and paracardial fat.Sixty-four consecutive overweight or obese subjects were enrolled in the study. Clinical characteristics and metabolic profiles were recorded. The volumes of abdominal visceral adipose tissue (AVAT), abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASAT), epicardial (EAT), and paracardial adipose tissue (PAT) were measured by computed tomography in the bariatric surgery group (N = 25) and the exercise group (N = 39) at baseline and 3 months after intervention. Subjects in both the surgery and exercise groups showed significant reduction in body mass index (15.97%, 7.47%), AVAT (40.52%, 15.24%), ASAT (31.40, 17.34%), PAT (34.40%, 12.05%), and PAT + EAT (22.31%, 17.72%) (all P < 0.001) after intervention compared with baseline. In both the groups, the decrease in EAT was small compared with the other compartments (P < 0.01 in both groups). Compared with the exercise group, the surgery group had greater loss in abdominal and cardiac visceral adipose tissue (AVAT, ASAT, PAT, EAT+PAT) (P < 0.001), but lesser loss in EAT (P = 0.037).Compared with the exercise group, bariatric surgery results in significantly greater percentage loss of excessive fat deposits except for EAT. EAT, but not PAT, was relatively preserved despite weight reduction in both the groups. The physiological impact of persistent EAT deserves further investigation. PMID:26844473

  16. Obstructive sleep apnea and pulmonary function in patients with severe obesity before and after bariatric surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of obesity in both developed and developing countries is one of the most serious public health problems and has led to a global epidemic. Obesity is one of the greatest risk factors of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is found in 60 to 70% of obese patients mainly due to the buildup of fat tissue in the upper portion of the thorax and neck. The aim of the present randomized clinical trial is to assess daytime sleepiness, sleep architecture and pulmonary function in patients with severe obesity before and after bariatric surgery. Methods This randomized, controlled trial, was designed, conducted, and reported in accordance with the standards of The CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) Statement. Patients were divided into a bariatric surgery group and control group. The clinical evaluation was performed at the Sleep Laboratory of the Nove de JulhoUniversity (Sao Paulo, Brazil) and consisted of the collection of clinical data, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), measurements of neck and abdomen circumferences, spirometry, maximum ventilatory pressure measurements, standard overnight polysomnography (PSG) and the administration of the Berlin Questionnaire and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Results Fifty-two patients participated in the present study and performed PSG. Out of these, 16 underwent bariatric surgery. After surgery, mean BMI decreased from 48.15 ± 8.58 to 36.91 ± 6.67 Kg/m2. Significant differences were found between the preoperative and postoperative periods regarding neck (p < 0.001) and waist circumference (p < 0.001), maximum inspiratory pressure (p = 0.002 and p = 0.004) and maximum expiratory pressure (p = 0.001 and p = 0.002) for women and men, respectively, as well as sleep stage N3 (p < 0.001), REM sleep (p = 0.049) and the apnea-hypopnea index (p = 0.008). Conclusions Bariatric surgery effectively reduces neck and waist circumference, increases maximum ventilatory pressures, enhances sleep

  17. Obese African-American Women’s Perspectives on Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Cheryl Sterling; Chang, Judy C.; Ford, Angela F.

    2007-01-01

    Background African-American (AA) women have higher rates of obesity and obesity-related diseases but are less likely than other women to undergo bariatric surgery or have success with conventional weight loss methods. Objective To explore obese AA women’s perceptions regarding barriers to weight loss and bariatric surgery. Design Focus groups to stimulate interactive dialogue about beliefs and attitudes concerning weight management. Participants and Approach We partnered with a community organization to recruit women who were AA, were ≥18 years old, and had a body mass index (BMI) of ≥30 kg/m2. We audiotaped the 90-minute focus groups and used content analysis for generating and coding recurring themes. Results In our sample of 41 participants, the mean age was 48.8 years and mean BMI was 36.3. Most participants were unmarried, had some postsecondary education, and reported good or fair health. About 85% knew someone who had undergone bariatric surgery. Qualitative analysis of 6 focus group sessions revealed that the most common barriers to weight loss were lack of time and access to resources; issues regarding self-control and extrinsic control; and identification with a larger body size. Common barriers to bariatric surgery were fears and concerns about treatment effects and perceptions that surgery was too extreme or was a method of last resort. Conclusions Only through the elimination of barriers can AA women receive the care needed to eliminate excess weight and prevent obesity-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:17447097

  18. [Beriberi after bariatric surgery: not an unusual complication. Report of two cases and literature review].

    PubMed

    Alves, Lilian F A; Gonçalves, Ricardo M; Cordeiro, Giovana V; Lauria, Márcio W; Ramos, Adauto V

    2006-06-01

    The number of patients submitted to bariatric surgery to treat morbid obesity is increasing, therefore, some nutritional deficiencies, with which many physicians are no longer familiarized, are reappearing. Postoperatively, many nutritional disorders may occur, one of them is thiamine deficiency (beriberi). The thiamine and/or vitamin B12 deficiency can correspond to 40% of the neuropathy cases after bariatric surgery. Two patients with the clinic of peripheral neuropathy and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome will be reported. Some months after the surgery, they presented prostration, depression, mental confusion and nystagmus, associated with pain and paresthesia in limbs (especially lower limbs). With the diagnostic hypothesis of beriberi, the treatment with thiamine started. One of the patients presented complete improvement of the neurological symptoms, however the other one remained with motor deficiency, exactly the one who spent a longer period of time between the symptoms appearance and the treatment beginning. These cases serve to alert us about the importance of nutritional vigilance after bariatric surgery. PMID:16936999

  19. Association between Binge Eating Disorder and Changes in Cognitive Functioning Following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Jason M.; Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Paul, Robert; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Gunstad, John

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests that both obesity and binge eating disorder (BED) may be associated with deficits in cognitive functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a lifetime history of BED would be associated with changes in several domains of cognitive functioning (attention, executive function, language, and memory) following bariatric surgery. Participants were 68 bariatric surgery patients who completed a computerized battery of cognitive tests within 30 days prior to undergoing surgery and again at a 12-month postoperative follow-up. Results revealed that on the whole, participants displayed improvements from baseline to follow-up in attention, executive function, and memory, even after controlling for diagnostic history of depression; no changes were observed for language. However, individuals with and without a history of BED did not differ in changes in body mass index or in the degree of improvement in cognitive functioning from baseline to follow-up. Such results suggest that a history of BED does not influence changes in cognitive functioning following bariatric surgery. Future research will be needed to further clarify the role of BED in predicting cognitive function over time. PMID:25201638

  20. Financial costs and patients’ perceptions of medical tourism in bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, David H.; Sheppard, Caroline E.; de Gara, Christopher J.; Karmali, Shahzeer; Birch, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Many Canadians pursue surgical treatment for severe obesity outside of their province or country — so-called “medical tourism.” We have managed many complications related to this evolving phenomenon. The costs associated with this care seem substantial but have not been previously quantified. We surveyed Alberta general surgeons and postoperative medical tourists to estimate costs of treating complications related to medical tourism in bariatric surgery and to understand patients’ motivations for pursuing medical tourism. Our analysis suggests more than $560 000 was spent treating 59 bariatric medical tourists by 25 surgeons between 2012 and 2013. Responses from medical tourists suggest that they believe their surgeries were successful despite some having postoperative complications and lacking support from medical or surgical teams. We believe that the financial cost of treating complications related to medical tourism in Alberta is substantial and impacts existing limited resources. PMID:26574702

  1. High flow insufflation for the maintenance of the pneumoperitoneum during bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Markos; Scheffel, Oliver; Weiner, Rudolf A

    2009-01-01

    Minimally invasive bariatric procedures next to becoming more and more popular have established a new field of applications for carbon dioxide (CO2) insufflators. In laparoscopic bariatric procedures, gas is used to insufflate the peritoneal cavity and increase the intra-abdominal pressure up to 15 mm Hg for optimal exposure and a suitable operating field. The increased intra-abdominal pressure during pneumoperitoneum can reduce femoral venous flow, intra-operative urine output, portal venous flow, respiratory compliance,and cardiac output. However, clinical complications related to these effects are rare. Yet, surgeons should be constantly aware that the duration of an operation is an important factor in reducing the patient's exposure to CO2 pneumoperitoneum and its adverse effects. The optimized performance of the bariatric high flow insufflator allows reaching stable abdominal pressure conditions quicker and at a higher level than a common insufflator. Therefore, high flow insufflators offer great advantages in maintaining intra-abdominal pressure and temperature in comparison to conventional insufflators and thus enhance laparoscopic bariatric surgery by potentially reducing the operating time and the undesirable effects of CO2 pneumoperitoneum. PMID:20124777

  2. ANALYSIS OF FOOD TOLERANCE IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY USING THE QUESTIONNAIRE QUALITY OF ALIMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    STUMPF, Matheo Augusto Morandi; RODRIGUES, Marcos Ricardo da Silva; KLUTHCOVSKY, Ana Claudia Garabeli Cavalli; TRAVALINI, Fabiana; MILLÉO, Fábio Quirillo

    2015-01-01

    Background : Due to the increased prevalence of obesity in many countries, the number of bariatric surgeries is increasing. They are considered the most effective treatment for obesity. In the postoperative there may be difficulties with the quality of alimentation, tolerance to various types of food, as well as vomiting and regurgitation. Few surveys are available to assess these difficulties in the postoperative. Aim : To perform a systematic literature review about food tolerance in patients undergoing bariatric surgery using the questionnaire "Quality of Alimentation", and compare the results between different techniques. Method : A descriptive-exploratory study where the portals Medline and Scielo were used. The following headings were used in english, spanish and portuguese: quality of alimentation, bariatric surgery and food tolerance. A total of 88 references were found, 14 used the questionnaire "Quality of Alimentation" and were selected. Results : In total, 2745 patients were interviewed of which 371 underwent to gastric banding, 1006 to sleeve gastrectomy, 1113 to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 14 to biliopancreatic diversion associated with duodenal switch, 83 were non-operated obese, and 158 non-obese patients. The questionnaire showed good acceptability. The biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch had the best food tolerance in the postoperative when compared to other techniques, but it was evaluated in a single article with a small sample. The longer the time after the operation, the better is the food tolerance. Comparing the sleeve gastrectomy and the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, there are still controversial results in the literature. The gastric banding had the worst score of food tolerance among all the techniques evaluated. Conclusion: The questionnaire is easy and fast to assess the food tolerance in patients after bariatric surgery. Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch had the best food tolerance in the postoperative when compared

  3. Salt taste after bariatric surgery and weight loss in obese persons.

    PubMed

    Ekmekcioglu, Cem; Maedge, Julia; Lam, Linda; Blasche, Gerhard; Shakeri-Leidenmühler, Soheila; Kundi, Michael; Ludvik, Bernhard; Langer, Felix B; Prager, Gerhard; Schindler, Karin; Dürrschmid, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the perception of salty taste in obese patients, especially after bariatric surgery. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse possible differences in salt detection thresholds and preferences for foods differing in salt content in obese persons before and after bariatric surgery with weight loss compared to non-obese individuals. Methods. Sodium chloride detection thresholds and liking for cream soups with different salt concentrations were studied with established tests. Moreover, a brief salt food questionnaire was assessed to identify the usage and awareness of salt in food. Results. The results showed similar mean sodium chloride detection thresholds between non-obese and obese participants. After bariatric surgery a non-significant increase in the salt detection threshold was observed in the obese patients (mean ± SD: 0.44 ± 0.24 g NaCl/L before OP vs. 0.64 ± 0.47 g NaCl/L after OP, p = 0.069). Cream soup liking between controls and obese patients were not significantly different. However, significant sex specific differences were detected with the tested women not liking the soups (p < 0.001). Results from the food questionnaire were similar between the groups. Conclusion. No differences between non-obese persons and obese patients were shown regarding the salt detection threshold. However, due to highly significant differences in soup liking, sex should be taken into consideration when conducting similar sensory studies. PMID:27330856

  4. Iron deficiency before and after bariatric surgery: the need for iron supplementation.

    PubMed

    ten Broeke, R; Bravenboer, B; Smulders, F J F

    2013-10-01

    Hepcidin inhibits the iron export from duodenal cells and liver cells into the plasma and therefore plays a key role in controlling iron homeostasis. In obese patients, elevated cytokine production stimulates hepcidin synthesis, causing iron to be retained as ferritin in e.g. macrophages (functional iron deficiency). In addition, patients often develop iron deficiency after bariatric surgery due to malabsorption, which may cause anaemia and thereby lead to complaints such as fatigue. In these patients, the absorption of iron may be disrupted because the reduction of Fe3+ by gastric acid into Fe2+ (the form that is easily absorbed) is not so effective after stomach reduction. Iron absorption is further reduced after malabsorptive interventions as a result of bypassing the duodenum and the proximal part of the small intestine, where the absorption takes place. Oral iron supplements often have little effect after bariatric surgery. Intravenous supplements of iron can restore the iron status rapidly after bariatric surgery, resulting in fewer symptoms such as fatigue. PMID:24127501

  5. Can medical therapy mimic the clinical efficacy or physiological effects of bariatric surgery?

    PubMed

    Miras, A D; le Roux, C W

    2014-03-01

    The number of bariatric surgical procedures performed has increased dramatically. This review discusses the clinical and physiological changes, and in particular, the mechanisms behind weight loss and glycaemic improvements, observed following the gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding bariatric procedures. The review then examines how close we are to mimicking the clinical or physiological effects of surgery through less invasive and safer modern interventions that are currently available for clinical use. These include dietary interventions, orlistat, lorcaserin, phentermine/topiramate, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, pramlintide, dapagliflozin, the duodenal-jejunal bypass liner, gastric pacemakers and gastric balloons. We conclude that, based on the most recent trials, we cannot fully mimic the clinical or physiological effects of surgery; however, we are getting closer. A 'medical bypass' may not be as far in the future as we previously thought, as the physician's armamentarium against obesity and type 2 diabetes has recently got stronger through the use of specific dietary modifications, novel medical devices and pharmacotherapy. Novel therapeutic targets include not only appetite but also taste/food preferences, energy expenditure, gut microbiota, bile acid signalling, inflammation, preservation of β-cell function and hepatic glucose output, among others. Although there are no magic bullets, an integrated multimodal approach may yield success. Non-surgical interventions that mimic the metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery, with a reduced morbidity and mortality burden, remain tenable alternatives for patients and health-care professionals. PMID:24213310

  6. Metabolic Mechanisms in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes: Insights from Bariatric/Metabolic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cătoi, Adriana Florinela; Pârvu, Alina; Mureşan, Adriana; Busetto, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and the related diabetes epidemics represent a real concern worldwide. Bariatric/metabolic surgery emerged in last years as a valuable therapeutic option for obesity and related diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The complicated network of mechanisms involved in obesity and T2DM have not completely defined yet. There is still a debate on which would be the first metabolic defect leading to metabolic deterioration: insulin resistance or hyperinsulinemia? Insight into the metabolic effects of bariatric/metabolic surgery has revealed that, beyond weight loss and food restriction, other mechanisms can be activated by the rearrangements of the gastrointestinal tract, such as the incretinic/anti-incretinic system, changes in bile acid composition and flow, and modifications of gut microbiota; all of them possibly involved in the remission of T2DM. The complete elucidation of these mechanisms will lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease. Our aim was to review some of the metabolic mechanisms involved in the development of T2DM in obese patients as well as in the remission of this condition in patients submitted to bariatric/metabolic surgery. PMID:26584027

  7. Salt taste after bariatric surgery and weight loss in obese persons

    PubMed Central

    Maedge, Julia; Lam, Linda; Blasche, Gerhard; Shakeri-Leidenmühler, Soheila; Kundi, Michael; Ludvik, Bernhard; Langer, Felix B.; Prager, Gerhard; Schindler, Karin; Dürrschmid, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the perception of salty taste in obese patients, especially after bariatric surgery. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse possible differences in salt detection thresholds and preferences for foods differing in salt content in obese persons before and after bariatric surgery with weight loss compared to non-obese individuals. Methods. Sodium chloride detection thresholds and liking for cream soups with different salt concentrations were studied with established tests. Moreover, a brief salt food questionnaire was assessed to identify the usage and awareness of salt in food. Results. The results showed similar mean sodium chloride detection thresholds between non-obese and obese participants. After bariatric surgery a non-significant increase in the salt detection threshold was observed in the obese patients (mean ± SD: 0.44 ± 0.24 g NaCl/L before OP vs. 0.64 ± 0.47 g NaCl/L after OP, p = 0.069). Cream soup liking between controls and obese patients were not significantly different. However, significant sex specific differences were detected with the tested women not liking the soups (p < 0.001). Results from the food questionnaire were similar between the groups. Conclusion. No differences between non-obese persons and obese patients were shown regarding the salt detection threshold. However, due to highly significant differences in soup liking, sex should be taken into consideration when conducting similar sensory studies. PMID:27330856

  8. Bariatric Surgery vs. Conventional Dieting in the Morbidly Obese.

    PubMed

    Greenstein; Rabner; Taler

    1994-02-01

    Weight loss and psychosocial events have been compared between low calorie conventional diet (n = 11) or following obesity surgery (n = 17). Interviews were >/= 9 months following initiation of treatment. After surgery significantly less hunger was experienced (surgery 76% [13/17] vs diet 18% [2/11] p < 0.01) and less will-power was required to stop eating (surgery 88% [15/17] vs diet 27% [3/11] p < 0.001). More dieters stopped eating because of 'figure and health' (surgery 12 % [2/17] vs diet 64 % [7/11 ] p < 0.01) whereas postoperative patients stopped due to vomit avoidance (surgery 53% [9/17] vs diet 0% [0/11] p surgery 76% [13/17] vs diet 18% [2/11) p < 0.005). Following surgery there were subjective appearance improvements (surgery 94% [15/16] vs diet 50% [5/10] p < 0.01) and fewer social limitations (surgery 69% [11/16] vs diet 27% [3/11] p surgery 73% [11/15] vs diet 18% [2/11] p < 0.01). Although both groups continue to feel 'fat' at times, more dieters think other people view them as obese (surgery 35% [6/17] vs diet 91% [10/11] p surgery (surgery 100% [16/16] vs diet 33% [3/9] p < 0.005). Enforced behavior modification (vomit avoidance) is the mechanism of action of gastric restrictive surgery. Physical activity increases, and satisfaction with weight loss method is greater, after surgery. Employment is greater (probably self selection) in the post-surgical group. We found that comparing >/= 9 months following surgery or beginning a conventional diet, the morbidly obese have a more positive response to surgery. PMID:10742758

  9. Effect of Intravenous Acetaminophen on Postoperative Opioid Use in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Saha, Ronik; Shah, Neal; Hanna, Adel; DeMuro, Jonas; Calixte, Rose; Brathwaite, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of opioids to achieve adequate pain relief following surgery is a common clinical practice. Opioids, however, are associated with serious adverse effects, such as respiratory depression, excessive sedation, and prolonged ileus, as well as increased mortality. The administration of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen to control postoperative pain has been effective in reducing opioid consumption in various surgical populations, but no studies have been conducted in bariatric surgery patients. This investigation was performed to determine whether IV acetaminophen reduces opioid requirements after bariatric surgery. Methods: IV acetaminophen was added to the Winthrop-University Hospital formulary in September 2012. We conducted a retrospective chart-review analysis of bariatric surgery patients who received at least four doses of IV acetaminophen (1 g every six hours) plus opioids from October 2012 to March 2013 (after IV acetaminophen was added to the hospital formulary), compared with bariatric surgery patients who received only opioids for postoperative pain control from January 2012 to June 2012 (before IV acetaminophen was added to the hospital formulary). The study’s primary endpoint was the difference between the two groups in opioid consumption, expressed in oral morphine equivalents (OMEs). Secondary endpoints included the reduction in the baseline pain score; the total amount of each opioid used; and the average hospital length of stay (LOS). Results: A total of 96 patients were identified for potential enrollment from January 2012 to March 2013. Eight patients, however, did not qualify for participation because they had received only one dose of IV acetaminophen. The remaining 88 patients comprised two study groups: IV acetaminophen plus opiates (n = 44) and IV opiates alone (n = 44). Paradoxically, the patients in the acetaminophen/opiates group required significantly more opiates (in OMEs) compared with the group that received opiates

  10. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Outcomes for Type 1 Diabetes after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Alexandra; Switzer, Noah J.; Dang, Jerry; Shi, Xinzhe; de Gara, Christopher; Birch, Daniel W.; Gill, Richdeep S.; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2016-01-01

    Background. The utility of bariatric surgery in type 1 diabetes remains controversial. The aim of the present study is to evaluate glycemic control outcomes in obese patients with type 1 diabetes after bariatric surgery. Methods. A comprehensive search of electronic databases was completed. Inclusion criteria included human adult subjects with BMI ≥35 kg/m2 and a confirmed diagnosis of type 1 diabetes who underwent a bariatric surgical procedure. Results. Thirteen primary studies (86 patients) were included. Subjects had a mean age of 41.16 ± 6.76 years with a mean BMI of 42.50 ± 2.65 kg/m2. There was a marked reduction in BMI postoperatively at 12 months and at study endpoint to 29.55 ± 1.76 kg/m2 (P < 0.00001) and 30.63 ± 2.09 kg/m2 (P < 0.00001), respectively. Preoperative weighted mean total daily insulin requirement was 98 ± 26 IU/d, which decreased significantly to 36 ± 15 IU/d (P < 0.00001) and 42 ± 11 IU/d (P < 0.00001) at 12 months and at study endpoint, respectively. An improvement in HbA1c was also seen from 8.46 ± 0.78% preoperatively to 7.95 ± 0.55% (P = 0.01) and 8.13 ± 0.86% (P = 0.03) at 12 months and at study endpoint, respectively. Conclusion. Bariatric surgery in patients with type 1 diabetes leads to significant reductions in BMI and improvements in glycemic control. PMID:27375900

  11. Evaluation of an In Silico PBPK Post-Bariatric Surgery Model through Simulating Oral Drug Bioavailability of Atorvastatin and Cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    Darwich, A S; Pade, D; Rowland-Yeo, K; Jamei, M; Åsberg, A; Christensen, H; Ashcroft, D M; Rostami-Hodjegan, A

    2013-01-01

    An increasing prevalence of morbid obesity has led to dramatic increases in the number of bariatric surgeries performed. Altered gastrointestinal physiology following surgery can be associated with modified oral drug bioavailability (Foral). In the absence of clinical data, an indication of changes to Foral via systems pharmacology models would be of value in adjusting dose levels after surgery. A previously developed virtual “post-bariatric surgery” population was evaluated through mimicking clinical investigations on cyclosporine and atorvastatin after bariatric surgery. Cyclosporine simulations displayed a reduced fraction absorbed through gut wall (fa) and Foral after surgery, consistent with reported observations. Simulated atorvastatin Foral postsurgery was broadly reflective of observed data with indications of counteracting interplay between reduced fa and an increased fraction escaping gut wall metabolism (FG). Inability to fully recover observed atorvastatin exposure after biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch highlights the current gap regarding the knowledge of associated biological changes. PMID:23903405

  12. Prioritising patients for bariatric surgery: building public preferences from a discrete choice experiment into public policy

    PubMed Central

    Whitty, Jennifer A; Ratcliffe, Julie; Kendall, Elizabeth; Burton, Paul; Wilson, Andrew; Littlejohns, Peter; Harris, Paul; Krinks, Rachael; Scuffham, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To derive priority weights for access to bariatric surgery for obese adults, from the perspective of the public. Setting Australian public hospital system. Participants Adults (N=1994), reflecting the age and gender distribution of Queensland and South Australia. Primary and secondary outcome measures A discrete choice experiment in which respondents indicated which of two individuals with different characteristics should be prioritised for surgery in repeated hypothetical choices. Potential surgery recipients were described by seven key characteristics or attributes: body mass index (BMI), presence of comorbid conditions, age, family history, commitment to lifestyle change, time on the surgical wait list and chance of maintaining weight loss following surgery. A multinomial logit model was used to evaluate preferences and derive priority weights (primary analysis), with a latent class model used to explore respondent characteristics that were associated with variation in preference across the sample (see online supplementary analysis). Results A preference was observed to prioritise individuals who demonstrated a strong commitment to maintaining a healthy lifestyle as well as individuals categorised with very severe (BMI≥50 kg/m2) or (to a lesser extent) severe (BMI≥40 kg/m2) obesity, those who already have obesity-related comorbidity, with a family history of obesity, with a greater chance of maintaining weight loss or who had spent a longer time on the wait list. Lifestyle commitment was considered to be more than twice as important as any other criterion. There was little tendency to prioritise according to the age of the recipient. Respondent preferences were dependent on their BMI, previous experience with weight management surgery, current health state and education level. Conclusions This study extends our understanding of the publics’ preferences for priority setting to the context of bariatric surgery, and derives priority weights

  13. Bariatric Surgery in University Clinic Center Tuzla - Results After 30 Operations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetasevic, Emir; Pasic, Fuad; Beslin, Miroslav Bekavac; Ilic, Miroslav; Ahmetasevic, Dzenita; Mesic, Mirza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Project of Bariatric surgery in University clinic center (UCC) Tuzla has been initiated in 2009 as an idea of professor Dešo Mešić and soon after that Bariatric surgical team led by doctor Fuad Pasic has been created. Material and methods: Practical team education was realized in Croatia in hospital „Sisters of Mercy” under supervision of professor Miroslav-Bekavac Beslin. First bariatric operations in UCC Tuzla has been done in 2011 and it was biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) Scopinaro. Results and discussion: So far there has been done 30 operations and among them there have been used almost all operative modalities - restrictive, malabsorptive and combined (laparoscopic gastric banding-LAPGB, Roux-y mini gastric bypass, open and laparoscopic gastric sleeve resection, and over mentioned Scopinaro’s BPD). Beginning results are very promising according to the fact that almost all operated patients after one year stopped using antihypertensive, antidiabetic and antidepressant therapy, that average year’s weight loss is 35-100 kilograms and total satisfactions of patients after surgeries is obvious. PMID:27147808

  14. Consequences of bariatric surgery on oesophageal function in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rishi D; Choksi, Yash A; Vaezi, Michael F

    2016-02-01

    Obesity is a continuing epidemic with substantial associated morbidity and mortality. Owing to the limitations of lifestyle modifications and pharmacological options, bariatric surgery has come to the forefront as an efficient method of achieving sustained weight loss and decreasing overall mortality in comparison with nonsurgical interventions. The most frequently performed bariatric operations are either purely restrictive, such as laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), or restrictive-malabsorptive, such as the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Each operation results in weight loss, but can also have unintended effects on the health of the oesophagus. Specifically, operations might lead to oesophageal dilation or the development of GERD. LAGB is the best-studied procedure with notable evidence for postoperative worsening of GERD and pseudo-achalasia, which increases lower oesophageal pressure and causes aperistalsis. In some studies, LSG initiates not only a worsening of GERD, but also the formation of de novo GERD in patients without preoperative GERD symptoms. RYGB demonstrates the most profound evidence for improvement of GERD symptoms and preservation of oesophageal motility. Future high-quality studies will be required to better understand the interaction between bariatric surgery and oesophageal disease. PMID:26648126

  15. Synthetic agents in the context of metabolic/bariatric surgery: expanding the scope and impact of diabetes drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Janero, David R

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) - particularly with concurrent obesity ('diabesity') - is an intensifying global public-health problem. Medical needs and market opportunities in the T2D space have propelled discovery efforts aimed at inventing new synthetic T2D drugs differentiable by improved safety and efficacy and/or the ability to modulate emerging T2D targets. Particularly for moderately and severely obese individuals, weight-loss (bariatric) surgery offers an effective means of reducing obesity-driven T2D that is superior in many respects to medical T2D management. Yet, not all overweight or obese individuals with T2D qualify for bariatric surgery, and current healthcare resources are inadequate for applying surgical T2D control to more than a very small segment of qualified patients. Bariatric surgery is no guarantee of 'curative' T2D abrogation, significant rates of T2D non-remission or re-emergence having been observed in diabesity patients following bariatric procedures. Preoperative glucose control by oral hypoglycemic drugs reduces the chance of T2D recurrence post-surgery, and diabesity patients in whom glycemic indices have been improved by bariatric surgery may still require some level of T2D pharmacotherapy. Laboratory and clinical data indicate that synthetic T2D drugs can improve T2D-related outcomes following bariatric procedures, and current T2D drug-discovery efforts are being informed by the metabolic advantages associated with bariatric surgery. These circumstances intensify the need for and extend the impact of T2D drug discovery by demonstrating multiple levels of interplay between medical and surgical approaches to improve the health of individuals with diabesity and, perhaps, approach the overarching goal of decreasing long-term cardiovascular mortality. PMID:24397872

  16. Bariatric surgery and T2DM improvement mechanisms: a mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Consensus exists that several bariatric surgery procedures produce a rapid improvement of glucose homeostasis in obese diabetic patients, improvement apparently uncorrelated with the degree of eventual weight loss after surgery. Several hypotheses have been suggested to account for these results: among these, the anti-incretin, the ghrelin and the lower-intestinal dumping hypotheses have been discussed in the literature. Since no clear-cut experimental results are so far available to confirm or disprove any of these hypotheses, in the present work a mathematical model of the glucose-insulin-incretin system has been built, capable of expressing these three postulated mechanisms. The model has been populated with critically evaluated parameter values from the literature, and simulations under the three scenarios have been compared. Results The modeling results seem to indicate that the suppression of ghrelin release is unlikely to determine major changes in short-term glucose control. The possible existence of an anti-incretin hormone would be supported if an experimental increase of GIP concentrations were evident post-surgery. Given that, on the contrary, collected evidence suggests that GIP concentrations decrease post-surgery, the lower-intestinal dumping hypothesis would seem to describe the mechanism most likely to produce the observed normalization of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) after bariatric surgery. Conclusions The proposed model can help discriminate among competing hypotheses in a context where definitive data are not available and mechanisms are still not clear. PMID:22587410

  17. COMPARISON OF HEPATIC PROFILE IN PRE AND POSTOPERATIVE OF BARIATRIC SURGERY: PRIVATE VS PUBLIC NETWORK

    PubMed Central

    NASCIMENTO, Taianne Machado; ALVES-JÚNIOR, Antônio; NUNES, Marco Antonio Prado; de FREITAS, Tiago Rodrigo Pereira; da SILVA, Marco Antonio Fontes Sarmento; ALVES, Maria Rosa Melo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity is associated to several comorbidities, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which implicates in isolated steatosis to steatohepatitis. The latter may progress to severe manifestations such as liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Aim: To compare the presence of advanced liver fibrosis before and after bariatric surgery in patients of private and public health system. Methods: Patients from public and privative networks were studied before and after bariatric surgery. The presence or absence of advanced hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by NAFLD Fibrosis Score, a non-invasive method that uses age, BMI, AST/ALT ratio, albumin, platelet count and the presence or absence of hyperglycemia or diabetes. The characteristics of the two groups were compared. The established statistical significance criterion was p<0.05. Results: Were analyzed 40 patients with a mean age of 34.6±9.5 years for private network and 40.6± 10.2 years for public. The study sample, 35% were treated at private health system and 65% in the public ones, 38% male and 62% female. Preoperatively in the private network one (7.1%) patient had advanced liver fibrosis and developed to the absence of liver fibrosis after surgery. In the public eight (30.8%) patients had advanced liver fibrosis preoperatively, and at one year after the proportion fell to six (23%). Conclusion: The non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in its advanced form is more prevalent in obese patients treated in the public network than in the treated at the private network and bariatric surgery may be important therapeutic option in both populations. PMID:26734800

  18. When Mood Worsens after Gastric Bypass Surgery: Characterization of Bariatric Patients with Increases in Depressive Symptoms Following Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Grilo, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression levels generally decrease substantially following bariatric surgery; however, little is known about bariatric patients who might experience increases in depression following surgery. We examined the frequency of bariatric patients who experienced discernible increases in depression levels following surgery and explored their correlates. Methods Participants were 107 patients with extreme obesity who underwent gastric bypass surgery and were followed up at 6 and 12 months postsurgery. Participants completed self-report questionnaires about depression (BDI), eating disorder psychopathology (EDE-Q), self-esteem (RSES), and social functioning (SF-36) at baseline and again at 6 and 12 months postsurgery. Results Fourteen (13.1 %) participants reported discernible increases (BDI-Increase), 14 (13.1 %) reported discernible decreases (BDI-Decrease), and 79 (73.8 %) did not report discernible changes (no change) in BDI scores from 6 to 12 months postsurgery. Presurgically, there were no differences between the three groups. By 12 months postsurgery, the BDI-Increase group had significantly higher depression scores and significantly lower self-esteem and SF-36 mental component scores than did the other groups. For the BDI-Increase group, BDI Change was significantly associated with body mass index, self-esteem, and SF-36 physical component scores. Conclusions Findings highlight that a subgroup of individuals report discernible increases in depressive scores postsurgery and may differ in potentially clinically meaningful ways from those who do not report discernible increases in depressive symptoms. Future research is needed to better understand the long-term trajectory of patients with discernible worsening mood following gastric bypass surgery. PMID:25190520

  19. All Bariatric Surgeries Are Not Created Equal: Insights from Mechanistic Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Stefater, Margaret A.; Wilson-Pérez, Hilary E.; Chambers, Adam P.; Sandoval, Darleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite considerable scientific progress on the biological systems that regulate energy balance, we have made precious little headway in providing new treatments to curb the obesity epidemic. Diet and exercise are the most popular treatment options for obesity, but rarely are they sufficient to produce long-term weight loss. Bariatric surgery, on the other hand, results in dramatic, sustained weight loss and for this reason has gained increasing popularity as a treatment modality for obesity. At least some surgical approaches also reduce obesity-related comorbidities including type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia. This success puts a premium on understanding how these surgeries exert their effects. This review focuses on the growing human and animal model literature addressing the underlying mechanisms. We compare three common procedures: Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB), vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), and adjustable gastric banding (AGB). Although many would group together VSG and AGB as restrictive procedures of the stomach, VSG is more like RYGB than AGB in its effects on a host of endpoints including intake, food choice, glucose regulation, lipids and gut hormone secretion. Our strong belief is that to advance our understanding of these procedures, it is necessary to group bariatric procedures not on the basis of surgical similarity but rather on how they affect key physiological variables. This will allow for greater mechanistic insight into how bariatric surgery works, making it possible to help patients better choose the best possible procedure and to develop new therapeutic strategies that can help a larger portion of the obese population. PMID:22550271

  20. Changes of insulin sensitivity and secretion after bariatric/metabolic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mingrone, Geltrude; Cummings, David E

    2016-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is classically characterized by failure of pancreatic β-cell function and insulin secretion to compensate for a prevailing level of insulin resistance, typically associated with visceral obesity. Although this is usually a chronic, progressive disease in which delay of end-organ complications is the primary therapeutic goal for medical and behavioral approaches, several types of bariatric surgery, especially those that include intestinal bypass components, exert powerful antidiabetes effects to yield remission of T2D in most cases. It has become increasingly clear that in addition to the known benefits of acute caloric restriction and chronic weight loss to ameliorate T2D, bariatric/metabolic operations also engage a variety of weight-independent mechanisms to improve glucose homeostasis, enhancing insulin sensitivity and secretion to varying degrees depending on the specific operation. In this paper, we review the effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, biliopancreatic diversion, and vertical sleeve gastrectomy on the primary determinants of glucose homeostasis: insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and, to the lesser extent that it is known, insulin-independent glucose disposal. A full understanding of these effects should help optimize surgical and device-based designs to provide maximal antidiabetes impact, and it holds the promise to identify targets for possible novel diabetes pharmacotherapeutics. These insights also contribute to the conceptual rationale for use of bariatric operations as "metabolic surgery," employed primarily to treat T2D, including among patients not obese enough to qualify for surgery based on traditional criteria related to high body mass index. PMID:27568471

  1. Changes in Whole Blood Gene Expression in Obese Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Following Bariatric Surgery: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Berisha, Stela Z.; Serre, David; Schauer, Philip; Kashyap, Sangeeta R.; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Background A pilot study was performed in order to investigate the effects of bariatric surgery on whole blood gene expression profiles in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes. Methodology/Principal Findings Whole blood from eleven obese subjects with type 2 diabetes was collected in PAXgene tubes prior to and 6–12 months after bariatric surgery. Total RNA was isolated, amplified, labeled and hybridized to Illumina gene expression microarrays. Clinical and expression data were analyzed using a paired t-test, and correlations between changes in clinical trait and transcript levels were calculated. Pathways were identified using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and DAVID gene ontology software. Overall, bariatric surgery resulted in significant reduction of body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, fasting plasma insulin, and normalization of glycosylated hemoglobin levels. The expression levels of 204 transcripts, representing 200 unique genes, were significantly altered after bariatric surgery. Among the significantly regulated genes were GGT1, CAMP, DEFA1, LCN2, TP53, PDSS1, OLR1, CNTNAP5, DHCR24, HHAT and SARDH, which have been previously implicated in lipid metabolism, obesity and/or type 2 diabetes. Selected findings were replicated by quantitative real-time-PCR. The changes in expression of seven transcripts, WDR35, FLF45244, DHCR24, TIGD7, TOPBP1, TSHZ1, and FAM8A1 were strongly correlated with the changes in body weight, fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin content. The top pathways associated with gene expression changes after bariatric surgery was lipid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry and gene expression. Two antimicrobial peptides were among the transcripts with the largest changes in gene expression after bariatric surgery. Conclusions/Significance Data from this pilot study suggest that whole blood expression levels of specific transcripts may be useful as biomarkers associated with susceptibility for type 2 diabetes and/or therapeutic

  2. Imaging in bariatric surgery: service set-up, post-operative anatomy and complications

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S; Shah, V; Ahmed, A R; Blunt, D M

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is an increasingly prevalent and costly problem faced by the healthcare system. The role of bariatric surgery in managing obesity has also increased with evidence showing a reduction in long-term morbidity and mortality. There are unique challenges faced by the radiology department in providing an imaging service for this population of patients, from technical and staffing requirements through to the interpretation of challenging post-surgical images. We describe these challenges and provide an overview of the most frequently performed procedures, normal post-operative imaging findings and the appearance of common complications. PMID:21045066

  3. Self-determination and motivation for bariatric surgery: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Park, Juyeon

    2016-10-01

    This study examined how obese individuals acquire their motivation to undergo weight loss surgery and characterized the motivations within the framework of the self-determination theory (SDT). Participants expecting to have bariatric surgery were recruited and participated in semi-structured interviews. Interview accounts characterized different types of motivation for individuals seeking surgical weight loss treatments on the SDT continuum of relative autonomy. This study demonstrated that the more one's motivation was internally regulated, related to one's personal life and supported for competency, the more personal and hopeful were the anecdotes participants mentioned in accounts, thus the more positive the surgical outcomes were anticipated. Study limitations and future research were discussed as was the need for a systematic scheme to categorize types of motivation within the SDT, a longitudinal approach to measure actual weight loss outcomes based on the patient's pre-surgical motivation, and a further investigation with a larger sample size and balanced gender ratio. Practical implications of the study findings were also discussed as a novel strategy to internalize bariatric patients' motivation, further helping to improve their long-term quality of life post-surgery. PMID:26708344

  4. Weight loss by calorie restriction versus bariatric surgery differentially regulates the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Bernadette E; Hakala-Finch, Andrew P; Kekulawala, Melani; Laub, Holly; Egan, Ann E; Ressler, Ilana B; Woods, Stephen C; Herman, James P; Seeley, Randy J; Benoit, Stephen C; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M

    2014-12-01

    Behavioral modifications for the treatment of obesity, including caloric restriction, have notoriously low long-term success rates relative to bariatric weight-loss surgery. The reasons for the difference in sustained weight loss are not clear. One possibility is that caloric restriction alone activates the stress-responsive hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, undermining the long-term maintenance of weight loss, and that this is abrogated after bariatric surgery. Accordingly, we compared the HPA response to weight loss in five groups of male rats: (1) high-fat diet-induced obese (DIO) rats treated with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB, n = 7), (2) DIO rats treated with vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG, n = 11), (3) DIO rats given sham surgery and subsequently restricted to the food intake of the VSG/RYGB groups (Pair-fed, n = 11), (4) ad libitum-fed DIO rats given sham surgery (Obese, n = 11) and (5) ad libitum chow-fed rats given sham surgery (Lean, n = 12). Compared with Lean controls, food-restricted rats exhibited elevated morning (nadir) non-stress plasma corticosterone concentration and increased hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone and vasopressin mRNA expression, indicative of basal HPA activation. This was largely prevented when weight loss was achieved by bariatric surgery. DIO increased HPA activation by acute (novel environment) stress and this was diminished by bariatric surgery-, but not pair-feeding-, induced weight loss. These results indicate that the HPA axis is differentially affected by weight loss from caloric restriction versus bariatric surgery, and this may contribute to the differing long-term effectiveness of these two weight-loss approaches. PMID:25238021

  5. Getting Off on the Right Foot: The Many Roles of the Psychosocial Evaluation in the Bariatric Surgery Practice.

    PubMed

    Sogg, Stephanie; Friedman, Kelli E

    2015-11-01

    A thorough and specialized pre-operative psychosocial assessment is an important part of a comprehensive bariatric treatment protocol. Over time, the presurgical psychosocial evaluation has evolved from a cut-and-dried process of recommending whether a patient should or should not undergo surgery to a more nuanced and multifaceted process that serves multiple functions. In this article, we review the many ways in which the pre-operative psychosocial evaluation can enhance patient outcomes and adjustment and even the functioning of the interdisciplinary bariatric surgery team. PMID:26294256

  6. Metabolic Changes After Roux-N-Y Bariatric Surgery In Hispanics.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Gil de Lamadrid, José; Nieves-Rivera, Juan J; Mora, Laura; Corretjer, Lisa; Altieri, Pablo I; Suárez, Albert; Banchs, Héctor L; Muñiz, Jesús; Soto, Marie Ivelisse; Escobales, Nelson; Crespo, María

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to describe the metabolic outcomes 12 months after bariatric surgery (Roux-N-Y) in morbidly obese Hispanic patients, and evaluate the correlation between weight loss and the observed changes. Medical records from a hundred-and-two Hispanic obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery were identified at the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) Hospital. The following variables were obtained before and 12 months after surgery: Body Mass Index (BMI), body weight, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), and fasting blood sugar (FBS). Ninety-seven percent of patients underwent Roux-N-Y surgery; 79.4% were females and 44% were diabetics. We observed statistically significant reductions (p < 0.05) 12 months after surgery in: BMI -14.3 (± 6.2) kg/m2, weight -86.1 (± 34.4) Ibs, TC -17.9 (± 32.4) mg/dL, triglycerides -28.7(± 40.6) mg/dL, LDL-15.4 (± 30.6) mg/dL, and FBS -11.3 (± 23.5) mg/dL. HDL, instead increased +5.22 (± 12.9) mg/dL (p < 0.0006). Gastric bypass surgery of the Roux-N-Y significantly improves the lipid profile and FBS levels in obese Hispanic patients. The poor correlation factor between weight loss and these variables suggests that other mechanisms, independent from weight loss, are responsible for these changes. PMID:26742199

  7. Clinical trial demonstrates exercise following bariatric surgery improves insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Paul M.; Tanner, Charles J.; Helbling, Nicole L.; Dubis, Gabriel S.; Hames, Kazanna C.; Xie, Hui; Eid, George M.; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Toledo, Frederico G.S.; Jakicic, John M.; Houmard, Joseph A.; Goodpaster, Bret H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery causes profound weight loss and improves insulin sensitivity (SI) in obese patients. Regular exercise can also improve SI in obese individuals; however, it is unknown whether exercise and RYGB surgery–induced weight loss would additively improve SI and other cardiometabolic factors. METHODS. We conducted a single-blind, prospective, randomized trial with 128 men and women who recently underwent RYGB surgery (within 1–3 months). Participants were randomized to either a 6-month semi-supervised moderate exercise protocol (EX, n = 66) or a health education control (CON; n = 62) intervention. Main outcomes measured included SI and glucose effectiveness (SG), which were determined from an intravenous glucose tolerance test and minimal modeling. Secondary outcomes measured were cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2 peak) and body composition. Data were analyzed using an intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-protocol (PP) approach to assess the efficacy of the exercise intervention (>120 min of exercise/week). RESULTS. 119 (93%) participants completed the interventions, 95% for CON and 91% for EX. There was a significant decrease in body weight and fat mass for both groups (P < 0.001 for time effect). SI improved in both groups following the intervention (ITT: CON vs. EX; +1.64 vs. +2.24 min–1/μU/ml, P = 0.18 for Δ, P < 0.001 for time effect). A PP analysis revealed that exercise produced an additive SI improvement (PP: CON vs. EX; +1.57 vs. +2.69 min–1/μU/ml, P = 0.019) above that of surgery. Exercise also improved SG (ITT: CON vs. EX; +0.0023 vs. +0.0063 min–1, P = 0.009) compared with the CON group. Exercise improved cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2 peak) compared with the CON group. CONCLUSION. Moderate exercise following RYGB surgery provides additional improvements in SI, SG, and cardiorespiratory fitness compared with a sedentary lifestyle during similar weight loss. TRIAL REGISTRATION. clinicaltrials.gov identifier

  8. Peroral endoscopic reduction of dilated gastrojejunal anastomosis after bariatric surgery: Techniques and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Changela, Kinesh; Ofori, Emmanuel; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the techniques and efficacy of peroral endoscopic reduction of dilated gastrojejunal anastomosis after bariatric surgery. METHODS: An extensive English language literature search was conducted using PubMed, MEDLINE, Medscape and Google to identify peer-reviewed original and review articles using the keywords “bariatric endoscopic suturing”, “overstitch bariatric surgery”, “endoscopic anastomotic reduction”, “bariatric surgery”, “gastric bypass”, “obesity”, “weight loss”. We identified articles describing technical feasibility, safety, efficacy, and adverse outcomes of overstitch endoscopic suturing system for transoral outlet reduction in patients with weight regain following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). All studies that contained material applicable to the topic were considered. Retrieved peer-reviewed original and review articles were reviewed by the authors and the data extracted using a standardized collection tool. Data were analyzed using statistical analysis as percentages of the event. RESULTS: Four original published articles which met our search criteria were pooled. The total number cases were fifty-nine with a mean age of 46.75 years (34-63 years). Eight of the patients included in those studies were males (13.6%) and fifty-one were females (86.4%). The mean time elapsed since the primary bypass surgery was 5.75 years. The average pre-endoscopic procedure body mass index (BMI) was 38.68 (27.5-48.5). Mean body weight regained post-RYGB surgery was 13.4 kg from their post-RYGB nadir. The average pouch length at the initial upper endoscopy was 5.75 cm (2-14 cm). The pre-intervention anastomotic diameter was averaged at 24.85 mm (8-40 mm). Average procedure time was 74 min (50-164 min). Mean post endoscopic intervention anastomotic diameter was 8 mm (3-15 mm). Weight reduction at 3 to 4 mo post revision noted to be an average of 10.1 kg. Average overall post revision BMI was recorded at 37.7. The combined

  9. Trends in oral drug bioavailability following bariatric surgery: examining the variable extent of impact on exposure of different drug classes

    PubMed Central

    Darwich, Adam S; Henderson, Kathryn; Burgin, Angela; Ward, Nicola; Whittam, Janet; Ammori, Basil J; Ashcroft, Darren M; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To identify the most commonly prescribed drugs in a bariatric surgery population and to assess existing evidence regarding trends in oral drug bioavailability post bariatric surgery. METHODS A retrospective audit was undertaken to document commonly prescribed drugs amongst patients undergoing bariatric surgery in an NHS hospital in the UK and to assess practice for drug administration following bariatric surgery. The available literature was examined for trends relating to drug permeability and solubility with regards to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) and main route of elimination. RESULTS No significant difference in the ‘post/pre surgery oral drug exposure ratio’ (ppR) was apparent between BCS class I to IV drugs, with regards to dose number (Do) or main route of elimination. Drugs classified as ‘solubility limited’ displayed an overall reduction as compared with ‘freely soluble’ compounds, as well as an unaltered and increased ppR. CONCLUSION Clinical studies establishing guidelines for commonly prescribed drugs, and the monitoring of drugs exhibiting a narrow therapeutic window or without a readily assessed clinical endpoint, are warranted. Using mechanistically based pharmacokinetic modelling for simulating the multivariate nature of changes in drug exposure may serve as a useful tool in the further understanding of postoperative trends in oral drug exposure and in developing practical clinical guidance. PMID:22463107

  10. Early-effect of bariatric surgery (Scopinaro method) on intestinal hormones and adipokines in insulin resistant Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Dib, N; Kiciak, A; Pietrzak, P; Ferenc, K; Jaworski, P; Kapica, M; Tarnowski, W; Zabielski, R

    2013-10-01

    Bariatric surgery consists in duodenal exclusion from the food passage in obese patients with coexistent type 2 diabetes. Nowadays bariatric surgery is considered the most effective method of glycemic index normalization and insulin resistance reduction. Recent results on obese and non-obese rats showed remission of type 2 diabetes symptoms within few days after the surgery. The aim of the present work was to analyze the mechanisms of neuro-hormonal regulation responsible for early normalization of metabolic syndrome after bariatric surgery. In present study the concentration of selected intestinal hormones and adipokines in blood plasma and gastrointestinal tissues were analyzed. Study was conducted on Wistar rats. Animals were divided into three groups (each n=6): control (SH) shame-operated rats; animals in which visceral fat tissue was extracted (LP); and rats in which Scopinaro bariatric surgery was performed (BPD). Immunochemistry analysis of blood plasma showed decrease of insulin concentration in BPD and LP and increase of polypeptide YY (PYY) in BPD group as compared to the control. In duodenal mucosa homogenates the tendency to reduce insulin in LP and BPD group, and increase PYY and visfatin in BPD group was observed. Histometry analysis showed reduction of mucosa thickness in excluded segments of gastrointestinal tract in BPD group as compared to the SH and LP. Concluding, model studies on rats allowed better understanding of mechanisms important for early normalization of glycemic index and insulin resistance reduction in rats. PMID:24304571

  11. The ambivalence of losing weight after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Warholm, Christine; Øien, Aud Marie; Råheim, Målfrid

    2014-01-01

    This study is grounded in a phenomenological lifeworld perspective. It aims at providing rich descriptions of lived experience of the process of losing weight after obesity surgery. Two women participated in in-depth interviews four times each during the first postoperative year. Based on the women’s experiences, a meaning structure—the ambivalence of losing weight after obesity surgery—was identified across the women’s processes of change. This consisted of five core themes: movement and activity—freedom but new demands and old restraints; eating habits and digestion—the complexity of change; appearance—smaller, but looser; social relations—stability and change; and being oneself—vulnerability and self-assurance. These core themes changed over time in terms of dominance. The experience of ambivalence is discussed according to a phenomenological perspective of the body as lived experience. PMID:24480033

  12. Improvements in Systemic Metabolism, Anthropometrics, and Left Ventricular Geometry Three Months after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Leichman, Joshua G; Aguilar, David; King, Terri M; Mehta, Snehal; Majka, Charles; Scarborough, Terry; Wilson, Erik B; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2006-01-01

    Objectives There are several lines of evidence suggesting a link between obesity and heart failure, including chronic inflammation, increased sympathetic tone, and insulin resistance. The goal of this study was to evaluate the changes in systemic metabolism, anthropometrics, and left ventricular contraction as well as geometry in clinically severe obese women after bariatric surgery. Methods Enrollment was offered consecutively to 22 women with clinically severe obesity. Participants had abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify visceral adipose tissue (VAT) area and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) echocardiography to measure left ventricular (LV) contractile function. Fasting blood chemistries were drawn to measure inflammatory markers and to calculate insulin sensitivity. All tests were performed before surgery and three months post-operatively. Results Three months after surgery there was a significant increase in insulin sensitivity [mean change (+/− SEM): 34.0(10.4), p<0.0001]. VAT significantly decreased [−66.1 cm2(17.8), p=0.002] and was associated with decreases in BMI, serum glucose concentrations, and hsCRP levels (r=0.61, p=0.005, r=0.48, p=0.033, and r=0.53, p=0.016, respectively). Left ventricular mass significantly decreased [−3.8 g/m2.7(1.7), p=0.037] and this decrease was associated with a decrease in glucose concentrations (r=0.46, p=0.041). Left ventricular systolic and diastolic contractile function were normal at baseline and there was no change following surgery. Conclusions The early phase of weight loss after bariatric surgery produces favorable changes in left ventricular geometry, and these are associated with normalization in glucose metabolism. PMID:17138229

  13. Fatal Nonhepatic Hyperammonemia in ICU Setting: A Rare but Serious Complication following Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Sunil; Patel, Ronakkumar; Frunza-Stefan, Simona; Kaur, Harmanjot

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is well established in reducing weight and improving the obesity-associated morbidity and mortality. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy following bariatric surgery is rare but highly fatal if not diagnosed in time and managed aggressively. Both macro- and micronutrients deficiencies play a role. A 42-year-old Hispanic female with a history of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Procedure was brought to ED for progressive altered mental status. Physical exam was remarkable for drowsiness with Glasgow Coma Scale 11, ascites, and bilateral pedal edema. Labs showed elevated ammonia, low hemoglobin, low serum prealbumin, albumin, HDL, and positive toxicology. She remained obtunded despite the treatment with Narcan and flumazenil and the serum ammonia level fluctuated despite standard treatment with lactulose and rifaximin. Laboratory investigations helped to elucidate the etiology of the hyperammonemia most likely secondary to unmasking the functional deficiency of the urea cycle enzymes. Hyperammonemia in the context of normal liver function tests becomes diagnostically challenging for physicians. Severe hyperammonemia is highly fatal. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment can alter the prognosis favorably. PMID:27144037

  14. Fatal Nonhepatic Hyperammonemia in ICU Setting: A Rare but Serious Complication following Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Gyanendra; Mehra, Sunil; Patel, Ronakkumar; Frunza-Stefan, Simona; Kaur, Harmanjot

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is well established in reducing weight and improving the obesity-associated morbidity and mortality. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy following bariatric surgery is rare but highly fatal if not diagnosed in time and managed aggressively. Both macro- and micronutrients deficiencies play a role. A 42-year-old Hispanic female with a history of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Procedure was brought to ED for progressive altered mental status. Physical exam was remarkable for drowsiness with Glasgow Coma Scale 11, ascites, and bilateral pedal edema. Labs showed elevated ammonia, low hemoglobin, low serum prealbumin, albumin, HDL, and positive toxicology. She remained obtunded despite the treatment with Narcan and flumazenil and the serum ammonia level fluctuated despite standard treatment with lactulose and rifaximin. Laboratory investigations helped to elucidate the etiology of the hyperammonemia most likely secondary to unmasking the functional deficiency of the urea cycle enzymes. Hyperammonemia in the context of normal liver function tests becomes diagnostically challenging for physicians. Severe hyperammonemia is highly fatal. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment can alter the prognosis favorably. PMID:27144037

  15. Fuzzy obesity index (MAFOI) for obesity evaluation and bariatric surgery indication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Miyahira-Araujo Fuzzy Obesity Index (MAFOI) for being used as an alternative in bariatric surgery indication (BSI) is validated in this paper. The search for a more accurate method to evaluate obesity and to indicate a better treatment is important in the world health context. Body mass index (BMI) is considered the main criteria for obesity treatment and BSI. Nevertheless, the fat excess related to the percentage of Body Fat (%BF) is actually the principal harmful factor in obesity disease that is usually neglected. The aim of this research is to validate a previous fuzzy mechanism by associating BMI with %BF that yields the Miyahira-Araujo Fuzzy Obesity Index (MAFOI) for obesity evaluation, classification, analysis, treatment, as well for better indication of surgical treatment. Methods Seventy-two patients were evaluated for both BMI and %BF. The BMI and %BF classes are aggregated yielding a new index (MAFOI). The input linguistic variables are the BMI and %BF, and the output linguistic variable is employed an obesity classification with entirely new types of obesity in the fuzzy context, being used for BSI, as well. Results There is gradual and smooth obesity classification and BSI criteria when using the Miyahira-Araujo Fuzzy Obesity Index (MAFOI), mainly if compared to BMI or %BF alone for dealing with obesity assessment, analysis, and treatment. Conclusion The resulting fuzzy decision support system (MAFOI) becomes a feasible alternative for obesity classification and bariatric surgery indication. PMID:21838928

  16. New obesity classification criteria as a tool for bariatric surgery indication

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, Antonino; Soldati, Laura; Sarlo, Francesca; Calvani, Menotti; Di Lorenzo, Nicola; Di Renzo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Obesity plays relevant pathophysiological role in the development of health problems, arising as result of complex interaction of genetic, nutritional, and metabolic factors. Due to the role of adipose tissue in lipid and glucose metabolism, and low grade inflammation, it is necessary to classify obesity on the basis of body fat composition and distribution, rather than the simply increase of body weight, and the Body Mass Index. The new term of adiposopathy (‘‘sick fat’’) clearly defines the pathogenic role of adipose tissue. Four phenotypes of obese individuals have been described: (1) normal weight obese (NWO); (2) metabolically obese normal weight; (3) metabolically healthy obese; and (4) metabolically unhealthy obese or “at risk” obese. Moreover, sarcopenic obesity has been related to all the phenotypes. The category of normal weight lean, represented by metabolically healthy normal weight has been classified to distinguish from NWO. It is crucial to recommend a bariatric surgery taking into account adiposopathy and sick fat that occurs with the expansion of fat mass, changing the inflammatory and metabolic profile of the patient. Body fat percentage and genetic polymorphism have to be evaluated to personalize the best bariatric surgery intervention. PMID:26811617

  17. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY: TREATMENT IS WITH CALCIUM CARBONATE OR CALCIUM CITRATE?

    PubMed Central

    BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso; CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; RODRIGUES, Arieli Luz; MENDES, Silvana Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Background : Bariatric surgery, especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, can cause serious nutritional complications arising from poor absorption of essential nutrients. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is one such complications that leads to increased parathyroid hormone levels due to a decrease in calcium and vitamin D, which may compromise bone health. Aim : To compare calcium carbonate and calcium citrate in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Method : Patients were selected on the basis of their abnormal biochemical test and treatment was randomly done with citrate or calcium carbonate. Results : After 60 days of supplementation, biochemical tests were repeated, showing improvement in both groups. Conclusion : Supplementation with calcium (citrate or carbonate) and vitamin D is recommended after surgery for prevention of secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:26537273

  18. Restoration of Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Following Bariatric Surgery is Associated with Reduction in Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, V.; Kashyap, S.R.; Schauer, P.R.; Kirwan, J.P.; McCrae, K.R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Microparticles bud from cellular elements during inflammation and are associated with vascular dysfunction related to type 2 diabetes. Although weight loss is known to reduce inflammation, the metabolic effects of bariatric surgery on microparticle concentration and composition are not known. Objectives To determine the effect of bariatric surgery on microparticle concentration and correlate these changes with clinical parameters. Setting Multispecialty group practice Methods We studied 14 obese subjects with type 2 diabetes two weeks before and at one and 12 months following bariatric surgery. Nine of the patients underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 5 received gastric restrictive surgery. Results One month following surgery, body mass index was reduced by ~10%, glycemic control improved dramatically (P < 0.01), and there was a >60% reduction in endothelial, platelet microparticles and CRP levels (P < 0.05). Tissue factor microparticles reduced by 40% ( p = 0.1). Twelve months following surgery, BMI was reduced by ~20%, glycemic control was maintained (P < 0.01), and there was a >50% reduction in monocyte microparticles compared to pre-surgery. The reduction in monocyte microparticles one month after surgery was strongly associated with the reduction in hemoglobin A1c (P < 0.05). The reduction in monocyte microparticles 12 months following surgery correlated strongly with the reduction in body mass index (P < 0.05). Conclusion The reduction in microparticles after bariatric surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes reflects an attenuation of inflammation and this mechanism may contribute to normalization of glycemic control. PMID:22093380

  19. Relevance of Adipose Tissue Stiffness Evaluated by Transient Elastography (AdipoScan™) in Morbidly Obese Patients before Bariatric Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasso, Magali; Abdennour, Meriem; Liu, Yuejun; Hazrak, Hecham; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Le Naour, Gilles; Bedossa, Pierre; Torjman, Joan; Clément, Karine; Miette, Véronique

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue (scAT) in human obesity undergoes severe alteration such as fibrosis which is related to metabolic alterations and to less efficiency in losing weight after bariatric surgery. There is currently no non-invasive tool to assess fibrosis in scAT. Vibration Controlled Transient Elastography (VCTE) using FibroScan® is widely used to assess liver fibrosis in clinical practice. A novel device named AdipoScan™ which is based on VCTE has been developed by Echosens (Paris) so as to assess scAT. The objective of this study is to show the first AdipoScan clinical results. AdipoScan™ was assessed in vivo on 73 morbidly obese patients candidate for bariatric surgery who were enrolled in the Pitié Salpêtrière hospital. scAT shear wave speed measured by AdipoScan™ is significantly associated with scAT fibrosis, gender, hypertension status, total body fat mass assessed by DXA, hypertension status, glycemic, lipid, hepatic parameters and adiponectin. Results suggest that scAT evaluation before bariatric surgery can be useful in clinical practice since it is related to scAT fibrosis -who plays in role in weight loss resistance after bariatric surgery- and to obesity induced co-morbidities such as diabetes, hypertension liver dysfunction.

  20. A Cognitive-Behavioral Mindfulness Group Therapy Intervention for the Treatment of Binge Eating in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahey, Tricia M.; Crowther, Janis H.; Irwin, Sharon R.

    2008-01-01

    Binge eating is a negative indicator of post-surgical weight loss and health outcome in bariatric surgery patients (Hsu, Bentancourt, Sullivan, 1996). Cognitive-behavioral techniques and mindfulness-based practices have been shown to successfully treat binge eating (Agras, Telch, Arnow, Eldredge, & Marnell, 1997; Kristeller & Hallett, 1999). This…

  1. Over-drainage and persistent shunt-dependency in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension treated with shunts and bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Jonathan; Constantini, Shlomi; Kesler, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) may lead to visual impairment. Shunt surgery is indicated for refractory IIH-related symptoms that persist despite medical treatment, or those presenting with significant visual decline. Obesity is a risk factor for IIH; a reduction in weight has been shown to improve papilledema. Bariatric surgery (BS) has been suggested for treating IIH associated with morbid obesity. In this study, we describe a high rate of over-drainage (OD) seen in patients following shunts and BS. Methods: The study cohort includes 13 patients with IIH that underwent shunt surgery for treatment of the IIH-related symptoms. Six patients underwent BS in addition to the shunt surgery (but not concomitantly). Seven patients had only shunt surgeries with no BS. Data were collected retrospectively. Results: BS effectively led to weight reduction (body mass index decreasing from 43 ± 4 to 28 ± 5). Patients undergoing BS had 1–6 (2.5 ± 1.9) shunt revisions for OD following BS, as opposed to 0–3 (1.4 ± 1.1) revisions prior to BS over similar time spans (statistically insignificant difference), and 0–6 (1.6 ± 2.5) revisions among the non-BS patients over a longer time span (statistically insignificant difference). Two patients in the BS group underwent shunt externalization and closure; however, they proved to be shunt-dependent. Conclusions: Patients with IIH that undergo shunt surgery and BS (not concomitantly) may suffer from OD symptoms, necessitating multiple shunt revisions, and valve upgrades. Despite BS being a valid primary treatment for some patients with IIH, among shunted patients, BS may not lead to resolution of IIH-related symptoms and patients may remain shunt-dependent. PMID:26713173

  2. Bariatric surgery for a patient with a HeartMate II ventricular assist device for destination therapy.

    PubMed

    Lockard, Kathleen L; Allen, Carrie; Lohmann, Douglas; Severyn, Donald A; Schaub, Richard D; Kauffman, Kelly E; Hodges, Jeffrey R; Woodhall, Lorna; Ramanathan, Ramesh; Teuteberg, Jeffrey J; Eckert, Chad E; Kormos, Robert L

    2013-03-01

    A patient with a HeartMate II left ventricular assist device who had a body mass index of 52 needed gastric bypass surgery in order to qualify for a heart transplant. Unlike previous experience in which the surgery was performed at the implant hospital, the gastric bypass surgery in this case was performed at a bariatric center of excellence that was a separate facility from the implant hospital. The artificial heart program of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center worked with the bariatric center of excellence in scheduling the gastric bypass surgery using a multidisciplinary team approach at 2 hospitals to coordinate safe, high-quality patient care in a unique situation. PMID:23448817

  3. Physical Activity and Physical Function in Individuals Post-bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Josbeno, Deborah A.; Kalarchian, Melissa; Sparto, Patrick J.; Otto, Amy D.; Jakicic, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Background A better understanding of the physical activity behavior of individuals who undergo bariatric surgery will enable the development of effective post-surgical exercise guidelines and interventions to enhance weight loss outcomes. This study characterized the physical activity profile and physical function of 40 subjects 2–5 years post-bariatric surgery and examined the association between physical activity, physical function, and weight loss after surgery. Methods Moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) was assessed with the BodyMedia SenseWear® Pro (SWPro) armband, and physical function (PF) was measured using the physical function subscale of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey instrument (SF-36PF). Height and weight were measured. Results Percent of excess weight loss (%EWL) was associated with MVPA (r = 0.44, p = 0.01) and PF (r = 0.38, p = 0.02); MVPA was not associated with PF (r = 0.24, p = 0.14). Regression analysis demonstrated that MVPA was associated with %EWL (β = 0.38, t = 2.43, p = 0.02). Subjects who participated in ≥150 min/week of MVPA had a greater %EWL (68.2 ± 19, p = 0.01) than those who participated in <150 min/week (52.5 ± 17.4). Conclusions Results suggest that subjects are capable of performing most mobility activities. However, the lack of an association between PF and MVPA suggests that a higher level of PF does not necessarily correspond to a higher level of MVPA participation. Thus, the barriers to adoption of a more physically active lifestyle may not be fully explained by the subjects’ physical limitations. Further understanding of this relationship is needed for the development of post-surgical weight loss guidelines and interventions. PMID:21153567

  4. Pre- to Post-operative Changes in Physical Activity: Report from the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2

    PubMed Central

    King, Wendy C; Hsu, Jesse Y; Belle, Steven H; Courcoulas, Anita P; Eid, George M; Flum, David R; Mitchell, James E; Pender, John R; Smith, Mark D; Steffen, Kristine J; Wolfe, Bruce M

    2011-01-01

    Background Numerous studies report that bariatric surgery patients report more physical activity (PA) after surgery than before, but the quality of PA assessment has been questionable. Methods The Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 is a 10-center longitudinal study of adults undergoing bariatric surgery. Of 2458 participants, 455 were given an activity monitor, which records steps/minute, and an exercise diary before and 1 year after surgery. Mean step/day, active minutes/day, and high-cadence minutes/week were calculated for 310 participants who wore the monitor at least 10 hours/day for at least 3 days at both time points. Pre- and post-surgery PA were compared for differences using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Generalized Estimating Equations identified independent pre-operative predictors of post-operative PA. Results PA increased significantly (p<.0001) pre- to post-operative for all PA measures. Median values pre- and post-operative were: 7563 and 8788 steps/day; 309 and 340 active minutes/day; and 72 and 112 high-cadence minutes/week, respectively. However, depending on the PA measure, 24–29% of participants were at least 5% less active post-operative than pre-operative. Controlling for surgical procedure, sex, age and BMI, higher PA preoperative independently predicted higher PA post-operative (p<.0001, all PA measures). Less pain, not having asthma and self-report of increasing PA as a weight loss strategy pre-operative also independently predicted more high-cadence minutes/week post-operative (p<.05). Conclusion The majority of adults increase their PA level following bariatric surgery. However, most remain insufficiently active and some become less active. Increasing PA, addressing pain and treating asthma prior to surgery may have a positive impact on post-operative PA. PMID:21944951

  5. Evaluation of an In Silico PBPK Post-Bariatric Surgery Model through Simulating Oral Drug Bioavailability of Atorvastatin and Cyclosporine.

    PubMed

    Darwich, A S; Pade, D; Rowland-Yeo, K; Jamei, M; Asberg, A; Christensen, H; Ashcroft, D M; Rostami-Hodjegan, A

    2013-01-01

    An increasing prevalence of morbid obesity has led to dramatic increases in the number of bariatric surgeries performed. Altered gastrointestinal physiology following surgery can be associated with modified oral drug bioavailability (Foral). In the absence of clinical data, an indication of changes to Foral via systems pharmacology models would be of value in adjusting dose levels after surgery. A previously developed virtual "post-bariatric surgery" population was evaluated through mimicking clinical investigations on cyclosporine and atorvastatin after bariatric surgery. Cyclosporine simulations displayed a reduced fraction absorbed through gut wall (fa) and Foral after surgery, consistent with reported observations. Simulated atorvastatin Foral postsurgery was broadly reflective of observed data with indications of counteracting interplay between reduced fa and an increased fraction escaping gut wall metabolism (FG). Inability to fully recover observed atorvastatin exposure after biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch highlights the current gap regarding the knowledge of associated biological changes.CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology (2013) 2, e47; doi:10.1038/psp.2013.23; advance online publication 12 June 2013. PMID:23903405

  6. Bariatric Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  7. A Surgical Model in Male Obese Rats Uncovers Protective Effects of Bile Acids Post-Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Setchell, Kenneth DR; Kirby, Michelle; Myronovych, Andriy; Ryan, Karen K.; Ibrahim, Samar H.; Berger, Jose; Smith, Kathi; Toure, Mouhamadoul; Woods, Stephen C.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2013-01-01

    Bariatric surgery elevates serum bile acids. Conjugated bile acid administration, such as tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), improves insulin sensitivity, whereas short-circuiting bile acid circulation through ileal interposition surgery in rats raises TUDCA levels. We hypothesized that bariatric surgery outcomes could be recapitulated by short circuiting the normal enterohepatic bile circulation. We established a model wherein male obese rats underwent either bile diversion (BD) or Sham (SH) surgery. The BD group had a catheter inserted into the common bile duct and its distal end anchored into the middistal jejunum for 4–5 weeks. Glucose tolerance, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) response, hepatic steatosis, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were measured. Rats post-BD lost significantly more weight than the SH rats. BD rats gained less fat mass after surgery. BD rats had improved glucose tolerance, increased higher postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 response and serum bile acids but less liver steatosis. Serum bile acid levels including TUDCA concentrations were higher in BD compared to SH pair-fed rats. Fecal bile acid levels were not different. Liver ER stress (C/EBP homologous protein mRNA and pJNK protein) was decreased in BD rats. Bile acid gavage (TUDCA/ursodeoxycholic acid [UDCA]) in diet-induced obese rats, elevated serum TUDCA and concomitantly reduced hepatic steatosis and ER stress (C/EBP homologous protein mRNA). These data demonstrate the ability of alterations in bile acids to recapitulate important metabolic improvements seen after bariatric surgery. Further, our work establishes a model for focused study of bile acids in the context of bariatric surgery that may lead to the identification of therapeutics for metabolic disease. PMID:23592746

  8. Patients Having Bariatric Surgery: Surgical Options in Morbidly Obese Patients with Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Braghetto, I; Csendes, A

    2016-07-01

    This article summarizes the currently knowledge and results observed in patients with obesity and Barrett's esophagus which were presented and discussed during the IFSO 2014 held in Montreal. In this meeting, the surgical options for the management after bariatric surgery were discussed. For this purpose, a complete revision of the available literature was done including Pubmed, Medline, Scielo database, own experience, and experts opinion. A total of 49 publications were reviewed and included in the present paper. The majority of authors agree that gastric bypass is the procedure of choice. Sleeve gastrectomy is not an absolute contraindication. Up to now, gastric bypass appears to be the best procedure for treatment of obese patients with Barrett's esophagus. Future investigations should give the definitive consensus. PMID:27167837

  9. Interventions to improve long-term weight loss in patients following bariatric surgery: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    McGrice, Melanie; Don Paul, Kathlene

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery aims to provide long-term weight loss and improvement in weight-related comorbidities. Unfortunately, some patients do not achieve predicted weight loss targets and many regain a portion of their lost weight within 2–10 years postsurgery. A review of the literature found that behavioral, dietary, psychological, physical, and medical considerations can all play a role in suboptimal long-term weight loss. Recommendations to optimize long-term weight loss include ensuring that the patient understands how the procedure works, preoperative and postoperative education sessions, tailored nutritional supplements, restraint with liquid kilojoules, pureed foods, grazing and eating out of the home, an average of 60 minutes of physical activity per day, and lifelong annual medical, psychological, and dietary assessments. PMID:26150731

  10. Weight loss after bariatric surgery normalizes brain opioid receptors in morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, H K; Tuulari, J J; Tuominen, L; Hirvonen, J; Honka, H; Parkkola, R; Helin, S; Salminen, P; Nuutila, P; Nummenmaa, L

    2016-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies suggest opioidergic system dysfunction in morbid obesity, while evidence for the role of the dopaminergic system is less consistent. Whether opioid dysfunction represents a state or trait in obesity remains unresolved, but could be assessed in obese subjects undergoing weight loss. Here we measured brain μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) availability in 16 morbidly obese women twice-before and 6 months after bariatric surgery-using PET with [(11)C]carfentanil and [(11)C]raclopride. Data were compared with those from 14 lean control subjects. Receptor-binding potentials (BPND) were compared between the groups and between the pre- and postoperative scans among the obese subjects. Brain MOR availability was initially lower among obese subjects, but weight loss (mean=26.1 kg, s.d.=7.6 kg) reversed this and resulted in ~23% higher MOR availability in the postoperative versus preoperative scan. Changes were observed in areas implicated in reward processing, including ventral striatum, insula, amygdala and thalamus (P's<0.005). Weight loss did not influence D2R availability in any brain region. Taken together, the endogenous opioid system plays an important role in the pathophysiology of human obesity. Because bariatric surgery and concomitant weight loss recover downregulated MOR availability, lowered MOR availability is associated with an obese phenotype and may mediate excessive energy uptake. Our results highlight that understanding the opioidergic contribution to overeating is critical for developing new treatments for obesity. PMID:26460230

  11. Maintaining weight loss after bariatric surgery: when the spectator role is no longer enough.

    PubMed

    Jones, L; Cleator, J; Yorke, J

    2016-08-01

    Bariatric (weight loss) surgery is the gold standard treatment for severe obesity. Concern exists that patients are regaining weight in the longer term. Success and cost-effectiveness of surgery are threatened due to the re-emergence of related conditions such as diabetes. This exploratory qualitative study investigates patients' expectations and experiences of weight regain (WR) 2 years or more after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Ten participants (two men and eight women) who experienced WR were interviewed between 2 and 6 years following surgery. Findings highlight that participants reacted to initial weight loss as passive spectators and were unprepared for subsequent WR. Their tolerability of WR reduced as the amount of regain increased, suggesting a 'line of tolerance' for WR. WR was influenced by a new vulnerability arising from weight loss over time, and participants struggled to manage their own weight actively as surgical effects waned. They considered self-management skills, and carer and professional support to be limited at the time when WR was most likely to occur. Degrees of tolerability are noted in individuals regaining weight after RYGB. More studies are needed to further understand these problems. Pre- and post-operative support and teaching patients self-management skills may be helpful to minimize WR. PMID:27273813

  12. Factors predictive of obstructive sleep apnea in patients undergoing pre-operative evaluation for bariatric surgery and referred to a sleep laboratory for polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Ricardo Luiz de Menezes; Magalhães-da-Silveira, Flavio José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the main predictive factors for obtaining a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients awaiting bariatric surgery. Methods: Retrospective study of consecutive patients undergoing pre-operative evaluation for bariatric surgery and referred for in-laboratory polysomnography. Eight variables were evaluated: sex, age, neck circumference (NC), BMI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score, snoring, observed apnea, and hypertension. We employed ROC curve analysis to determine the best cut-off value for each variable and multiple linear regression to identify independent predictors of OSA severity. Results: We evaluated 1,089 patients, of whom 781 (71.7%) were female. The overall prevalence of OSA-defined as an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 5.0 events/h-was 74.8%. The best cut-off values for NC, BMI, age, and ESS score were 42 cm, 42 kg/m2, 37 years, and 10 points, respectively. All eight variables were found to be independent predictors of a diagnosis of OSA in general, and all but one were found to be independent predictors of a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA (AHI ≥ 15.0 events/h), the exception being hypertension. We devised a 6-item model, designated the NO-OSAS model (NC, Obesity, Observed apnea, Snoring, Age, and Sex), with a cut-off value of ≥ 3 for identifying high-risk patients. For a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA, the model showed 70.8% accuracy, 82.8% sensitivity, and 57.9% specificity. Conclusions: In our sample of patients awaiting bariatric surgery, there was a high prevalence of OSA. At a cut-off value of ≥ 3, the proposed 6-item model showed good accuracy for a diagnosis of moderate/severe OSA. PMID:26578136

  13. Changes in physical activity behaviour and physical function after bariatric surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Herring, L Y; Stevinson, C; Davies, M J; Biddle, S Jh; Sutton, C; Bowrey, D; Carter, P

    2016-03-01

    Although physical activity performed after bariatric surgery is associated with enhanced weight loss outcomes, there is limited information on patients' physical activity behaviour in this context. This systematic review and meta-analysis assessed pre-operative to post-operative changes in physical activity and physical function outcomes among obese adults undergoing bariatric surgery. A total of 50 studies met inclusion criteria with 26 papers reporting data for meta-analysis. Increases in both objectively recorded and self-reported physical activity at 12 months were demonstrated. Studies indicated that there was a shift towards a greater amount of active time, but of a lower intensity within the first 6 months of bariatric surgery, suggested by a reduction in moderate to vigorous physical activity but an increase in step count. A standardized mean difference (SMD) of 1.53 (95% CI: 1.02-2.04) based on nine studies indicated improved walking performance at 12 months. Similarly, analysis of five studies demonstrated increased musculoskeletal function at 3-6 months (SMD: 1.51; 95% CI: 0.60-2.42). No relationship was identified between changes in weight and walking performance post-surgery. More studies assessing physical activity, physical function and weight loss would help understand the role of physical activity in optimizing post-operative weight and functional outcomes. PMID:26783103

  14. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529939

  15. Could the mechanisms of bariatric surgery hold the key for novel therapies? A report from the Pennington Scientific Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Tam, C. S.; Berthoud, H.-R.; Bueter, M.; Chakravarthy, M. V.; Geliebter, A.; Hajnal, A.; Holst, J.; Kaplan, L.; Pories, W.; Raybould, H.; Seeley, R.; Strader, A.; Ravussin, E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Bariatric surgery is the most effective method for promoting dramatic and durable weight loss in morbidly obese subjects. Furthermore, type 2 diabetes is resolved in over 80% of patients. The mechanisms behind the amelioration in metabolic abnormalities are largely unknown but may be due to changes in energy metabolism, gut peptides and food preference. The goal of this meeting was to review the latest research to better understand the mechanisms behind the ‘magic’ of bariatric surgery. Replication of these effects in a non-surgical manner remains one of the ultimate challenges for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. Promising data on energy metabolism, gastrointestinal physiology, hedonic response and food intake were reviewed and discussed. PMID:21729236

  16. Enoxaparin venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in bariatric surgery: A best evidence topic.

    PubMed

    Parker, S G; McGlone, E R; Knight, W R; Sufi, P; Khan, O A

    2015-11-01

    A best evidence topic in surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: which is the best regimen of enoxaparin thromboprophylaxis for patients undergoing bariatric surgery? One hundred and twenty-five papers were identified using the reported literature search, of which four represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, country and date of publication, patient groups, relevant outcomes and results of these papers were tabulated. All four studies are non-randomized cohort studies examining venous thromboembolism rates and major postoperative bleeding following varying regimens of Enoxaparin thromboprophylaxis. There is no level 1 evidence which significantly favors any particular thromboprophylaxis regimen. There is some evidence that extended duration of treatment of ten days after discharge significantly reduces the incidence of VTE compared to in-hospital treatment only, and that a higher incidence of post-operative bleeding occurs with a regimen that includes a pre-operative dose of Enoxaparin. With regard to dosage, for in-hospital treatment the higher dosage of 40 mg twice daily as opposed to 30 mg seems to significantly reduce the incidence of VTE without significantly affecting bleeding rate. PMID:26394187

  17. Oral liquid L-thyroxine (L-t4) may be better absorbed compared to L-T4 tablets following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Pirola, Ilenia; Formenti, Anna M; Gandossi, Elena; Mittempergher, Francesco; Casella, Claudio; Agosti, Barbara; Cappelli, Carlo

    2013-09-01

    Drug malabsorption is a potential concern after bariatric surgery. We present four case reports of hypothyroid patients who were well replaced with thyroxine tablets to euthyroid thyrotropin (TSH) levels prior to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. These patients developed elevated TSH levels after the surgery, the TSH responded reversibly to switching from treatment with oral tablets to a liquid formulation. PMID:23824980

  18. The IFSO Website (www.ifso.com): the Online Gateway to Obesity and Metabolic Disorders for Bariatric Surgery Professionals and Patients: On behalf of the IFSO Communications Committee.

    PubMed

    Khwaja, Haris; Coelho, António Jamel; Mazzarella, Manuela; Miller, Karl; Nimeri, Abdelrahman; Ponce, Jaime; Prachand, Vivek; Shikora, Scott; van Wagensveld, Bart; Weiner, Rudolf; Zundel, Natan

    2015-11-01

    The refurbished International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders (IFSO) website ( www.ifso.com ) showcases a wealth of high-quality information for bariatric surgery professionals and patients. The website provides free online access to the organisational structure of IFSO and useful information on IFSO-endorsed congresses, symposia and courses. Online access to the journal, Obesity Surgery, and the IFSO Newsletter can also be obtained via the IFSO website. There is also easy-to-understand information on the topics of obesity and the various bariatric/metabolic surgeries for our patients. PMID:26319793

  19. Comparison of two objective monitors for assessing physical activity and sedentary behaviors in bariatric surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Unick, Jessica L.; Bond, Dale S.; Jakicic, John M.; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Ryder, Beth A.; Roye, G. Dean; Pohl, Dieter; Trautvetter, Jennifer; Wing, Rena R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Objective quantification of physical activity (PA) is needed to understand PA and sedentary behaviors in bariatric surgery patients, yet it is unclear whether PA estimates produced by different monitors are comparable and can be interpreted similarly across studies. We compared PA estimates from the Stayhealthy RT3 triaxial accelerometer (RT3) and the Sensewear Pro2 Armband (SWA) at both the group and individual participant level. Methods Bariatric surgery candidates were instructed to wear the RT3 and SWA during waking hours for seven days. Participants meeting valid wear time requirements (≥4 days of ≥8 hours/day) for both monitors were included in the analyses. Time spent in sedentary (<1.5 METs), light (1.5–2.9 METs), moderate-to-vigorous (MVPA; ≥3.0 METs), and total PA (TPA; ≥1.5 METs) according to each monitor was compared. Results Fifty-five participants (BMI: 48.4±8.2 kg/m2) met wear time requirements. Daily time spent in sedentary (RT3: 582.9±94.3; SWA: 602.3±128.6 min), light (RT3: 131.9±60.0; SWA: 120.6±65.7 min), MVPA (RT3: 25.9±20.9; SWA: 29.9±19.5 min), and TPA (RT3: 157.8±74.5; SWA: 150.6±80.7 min) was similar between monitors (p>0.05). While the average difference in TPA between the two monitors at the group level was 7.2±64.2 minutes; the average difference between the two monitors for each participant was 45.6±45.4 minutes. Conclusions At the group level, the RT3 and SWA provide similar estimates of PA and sedentary behaviors; however concordance between monitors may be compromised at the individual level. Findings related to PA and sedentary behaviors at the group level can be interpreted similarly across studies when either monitor is used. PMID:21814865

  20. Neuro-Genetics of Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) as the Root Cause of “Addiction Transfer”: A New Phenomenon Common after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Bailey, John; Gonzalez, Anthony M; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Liu, Yijun; Giordano, John; Braverman, Eric; Gold, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Now after many years of successful bariatric (weight-loss) surgeries directed at the obesity epidemic clinicians are reporting that some patients are replacing compulsive overeating with newly acquired compulsive disorders such as alcoholism, gambling, drugs, and other addictions like compulsive shopping and exercise. This review article explores evidence from psychiatric genetic animal and human studies that link compulsive overeating and other compulsive disorders to explain the phenomenon of addiction transfer. Possibly due to neurochemical similarities, overeating and obesity may act as protective factors reducing drug reward and addictive behaviors. In animal models of addiction withdrawal from sugar induces imbalances in the neurotransmitters, acetylcholine and dopamine, similar to opiate withdrawal. Many human neuroimaging studies have supported the concept of linking food craving to drug craving behavior. Previously our laboratory coined the term Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) for common genetic determinants in predicting addictive disorders and reported that the predictive value for future RDS behaviors in subjects carrying the DRD2 Taq A1 allele was 74%. While poly genes play a role in RDS, we have also inferred that disruptions in dopamine function may predispose certain individuals to addictive behaviors and obesity. It is now known that family history of alcoholism is a significant obesity risk factor. Therefore, we hypothesize here that RDS is the root cause of substituting food addiction for other dependencies and potentially explains this recently described Phenomenon (addiction transfer) common after bariatric surgery. PMID:23483116

  1. Lung function and left ventricular hypertrophy in morbidly obese candidates for bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Paulo de Tarso; Domingos, Hamilton; Patusco, Luiz Armando Pereira; Rapello, Gabriel Victor Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To look for correlations between lung function and cardiac dimension variables in morbidly obese patients, in order to test the hypothesis that the relative size of the small airways is independently correlated with left ventricular hypertrophy. Methods: This was a retrospective study involving 192 medical records containing a clinical protocol employed in candidates for bariatric surgery between January of 2006 and December of 2010. Results: Of the 192 patients evaluated, 39 (10 males and 29 females) met the inclusion criteria. The mean BMI of the patients was 49.2 ± 7.6 kg/m2, and the mean age was 35.5 ± 7.7 years. The FEF25-75/FVC, % correlated significantly with left ventricular posterior wall thickness and relative left ventricular posterior wall thickness, those correlations remaining statistically significant (r = −0.355 and r = −0.349, respectively) after adjustment for weight, gender, and history of systemic arterial hypertension. Stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis showed that FVC and FEV1 were the major determinants of left ventricular mass (in grams or indexed to body surface area). Conclusions: A reduction in the relative size of the small airways appears to be independently correlated with obesity-related cardiac hypertrophy, regardless of factors affecting respiratory mechanics (BMI and weight), gender, or history of systemic arterial hypertension. However, FEV1 and FVC might be important predictors of left ventricular mass in morbidly obese individuals. PMID:26578134

  2. Diagnosis and management of the postoperative surgical and medical complications of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Montravers, Philippe; Augustin, Pascal; Zappella, Nathalie; Dufour, Guillaume; Arapis, Konstantinos; Chosidow, Denis; Fournier, Pierre; Ribeiro-Parienti, Lara; Marmuse, Jean-Pierre; Desmard, Mathieu

    2015-02-01

    Perioperative complications following bariatric surgery (BS) have been poorly analysed and their management is not clearly assessed. The associated frequency of ICU admission is difficult to estimate. Among surgical complications, digestive perforations are the most frequent. The most common postoperative complications of sleeve gastrectomy are fistulas, but bleeding on the stapling line is also commonly reported. Complication rates are higher after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, mainly due to anastomotic leaks. Medical complications are mainly thromboembolic or respiratory complications. All these surgical and medical complications are not easily detected; clinical signs can be atypical or insidious, often resulting in delayed management. Respiratory signs can be predominant and lead erroneously to pulmonary or thromboembolic diseases. Diagnostic criteria are based on minor clinical signs, tachycardia being probably the most frequent one. Lately, complications are revealed by haemodynamic instability, respiratory failure or renal dysfunction and radiographic findings. Management decision according to these abnormal signs is based on a combined multidisciplanary approach including surgical and/or endoscopic procedures and medical care, depending on the nature and severity of the surgical complication. Medical management is based on supportive ICU care of organ dysfunctions, curative anticoagulation if required, nutritional support, and appropriate anti-infective therapy. Pharmacological data are limited in morbidly obese patients and the appropriate doses are debated, especially for anti-infective agents. Complicated BS cases have a poor outcome, probably largely related to delayed diagnosis and reoperation. PMID:25829315

  3. Pharmacologic and mechanical strategies for preventing venous thromboembolism after bariatric surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Brotman, Daniel J; Shihab, Hasan M; Prakasa, Kalpana R; Kebede, Sosena; Haut, Elliott R; Sharma, Ritu; Shermock, Kenneth; Chelladurai, Yohalakshmi; Singh, Sonal; Segal, Jodi B

    2013-07-01

    We sought to assess the comparative effectiveness and safety of pharmacologic and mechanical strategies to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. We searched (through August 2012) for primary studies that had at least 2 different interventions. Of 30,902 citations, we identified 8 studies of pharmacologic strategies and 5 studies of filter placement. No studies randomized patients to receive different interventions. One study suggested that low-molecular-weight heparin is more efficacious than unfractionated heparin in preventing VTE (0.25% vs 0.68%, P < .001), with no significant difference in bleeding. One study suggested that prolonged therapy (after discharge) with enoxaparin sodium may prevent VTE better than inpatient treatment only. There was insufficient evidence supporting the hypothesis that filters reduce the risk of pulmonary embolism, with a point estimate suggesting increased rates with filters (pooled relative risk [RR], 1.21 95% CI, 0.57-2.56). There was low-grade evidence that filters are associated with higher mortality (pooled RR, 4.30 95% CI, 1.60-11.54) and higher deep vein thrombosis rates (2.94 1.35-6.38). There was insufficient evidence to support that augmented subcutaneous enoxaparin doses (>40 mg daily or 30 mg twice daily) are more efficacious than standard dosing, with a trend toward increased bleeding. Of note, for both filters and augmented pharmacologic dosing strategies, patients at highest risk for VTE were more likely to receive more intensive interventions, limiting our ability to attribute outcomes to prophylactic strategies used. PMID:23754086

  4. Early detection of changes in lung mechanics with oscillometry following bariatric surgery in severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ubong; Hernandez, Paul; Dechman, Gail; Ellsmere, James; Maksym, Geoffrey

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is associated with respiratory symptoms that are reported to improve with weight loss, but this is poorly reflected in spirometry, and few studies have measured respiratory mechanics with oscillometry. We investigated whether early changes in lung mechanics following weight loss are detectable with oscillometry. Furthermore, we investigated whether the changes in lung mechanics measured in the supine position following weight loss are associated with changes in sleep quality. Nineteen severely obese female subjects (mean body mass index, 47.2 ± 6.6 kg/m(2)) were evaluated using spirometry, oscillometry, plethysmography, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index before and 5 weeks after bariatric surgery. These tests were conducted in both the upright and the supine position, and pre- and postbronchodilation with 200 μg of salbutamol. Five weeks after surgery, weight loss of 11.5 ± 2.5 kg was not associated with changes in spirometry and plethysmography, with the exception of functional residual capacity. There were also no changes in upright respiratory system resistance (Rrs) or reactance following weight loss. Importantly, however, in the supine position, weight loss caused a substantial reduction in Rrs. In addition, sleep quality improved significantly and was highly correlated with the reduction in supine Rrs. Prior to weight loss, subjects did not respond to the bronchodilator when assessed in the upright position with either spirometry or oscillometry; however, with modest weight loss, bronchodilator responsiveness returned to the normal range. Improvements in lung mechanics occur very early after weight loss, mostly in the supine position, resulting in improved sleep quality. These improvements are detectable with oscillometry but not with spirometry. PMID:27109263

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Bariatric Surgery for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qi; Sun, Zhipeng; Zhang, Nengwei; Xu, Guangzhong; Song, Peipei; Xu, Lingzhong; Tang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To compare the remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) through treatment with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) or laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB), and to analyze the cost-effectiveness of medical treatment, LSG, and LRYGB in T2DM patients (BMI ≥ 28). A 2-group randomized controlled trial was conducted at Diabetes Surgery Centre, Beijing Shijitan Hospital in Beijing, China. Subjects were 80 patients ages 16 to 65 years with a body mass index of 28 kg/m2 or more and duration of T2DM no more than 15 years. Subjects were randomly assigned (1:1) to undergo either LSG (n = 40) or LRYGB (n = 40) between February 3, 2011 and October 31, 2013. Of those patients, 72 (90%) were available at follow-up at 2 years. These patients included 34 (85%) who underwent LSG and 38 (95%) who underwent LRYGB. This study presents the follow-up data at 2 years, which compared LSG and LRYGB in T2DM patients. Partial remission and complete remission were determined, and weight loss, BMI, changes in abdominal circumference, cholesterol, and triglycerides were measured. The cost-effectiveness of each type of bariatric surgery was analyzed with a Markov simulation model that yielded quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and costs. From our analysis results, LSG and LRYGB are both have taken a great effect on the reduction of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and bodyweight in patients with T2DM. The cost-effectiveness ratios of medical treatment, LSG, and LRYGB respectively are 1589.02, 1028.97, and 1197.44 dollars per QALY. Our analysis indicates that LSG appear to provide a cost-effective method of T2DM treatment for the patients. PMID:27196454

  6. [The psychiatric, psychological and addiction evaluation in bariatric surgery candidates: What should we assess, why and how?].

    PubMed

    Brunault, Paul; Gohier, Bénédicte; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri; Bourbao-Tournois, Céline; Frammery, Julie; Réveillère, Christian; Ballon, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is indicated in obese patients with a BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2) or ≥ 35 kg/m(2) with serious comorbidities, in second intention in patients who failed to achieve significant weight loss after a well-managed medical, nutritional and psychotherapeutic treatment for 6 to 12 months, and in patients who are aware of the consequences of bariatric surgery and who agree with a long term medical and surgical follow-up. Such a treatment requires a preoperative multidisciplinary assessment and management, which includes a mandatory consultation with a psychiatrist or a psychologist that should be member of the multidisciplinary staff and participate in these staffs. Although one of this consultation's aim is to screen for the few patients who for which surgery is contra-indicated, in most cases, the main aim of this assessment is to screen for and manage psychiatric and psychopathologic disorders that could be temporary contra-indication, because these disorders could lead to poorer postoperative outcome when untreated. By explaining to the patient how these disorders could affect postoperative outcome and which benefits he could retrieve from their management, the patient will increase his motivation for change and he will be more likely to seek professional help for these disorders. In all cases, a systematic examination of the patient's personality and his/her ability to understand the postoperative instructions is essential before surgery because clinicians should check that the patient is able to be adherent to postoperative instructions. In addition to clinical interview, use of self-administered questionnaires before the consultation might help to determine which psychiatric or psychopathologic factors should be more closely screened during the consultation. Psychiatric disorders and addictions are highly prevalent in this population (e.g., mood and anxiety disorders, binge eating disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, addictions, personality

  7. Frequency of periodontal pathogens and Helicobacter pylori in the mouths and stomachs of obese individuals submitted to bariatric surgery: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    PATARO, André Luiz; CORTELLI, Sheila Cavalca; ABREU, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães; CORTELLI, José Roberto; FRANCO, Gilson Cesar Nobre; AQUINO, Davi Romeiro; COTA, Luis Otavio Miranda; COSTA, Fernando Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This cross-sectional study compared the frequency of oral periodontopathogens and H. pylori in the mouths and stomachs of obese individuals with or without periodontitis submitted to bariatric surgery. Material and Methods One hundred and fifty-four men and women aged 18-65 were conveniently distributed into four groups. Two groups were composed of individuals who underwent bariatric surgery with (BP) (n=40) and without (BNP) (n=39) periodontitis and two obese control groups with (CP) (n=35) and without (CNP) (n=40) periodontitis. The oral pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Parvimonas micra, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, Campylobacter rectus, and Helicobacter pylori were detected by a polymerase chain reaction technique using saliva, tongue and stomach biopsy samples. Results Statistical analysis demonstrated that periodontopathogens were highly frequent in the mouth (up to 91.4%). In the bariatric surgically treated group, orally, P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia were more frequent in periodontitis, while C. rectus was more frequent in non-periodontitis subjects. Stomach biopsies also revealed the high frequency of five oral species in both candidates for bariatric surgery (91.6%) and the bariatric (83.3%) groups. H. pylori was frequently detected in the mouth (50.0%) and stomach (83.3%). In the stomach, oral species and H. pylori appeared in lower frequency in the bariatric group. Conclusions Obese individuals showed high frequencies of periodontopathogens and H. pylori in their mouths and stomachs. Bariatric surgery showed an inverse microbial effect on oral and stomach environments by revealing higher oral and lower stomach bacterial frequencies. PMID:27383704

  8. Carbon dioxide monitoring during laparoscopic-assisted bariatric surgery in severely obese patients: transcutaneous versus end-tidal techniques.

    PubMed

    Dion, Joanna M; McKee, Chris; Tobias, Joseph D; Herz, Daniel; Sohner, Paul; Teich, Steven; Michalsky, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Various factors including severe obesity or increases in intra-abdominal pressure during laparoscopy can lead to inaccuracies in end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) monitoring. The current study prospectively compares ET and transcutaneous (TC) CO2 monitoring in severely obese adolescents and young adults during laparoscopic-assisted bariatric surgery. Carbon dioxide was measured with both ET and TC devices during insufflation and laparoscopic bariatric surgery. The differences between each measure (PETCO2 and TC-CO2) and the PaCO2 were compared using a non-paired t test, Fisher's exact test, and a Bland-Altman analysis. The study cohort included 25 adolescents with a mean body mass index of 50.2 kg/m2 undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. There was no difference in the absolute difference between the TC-CO2 and PaCO2 (3.2±3.0 mmHg) and the absolute difference between the PETCO2 and PaCO2 (3.7±2.5 mmHg). The bias and precision were 0.3 and 4.3 mmHg for TC monitoring versus PaCO2 and 3.2 and 3.2 mmHg for ET monitoring versus PaCO2. In the young severely obese population both TC and PETCO2 monitoring can be used to effectively estimate PaCO2. The correlation of PaCO2 to TC-CO2 is good, and similar to the correlation of PaCO2 to PETCO2. In this population, both of these non-invasive measures of PaCO2 can be used to monitor ventilation and minimize arterial blood gas sampling. PMID:24916514

  9. Exploratory evaluation of an obese population seeking bariatric surgery in an Italian public service.

    PubMed

    Bonfà, F; Marchetta, L; Avanzi, M; Baldini, E; Raselli, R; Uber, E; Cabrini, S

    2010-09-01

    Obesity is a difficult to treat multi-problematic disease. Bariatric surgery (BS) has been regarded as the most effective therapeutic option, however the outcomes strongly depend on baseline conditions and further behavioural modifications. Our aim was to assess the characteristics of severely obese patients seeking BS in a Public Health Service in Italy. Socio-demographic characteristics, eating habits and the presence of stressful situations associated to weight increase, as well as psychiatric disorders of 111 outpatients attending our BS Program were assessed. Twenty-seven percent of patients have familiar history of obesity (FHO). Differences between patients having or not having a FHO were found for several psychiatric conditions, including lower Bulimic symptoms (p=0.025) and lower use of Alcohol (p=0.045). A total of 28.8% of the participants reported a BED; those patients do not differ in BMI (p=0.437) from non-BED patients but had higher psychological disorders associated to eating disorder, as for example Bulimic symptoms (p=0.000), higher BES scores (p=0.000) and psychological distress, such as Depression (p=0.000). Nearly 50% of patients had any psychiatric disorders and depression was the most common disturbance (32.4%); anxiety disorder was present in 15.3% of patients. Moreover, patients who have disclosed traumatic episodes (11.7%) presented higher distress associated to eating disorder variables, such as BES (p=0.001) and EDI-2 BU scores (p=0.000) and presence of BED (p=0.001), and women are more likely to be in this group (p=0.043). Our report proposes that multiple causative factors play a role in obesity, and we need to take them all into account to plan a comprehensive pre- and post-surgical treatment plan. PMID:21150247

  10. The Systemic Inflammome of Severe Obesity before and after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Arismendi, Ebymar; Rivas, Eva; Agustí, Alvar; Ríos, José; Barreiro, Esther; Vidal, Josep; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is associated with low-grade systemic inflammation. The “inflammome” is a network layout of the inflammatory pattern. The systemic inflammome of obesity has not been described as yet. We hypothesized that it can be significantly worsened by smoking and other comorbidities frequently associated with obesity, and ameliorated by bariatric surgery (BS). Besides, whether or not these changes are mirrored in the lungs is unknown, but obesity is often associated with pulmonary inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. Objectives We sought to: (1) describe the systemic inflammome of morbid obesity; (2) investigate the effects of sex, smoking, sleep apnea syndrome, metabolic syndrome and BS upon this systemic inflammome; and, (3) determine their interplay with pulmonary inflammation. Methods We studied 129 morbidly obese patients (96 females; age 46±12 years; body mass index [BMI], 46±6 kg/m2) before and one year after BS, and 20 healthy, never-smokers, (43±7 years), with normal BMI and spirometry. Results Before BS, compared with controls, all obese subjects displayed a strong and coordinated (inflammome) systemic inflammatory response (adiponectin, C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-8, IL-10, leptin, soluble tumor necrosis factor-receptor 1(sTNF-R1), and 8-isoprostane). This inflammome was not modified by sex, smoking, or coexistence of obstructive sleep apnea and/or metabolic syndrome. By contrast, it was significantly ameliorated, albeit not completely abolished, after BS. Finally, obese subjects had evidence of pulmonary inflammation (exhaled condensate) that also decreased after BS. Conclusions The systemic inflammome of morbid obesity is independent of sex, smoking status and/or comorbidities, it is significantly reduced by BS and mirrored in the lungs. PMID:25238542

  11. Psychiatric symptoms and leptin in obese patients who were bariatric surgery candidates

    PubMed Central

    Changchien, Te-Chang; Tai, Chi-Ming; Huang, Chih-Kun; Chien, Chia-Chang; Yen, Yung-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is a significant relationship between obesity and common mental symptoms (depression and anxiety symptoms). But the association between depression (or anxiety symptoms) and serum leptin is still unclear and controversial, despite the growing body of evidence supporting the existence of “leptin resistance” in obese persons. So we investigated whether common mental symptoms, obesity, and the interactive effect of these two factors have a relationship with leptin in obese patients who were candidates for bariatric surgery. Methods In all, 139 participants (mean age: 31.4 years, standard deviation: 9.3 years, 73.4% female) were enrolled at an obesity treatment center in southern Taiwan. Serum leptin levels and body mass index (BMI) were measured. The Chinese Health Questionnaire and Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire were administered. Results The mean BMI of our participants was 39.4 kg/m2 (±6.8), and the mean leptin level was 24.5 ng/mL (±9.4). In the multivariate regression models, Chinese Health Questionnaire-by-BMI and Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire-by-BMI interaction terms remained significant predictors of leptin level (β=0.16, P<0.0001; β=0.04, P<0.0001, respectively), after adjustment for age, sex, and history of hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia, despite the inverse correlation between Chinese Health Questionnaire (or Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire) and leptin. In addition, female patients had significantly higher leptin levels than male patients. Conclusion The present findings confirmed that the relationship between common mental symptoms and leptin is modulated by obesity in severely obese patients. Future studies should focus on further measures of leptin receptors or signaling on the basis of these interactive effects in psychiatry. PMID:26316761

  12. Objective Assessment of Changes in Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior: Pre-through 3-Years Post- Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    King, Wendy C; Chen, Jia-Yuh; Bond, Dale S; Belle, Steven H; Courcoulas, Anita P; Patterson, Emma J; Mitchell, James E; Inabnet, William B; Dakin, George F; Flum, David R; Cook, Brian; Wolfe, Bruce M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate change in sedentary behavior (SB) and physical activity (PA) over three years following bariatric surgery. Methods A subset of participants in an observational study (n=473 of 2458; 79% female, median body mass index 45kg/m2) wore an activity monitor pre-surgery and at 1–3 annual post-surgery assessments. Results Over the first year, on average, sedentary time decreased from 573 (95%CI 563–582) to 545 (95%CI 534–555) min/d and moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) increased from 77 (95%CI: 71–84) to 106 (95%CI: 98–116) min/wk, or 7 (95%CI: 5–10) to 24 (95%CI: 18–29) min/wk in MVPA bouts ≥10 minutes. There were no changes in these parameters from years 1 to 3 (P for all>.05). The percentage of participants achieving ≥150 min/wk of bout-related MVPA was not different at year 3 [6.5% (95%CI: 3.1–12.7)] vs. pre-surgery [3.4% (95%CI: 1.8–5.0); p=.45]. Most participants followed SB and PA trajectories that paralleled mean change and were consistent with their pre-surgery position in relation to the group. Conclusions On average, bariatric surgical patients make small reductions in SB and increases in PA during the first post-surgery year, which are maintained through 3 years. Still, post-surgery PA levels fall short of PA guidelines for general health or weight control. PMID:26010326

  13. Endoscopic extraction of adjustable gastric bands after intragastric migration as a complication of bariatric surgery: technique and advice

    PubMed Central

    Collado-Pacheco, David; Rábago-Torre, Luis Ramon; Arias-Rivera, Maria; Ortega-Carbonel, Alejandro; Olivares-Valles, Ana; Alonso-Prada, Alicia; Vázquez-Echarri, Jaime; Herrera-Merino, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery has been the method most widely used to manage the extraction of gastric bands with inclusion as a late complication of bariatric surgery; however, surgical extraction entails morbidity and limits future surgical procedures. The development of endoscopic techniques has provided an important means of improving the treatment of this complication, enabling minimally invasive and safe procedures that have a high success rate. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of patients who had laparoscopic gastric banding complicated by intragastric migration and were treated endoscopically. A technique already described for managing this complication was employed. An MTW Endoskopie Dormia basket for mechanical lithotripsy or a standard 0.0035-in guidewire was placed around the band, and an MTW Endoskopie emergency lithotripter was used to section it, after which the band was extracted with a standard polypectomy snare. Also analyzed were the initial symptoms of patients with this complication, the mean time from surgery to development of the event, the success rate of endoscopic treatment, and complications, Results: A total of 127 patients had undergone gastric banding surgery in our Bariatric Surgery Center; of these, 12 patients (9.4 %) developed a complication such as intragastric migration of the band. Weight gain and pain were the main symptoms in 11 patients (92 %), and the mean time to the development of symptoms was 51.3 months. A single endoscopic treatment was successful in 7 of 9 patients (78 %). Only 1 complication, involving ventilation during anesthesia, occurred; no other adverse events were recorded. Conclusions: The endoscopic extraction of bands with inclusion is feasible and can be performed easily and successfully. The procedure is available in all hospitals and has a low incidence of related complications, so that unnecessary surgical procedures can be avoided. PMID:27556077

  14. Feasibility and Impact of a Combined Supervised Exercise and Nutritional-Behavioral Intervention following Bariatric Surgery: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jassil, Friedrich C.; Manning, Sean; Lewis, Neville; Steinmo, Siri; Kingett, Helen; Lough, Fiona; Pucci, Andrea B. F.; Cheung, W. H.; Finer, Nicholas; Walker, Judith; Doyle, Jaqueline; Batterham, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Lifestyle intervention programs after bariatric surgery have been suggested to maximise health outcomes. This pilot study aimed to investigate the feasibility and impact of an 8-week combined supervised exercise with nutritional-behavioral intervention following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. Methods. Eight female patients (44 ± 8 years old, BMI = 38.5 ± 7.2 kgm−2) completed the program. Before and after intervention, anthropometric measures, six-minute walk test (6MWT), physical activity level, eating behavior, and quality of life (QoL) were assessed. Percentage weight loss (%WL) outcomes were compared with a historical matched control group. Results. The program significantly improved functional capacity (mean increment in 6MWT was 127 ± 107 meters, p = 0.043), increased strenuous intensity exercise (44 ± 49 min/week, p = 0.043), increased consumption of fruits and vegetables (p = 0.034), reduced consumption of ready meals (p = 0.034), and improved “Change in Health” in QoL domain (p = 0.039). The intervention group exhibited greater %WL in the 3–12-month postsurgery period compared to historical controls, 12.2 ± 7.5% versus 5.1 ± 5.4%, respectively (p = 0.027). Conclusions. Lifestyle intervention program following bariatric surgery is feasible and resulted in several beneficial outcomes. A large randomised control trial is now warranted. PMID:26199740

  15. The Role of Obesity Training in Medical School and Residency on Bariatric Surgery Knowledge in Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Fatima Cody; Johnson, Erica D.; Claridy, Mechelle D.; Earle, Rebecca L.; Kaplan, Lee M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. US primary care physicians are inadequately educated on how to provide obesity treatment. We sought to assess physician training in obesity and to characterize the perceptions, beliefs, knowledge, and treatment patterns of primary care physicians. Methods. We administered a cross-sectional web-based survey from July to October 2014 to adult primary care physicians in practices affiliated with the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). We evaluated survey respondent demographics, personal health habits, obesity training, knowledge of bariatric surgery care, perceptions, attitudes, and beliefs regarding the etiology of obesity and treatment strategies. Results. Younger primary care physicians (age 20–39) were more likely to have received some obesity training than those aged 40–49 (OR: 0.08, 95% CI: 0.008–0.822) or those 50+ (OR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.004–0.321). Physicians who were young, had obesity, or received obesity education in medical school or postgraduate training were more likely to answer bariatric surgery knowledge questions correctly. Conclusions. There is a need for educational programs to improve physician knowledge and competency in treating patients with obesity. Obesity is a complex chronic disease, and it is important for clinicians to be equipped with the knowledge of the multiple treatment modalities that may be considered to help their patients achieve a healthy weight. PMID:26339506

  16. [The profile of patients undergoing bariatric surgery in the Brazilian Unified National Health System: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Kelles, Silvana Marcia Bruschi; Diniz, Maria de Fátima Haueisen Sander; Machado, Carla Jorge; Barreto, Sandhi Maria

    2015-08-01

    Nearly one million Brazilians were morbidly obese in 2013. Bariatric surgery is an option for sustained weight loss, and the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) had provided 50,000 such procedures as of 2014. The SUS database does not provide anthropometric and comorbidity data on these patients, so the aim of the current study was to perform a systematic review to assess the profile of SUS patients that underwent bariatric surgery from 1998 to 2014. The MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO, and Scopus databases were searched, and the methodological quality of the included articles was assessed. Of the 1,591 identified studies, 39 were selected, 95% of which were observational. Patients had a mean age of 41.4 years and mean body mass index of 48.6kg/m2; 21% were males, 61% hypertensive, 22% diabetics, and 31% presented sleep apnea. When compared to international study samples, SUS patients showed similar a anthropometric profile and comorbidities but higher prevalence of hypertension. The studies' low methodological quality suggests caution in interpreting the results. PMID:26375639

  17. Clinical Correlates of the Weight Bias Internalization Scale in a Sample of Obese Adolescents Seeking Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Christina A.; Sysko, Robyn; Bush, Jennifer; Pearl, Rebecca; Puhl, Rebecca M.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Dovidio, John F.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate psychometric properties and clinical correlates of the Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS) in a sample of obese adolescents seeking bariatric surgery. Sixty five adolescents enrolled in a bariatric surgery program at a large, urban medical center completed psychiatric evaluations, self-report questionnaires including the WBIS and other measures of psychopathology and physical assessments. The WBIS had high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = .92). As in previous research with adults, the one underlying factor structure was replicated and 10 of the original 11 items were retained. The scale had significant partial correlations with depression (r = .519), anxiety (r = .465), social and behavioral problems (r = .364), quality of life (r = −.480), and eating (r = .579), shape (r = .815), and weight concerns (r = .545), controlling for body mass index. However, WBIS scores did not predict current or past psychiatric diagnosis or treatment or past suicidal ideation. Overall, the WBIS had excellent psychometric properties in a sample of obese treatment-seeking adolescents and correlated significantly with levels of psychopathology. These findings suggest that the WBIS could be a useful tool for healthcare providers to assess internalized weight bias among treatment-seeking obese youth. Assessment of internalized weight bias among this clinical population has the potential to identify adolescents who may benefit from information on coping with weight stigma which in turn can augment weight loss efforts. PMID:21593805

  18. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY★

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE- TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529351

  19. Prediction of Exercise in Patients across Various Stages of Bariatric Surgery: A Comparison of the Merits of the Theory of Reasoned Action versus the Theory of Planned Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Hillary R.; Gross, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is a world-wide health concern approaching epidemic proportions. Successful long-term treatment involves a combination of bariatric surgery, diet, and exercise. Social cognitive models, such as the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), are among the most commonly tested theories utilized in the…

  20. Complications of abdominoplasty after weight loss as a result of bariatric surgery or dieting/postpregnancy.

    PubMed

    Staalesen, Trude; Olsén, Monika Fagevik; Elander, Anna

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that the risk of complications after abdominal contouring surgery is high. Sparse data in published reports exist, suggesting that complication rates are higher in postbariatric patients compared with patients who have lost weight by dieting. The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence of complications after abdominoplasty in postbariatric patients compared with in patients who have not had weight loss surgery. The aim was also to identify predictive factors associated with the development of postoperative complications. This study retrospectively analysed 190 consecutive patients operated on with abdominoplasty due to abdominal tissue excess from January 2006 to December 2008 at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. Variables analysed were sex, age, max body mass index (BMI), delta BMI (max BMI minus preoperative BMI), preoperative BMI, method of weight reduction, resection weight, and complications. The early complication rates were significantly higher in postbariatric patients (48%) than in patients who had not had weight loss surgery (29%). Resection weight was significantly higher for patients with early local complications compared with patients without early local complications. Max BMI, delta BMI, or preoperative BMI had no influence on the incidence of complications. In conclusion, this study confirms in a fairly large sample that the complication rate after abdominoplasty seems to be higher in postbariatric patients compared with patients who have not had weight loss surgery. However, no predictive factors could be identified explaining these differences. Further studies need to be conducted to identify predictive factors for the occurrence of complications after abdominal contouring surgery. PMID:23088637

  1. The use of sugammadex for bariatric surgery: analysis of recovery time from neuromuscular blockade and possible economic impact

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Edoardo; Zito Marinosci, Geremia; Romano, Giovanni Marco; Piazza, Ornella; Iannuzzi, Michele; Cirillo, Fabrizio; De Simone, Stefania; Servillo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuromuscular block (NMB) monitoring and use of reversal agents accelerate the recovery time and improve the workflow in the operating room. We aimed to compare recovery times after sugammadex or neostigmine administration, and estimate the time spent in operating theater and the possible economic impact of a faster recovery, in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Methods We conducted a retrospective study that analyzed data from records of morbidly obese patients (body mass index >40 kg/m2) undergoing elective laparoscopic bariatric surgery in which sugammadex or neostigmine were used to reverse NMB. Patients were divided in two groups: group 1 (sugammadex group [SUG]) received rocuronium and sugammadex for reversal and group 2 (neostigmine group [NEO]) received either rocuronium or cisatracurium and neostigmine. Data are presented as mean (standard deviation). Results Compared with NEO, SUG group showed shorter times to achieve train-of-four ratio of 0.9 (P<0.05) and an Aldrete score of 10 (P<0.05), a higher cost (€146.7 vs €3.6 [P<0.05]), plus a remarkable less duration of operating theater occupancy (P<0.05). Sugammadex cost accounted for 2.58% of the total cost per surgery, while neostigmine cost accounted for 0.06%. Total time saved in SUG group was 19.4 hours, which could be used to perform 12 extra laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomies. Conclusion Reversal from NMB was significantly faster with sugammadex than with neostigmine. Although sugammadex was substantially more expensive, duration of operating theater occupancy was reduced with potentially workflow increase or personnel reduced cost. PMID:27418846

  2. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability increases after long-term bariatric surgery-induced weight loss.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaal, Esther M; de Weijer, Barbara A; van de Giessen, Elsmarieke M; Janssen, Ignace; Berends, Frits J; van de Laar, Arnold; Ackermans, Mariette T; Fliers, Eric; la Fleur, Susanne E; Booij, Jan; Serlie, Mireille J

    2016-07-01

    In several studies reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) availability was reported in obese subjects compared to lean controls. Whether this is a reversible phenomenon remained uncertain. We previously determined the short-term effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) on striatal D2/3R availability (using [(123)I]IBZM SPECT) in 20 morbidly obese women. Striatal D2/3R availability was lower compared to controls at baseline, and remained unaltered after 6 weeks, despite significant weight loss. To determine whether long-term bariatric surgery-induced weight loss normalizes striatal D2/3R binding, we repeated striatal D2/3R binding measurements at least 2 years after RYGB in 14 subjects of the original cohort. In addition, we assessed long-term changes in body composition, eating behavior and fasting plasma levels of leptin, ghrelin, insulin and glucose. Mean body mass index declined from 46±7kg/m(2) to 32±6kg/m(2), which was accompanied by a significant increase in striatal D2/3R availability (p=0.031). Striatal D2/3R availability remained significantly reduced compared to the age-matched controls (BMI 22±2kg/m(2); p=0.01). Changes in striatal D2/3R availability did not correlate with changes in body weight/fat, insulin sensitivity, ghrelin or leptin levels. Scores on eating behavior questionnaires improved and changes in the General Food Craving Questionnaire-State showed a borderline significant correlation with changes in striatal D2/3R availability. These findings show that striatal D2/3R availability increases after long-term bariatric-surgery induced weight loss, suggesting that reduced D2/3R availability in obesity is a reversible phenomenon. PMID:27184782

  3. Effects of bariatric surgery on male obesity-associated secondary hypogonadism: comparison of laparoscopic gastric bypass with restrictive procedures.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Berniza; Galdón, Alba; Calañas, Alfonso; Peromingo, Roberto; Galindo, Julio; García-Moreno, Francisca; Rodriguez-Velasco, Gloria; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia; Vazquez, Clotilde; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F; Botella-Carretero, José I

    2014-10-01

    Bariatric surgery results in the complete resolution of male obesity-associated secondary hypogonadism (MOSH) in many patients. However, the effects of different bariatric surgical procedures on male sexual hormone profiles and sexual dysfunction have not been compared to date. We compared the pre- and post-operative (at least 6 months after initial surgery) sex hormone profiles of 20 severely obese men submitted to laparoscopic gastric bypass (LGB) with 15 similar patients submitted to restrictive techniques (sleeve gastrectomy in 10 and adjustable gastric banding in 5). We calculated free testosterone (FT) levels from total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations. Fasting glucose and insulin levels served for homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMAIR). MOSH was present in 25 and 16 of the 35 patients when considering TT and FT concentrations respectively, resolving after surgery in all but one of them. When considering all obese men as a whole, patients submitted to LGB or restrictive procedures did not differ in terms of excess weight loss, in the decrease of fasting glucose and insulin, HOMAIR and waist circumference, or in the increase of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, TT and FT levels. The improvement in TT correlated with the decrease in fasting glucose (r = -0.390, P = 0.021), insulin (r = -0.425, P = 0.015) and HOMAIR (r = -0.380, P = 0.029), and with the increase in SHBG (r = 0.692, P < 0.001). The increase in FT correlated with the decrease in fasting glucose (r = -0.360, P = 0.034). LGB and restrictive techniques are equally effective in producing a remission of MOSH. PMID:24664512

  4. Bari-Active: A randomized controlled trial of a preoperative intervention to increase physical activity in bariatric surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Thomas, J. Graham; Trautvetter, Jennifer; Unick, Jessica L.; Jakicic, John M.; Pohl, Dieter; Ryder, Beth A.; Roye, G. Dean; Sax, Harry C.; Wing, Rena R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Habitual physical activity (PA) may help to optimize bariatric surgery outcomes; however objective PA measures show that most patients have low PA preoperatively and make only modest PA changes postoperatively. Patients require additional support to adopt habitual PA. Objectives: Test the efficacy of a preoperative PA intervention (PAI) versus standard pre-surgical care (SC) for increasing daily moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) in bariatric surgery patients. Setting: University Hospital, United States. Methods: Outcomes analysis included 75 participants (86.7% women; 46.0±8.9 years; Body Mass Index [BMI]=45.0±6.5 kg/m2) who were randomly assigned preoperatively to 6 weeks of PAI (n=40) or SC (n=35). PAI received weekly individual face-to-face sessions with tailored instruction in behavioral strategies (e.g., self-monitoring, goal-setting) to increase home-based walking exercise. The primary outcome, pre- to post-intervention change in daily bout-related (≥10-min bouts) and total (≥1-minute bouts) MVPA minutes, was assessed objectively via a multi-sensor monitor worn for 7 days at baseline- and post-intervention. Results: Retention was 84% at the post-intervention primary end point. In intent-to-treat analyses with baseline value carried forward for missing data and adjusted for baseline MVPA, PAI achieved a mean increase of 16.6±20.6 minutes/day in bout-related MVPA (baseline: 4.4±5.5 to post-intervention: 21.0±21.4 minutes/day) compared to no change (−0.3±12.7 minutes/day; baseline: 7.9±16.6 to post-intervention: 7.6±11.5 minutes/day) for SC (p=0.001). Similarly, PAI achieved a mean increase of 21.0±26.9 minutes/day in total MVPA (baseline: 30.9±21.2 to post-intervention: 51.9±30.0 minutes/day), whereas SC demonstrated no change (− 0.1±16.3 minutes/day; baseline: 33.7±33.2 to post-intervention: 33.6±28.5 minutes/day) (p=0.001). Conclusions: With behavioral intervention, patients can significantly increase MVPA before bariatric

  5. Analysis of the Information Quality of Bariatric Surgery Smartphone Applications Using the Silberg Scale.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Melvyn W B; Ho, Roger C M; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature that has evaluated the information quality of the current bariatric and obesity applications. Our objective was to evaluate the quality of currently available smartphone applications for bariatric-patient care using the Silberg scale. The two most widely used smartphone application online stores were searched in June 2014 and a total of 39 applications were evaluated. The average Silberg score of the 39 applications was 4.0 ± 1.76. The current gaps of information quality include the lack of provision of appropriate references, full disclosure of sponsorship, and accurate disclosure whether the application has been modified in the past month. PMID:26424704

  6. Ten-years of bariatric surgery in Brazil: in-hospital mortality rates for patients assisted by universal health system or a health maintenance organization

    PubMed Central

    KELLES, Silvana Márcia Bruschi; MACHADO, Carla Jorge; BARRETO, Sandhi Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is an option for sustained weight loss for the morbidly obese patient. In Brazil coexists the Unified Health System (SUS) with universal coverage and from which depend 150 million Brazilians and supplemental health security, predominantly private, with 50 million beneficiaries. Aim To compare access, in-hospital mortality, length of stay and costs for patients undergoing bariatric surgery, assisted in one or another system. Methods Data from DATASUS and IBGE were used for SUS patients' and database from one health plan of southeastern Brazil for the health insurance patients. Results Between 2001 and 2010 there were 24,342 and 4,356 surgeries performed in SUS and in the health insurance company, respectively. The coverage rates for surgeries performed in 2010 were 5.3 and 91/100.000 individuals in SUS and health insurance respectively. The rate of in-hospital mortality in SUS, considering the entire country, was 0.55 %, 0.44 % considering SUS Southeast, and 0.30 % for the health insurance. The costs of surgery in the SUS and in the health insurance trend to equalization over the years. Conclusion Despite differences in access and characteristics that may compromise the outcome of bariatric surgery, patients treated at the Southeast SUS had similar rate of in-hospital mortality compared to the health insurance patients. PMID:25626935

  7. Bariatric Surgery Induces Disruption in Inflammatory Signaling Pathways Mediated by Immune Cells in Adipose Tissue: A RNA-Seq Study

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, François; Truong, Vinh; Blum, Yuna; Durand, Hervé; Alili, Rohia; Chelghoum, Nadjim; Pelloux, Véronique; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Torcivia, Adriana; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Parks, Brian W.; Ninio, Ewa; Clément, Karine; Tiret, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is associated to improvements in obesity-associated comorbidities thought to be mediated by a decrease of adipose inflammation. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these beneficial effects are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed RNA-seq expression profiles in adipose tissue from 22 obese women before and 3 months after surgery. Of 15,972 detected genes, 1214 were differentially expressed after surgery at a 5% false discovery rate. Upregulated genes were mostly involved in the basal cellular machinery. Downregulated genes were enriched in metabolic functions of adipose tissue. At baseline, 26 modules of coexpressed genes were identified. The four most stable modules reflected the innate and adaptive immune responses of adipose tissue. A first module reflecting a non-specific signature of innate immune cells, mainly macrophages, was highly conserved after surgery with the exception of DUSP2 and CD300C. A second module reflected the adaptive immune response elicited by T lymphocytes; after surgery, a disconnection was observed between genes involved in T-cell signaling and mediators of the signal transduction such as CXCR1, CXCR2, GPR97, CCR7 and IL7R. A third module reflected neutrophil-mediated inflammation; after surgery, several genes were dissociated from the module, including S100A8, S100A12, CD300E, VNN2, TUBB1 and FAM65B. We also identified a dense network of 19 genes involved in the interferon-signaling pathway which was strongly preserved after surgery, with the exception of DDX60, an antiviral factor involved in RIG-I-mediated interferon signaling. A similar loss of connection was observed in lean mice compared to their obese counterparts. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that improvements of the inflammatory state following surgery might be explained by a disruption of immuno-inflammatory cascades involving a few crucial molecules which could serve as potential therapeutic targets

  8. Post-Bariatric Body Contouring Surgery After Weight Loss: Lessons Learned From an Obesity Epidemic in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael S

    2016-02-01

    With the rise in obesity in the United States, there has been a similar increase in bariatric surgery. This has resulted in numerous patients losing significant weight with accompanying circumferential body contouring issues. This has led to an amazing increase in the number of body contouring procedures performed, both traditional excisional techniques as well as new emerging techniques emphasizing tissue preservation, rearrangement, and dermal reshaping. Although China's rates of obesity lag behind the United States, there is a recipe for obesity that will eventually surpass the United States. Thus, China has the opportunity to learn from the United States experience with regards to obesity treatment and contouring procedures after significant weight loss. Time will tell whether China will choose to use similar tissue preservation techniques to address issues of soft tissue ptosis and volume deficiency seen after significant weight loss, make refinements of these techniques, or develop new uniquely Chinese solutions. PMID:27414005

  9. ENDOSCOPIC PLASMA ARGON COAGULATION IN TREATMENT OF WEIGHT REGAIN AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY: WHAT DOES THE PATIENT THINK ABOUT THIS?

    PubMed Central

    MARCHESINI, Simone Dallegrave; BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso; CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; MARCHESINI, João Batista

    2014-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery, especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is an effective treatment for refractory morbid obesity, causing the loss of 75% of initial excess weight. After the surgery, however, weight regain can occur in 10-20% of cases. To help, endoscopic argon plasma coagulation (APC) is used to reduce the anastomotic diameter. Many patients who undergo this treatment, are not always familiar with this procedure and its respective precautions. Aim The aim of this study was to determine how well the candidate for APC understands the procedure and absorbs the information provided by the multidisciplinary team. Method We prepared a questionnaire with 12 true/false questions to evaluate the knowledge of the patients about the procedure they were to undergo. The questionnaire was administered by the surgeon during consultation in the preoperative period. The patients were invited to fill out the questionnaire. Results We found out that the majority learned about the procedure through the internet. They knew it was an outpatient treatment, where the anesthesia was similar to that for endoscopy, and that they would have to follow a liquid diet. But none of them knew that the purpose of this diet was to improve local wound healing. Conclusion Bariatric patients who have a second chance to resume weight loss, need continuous guidance. The internet should be used by the multidisciplinary team to promote awareness that APC will not be sufficient for weight loss and weight-loss maintenance in the long term. Furthermore, there is a need to clarify again the harm of drinking alcohol in the process of weight loss, making its curse widely known. PMID:25409966

  10. Pregnancy as a risk factor for undertreatment after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Jacquemyn, Yves; Meesters, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    A pregnant woman presented at the emergency department with severe nausea and vomiting at 20 weeks of gestational age; she was known with gastric banding. Advanced imaging studies were avoided of fear to harm the fetus. The patient continued to vomit and at 23 weeks intrauterine fetal death was noted. The symptoms did not resolve after delivery and CT scan demonstrated slippage of the gastric band over the pylorus resulting in a high digestive obstruction as the cause of hyperemesis and finally resulting necrosis of the vasa brevia. The gastric band was laparoscopically removed along with the necrotic tissue. Avoidance of radiological and endoscopic investigations of fear to harm the pregnancy resulted in complications and possibly in fetal death. PMID:24408945

  11. USE OF POSITIVE PRESSURE IN THE BARIATRIC SURGERY AND EFFECTS ON PULMONARY FUNCTION AND PREVALENCE OF ATELECTASIS: RANDOMIZED AND BLINDED CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    BALTIERI, Letícia; SANTOS, Laisa Antonela; RASERA-JUNIOR, Irineu; MONTEBELO, Maria Imaculada Lima; PAZZIANOTTO-FORTI, Eli Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background In surgical procedures, obesity is a risk factor for the onset of intra and postoperative respiratory complications. Aim Determine what moment of application of positive pressure brings better benefits on lung function, incidence of atelectasis and diaphragmatic excursion, in the preoperative, intraoperative or immediate postoperative period. Method Randomized, controlled, blinded study, conducted in a hospital and included subjects with BMI between 40 and 55 kg/m2, 25 and 55 years, underwent bariatric surgery by laparotomy. They were underwent preoperative and postoperative evaluations. They were allocated into four different groups: 1) Gpre: treated with positive pressure in the BiPAP mode (Bi-Level Positive Airway Pressure) before surgery for one hour; 2) Gpos: BIPAP after surgery for one hour; 3) Gintra: PEEP (Positive End Expiratory Pressure) at 10 cmH2O during the surgery; 4) Gcontrol: only conventional respiratory physiotherapy. The evaluation consisted of anthropometric data, pulmonary function tests and chest radiography. Results Were allocated 40 patients, 10 in each group. There were significant differences for the expiratory reserve volume and percentage of the predicted expiratory reserve volume, in which the groups that received treatment showed a smaller loss in expiratory reserve volume from the preoperative to postoperative stages. The postoperative radiographic analysis showed a 25% prevalence of atelectasis for Gcontrol, 11.1% for Gintra, 10% for Gpre, and 0% for Gpos. There was no significant difference in diaphragmatic mobility amongst the groups. Conclusion The optimal time of application of positive pressure is in the immediate postoperative period, immediately after extubation, because it reduces the incidence of atelectasis and there is reduction of loss of expiratory reserve volume. PMID:25409961

  12. Effect of bariatric surgery on humoral control of metabolic derangements in obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: How it works

    PubMed Central

    Cetinkunar, Suleyman; Erdem, Hasan; Aktimur, Recep; Sozen, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes is a co-pandemic and a major health concern that is expanding. It has many psychosocial and economic consequences due to morbidity and mortality of this disease combination. The pathophysiology of obesity and related diabetes is complex and multifactorial. One arm of this disease process is the genetic susceptibility. Other arm is dependent on the intricate neuro-humoral factors that converge in the central nerve system. Gut hormones and the adipose tissue derived factors plays an important role in this delicate network. Bariatric surgery provides the only durable option for treatment of obesity and furthermore it provides a remission in the concomitant diseases that accompany obesity. This review provides a brief insight to all these mechanisms and tries to deduce the possible reasons of remission of type 2 diabetes after bariatric surgery. PMID:26090370

  13. Pilot testing of a portion-controlled, commercially available diet on presurgical weight loss and metabolic outcomes in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Heinberg, Leslie J; Schauer, Philip R

    2014-10-01

    Weight loss prior to bariatric surgery is often recommended, but success with weight loss varies. The current study piloted the efficacy of a structured, low-glycemic portion-controlled diet (PCD) intervention compared to usual dietary care (UDC). The study randomized 73 subjects in a 12-week, controlled, randomized design. Participants' height, weight, BMI, percent body fat, fasting lipids, and glucose were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks. Although both groups had significant BMI reductions, there were no differences based upon diet and no effect on percent body fat or metabolic outcomes (all p values >0.10). Although patients were able to reduce their BMI through dietary intervention, losses were minimal. Both groups may have been less adherent or motivated to adopt dietary recommendations because of their upcoming bariatric surgery. PMID:25070483

  14. The Impact of Vitamin D, Calcium, Protein Supplementation, and Physical Exercise on Bone Metabolism After Bariatric Surgery: The BABS Study.

    PubMed

    Muschitz, Christian; Kocijan, Roland; Haschka, Judith; Zendeli, Afrodite; Pirker, Thomas; Geiger, Corinna; Müller, Andrea; Tschinder, Bettina; Kocijan, Annemarie; Marterer, Christina; Nia, Arastoo; Muschitz, Gabriela Katharina; Resch, Heinrich; Pietschmann, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG) are common and effective methods to treat severe obesity, but these procedures can adversely influence bone metabolism and areal bone mineral density (aBMD). This was a prospective 24-month single-center interventional two-arm study in 220 women and similarly aged men (median age 40.7 years) with a body mass index (BMI) >38 kg/m(2) after RYGB and SG procedures. Patients were randomized into: 1) an intervention group receiving: 28,000 IU cholecalciferol/wk for 8 weeks before bariatric surgery, 16,000 IU/wk and 1000 mg calciummonocitrate/d after surgery, daily BMI-adjusted protein supplementation and physical exercise (Nordic walking, strength perseverance, and equipment training); 2) a non-intervention group: no preoperative loading, nutritional supplementation, or obligatory physical exercise. At study endpoint, when comparing the intervention group to the non-intervention group, the relative percentage changes of serum levels of sclerostin (12.1% versus 63.8%), cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTX, 82.6% versus 158.3%), 25-OH vitamin D (13.4% versus 18.2%), phosphate (23.7% versus 32%, p < 0.001 for all), procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide (P1NP, 12% versus 41.2%), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH, -17.3% versus -7.6%), and Dickkopf-1 (-3.9% versus -8.9%, p < 0.05 for all) differed. The decline in lumbar spine, total hip and total body aBMD, changes in BMI, lean body mass (LBM), as well as changes in trabecular bone score (TBS) values (p < 0.005 for all) were less, but significantly, pronounced in the intervention group. We conclude that vitamin D loading and ongoing vitamin D, calcium, and BMI-adjusted protein supplementation in combination with physical exercise decelerates the loss of aBMD and LBM after bariatric surgery. Moreover, the well-known increases of bone turnover markers are less pronounced. PMID:26350034

  15. To eat or not to eat; is that really the question? An evaluation of problematic eating behaviors and mental health among bariatric surgery candidates.

    PubMed

    Miller-Matero, Lisa Renee; Armstrong, Rachel; McCulloch, Katherine; Hyde-Nolan, Maren; Eshelman, Anne; Genaw, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Problematic eating behaviors, such as emotional eating, and food addiction, may affect weight; however, little is known about these eating behaviors, especially among those seeking bariatric surgery. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of problematic eating behaviors and to investigate their relationship with other eating behaviors, body mass index (BMI), and psychiatric symptoms. There were 142 patients who completed a required psychiatric evaluation prior to bariatric surgery. Of these, 16.9 % met criteria for a food addiction and 25.4-40.7 % endorsed emotional eating, depending on type of emotional eating. The number of food addiction symptoms endorsed was related to emotional eating. Both food addiction and emotional eating were related to anxiety and depressive symptoms. However, surprisingly, BMI was not related to a food addiction diagnosis, emotional eating scores, or psychiatric symptoms. Results from this study suggest that problematic eating behaviors are occurring among bariatric surgery candidates. Furthermore, this study may help to address the conflicting research regarding the effects of psychiatric symptoms on weight-loss outcomes. Perhaps it is the problematic eating behaviors (e.g., food addiction and emotional eating) that are associated with psychiatric symptoms that could be influencing outcomes. Future research should evaluate treatments for problematic eating behaviors and whether treatments improve weight-loss success. PMID:24878835

  16. Changes in Plasma Levels of N-Arachidonoyl Ethanolamine and N-Palmitoylethanolamine following Bariatric Surgery in Morbidly Obese Females with Impaired Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Mallipedhi, Akhila; Prior, Sarah L.; Dunseath, Gareth; Bracken, Richard M.; Barry, Jonathan; Caplin, Scott; Eyre, Nia; Morgan, James; Baxter, John N.; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E.; Sarmad, Sarir; Barrett, David A.; Bain, Stephen C.; Luzio, Steve D.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. We examined endocannabinoids (ECs) in relation to bariatric surgery and the association between plasma ECs and markers of insulin resistance. Methods. A study of 20 participants undergoing bariatric surgery. Fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose, lipids, insulin, and C-peptide were recorded preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively with plasma ECs (AEA, 2-AG) and endocannabinoid-related lipids (PEA, OEA). Results. Gender-specific analysis showed differences in AEA, OEA, and PEA preoperatively with reductions in AEA and PEA in females postoperatively. Preoperatively, AEA was correlated with 2-hour glucose (r = 0.55, P = 0.01), HOMA-IR (r = 0.61, P = 0.009), and HOMA %S (r = −0.71, P = 0.002). OEA was correlated with weight (r = 0.49, P = 0.03), waist circumference (r = 0.52, P = 0.02), fasting insulin (r = 0.49, P = 0.04), and HOMA-IR (r = 0.48, P = 0.05). PEA was correlated with fasting insulin (r = 0.49, P = 0.04). 2-AG had a negative correlation with fasting glucose (r = −0.59, P = 0.04). Conclusion. Gender differences exist in circulating ECs in obese subjects. Females show changes in AEA and PEA after bariatric surgery. Specific correlations exist between different ECs and markers of obesity and insulin and glucose homeostasis. PMID:25874237

  17. Application of positive airway pressure in restoring pulmonary function and thoracic mobility in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Brigatto, Patrícia; Carbinatto, Jéssica C.; Costa, Carolina M.; Montebelo, Maria I. L.; Rasera-Júnior, Irineu; Pazzianotto-Forti, Eli M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether the application of bilevel positive airway pressure in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery might be more effective in restoring lung volume and capacity and thoracic mobility than the separate application of expiratory and inspiratory positive pressure. Method: Sixty morbidly obese adult subjects who were hospitalized for bariatric surgery and met the predefined inclusion criteria were evaluated. The pulmonary function and thoracic mobility were preoperatively assessed by spirometry and cirtometry and reevaluated on the 1st postoperative day. After preoperative evaluation, the subjects were randomized and allocated into groups: EPAP Group (n=20), IPPB Group (n=20) and BIPAP Group (n=20), then received the corresponding intervention: positive expiratory pressure (EPAP), inspiratory positive pressure breathing (IPPB) or bilevel inspiratory positive airway pressure (BIPAP), in 6 sets of 15 breaths or 30 minutes twice a day in the immediate postoperative period and on the 1st postoperative day, in addition to conventional physical therapy. Results: There was a significant postoperative reduction in spirometric variables (p<0.05), regardless of the technique used, with no significant difference among the techniques (p>0.05). Thoracic mobility was preserved only in group BIPAP (p>0.05), but no significant difference was found in the comparison among groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: The application of positive pressure does not seem to be effective in restoring lung function after bariatric surgery, but the use of bilevel positive pressure can preserve thoracic mobility, although this technique was not superior to the other techniques. PMID:25590448

  18. THE USE OF THE INTERNET BY THE PATIENT AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY: CONTRIBUTIONS AND OBSTACLES FOR THE FOLLOW-UP OF MULTIDISCIPLINARY MONITORING

    PubMed Central

    MARTINS, Michele Pereira; ABREU-RODRIGUES, Marcela; SOUZA, Juciléia Rezende

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background : Bariatric surgery is presented as the last treatment option for obesity. It requires from all candidates a multidisciplinary evaluation and monitoring throughout treatment. The non-adherence to follow-up with health care teams is related to weight regain. It's possible that the use of internet influences the doctor-patient relationship and patients replace medical care or information provided by health professionals for information from the internet. Aim : Identify and analyze the pattern of internet use by patients after bariatric surgery and check the influence of such use in attending medical appointments with the multidisciplinary team. Method : Electronic questionnaire available on the Internet was used to verify patient´s patterns of Internet use and its influence on in attending multidisciplinary care after surgery. Results : Of the 103 participants, 95% were female, 64% married, 59% with children and 54% with higher education. The mean age was 35.69 years and the mean duration of performing surgery, 11.74 months. The surgical technique that prevailed was Roux-en-Y gastric by-pass (90.3%), the local monitoring concentrated in the private care (93.2%). In the preoperative, most participants consulted more than three times with the surgeon (n=81), nutritionists (n=70), psychologist (n=70). After the surgery, p most patients maintained monitoring with the surgeon and nutritionist. Concerning the internet use, 51.5% accessed the internet in search of information about health and bariatric surgery every day. Facebook and search tools were the most used sites. Conclusion - Data showed the influence of the information contained on the Internet and the adherence to multidisciplinary monitoring. This fact requires the team to consider the use of the Internet as a variable that may interfere and must be handled during follow-up. It is suggested that an active participation of professionals on their websites and social networks and the

  19. Bariatric Surgery Restores Cardiac and Sudomotor Autonomic C-Fiber Dysfunction towards Normal in Obese Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, David C.; Wohlgemuth, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim was to evaluate the impact of bariatric surgery on cardiac and sudomotor autonomic C-fiber function in obese subjects with and without Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), using sudorimetry and heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Method Patients were evaluated at baseline, 4, 12 and 24 weeks after vertical sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. All subjects were assessed using SudoscanTM to measure electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) of hands and feet, time and frequency domain analysis of HRV, Neurologic Impairment Scores of lower legs (NIS-LL), quantitative sensory tests (QST) and sural nerve conduction studies. Results Seventy subjects completed up to 24-weeks of follow-up (24 non-T2DM, 29 pre-DM and 17 T2DM). ESC of feet improved significantly towards normal in T2DM subjects (Baseline = 56.71±3.98 vs 12-weeks = 62.69±3.71 vs 24-weeks = 70.13±2.88, p<0.005). HRV improved significantly in T2DM subjects (Baseline sdNN (sample difference of the beat to beat (NN) variability) = 32.53±4.28 vs 12-weeks = 44.94±4.18 vs 24-weeks = 49.71±5.19, p<0,001 and baseline rmsSD (root mean square of the difference of successive R-R intervals) = 23.88±4.67 vs 12-weeks = 38.06±5.39 vs 24-weeks = 43.0±6.25, p<0.0005). Basal heart rate (HR) improved significantly in all groups, as did weight, body mass index (BMI), percent body fat, waist circumference and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), insulin and HOMA2-IR (homeostatic model assessment) levels improved significantly in pre-DM and T2DM subjects. On multiple linear regression analysis, feet ESC improvement was independently associated with A1C, insulin and HOMA2-IR levels at baseline, and improvement in A1C at 24 weeks, after adjusting for age, gender and ethnicity. Sudomotor function improvement was not associated with baseline weight, BMI, % body fat or lipid levels. Improvement in basal HR was also independently associated with A1C, insulin and HOMA2-IR levels at

  20. Three Year Outcomes of Bariatric Surgery vs. Lifestyle Intervention for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Treatment: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Courcoulas, Anita P.; Belle, Steven H.; Neiberg, Rebecca H.; Pierson, Sheila K.; Eagleton, Jessie K; Kalarchian, Melissa A.; DeLany, James P.; Lang, Wei; Jakicic, John M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Questions remain about the role and durability of bariatric surgery for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). OBJECTIVE This study compared the remission of T2DM following surgical and non-surgical treatments. DESIGN Randomized Controlled Trial SETTING University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, in the United States. PARTICIPANTS and INTERVENTIONS Outcomes were assessed 3 years after treating 61 obese participants with T2DM who were randomized to either an intensive lifestyle weight loss intervention for 1 year followed by a lower lifestyle weight loss intervention (LLLI) for 2 years or surgical treatments [Roux en Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB)] followed by LLLI in years 2 and 3. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Primary endpoints were partial and complete diabetes remission and secondary endpoints included diabetes medications and weight change. RESULTS Body mass index was <35kg/m2 for 26 (43%) participants, 50 (82%) were women, and 13 (21%) African American. Mean (SD) values for weight were 100.5 (13.7) kg, age 47.3 (6.6) years, hemoglobin A1c level 7.8% (1.9%), and fasting plasma glucose 171.3 (72.5) mg/dL. Partial or complete T2DM remission was achieved by 40% (n=8) of RYGB, 29% (n=6) of LAGB, and no LWLI participants (p=0.0037). The use of diabetes medications was reduced more in the surgical groups than the lifestyle alone group; with 65% of RYGB, 33% of LAGB, and 0% of LWLI going from using insulin or oral medication at baseline to no medication at year 3 (p<0.0001). Mean (SE) reductions in percent body weight at 3 years was the greatest after RYGB 25.0% (2.0), followed by LAGB 15.0% (2.0) and lifestyle treatment 5.7% (2.4) (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS Among obese participants with T2DM, bariatric surgery with 2 years of an adjunctive LLLI resulted in more disease remission than did lifestyle intervention alone. PMID:26132586

  1. The application of transcutaneous CO2 pressure monitoring in the anesthesia of obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijiang; Sun, Jie; Chen, Xing; Yu, Yingying; Liu, Xuan; Liu, Cunming

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the correlation and accuracy of transcutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressure (PTCCO2) with regard to arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) in severe obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Twenty-one patients with BMI>35 kg/m(2) were enrolled in our study. Their PaCO2, end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PetCO2), as well as PTCCO2 values were measured at before pneumoperitoneum and 30 min, 60 min, 120 min after pneumoperitoneum respectively. Then the differences between each pair of values (PetCO2-PaCO2) and. (PTCCO2-PaCO2) were calculated. Bland-Altman method, correlation and regression analysis, as well as exact probability method and two way contingency table were employed for the data analysis. 21 adults (aged 19-54 yr, mean 29, SD 9 yr; weight 86-160 kg, mean 119.3, SD 22.1 kg; BMI 35.3-51.1 kg/m(2), mean 42.1,SD 5.4 kg/m(2)) were finally included in this study. One patient was eliminated due to the use of vaso-excitor material phenylephrine during anesthesia induction. Eighty-four sample sets were obtained. The average PaCO2-PTCCO2 difference was 0.9 ± 1.3 mmHg (mean ± SD). And the average PaCO2-PetCO2 difference was 10.3 ± 2.3 mmHg (mean ± SD). The linear regression equation of PaCO2-PetCO2 is PetCO2 = 11.58+0.57 × PaCO2 (r(2) = 0.64, P<0.01), whereas the one of PaCO2-PTCCO2 is PTCCO2 = 0.60 + 0.97 × PaCO2 (r(2) = 0.89). The LOA (limits of agreement) of 95% average PaCO2-PetCO2 difference is 10.3 ± 4.6 mmHg (mean ± 1.96 SD), while the LOA of 95% average PaCO2-PTCCO2 difference is 0.9 ± 2.6 mmHg (mean ± 1.96 SD). In conclusion, transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitoring provides a better estimate of PaCO2 than PetCO2 in severe obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. PMID:24699267

  2. The Application of Transcutaneous CO2 Pressure Monitoring in the Anesthesia of Obese Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shijiang; Sun, Jie; Chen, Xing; Yu, Yingying; Liu, Xuan; Liu, Cunming

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the correlation and accuracy of transcutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressure (PTCCO2) with regard to arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) in severe obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Twenty-one patients with BMI>35 kg/m2 were enrolled in our study. Their PaCO2, end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PetCO2), as well as PTCCO2 values were measured at before pneumoperitoneum and 30 min, 60 min, 120 min after pneumoperitoneum respectively. Then the differences between each pair of values (PetCO2–PaCO2) and. (PTCCO2–PaCO2) were calculated. Bland–Altman method, correlation and regression analysis, as well as exact probability method and two way contingency table were employed for the data analysis. 21 adults (aged 19–54 yr, mean 29, SD 9 yr; weight 86–160 kg, mean119.3, SD 22.1 kg; BMI 35.3–51.1 kg/m2, mean 42.1,SD 5.4 kg/m2) were finally included in this study. One patient was eliminated due to the use of vaso-excitor material phenylephrine during anesthesia induction. Eighty-four sample sets were obtained. The average PaCO2–PTCCO2 difference was 0.9±1.3 mmHg (mean±SD). And the average PaCO2–PetCO2 difference was 10.3±2.3 mmHg (mean±SD). The linear regression equation of PaCO2–PetCO2 is PetCO2 = 11.58+0.57×PaCO2 (r2 = 0.64, P<0.01), whereas the one of PaCO2–PTCCO2 is PTCCO2 = 0.60+0.97×PaCO2 (r2 = 0.89). The LOA (limits of agreement) of 95% average PaCO2–PetCO2 difference is 10.3±4.6 mmHg (mean±1.96 SD), while the LOA of 95% average PaCO2–PTCCO2 difference is 0.9±2.6 mmHg (mean±1.96 SD). In conclusion, transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitoring provides a better estimate of PaCO2 than PetCO2 in severe obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. PMID:24699267

  3. GLYCEMIC BEHAVIOR IN 48 HOURS POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD OF PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND NON DIABETIC SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, Lucas Freitas; TISOTT, Caroline Gewehr; SILVANO, Diego Machado; CAMPOS, Camila Mafalda Mouta; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis

    2015-01-01

    Although there is no indication for surgery taking only into account the glycemic condition, results have shown that benefits can be obtained in glycemic control with bariatric surgery. Aim : To compare the glycemic behavior among type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic patients within 48 h after bariatric surgery, and clarify whether there is a reduction in blood glucose level in obese patients with diabetes before the loss of weight excess. Methods : Descriptive epidemiological study with prospective cohort design with 31 obese patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. The patients were controlled with hemoglucotests in different periods of time: preoperative, postoperative and each 6 h after surgery for 48 h. Results : Average ambulatory blood glucose in diabetics was 120.7±2.9 mg/dl vs 91.8±13.9 mg/dl in the nondiabetic. After 48 h there was decrease in diabetics to 100.0±17.0 mg/dl (p=0.003), while the non-diabetic group did not change significantly (102.7±25.4 mg/dl; p=0.097). There were no differences between the surgical techniques. There were no death. Conclusions : Diabetic patients significantly reduced blood glucose after surgery regardless of the use of exogenous insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. PMID:26537269

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of Bariatric Surgery for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial in China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qi; Sun, Zhipeng; Zhang, Nengwei; Xu, Guangzhong; Song, Peipei; Xu, Lingzhong; Tang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    To compare the remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) through treatment with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) or laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB), and to analyze the cost-effectiveness of medical treatment, LSG, and LRYGB in T2DM patients (BMI ≥ 28).A 2-group randomized controlled trial was conducted at Diabetes Surgery Centre, Beijing Shijitan Hospital in Beijing, China. Subjects were 80 patients ages 16 to 65 years with a body mass index of 28 kg/m or more and duration of T2DM no more than 15 years. Subjects were randomly assigned (1:1) to undergo either LSG (n = 40) or LRYGB (n = 40) between February 3, 2011 and October 31, 2013. Of those patients, 72 (90%) were available at follow-up at 2 years. These patients included 34 (85%) who underwent LSG and 38 (95%) who underwent LRYGB. This study presents the follow-up data at 2 years, which compared LSG and LRYGB in T2DM patients. Partial remission and complete remission were determined, and weight loss, BMI, changes in abdominal circumference, cholesterol, and triglycerides were measured. The cost-effectiveness of each type of bariatric surgery was analyzed with a Markov simulation model that yielded quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and costs.From our analysis results, LSG and LRYGB are both have taken a great effect on the reduction of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and bodyweight in patients with T2DM. The cost-effectiveness ratios of medical treatment, LSG, and LRYGB respectively are 1589.02, 1028.97, and 1197.44 dollars per QALY.Our analysis indicates that LSG appear to provide a cost-effective method of T2DM treatment for the patients. PMID:27196454

  5. SurgiCal Obesity Treatment Study (SCOTS): protocol for a national prospective cohort study of patients undergoing bariatric surgery in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Logue, Jennifer; Stewart, Sally; Munro, Jane; Grieve, Eleanor; Lean, Mike; Lindsay, Robert S; Bruce, Duff; Ali, Abdulmajid; Briggs, Andrew; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The efficacy of bariatric surgery for large-scale, long-term weight loss is well established. However, many questions remain over the continual benefits and cost-effectiveness of that weight loss for overall health, particularly when accounting for potential complications and adverse events of surgery. Health research institutes in the UK and the USA have called for high-quality longitudinal cohort studies of patients undergoing bariatric surgery, assessing outcomes such as surgical complications, mortality, diabetes remission, microvascular complications, cardiovascular events, mental health, cost and healthcare use. Methods and analysis SurgiCal Obesity Treatment Study (SCOTS) is a national, prospective, observational, cohort study of patients undergoing primary bariatric surgical procedures in Scotland. This study aims to recruit 2000 patients and conduct a follow-up for 10 years postbariatric surgery using multiple data collection methods: surgeon-recorded data, electronic health record linkage, and patient-reported outcome measures. Outcomes measured will include: mortality, weight change, diabetes, surgical, cardiovascular, cancer, behavioural, reproductive/urological and nutritional variables. Healthcare utilisation and economic productivity will be collected to inform cost-effectiveness analysis. Ethics and dissemination The study has received a favourable ethical opinion from the West of Scotland Research Ethics committee. All publications arising from this cohort study will be published in open-access peer-reviewed journals. All SCOTS investigators (all members of the research team at every recruiting site) will have the ability to propose research suggestions and potential publications using SCOTS data; a publications committee will approve all requests for use of SCOTS data and propose writing committees and timelines. Lay-person summaries of all research findings will be published simultaneously on the SCOTS website (http

  6. Monitoring and normalising a lack of appetite and weight loss. A discursive analysis of an online support group for bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Cranwell, Jo; Seymour-Smith, Sarah

    2012-06-01

    A significant adjustment in eating practices is required before and after bariatric surgery, yet we know relatively little about how patients manage these changes. In this paper, we explored how members of an online bariatric support group constructed their appetite and weight loss. Two hundred and eighty four online posts were collected, covering a period of just over a year, and analysed using discursive psychology. We found that a lack of appetite post-surgery was oriented to as something that was positively evaluated yet a cause for concern. Indeed, members monitored their food intake and marked out food consumption as a necessary activity in line with notions of healthy eating. Through monitoring members also normalised periods of weight stabilisation and were inducted into a group philosophy which encouraged a more holistic approach to post-surgery 'success'. Our analysis also highlights how monitoring and policing work as social support mechanisms which help to maintain weight management. Thus we argue, in line with others, that weight management, typically depicted as an individual responsibility, is bound up with the social practices of the online support group. We suggest that clinical advice about a loss of appetite and periods of weight stabilisation post-surgery perhaps need further explanation to patients. PMID:22342357

  7. Biochemical response and the effects of bariatric surgeries on type 2 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Roland; Hughes, Tyler; Lerd Ng, Jia; Ortiz, Roberto; Abou Ghantous, Michel; Bouhali, Othmane; Arredouani, Abdelilah

    2013-03-01

    A general method is introduced for calculating the biochemical response to pharmaceuticals, surgeries, or other medical interventions. This method is then applied in a simple model of the response to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery in obese diabetic patients. We specifically address the amazing fact that glycemia correction is usually achieved immediately after RYGB surgery, long before there is any appreciable weight loss. Many studies indicate that this result is not due merely to caloric restriction, and it is usually attributed to an increase in glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels observed after the surgery. However, our model indicates that this mechanism alone is not sufficient to explain either the largest declines in glucose levels or the measured declines in the homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The most robust additional mechanism would be production of a factor which opens an insulin-independent pathway for glucose transport into cells, perhaps related to the well-established insulin-independent pathway associated with exercise. Potential candidates include bradykinin, a 9 amino acid peptide. If such a substance were found to exist, it would offer hope for medications which mimic the immediate beneficial effect of RYGB surgery. Supported by Qatar Biomedical Research Institute and Science Program at Texas A&M University at Qatar

  8. Evidence supporting the need for bariatric surgery to address the obesity epidemic in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bour, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    Despite aims at prevention, obesity in the United States is now an epidemic. Along with the rise in obesity, the United States has experienced a concomitant rise in obesity-related comorbidities. Furthermore overweight and obesity present a major economic public health challenge. Physicians are likely to recommend weight loss to their overweight patients. Diet, exercise, and behavior modification are often effective during the course of treatment but are subject to recidivism and post-treatment weight gain. Obesity intervention mandates that providers consider the need for surgery in many cases. The three most commonly performed weight loss surgical procedures in the United States include gastric banding, gastric bypass, and sleeve gastrectomy. Patients undergoing surgery lose considerable amounts of excess weight and experience marked improvement in many other obesity-related comorbidities. Surgery is a proven therapy for patients who do not respond to less invasive measures and should be considered mainstream therapy in the treatment of the obesity epidemic. PMID:25757004

  9. Changes in the salivary protein profile of morbidly obese women either previously subjected to bariatric surgery or not.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Elsa; Simões, Carla; Rodrigues, Lénia; Costa, Ana Rodrigues; Vitorino, Rui; Amado, Francisco; Antunes, Célia; do Carmo, Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Saliva is a non-invasive source of biomarkers useful in the study of physiological mechanisms. Moreover, this fluid has diverse functions, among which food perception and ingestion, making it particularly suitable for the study of obesity. The aims of this study were to assess changes in salivary proteome among morbidly obese women, with a view to provide information about mechanisms potentially related to the development of obesity, and to evaluate whether these changes persist after weight loss. Mixed saliva samples from morbidly obese women (N = 18) who had been either subjected (group O-BS) or not (group O) to bariatric surgery and women with normal weight (N = 14; group C) were compared for protein profiles, alpha-amylase abundance and enzymatic activity, and carbonic anhydrase (CA) VI abundance. Differences in salivary obese profiles were observed for 23 different spots. Zinc-alpha-2 glycoprotein-containing spots showed higher abundance in group O only, whereas cystatin S-containing spots presented higher abundance in the two groups of obese subjects. Most of the spots identified as salivary amylase were present at lower levels in group O-BS. With regard to the amylase enzymatic activity, increases were observed for group O and decreases for group O-BS. One interesting finding was the high correlation between levels of CA VI and body mass index in group O, which was not observed for groups O-BS or C. The differences between groups, mainly regarding salivary proteins involved in taste sensitivity and metabolism, point to the potential of using saliva in the study of obesity development. PMID:26399515

  10. Increasing GLP-1 Circulating Levels by Bariatric Surgery or by GLP-1 Receptor Agonists Therapy: Why Are the Clinical Consequences so Different?

    PubMed Central

    Amouyal, Chloé; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The “incretin effect” is used to describe the observation that more insulin is secreted after the oral administration of glucose compared to that after the intravenous administration of the same amount of glucose. During the absorption of meals, the gut is thought to regulate insulin secretion by secreting a specific factor that targets pancreatic beta cells. Additional research confirmed this hypothesis with the discovery of two hormones called incretins: gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). During meals, specific cells in the gut (L and K enteroendocrine cells) secrete incretins, causing an increase in the blood concentrations of, respectively, GLP-1 and GIP. Bariatric surgery is now proposed during the therapeutic management of type 2 diabetes in obese or overweight populations. It has been hypothesized that restoration of endogenous GLP-1 secretion after the surgery may contribute to the postsurgical resolution of diabetes. In 2005, the commercialization of GLP-1 receptor agonists gave the possibility to test this hypothesis. A few years later, it is now accepted that GLP-1 receptor agonists and bariatric surgery differently improve type 2 diabetes. These differences between endogenous and exogenous GLP-1 on glucose homeostasis emphasized the dual properties of GLP-1 as a peptide hormone and as a neurotransmitter. PMID:27382574

  11. Postprandial metabolite profiles reveal differential nutrient handling after bariatric surgery compared to matched caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Chin Meng; Muehlbauer, Michael J.; Stevens, Robert D.; Pamuklar, Zehra; Chen, Jiegen; Newgard, Christopher B.; Torquati, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Background Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery results in exaggerated postprandial insulin and incretin responses, and increased susceptibility to hypoglycemia. We examined whether these features are due to caloric restriction (CR) or altered nutrient handling. Methods We performed comprehensive analysis of postprandial metabolite responses during a 2-hour mixed-meal challenge test (MMT) in twenty morbidly obese subjects with type 2 diabetes who underwent RYGB surgery or matched CR. Acylcarnitines and amino acids was measured using targeted mass spectrometry. Linear mixed model was used to determine the main effect of interventions, and interaction term to assess the effect of interventions on postprandial kinetics. Results Two-weeks after these interventions, several gut hormones (insulin, GIP and GLP-1), glucose, and multiple amino acids, including branched-chain and aromatic species, exhibited a more rapid rate of appearance and clearance in RYGB subjects compared to CR during the MMT. In the RYGB group, changes in leucine/isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine and GLP-1 responses were associated with changes in insulin response. Levels of alanine, pyruvate, and lactate decreased significantly at the later stages of meal challenge in RYGB subjects, but increased with CR. Conclusions RYGB surgery results in improved metabolic flexibility (i.e. greater disposal of glucose and amino acids, and more complete β-oxidation of fatty acids) compared to CR. The changes in the amino acid kinetics may augment the hormonal responses seen after RYGB surgery. The reduction in key gluconeogenic substrates in the postprandial state may contribute to increased susceptibility to hypoglycemic symptoms in RYGB subjects. PMID:23787216

  12. Risk management in surgery

    PubMed Central

    MESSANO, G.A.; SPAZIANI, E.; TURCHETTA, F.; CECI, F.; CORELLI, S.; CASCIARO, G.; MARTELLUCCI, A.; COSTANTINO, A.; NAPOLEONI, A.; CIPRIANI, B.; NICODEMI, S.; DI GRAZIA, C.; MOSILLO, R.; AVALLONE, M.; ORSINI, S.; TUDISCO, A.; AIUTI, F.; STAGNITTI, F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Malpractice is the responsible for the greatest number of legal claims. At the present time, legal actions against physicians in Italy are 15,000 per year, and a stunning increase about costs to refund patients injured by therapeutic and diagnostic errors is expected. The method for the medical prevention is “Risk Management”, that is the setting-up of organizational instruments, methods and actions that enable the measurement or estimation of medical risk; it allows to develop strategies to govern and reduce medical error. In the present work, the reconstruction about the history of risk management in Italy was carried out. After then the latest initiatives undertaken by Italy about the issue of risk management were examined. PMID:24091181

  13. What Variables are Associated with Successful Weight Loss Outcomes for Bariatric Surgery After One Year?

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Athena H.; Adler, Sarah; Stevens, Helen B.; Darcy, Alison M.; Morton, John M.; Safer, Debra L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prior evidence indicates that predictors of weight loss outcomes after gastric bypass surgery fall within 5 domains: 1) presurgical factors; 2) postsurgical psychosocial variables (e.g., support group attendance); 3) postsurgical eating patterns; 4) postsurgical physical activity; and 5) follow-up at postsurgical clinic. However, little data exist on which specific behavioral predictors are most associated with successful outcomes (e.g., ≥50% excess weight loss) when considering the 5 domains simultaneously. Objectives Specify the behavioral variables, and their respective cutoff points, most associated with successful weight loss outcomes. Setting On-line survey. Methods Signal Detection Analysis evaluated associations between 84 pre-and postsurgical behavioral variables (within the 5 domains) and successful weight loss at ≥1 year in 274 post-gastric bypass surgery patients. Results Successful weight loss was highest (92.6%) among those reporting dietary adherence of >3 on a 9 point scale (median=5) who grazed no more than once-per-day. Among participants reporting dietary adherence <3 and grazing daily or less, success rates more than doubled when highest lifetime Body Mass Index was <53.7 kg/m2. Success rates also doubled for participants with dietary adherence =3 if attending support groups. No variables from the physical activity or postsurgical follow-up domains were significant, nor were years since surgery. The overall model’s sensitivity =.62, specificity =.92. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to simultaneously consider the relative contribution of behavioral variables within 5 domains and offer clinicians an assessment algorithm identifying cut-off points for behaviors most associated with successful postsurgical weight loss. Such data may inform prospective study designs and postsurgical interventions. PMID:24913590

  14. The Effect of Insurance Status on Pre- and Post-operative Bariatric Surgery Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Melissa A.; Lent, Michelle R.; Wood, G. Craig; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Irving, Brian A.; Argyropoulos, George; Foster, Gary D.; Still, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study compared pre- and post-surgical data and outcomes among gastric bypass patients based on the type of insurance (Medicaid, Medicare, or private). Methods Data were examined from 2553 consecutive RYGB patients at a rural ASMBS Center of Excellence. Results Participants were primarily female (80.5 %), Caucasian (97.1 %), and middle-aged (45.9 years). Medicaid patients’ BMI at consultation was significantly higher than the other two groups (p<0.001). Time to surgery was significantly longer for Medicaid (13.2 %) and Medicare (7.1 %) patients compared with privately insured patients (p<0.001). Pre-surgical weight loss and post-surgical percent of excess weight loss nadir did not differ among the groups. Type 2 diabetes remission rates were comparable across insurance groups. Conclusions Medicaid patients, although demographically different from their privately insured and Medicare counterparts, will benefit from surgery with comparable weight loss results and overall diabetes remission rates. PMID:25373925

  15. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy at a new bariatric surgery centre in Canada: 30-day complication rates using the Clavien–Dindo classification

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Vanessa; Twells, Laurie; Gregory, Deborah; Murphy, Raleen; Smith, Chris; Boone, Darrell; Pace, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) has the highest rate of obesity in Canada, prompting the establishment of a bariatric surgery program at the Health Sciences Centre in NL. This retrospective study examined 30-day complication rates in more than 200 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) between May 2011 and February 2014. Methods We performed a chart review and collected data on 30-day postoperative complications. Complications were graded and reported using the Clavien–Dindo classification. Grades I and II were defined as minor and grades III and higher were defined as major complications. Results We reviewed the charts of the first 209 patients to undergo LSG. The mean body mass index was 49.2, 81% were women and the average age was 43 years. Comorbidities included hypertension (55.0%), obstructive sleep apnea (46.4%), dyslipidemia (42.1%), diabetes (37.3%), osteoarthritis (36.4%) and cardiovascular disease with previous cardiac stents (5.3%). Furthermore, 38.3% of patients reported psychiatric diagnoses, such as depression and anxiety. The overall 30-day complication rate was 15.3%. The complication rate for minor complications was 13.4% and for major complications was 1.9% (2 leaks, 1 stricture and 1 fistula). Conclusion Our results support the feasibility of safely performing LSG surgery at bariatric centres completing fewer than 125 procedures annually. PMID:27007089

  16. Hyperammonemia-induced encephalopathy: A rare devastating complication of bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kromas, Michelle L; Mousa, Omar Y; John, Savio

    2015-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of hyperammonemia are usually easily identifiable to the clinician when associated with liver disease and lead to prompt diagnosis and treatment. However, hyperammonemia-induced encephalopathy is rare in adults in the absence of overt liver disease, thus diagnosis is often delayed or missed leading to potentially life threatening complications. Without proper treatment, such patients can decompensate rapidly with poor outcomes including seizures, coma, and death. Early assessment of plasma ammonia levels in patients with normal hepatic function and characteristic symptoms of encephalopathy can lead to early intervention while investigating the underlying etiology. We describe a patient who presented with a 2-year progression of waxing and waning acute mental status changes after a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. He was found to have elevated ammonia level as well as orotic aciduria; results consistent with a urea cycle disorder. After consulting neurology as well as toxicology, he ultimately improved after dietary protein restriction, sodium benzoate and lactulose therapy. While rare, clinicians should have a high index of suspicion for late onset urea cycle disorders in symptomatic patients presenting with encephalopathy secondary to hyperammonemia. PMID:25954483

  17. Preservation of Fat-free Mass after Bariatric Surgery: A Comparison of Malabsorptive and Restrictive Procedures.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jason; Miller, Megan; Perry, Brittonni; Ewing, Joseph A; Hale, Allyson L; Scott, John D

    2015-08-01

    The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has been shown to cause significant weight loss. However, fat-free mass (FFM) is often lost with this rapid weight change. It is suggested that the loss of FFM is minimized with restrictive-only procedures, such as the vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), when compared with malabsorptive surgery. The purpose of the study was to determine the difference in the postoperative loss of FFM between RYBG and VSG patients. We reviewed all patients who underwent RYGB or VSG between May 2012 and January 2013. Patients were evaluated one month before their procedure and 12 months after for comparison of results. Preoperative and postoperative body analysis data were procured using a body composition analysis device. Within the study period, 33 patients underwent a RYGB procedure and 20 patients a VSG. After 12 months, RYGB patients had an average increase of 38.15 per cent in their proportion of FFM, whereas VSG patients had an average FFM increase of 22.09 per cent, a statically significant difference (P = 0.004). The RYGB helps preserve overall FFM as compared with the VSG. These findings are unexpected because malabsorptive procedures require increased protein intake, resulting in a stronger likelihood of inadequate protein intake, which may lead to protein malnutrition. PMID:26215245

  18. POST-BARIATRIC SURGERY WEIGHT REGAIN: EVALUATION OF NUTRITIONAL PROFILE OF CANDIDATE PATIENTS FOR ENDOSCOPIC ARGON PLASMA COAGULATION

    PubMed Central

    CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; MARCHESINI, Simone Dallegrave; BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso

    2015-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is effective treatment for weight loss, but demand continuous nutritional care and physical activity. They regain weight happens with inadequate diets, physical inactivity and high alcohol consumption. Aim To investigate in patients undergoing Roux-Y-of gastroplasty weight regain, nutritional deficiencies, candidates for the treatment with endoscopic argon plasma, the diameter of the gastrojejunostomy and the size of the gastric pouch at the time of treatment with plasma. Methods A prospective 59 patients non-randomized study with no control group undergoing gastroplasty with recurrence of weight and candidates for the endoscopic procedure of argon plasma was realized. The surgical evaluation consisted of investigation of complications in the digestive system and verification of the increased diameter of the gastrojejunostomy. Nutritional evaluation was based on body mass index at the time of operation, in the minimum BMI achieved after and in which BMI was when making the procedure with plasma. The laboratory tests included hemoglobin, erythrocyte volume, ferritin, vitamin D, B12, iron, calcium, zinc and serum albumin. Clinical analysis was based on scheduled follow-up. Results Of the 59 selected, five were men and 51 women; were included 49 people (four men and 44 women) with all the complete data. The exclusion was due to the lack of some of the laboratory tests. Of this total 19 patients (38.7%) had a restrictive ring, while 30 (61.2%) did not. Iron deficiency anemia was common; 30 patients (61.2%) were below 30 with ferritin (unit); 35 (71.4%) with vitamin B12 were below 300 pg/ml; vitamin D3 deficiency occurred in more than 90%; there were no cases of deficiency of protein, calcium and zinc; glucose levels were above 99 mg/dl in three patients (6.12%). Clinically all had complaints of labile memory, irritability and poor concentration. All reported that they stopped treatment with the multidisciplinary team in the first year after

  19. Efficacy of a liquid low-energy formula diet in achieving preoperative target weight loss before bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lone V; Nielsen, Mette S; Schmidt, Julie B; Pedersen, Sue D; Sjödin, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A preoperative weight loss of 8 % is a prerequisite to undergo bariatric surgery (BS) in Denmark. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a 7- or an 11-week low-energy diet (LCD) for achieving preoperative target weight before BS. A total of thirty obese patients (BMI 46·0 (sd 4·4) kg/m(2)) followed an LCD (Cambridge Weight Plan(®), 4184 kJ/d (1000 kcal/d)) for 7 or 11 weeks as preparation for BS. Anthropometric measurements including body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), blood parameters and blood pressure were assessed at weeks 0, 7 and 11. At week 7, the majority of patients (77 %) had reached their target weight, and this was achieved after 5·4 (sem 0·3) weeks. Mean weight loss was 9·3 (sem 0·5) % (P < 0·01) and consisted of 41·6 % fat-free mass (FFM) and 58·4 % fat mass. The weight loss was accompanied by a decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (7·1 (sem 2·3) and 7·3 (sem 1·8) mmHg, respectively, all P < 0·01) as well as an improved metabolic profile (8·2 (sem 1·8) % decrease in fasting glucose (P < 0·01), 28·6 (sem 6·4) % decrease in fasting insulin (P < 0·01), 23·1 (sem 2·2) % decrease in LDL (P < 0·01), and 9·7 (sem 4·7) % decrease in TAG (P < 0·05)). Weight, FFM and fat mass continued to decrease from week 7 to 11 (all P < 0·01), whereas no additional improvements was observed in the metabolic parameters. Severely obese patients can safely achieve preoperative target weight on an LCD within 7 weeks as part of preparation for BS. However, the considerable reduction in FFM in severely obese subjects needs further investigation. PMID:27293559

  20. A Higher Meal Frequency May be Associated with Diminished Weight Loss after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Angela Gadelha; de Carvalho Costa, Maria José; Faintuch, Joel; Dias, Maria Carolina Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aimed to investigate the relationship between meal frequency, the occurrence of vomiting and weight loss among patients submitted to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass up to 9 months after surgery. METHODS Female patients (n = 80) were followed at 3-month intervals for 9 months. Weight, BMI, 24-hour dietary recall, drug consumption and vomiting episodes were recorded and compared with nutritional outcome. RESULTS The BMI values at 3, 6 and 9 months were 45.1 ± 9.7, 39.9 ± 7.6 and 35.4 ± 8.2 kg/m2, respectively. The corresponding choleric intakes were 535.6 ± 295.7, 677.1 ± 314.7 and 828.6 ± 398.2 kcal/day, and the numbers of daily meals were 5.0 ± 2.5, 4.7 ± 1.8 and 4.9 ± 1.0, respectively. The peak of vomiting episodes occurred within 6 months; however, patients tolerated this complication despite its high prevalence. A significant negative correlation between weight loss and diet fractioning, but not vomiting, was observed throughout the entire postoperative period (P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS 1) Frequent small meals were associated with a reduction in weight loss after gastric bypass and a decrease in vomiting episodes at 6 months, and 2) vomiting did not interfere with nutritional outcome. Unless required because of vomiting or other reasons, multiple small meals may not be advantageous after such intervention. PMID:19936178

  1. Ventilation during laparoscopic-assisted bariatric surgery: volume-controlled, pressure-controlled or volume-guaranteed pressure-regulated modes

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Joanna M; McKee, Chris; Tobias, Joseph D; Sohner, Paul; Herz, Daniel; Teich, Steven; Rice, Julie; Barry, N’ diris; Michalsky, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Managing ventilation and oxygenation during laparoscopic procedures in severely obese patients undergoing weight loss surgery presents many challenges. Pressure-controlled ventilation, volume-guaranteed (PCV-VG) is a dual-control mode of ventilation and an alternative to pressure (PC) or volume (VC) controlled ventilation. PCV-VG features a user-selected tidal volume target, that is auto-regulated and pressure controlled. We hypothesized that PCV-VG ventilation would provide improved oxygenation and ventilation during laparoscopic bariatric surgery with a lower peak inflating pressure (PIP) than either PC or VC ventilation. Methods: This was a prospective cross-over cohort trial (n = 20). In random sequence each patient received the three modes of ventilation for 20 minutes during the laparoscopic portion of the procedure. For all modes of ventilation the goal tidal volume was 6-8 mL/kg, and the respiratory rate was adjusted to achieve normocarbia. The PIP, exhaled tidal volume, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation were recorded every five minutes. At the end of 20 minutes, an arterial blood gas was obtained. Data were analyzed using a paired t-test. Results: PCV-VG and PC ventilation both resulted in significantly lower PIP (cmH2O) than VC ventilation (30.5 ± 3.0, 31.6 ± 4.9, and 36.3 ± 3.4 mmHg respectively; p < 0.01 for PCV-VG vs. VC and PC vs. VC). There was no difference in oxygenation (PaO2), ventilation (PaCO2) or hemodynamic variables between the three ventilation modes. Conclusions: In adolescents and young adults undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery, PCV-VG and PC were superior to VC ventilation in their ability to provide ventilation with the lowest PIP. PMID:25232415

  2. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kits State Chapters State Chapters State Chapter CME STARs and SuperSTARs Organize a State Chapter EHB Access ... Kits State Chapters State Chapters State Chapter CME STARs and SuperSTARs Organize a State Chapter EHB Access ...

  3. Bariatric Surgery Misconceptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kits State Chapters State Chapters State Chapter CME STARs and SuperSTARs Organize a State Chapter EHB Access ... Kits State Chapters State Chapters State Chapter CME STARs and SuperSTARs Organize a State Chapter EHB Access ...

  4. [Post bariatric body contouring.

    PubMed

    Winge, Rikke; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Printzlau, Andreas; Hülmich, Lisbet

    2014-03-17

    Post bariatric body contouring in Denmark is currently a field under development. The scope of this article is to give an overview of existing plastic surgery techniques being used to treat patients with massive weight loss, as well as the current indications for patient referral. Furthermore, we describe how to optimise the preoperative evaluation of the patient and give a brief description of potential surgical adverse effects and their prevalence. Further research can provide this field with invaluable data regarding the post-operative effects on patient rehabilitation and quality of life. PMID:25096208

  5. Patient Selection and Surgical Management of High-Risk Patients with Morbid Obesity.

    PubMed

    Daniel Guerron, A; Portenier, Dana D

    2016-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective way to improve comorbidities related to obesity. Since the introduction of minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery in the bariatric surgery techniques, the number of procedures has increased substantially; advances in techniques and the transition from open to minimally invasive procedures have decreased morbidity and mortality. Multidisciplinary teams in charge of the operative planning, surgical act, and postoperative recovery are determinant in the success of the management of high-risk bariatric patients; careful identification and preoperative management of these higher-risk patients is crucial in decreasing complications after weight loss surgery. PMID:27473799

  6. Common Surgeries Raise Risk for Opioid Dependence

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159815.html Common Surgeries Raise Risk for Opioid Dependence: Study Doctors should explore alternatives for pain ... have an elevated risk of growing dependent on opioid painkillers, a new study finds. These prescription painkillers ...

  7. Risks of noncardiac surgery after coronary stenting.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Proddutur R; Vaitkus, Paul T

    2005-03-15

    An increased risk of major complications for noncardiac surgery after coronary stenting has been suggested. We retrospectively reviewed all cases of coronary stents from 1999 to 2003 with subsequent surgery to assess major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs), including myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, major bleeding, and death. Among the 56 patients identified, 8 developed MACEs; 38% underwent surgery < or =14 days after stenting, and 62% underwent surgery 15 to 42 days after stenting. No patient developed MACEs if surgery occurred >42 days after stenting. Among patients who developed MACEs, 77% of surgeries were elective, 19% were urgent, and only 4% were emergency. Noncardiac surgery 6 weeks after coronary stenting is associated with a high risk of MACEs. PMID:15757604

  8. "Omics" Prospective Monitoring of Bariatric Surgery: Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass Outcomes Using Mixed-Meal Tolerance Test and Time-Resolved (1)H NMR-Based Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Thiago I B; Geloneze, Bruno; Pareja, José C; Calixto, Antônio R; Ferreira, Márcia M C; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2016-07-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery goes beyond weight loss to induce early beneficial hormonal changes that favor glycemic control. In this prospective study, ten obese subjects diagnosed with type 2 diabetes underwent bariatric surgery. Mixed-meal tolerance test was performed before and 12 months after RYGB, and the outcomes were investigated by a time-resolved hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR)-based metabolomics. To the best of our knowledge, no previous omics-driven study has used time-resolved (1)H NMR-based metabolomics to investigate bariatric surgery outcomes. Our results presented here show a significant decrease in glucose levels after bariatric surgery (from 159.80 ± 61.43 to 100.00 ± 22.94 mg/dL), demonstrating type 2 diabetes remission (p < 0.05). The metabolic profile indicated lower levels of lactate, alanine, and branched chain amino acids for the operated subject at fasting state after the surgery. However, soon after food ingestion, the levels of these metabolites increased faster in operated than in nonoperated subjects. The lipoprotein profile achieved before and after RYGB at fasting was also significantly different, but converging 180 min after food ingestion. For example, the very low-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, N-acetyl-glycoproteins, and unsaturated lipid levels decreased after RYGB, while phosphatidylcholine and high-density lipoprotein increased. This study provides important insights on RYGB surgery and attendant type 2 diabetes outcomes using an "omics" systems science approach. Further research on metabolomic correlates of RYGB surgery in larger study samples is called for. PMID:27428253

  9. Sex, Race, and the Quality of Life Factors Most Important to Patients’ Well-Being Among Those Seeking Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Roger B.; Jones, Dan B.; Apovian, Caroline A.; Chiodi, Sarah; Huskey, Karen W.; Hamel, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests obesity-related social stigma and impairment in work function may be the two most detrimental quality of life (QOL) factors to overall well-being among patients seeking weight loss surgery (WLS); whether the relative importance of QOL factors varies across patient sex and race/ethnicity is unclear. Methods We interviewed 574 patients seeking WLS at two centers. We measured patient’s health utility (preference-based well-being measure) as determined via standard gamble scenarios assessing patients’ willingness to risk death to achieve weight loss or perfect health. Multivariable models assessed associations between patients’ utility and five weight-related QOL domains stratified by gender and race: social stigma, self-esteem, physical function, public distress (weight stigma), and work life. Results Depending on patients’ sex and race/ethnicity, mean utilities ranged from 0.85 to 0.91, reflecting an average willingness to assume a 9–15 % risk of death to achieve their most desired health/weight state. After adjustment, African Americans (AAs) reported higher utility than Caucasians (+ 0.054, p=0.03), but utilities did not vary significantly by sex. Among Caucasian and AA men, impairment in physical functioning was the most important factor associated with diminished utility; social stigma was also a leading factor for Caucasian men. Among Caucasian women, self-esteem and work function appeared equally important. Social stigma was the leading contributor to utility among AA women; QOL factors did not appear as important among Hispanic patients. Conclusion AAs reported higher utilities than Caucasian patients. Individual QOL domains that drive diminished well-being varied across race/ethnicity and sex. PMID:26630951

  10. Preoperative weight gain might increase risk of gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Istfan, Nawfal W.; Anderson, Wendy A.; Apovian, Caroline M.; Hess, Donald T.; Forse, Armour R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Weight loss improves the cardiovascular and metabolic risk associated with obesity. However, insufficient data are available about the health effects of weight gain, separate from the obesity itself. We sought to determine whether the changes in body weight before open gastric bypass surgery (OGB) would have a significant effect on the immediate perioperative hospital course. Methods A retrospective chart review of 100 consecutive patients was performed to examine the effects of co-morbidities and body weight changes in the immediate preoperative period on the hospital length of stay and the rate of admission to the surgical intensive care unit (SICU). Results Of our class III obese patients undergoing OGB, 95% had ≥1 co-morbid condition and an overall SICU admission rate of 18%. Compared with the patients with no perioperative SICU admission, the patients admitted to the SICU had a greater degree of insulin resistance (homeostatic model analysis–insulin resistance 10.8 ± 1.3 versus 5.9 ± 0.5, P = .001), greater serum triglyceride levels (225 ± 47 versus 143 ± 8 mg/dL, P = .003), and had gained more weight preoperatively (.52 ± .13 versus .06 ± .06 lb/wk, P = .003). The multivariate analyses showed that preoperative weight gain was a risk factor for a longer length of stay and more SICU admissions lasting ≥3 days, as were a diagnosis of sleep apnea and an elevated serum triglyceride concentration. Conclusion The results of the present retrospective study suggest that weight gain increases the risk of perioperative SICU admission associated with OGB, independent of the body mass index. Sleep apnea and elevated serum triglyceride levels were also important determinants of perioperative morbidity. In view of the increasing epidemic of obesity and the popularity of bariatric surgical procedures, we propose that additional clinical and metabolic research focusing on the understanding of the complex relationship among obesity, positive energy

  11. Your diet after gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the post-bariatric surgery patient: An Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and ... et al. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists; Obesity ... Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery. American Association ...

  12. Factors Associated With Long-Term Weight Loss Following Bariatric Surgery Using 2 Methods for Repeated Measures Analysis.

    PubMed

    Baldridge, Abigail S; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Aufox, Sharon A; Kim, Kwang-Youn A; Silverstein, J C; Denham, W; Hungness, E; Smith, Maureen E; Allen, Norrina B; Greenland, Philip; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J

    2015-08-01

    We used electronic health record data from 162 patients enrolled in the NUgene Project (2002-2013) to determine demographic factors associated with long-term (from 1 to up to 9.5 (mean = 5.6) years) weight loss following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Ninety-nine (61.1%) patients self-reported white, and 63 (38.9%) self-reported black, mixed, or missing race. The average percent weight loss was -33.4% (standard deviation, 9.3) at 1 year after surgery and -30.7% (standard deviation, 12.5) at the last follow-up point. We used linear mixed and semiparametric trajectory models to test the association of surgical and demographic factors (height, surgery age, surgery weight, surgery body mass index, marital status, sex, educational level, site, International Classification of Diseases code, Current Procedural Terminology code, Hispanic ethnicity, and self-reported race) with long-term percent weight loss and pattern of weight loss. We found that black, mixed, and missing races (combined) in comparison with white race were associated with a decreased percent weight loss of -4.31% (95% confidence interval: -7.30, -1.32) and were less likely to have higher and sustained percent weight loss (P = 0.04). We also found that less obese patients were less likely to have higher and sustained percent weight loss (P = 0.01). These findings may be helpful to patients in setting expectations after weight loss surgery. PMID:26093003

  13. [Bariatric surgery, stomas and other digestive tract reductions: Insufficient data and recommendations to adapt medicines regimens in therapeutic practice].

    PubMed

    Bernard, Élodie; Charpiat, Bruno; Mabrut, Jean-Yves; Dode, Xavier; Garcia, Stephan; Le Duff, Michel; Rose, François-Xavier; Ducerf, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Surgery modifying digestive tract may alter drugs pharmacokinetics. To maintain concentrations of active substance in their therapeutic ranges, a dosage adjustment or change of drug may be necessary. This is particularly important when no pharmacological or pharmacodynamic parameter reflecting the medication effectiveness is easily measurable. Our objective was to gather the information and documentary tools that can guide prescription in these patients with rearranged digestive tract. We searched information on the documentary portals of French agencies, on gray literature, on MEDLINE and in the summaries product characteristics. No information was found on the website of French agencies, sparse data were identified in gray literature. Some document are discordant, most are imprecise. One hundred and ten studies or case reports referenced on MEDLINE describe 79 medications pharmacokinetics after gastrointestinal surgery. Four are not available in France. Six literature reviews were found. Four summaries of product characteristics provided information related to drug absorption. No documentary tool adapted to clinical routine exists. This unsatisfactory situation is a barrier to optimal patients care. Information is available. It is however necessary to gather under an ergonomic shape adapted to clinical routine, bringing the surgery type, pharmacokinetic changes induced and what to do about the dose adjustment. PMID:26358672

  14. Smoking Linked to Higher Relapse Risk After Surgery for Crohn's

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Smoking Linked to Higher Relapse Risk After Surgery for Crohn's Research supports immediate drug treatment after bowel surgery for ... Crohn's disease patients will have relapses after bowel surgery, new research suggests. The study included 240 Crohn's disease patients ...

  15. Risk management in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Steven M; Udey, Debra K

    2008-02-01

    The goal of risk management in the oral and maxillofacial surgery practice is to reduce the risk of care rendered to patients. Of all the elements of risk management, communication and documentation are two of the most important. Ensuring that a patient is truly educated about all facets of procedures to be performed and thoroughly documenting all aspects of the care that is rendered can greatly reduce the risk of claims. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons should practice these principles regularly and not wait for a claim to occur to teach them their benefits. PMID:18194744

  16. What Are the Risks of Pacemaker Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor about the benefits and risks of pacemaker surgery. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: February 28, 2012 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA OIG CONTACT US National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  17. How do patients’ clinical phenotype and the physiological mechanisms of the operations impact the choice of bariatric procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Bächler, Thomas; le Roux, Carel W; Bueter, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective option for the treatment of morbid obesity and its associated comorbidities. Recent clinical and experimental findings have challenged the role of mechanical restriction and caloric malabsorption as the main mechanisms for weight loss and health benefits. Instead, other mechanisms including increased levels of satiety gut hormones, altered gut microbiota, changes in bile acid metabolism, and/or energy expenditure have been proposed as explanations for benefits of bariatric surgery. Beside the standard proximal Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and the biliopancreatic diversion with or without duodenal switch, where parts of the small intestine are excluded from contact with nutrients, resectional techniques like the sleeve gastrectomy (SG) have recently been added to the armory of bariatric surgeons. The variation of weight loss and glycemic control is vast between but also within different bariatric operations. We surveyed members of the Swiss Society for the Study of Morbid Obesity and Metabolic Disorders to assess the extent to which the phenotype of patients influences the choice of bariatric procedure. Swiss bariatric surgeons preferred Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and SG for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and patients with a body mass index >50 kg/m2, which is consistent with the literature. An SG was preferred in patients with a high anesthetic risk or previous laparotomy. The surgeons’ own experience was a major determinant as there is little evidence in the literature for this approach. Although trends will come and go, evidence-based medicine requires a rigorous examination of the proof to inform clinical practice. PMID:27524917

  18. The role of infection-associated risk factors in prosthetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Witsø, Eivind

    2012-01-01

    The number of obese people with diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing. DM is in itself a risk factor for all types of infections, including infections after total hip and knee prosthetic surgery. In particular, the prevalence of obesity is high among orthopaedic patients. Obesity is also a risk factor for post-operative infections in general. After total hip arthroplasty obese patients have a threefold increased risk for post-operative infections compared to a patient with normal weight. There is an association between DM and obesity, and this association is explained by the presence of metabolic syndrome. Fat tissue in people with abdominal obesity acts as an endocrine organ and metabolic syndrome is characterized by a condition of chronic inflammation, insulin resistance, and vascular obstructive disease. The obese patient with DM should be considered a high risk patient for post-operative infection in all types of surgery. Efforts should be made to identify patients with a metabolic syndrome prior to prosthetic surgery. Fasting glucose levels and HbA1C should be included in pre-operative blood tests, and, if necessary, specialists in internal medicine and endocrinology should assess the patient pre-operatively. The amount of antibiotics administered as prophylaxis should be adjusted to the body mass and the blood glucose level should be controlled per-operatively. Persistent wound drainage for more than five days post-operatively should be considered for surgical revision. If possible, the patient should of course lose weight before the operation, but the role of bariatric surgery is not discussed in this presentation. PMID:22956383

  19. Utility of Ultrasound, Transaminases, and Visual Inspection to Assess Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Petrick, Anthony; Wood, G. Craig; Still, Christopher D.; Strodel, William E.; Gabrielsen, John; Rolston, David; Chu, Xin; Argyropoulos, George; Ibele, Anna; Gerhard, Glenn S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is common in adults with extreme obesity and can impact long-term health and survival. Liver biopsy is the only accurate test for diagnosis and staging, but is invasive and costly. Non-invasive testing offers an attractive alternate, but the overall accuracy remains a significant issue. This study was conducted to determine the accuracy and clinical utility of preoperative ultrasound and liver transaminase levels, as well as intra-operative hepatic visual inspection, for assessing presence of NAFLD as confirmed by hepatic histology. Methods Data was collected prospectively from 580 morbidly obese adult patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery with intraoperative wedge biopsy between January 2004 and February 2009. Complete data for ultrasound, ALT and AST levels, and documented visual inspection was available for 513 patients. Results The prevalence of NAFLD was 69 % and that of NASH was 32 %. The individual non-invasive clinical assessments demonstrated low sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for detecting the presence of steatosis, steatohepatitis, or fibrosis. The combination of normal or abnormal results for all tests improved predictive utility. Abnormal tests with all three assessments had a sensitivity of 95–98 % and a specificity of 28–48 % for major histologic findings in NAFLD/NASH. Normal tests with all three assessments had a sensitivity of 12–22 % and a specificity of 89–97 % for major histologic findings in NAFLD/NASH. Conclusions Although individual clinical tests for NAFLD have limited accuracy, the use of combined clinical tests may prove useful. PMID:26003548

  20. Post-bariatric abdominoplasty: our experience.

    PubMed

    Grignaffini, Eugenio; Grieco, Michele P; Bertozzi, Nicolo'; Gandolfi, Marco; Palli, Dante; Cinieri, Francesco Giovanni; Gardani, Marco; Raposio, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    The fast increase in obesity has been followed by the growth in the demand for plastic surgery in formerly obese patients. The weight loss is accompanied by new dysfunctions and disorders of the outline of the body that affects the quality of life of the patient. Abdominoplasty is a cosmetic surgery procedure that aims to remove the excess of skin and the redundant fat. The aim of this paper was to analyze our experience in this field and to test how functional abdominoplasty improved quality of life in the operated patients. In our Unit from January 2012 to December 2014, 25 patients (18 women and 7 men, age: 24 - 79 years, mean: 51 years) underwent abdominoplastic surgery. Only at least six months after bariatric surgery the patients were eligible for functional abdominoplasty. Average weight of the patients before surgery was 83.5 kg (range 58 - 163 Kg); averege BMI was 31 (range 24.77 - 57). The average quantity of tissue removed was 1.765 Kg (range 250 g - 11,5 Kg). Minor complications rate was in agreement with the percentages reported in literature. No mortality and major complications have occurred in our series. The majority of patients undergoing post-bariatric abdominoplasty reported an improvement in the quality of life and psychological well-being. In our opinion, however, only a multidisciplinary (surgical, psychological, dietological) approach of the post-bariatric patient allows to maintain long-term aesthetic and functional results. PMID:26694156

  1. Ectasia risk factors in refractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Santhiago, Marcony R; Giacomin, Natalia T; Smadja, David; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    This review outlines risk factors of post-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) ectasia that can be detected preoperatively and presents a new metric to be considered in the detection of ectasia risk. Relevant factors in refractive surgery screening include the analysis of intrinsic biomechanical properties (information obtained from corneal topography/tomography and patient’s age), as well as the analysis of alterable biomechanical properties (information obtained from the amount of tissue altered by surgery and the remaining load-bearing tissue). Corneal topography patterns of placido disk seem to play a pivotal role as a surrogate of corneal strength, and abnormal corneal topography remains to be the most important identifiable risk factor for ectasia. Information derived from tomography, such as pachymetric and epithelial maps as well as computational strategies, to help in the detection of keratoconus is additional and relevant. High percentage of tissue altered (PTA) is the most robust risk factor for ectasia after LASIK in patients with normal preoperative corneal topography. Compared to specific residual stromal bed (RSB) or central corneal thickness values, percentage of tissue altered likely provides a more individualized measure of biomechanical alteration because it considers the relationship between thickness, tissue altered through ablation and flap creation, and ultimate RSB thickness. Other recognized risk factors include low RSB, thin cornea, and high myopia. Age is also a very important risk factor and still remains as one of the most overlooked ones. A comprehensive screening approach with the Ectasia Risk Score System, which evaluates multiple risk factors simultaneously, is also a helpful tool in the screening strategy. PMID:27143849

  2. Ectasia risk factors in refractive surgery.

    PubMed

    Santhiago, Marcony R; Giacomin, Natalia T; Smadja, David; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    This review outlines risk factors of post-laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) ectasia that can be detected preoperatively and presents a new metric to be considered in the detection of ectasia risk. Relevant factors in refractive surgery screening include the analysis of intrinsic biomechanical properties (information obtained from corneal topography/tomography and patient's age), as well as the analysis of alterable biomechanical properties (information obtained from the amount of tissue altered by surgery and the remaining load-bearing tissue). Corneal topography patterns of placido disk seem to play a pivotal role as a surrogate of corneal strength, and abnormal corneal topography remains to be the most important identifiable risk factor for ectasia. Information derived from tomography, such as pachymetric and epithelial maps as well as computational strategies, to help in the detection of keratoconus is additional and relevant. High percentage of tissue altered (PTA) is the most robust risk factor for ectasia after LASIK in patients with normal preoperative corneal topography. Compared to specific residual stromal bed (RSB) or central corneal thickness values, percentage of tissue altered likely provides a more individualized measure of biomechanical alteration because it considers the relationship between thickness, tissue altered through ablation and flap creation, and ultimate RSB thickness. Other recognized risk factors include low RSB, thin cornea, and high myopia. Age is also a very important risk factor and still remains as one of the most overlooked ones. A comprehensive screening approach with the Ectasia Risk Score System, which evaluates multiple risk factors simultaneously, is also a helpful tool in the screening strategy. PMID:27143849

  3. Cognitive Function is Linked to Adherence to Bariatric Postoperative Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Galioto, Rachel; Limbach, Kristen; Gunstad, John; Heinberg, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Background Impairment in cognitive function is found in a significant subset of individuals undergoing bariatric surgery and recent work shows this impairment is associated with smaller postoperative weight loss. Reduced cognitive function could contribute to poorer adherence to postoperative guidelines, though this has not been previously examined. Objectives The current study examined the relationship between cognitive function and adherence to bariatric postoperative guidelines. We expected that higher cognitive function would be associated with better adherence to postoperative guidelines. Setting Data were collected through the bariatric service of a major medical center. Methods Thirty-seven bariatric surgery patients completed cognitive testing and a self-report measure of adherence to postoperative bariatric guidelines during their 4–6 week postoperative appointment. Results Strong correlations were observed between adherence to postoperative guidelines and cognitive indices of attention, executive function, and memory. Conclusions Results demonstrate that cognitive performance is strongly associated with adherence to postoperative guidelines shortly after bariatric surgery. Further work is needed to clarify if this relationship is present at later postoperative stages, and the degree to which this relationship mediates postoperative weight loss outcomes. PMID:23791534

  4. Bariatric Surgery for Severe Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... many questions still exist about the long-term effects on teens’ developing bodies and minds. Who is a good youth candidate ... ... common questions about the causes, effects, and treatment of gallstones (available online at http:// ...

  5. Bariatric Surgery for Severe Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... have been reported abroad. [ Top ] The Normal Digestive Process Normally, as food moves along the digestive tract, ... throat to the stomach. The surgeon can then control the size of the opening with a circular ...

  6. Transsexual attractions and sexual reassignment surgery: Risks and potential risks.

    PubMed

    P Fitzgibbons, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Transsexual issues and sexual reassignment surgery (SRS) are receiving a great deal of attention and support in the media, schools, and government. Given the early age at which youth seek treatment for transsexual attractions (TSA) and gender dysphoria and given the serious risks associated with such treatment, it is essential that family and youth be advised about these risks and alternative treatment options. Physicians and mental-health professionals have a professional responsibility to know and communicate the serious risks, in particular risk of suicide, that are associated with SRS; the spontaneous resolution of TSA in youth; the psychological conflicts that have been identified in such patients and in their parents; the successful treatment of conflicts associated TSA and the regrets of those who have been through SRS. SRS and gender theory are also viewed from the faith perspective of Pope Francis and Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI. Lay summary: Transsexuals and sex-change operations are receiving a great deal of attention. Young people may seek treatment for transsexual attractions at an early age even though these attractions may go away on their own. Psychological conflicts have been identified in these patients and their parents and may be successfully treated. There are serious risks associated with sex change. They include the risk of depressive illness and suicide. Physicians and mental-health professionals should know these risks and the regrets of those who have been through sex-change operations. These patients and their families also should be informed of other treatment options. PMID:26997675

  7. Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sick, but in time they can regain weight. "Dumping syndrome" is a problem associated mainly with gastric ... nausea, weakness, sweating, abdominal cramping, and diarrhea. Because dumping can be made worse by eating high-sugar ...

  8. Life after weight-loss surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Mechanick JI, Youdim A, Jones DB, et al. Clinical practice guidelines for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient-2013 update: cosponsored ...

  9. Assessment of cardiovascular risks and overall risks for noncardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Chung, O Y; Beattie, C; Friesinger, G C

    1999-02-01

    Appropriate care of the elderly patient requires a concerted multi-disciplinary approach before, during, and after surgery to optimize functional outcomes, with the principal focus placed on improving quality of life and strategies for risk reduction. Perioperative physicians must be able to assess the biologic, not the chronologic, age of geriatric patients and their capacity for independent function. Physicians need to understand alterations in the physiology of elderly patients attributable to the normal aging process as well as the prevalence of concurrent pathologic conditions that necessitate special precautions. Maintaining autonomy and function as a result of an acute surgical intervention may be the most important outcome to the elderly patient. Most of the data available and guidelines promulgated do not specifically address the elderly population. It is important to collect data prospectively and use sophisticated methods for analyses to develop better management algorithms for these (often complicated) clinical issues in the elderly. PMID:10093774

  10. Coronary computed tomography angiography for risk stratification before noncardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fathala, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Currently, there are limited available data for coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in the setting of the risk stratification before noncardiac surgery. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the role of CCTA in cardiac risk stratification before noncardiac surgery. Materials and Methods: Ninety-three patients underwent CCTA in the assessment of cardiac risk before noncardiac surgery. Patients with normal or mildly abnormal CCTA (<50% stenosis) underwent surgery without any further testing (Group 1). Patients with abnormal CCTA (17 patients) (more than 50% stenosis) and nondiagnostic CCTA (5%) underwent either stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphy or conventional coronary angiography, Group 2. Results: Group one consists of 71 patients who went for surgery without any further testing. 59 of 71 (83%) patients had no complications in the postoperative period, 9 patients had noncardiac complications, 1 had a cardiac complication (new onset atrial fibrillation), and 2 patients died in the postoperative period due to noncardiac complications. Group 2 comprises 22 (26%) patients, 16 patients had no postoperative complications, 5 patients had noncardiac complications, and one patient developed postoperative acute heart failure. Conclusions: CCTA is diagnostic in up to 95% in the preoperative setting, and it provides a comprehensive cardiac examination in the risk stratification before intermediate and high-risk noncardiac surgery. Therefore, CCTA may be considered as an alternative test for already established imaging techniques for preoperative cardiac risk stratification before noncardiac surgery. PMID:26750671

  11. The Anatomy of a Weight Recidivism and Revision Bariatric Surgical Clinic

    PubMed Central

    de Gara, C. J.; Karmali, S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Weight recidivism in bariatric surgery failure is multifactorial. It ranges from inappropriate patient selection for primary surgery to technical/anatomic issues related to the original surgery. Most bariatric surgeons and centers focus on primary bariatric surgery while weight recidivism and its complications are very much secondary concerns. Methods. We report on our initial experience having established a dedicated weight recidivism and revisional bariatric surgery clinic. A single surgeon, dedicated nursing, dieticians, and psychologist developed care maps, goals of care, nonsurgical candidate rules, and discharge planning strategies. Results. A single year audit (2012) of clinical activity revealed 137 patients, with a mean age 49 ± 10.1 years (6 years older on average than in our primary clinic), 75% of whom were women with BMI 47 ± 11.5. Over three quarters had undergone a vertical band gastroplasty while 15% had had a laparoscopic adjustable gastric band. Only 27% of those attending clinic required further surgery. As for primary surgery, the role of the obesity expert clinical psychologist was a key component to achieving successful revision outcomes. Conclusion. With an exponential rise in obesity and a concomitant major increase in bariatric surgery, an inevitable increase in revisional surgery is becoming a reality. Anticipating this increase in activity, Alberta Health Services, Alberta, Canada, has established a unique and dedicated clinic whose early results are promising. PMID:24672540

  12. Severe Obesity May Boost Infection Risk After Heart Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159143.html Severe Obesity May Boost Infection Risk After Heart Surgery Excess ... new study suggests. The researchers found that severe obesity was linked to much higher odds of developing ...

  13. Severe Obesity May Boost Infection Risk After Heart Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159143.html Severe Obesity May Boost Infection Risk After Heart Surgery Excess ... new study suggests. The researchers found that severe obesity was linked to much higher odds of developing ...

  14. Communication between the obese patient and bariatric surgeon.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Angulo, David; Munitiz, Vicente; Ortiz, M Ángeles; Martínez de Haro, Luisa F; Frutos, M Dolores; Hernández, Antonio; Parrilla, Pascual

    2015-10-01

    Communication between the bariatric surgeon and the obese patient is very important as it influences the expectations of patients with regard to surgery, aim of the surgery and the understanding of the mechanisms of failure of surgery. Furthermore, the incidence of certain psychopathology in these patients makes it necessary for the surgeon to have the ability to communicate to the patient the need for motivation and the maintenance of healthy life habits. Although the topic is subjective, in this article we review several useful recommendations to optimize communication before and after surgery. Finally, we emphasize the need to create workshops to train the bariatric surgeon in these issues that we consider so important. PMID:25912163

  15. Post-bariatric body contouring: oue experience.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Michele; Grignaffini, Eugenio; Simonacci, Francesco; Di Mascio, Donatello; Raposio, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a growing socio-economic problem especially in the western population. Patients who are undergoing bariatric surgery after a significant weight loss have an altered body profile which may have an important psychological impact. These patients may be candidates for surgical body-lifting. The aim of body-lifting is to obtain a firmer, tighter, rejuvenated appearance for patients who have lax, ptotic tissues. In this paper we describe our experience with two techniques currently practiced by our team, brachioplasty and thigh lift, reporting the indications, the surgical technique and possible complications. PMID:27163898

  16. Gastric bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force on Practice Guidelines and The Obesity Society. PMID: 24239920 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ ... et al. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists; Obesity Society; American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery. American Association ...

  17. A Risk Model and Cost Analysis of Incisional Hernia After Elective, Abdominal Surgery Based Upon 12,373 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, John P.; Basta, Marten N.; Mirzabeigi, Michael N.; Bauder, Andrew R.; Fox, Justin P.; Drebin, Jeffrey A.; Serletti, Joseph M.; Kovach, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Incisional hernia (IH) remains a common, highly morbid, and costly complication. Modest progress has been realized in surgical technique and mesh technology; however, few advances have been achieved toward understanding risk and prevention. In light of the increasing emphasis on prevention in today's health care environment and the billions in costs for surgically treated IH, greater focus on predictive risk models is needed. Methods: All patients undergoing gastrointestinal or gynecologic procedures from January 1, 2005 to June 1, 2013, within the University of Pennsylvania Health System were identified. Comorbidities and operative characteristics were assessed. The primary outcome was surgically treated IH after index procedures. Patients with prior hernia, less than 1-year follow-up, or emergency surgical procedures were excluded. Cox hazard regression modeling with bootstrapped validation, risk factor stratification, and assessment of model performance were conducted. Results: A total of 12,373 patients with a 3.5% incidence of surgically treated IH (follow-up 32.2 ± 26.6 months) were identified. The cost of surgical treatment of IH and management of associated complications exceeded $17.5 million. Notable independent risk factors for IH were ostomy reversal (HR = 2.76), recent chemotherapy (HR = 2.04), bariatric surgery (HR = 1.78), smoking history (HR = 1.74), liver disease (HR = 1.60), and obesity (HR = 1.96). High-risk patients (20.6%) developed IH compared with 0.5% of low-risk patients (C-statistic = 0.78). Conclusions: This study demonstrates an internally validated preoperative risk model of surgically treated IH after 12,000 elective, intra-abdominal procedures to provide more individualized risk counseling and to better inform evidence-based algorithms for the role of prophylactic mesh. PMID:26465784

  18. Risk factors of morbidity and mortality following hip fracture surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Dong; Park, Sang Jin; Lee, Deok Hee

    2013-01-01

    Background The preoperative coexisting chronic systemic illness, delay in surgery, gender, and age were considered as risk factors for the complications after hip fracture surgery. The wider range of surgical delay and immobility-related pulmonary morbidity may affect postoperative complications and mortality. This study examined the risk factors for morbidity and mortality following the hip fracture surgery. Methods The patient data was collected retrospectively. The consecutive 506 patients with hip fracture surgery, aged 60 years or older, were included. The patients' age, gender, preexisting diseases, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, delay in surgical repair, duration of surgical procedure, and methods of anesthesia were noted. The thirty-day postoperative complications were reviewed, and cardiac complications, pulmonary complications, delirium, and death were recorded. The data was analyzed for postoperative complications and risk factors. Results Atelectasis was associated with postoperative pulmonary complications. Male gender and age ≥ 80 years were associated with an increased incidence of postoperative delirium. ASA classification 3 was associated with death. A delay in surgery was not associated with any complications. Preexisting diseases and methods of anesthesia did not affect mortality and postoperative complications. Conclusions The results suggest that a delay in surgery did not affect the postoperative complications and morbidity. PMID:23814650

  19. Risk assessment methods for cardiac surgery and intervention.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Nassir M; Suri, Rakesh M; Greason, Kevin L; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2014-12-01

    Surgical risk models estimate operative outcomes while controlling for heterogeneity in 'case mix' within and between institutions. In cardiac surgery, risk models are used for patient counselling, surgical decision-making, clinical research, quality assurance and improvement, and financial reimbursement. Importantly, risk models are only as good as the databases from which they are derived; physicians and investigators should, therefore, be aware of shortcomings of clinical and administrative databases used for modelling risk estimates. The most frequently modelled outcome in cardiac surgery is 30-day mortality. However, results of randomized trials to compare conventional surgery versus transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) indicate attrition of surgical patients at 2-4 months postoperatively, suggesting that 3-month survival or mortality might be an appropriate procedural end point worth modelling. Risk models are increasingly used to identify patients who might be better-suited for TAVI. However, the appropriateness of available statistical models in this application is controversial, particularly given the tendency of risk models to misestimate operative mortality in high-risk patient subsets. Incorporation of new risk factors (such as previous mediastinal radiation, liver failure, and frailty) in future surgical or interventional risk-prediction tools might enhance model performance, and thereby optimize patient selection for TAVI. PMID:25245832

  20. Risk of Complications in Spine Surgery: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Rodolfo Casimiro; de Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes; Rotta, José Marcus; Botelho, Ricardo Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : Complications are the chief concern of patients and physicians when considering spine surgery. The authors seek to assess the incidence of complications in patients undergoing spine surgery and identify risk factors for their occurrence. Methods : Prospective study of patients undergoing spine surgery from 1 February 2013 to 1 February 2014. Epidemiological characteristics and complications during the surgical hospitalization were recorded and analyzed. Results : The sample comprised 95 patients (mean age, 59 years). Overall, 23% of patients were obese (BMI =30). The mean BMI was 25.9. Approximately 53% of patients had comorbidities. Complications occurred in 23% of cases; surgical site infections were the most common (9%). There were no significant differences between patients who did and did not develop complications in terms of age (60.6 vs 59.9 years, p = 0.71), sex (56% female vs 54% female, p = 0.59), BMI (26.6 vs 27.2, p = 0.40), or presence of comorbidities (52% vs 52.8%, p = 0.87). The risk of complications was higher among patients submitted to spine instrumentation than those submitted to non-instrumented surgery (33% vs 22%), p=0.8. Conclusion : Just over one-quarter of patients in the sample developed complications. In this study, age, BMI, comorbidities were not associated with increased risk of complications after spine surgery. The use of instrumentation increased the absolute risk of complications. PMID:25674185

  1. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism after spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Hiroyuki; Setoguchi, Takao; Tanabe, Fumito; Kawamura, Ichiro; Tsuneyoshi, Yasuhiro; Kawabata, Naoya; Nagano, Satoshi; Abematsu, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Takuya; Yone, Kazunori; Komiya, Setsuro

    2015-02-01

    The efficacy and safety of chemical prophylaxis to prevent the development of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE) following spine surgery are controversial because of the possibility of epidural hematoma formation. Postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) after spine surgery occurs at a frequency similar to that seen after joint operations, so it is important to identify the risk factors for VTE formation following spine surgery. We therefore retrospectively studied data from patients who had undergone spinal surgery and developed postoperative VTE to identify those risk factors. We conducted a retrospective clinical study with logistic regression analysis of a group of 80 patients who had undergone spine surgery at our institution from June 2012 to August 2013. All patients had been screened by ultrasonography for DVT in the lower extremities. Parameters of the patients with VTE were compared with those without VTE using the Mann-Whitney U-test and Fisher exact probability test. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the risk factors associated with VTE. A value of P < 0.05 was used to denote statistical significance. The prevalence of VTE was 25.0% (20/80 patients). One patient had sensed some incongruity in the chest area, but the vital signs of all patients were stable. VTEs had developed in the pulmonary artery in one patient, in the superficial femoral vein in one patient, in the popliteal vein in two patients, and in the soleal vein in 18 patients. The Mann-Whitney U-test and Fisher exact probability test showed that, except for preoperative walking disability, none of the parameters showed a significant difference between patients with and without VTE. Risk factors identified in the multivariate logistic regression analysis were preoperative walking disability and age. The prevalence of VTE after spine surgery was relatively high. The most important risk factor for developing postoperative VTE was preoperative walking

  2. Dry Beriberi and Wernicke's encephalopathy following gastric lap band surgery.

    PubMed

    Becker, Danielle A; Ingala, Erin E; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Price, Raymond S; Galetta, Steven L

    2012-07-01

    The incidence of neurologic complications from bariatric surgery is rising with the prevalence of obesity and the increasing number of bariatric surgeries. We report a 25-year-old woman who developed subacute progressive weakness and areflexia followed by confusion, ophthalmoplegia, and nystagmus following bariatric surgery. While the differential of generalized weakness with altered mental status is broad, vitamin deficiency should be routinely suspected after bariatric surgery to prevent permanent neurological injury. Multifocal neurological dysfunction in our patient represented beriberi and Wernicke's encephalopathy related to vitamin B1 deficiency. PMID:22525460

  3. Pharmacological Risk Factors for Delirium after Cardiac Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Lurdes; Schwarz, Stephan KW; Bowering, John B; Moore, Randell L; Burns, Kyle D; Richford, Carole M; Osborn, Jill A; Barr, Alasdair M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this review is to evaluate the literature on medications associated with delirium after cardiac surgery and potential prophylactic agents for preventing it. Source: Articles were searched in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and EMBASE with the MeSH headings: delirium, cardiac surgical procedures, and risk factors, and the keywords: delirium, cardiac surgery, risk factors, and drugs. Principle inclusion criteria include having patient samples receiving cardiac procedures on cardiopulmonary bypass, and using DSM-IV-TR criteria or a standardized tool for the diagnosis of delirium. Principal Findings: Fifteen studies were reviewed. Two single drugs (intraoperative fentanyl and ketamine), and two classes of drugs (preoperative antipsychotics and postoperative inotropes) were identified in the literature as being independently associated with delirium after cardiac surgery. Another seven classes of drugs (preoperative antihypertensives, anticholinergics, antidepressants, benzodiazepines, opioids, and statins, and postoperative opioids) and three single drugs (intraoperative diazepam, and postoperative dexmedetomidine and rivastigmine) have mixed findings. One drug (risperidone) has been shown to prevent delirium when taken immediately upon awakening from cardiac surgery. None of these findings was replicated in the studies reviewed. Conclusion: These studies have shown that drugs taken perioperatively by cardiac surgery patients need to be considered in delirium risk management strategies. While medications with direct neurological actions are clearly important, this review has shown that specific cardiovascular drugs may also require attention. Future studies that are methodologically consistent are required to further validate these findings and improve their utility. PMID:23449337

  4. Risk maps for navigation in liver surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C.; Zidowitz, S.; Schenk, A.; Oldhafer, K.-J.; Lang, H.; Peitgen, H.-O.

    2010-02-01

    The optimal transfer of preoperative planning data and risk evaluations to the operative site is challenging. A common practice is to use preoperative 3D planning models as a printout or as a presentation on a display. One important aspect is that these models were not developed to provide information in complex workspaces like the operating room. Our aim is to reduce the visual complexity of 3D planning models by mapping surgically relevant information onto a risk map. Therefore, we present methods for the identification and classification of critical anatomical structures in the proximity of a preoperatively planned resection surface. Shadow-like distance indicators are introduced to encode the distance from the resection surface to these critical structures on the risk map. In addition, contour lines are used to accentuate shape and spatial depth. The resulting visualization is clear and intuitive, allowing for a fast mental mapping of the current resection surface to the risk map. Preliminary evaluations by liver surgeons indicate that damage to risk structures may be prevented and patient safety may be enhanced using the proposed methods.

  5. Determining Surgical Complications in the Overweight (DISCOVER): a multicentre observational cohort study to evaluate the role of obesity as a risk factor for postoperative complications in general surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nepogodiev, Dmitri; Chapman, Stephen J; Glasbey, James; Kelly, Michael; Khatri, Chetan; Drake, Thomas M; Kong, Chia Yew; Mitchell, Harriet; Harrison, Ewen M; Fitzgerald, J Edward; Bhangu, Aneel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is increasingly prevalent among patients undergoing surgery. Conflicting evidence exists regarding the impact of obesity on postoperative complications. This multicentre study aims to determine whether obesity is associated with increased postoperative complications following general surgery. Methods and analysis This prospective, multicentre cohort study will be performed utilising a collaborative methodology. Consecutive adults undergoing open or laparoscopic, elective or emergency, gastrointestinal, bariatric or hepatobiliary surgery will be included. Day case patients will be excluded. The primary end point will be the overall 30-day major complication rate (Clavien-Dindo grade III–V complications). Data will be collected to risk-adjust outcomes for potential confounding factors, such as preoperative cardiac risk. This study will be disseminated through structured medical student networks using established collaborative methodology. The study will be powered to detect a two-percentage point increase in the major postoperative complication rate in obese versus non-obese patients. Ethics and dissemination Following appropriate assessment, an exemption from full ethics committee review has been received, and the study will be registered as a clinical audit or service evaluation at each participating hospital. Dissemination will take place through national and local research collaborative networks. PMID:26195471

  6. [Risk Factor Analysis of Pneumonia after Cardiovascular Surgery].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Yoshiyuki; Abe, Shuichi; Nakamura, Ken; Uchida, Tetsuro; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki; Morikane, Keita

    2016-08-01

    Pneumonia is a major and life-threatening complication after cardiovascular surgery. The objective of our study was to describe epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and risk factors of pneumonia after cardiovascular surgery. From January 2007 to December 2011, 511 consecutive patients (age 67.3±11.9;336 men, 175 women) were enrolled in this study. Pneumonia was diagnosed according to Centers of Disease Control and Prevention surveillance criteria for healthcare associated infection. Data collection included preoperative, intraoperative, and post-operative variables. The overall incidence of pneumonia was 72 cases(14.0%). The mortality in pneumonia group was significantly higher than that in non-pneumonia group (16.6% vs 4.3%, Odds ratio 4.4 p<0.001). Multi-logistic analysis revealed that elderly patient, preoperative congestive heart failure, preoperative hemodialysis, and operation of the thoracic aorta were independent risk factors for pneumonia after cardiovascular surgery. PMID:27476560

  7. Severe Scurvy After Gastric Bypass Surgery and a Poor Postoperative Diet

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Esben P.K.; Metzsche, Carsten; Henningsen, Emil; Toft, Palle

    2012-01-01

    After bariatric gastric bypass surgery patients are at risk of developing micronutrient deficiencies. If gastric bypass surgery is followed by a vitamin deficient diet the patients have a risk of developing vitamin-C deficiency. When spontaneous ecchymosis is observed in the skin, in at-risk patients, scurvy must be considered. When treated with large doses of vitamin-C the symptoms of scurvy rapidly improve even if the patient has developed multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Keywords Scurvy; Gastric bypass surgery; Multiorgan dysfunction PMID:22505988

  8. The Concept of Risk Assessment and Being Unfit for Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kolh, P; De Hert, S; De Rango, P

    2016-06-01

    The concept of risk assessment and the identification of surgical unfitness for vascular intervention is a particularly controversial issue today as the minimally invasive surgical population has increased not only in volume but also in complexity (comorbidity profile) and age, requiring an improved pre-operative selection and definition of high risk. A practical step by step (three steps, two points for each) approach for surgical risk assessment is suggested in this review. As a general rule, the identification of a "high risk" patient for vascular surgery follows a step by step process where the risk is clearly defined, quantified (when too "high"?), and thereby stratified based on the procedure, the patient, and the hospital, with the aid of predictive risk scores. However, there is no standardized, updated, and objective definition for surgical unfitness today. The major gap in the current literature on the definition of high risk in vascular patients explains the lack of sound validated predictive systems and limited generalizability of risk scores in vascular surgery. In addition, the concept of fitness is an evolving tool and many traditional high risk criteria and definitions are no longer valid. Given the preventive purpose of most vascular procedures performed in elderly asymptomatic patients, the decision to pursue or withhold surgery requires realistic estimates not only regarding individual peri-operative mortality, but also life expectancy, healthcare priorities, and the patient's primary goals, such as prolongation of life versus maintenance of independence or symptom relief. The overall "frailty" and geriatric risk burden, such as cognitive, functional, social, and nutritional status, are variables that should be also included in the analyses for stratification of surgical risk in elderly vascular patients. PMID:27053098

  9. BAROS METHOD CRITICAL ANALYSIS (BARIATRIC ANALYSIS AND REPORTING SYSTEM)

    PubMed Central

    NICARETA, Jean Ricardo; de FREITAS, Alexandre Coutinho Teixeira; NICARETA, Sheyla Maris; NICARETA, Cleiton; CAMPOS, Antonio Carlos Ligocki; NASSIF, Paulo Afonso Nunes; MARCHESINI, João Batista

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Although it has received several criticisms, which is considered to be the most effective method used for global assessment of morbid obesity surgical treatment, still needs to be updated. Objective : Critical analysis of BAROS constitution and method. Method : BAROS as headings was searched in literature review using data from the main bariatric surgery journals until 2009. Results : Where found and assessed 121 papers containing criticisms on BAROS constitution and methodology. It has some failures and few researches show results on the use of this instrument, although it is still considered a standard method. Several authors that used it found imperfections in its methodology and suggested some changes addressed to improving its acceptance, showing the need of developing new methods to qualify the bariatric surgery results. Conclusion: BAROS constitution has failures and its methodology needs to be updated. PMID:26537280

  10. Risk factors for postoperative ileus after urologic laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung Joon; Min, Gyeong Eun; Yoo, Koo Han; Chang, Sung-Goo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Although its incidence has decreased with the widespread use of less invasive surgical techniques including laparoscopic surgery, postoperative ileus remains a common postoperative complication. In the field of urologic surgery, with the major exception of radical cystectomy, few studies have focused on postoperative ileus as a complication of laparoscopic surgery. The present study aims to offer further clues in the management of postoperative ileus following urological laparoscopic surgery through an assessment of the associated risk factors. Methods The medical records of 267 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery between February 2004 and November 2009 were reviewed. After excluding cases involving radical cystectomy, combined surgery, open conversion, and severe complications, a total of 249 patients were included for this study. The subjects were divided into a non-ileus group and an ileus group. The gender and age distribution, duration of anesthesia, American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification Score, body mass index, degree of operative difficulty, presence of complications, surgical procedure and total opiate dosage were compared between the two groups. Results Of the 249 patients, 10.8% (n = 27) experienced postoperative ileus. Patients with ileus had a longer duration of anesthesia (P = 0.019), and perioperative complications and blood loss were all correlated with ileus (P = 0.000, 0.004, respectively). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the modified Clavien classification was an independent risk factor for postoperative ileus (odds ratio, 5.372; 95% confidence interval, 2.084 to 13.845; P = 0.001). Conclusion Postoperative ileus after laparoscopic urologic surgery was more frequent in patients who experienced more perioperative complications. PMID:22066064

  11. Bariatric Embolization of the Gastric Arteries for the Treatment of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Clifford R.; Gunn, Andrew J.; Kim, Charles Y.; Paxton, Ben E.; Kraitchman, Dara L.; Arepally, Aravind

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health epidemic in the United States, which results in significant morbidity, mortality, and cost to the healthcare system. Despite advancements in therapeutic options for the bariatric patients, the number of overweight and obese individuals continues to rise. Thus, complimentary or alternative treatments to lifestyle changes and surgery are urgently needed. Embolization of the left gastric artery, or ‘bariatric arterial embolization’, has been shown to modulate body weight in animal models and early clinical studies. If successful, bariatric arterial embolization represents a potential minimally invasive approach to treat obesity offered by interventional radiologists. The purpose of the following review will be to introduce the interventional radiologist to bariatric arterial embolization by presenting its physiologic and anatomic bases, reviewing the pre-clinical and clinical data, and discussing current and future investigations. PMID:25777177

  12. Risk factors for postoperative complications following oral surgery

    PubMed Central

    SHIGEISHI, Hideo; OHTA, Kouji; TAKECHI, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to clarify significant risk factors for postoperative complications in the oral cavity in patients who underwent oral surgery, excluding those with oral cancer. Material and Methods This study reviewed the records of 324 patients who underwent mildly to moderately invasive oral surgery (e.g., impacted tooth extraction, cyst excision, fixation of mandibular and maxillary fractures, osteotomy, resection of a benign tumor, sinus lifting, bone grafting, removal of a sialolith, among others) under general anesthesia or intravenous sedation from 2012 to 2014 at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Reconstructive Surgery, Hiroshima University Hospital. Results Univariate analysis showed a statistical relationship between postoperative complications (i.e., surgical site infection, anastomotic leak) and diabetes (p=0.033), preoperative serum albumin level (p=0.009), and operation duration (p=0.0093). Furthermore, preoperative serum albumin level (<4.0 g/dL) and operation time (≥120 minutes) were found to be independent factors affecting postoperative complications in multiple logistic regression analysis results (odds ratio 3.82, p=0.0074; odds ratio 2.83, p=0.0086, respectively). Conclusion Our results indicate that a low level of albumin in serum and prolonged operation duration are important risk factors for postoperative complications occurring in the oral cavity following oral surgery. PMID:26398515

  13. Endoscopic Bariatric Therapies.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Deepinder; Watson, Rabindra R

    2016-06-01

    Obesity and its associated cardio-metabolic comorbidities have emerged as a global pandemic. The efficacy of various hypo-caloric diets and prescription drugs has been poor with respect to sustained weight loss. Recent advancements in endoscopic technology and techniques have opened a new field of minimally invasive endoscopic treatment options for combatting obesity both as a first line and adjunctive therapy. Presently, two endoscopic space-occupying devices in the form of intragastric balloons have received FDA approval for 6-month implantation in patients within a BMI range of 30-40 kg/m(2). Furthermore, full-thickness suturing has led to the development of primary endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass revision as viable endoscopic alternatives to surgical approaches. These techniques have the potential to reduce adverse events, cost, and recovery times. Looking forward, a variety of promising and novel medical devices and endoscopic platforms that target obesity and diabetes are in various phases of development and investigation. The present review aims to discuss the current and forthcoming endoscopic bariatric therapies with emphasis on relevant procedural technique and review of available evidence. PMID:27098813

  14. Clinical Outcomes of Metabolic Surgery: Microvascular and Macrovascular Complications.

    PubMed

    Adams, Ted D; Arterburn, David E; Nathan, David M; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Understanding of the long-term clinical outcomes associated with bariatric surgery has recently been advanced. Research related to the sequelae of diabetes-in particular, long-term microvascular and macrovascular complications-in patients who undergo weight-loss surgery is imperative to this pursuit. While numerous randomized control trials have assessed glucose control with bariatric surgery compared with intensive medical therapy, bariatric surgery outcome data relating to microvascular and macrovascular complications have been limited to observational studies and nonrandomized clinical trials. As a result, whether bariatric surgery is associated with a long-term reduction in microvascular and macrovascular complications when compared with current intensive glycemic control therapy cannot be determined because the evidence is insufficient. However, the consistent salutary effects of bariatric surgery on diabetes remission and glycemic improvement support the opportunity (and need) to conduct high-quality studies of bariatric surgery versus intensive glucose control. This review provides relevant background information related to the treatment of diabetes, hyperglycemia, and long-term complications; reports clinical findings (to date) with bariatric surgery; and identifies ongoing research focusing on long-term vascular outcomes associated with bariatric surgery. PMID:27222549

  15. IMPLEMENTING LAPAROSCOPY IN BRAZIL'S NATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH SYSTEM: THE BARIATRIC SURGEONS' POINT OF VIEW

    PubMed Central

    SUSSENBACH, Samanta; SILVA, Everton N; PUFAL, Milene Amarante; ROSSONI, Carina; CASAGRANDE, Daniela Schaan; PADOIN, Alexandre Vontobel; MOTTIN, Cláudio Corá

    2014-01-01

    Background Although Brazilian National Public Health System (BNPHS) has presented advances regarding the treatment for obesity in the last years, there is a repressed demand for bariatric surgeries in the country. Despite favorable evidences to laparoscopy, the BNPHS only performs this procedure via laparotomy. Aim 1) Estimate whether bariatric surgeons would support the idea of incorporating laparoscopic surgery in the BNPHS; 2) If there would be an increase in the total number of surgeries performed; 3) As well as how BNPHS would redistribute both procedures. Methods A panel of bariatric surgeons was built. Two rounds to answer the structured Delphi questionnaire were performed. Results From the 45 bariatric surgeons recruited, 30 (66.7%) participated in the first round. For the second (the last) round, from the 30 surgeons who answered the first round, 22 (48.9%) answered the questionnaire. Considering the possibility that BNPHS incorporated laparoscopic surgery, 95% of surgeons were interested in performing it. Therefore, in case laparoscopic surgery was incorporated by the BNPHS there would be an average increase of 25% in the number of surgeries and they would be distributed as follows: 62.5% via laparoscopy and 37.5% via laparotomy. Conclusion 1) There was a preference by laparoscopy; 2) would increase the number of operations compared to the current model in which only the laparotomy is available to users of the public system; and 3) the distribution in relation to the type of procedure would be 62.5% and 37.5% for laparoscopy laparotomy. PMID:25409964

  16. Prediction of cardiac risk in patients undergoing vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Morise, A.P.; McDowell, D.E.; Savrin, R.A.; Goodwin, C.A.; Gabrielle, O.F.; Oliver, F.N.; Nullet, F.R.; Bekheit, S.; Jain, A.C.

    1987-03-01

    In an attempt to determine whether noninvasive cardiac testing could be used to assess cardiac risk in patients undergoing surgery for vascular disease, the authors studied 96 patients. Seventy-seven patients eventually underwent major vascular surgery with 11 (14%) experiencing a significant cardiac complication. Thallium imaging was much more likely to be positive (p less than 0.01) in patients with a cardiac complication; however, there was a significant number of patients with cardiac complications who had a positive history or electrocardiogram for myocardial infarction. When grouped by complication and history of infarction, thallium imaging, if negative, correctly predicted low cardiac risk in the group with a history of infarction. Thallium imaging, however, did not provide a clear separation of risk in those without a history of infarction. Age and coronary angiography, on the other hand, did reveal significant differences within the group without a history of infarction. The resting radionuclide ejection fraction followed a similar pattern to thallium imaging. It is concluded that a positive history of myocardial infarction at any time in the past is the strongest risk predictor in this population and that the predictive value of noninvasive testing is dependent on this factor. Considering these findings, a proposed scheme for assessing risk that will require further validation is presented.

  17. Risk factors predictive of atrial fibrillation after lung cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Takekazu; Nagato, Kaoru; Nakajima, Takahiro; Suzuki, Hidemi; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF), the most frequent arrhythmia after pulmonary resection, is a cause of both morbidity and mortality. Being able to predict the risk of POAF before surgery would help us evaluate the surgical risk and plan prophylaxis. We investigated the reported preoperative risk factors associated with the incidence of POAF and found that the recommended predictive factors were quite variable. Therefore, we evaluated the previously reported preoperative risk factors for POAF using our institutional data. We discuss our findings in this short review. Male gender, resected lung volume, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and left ventricular early transmitral velocity/mitral annular early diastolic velocity (E/e') calculated by echocardiography were suggested as independent predictors for POAF, but the predictive values of each individual parameter were not high. The lack of definitive predictors for POAF warrants further investigations by gathering the reported knowledge, to establish an effective preoperative examination strategy. PMID:26471506

  18. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following Roux en Y gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Azra

    2015-01-01

    Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE) is a serious neurological disorder characterized by a classical triad of acute mental confusion, ataxia, and opthalmoplegia due to thiamine deficiency. It was initially described in chronic alcoholics; however, any condition resulting in poor nutritional status places the patient at risk of WE. Bariatric surgery is now considered as an emergent cause of WE. The number of bariatric surgery is increasing for morbid obesity. We present a case of a 40-year-old male who presented with confusion and difficulty in maintaining the balance while walking 3 months after Roux en Y gastric bypass surgery. Diagnosis of WE was made on clinical ground and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, which showed bilateral hyperintense signals in paramedian thalami. Parenteral thiamine replacement was started, and patient showed complete recovery. PMID:26620994

  19. Bariatric Endocrinology: Principles of Medical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Campoy, J. Michael; Richardson, Bruce; Gonzalez-Cameron, David; Ebrahim, Ayesha; Strobel, Pamela; Martinez, Tiphani; Blaha, Beth; Ransom, Maria; Quinonez-Weislow, Jessica; Pierson, Andrea; Gonzalez Ahumada, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, is a chronic, biological, preventable, and treatable disease. The accumulation of fat mass causes physical changes (adiposity), metabolic and hormonal changes due to adipose tissue dysfunction (adiposopathy), and psychological changes. Bariatric endocrinology was conceived from the need to address the neuro-endocrinological derangements that are associated with adiposopathy, and from the need to broaden the scope of the management of its complications. In addition to the well-established metabolic complications of overweight and obesity, adiposopathy leads to hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia, hypoadiponectinemia, dysregulation of gut peptides including GLP-1 and ghrelin, the development of an inflammatory milieu, and the strong risk of vascular disease. Therapy for adiposopathy hinges on effectively lowering the ratio of orexigenic to anorexigenic signals reaching the the hypothalamus and other relevant brain regions, favoring a lower caloric intake. Adiposopathy, overweight and obesity should be treated indefinitely with the specific aims to reduce fat mass for the adiposity complications, and to normalize adipose tissue function for the adiposopathic complications. This paper defines the principles of medical practice in bariatric endocrinology—the treatment of overweight and obesity as means to treat adiposopathy and its accompanying metabolic and hormonal derangements. PMID:24899894

  20. Risk Factors for Mesh Exposure after Transvaginal Mesh Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Ke; Lu, Yong-Xian; Shen, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Wang, Wen-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mesh exposure after surgery continues to be a clinical challenge for urogynecological surgeons. The purpose of this study was to explore the risk factors for polypropylene (PP) mesh exposure after transvaginal mesh (TVM) surgery. Methods: This study included 195 patients with advanced pelvic organ prolapse (POP), who underwent TVM from January 2004 to December 2012 at the First Affiliated Hospital of Chinese PLA General Hospital. Clinical data were evaluated including patient's demography, TVM type, concomitant procedures, operation time, blood loss, postoperative morbidity, and mesh exposure. Mesh exposure was identified through postoperative vaginal examination. Statistical analysis was performed to identify risk factors for mesh exposure. Results: Two-hundred and nine transvaginal PP meshes were placed, including 194 in the anterior wall and 15 in the posterior wall. Concomitant tension-free vaginal tape was performed in 61 cases. The mean follow-up time was 35.1 ± 23.6 months. PP mesh exposure was identified in 32 cases (16.4%), with 31 in the anterior wall and 1 in the posterior wall. Significant difference was found in operating time and concomitant procedures between exposed and nonexposed groups (F = 7.443, P = 0.007; F = 4.307, P = 0.039, respectively). Binary logistic regression revealed that the number of concomitant procedures and operation time were risk factors for mesh exposure (P = 0.001, P = 0.043). Conclusion: Concomitant procedures and increased operating time increase the risk for postoperative mesh exposure in patients undergoing TVM surgery for POP. PMID:27453227

  1. Risk of adjacent-segment disease requiring surgery after short lumbar fusion: results of the French Spine Surgery Society Series.

    PubMed

    Scemama, Caroline; Magrino, Baptiste; Gillet, Philippe; Guigui, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Adjacent-segment disease (ASD) is an increasingly problematic complication following lumbar fusion surgery. The purpose of the current study was to determine the risk of ASD requiring surgical treatment after short lumbar or lumbosacral fusion. Primary spinal disease and surgical factors associated with an increased risk of revision were also investigated. METHODS This was a retrospective cohort study using the French Spine Surgery Society clinical data that included 3338 patients, with an average follow-up duration of 7 years (range 4-10 years). Clinical ASD requiring surgery was the principal judgment criterion; the length of follow-up time and initial spinal disease were also recorded. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed. The correlation between primary spinal disease and surgery with an increased risk of revision was investigated. RESULTS During the follow-up period, 186 patients required revision surgery for ASD (5.6%). The predicted risk of ASD requiring revision surgery was 1.7% (95% CI 1.3%-2.2%) at 2 years, 3.8% (95% CI 4.9%-6.7%) at 4 years, 5.7% (95% CI 4.9%-6.7%) at 6 years, and 9% (95% CI 8.7%-10.6%) at 8 years. Initial spinal disease affected the risk of ASD requiring surgery (p = 0.0003). The highest risk was observed for degenerative spondylolisthesis. CONCLUSIONS ASD requiring revision surgery was predicted in 5.6% of patients 7 years after index short lumbar spinal fusion in the French Spine Surgery Society retrospective series. An increased risk of ASD requiring revision surgery associated with initial spinal disease showed the significance of the influence of natural degenerative history on adjacent-segment pathology. PMID:26967992

  2. Managing Bariatric Patients in Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Debbie; Vallé-Jones, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is a growing issue across the world, presenting a range of challenges to society. Management of obese or bariatric patients in the dental environment has become more commonplace. This article considers an overview of obesity, reviews its dental impact and offers some solutions to minimising those challenges in the dental setting. PMID:26556254

  3. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kits State Chapters State Chapters State Chapter CME STARs and SuperSTARs Organize a State Chapter EHB Access ... Kits State Chapters State Chapters State Chapter CME STARs and SuperSTARs Organize a State Chapter EHB Access ...

  4. Risk factors for perioperative ischemic stroke in cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Mário Augusto Cray; Gauer, Maria Fernanda; Gomes, Ricardo Zaneti; Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods From January 2010 to December 2012, 519 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery were analyzed prospectively. The sample was divided into two groups: patients with stroke per and postoperative were allocated in Group GS (n=22) and the other patients in the group CCONTROL (n=497). The following variables were compared between the groups: gender, age, carotid stenosis ≥ 70%, diabetes on insulin, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, peripheral arteriopathy, unstable angina, kidney function, left ventricular function, acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary arterial hypertension, use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Ischemic stroke was defined as symptoms lasting over 24 hours associated with changes in brain computed tomography scan. The variables were compared using Fisher’s exact test, Chi square, Student’s t-test and logistic regression. Results Stroke occurred in 4.2% of patients and the risk factors statistically significant were: carotid stenosis of 70% or more (P=0.03; OR 5.07; IC 95%: 1.35 to 19.02), diabetes on insulin (P=0.04; OR 2.61; IC 95%: 1.10 to 6.21) and peripheral arteriopathy (P=0.03; OR 2.61; 95% CI: 1.08 to 6.28). Conclusion Risk factors for ischemic stroke were carotid stenosis of 70% or more, diabetes on insulin and peripheral arteriopathy. PMID:26313728

  5. A comparative analysis of Type 2 diabetes and binge eating disorder in a bariatric sample.

    PubMed

    Webb, Jennifer B; Applegate, Katherine L; Grant, John P

    2011-08-01

    An emerging literature has illuminated an important link between Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and binge eating disorder (BED) within obese cohorts. However, prior work has not examined this relationship specifically in a weight loss surgery (WLS) sample or fully explored potential psychosocial factors associated with this co-occurrence. Therefore, the present investigation sought to identify socio-demographic (i.e. age, education, BMI, ethnicity, gender, age of obesity onset) and psychological (i.e. depressive symptoms, hedonic hunger/food locus of control beliefs, severity of binge eating-related cognitions) correlates of the co-occurrence of Type 2 DM and BED among bariatric surgery candidates. An archival sample of 488 patients seeking surgical treatment for clinical obesity completed a standard battery of pre-operative psychosocial measures. The presence of BED was evaluated using a semi-structured clinical interview based on the DSM-IV TR (APA, 2000) and was further corroborated by responses on the Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns-Revised (QEWP-R; Spitzer, Yanovski, & Marcus, 1993). Results indicated that 8.2% of the sample was classified as having both Type 2 DM and BED concurrently. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that in addition to other psychological (e.g., binge eating-related cognitions, hedonic hunger) and demographic variables (i.e. male gender), African American ethnicity (OR=3.3: 1.41-7.73) was a particularly robust indicator of comorbid status. Findings support and extend previous health disparity research urging greater attention to the needs of traditionally underserved, at-risk populations seeking treatment for obesity complicated by dysregulated eating and metabolism. Additionally, these preliminary results underscore the relevance of considering the potential benefits of providing quality comprehensive pre- and post-operative psychological care among bariatric patients towards optimizing both short- and long

  6. Risk factors for intraoperative hypotension during thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kalezic, Nevena; Stojanovic, Marina; Ladjevic, Nebojsa; Markovic, Dejan; Paunovic, Ivan; Palibrk, Ivan; Milicic, Biljana; Sabljak, Vera; Antonijevic, Vesna; Ivanovic, Branislava; Ugrinovic, Djordje; Zivaljevic, Vladan

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypotension is a common adverse effect of IV anaesthetics, especially during the induction of anaesthesia. The aim of our study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for intraoperative hypotension (IOH) in thyroid surgery, as well as to determine whether and to what extent IOH affects the occurrence of postoperative hypotension. Material/Methods The study included 1252 euthyroid patients, ASA 2 and ASA 3 status (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification), who had thyroid surgery between 2007 and 2011. IOH was defined as a decrease in systolic blood pressure of >20% of baseline values. We studied the influence of demographic characteristics (sex, age, body mass index-BMI), comorbidity, type and duration of surgery, and anaesthesia on the occurrence of IOH. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to determine predictors of occurrence of IOH. Results IOH was registered in 6.5% of patients. The most common operation was thyroidectomy. Patients with IOH were younger, had lower BMI, and significantly less often had hypertension as a coexisting disease. The multivariate regression model identified BMI and the absence of hypertension as a coexisting disease, and as independent predictors of occurrence of IOH. Significantly more patients with IOH had postoperative hypotension (9.9% vs. 2.4%, p=0.000). Conclusions IOH is common, even during operations of short duration and with minimal bleeding. It is necessary to pay special attention to these patients, given that many of these patients remained hypotensive during the postoperative period. PMID:23548975

  7. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body Looking and feeling your best Cosmetic surgery Cosmetic surgery Teens might have cosmetic surgery for a ... about my body? What are the risks of cosmetic surgery? top People who have cosmetic surgery face ...

  8. Weighing the Options: Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is more widely accepted. This is a relatively new procedure for bariatric surgery. It’s only been around ... body. And this, to the left, is a new stomach. Essentially, like I said, about 20% of ...

  9. The bariatric patient: an overview of perioperative care.

    PubMed

    Fencl, Jennifer L; Walsh, Angela; Vocke, Dawn

    2015-08-01

    Obesity (ie, a body mass index of ≥30 kg/m(2)) is increasing in the United States. As a result, more overweight individuals are being surgically treated for weight loss, thus making it imperative for perioperative RNs to understand obesity's effects on patients' health, its contribution to significant comorbidities (eg, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, sleep apnea, musculoskeletal issues, stroke), the perioperative care requirements (eg, specialized instruments and equipment, positioning and lifting aids), and unique needs of these patients (eg, diet, counseling). It is vital that the perioperative nurse accurately assesses the patient undergoing bariatric surgery to provide safe and appropriate nursing interventions during the perioperative continuum of care. PMID:26227516

  10. Metabolic surgery: quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The impact of bariatric surgery beyond its effect on weight loss has entailed a change in the way of regarding it. The term metabolic surgery has become more popular to designate those interventions that aim at resolving diseases that have been traditionally considered as of exclusive medical management, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Recommendations for metabolic surgery have been largely addressed and discussed in worldwide meetings, but no definitive consensus has been reached yet. Rates of diabetes remission after metabolic surgery have been one of the most debated hot topics, with heterogeneity being a current concern. This review aims to identify and clarify controversies regarding metabolic surgery, by focusing on a critical analysis of T2D remission rates achieved with different bariatric procedures, and using different criteria for its definition. Indications for metabolic surgery for patients with T2D who are not morbidly obese are also discussed. PMID:23911576

  11. Risk Factors for Postoperative Pulmonary Complications after Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kodra, Nertila; Shpata, Vjollca; Ohri, Ilir

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC) in patients undergoing non-cardiothoracic surgery remains high and the occurrence of these complications has enormous implications for the patient and the health care system. AIM: The aim of the study was to identify risk factors for PPC in patients undergoing abdominal surgical procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective cohort study in abdominal surgical patients, admitted to the emergency and surgical ward of the UHC of Tirana, Albania, was conducted during the period: March 2014-March 2015. We collected data on the occurrence of a symptomatic and clinically significant PPC using clinical, laboratory, and radiology data. We evaluated the relations between PPCs and various pre-operative or intra-operative factors to identify risk factors. RESULTS: A total of 450 postoperative patients admitted to the surgical emergency and surgical ward were studied. The mean age were 59.85 ±13.64 years with 59.3% being male. Incidence of PPC was 27.3% (123 patients) and hospital length of stay was 4.93 ± 4.65 days. Length of stay was substantially prolonged for those patients who developed PPC (7.48 ± 2.89 days versus 3.97± 4.83 days, p < 0.0001. PPC were identified as risk factors for mortality, OR: 21.84; 95% CI: 11.66-40.89; P < 0.0001. The multivariate regression analysis identified as being independently associated with an increased risk of PPC: age ≥ 65 years (OR 11.41; 95% CI: 4.84-26.91, p < 0.0001), duration of operation ≥ 2.5 hours (OR 8.38; 95% CI: 1.52-46.03, p = 0.01, history of previous pulmonary diseases (OR 11.12; 95% CI: 3.28-37.65, P = 0.0001) and ASA > 2 (OR 6.37; 95% CI: 1.54-26.36, P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: We must do some efforts in reducing postoperative pulmonary complications, firstly to identify which patients are at increased risk, and then following more closely high-risk patients because those patients are most likely to benefit. PMID:27335597

  12. Providing quality skin and wound care for the bariatric patient: an overview of clinical challenges.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, (defined as body mass index [BMI] ≥30), and especially morbid obesity (defined as BMI ≥40), has a profound impact on the health and integrity of the patient's integumentary system and on the caregivers who strive to provide care for larger, heavy patients. The purpose of this overview is to address some common skin and wound care issues faced by bariatric patients in order to inform clinicians, patients, and caregivers and enable them to optimize care. For bariatric patients, extra attention must be paid to skin care, cleanliness, skin fold management, perigenital care, odor management, and effective pressure redistribution. Despite these interventions, the multifactorial challenges presented by morbid obesity increase patient risk for serious skin diseases and wound conditions. Implications for practice include how best to educate patients and caregivers for optimal problem prevention. Future research should target improving bariatric care equipment and decreasing risk indices. PMID:24434162

  13. Handling of the bariatric patient in critical care: a case study of lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Muir, Marylou; Heese, Gail Archer; McLean, Daria; Bodnar, Sheila; Rock, Betty Lou

    2007-06-01

    Bariatric admissions across the United States (US) are increasing at an alarming rate. The obesity epidemic costs the US health care system $70 billion per year. Many bariatric surgical and medical patients are admitted to critical care units. The mortality risks for these patients compared with non-bariatric patients is up to 2:1. Managing these patients is a challenge to health care nursing personnel. Patient size, care required, equipment technology, availability, and environmental space can increase risk for injury for nursing personnel and patients. The Health Sciences Center in Winnipeg shares a case study of an admission of a 697-lb patient, reviewing lessons learned, techniques, equipment, and difficulties. PMID:17512478

  14. Risks of cerebrovascular events related to open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Attum, A A; Girardet, R; Barbie, R; Yared, S; Raleigh, D; Mathew, T; Hymes, W; Lansing, A

    1998-08-01

    Prevention of perioperative cerebrovascular injury in patients undergoing open heart surgery is a serious task for the surgeon, especially as age and severity of atherosclerotic disease increases. The most significant predisposing factors have been identified as existing carotid arterial disease or prior stroke, heavy calcification of the aorta, renal dysfunction, advanced age, and diabetes mellitus. We have studied a series of 600 open heart patients from 1992 to 1995 from the incidence of peri-operative stroke and mortality, evaluating 16 risk factors: heavy calcification of the ascending aorta, asymptomatic carotid disease, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, prior CVA, left ventricular function (ejection fraction of 20% or less), age greater than 70, renal dysfunction, transmural myocardial infarction, fluid balance index greater than 2500 ccs, smoking, type of procedure, emergency procedure, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, cardiopulmonary bypass time, gender, and hypertension Stroke occurred in 8 patients (1.3%), one of whom die postoperatively. Full or near-full recovery was experienced by 5 patients; 2 patients remained partially dysfunctional at the end of the study period. The operative mortality was 2.0% (12 patients); 10 deaths occurred in hospital and 2 following discharge within 30 days postoperatively. The risk of stroke was 15 times greater in patients over age 70; 16 times greater in older males (> or = 70 years); 5 times greater in patients with prior stroke or existing (asymptomatic) carotid artery disease; 8 times greater in patients with renal dysfunction; 4 times greater with a positive fluid balance index; and twice greater when cardiopulmonary bypass exceeded 110 minutes. Four of the stroke patients had diabetes mellitus. Two of 9 patients with heavy calcification of the aortic arch suffered cerebrovascular injury. Six or more of the risk factors studied were present in 81 patients; all 8 stroke patients (9.9%) came from this

  15. Traffic Crash Risks in Morbidly Obese Drivers Before and After Weight Loss Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Junaid A; Nathens, Avery B; Redelmeier, Donald A

    2016-08-01

    Morbidly obese drivers have a higher risk of road crashes because of associated conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea. We assessed whether weight loss surgery has an impact on subsequent road crash risks in morbidly obese drivers. Our longitudinal self-matched cohort analyses suggest that road crash risks are three times higher in morbidly obese drivers than the population norm. Yet, weight loss surgery yields no significant reductions in crash risks. We found similar results in patients not previously diagnosed with sleep disorders, suggesting the need to clarify the relationship of obesity with road crash risk. PMID:27216732

  16. Indications and Risks of Fibrinogen in Surgery and Trauma.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Donat R; Spahn, Gabriela H; Stein, Philipp

    2016-03-01

    Fibrinogen has a central role in coagulation. Following trauma and perioperatively, low fibrinogen levels have been found to be risk factors for exaggerated bleeding, transfusion needs, and adverse outcome. Conversely, treatment with exogenous fibrinogen in critically bleeding patients with low fibrinogen levels has been shown to decrease transfusion needs. Because following trauma and in many perioperative situations fibrinogen is the first coagulation "element" to become critically low, it appears reasonable to target fibrinogen in clinical coagulation algorithms aiming at early specific and goal-directed treatment. A low fibrinogen can be a low plasma concentration or a low functional fibrinogen as assessed by point-of-care techniques such as thromboelastography (TEG) or thromboelastometry (ROTEM). This review summarizes the evidence base for perioperative algorithm-based fibrinogen administration, including the exact thresholds for fibrinogen administration used in the different algorithms. Algorithm-based individualized goal-directed use of fibrinogen resulted in highly significant reduction in transfusion needs, adverse outcomes, in certain studies even mortality, and where investigated reduced costs, with high safety levels at the same time. Best evidence exists in cardiac surgery, followed by trauma, postpartum hemorrhage, and liver transplantation. The introduction of these concepts is highly demanding and requires a tremendous educational effort to familiarize all health care workers with the necessary knowledge and the skills of how to run TEG/ROTEM tests. Future research is needed to compare the efficacy, safety, and costs of different algorithms. This, however, should not prevent us from introducing these expedient point-of-care-based algorithms clinically today. PMID:26716503

  17. Problematic eating behaviors among bariatric surgical candidates: a psychometric investigation and factor analytic approach.

    PubMed

    Gelinas, Bethany L; Delparte, Chelsea A; Wright, Kristi D; Hart, Regan

    2015-01-01

    Psychological factors (e.g., anxiety, depression) are routinely assessed in bariatric pre-surgical programs, as high levels of psychopathology are consistently related to poor program outcomes (e.g., failure to lose significant weight pre-surgery, weight regain post-surgery). Behavioral factors related to poor program outcomes and ways in which behavioral and psychological factors interact, have received little attention in bariatric research and practice. Potentially problematic behavioral factors are queried by Section H of the Weight and Lifestyle Inventory (WALI-H), in which respondents indicate the relevance of certain eating behaviors to obesity. A factor analytic investigation of the WALI-H serves to improve the way in which this assessment tool is interpreted and used among bariatric surgical candidates, and subsequent moderation analyses serve to demonstrate potential compounding influences of psychopathology on eating behavior factors. Bariatric surgical candidates (n =362) completed several measures of psychopathology and the WALI-H. Item responses from the WALI-H were subjected to principal axis factoring with oblique rotation. Results revealed a three-factor model including: (1) eating in response to negative affect, (2) overeating/desirability of food, and (3) eating in response to positive affect/social cues. All three behavioral factors of the WALI-H were significantly associated with measures of depression and anxiety. Moderation analyses revealed that depression did not moderate the relationship between anxiety and any eating behavior factor. Although single forms of psychopathology are related to eating behaviors, the combination of psychopathology does not appear to influence these problematic behaviors. Recommendations for pre-surgical assessment and treatment of bariatric surgical candidates are discussed. PMID:25464064

  18. Long-Term Data Reveal Rate and Risk Factors for Subsequent Surgeries Following Initial ACL Reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... we have not known the rate and risk factors for subsequent knee surgery until now,” said senior author Kurt Spindler, M.D., of Vanderbilt University. In the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) study, ...

  19. Prevalence of Adverse Intraoperative Events during Obesity Surgery and Their Sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Greenstein, Alexander J; Wahed, Abdus S; Adeniji, Abidemi; Courcoulas, Anita P; Dakin, Greg; Flum, David R; Harrison, Vincent; Mitchell, James E; O'Rourke, Robert; Pomp, Alfons; Pender, John; Ramanathan, Ramesh; Wolfe, Bruce M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adverse intraoperative events (AIEs) during surgery are a well-known entity. A better understanding of the incidence of AIEs and their relationship with outcomes is helpful for surgeon preparation and preoperative patient counseling. The goals of this study are to describe the incidence of AIEs during bariatric surgery and examine their impact on major adverse complications. STUDY DESIGN The study included 5,882 subjects who had bariatric surgery in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery study between March 2005 and April 2009. Prospectively collected AIEs included organ injuries, anesthesia-related events, anastomotic revisions, and equipment failure. The relationship between AIEs and a composite end point of 30-day major adverse complications (ie, death, venous thromboembolism, percutaneous, endoscopic, or operative reintervention and failure to be discharged from the hospital within 30 days from surgery) was evaluated using a multivariable relative risk model adjusting for factors known to influence their risk. RESULTS There were 1,608 laparoscopic adjusted gastric banding, 3,770 laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass operations, and 504 open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass operations. Adverse intraoperative events occurred in 5% of the overall sample and were most frequent during open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (7.3%), followed by laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (5.5%) and laparoscopic adjusted gastric banding (3%). The rate of composite end point was 8.8% in the AIE group compared with 3.9% among those without an AIE (p < 0.001). Multivariable analysis revealed that patients with an AIE were at 90% greater risk of composite complication than those without an event (relative risk = 1.90; 95% CI, 1.26–2.88; p = 0.002), independent of the type of procedure (open or laparoscopic). CONCLUSIONS Incidence of an AIE is not infrequent during bariatric surgery and is associated with much higher risk of major complication. Additional study is needed to

  20. Bariatric support line: a prospective study of support line activity.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Kirsten; Segaran, Ella; Sufi, Pratik; Heath, Dugal I

    2010-03-01

    In this prospective study, we examine the workload of the North London Obesity Surgery Service Bariatric telephone support line (BTSL) and its effects on service provision. Over a 3-month period (June to August 2008), a prospective record was kept of all calls, who they were from, whether the patient was presurgery or postsurgery, the type of procedure planned or undertaken, the nature of the enquiry, and the time taken to answer the query. Seventy-five (72%) calls were related to patients who were postsurgery and 29 (28%) presurgery. Patients scheduled for or having undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass accounted for 46 (44%) calls; 24 (23%) were preprocedure and 22 (21%) postprocedure. Patients scheduled for or having undergone gastric banding accounted for 56 (54%) calls; five (0.5%) were preprocedure and 51 (49%) postprocedure. Patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy accounted for two (<1%) calls. Both calls were postprocedure. The reason for the support line enquiry was psychological support in 15 (14%) patients, questions postsurgery in 26 (25%), general enquiries in 27 (26%), and clinical enquiries in 36 (36%). This study of the BTSL has allowed us to identify areas of need within our bariatric population and improve the service we deliver. The changes we have made should lead to a better use of the team's time, greater patient compliance, and satisfaction as well as reduced complaints and litigation. PMID:19711140

  1. Bariatric CT Imaging: Challenges and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Fursevich, Dzmitry M; LiMarzi, Gary M; O'Dell, Matthew C; Hernandez, Manuel A; Sensakovic, William F

    2016-01-01

    The obesity epidemic in the adult and pediatric populations affects all aspects of health care, including diagnostic imaging. With the increasing prevalence of obese and morbidly obese patients, bariatric computed tomographic (CT) imaging is becoming common in day-to-day radiology practice, and a basic understanding of the unique problems that bariatric patients pose to the imaging community is crucial in any setting. Because larger patients may not fit into conventional scanners, having a CT scanner with an adequate table load limit, a large gantry aperture, a large scan field of view, and a high-power generator is a prerequisite for bariatric imaging. Iterative reconstruction methods, high tube current, and high tube voltage can reduce the image noise that is frequently seen in bariatric CT images. Truncation artifacts, cropping artifacts, and ring artifacts frequently complicate the interpretation of CT images of larger patients. If recognized, these artifacts can be easily reduced by using the proper CT equipment, scan acquisition parameters, and postprocessing options. Lastly, because of complex contrast material dynamics, contrast material-enhanced studies of bariatric patients require special attention. Understanding how the rate of injection, the scan timing, and the total mass of iodine affect vascular and parenchymal enhancement will help to optimize contrast-enhanced studies in the bariatric population. This article familiarizes the reader with the challenges that are frequently encountered at CT imaging of bariatric patients, beginning with equipment selection and ending with a review of the most commonly encountered obesity-related artifacts and the technical considerations in the acquisition of contrast-enhanced images. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27232505

  2. Mechanisms of improved glucose handling after metabolic surgery: the big 6.

    PubMed

    Paszkiewicz, Rebecca L; Bergman, Richard N

    2016-07-01

    For some time, it has been clear that elevated glucose is detrimental to the organism. A plethora of medicines have been introduced to reduce the fasting and postprandial glucose levels (including insulin, glucagon-like peptide receptor 1 [GLP-1] agonists, and sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 [SGLT2] inhibitors, among others). Although these medications are useful to reduce tissue exposure to glucose, no single compound and no combination have been able to totally normalize the blood sugar. Thus, it was astonishing when it was reported that surgery of the gastrointestinal tract could not only reduce obesity but also normalize the blood sugar. These discoveries have transformed diabetes research. What is it about bariatric surgery that causes the remarkable amelioration of glucose homeostasis dysregulation? The answer to this million dollar question is a billion dollar answer. However, a new perspective could shed some light and help provide a clear path for investigation. Instead of asking what does bariatric surgery do to change the pathophysiology, we can ask what pathophysiology and risk factors confer a greater success with remission and improved disease state after surgery. Work from our laboratory and others can help to offer a physiologic basis for which mechanisms may be put into play when the anatomy is altered during surgery. Here, we do not offer an explanation of the mechanism of action of bariatric surgery, but rather provide a background on the regulation of blood glucose and how it is altered during both the diseased state and, as available, the remission state. PMID:27568470

  3. Epilepsy surgery, vision, and driving: What has surgery taught us and could modern imaging reduce the risk of visual deficits?

    PubMed Central

    Winston, Gavin P

    2013-01-01

    Up to 40% of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are refractory to medication. Surgery is an effective treatment but may cause new neurologic deficits including visual field deficits (VFDs). The ability to drive after surgery is a key goal, but a postoperative VFD precludes driving in 4–50% of patients even if seizure-free. VFDs are a consequence of damage to the most anterior portion of the optic radiation, Meyer's loop. Anatomic dissection reveals that the anterior extent of Meyer's loop is highly variable and may clothe the temporal horn, a key landmark entered during temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. Experience from surgery since the 1940s has shown that VFDs are common (48–100%) and that the degree of resection affects the frequency or severity of the deficit. The pseudowedge shape of the deficit has led to a revised retinotopic model of the organization of the optic radiation. Evidence suggests that the left optic radiation is more anterior and thus at greater risk. Alternative surgical approaches, such as selective amygdalo-hippocampectomy, may reduce this risk, but evidence is conflicting or lacking. The optic radiation can be delineated in vivo using diffusion tensor imaging tractography, which has been shown to be useful in predicting the postoperative VFDs and in surgical planning. These data are now being used for surgical guidance with the aim of reducing the severity of VFDs. Compensation for brain shift occurring during surgery can be performed using intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but the additional utility of this expensive technique remains unproven. PMID:24199825

  4. Postoperative Risk of Hepatic Decompensation after Orthopedic Surgery in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Eric M.; Batech, Michael; Cheetham, T. Craig; Pio, Jose R.; Caparosa, Susan L.; Chocas, Mary Alice; Singh, Anshuman

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims: Previous studies have shown increased hepatic decompensation in patients with cirrhosis undergoing surgery. However, there are little data available in cirrhotics undergoing orthopedic surgery compared to cirrhotics who did not undergo surgery. The aim of this study was to examine the demographics, comorbid conditions, and clinical factors associated with hepatic decompensation within 90 days in cirrhotics who underwent orthopedic surgery. Methods: This is a retrospective matched cohort study. Inclusion criteria were cirrhosis diagnosis, age > 18 years, ≥ 6 months continuous health plan membership, and a procedure code for orthopedic surgery. Up to five cirrhotic controls without orthopedic surgery were matched on age, gender, and cirrhosis diagnosis date. Data abstraction was performed for demographics, socioeconomics, clinical, and decompensation data. Chart review was performed for validation. Multivariable analysis estimated relative risk of decompensation. Results: Eight hundred fifty-three orthopedic surgery cases in cirrhotics were matched with 4,263 cirrhotic controls. Among the cases and matched controls, the mean age was 60.5 years, and 52.2% were female. Within 90 days after surgery, cases had more decompensation compared to matched controls (12.8% vs 4.9%). Using multivariable analysis, orthopedic surgery, a 0.5 g/dL decrease in serum albumin, and a 1-unit increase in Charlson Comorbidity Index were associated with a significant increase in decompensation within 90 days of surgery. Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and chronic kidney disease were seen with increased frequency in cases vs. matched controls. Conclusions: Cirrhotics who underwent orthopedic surgery had a significant increase in hepatic decompensation within 90 days of surgery compared to matched controls. An incremental decrease in serum albumin and an incremental increase in the Charlson Comorbidity Index were significantly associated with

  5. Multifactorial Risk Index for Predicting Postoperative Respiratory Failure in Men After Major Noncardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Arozullah, Ahsan M.; Daley, Jennifer; Henderson, William G.; Khuri, Shukri F.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a preoperative risk index for predicting postoperative respiratory failure (PRF). Summary Background Data Respiratory failure is an important postoperative complication. Method Based on a prospective cohort study, cases from 44 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (n = 81,719) were used to develop the models. Cases from 132 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (n = 99,390) were used as a validation sample. PRF was defined as mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours after surgery or reintubation and mechanical ventilation after postoperative extubation. Ventilator-dependent, comatose, do not resuscitate, and female patients were excluded. Results PRF developed in 2,746 patients (3.4%). The respiratory failure risk index was developed from a simplified logistic regression model and included abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, thoracic surgery, neurosurgery, upper abdominal surgery, peripheral vascular surgery, neck surgery, emergency surgery, albumin level less than 30 g/L, blood urea nitrogen level more than 30 mg/dL, dependent functional status, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and age. Conclusions The respiratory failure risk index is a validated model for identifying patients at risk for developing PRF and may be useful for guiding perioperative respiratory care. PMID:10903604

  6. Risk Factors Associated with Cognitive Decline after Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikil; Minhas, Jatinder S.; Chung, Emma M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Modern day cardiac surgery evolved upon the advent of cardiopulmonary bypass machines (CPB) in the 1950s. Following this development, cardiac surgery in recent years has improved significantly. Despite such advances and the introduction of new technologies, neurological sequelae after cardiac surgery still exist. Ischaemic stroke, delirium, and cognitive impairment cause significant morbidity and mortality and unfortunately remain common complications. Postoperative cognitive decline (POCD) is believed to be associated with the presence of new ischaemic lesions originating from emboli entering the cerebral circulation during surgery. Cardiopulmonary bypass was thought to be the reason of POCD, but randomised controlled trials comparing with off-pump surgery show contradictory results. Attention has now turned to the growing evidence that perioperative risk factors, as well as patient-related risk factors, play an important role in early and late POCD. Clearly, identifying the mechanism of POCD is challenging. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the literature that has investigated patient and perioperative risk factors to better understand the magnitude of the risk factors associated with POCD after cardiac surgery. PMID:26491558

  7. Sarcina, a new threat in the bariatric era.

    PubMed

    Sopha, Sabrina C; Manejwala, Alif; Boutros, Cherif N

    2015-09-01

    First identified in humans by Goodsir in 1842, Sarcina were already known to cause fatal abomasal bloat in animals. Their pathogenicity in humans has only recently been characterized. Sarcina is not inherently pathogenic but, with a gastric ulcer and delayed gastric emptying, can result in perforation. We present a case report of a 32-year-old woman status post-gastric banding presenting with epigastric pain. Upper endoscopy revealed a gastric ulcer near the band. After deflation, upper gastrointestinal series showed passage of contrast and no perforation. Ulcer biopsy showed gastric contents composed of Sarcina. Proton pump inhibitors and antibiotics were administered. Follow-up endoscopy at an outside institution resulted in perforation. This case report supports a growing body of literature that Sarcina organisms contribute to ulcers and perforation. This is the first report of Sarcina in elective bariatric surgery patients, highlighting the high suspicion needed among pathologists evaluating ulcers in this unique surgical population. PMID:26198746

  8. Risk factors associated with postoperative pain after ophthalmic surgery: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Lesin, Mladen; Dzaja Lozo, Mirna; Duplancic-Sundov, Zeljka; Dzaja, Ivana; Davidovic, Nikolina; Banozic, Adriana; Puljak, Livia

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk factors associated with postoperative pain intensity and duration, as well as consumption of analgesics after ophthalmic surgery are poorly understood. Methods A prospective study was conducted among adults (N=226) who underwent eye surgery at the University Hospital Split, Croatia. A day before the surgery, the patients filled out questionnaires assessing personality, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, sociodemographics and were given details about the procedure, anesthesia, and analgesia for each postoperative day. All scales were previously used for the Croatian population. The intensity of pain was measured using a numerical rating scale from 0 to 10, where 0 was no pain and 10 was the worst imaginable pain. The intensity of pain was measured before the surgery and then 1 hour, 3 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours after surgery, and then once a day until discharge from the hospital. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results A multivariate analysis indicated that independent predictors of average pain intensity after the surgery were: absence of premedication before surgery, surgery in general anesthesia, higher pain intensity before surgery and pain catastrophizing level. Independent predictors of postoperative pain duration were intensity of pain before surgery, type of anesthesia, and self-assessment of health. Independent predictors of pain intensity ≥5 during the first 6 hours after the procedure were the type of procedure, self-assessment of health, premedication, and the level of pain catastrophizing. Conclusion Awareness about independent predictors associated with average postoperative pain intensity, postoperative pain duration, and occurrence of intensive pain after surgery may help health workers to improve postoperative pain management in ophthalmic surgery. PMID:26858525

  9. Early Cocking Phase Mechanics and Upper Extremity Surgery Risk in Starting Professional Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Douoguih, Wiemi A.; Dolce, Donald L.; Lincoln, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early cocking phase pitching mechanics may affect risk of upper extremity injury requiring surgery in professional baseball players. Purpose: To assess the occurrence of inverted-W arm positioning and early trunk rotation in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers and to determine whether this throwing position is associated with upper extremity injury requiring surgery. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: For 250 MLB pitchers in the 2010 season, 15 to 20 pitches from the start and end of an outing were reviewed using slow-motion game video for presence of an inverted-W position and early trunk rotation. Previous or current incidence of upper extremity injury requiring surgery for each player was determined using the MLB injury database, minor league injury records, available collegiate data, and publicly available online injury databases. Upper extremity surgery associated with an injury was considered to result from pitching. Results: Consensus between investigators was achieved for 99% of players for inverted-W positioning (248 players) and in 97% of players for early trunk rotation (243 players) for videos reviewed independently. Rate of surgery with and without inverted-W position was 28 of 93 (30%) and 42 of 155 (27%), respectively. Rate of surgery with and without early trunk rotation was 37 of 111 (33%) and 30 of 132 (23%), respectively. Using a Cox proportional hazards model for risk analysis using the measured number of innings pitched at time of surgery as an approximate index of exposure and adjusting for age and fastball speed at time of surgery, early trunk rotation was associated with significantly increased risk of shoulder and/or elbow surgery with hazard ratio estimate of 1.69 (95% CI, 1.02-2.80). Presence of the inverted-W position was not associated with significantly increased risk (hazard ratio, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.79-2.14). Conclusion: The inverted-W throwing position was not associated with significantly

  10. Outcomes and Risk Factors Affecting Mortality in Patients Who Underwent Colorectal Emergency Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Nam Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Emergency colorectal surgery has a high risk of mortality and morbidity because of incomplete bowel preparation, bacterial proliferation, and contamination. In this study, we investigated the outcomes and the risk factors affecting mortality in patients who had undergone emergency surgery for the treatment of various colorectal diseases. Methods This study is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data to survey the clinical results for patients who had undergone emergency colorectal surgery from January 2014 to December 2014. We analyzed various clinicopathologic factors, which were divided into 3 categories: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. Results A total of 50 patients had undergone emergency colorectal surgery during the time period covered by this study. Among them, 10 patients (20%) died during the postoperative period. A simple linear regression analysis showed that the risk factors for mortality were old age, preoperative hypotension, and a high American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) score. Moreover, a multiple linear regression analysis showed a high ASA score and preoperative hypotension to be independent risk factors. Conclusion In this study, emergency colorectal surgery showed a relatively high mortality rate. Furthermore, the independent risk factors for mortality were preoperative hypotension and high ASA score; thus, patients with these characteristics need to be evaluated more carefully and receive better care if the mortality rate is to be reduced.

  11. Impaired Olfaction and Risk for Delirium or Cognitive Decline After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Charles H.; Morrissey, Candice; Ono, Masahiro; Yenokyan, Gayane; Selnes, Ola A.; Walston, Jeremy; Max, Laura; LaFlam, Andrew; Neufeld, Karin; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Hogue, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Statement Impaired olfaction, identified in 33% of patients undergoing cardiac surgery, was associated with the adjusted risk for postoperative delirium but not cognitive decline. Objectives The prevalence and significance of impaired olfaction is not well characterized in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Because impaired olfaction has been associated with underlying neurologic disease, impaired olfaction may identify patients who are vulnerable to poor neurological outcomes in the perioperative period. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of impaired olfaction among patients presenting for cardiac surgery and the independent association of impaired olfaction with postoperative delirium and cognitive decline. Design Nested prospective cohort study Setting Academic hospital Participants 165 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass and/or valve surgery Measurements Olfaction was measured using the Brief Smell Identification Test, with impaired olfaction defined as an olfactory score < 5th percentile of normative data. Delirium was assessed using a validated chart-review method. Cognitive performance was assessed using a neuropsychological testing battery at baseline and 4–6 weeks after surgery. Results Impaired olfaction was identified in 54 of 165 patients (33%) prior to surgery. Impaired olfaction was associated with increased adjusted risk for postoperative delirium (relative risk [RR] 1.90, 95% CI 1.17–3.09; P=0.009). There was no association between impaired olfaction and change in composite cognitive score in the overall study population. Conclusion Impaired olfaction is prevalent in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and is associated with increased adjusted risk for postoperative delirium, but not cognitive decline. Impaired olfaction may identify unrecognized vulnerability for postoperative delirium among patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:25597555

  12. The Risk of Meningitis Following Expanded Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Leon T.; Trooboff, Spencer; Morgan, Michael K.; Harvey, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the risk of postoperative meningitis following expanded endoscopic endonasal skull base (EESB) surgery. Setting A systematic analysis of publications identified through searches of the electronic databases from Embase (1980–July 17, 2012), Medline (1950–July 17, 2012), and references of review articles. Main Outcome Measures Incidence of meningitis following EESB surgery. Results A total of 2,444 manuscripts were selected initially, and full-text analysis produced 67 studies with extractable data. Fifty-two contained data regarding the frequency of postoperative meningitis. The overall risk of postoperative meningitis following EESB surgery was 1.8% (36 of 2,005). For those reporting a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, meningitis occurred in 13.0% (35 of 269). For those not reporting a CSF leak, meningitis occurred in 0.1% (1 of 1,736). The odds ratio for the development of meningitis in the presence of a postoperative CSF leak was 91.99 (95% confidence interval, 11.72–721.88; p < 0.01). There was no difference in reported incidence of meningitis or CSF leak between anterior and posterior cranial fossa surgery. There was one reported case of meningitis-related mortality following EESB surgery. Conclusion The evidence in skull base surgery is limited. This study demonstrates a low incidence of meningitis (1.8%) following EESB procedures. The incidence of meningitis from EESB surgery without an associated CSF leak is uncommon. PMID:24498585

  13. [Current status of cataract surgery. Modern methods--internal medicine risk factors and contraindications].

    PubMed

    Knoche, M

    1998-02-10

    Modern cataract surgery is characterized by minimal invasive techniques that have been introduced during the past decade. These include phacoemulsification, capsulorhexis, foldable intraocular lenses and small tunnel incisions. High success rates coupled with low complication rates have resulted in a change in indications--cataract surgery is no longer performed merely to prevent blindness, but also to improve vision in patients whose professional or private visual demands are compromised by the onset of lens opacification. To ensure that their cooperation with the ophthalmic surgeon results in optimal benefit to the patient, it is important for general practitioners and internists to be conversant with the risk factors and contraindications for cataract surgery. PMID:9540259

  14. Intraocular surgery in a large diabetes patient population: risk factors and surgical results.

    PubMed

    Ostri, Christoffer

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is on the increase in developed countries. Accordingly, the prevention and treatment of vision-threatening diabetic eye complications is assuming greater importance. The overall aim of this thesis is to analyse risk factors for intraocular surgery in a large diabetes population and to report surgical results. The specific objectives are to (1) estimate the incidence of diabetic vitrectomy and analyse risk factors (Study I), (2) report long-term results, prognostic factors and incidence of cataract surgery after diabetic vitrectomy (Study II), (3) report results and prognostic factors after cataract surgery in diabetes patients (Study III) and (4) analyse risk factors for diabetic papillopathy with emphasis on metabolic control variability (Study IV). All studies are based on a close-to-complete national surgery register and a large, closely followed diabetic retinopathy screening population. Study I (cohort study, 3980 type 1 diabetes patients) illustrates that diabetic vitrectomy is rarely required in a diabetes patient population with varying degrees of diabetic retinopathy. The risk of reaching diabetic vitrectomy increases fourfold with poor metabolic control, defined as glycosylated haemoglobin A1c > 75 mmol/mol (~9%), which points to good metabolic control as an important preventive measure. Study II (cohort study, 167 diabetes patients) shows that most diabetic vitrectomy patients stand to gain visual acuity ≥0.3 after surgery. Visual acuity is stable after 1 year, and the stability is maintained through 10 years of follow-up. The use of silicone oil for endotamponade is a consistent long-term predictor of low vision after surgery. The risk of requiring cataract surgery after diabetic vitrectomy is substantial, and the risk increases if silicone oil is used. Study III (cohort study, 285 diabetes patients) shows, on the other hand, that diabetes patients can expect a significant improvement in visual acuity after cataract

  15. Preoperative risk factors in recurrent endometrioma after primary conservative surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Seung Joo; Lee, Seung Hyeong; Choi, Joo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Endometriosis is a common gynecological disorder caused by ectopic implantation of endometrial glandular and stromal cells outside the uterine cavity. Among several types of endometriosis, endometrioma is the only subtype that could be determined preoperatively using pelvic ultrasonography, and guidelines recommend pathologic confirmation of endometrioma greater than 3 cm in diameter. However, although surgery is performed in cases of endometrioma, endometrioma has a high cumulative rate of recurrence. Therefore, because determining the possibility of recurrence before performance of initial surgery is important, we examined preoperative factors associated with recurrent endometrioma. Methods This was a retrospective, comparative study including 236 patients who visited the outpatient clinic between January 2009 and December 2011. Patients who were pathologically diagnosed with endometrioma were included in this study. They were followed up postoperatively and were divided into two groups according to presence of recurrent endometrioma. Results We examined associations between baseline factors and recurrent endometrioma. In multivariate analysis, dysmenorrhea and cyst septation were statistically significant after adjusting with age, parity, surgical staging and postoperative management. We examined cumulative recurrence free survival within cases of recurrent endometriosis, based on the presence of inner cyst septation. The cumulative recurrence free survival was lower in cases with septation. Conclusion Our study found that recurrent endometrioma is more likely in patients with inner cyst septation and the recurrence occurred within a shorter duration of time than in patients without inner cyst septation on preoperative ultrasonography. Therefore intensive caution and postoperative long term medical therapy would be appropriate in patients with inner cyst septation on preoperative ultrasonography before undergoing primary surgery for endometrioma. PMID

  16. [Robotics in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Possibilities, chances, risks].

    PubMed

    Hassfeld, S; Raczkowsky, J; Bohner, P; Hofele, C; Holler, C; Mühling, J; Rembold, U

    1997-11-01

    Robot systems are being tested in stereotactic neurosurgical interventions, orthopedic surgery of the hip or knee and advancal endoscopic systems for minimally invasive surgery. In contrast to most industrially manufactured products, objects for medical treatment are characterized by plasticity as well as by complex and individual forms. Thus, features of robots in this field have to be further developed in terms of advanced sensory and specific micromotoric systems. Safety and cooperation between surgeon and robot on the patient in the operating room have to be guaranteed. Extensive three-dimensional diagnosis, computer-aided planning and simulation of the intervention as well as sensory systems that monitor the actual performance of the operation are mandatory parts of this concept. In our interdisciplinary study, we aim to examine whether a robot-given a complete preoperative planning and simulation procedure-is able to perform certain surgical operations more precisely than the surgeon. Examples are drilling with depth control, shaping of bone surface by milling, sawing with defined depth in cranial osteotomies, defined preparation of implant sites and the positioning and insertion of dental and other surgical implants, whereby autonomous employment of the robot is not that which is aspired to in these interventions but rather the interactive support of the surgeon. PMID:9490216

  17. Post-Surgery Codeine Puts Kids at Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... asks health care professionals to use an alternate pain reliever. In addition, parents and caregivers need to be aware of the risks of codeine treatment after tonsillectomy or adenoidectomy and should ask for ...

  18. Applying the Gender Lens to Risk Factors and Outcome after Adult Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Eifert, Sandra; Guethoff, Sonja; Kaczmarek, Ingo; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres; Seeland, Ute; Gulbins, Helmut; Seeburger, Jörg; Deutsch, Oliver; Jungwirth, Bettina; Katsari, Elpiniki; Dohmen, Pascal; Pfannmueller, Bettina; Hultgren, Rebecka; Schade, Ina; Kublickiene, Karolina; Mohr, Friedrich W.; Gansera, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Applying the gender lens to risk factors and outcome after adult cardiac surgery is of major clinical interest, as the inclusion of sex and gender in research design and analysis may guarantee more comprehensive cardiovascular science and may consecutively result in a more effective surgical treatment as well as cost savings in cardiac surgery. Methods We have reviewed classical cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes, arterial hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking) according to a gender-based approach. Furthermore, we have examined comorbidities such as depression, renal insufficiency, and hormonal influences in regard to gender. Gender-sensitive economic aspects have been evaluated, surgical outcome has been analyzed, and cardiovascular research has been considered from a gender perspective. Results The influence of typical risk factors and outcome after cardiac surgery has been evaluated from a gender perspective, and the gender-specific distribution of these risk factors is reported on. The named comorbidities are listed. Economic aspects demonstrated a gender gap. Outcome after coronary and valvular surgeries as well as after heart transplantation are displayed in this regard. Results after postoperative use of intra-aortic balloon pump are shown. Gender-related aspects of clinical and biomedical cardiosurgical research are reported. Conclusions Female gender has become an independent risk factor of survival after the majority of cardiosurgical procedures. Severely impaired left ventricular ejection fraction independently predicts survival in men, whereas age does in females. PMID:26288584

  19. TMJ response to mandibular advancement surgery: an overview of risk factors

    PubMed Central

    VALLADARES-NETO, José; CEVIDANES, Lucia Helena; ROCHA, Wesley Cabral; ALMEIDA, Guilherme de Araújo; de PAIVA, João Batista; RINO-NETO, José

    2014-01-01

    Objective In order to understand the conflicting information on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathophysiologic responses after mandibular advancement surgery, an overview of the literature was proposed with a focus on certain risk factors. Methods A literature search was carried out in the Cochrane, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases in the period from January 1980 through March 2013. Various combinations of keywords related to TMJ changes [disc displacement, arthralgia, condylar resorption (CR)] and aspects of surgical intervention (fixation technique, amount of advancement) were used. A hand search of these papers was also carried out to identify additional articles. Results A total of 148 articles were considered for this overview and, although methodological troubles were common, this review identified relevant findings which the practitioner can take into consideration during treatment planning: 1- Surgery was unable to influence TMJ with preexisting displaced disc and crepitus; 2- Clicking and arthralgia were not predictable after surgery, although there was greater likelihood of improvement rather than deterioration; 3- The amount of mandibular advancement and counterclockwise rotation, and the rigidity of the fixation technique seemed to influence TMJ position and health; 4- The risk of CR increased, especially in identified high-risk cases. Conclusions Young adult females with mandibular retrognathism and increased mandibular plane angle are susceptible to painful TMJ, and are subject to less improvement after surgery and prone to CR. Furthermore, thorough evidenced-based studies are required to understand the response of the TMJ after mandibular advancement surgery. PMID:24626243

  20. Risk factors for diskospondylitis in dogs after spinal decompression surgery for intervertebral disk herniation.

    PubMed

    Canal, Sara; Contiero, Barbara; Balducci, Federica; Calò, Pietro; Bernardini, Marco

    2016-06-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the incidence of and risk factors for development of postoperative diskospondylitis (POD) in dogs that underwent spinal decompression surgery for intervertebral disk herniation (IVDH). DESIGN Retrospective single cohort study. ANIMALS 372 dogs that underwent spinal decompression surgery for IVDH between January 2007 and January 2011. PROCEDURES Medical records of dogs were retrospectively reviewed. Data regarding signalment, type and anatomic site of IVDH, severity of neurologic signs, type of surgery, duration of anesthesia, esophageal temperature during surgery, and use of corticosteroid drugs were analyzed for associations with POD. RESULTS POD developed in 8 of 372 (2.2%) dogs. Univariate analysis revealed that German Shepherd Dogs had 9.8 times the odds of POD, compared with the odds for other breeds. In addition, dogs > 8.8 years of age, weighing > 20 kg (44 lb), or having disk protrusions were at higher risk of developing POD than were other dogs. The only factor that retained a significant association with POD after controlling for other factors in multivariate analysis was body weight > 20 kg. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Factors identified in this study may be useful for prediction of POD, an apparently uncommon outcome, in dogs undergoing spinal decompression surgery for IVDH. Dogs at higher risk than others, particularly those weighing > 20 kg, should be monitored carefully in the immediate postoperative period, and signs of worsening neurologic condition after initial improvement should be promptly investigated. PMID:27270060

  1. Previous gastric bypass surgery complicating total thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Bianca; Jacobson, Adam S; Alon, Eran E; Via, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Hypocalcemia is a well-known complication of total thyroidectomy. Patients who have previously undergone gastric bypass surgery may be at increased risk of hypocalcemia due to gastrointestinal malabsorption, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and an underlying vitamin D deficiency. We present the case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent a total thyroidectomy for the follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Her history included Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Following the thyroid surgery, she developed postoperative hypocalcemia that required large doses of oral calcium carbonate (7.5 g/day), oral calcitriol (up to 4 μg/day), intravenous calcium gluconate (2.0 g/day), calcium citrate (2.0 g/day), and ergocalciferol (50,000 IU/day). Her serum calcium levels remained normal on this regimen after hospital discharge despite persistent hypoparathyroidism. Bariatric surgery patients who undergo thyroid surgery require aggressive supplementation to maintain normal serum calcium levels. Preoperative supplementation with calcium and vitamin D is strongly recommended. PMID:25738720

  2. Recent advances in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Chan, Chien-Pin; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2013-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has been widely adopted and new technical innovation, procedures and evidence based knowledge are persistently emerging. This review documents recent major advancements in laparoscopic surgery. A PubMed search was made in order to identify recent advances in this field. We reviewed the recent data on randomized trials in this field as well as papers of systematic review. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the most frequently performed procedure, followed by laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Although bile duct injuries are relatively uncommon (0.15%-0.6%), intraoperative cholangiography still plays a role in reducing the cost of litigation. Laparoscopic bariatric surgery is the most commonly performed laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery in the USA, and laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the treatment of choice for intractable gastroesophageal reflux disease. Recent randomized trials have demonstrated that laparoscopic gastric and colorectal cancer resection are safe and oncologically correct procedures. Laparoscopic surgery has also been widely developed in hepatic, pancreatic, gynecological and urological surgery. Recently, SILS and robotic surgery have penetrated all specialties of abdominal surgery. However, evidence-based medicine has failed to show major advantages in SILS, and the disadvantage of robotic surgery is the high costs related to purchase and maintenance of technology. Laparoscopic surgery has become well developed in recent decades and is the choice of treatment in abdominal surgery. Recently developed SILS techniques and robotic surgery are promising but their benefits remain to be determined. PMID:23126424

  3. Benefits and risks of immediately sequential bilateral cataract surgery: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lansingh, Van C; Eckert, Kristen A; Strauss, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Immediately sequential bilateral cataract surgery (ISBCS) is a highly contended issue in ophthalmology, mainly due to the risk of bilateral endophthalmitis and financial penalties that many ophthalmologists face when performing simultaneous cataract surgeries. The purpose of this review is to understand the current status of the knowledge of ISBCS, mainly its benefits and risks and how they compare with the standard of care, delayed sequential bilateral cataract surgery. Evidence, although limited, increasingly supports ISBCS for providing faster rehabilitation, improved visual outcomes, and cost and time savings. Evidence does not support the fear of bilateral endophthalmitis resulting from the simultaneous procedure. However, stronger and greater evidence is needed before ISBCSs can be considered the standard of care. Where ISBCS can potentially create the most beneficial impact is in public eye health programmes in developing countries, but this has not yet been explored. PMID:25824813

  4. Perioperative risk factors for in-hospital mortality after emergency gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Jung, Myung Jae; Lee, Jae Gil

    2016-08-01

    Few studies have evaluated the risk factors for in-hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients who have undergone emergency gastrointestinal (GI) surgery. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients after emergency GI surgery.The medical records of 362 critically ill surgical patients who underwent emergency GI surgery, admitted to intensive care unit between January 2007 and December 2011, were reviewed retrospectively. Perioperative biochemical and clinical parameters of survivors and nonsurvivors were compared. Logistic regression multivariate analysis was performed to identify the independent risk factors of mortality.The in-hospital mortality rate was 15.2% (55 patients). Multivariate analyses revealed cancer-related perforation (odds ratio [OR] 16.671, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.629-105.721, P = 0.003), preoperative anemia (hemoglobin <10 g/dL; OR 6.976, 95% CI 1.376-35.360, P = 0.019), and preoperative hypoalbuminemia (albumin <2.7 g/dL; OR 9.954, 95% CI 1.603-61.811, P = 0.014) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality after emergency GI surgery.The findings of this study suggest that in critically ill patients undergoing emergency GI surgery, cancer-related peritonitis, preoperative anemia, and preoperative hypoalbuminemia are associated with in-hospital mortality. Recognizing risk factors at an early stage could aid risk stratification and the provision of optimal perioperative care. PMID:27583863

  5. Perioperative risk factors for in-hospital mortality after emergency gastrointestinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Seung Hwan; Jung, Myung Jae; Lee, Jae Gil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have evaluated the risk factors for in-hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients who have undergone emergency gastrointestinal (GI) surgery. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients after emergency GI surgery. The medical records of 362 critically ill surgical patients who underwent emergency GI surgery, admitted to intensive care unit between January 2007 and December 2011, were reviewed retrospectively. Perioperative biochemical and clinical parameters of survivors and nonsurvivors were compared. Logistic regression multivariate analysis was performed to identify the independent risk factors of mortality. The in-hospital mortality rate was 15.2% (55 patients). Multivariate analyses revealed cancer-related perforation (odds ratio [OR] 16.671, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.629–105.721, P = 0.003), preoperative anemia (hemoglobin <10 g/dL; OR 6.976, 95% CI 1.376–35.360, P = 0.019), and preoperative hypoalbuminemia (albumin <2.7 g/dL; OR 9.954, 95% CI 1.603–61.811, P = 0.014) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality after emergency GI surgery. The findings of this study suggest that in critically ill patients undergoing emergency GI surgery, cancer-related peritonitis, preoperative anemia, and preoperative hypoalbuminemia are associated with in-hospital mortality. Recognizing risk factors at an early stage could aid risk stratification and the provision of optimal perioperative care. PMID:27583863

  6. Developing a genetic fuzzy system for risk assessment of mortality after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Nouei, Mahyar Taghizadeh; Kamyad, Ali Vahidian; Sarzaeem, MahmoodReza; Ghazalbash, Somayeh

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac events could be taken into account as the leading causes of death throughout the globe. Such events also trigger an undesirable increase in what treatment procedures cost. Despite the giant leaps in technological development in heart surgery, coronary surgery still carries the high risk of the mortality. Besides, there is still a long way ahead to accurately predict and assess the mortality risk. This study is an attempt to develop an expert system for the risk assessment of mortality following the cardiac surgery. The developed system involves three main steps. In the first step, a filtering feature selection method is applied to select the best features. In the second step, an ad hoc data-driven method is utilized to generate the preliminary fuzzy inference system. Finally, a hybrid optimization method is presented to select the optimum subset of the rules. The study relies on 1,811 samples to evaluate the diagnosis performance of the proposed system. The obtained classification accuracy is very promising with regard to other benchmark classification methods including binary logistic regression (LR) and multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP) with the same attributes. The developed system leads to 100% sensitivity and 84.7% specificity, while LR and MLP methods statistically come up with lower figures (65, 78.6 and 65%, 75.8%), respectively. Now, a fuzzy supportive tool can be potentially taken as an alternative for the current mortality risk assessment system that are applied in coronary surgeries, and are chiefly based on crisp database. PMID:25119238

  7. Development of a screening instrument for risk factors of persistent pain after breast cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sipilä, R; Estlander, A-M; Tasmuth, T; Kataja, M; Kalso, E

    2012-01-01

    Background: Persistent postsurgical pain can have a significant effect on the quality of life of women being treated for breast cancer. The aim of this prospective study was to develop a screening tool to identify presurgical demographic, psychological and treatment-related factors that predict persistence of significant pain in the operated area after 6 months from surgery. Methods: Background and self-reported questionnaire data were collected the day before surgery and combined with treatment-related data. Pain in the operated area was assessed 6 months after surgery with a questionnaire. The Bayesian model was used for the development of a screening tool. Results: Report of preoperative chronic pain, more than four or more previous operations, preoperative pain in the area to be operated, high body mass index, previous smoking and older age were included in the six-factor model that best predicted significant pain at the follow-up in the 489 women studied. Conclusion: A six-factor risk index was developed to estimate the risk of developing significant pain after breast cancer surgery. Neither treatment- nor mood-related variables were included in the model. Identification of risk factors may lead to prevention of persistent postsurgery pain. This tool could be used for target prevention to those who are at the highest risk of developing persistent postsurgery pain. PMID:23093294

  8. Risk Factors for Wound Dehiscence after Guided Bone Regeneration in Dental Implant Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Yun, Pil-Young

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate risks for wound dehiscence after guided bone regeneration (GBR) in dental implant surgery. Methods: Patients who received dental implant therapy with GBR procedure at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (Seongnam, Korea) from June 2004 to May 2007 were included. The clinical outcome of interest was complications related to dental implant surgery. The factors influencing wound dehiscence, classified into patient-related factors, surgery-related factors and material-related factors, were evaluated. Results: One hundred and fifteen cases (202 implants) were included in this study. Wound dehiscence (19.1%) was considered a major complication. The risk of wound dehiscence was higher in males than in females (odds ratio=4.279, P =0.014). In the main graft, the allogenic group had the lowest risk of wound dehiscence (odds ratio=0.106, P =0.006). Though the external connection group had a higher risk of wound dehiscence than the internal connection group (odds ratio=2.381), the difference was not significant (P =0.100). Conclusion: In this study, male gender and main graft have the highest risk of wound dehiscence. To reduce wound dehiscence after GBR, instructions on postoperative care with supplementary procedure for the protection of the wound dehiscence is recommended, especially to male patients. A main graft with a gel base can reduce the risk of wound dehiscence. PMID:27489821

  9. Risks of packed red blood cell transfusion in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gerber, David R

    2012-12-01

    Packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion is common in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Evidence has accumulated demonstrating that such patients can tolerate relatively low hemoglobins, and an extensive body of literature has developed demonstrating that patients undergoing such surgery who receive PRBC are at risk for several adverse outcomes including increased mortality, atrial fibrillation, and more postoperative infections, as well as numerous other complications. The PubMed database was searched for the English language literature on the topic of PRBC transfusion and outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, as well as alternatives to this intervention. Data were reviewed to assess the impact of transfusion in patients undergoing cardiac surgery on mortality, cardiac, infectious, and pulmonary, as well as a variety of miscellaneous complications. Patients receiving PRBC were consistently identified as being at higher risk for complications in all categories. The limited prospective data were consistent with the retrospective data, which comprised most of the literature. The preponderance of the literature suggests that patients undergoing cardiac surgery can tolerate lower hemoglobin/hematocrit values than traditionally appreciated. Most published data also indicate that PRBC transfusion should be reserved for patients with an identifiable clinical/physiologic indication fir this intervention, consistent with recent specialty society guidelines. PMID:22762927

  10. Smoking Is Associated with an Increased Risk for Surgery in Diverticulitis: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Michael J.; Schaffer, Samuel; Coward, Stephanie; Kuenzig, M. Ellen; Hubbard, James; Eksteen, Bertus; Heitman, Steven; Panaccione, Remo; Ghosh, Subrata; Kaplan, Gilaad G.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Cigarette smoking increases the risk of surgery in Crohn’s disease. However, the effect of smoking on the need for surgery for diverticulitis is unknown. Objective We evaluated whether smoking was a risk factor for surgery among patients admitted to hospital with acute diverticulitis. Design We conducted a population-based comparative cohort study of patients admitted to hospital for diverticulitis who were treated with medical versus surgical management. Setting & Participants We used the population-based Discharge Abstract Database to identify 176 adults admitted emergently with a diagnosis of diverticulitis between 2009 and 2010 in Calgary. Intervention & Main Outcome We performed a medical chart review to confirm the diagnosis of diverticulitis and to extract clinical data. The primary outcome was a partial colectomy during hospitalization. Logistic regression evaluated the association between smoking and surgery after adjusting for potential confounders, including age, sex, comorbidity, and disease severity. Results A partial colectomy was performed on 35.6% of patients with diverticulitis and 1.3% died. Among diverticulitis patients, 26.8% were current smokers, 31.5% were ex-smokers, and 41.6% never smoked. Compared to non-smokers, current smokers (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 9.02; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.47–32.97) and former smokers (adjusted OR 5.41; 95% CI: 1.54–18.96) had increased odds of surgery. Conclusion and Relevance Smoking is associated with the need for surgical management of diverticulitis. PMID:27467077

  11. Risk Factors for Gallstone Formation after Surgery for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Jin; Kim, Ki Hyun; Park, Young Suk; Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of gallstones after gastrectomy for gastric cancer is higher than in the general population. However, the causes and mechanisms of post-gastrectomy gallstones are unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of gallstone formation and the risk factors for their development after gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Materials and Methods Of 1,744 gastric cancer patients who underwent gastrectomy at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between January 2010 and December 2012, 1,284 were included in this study and retrospectively reviewed. Patients' age, sex, body mass index (BMI), tumor location, stage, type of gastrectomy, type of reconstruction, and extent of node dissection were evaluated. Results The incidence of gallstones after gastrectomy for gastric cancer was significantly higher in men than in women (P=0.019). Exclusion of the duodenum during reconstruction was associated with a significantly higher incidence of gallstones (P=0.003). Overweight and obese patients with BMI ≥23 kg/m2 had significantly higher incidence of gallstones than those with a lower BMI (P=0.006). Multivariate analysis showed that obesity (hazard ratio, HR=1.614; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.135~2.296; P=0.008), male sex (HR=1.515, 95% CI: 1.029~2.231, P=0.033), and exclusion of the duodenum (HR=1.648, 95% CI: 1.192~2.280, P=0.003) were significant, independent risk factors for gallstones after gastrectomy. Conclusions The cumulative incidence of gallstones for 5 years after gastrectomy was 15.3%. Male sex, obesity, and exclusion of the duodenum were risk factors for gallstone formation after gastrectomy. Careful surveillance will be required for these patient groups after gastrectomy.

  12. Preoperative nutritional deficiencies in severely obese bariatric candidates are not linked to gastric Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Gerig, Rahel; Ernst, Barbara; Wilms, Britta; Thurnheer, Martin; Schultes, Bernd

    2013-05-01

    Severely obese subjects have been found to show a high prevalence of distinct nutritional deficiencies even without any bariatric intervention but the underlying reasons remain obscure. We tested the hypothesis that gastric Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with increased nutritional deficiency rates. Taking advantage of our large database, we identified 404 patients who had undergone a gastroscopy--as a standard diagnostic assessment before bariatric surgery--along with a histological examination of gastric mucosal biopsies with concurrent nutritional blood measurements. Eighty-five (21 %) of the obese patients included in the study displayed a gastric H. pylori infection. Sex distribution, age and body mass index did not differ between H. pylori+ and H. pylori- patients (P > 0.29). Referring to nutritional markers, neither serum levels of total protein, albumin, calcium, phosphate, magnesium, ferritin, zinc, copper, vitamin B12, folate and 25-OH vitamin D3 nor respective deficiency rates differed between the H. pylori+ and H. pylori- patients group (all P > 0.13). Overall, 49.5 % of the bariatric candidates displayed at least one nutritional deficiency. Our data confirm previous reports on high prevalences of nutritional deficiencies in severely obese subjects. However, they do not provide evidence for a contributing role of gastric H. pylori infection to these nutritional alterations. PMID:23430478

  13. Conversion from robotic surgery to laparotomy: A case-control study evaluating risk factors for conversion

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nate; Fleming, Nicole D.; Nick, Alpa M.; Munsell, Mark F.; Rallapalli, Vijayashri; Westin, Shannon N.; Meyer, Larissa A.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Soliman, Pamela T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine risk factors associated with conversion to laparotomy for women undergoing robotic gynecologic surgery. Methods The medical records of 459 consecutive robotic surgery cases performed between December 2006 and October 2011 by 8 different surgeons at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Cases converted to laparotomy were compared to those completed robotically. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the demographic and clinical characteristics. Results Forty of 459 (8.7%, 95% CI 6.3%-11.7%) patients had conversion to open surgery. Reason for conversion included poor visualization due to adhesions (13), inability to tolerate Trendelenburg (7), enlarged uterus (7), extensive peritoneal disease (5), bowel injury (2), ureteral injury (1), vascular injury (1), bladder injury (1), technical difficulty with the robot (2), and inability to access abdominal cavity (1). 5% of cases were converted prior to docking the robot. On univariate analysis preoperative diagnosis (p=0.012), non-White race (p=0.004), history of asthma (p=0.027), ASA score (p=0.032), bowel injury (p=0.012), greater BMI (p<0.001), need for blood transfusion (p<0.001), and expected blood loss (p<0.001) were associated with conversion. On multivariate analysis, non-White race (OR 2.88, 95% CI 1.39-5.96, p=0.004), bowel injury (OR 35.40, 95% CI 3.00-417.28, p=0.005), and increasing BMI (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.03-1.09, p<0.001) were significantly associated with increased risk for conversion. Prior surgery was not associated with conversion to open surgery (p=0.347). Conclusion Conversion to laparotomy was required for 8.7% of patients undergoing robotic surgery for a gynecologic indication. Increasing BMI and non-white race were identified as the two preoperative risk factors associated with conversion. PMID:24937481

  14. Emerging risks and outcomes of blood transfusion in surgery.

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh

    2004-01-01

    Prior to 1900, blood transfusions were fraught with danger and often caused more complications than the underlying disease. Discovery of the ABO compatibility system in the early twentieth century opened the modern era of blood transfusion, yet ABO incompatibility-as a result of clerical error-remains a significant threat to the recipient today. The risk of disease transmission now includes new and emerging agents, such as Trepanosoma cruzii and West Nile Virus (WNV), as well as other existing pathogens. Transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM) presents a further risk to recipient patients. Confounding these problems are shortages of safe blood and the accelerated rise in the cost of blood due to increased testing. Outcome data on transfusion therapy have not always been favorable, particularly in the areas of postoperative infection, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), multiple organ failure (MOF), and mortality. Such data have generated extensive efforts to determine association versus underlying cause of post-transfusion complications. In addition, unprecedented global initiatives to minimize the use of allogeneic blood are on the way. Options may include, but are not limited to, the use of "blood substitutes," although validation of such products is still required. In the meantime, blood product conservation techniques should become part of routine transfusion medicine. PMID:14872432

  15. The importance of national registries/databases in metabolic surgery: the UK experience.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, James; Welbourn, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The United Kingdom (UK) National Bariatric Surgery Registry (NBSR) is a registry of self-reported bariatric surgery from members of the British Obesity and Metabolic Surgery Society. We describe the registry and its usefulness and limitations in improving the knowledge base for metabolic and bariatric surgery, reviewing the main results for the first 5 years of its introduction since 2009. We also review the reports of other national and international bariatric surgery registries and compare the baseline characteristics, including metabolic parameters, of the patients entered into the NBSR. A total of 161 surgeons from 137 UK bariatric surgery units entered 32,212 anonymized patient records. Of these patients, 76% were female, mean weight at preoperative clinic was 135.6 kg, body mass index was 48.8 kg/m(2), and 76.5 % had publicly funded National Health Service treatment. The 3 most common procedures were gastric bypass (55.3%), gastric banding (20.4%), and sleeve gastrectomy (20.2%), although the prevalence of these changed over time and was different between public and private sectors. The 2-year rate for diabetes improvement was 61.5%, but this varied with the duration of diabetes and baseline diabetic therapy. The data were similar to those from other large registries. Establishment of large national registries such as the NBSR has the potential to provide "real-world" information for quality assurance and the effect of metabolic and bariatric surgery on the whole operated population. PMID:27313193

  16. Retrospective study of the risk factors and prevalence of colic in horses after orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Senior, J M; Pinchbeck, G L; Dugdale, A H A; Clegg, P D

    2004-09-11

    The records of 496 orthopaedic operations on 428 horses were reviewed to estimate the prevalence of, and identify the risk factors for, the development of colic in horses after surgery. Colic was defined as any recognised sign of abdominal pain that could not be attributed to a concurrent disease. Fourteen of the horses developed colic; eight of them were undiagnosed, three were classified as impactions, one as tympanic colic of the colon, one as incarceration of the small intestine in the epiploic foramen, and one as left dorsal displacement of the colon in the nephrosplenic space. Morphine was associated with a four-fold increased risk of colic compared with the use of no opioid or butorphanol, and out-of-hours surgery was also associated with an increased risk. PMID:15470967

  17. Pregnancy after diabetes obesity surgery (PADOS): Incidence and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Whyte, M; Pring, C; Cooke, D; Hart, K; McGowan, B M; Subramanian, D; Shawe, J

    2014-07-01

    Half of all bariatric surgical procedures are in women of childbearing age but it remains unclear whether surgery is suitable for women who subsequently conceive: specifically the relative risks and benefits of potential nutrient deficiencies versus weight reduction. We will present data collected from Clinical Practice Research Databases on the maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancies complicated either by obesity or previous bariatric surgery (BS). Two groups, matched to obese controls for BMI pre-BS and post-BS (at the time of ante-natal booking) will be compared. In this way, the effect of BS on pregnancy outcomes may be examined, independent of its effect on weight. A sub-group of women with antecedent Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) will allow for investigation of the additional impact and persistence of this co-morbidity. This builds upon pilot data collected from a retrospective cohort of women (18-45years) undergoing laparoscopic roux-en-Y (RYGB) surgery over a 24-month period (n=218). After exclusions and loss to follow up, data from 111 patients were analysed; 81 (73%) had conceived prior to RYGB, 20 (18%) became pregnant post RYGB and a further 22 patients (20%) were trying to conceive at the time of data collection. Three women had T2DM which resolved post BS. A suggestion of greater miscarriage risk prior to surgery in this sub-group will be confirmed as more women are recruited. Pregnancy is a frequent desire/occurrence after BS. This database study will advance understanding of the maternal and fetal outcomes of such pregnancies and inform antenatal care. PMID:26104634

  18. Surgical site infection in clean-contaminated head and neck cancer surgery: risk factors and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Hanai, Nobuhiro; Ozawa, Taijiro; Hyodo, Ikuo; Suzuki, Mikio

    2013-03-01

    Since new treatment strategies, such as chemoradiotherapy, have been introduced for head and neck cancer, a higher number of unknown factors may be involved in surgical site infection in clean-contaminated head and neck cancer surgery. The aim of the present study was to clarify the risk factors of surgical site infection in clean-contaminated surgery for head and neck cancer and the prognosis of patients with surgical site infection. Participants were 277 consecutive patients with head and neck cancer who underwent clean-contaminated surgery for primary lesions at the Aichi Cancer Center over a 60-month period. A total of 22 putative risk factors were recorded in each patient and statistically analyzed to elucidate surgical site infection related factors. Surgical site infection was observed in 92 (32.1 %) of 277 cases. Univariate analysis indicated that alcohol consumption, T classification, neck dissection, reconstructive procedure, and chemoradiotherapy were significantly associated with surgical site infection. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified two independent risk factors for surgical site infection: reconstructive surgery (p = 0.04; odds ratio (OR) 1.77) and chemoradiotherapy (p = 0.01; OR 1.93). In spite of surgical site infection, the five-year overall survival rate of patients with surgical site infection was not significantly different from those without surgical site infection. Although surgical site infection did not impact the overall survival of patients with surgical procedures, head and neck surgeons should pay attention to patients with previous chemoradiotherapy as well as to those with a high risk of surgical site infection requiring reconstructive surgery. PMID:22865106

  19. Coronary artery bypass surgery in diabetic patients – risk factors for sternal wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Kristina; Brandt, Michael; Fraund-Cremer, Sandra; Cremer, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of sternal wound infections (SWI) after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) as reported worldwide is low. However, it is associated with significant increase of postoperative mortality and treatment costs. The major risk factors discussed are diabetes mellitus and bilateral IMA harvesting of the internal mammary artery. This study analyses data of 590 patients receiving CABG concerning the risk factors for SWI. Sternal wound infections occur significantly more often in diabetic patients, one crucial and significant additional risk factor is obesity. PMID:27547690

  20. The Socioeconomic Impact of Morbid Obesity and Factors Affecting Access to Obesity Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fouse, Tammy; Schauer, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Bariatric surgery has been shown in many studies to be the most effective long-term treatment for severe obesity and obesity-related comorbidities. Economic analysis has demonstrated cost-effectiveness as well as cost-savings in select subgroups of patients. Despite the health and economic benefits of bariatric surgery, relatively few eligible patients receive this treatment. This disparity in access to care must be addressed by health policy decision-makers. PMID:27473794

  1. Risk Factors and Outcomes for Postoperative Delirium after Major Surgery in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Raats, Jelle W.; van Eijsden, Wilbert A.; Crolla, Rogier M. P. H.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; van der Laan, Lijckle

    2015-01-01

    Background Early identification of patients at risk for delirium is important, since adequate well timed interventions could prevent occurrence of delirium and related detrimental outcomes. The aim of this study is to evaluate prognostic factors for delirium, including factors describing frailty, in elderly patients undergoing major surgery. Methods We included patients of 65 years and older, who underwent elective surgery from March 2013 to November 2014. Patients had surgery for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) or colorectal cancer. Delirium was scored prospectively using the Delirium Observation Screening Scale. Pre- and peri-operative predictors of delirium were analyzed using regression analysis. Outcomes after delirium included adverse events, length of hospital stay, discharge destination and mortality. Results We included 232 patients. 51 (22%) underwent surgery for AAA and 181 (78%) for colorectal cancer. Postoperative delirium occurred in 35 patients (15%). Predictors of postoperative delirium included: delirium in medical history (Odds Ratio 12 [95% Confidence Interval 2.7–50]), advancing age (Odds Ratio 2.0 [95% Confidence Interval 1.1–3.8]) per 10 years, and ASA-score ≥3 (Odds Ratio 2.6 [95% Confidence Interval 1.1–5.9]). Occurrence of delirium was related to an increase in adverse events, length of hospital stay and mortality. Conclusion Postoperative delirium is a frequent complication after major surgery in elderly patients and is related to an increase in adverse events, length of hospital stay, and mortality. A delirium in the medical history, advanced age, and ASA-score may assist in defining patients at increased risk for delirium. Further attention to prevention of delirium is essential in elderly patients undergoing major surgery. PMID:26291459

  2. Risk Factors for 30-Day Hospital Readmission among General Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kassin, Michael T; Owen, Rachel M; Perez, Sebastian; Leeds, Ira; Cox, James C; Schnier, Kurt; Sadiraj, Vjollca; Sweeney, John F

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission within 30-days of an index hospitalization is receiving increased scrutiny as a marker of poor quality patient care. This study identifies factors associated with 30-day readmission following General Surgery procedures. Study Design Using standard National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) protocol, preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative outcomes were collected on patients undergoing inpatient General Surgery procedures at a single academic center between 2009 and 2011. Data were merged with our institutional clinical data warehouse to identify unplanned 30-day readmissions. Demographics, comorbidities, type of procedure, postoperative complications, and ICD-9 coding data were reviewed for patients who were readmitted. Univariate and multivariate analysis was utilized to identify risk factors associated with 30-day readmission. Results 1442 General Surgery patients were reviewed. 163 (11.3%) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. The most common reasons for readmission were gastrointestinal complaint/complication (27.6%), surgical infection (22.1%), and failure to thrive/malnutrition (10.4%). Comorbidities associated with risk of readmission included disseminated cancer, dyspnea, and preoperative open wound (p<0.05 for all variables). Surgical procedures associated with higher rates of readmission included pancreatectomy, colectomy, and liver resection. Postoperative occurrences leading to increased risk of readmission were blood transfusion, postoperative pulmonary complication, wound complication, sepsis/shock, urinary tract infection, and vascular complications. Multivariable analysis demonstrates that the most significant independent risk factor for readmission is the occurrence of any postoperative complication (OR 4.20, 95% CI 2.89–6.13). Conclusions Risk factors for readmission after General Surgery procedures are multi-factorial; however, postoperative complications appear to drive readmissions in

  3. Creating an advance-care-planning decision aid for high-risk surgery: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-risk surgery patients may lose decision-making capacity as a result of surgical complications. Advance care planning prior to surgery may be beneficial, but remains controversial and is hindered by a lack of appropriate decision aids. This study sought to examine stakeholders’ views on the appropriateness of using decision aids, in general, to support advance care planning among high-risk surgery populations and the design of such a decision aid. Methods Key informants were recruited through purposive and snowball sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted by phone until data collected reached theoretical saturation. Key informants were asked to discuss their thoughts about advance care planning and interventions to support advance care planning, particularly for this population. Researchers took de-identified notes that were analyzed for emerging concordant, discordant, and recurrent themes using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results Key informants described the importance of initiating advance care planning preoperatively, despite potential challenges present in surgical settings. In general, decision aids were viewed as an appropriate approach to support advance care planning for this population. A recipe emerged from the data that outlines tools, ingredients, and tips for success that are needed to design an advance care planning decision aid for high-risk surgical settings. Conclusions Stakeholders supported incorporating advance care planning in high-risk surgical settings and endorsed the appropriateness of using decision aids to do so. Findings will inform the next stages of developing the first advance care planning decision aid for high-risk surgery patients. PMID:25067908

  4. Risk Factors for post-Cardiac Surgery Diaphragmatic Paralysis in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Akbariasbagh, Parvin; Mirzaghayan, Mohammad Reza; Akbariasbagh, Naseredin; Shariat, Mamak; Ebrahim, Bita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Injured phrenic nerve secondary to cardiac surgeries is the most common cause of diaphragmatic paralysis (DP) in infants. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for DP caused by congenital heart defect corrective surgeries in pediatrics. Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted in a 2-year period (2006–2008), included 451 children with congenital heart diseases admitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital. The diaphragmatic function was examined via fluoroscopy, and the frequency of DP and its relevant parameters were evaluated. Results: Of the 451 patients, comprising 268 males and 183 females at an age range of 3 days to 204 months (28.2 ± 33.4 months), 25 (5.5%) infants (60% male and 40% female, age range = 15 days to 132 months, 41.2 ± 28.1 months) had DP as follows: 48% unilateral right-sided and 36% unilateral left-sided. Additionally, 68% had cyanotic congenital heart disease and 84% had DP following total correction surgery. The highest prevalence rates of DP resulting in phrenic hemiparesis were observed after arterial switch operation, Fontan procedure, and Blalock–Taussig shunt surgery, respectively. Thirteen (52%) of the 25 DP patients underwent surgical diaphragmatic plication because of severe respiratory distress and dependency on mechanical ventilation, and most of the cases of plication underwent arterial switch operation. The rate of mortality was 24% (6 patients). Conclusion: DP with a prevalence of 5.5% was one of the most common complications secondary to cardiac surgeries in the infants included in the present study. Effective factors were age, weight, cyanotic congenital heart defects, and previous cardiac surgery. Diaphragmatic plication improved prognosis in severe cases. PMID:26697086