Science.gov

Sample records for barium sulfate precipitation

  1. Morphologies, mechanical properties and thermal stability of poly(lactic acid) toughened by precipitated barium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinian; Wang, Chuang; Shao, Kaiyun; Ding, Guoxin; Tao, Yulun; Zhu, Jinbo

    2015-11-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-based composites were prepared by blending PLA with precipitated barium sulfate (BaSO4) modified with stearic acid. The morphologies, mechanical properties and thermal stability of samples with increased mass fraction of BaSO4 were investigated. Results showed that PLA was toughened and reinforced simultaneously by incorporation of precipitated BaSO4 particles. The highest impact toughness and elongation at break were both achieved at 15% BaSO4, while the elastic modulus increased monotonically with increasing BaSO4 loading. Little effect of BaSO4 on the thermal behavior of PLA was observed in the present case. However, the thermal stability of PLA/BaSO4 composites at high temperature was enhanced.

  2. Effect of flow structure at the onset of instability on barium sulfate precipitation in Taylor-Couette crystallizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljishi, Mohammad Fuad; Ruo, An-Cheng; Park, Jay Hoon; Nasser, Bader; Kim, Woo-Sik; Joo, Yong Lak

    2013-06-01

    The effect of the vortex flow by primary instability on the precipitation of barium sulfate crystals was examined in Taylor-Couette crystallizers. Experiments involving precipitation of barium sulfate under laminar flow (before the onset of instability) and vortex flow (after the onset of primary instability) at three different axial flow rates revealed that the vortex motion plays a critical role in fine-tuning crystal properties such as internal crystal structure, particle microstructure and morphology. While no clear trends in crystalline size were observed for laminar flow, all flowrates at the onset of instability resulted in smaller crystalline sizes that ranged between 40 nm and 50 nm. A decrease in the unit cell dimensions of the orthorhombic lattice structure was also observed after the onset of instability. For both laminar and vortex flow, shortening the residence time by increasing axial flow rate led to a substantial decrease in crystal size. It is also observed that the crystal size distribution (CSD) became much narrower after the emergence of vortices. Under vortex flow, an increase in axial flow resulted in even narrower crystal size distributions. Finally, the observed phenomena of smaller crystal size and narrow crystal size distribution under vortex flow are qualitatively explained by the analysis of particle trajetory.

  3. Effects of nitrate and water on the oxygen isotopic analysis of barium sulfate precipitated from solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hannon, Janet E.; Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Mroczkowski, Stanley J.

    2008-01-01

    BaSO4 precipitated from mixed salt solutions by common techniques for SO isotopic analysis may contain quantities of H2O and NOthat introduce errors in O isotope measurements. Experiments with synthetic solutions indicate that δ18O values of CO produced by decomposition of precipitated BaSO4 in a carbon reactor may be either too low or too high, depending on the relative concentrations of SO and NO and the δ18O values of the H2O, NO, and SO. Typical δ18O errors are of the order of 0.5 to 1‰ in many sample types, and can be larger in samples containing atmospheric NO, which can cause similar errors in δ17O and Δ17O. These errors can be reduced by (1) ion chromatographic separation of SO from NO, (2) increasing the salinity of the solutions before precipitating BaSO4 to minimize incorporation of H2O, (3) heating BaSO4 under vacuum to remove H2O, (4) preparing isotopic reference materials as aqueous samples to mimic the conditions of the samples, and (5) adjusting measured δ18O values based on amounts and isotopic compositions of coexisting H2O and NO. These procedures are demonstrated for SO isotopic reference materials, synthetic solutions with isotopically known reagents, atmospheric deposition from Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA, and sulfate salt deposits from the Atacama Desert, Chile, and Mojave Desert, California, USA. These results have implications for the calibration and use of O isotope data in studies of SOsources and reaction mechanisms.

  4. Effects of nitrate and water on the oxygen isotopic analysis of barium sulfate precipitated from water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hannon, J.E.; Böhlke, J.K.; Mroczkowski, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    BaSO4 precipitated from mixed salt solutions by common techniques for SO42- isotopic analysis may contain quantities of H2O and NO3- that introduce errors in O isotope measurements. Experiments with synthetic solutions indicate that ??18O values of CO produced by decomposition of precipitated BaSO4 in a carbon reactor may be either too low or too high, depending on the relative concentrations of SO42- and NO3- and the ??18O values of the H2O, NO3-, and SO42-. Typical ??18O errors are of the order of 0.5 to 1??? in many sample types, and can be larger in samples containing atmospheric NO 3-, which can cause similar errors in ?? 17O and ??17O. These errors can be reduced by (1) ion chromatographic separation of SO42- from NO 3-, (2) increasing the salinity of the solutions before precipitating BaSO4 to minimize incorporation of H2O, (3) heating BaSO4 under vacuum to remove H2O, (4) preparing isotopic reference materials as aqueous samples to mimic the conditions of the samples, and (5) adjusting measured ??18O values based on amounts and isotopic compositions of coexisting H2O and NO 3-. These procedures are demonstrated for SO 42- isotopic reference materials, synthetic solutions with isotopically known reagents, atmospheric deposition from Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA, and sulfate salt deposits from the Atacama Desert, Chile, and Mojave Desert, California, USA. These results have implications for the calibration and use of O isotope data in studies of SO42- sources and reaction mechanisms.

  5. Protein Precipitation Using Ammonium Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2016-01-01

    The basic theory of protein precipitation by addition of ammonium sulfate is presented and the most common applications are listed, Tables are provided for calculating the appropriate amount of ammonium sulfate to add to a particular protein solution. PMID:18429073

  6. Co-precipitation of radium with barium and strontium sulfate and its impact on the fate of radium during treatment of produced water from unconventional gas extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tieyuan; Gregory, Kelvin; Hammack, Richard W; Vidic, Radisav D

    2014-04-15

    Radium occurs in flowback and produced waters from hydraulic fracturing for unconventional gas extraction along with high concentrations of barium and strontium and elevated salinity. Radium is often removed from this wastewater by co-precipitation with barium or other alkaline earth metals. The distribution equation for Ra in the precipitate is derived from the equilibrium of the lattice replacement reaction (inclusion) between the Ra(2+) ion and the carrier ions (e.g., Ba(2+) and Sr(2+)) in aqueous and solid phases and is often applied to describe the fate of radium in these systems. Although the theoretical distribution coefficient for Ra-SrSO4 (Kd = 237) is much larger than that for Ra-BaSO4 (Kd = 1.54), previous studies have focused on Ra-BaSO4 equilibrium. This study evaluates the equilibria and kinetics of co-precipitation reactions in Ra-Ba-SO4 and Ra-Sr-SO4 binary systems and the Ra-Ba-Sr-SO4 ternary system under varying ionic strength (IS) conditions that are representative of brines generated during unconventional gas extraction. Results show that radium removal generally follows the theoretical distribution law in binary systems and is enhanced in the Ra-Ba-SO4 system and restrained in the Ra-Sr-SO4 system by high IS. However, the experimental distribution coefficient (Kd') varies widely and cannot be accurately described by the distribution equation, which depends on IS, kinetics of carrier precipitation and does not account for radium removal by adsorption. Radium removal in the ternary system is controlled by the co-precipitation of Ra-Ba-SO4, which is attributed to the rapid BaSO4 nucleation rate and closer ionic radii of Ra(2+) with Ba(2+) than with Sr(2+). Carrier (i.e., barite) recycling during water treatment was shown to be effective in enhancing radium removal even after co-precipitation was completed. Calculations based on experimental results show that Ra levels in the precipitate generated in centralized waste treatment facilities far exceed regulatory limits for disposal in municipal sanitary landfills and require careful monitoring of allowed source term loading (ASTL) for technically enhanced naturally occurring materials (TENORM) in these landfills. Several alternatives for sustainable management of TENORM are discussed. PMID:24670034

  7. Protein Precipitation Using Ammonium Sulfate.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The basic theory of protein precipitation by addition of ammonium sulfate is presented, and the most common applications are listed. Tables are provided for calculating the appropriate amount of ammonium sulfate to add to a particular protein solution. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27038272

  8. Radiation dose in mass screening for gastric cancer with high-concentration barium sulfate compared with moderate-concentration barium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Azuma, M; Kuroda, C; Kubo, T; Yabunaka, K; Yamazaki, H; Katsuda, T; Takeda, Y

    2009-06-01

    Recently, high-concentration barium sulfate has been developed and is used in many medical facilities. This study compared radiation dose using high-concentration and moderate-concentration barium sulfate. The dose was evaluated with an experimental method using a gastric phantom and with a clinical examination. In the former, the dose and X-ray tube load were measured on the phantom with two concentrations of barium sulfate. In the latter, the fluoroscopic dose-area product (DAP), the radiographic DAP and their sum, the total DAP, were investigated in 150 subjects (112 males, 38 females) treated with both concentrations of barium sulfate. The effective dose was calculated by the software of PCXMC in every case. The results of the experimental evaluation indicated that the effective dose and X-ray tube load were greater with high-concentration barium sulfate than with moderate-concentration barium sulfate (p < 0.05). The results of the clinical evaluation indicated that the fluoroscopic DAP was greater with moderate-concentration barium sulfate than with high-concentration barium sulfate (p < 0.05), but the radiographic DAP was quite the reverse, so the total DAP and effective dose were almost same with both concentrations of barium sulfate. We conclude that high-concentration barium sulfate does not increase radiation dose in mass screening for gastric cancer. PMID:19623859

  9. Precipitation of Calcium, Magnesium, Strontium and Barium in Tissues of Four Acacia Species (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae)

    PubMed Central

    He, Honghua; Bleby, Timothy M.; Veneklaas, Erik J.; Lambers, Hans; Kuo, John

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation of calcium in plants is common. There are abundant studies on the uptake and content of magnesium, strontium and barium, which have similar chemical properties to calcium, in comparison with those of calcium in plants, but studies on co-precipitation of these elements with calcium in plants are rare. In this study, we compared morphologies, distributional patterns, and elemental compositions of crystals in tissues of four Acacia species grown in the field as well as in the glasshouse. A comparison was also made of field-grown plants and glasshouse-grown plants, and of phyllodes of different ages for each species. Crystals of various morphologies and distributional patterns were observed in the four Acacia species studied. Magnesium, strontium and barium were precipitated together with calcium, mainly in phyllodes of the four Acacia species, and sometimes in branchlets and primary roots. These elements were most likely precipitated in forms of oxalate and sulfate in various tissues, including epidermis, mesophyll, parenchyma, sclerenchyma (fibre cells), pith, pith ray and cortex. In most cases, precipitation of calcium, magnesium, strontium and barium was biologically induced, and elements precipitated differed between soil types, plant species, and tissues within an individual plant; the precipitation was also related to tissue age. Formation of crystals containing these elements might play a role in regulating and detoxifying these elements in plants, and protecting the plants against herbivory. PMID:22848528

  10. Comparison of the reflectance characteristics of polytetrafluoroethylene and barium sulfate paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, C. L.; Schutt, J. B.; Shai, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of the directional reflectance measurements taken on two tetrafluorethylene (TFE) paints formulated with silicone binders. Both paints are found to be more Lambertian than barium sulfate paint and pressed powder, although the pigment to binder ratios for barium sulfate and TFE paints are about 133 and 3.3 to 1, respectively. The TFE paints exhibit total visible reflectances above 90 percent and offer surfaces that are not significantly affected by water.

  11. BARIUM RECOVERY PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Blanco, R.E.

    1959-07-21

    A method of separating barium from nuclear fission products is described. In accordance with the invention, barium may be recovered from an acidic solution of neutron-irradiated fissionable material by carrying ihe barium cut of solution as a sulfate with lead as a carrier and then dissolving the barium-containing precipitate in an aqueous solution of an aliphatic diamine chelating reagent. The barium values together with certain other metallic values present in the diamine solution are then absorbed onto a cation exchange resin and the barium is selectively eluted from the resin bed with concentrated nitric acid.

  12. Nanofunctionalized zirconia and barium sulfate particles as bone cement additives.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Riaz; Ercan, Batur; Qiao, Alex; Webster, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Zirconia (ZrO(2)) and barium sulfate (BaSO(4)) particles were introduced into a methyl methacrylate monomer (MMA) solution with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) beads during polymerization to develop the following novel bone cements: bone cements with unfunctionalized ZrO(2) micron particles, bone cements with unfunctionalized ZrO(2) nanoparticles, bone cements with ZrO(2) nanoparticles functionalized with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TMS), bone cements with unfunctionalized BaSO(4) micron particles, bone cements with unfunctionalized BaSO(4) nanoparticles, and bone cements with BaSO(4) nanoparticles functionalized with TMS. Results demonstrated that in vitro osteoblast (bone-forming cell) densities were greater on bone cements containing BaSO(4) ceramic particles after four hours compared to control unmodified bone cements. Osteoblast densities were also greater on bone cements containing all of the ceramic particles after 24 hours compared to unmodified bone cements, particularly those bone cements containing nanofunctionalized ceramic particles. Bone cements containing ceramic particles demonstrated significantly altered mechanical properties; specifically, under tensile loading, plain bone cements and bone cements containing unfunctionalized ceramic particles exhibited brittle failure modes whereas bone cements containing nanofunctionalized ceramic particles exhibited plastic failure modes. Finally, all bone cements containing ceramic particles possessed greater radio-opacity than unmodified bone cements. In summary, the results of this study demonstrated a positive impact on the properties of traditional bone cements for orthopedic applications with the addition of unfunctionalized and TMS functionalized ceramic nanoparticles. PMID:20161983

  13. Development and Demonstration of a Sulfate Precipitation Process for Hanford Waste Tank 241-AN-107

    SciTech Connect

    SK Fiskum; DE Kurath; BM Rapko

    2000-08-16

    A series of precipitation experiments were conducted on Hanford waste tank 241-AN-107 samples in an effort to remove sulfate from the matrix. Calcium nitrate was added directly to AN-107 sub-samples to yield several combinations of Ca:CO{sub 3} mole ratios spanning a range of 0:1 to 3:1 to remove carbonate as insoluble CaCO{sub 3}. Similarly barium nitrate was added directly to the AN-107 aliquots, or to the calcium pretreated AN-107 aliquots, giving of Ba:SO{sub 4} mole ratios spanning a range of 1:1 to 5:1 to precipitate sulfate as BaSO{sub 4}. Initial bulk carbonate removal was required for successful follow-on barium sulfate precipitation. A {ge} 1:1 mole ratio of Ca:CO{sub 3} was found to lower the carbonate concentration such that Ba would react preferentially with the sulfate. A follow-on 1:1 mole ratio of Ba:SO{sub 4} resulted in 70% sulfate removal. The experiment was scaled up with a 735-mL aliquot of AN-107 for more complete testing. Calcium carbonate and barium sulfate settling rates were determined and fates of selected cations, anions, and radionuclides were followed through the various process steps. Seventy percent of the sulfate was removed in the scale-up test while recovering 63% of the filtrate volume. Surprisingly, during the scale-up test a sub-sample of the CaCO{sub 3}/241-AN-107 slurry was found to lose fluidity upon standing for {le} 2 days. Metathesis with BaCO{sub 3} at ambient temperature was also evaluated using batch contacts at various BaCO{sub 3}:SO{sub 4} mole ratios with no measurable success.

  14. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: MAJOR BARIUM CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes data on air emissions from the production of major barium chemicals. Compounds studied include barium sulfide, barium carbonate, barium chloride, barium hydroxide, and barium sulfate. In order to evaluate potential environmental effects the source severity,...

  15. Dissolving barium sulfate scale with aqueous solutions of salts of carboxymethyl monocyclic macrocyclic polyamines

    SciTech Connect

    De Jong, R.; Torny-Schutte, G.J.; Reinhoudt, D.N.

    1980-02-26

    Barium sulfate scale can be removed from remote locations such as those in or around the borehole of a well extending into a subterranean earth formation by contacting the scale with an aqueous solution consisting essentially of water, a monovalent cation salt of a monocyclic macrocylic polyamine containing at least 2 nitrogen-linked carboxymethyl groups and enough monovalent basic compound to provide a solution pH of approximately 8. 5 claims.

  16. EPR dosimetric properties of nano-barium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboelezz, E.; Hassan, G. M.; Sharaf, M. A.; El-Khodary, A.

    2015-01-01

    Nano/micro BaSO4 were prepared through the co-precipitation method to measure ionizing radiation doses using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The nano-BaSO4 sample was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The dose response and fading properties of nano- and micro-phase BaSO4 were compared in EPR spectra. The prepared nano- and micro-BaSO4 samples have the same hole and electron centers, which may be attributed to SO4- and SO3-, respectively. The dosimetric signals for prepared nano- and micro-BaSO4 have spectroscopic splitting factor (g) with values 2.00250.0006 and 2.00270.0006, respectively. The nanocrystalline sample has a linear ?-ray dose response over the range 0.4 Gy-1 kGy. The performance parameters which including detection limit and critical level calculated from weighted and unweighted least-squares fitting. The sensitivity of nano-BaSO4 to ?-ray is one and a half times more than alanine. The lifetime and activation energy for nano-BaSO4 were estimated by conducting a thermal stability study, and were 5.71.1104 years and 0.730.14 eV, respectively. The combined and expanded uncertainties accompanying measurements were 3.89% and 7.78%, respectively.

  17. Reactions of calcium orthosilicate and barium zirconate with oxides and sulfates of various elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1979-01-01

    Calcium orthosilicate and barium zirconate were evaluated as the insulation layer of thermal barrier coatings for air cooled gas turbine components. Their reactions with various oxides and sulfates were studied at 1100 C and 1300 C for times ranging up to 400 and 200 hours, respectively. These oxides and sulfates represent potential impurities or additives in gas turbine fuels and in turbine combustion air, as well as elements of potential bond coat alloys. The phase compositions of the reaction products were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. BaZrO3 and 2CaO-SiO2 both reacted with P2O5, V2O5, Cr2O3, Al2O3, and SiO2. In addition, 2CaO-SiO2 reacted with Na2O, BaO, MgO, and CoO and BaZrO3 reacted with Fe2O3.

  18. Physiologic Studies of the Pulmonary Capillary Bed after Barium Sulfate Embolization*

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Walter J.; Waldhausen, John A.

    1967-01-01

    22 anesthetized dogs were given a barium sulfate suspension intravenously in a dose sufficient to double mean pulmonary artery pressure. 10 sec breath-holding carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO10) was measured before and after this standard embolization in each dog. No post-embolic decrease in DLCO10 was observed. In the study of this apparent paradox, it was found that the potential for further increase in DLCO10 during exercise remained after embolization. During rest prolongation of breath holding to 60 sec decreased CO absorption significantly more in the embolized than in the nonembolized dogs. While DLCO10 was not affected by standard barium embolization, oxygen diffusing capacity was clearly decreased. The bronchial collateral circulation did not participate in preventing a DLCO10 decrease after embolization since surgical interruption of the bronchial circulation did not alter the response to barium. Microscopic examination of lung sections taken after standard embolization showed plugging of precapillary vessels in the 40-50 μ range. These studies suggest that acute precapillary embolic obstruction of vessels of this size interferes remarkably little with CO absorption over short periods of time, probably because of continued CO absorption in portions of the capillary net distal to the sites of impaction. The remarkable anastomotic nature of this capillary network with multiple sources of access possibly provides the anatomic basis for this observation. This study demonstrates a clear dissociation between acute changes in pulmonary vascular resistance and DLCO10—both during rest and exercise. Images PMID:6061739

  19. Barium Sulfate

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the esophagus (tube that connects the mouth and stomach), stomach, and intestine using x-rays or computed tomography ( ... contrast media. It works by coating the esophagus, stomach, or intestine with a material that is not ...

  20. Viscosity measurements of barium sulfate mixtures for use in motility studies of the pharynx and esophagus.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Brasseur, J G; Kern, M K; Dodds, W J

    1992-01-01

    Detailed viscosity measurements have been made of barium sulfate mixtures over a wide range of viscosities for use in radiography of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. A new methodology was developed for more accurate estimation of viscosity in non-Newtonian fluids in conventional cylinder-type viscometers. As base cases, the variation of viscosity with shear rate was measured for standard commercial mixes of e.z.hd (250% w/v) and a diluted mixture of liquid e.z.paque (40% w/v). These suspensions are strongly shear thinning at low shear rates. Above about 3s-1 the viscosity is nearly constant, but relatively low. To increase the viscosity of the barium sulfate mixture, Knott's strawberry syrup was mixed to different proportions with e.z.hd powder. In this way viscosity was systematically increased to values 130,000 times that of water. For these mixtures the variation of viscosity with temperature, and the change in mixture density with powder-syrup ratio are documented. From least-square fits through the data, simple mathematical formulas are derived for approximate calculation of viscosity as a function of mixture ratio and temperature. These empirical formulas should be useful in the design of "test kits" for systematic study for pharyngeal and esophageal motility, and clinical analysis of motility disorders as they relate to bolus consistency. PMID:1424824

  1. A simple method based on the application of a CCD camera as a sensor to detect low concentrations of barium sulfate in suspension.

    PubMed

    de Sena, Rodrigo Caciano; Soares, Matheus; Pereira, Maria Luiza Oliveira; da Silva, Rogério Cruz Domingues; do Rosário, Francisca Ferreira; da Silva, Joao Francisco Cajaiba

    2011-01-01

    The development of a simple, rapid and low cost method based on video image analysis and aimed at the detection of low concentrations of precipitated barium sulfate is described. The proposed system is basically composed of a webcam with a CCD sensor and a conventional dichroic lamp. For this purpose, software for processing and analyzing the digital images based on the RGB (Red, Green and Blue) color system was developed. The proposed method had shown very good repeatability and linearity and also presented higher sensitivity than the standard turbidimetric method. The developed method is presented as a simple alternative for future applications in the study of precipitations of inorganic salts and also for detecting the crystallization of organic compounds. PMID:22346607

  2. Diagnostic Validity of High-Density Barium Sulfate in Gastric Cancer Screening: Follow-up of Screenees by Record Linkage with the Osaka Cancer Registry

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kenyu; Yamazaki, Hideo; Kuroda, Chikazumi; Kubo, Tsugio; Oshima, Akira; Katsuda, Toshizo; Kuwano, Tadao; Takeda, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    Background The use of high-density barium sulfate was recommended by the Japan Society of Gastroenterological Cancer Screening (JSGCS) in 2004. We evaluated the diagnostic validity of gastric cancer screening that used high-density barium sulfate. Methods The study subjects were 171 833 residents of Osaka, Japan who underwent gastric cancer screening tests at the Osaka Cancer Prevention and Detection Center during the period from 1 January 2000 through 31 December 2001. Screening was conducted using either high-density barium sulfate (n = 48 336) or moderate-density barium sulfate (n = 123 497). The subjects were followed up and their medical records were linked to those of the Osaka Cancer Registry through 31 December 2002. The results of follow-up during 1 year were defined as the gold standard, and test performance values were calculated. Results The sensitivity and specificity of the screening test using moderate-density barium sulfate were 92.3% and 91.0%, respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity of the high-density barium test were 91.8% and 91.4%, respectively. The results of area under receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed no significant difference between the 2 screening tests. Conclusions Screening tests using high- and moderate-density barium sulfate had similar validity, as determined by sensitivity, specificity, and ROC curve analysis. PMID:20551581

  3. Sulfate-reducing bacteria release barium and radium from naturally occurring radioactive material in oil-field barite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, E.J.P.; Landa, E.R.; Kraemer, T.; Zielinski, R.

    2001-01-01

    Scale and sludge deposits formed during oil production can contain elevated levels of Ra, often coprecipitated with barium sulfate (barite). The potential for sulfate-reducing bacteria to release 226 Ra and Ba (a Ra analog) from oil-field barite was evaluated. The concentration of dissolved Ba increased when samples containing pipe scale, tank sludge, or oil-field brine pond sediment were incubated with sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio sp., Str LZKI, isolated from an oil-field brine pond. However, Ba release was not stoichiometric with sulfide production in oil-field samples, and <0.1% of the Ba was released. Potential for the release of 226Ra was demonstrated, and the 226 Ra release associated with sulfate-reducing activity was predictable from the amount of Ba released. As with Ba, only a fraction of the 226Ra expected from the amount of sulfide produced was released, and most of the Ra remained associated with the solid material.

  4. Fabrication and surface properties of hydrophobic barium sulfate aggregates based on sodium cocoate modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Linna; Wang, Guangxiu; Cao, Rong; Yang, Chun; Chen, Xi

    2014-10-01

    Hydrophobic barium sulfate aggregates were fabricated by the direction of cocoate anions. At 30 °C, when the weight ratio of sodium cocoate to BaSO4 particles was 2.0 wt.%, the active ratio of the product reached 99.43% and the contact angle was greater than 120°. This method could not only simplify the complex modification process, but reduce energy consumption. The surface morphology, chemical structure and composition of BaSO4 aggregates were characterized by SEM, XRD, and FTIR. The results indicated that the as-synthesized BaSO4 particles were almond-liked and were composed of many interconnected nanoballs and that their surfaces were affected by cocoate anions. The adsorption of cocoate anions reversed the charge and weakened the surface polarity of BaSO4 particles, driving the formation of aggregates. And cocoate anions induced a change of the BaSO4 particles surface from hydrophilic to hydrophobic by a self-assembly and transformation process. Due to the self-assembled structure and the surface hydrophobicity, when adding the hydrophobic BaSO4 into PVC, the mechanical properties of PVC composite materials were significantly improved.

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Sulfate in Water by Indirect EDTA Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belle-Oudry, Deirdre

    2008-01-01

    The determination of sulfate concentration in water by indirect EDTA titration is an instructive experiment that is easily implemented in an analytical chemistry laboratory course. A water sample is treated with excess barium chloride to precipitate sulfate ions as BaSO[subscript 4](s). The unprecipitated barium ions are then titrated with EDTA.…

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Sulfate in Water by Indirect EDTA Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belle-Oudry, Deirdre

    2008-01-01

    The determination of sulfate concentration in water by indirect EDTA titration is an instructive experiment that is easily implemented in an analytical chemistry laboratory course. A water sample is treated with excess barium chloride to precipitate sulfate ions as BaSO[subscript 4](s). The unprecipitated barium ions are then titrated with EDTA.

  7. Precipitation method for barium metaborate (BaB2O4) synthesis from borax solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akşener, Eymen; Figen, Aysel Kantürk; Pişkin, Sabriye

    2013-12-01

    In this study, barium metaborate (BaB2O4, BMB) synthesis from the borax solution was carried out. BMB currently is used in production of ceramic glazes, luminophors, oxide cathodes as well as additives to pigments for aqueous emulsion paints and also β-BaB2O4 single crystals are the best candidate for fabrication of solid-state UV lasers operating at a wavelength of 200 nm due to excellent nonlinear optical properties. In the present study, synthesis was carried out from the borax solution (Na2B4O7ṡ10H2O, BDH) and barium chloride (BaCI2ṡ2H2O, Ba) in the glass-batch reactor with stirring. The effect of, times (5-15 min), molar ratio [stoich.ration (1.0:2.0), 1.25:2.0, 1.5:2.0, 2.5:2:0, 3.0:2.0, 3.5:2.0,4.0:2.0, 5.0:2.0] and also crystallization time (2-6 hour) on the BMB yield (%) was investigated at 80 °C reaction temperature. It is found that, BMB precipitation synthesis with 90 % yield can be performed from 0.50 molar ration (BDH:Ba), under 80 °C, 15 minute, and 6 hours crystallization time. The structural properties of BMB powders were characterized by using XRD, FT-IR and DTA-TG instrumental analysis technique.

  8. Bioabsorbable bone fixation plates for X-ray imaging diagnosis by a radiopaque layer of barium sulfate and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid).

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung Yoon; Hur, Woojune; Kim, Byeung Kyu; Shasteen, Catherine; Kim, Myung Hun; Choi, La Mee; Lee, Seung Ho; Park, Chun Gwon; Park, Min; Min, Hye Sook; Kim, Sukwha; Choi, Tae Hyun; Choy, Young Bin

    2015-04-01

    Bone fixation systems made of biodegradable polymers are radiolucent, making post-operative diagnosis with X-ray imaging a challenge. In this study, to allow X-ray visibility, we separately prepared a radiopaque layer and attached it to a bioabsorbable bone plate approved for clinical use (Inion, Finland). We employed barium sulfate as a radiopaque material due to the high X-ray attenuation coefficient of barium (2.196 cm(2) /g). The radiopaque layer was composed of a fine powder of barium sulfate bound to a biodegradable material, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), to allow layer degradation similar to the original Inion bone plate. In this study, we varied the mass ratio of barium sulfate and PLGA in the layer between 3:1 w/w and 10:1 w/w to modulate the degree and longevity of X-ray visibility. All radiopaque plates herein were visible via X-ray, both in vitro and in vivo, for up to 40 days. For all layer types, the radio-opacity decreased with time due to the swelling and degradation of PLGA, and the change in the layer shape was more apparent for layers with a higher PLGA content. The radiopaque plates released, at most, 0.5 mg of barium sulfate every 2 days in a simulated in vitro environment, which did not appear to affect the cytotoxicity. The radiopaque plates also exhibited good biocompatibility, similar to that of the Inion plate. Therefore, we concluded that the barium sulfate-based, biodegradable plate prepared in this work has the potential to be used as a fixation device with both X-ray visibility and biocompatibility. PMID:24964903

  9. BARIUM BIOAVAILABILITY AS THE CHLORIDE, SULFATE, OR CARBONATE SALT IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to determine how the bioavailability of a low concentration of barium (Ba) in drinking water is affected by anion speciation. Male Sprague Dawley rats weighing 250-300 grams were maintained on a diet of less than 1 mg Ba/kg of food for at least 1 month pr...

  10. Barium borosilicate glass a potential matrix for immobilization of sulfate bearing high-level radioactive liquid waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, C. P.; Mishra, R. K.; Sengupta, P.; Kumar, Amar; Das, D.; Kale, G. B.; Raj, Kanwar

    2006-11-01

    Borosilicate glass formulations adopted worldwide for immobilization of high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) is not suitable for sulphate bearing HLW, because of its low solubility in such glass. A suitable glass matrix based on barium borosilicate has been developed for immobilization of sulphate bearing HLW. Various compositions based on different glass formulations were made to examine compatibility with waste oxide with around 10 wt% sulfate content. The vitrified waste product obtained from barium borosilicate glass matrix was extensively evaluated for its characteristic properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, glass transition temperature, thermal conductivity, impact strength, etc. using appropriate techniques. Process parameters like melt viscosity and pour temperature were also determined. It is found that SB-44 glass composition (SiO 2: 30.5 wt%, B 2O 3: 20.0 wt%, Na 2O: 9.5 wt% and BaO: 19.0 wt%) can be safely loaded with 21 wt% waste oxide without any phase separation. The other product qualities of SB-44 waste glass are also found to be on a par with internationally adopted waste glass matrices. This formulation has been successfully implemented in plant scale.

  11. Use of 24 kHz ultrasound to improve sulfate precipitation from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Davies, Lisa A; Dargue, Andrew; Dean, John R; Deary, Michael E

    2015-03-01

    Elevated sulfate concentrations in industrial effluent can lead to a number of significant problems, the most serious of which is the corrosion of concrete sewers as a result of hydrogen sulfide induced biogenic sulfuric acid attack; hydrogen sulfide can also create odor nuisance problems. The most common treatment process for sulfate removal from wastewaters is to precipitate it as gypsum using lime addition. Nevertheless, meeting discharge consent limits for sulfate can often present practical challenges due to the solubility of gypsum and so there is a need to investigate technological solutions that might provide for more consistent sulfate removal. This paper reports on the application of ultrasound during the sulfate precipitation process. We show that with as little as 10 s sonication at 24 kHz, significant increases in the rate of sulfate precipitation are observed. Particle size analysis, pH profiles and SEM micrographs, suggest that the likely mode of action is disaggregation of the calcium hydroxide particles, giving a greater solid-liquid interface, thus resulting in a faster dissolution rate and more readily available calcium ions. A range of experimental variables are studied, including the duration and power of sonication, as well as initial sulfate concentration and the effect of changing the time at which sonication is applied. For both sonicated and non-sonicated samples, precipitation commences almost immediately that the lime is added and so induction time is not an issue in this system. PMID:25218769

  12. Co-precipitation of yttrium and barium fluorides from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Pavel P.; Mayakova, Maria N.; Kuznetsov, Sergey V.; Voronov, Valery V.; Ermakov, Roman P.; Samarina, Kseniya S.; Popov, Arthur I.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: ► BaF{sub 2}–YF{sub 3} system has been studied under the non-equilibrium ambient conditions. ► Ba{sub 1−x}Y{sub x}F{sub 2+x} (x = 0.35–0.75) solid solution phase has cubic fluorite-type structure. ► Ba{sub 1−x}Y{sub x}F{sub 2+x} cubic crystal lattice parameter a{sub 0} does not change monotonously. ► Different types of lattice defects determine a dependency from sample composition. ► (H{sub 3}O{sup +})Y{sub 3}F{sub 10}{sup −}·nH{sub 2}O phase precipitates from HF aqueous solutions instead of YF{sub 3}·nH{sub 2}O. -- Abstract: Co-precipitation of barium and yttrium fluorides from aqueous solutions at room temperature produced non-equilibrium Ba{sub 1−x}Y{sub x}F{sub 2+x} nanofluoride phase with face-centered cubic crystal lattice of fluorite-type with the composition interval of the homogeneity for x = 0.35–0.75. Lattice parameter a of this solid solution nanophase varied as a function of the sample chemical composition in a complex manner with two areas of linear dependency, from x = 0.35 to 0.45 and from x = 0.50 to 0.75. A plausible explanation of this phenomenon included a change of the type of crystal lattice defects and the manner of their population with the corresponding ions. An increase of the relative amount of yttrium in the HF reaction system led to the formation of hydroxonium salt of decafluorotriyttrium acid, (H{sub 3}O{sup +})Y{sub 3}F{sub 10}{sup −}·nH{sub 2}O, instead of expected YF{sub 3} hydrate. No formation of oxyfluoride phases under acidic conditions has been observed.

  13. Effect of dispersant on preparation of barium-strontium titanate powders through oxalate co-precipitation method

    SciTech Connect

    Li Mingli Xu Mingxia

    2009-04-02

    The quantitative precipitation of barium-strontium titanyl oxalate: (Ba{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}TiO(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O, BSTO) precursor powders were successfully prepared through oxalate co-precipitation method. The pyrolysis of BSTO at 800 deg. C/4 h produced the barium-strontium titanate (Ba{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}TiO{sub 3}, BST) powders. Two kinds of dispersants namely ammonium salt of poly mathacrylic acid (PMAA-NH{sub 4}) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were added respectively during the co-precipitation procedure. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), etc. Experimental results show that the addition of the dispersants reduced the productive rate of BST powders. The BSTO and BST powders obtained by aforementioned technique without dispersants were homogeneous with quasi-orbicular morphology. The particles grew into spindle shape with the effect of PEG. The morphology homogeneity was broke with small grains as well as large agglomerated particles concurrent when PMAA-NH{sub 4} was added. The mechanism of the effect of the two dispersants was investigated in detail.

  14. PROCESS USING POTASSIUM LANTHANUM SULFATE FOR FORMING A CARRIER PRECIPITATE FOR PLUTONIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Angerman, A.A.

    1958-10-21

    A process is presented for recovering plutonium values in an oxidation state not greater than +4 from fluoride-soluble fission products. The process consists of adding to an aqueous acidic solution of such plutonium values a crystalline potassium lanthanum sulfate precipitate which carries the plutonium values from the solution.

  15. Reduction and precipitation of neptunium(V) by sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J. E.; Rittmann, B. E.; Reed, D. T.

    1999-10-21

    Migration of neptunium, as NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, has been identified as a potentially important pathway for actinide release at nuclear waste repositories and existing sites of subsurface contamination. Reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) will likely reduce its volubility, resulting in lowered subsurface migration. The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to utilize Np(V) as an electron acceptor was investigated, because these bacteria are active in many anaerobic aquifers and are known to facilitate the reduction of metals and radionuclides. Pure and mixed cultures of SRB were able to precipitate neptunium during utilization of pyruvate, lactate, and hydrogen as electron donors in the presence and absence of sulfate. The neptunium in the precipitate was identified as Np(IV) using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis. In mixed-culture studies, the addition of hydrogen to consortia grown by pyruvate fermentation stimulated neptunium reduction and precipitation. Experiments with pure cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, growing by lactate fermentation in the absence of sulfate or by sulfate reduction, confirm that the organism is active in neptunium reduction and precipitation. Based on our results, the activity of SRB in the subsurface may have a significant, and potentially beneficial, impact on actinide mobility by reducing neptunium volubility.

  16. PRIMARY SULFATE EMISSION FACTORS FOR THE NAPAP (NATIONAL ACID PRECIPITATION ASSESSMENT PROGRAM) EMISSIONS INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an estimation of primary sulfate emission factors for use in the 1980 and 1985 National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) emissions inventories. The estimates were developed from an assessment of existing measurements data for source catego...

  17. Spontaneous precipitation of calcium carbonate in the presence of chondroitin sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoli, F.; Dalas, E.

    2000-08-01

    The kinetics of spontaneous precipitation of vaterite (CaCO 3) from an aqueous solution in the presence of chondroitin sulfates (CSA, CSB, CSC) was investigated by the constant composition method. The presence of chondroitin sulfate in the supersaturated solution resulted in a reduction of the crystal growth rate by 23-65%. Induction times preceding vaterite precipitation were inversely proportional to the solution's supersaturation and a surface energy of 52 mJ m -2 was calculated according to the classical nucleation theory. Chondroitin sulfate influences the particle size distribution of the vaterite crystals formed and stabilizing this mineral phase, preventing the transformation to calcite. The apparent order found from kinetics data was n>2, thus suggesting a surface nucleation mechanism.

  18. Modeling the influence of decomposing organic solids on sulfate reduction rates for iron precipitation.

    PubMed

    Hemsi, Paulo S; Shackelford, Charles D; Figueroa, Linda A

    2005-05-01

    The influence of decomposing organic solids on sulfate (S04(2-)) reduction rates for metals precipitation in sulfate-reducing systems, such as in bioreactors and permeable reactive barriers for treatment of acid mine drainage, is modeled. The results are evaluated by comparing the model simulations with published experimental data for two single-substrate and two multiple-substrate batch equilibrium experiments. The comparisons are based on the temporal trends in SO4(2-), ferrous iron (Fe2+), and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) concentrations, as well as on rates of sulfate reduction. The temporal behaviors of organic solid materials, dissolved organic substrates, and different bacterial populations also are simulated. The simulated results using Contois kinetics for polysaccharide decomposition, Monod kinetics for lactate-based sulfate reduction, instantaneous or kinetically controlled precipitation of ferrous iron mono-sulfide (FeS), and partial volatilization of H2S to the gas phase compare favorably with the experimental data. When Contois kinetics of polysaccharide decomposition is replaced by first-order kinetics to simulate one of the single-substrate batch experiments, a comparatively poorer approximation of the rates of sulfate reduction is obtained. The effect of sewage sludge in boosting the short-term rate of sulfate reduction in one of the multiple-substrate experiments also is approximated reasonably well. The results illustrate the importance of the type of kinetics used to describe the decomposition of organic solids on metals precipitation in sulfate-reducing systems as well as the potential application of the model as a predictive tool for assisting in the design of similar biochemical systems. PMID:15926572

  19. Behavior of Carbonate Associated Sulfate During Authigenic Carbonates Precipitation at Cold Seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D.; Peng, Y.; Bao, H.; Roberts, H. H.

    2011-12-01

    The carbonate associated sulfate (CAS) has been widely used in investigating geochemistry of ancient seawater sulfate. The reliability of CAS as a proxy of contemporaneous seawater sulfate has been examined in multiple cases and the results have been somewhat assuring in most cases involving open ocean deposits. Many geological carbonate deposits, however, were the product of early diagenesis, the CAS behavior in them, especially among different carbonate mineral phases that are sensitive to microbial activity and pore-water chemistry have not been examined. Distinct mineral phases are occurring among modern cold-seep carbonates in the Gulf of Mexico, which provides us a unique opportunity to examine the relationship between mineral formation condition and the CAS within. We found that the CAS concentration in different minerals varies widely without a clear pattern. The δ34SCAS and δ18OCAS also vary considerably, ranging from 21.9% to 56.2% (V-CDT) and from 10.5% to 24.8% (V-SMOW), respectively. On δ34SCAS versus δ18OCAS plots, both aragonite and calcite show linear trends that project down toward those of open seawater sulfate. The trends suggest that sulfate has been isotopically modified to various degrees in pore fluids before being incorporated into carbonate lattice. The much narrower δ34SCAS and δ18OCAS ranges for aragonite than for calcite suggests a much "pickier" condition for aragonite formation during early diagenesis, which is consistent with the fact that aragonite is more prone to precipitate in high sulfate concentration environments. Our results suggest that concentration and isotopic composition of CAS in seep carbonates may be controlled by the supply of pore-water sulfate during carbonate precipitation. The reliability of CAS in carbonate of early diagenetic origin as a proxy of contemporaneous seawater sulfate is therefore questioned.

  20. Influence of ultrasonic treatment of zirconium-containing solutions on precipitation of basic zirconium sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Kurdyumov, G.M.; Davydova, I.N.; Sarukhanov, R.G.; Istomin-Kastrovskii, V.V.; Pokhodenko, V.N.

    1988-02-20

    The purpose of this work was to study the influence of ultrasonic (US) treatment of zirconium-containing solutions on the characteristics of hydrolytic precipitation of basic zirconium sulfate (BZS), and also on certain properties of BZS and of the zirconium dioxide obtained from it. It was shown that US treatment of zirconium-containing solutions results in depolymerization of polynuclear Zr(IV) complexes, as the result of which precipitation of basic zirconium sulfate from these solutions is more rapid and more complete. The influence of the conditions of US treatment on the particle size has been demonstrated; it is accordingly possible to obtain zirconium dioxide of regulated degree of dispersion from the precipitates.

  1. Presence of sulfate does not inhibit low-temperature dolomite precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; McKenzie, Judith A.; de Luca Rebello Wagener, Angela; Rivadeneyra, Maria A.; Vasconcelos, Crisógono

    2009-07-01

    The hypothesis that sulfate inhibits dolomite formation evolved from geochemical studies of porewaters from deep-sea sedimentary sequences and has been tested with hydrothermal experiments. We examined the sulfate inhibition factor using aerobic culture experiments with Virgibacillus marismortui and Halomonas meridiana, two moderately halophilic aerobic bacteria, which metabolize independent of sulfate concentration. The culture experiments were conducted at 25 and 35 °C using variable SO 42- concentrations (0, 14, 28 and 56 mM) and demonstrate that halophilic aerobic bacteria mediate direct precipitation of dolomite with or without SO 42- in the culture media which simulate dolomite occurrences commonly found under the Earth's surface conditions. Hence, we report that the presence of sulfate does not inhibit dolomite precipitation. Further, we hypothesize that, if sedimentary dolomite is a direct precipitate, as in our low-temperature culture experiments, the kinetic factors involved are likely to be quite different from those governing a dolomite replacement reaction, such as in hydrothermal experiments. Consequently, the occurrence and, presumably, growth of dolomite in SO 42--rich aerobic cultures may shed new light on the long-standing Dolomite Problem.

  2. Evaluation of radiation dose reduction during CT scans by using bismuth oxide and nano-barium sulfate shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoung, Youl-Hun

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the radiation dose reduction and the image quality during CT scanning by using a new dose reduction fiber sheet (DRFS) with commercially available bismuth shields. These DRFS, were composed of nano-barium sulfate (BaSO4) filling the gaps left by the large bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) particles. The radiation dose was measured five times at a direction of 12 o'clock from the center of the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) head phantom by using a CT ionization chamber to calculate an average value. The image quality of measured CT transverse images of the PMMA head phantom depended on the X-ray tube voltage and the type of shielding. Two regions of interest in the CT transverse images were chosen, one from the right area and the other from the left area under the surface of the PMMA head phantom and at a distance of ion chamber holes located in a direction of 12 o'clock from the center of the PMMA head phantom. The results of this study showed that the new DRFS shields could reduce the dosages by 15.61%, 23.05%, and 22.71% at 90 kVp, 120 kVp, and 140 kVp, respectively, than with these of a conventional bismuth shield of the same thickness while maintaining image quality. In addition, the DRFSs produced were about 25% thinness than conventional bismuth. We conclude, therefore, that a DRFS can replace conventional bismuth as a new shield.

  3. Speciation of iron and sulfate in acid waters: aqueous clusters to mineral precipitates.

    PubMed

    Majzlan, Juraj; Myneni, Satish C B

    2005-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) contaminates surface water bodies, groundwater, soils, and sediments at innumerable locations around the world. AMD usually originates by weathering of pyrite (FeS2) and is rich in Fe and sulfate. In this study, we investigated speciation of FeII, FeIII, and SO4 in acid waters by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The molalities of sulfate (15 mmol/ kg) and iron (10, 20, and 50 mmol/kg), and pH (1, 2, and 3) were chosen to mimic the concentration of ions in AMD waters. Sulfate and FeII either associate in outer-sphere complexes or do not associate at all. In contrast, sulfate interacts strongly with FeIII. The predominating species in FeIII-SO4 solutions are hydrogen-bonded complexes; inner-sphere complexes account only for 10+/-10% of the total sulfate. Our results show that the mode of interaction between FeIII and sulfate is similar in aqueous phase and in nanocrystalline precipitate schwertmannite (approximately FeO(OH)3/4(SO4)1/8). Because of this similarity, schwert-mannite should be the phase that controls solubility and availability of FeIII, SO4, and indirectly also other components in the AMD solutions. PMID:15667094

  4. Calcium sulfate precipitation in the presence of water-soluble polymers.

    PubMed

    Lioliou, Maria G; Paraskeva, Christakis A; Koutsoukos, Petros G; Payatakes, Alkiviades C

    2006-11-01

    The effect of four different polymers on the precipitation of calcium sulfate was investigated in the present work. The degree of inhibition was estimated from measurements of the calcium ion activity and from specific solution conductivity measurements in the supersaturated solutions during the course of the precipitation process. The effects of polyacrylic acid (PAA, three different polymers with average molecular weight 2000, 50,000, and 240,000, respectively) and of a co-polymer of PAA with polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSA, average molecular weight<20,000) were investigated with respect to their effect on the kinetics of spontaneous precipitation of calcium sulfate salts. The results of the kinetics experiments suggested that the spontaneous precipitation from supersaturated calcium sulfate solutions at 25 degrees C yielded exclusively calcium sulfate dihydrate (gypsum) both in the absence and in the presence of the polymeric additives. The induction times, preceding the formation of the solid increased in all cases in the presence of the polymeric additives. Polymer concentrations as low as 2.0 ppm increased induction time from practically zero to 10 min. The rates of precipitation were reduced according to the solutions content in the polymers added and precipitation was completely suppressed in the presence of 6.0 ppm of the polymers tested, depending on their molecular weight. The lower the molecular weight of PAA, the more efficient was the threshold inhibition and the stronger the reduction of the rates of spontaneous precipitation. PSA yielded the poorest inhibition efficiency in comparison with the PAA, possibly because of the relatively lower affinity of the sulfonate groups for the calcium ions of the surface of the solid forming. The kinetics results analysis assuming Langmuir-type adsorption of the polymeric molecules on the growing supercritical gypsum nuclei showed different affinity for the polymers tested in agreement with the respective inhibition efficiency, in the order: PAA1>PAA2>PSA>PAA3. The presence of the polymers in the supersaturated solutions resulted in modification of the precipitated gypsum crystals morphology. PMID:16920136

  5. Precipitation method for barium metaborate (BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}) synthesis from borax solution

    SciTech Connect

    Akşener, Eymen; Figen, Aysel Kantürk; Pişkin, Sabriye

    2013-12-16

    In this study, barium metaborate (BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, BMB) synthesis from the borax solution was carried out. BMB currently is used in production of ceramic glazes, luminophors, oxide cathodes as well as additives to pigments for aqueous emulsion paints and also β−BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} single crystals are the best candidate for fabrication of solid-state UV lasers operating at a wavelength of 200 nm due to excellent nonlinear optical properties. In the present study, synthesis was carried out from the borax solution (Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7⋅}10H{sub 2}O, BDH) and barium chloride (BaCI{sub 2⋅}2H{sub 2}O, Ba) in the glass-batch reactor with stirring. The effect of, times (5-15 min), molar ratio [stoich.ration (1.0:2.0), 1.25:2.0, 1.5:2.0, 2.5:2:0, 3.0:2.0, 3.5:2.0,4.0:2.0, 5.0:2.0] and also crystallization time (2-6 hour) on the BMB yield (%) was investigated at 80 °C reaction temperature. It is found that, BMB precipitation synthesis with 90 % yield can be performed from 0.50 molar ration (BDH:Ba), under 80 °C, 15 minute, and 6 hours crystallization time. The structural properties of BMB powders were characterized by using XRD, FT-IR and DTA-TG instrumental analysis technique.

  6. COMPARISON OF WET CHEMICAL AND INSTRUMENTAL METHODS FOR MEASURING AIRBORNE SULFATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four techniques for determination of water soluble sulfate in atmospheric samples were compared including the barium sulfate turbidimetric method, the Brosset (barium-Thorin) method, the automated barium-methylthymol blue procedure and a microchemical (barium-dinitro-sulfanazo II...

  7. Depletion of abundant plant RuBisCO protein using the protamine sulfate precipitation method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Ji; Lee, Hye Min; Wang, Yiming; Wu, Jingni; Kim, Sang Gon; Kang, Kyu Young; Park, Ki Hun; Kim, Yong Chul; Choi, In Soo; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Kim, Sun Tae

    2013-07-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is the most abundant plant leaf protein, hampering deep analysis of the leaf proteome. Here, we describe a novel protamine sulfate precipitation (PSP) method for the depletion of RuBisCO. For this purpose, soybean leaf total proteins were extracted using Tris-Mg/NP-40 extraction buffer. Obtained clear supernatant was subjected to the PSP method, followed by 13% SDS-PAGE analysis of total, PS-supernatant and -precipitation derived protein samples. In a dose-dependent experiment, 0.1% w/v PS was found to be sufficient for precipitating RuBisCO large and small subunits (LSU and SSU). Western blot analysis confirmed no detection of RuBisCO LSU in the PS-supernatant proteins. Application of this method to Arabidopsis, rice, and maize leaf proteins revealed results similar to soybean. Furthermore, 2DE analyses of PS-treated soybean leaf displayed enriched protein profile for the protein sample derived from the PS-supernatant than total proteins. Some enriched 2D spots were subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis and were successfully assigned for their protein identity. Hence, the PSP method is: (i) simple, fast, economical, and reproducible for RuBisCO precipitation from the plant leaf sample; (ii) applicable to both dicot and monocot plants; and (iii) suitable for downstream proteomics analysis. PMID:23576416

  8. Kinetics of sulfate reduction and sulfide precipitation rates in sediments of a bar-built estuary (Pescadero, California).

    PubMed

    Richards, Chandra M; Pallud, Céline

    2016-05-01

    The bar-built Pescadero Estuary in Northern California is a major fish rearing habitat, though recently threatened by near-annual fish kill events, which occur when the estuary transitions from closed to open state. The direct and indirect effects of hydrogen sulfide are suspected to play a role in these mortalities, but the spatial variability of hydrogen sulfide production and its link to fish kills remains poorly understood. Using flow-through reactors containing intact littoral sediment slices, we measured potential sulfate reduction rates, kinetic parameters of microbial sulfate reduction (Rmax, the maximum sulfate reduction rate, and Km, the half-saturation constant for sulfate), potential sulfide precipitation rates, and potential hydrogen sulfide export rates to water at four sites in the closed and open states. At all sites, the Michaelis-Menten kinetic rate equation adequately describes the utilization of sulfate by the complex resident microbial communities. We estimate that 94-96% of hydrogen sulfide produced through sulfate reduction precipitates in the sediment and that only 4-6% is exported to water, suggesting that elevated sulfide concentrations in water, which would affect fish through toxicity and oxygen consumption, cannot be responsible for fish deaths. However, the indirect effects of sulfide precipitates, which chemically deplete, contaminate, and acidify the water column during sediment re-suspension and re-oxidation in the transition from closed to open state, can be implicated in fish mortalities at Pescadero Estuary. PMID:26925545

  9. Radiographic anatomy and barium sulfate contrast transit time of the gastrointestinal tract of bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Grosset, Claire; Daniaux, Lise; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Weber, Ernest Scott; Zwingenberger, Allison; Paul-Murphy, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The positive contrast gastrointestinal study is a common non-invasive diagnostic technique that does not require anesthesia and enables good visualization of the digestive tract. Radiographic anatomy and reference intervals for gastrointestinal contrast transit time in inland bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) were established using seven animals administered 15 ml/kg of a 35% w/v suspension of barium by esophageal gavage. Dorso-ventral and lateral radiographic views were performed at 0, 15, 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 h, and then every 12 h up to 96 h after barium administration. Gastric emptying was complete at a median time of 10 h (range 4-24 h). Median jejunum and small intestinal emptying times were 1 h (range 30 min-2 h) and 29 h (range 24-48 h), respectively. Median transit time for cecum was 10 h (range 8-12 h). Median time for contrast to reach the colon was 31 h (range 12-72 h) after administration. Results were compared to those obtained in other reptilian species. This technique appeared safe in fasted bearded dragons and would be clinically applicable in other lizard species. PMID:24945023

  10. Influence of semi-batch operation on the precipitation of natrojarosite particles from sulfate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandré, Anne-Laure; Gaunand, Alain

    2012-03-01

    The precipitation of natrojarosite from iron sodium sulfate solutions has been investigated at temperatures close to the atmospheric boiling point, in batch and semi-batch conditions. Semi-batch conditions make it possible to maintain a weaker iron concentration in the stirred reactor, leading to lower supersaturations, closer to those in continuous and possibly seeded MSMPRs or tanks—in series units. In these reactors, primary and secondary nucleations are few, allowing the growth of pure mono-crystalline particles of controlled size and size dispersion. Both modi operandi lead to agglomerates made of crystals of cubic habit. The surface of cauliflower-like particles from the batch modus operandi displays overlaying crystals, of size between 100 and 400 nm. The particles from the semi-batch mode, with moderate iron addition, are rougher and show bigger intergrown constitutive crystals of size up to a few microns, which denotes lesser secondary nucleation and more growth. A model is developed to characterize iron(III) and sulfate speciation with non-ideal behavior in the mother solution. It is used to compare the variations of supersaturation in the reactor between the batch and the semi-batch conditions. During the first 500 min, the supersaturation resulting from a moderate addition of iron is 10,000-10 times lower than during batch kinetics, which agrees with the reduction of secondary nucleation suggested by scanning electron micrographs. The semi-batch technique, which can be combined with the addition of support particles, is worth further work, aiming to reduce secondary nucleation and to determine the crystallite growth rate expression of natrojarosite as a function of supersaturation, using the model of solution developed in this work.

  11. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Kopycki, Jakub; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2), photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS) was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly 13C/15N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. 2D 13C–13C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of 13C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, 13C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS 13C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive inhomogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that the effect of dehydration process indeed leads to changes of electronic structure of the bilin chromophore and a decrease in its mobility within the binding pocket, but not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely used in previous MAS NMR and crystallographic studies. AmS precipitation might nevertheless provide useful protein structure/functional information for full-length Cph1 in cases where neither X-ray crystallography nor conventional NMR methods are available. PMID:26284254

  12. Assessment of sulfate sources in high-elevation Asian precipitation using stable sulfur isotopes.

    PubMed

    Pruett, Lee E; Kreutz, Karl J; Wadleigh, Moire; Aizen, Vladimir

    2004-09-15

    Stable sulfur isotope measurements (delta34S) made on samples collected from a 2 m snowpit on the Inilchek Glacier, Tien Shan Mountains (42.16 degrees N, 80.25 degrees E, 5100 m) are used to estimate sources of sulfate (SO4(2-)) in high-elevation Central Asian precipitation. Comparison of snowpit oxygen isotope (delta18O) data with previous work constrains the age of the snowpit samples to the summer season during which they were retrieved (1999). Delta34S measurements were made at 10 cm resolution (20 samples total), with delta34S values ranging from 0.4/1000 during background ([SO4(2-)] < 1 microequiv L(-1)) periods to 19.4/1000 during a single high [SO4(2-)] event. On the basis of the significant correlation (r = 0.87) between [SO4(2-)] and delta34S values, coupled with major ion concentration time series and concentration ratios, we suggest a two-component mixing system consisting of evaporite dust and anthropogenic SO4(2-) to explain the observed delta34S values. Using a regression model, we estimate that during the 1999 summer season 60% of the deposited SO4(2-) was from an evaporite dust source, while 40% of the SO4(2-) was from anthropogenic sources. Due to the potentially large and unconstrained range of delta34S values for both evaporite and anthropogenic SO4(2-) sources in Asia, the error in our estimates is difficult to assess. However, the delta34S data from the 1999 Tien Shan snowpit provide the first unambiguous identification of evaporite and anthropogenic SO4(2-) in high-elevation Asian precipitation, and future ice core studies using improved analysis techniques and source delta34S values can provide detailed information on sulfur biogeochemistry and anthropogenic impacts in Asian alpine regions. PMID:15487779

  13. Evidence for Aqueously Precipitated Sulfates in Northeast Meridiani Using THEMIS and TES Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Melissa D.

    2005-01-01

    Recently aqueously deposited sulfate-rich bedrock was found at the MER-B Meridiani landing site [1]. Additional sulfate was observed from orbit by the Mars Express OMEGA instrument [2]. In this work, I present midinfrared spectral evidence (using THEMIS and TES) for sulfate in and around a channel deposit that lies to the northeast of the hematite- strewn plains of Meridiani at approx.2degN, 1degW (Fig. 1).

  14. Biodegradation of BTEX and Other Petroleum Hydrocarbons by Enhanced and Controlled Sulfate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Song Jin

    2007-07-01

    High concentrations of sulfide in the groundwater at a field site near South Lovedale, OK, were inhibiting sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) that are known to degrade contaminants including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m+p-xylenes (BTEX). Microcosms were established in the laboratory using groundwater and sediment collected from the field site and amended with various nutrient, substrate, and inhibitor treatments. All microcosms were initially amended with FeCl{sub 2} to induce FeS precipitation and, thereby, reduce sulfide concentrations. Complete removal of BTEX was observed within 39 days in treatments with various combinations of nutrient and substrate amendments. Results indicate that elevated concentration of sulfide is a limiting factor to BTEX biodegradation at this site, and that treating the groundwater with FeCl{sub 2} is an effective remedy to facilitate and enhance BTEX degradation by the indigenous SRB population. On another site in Moore, OK, studies were conducted to investigate barium in the groundwater. BTEX biodegradation by SRB is suspected to mobilize barium from its precipitants in groundwater. Data from microcosms demonstrated instantaneous precipitation of barium when sulfate was added; however, barium was detected redissolving for a short period and precipitating eventually, when active sulfate reduction was occurring and BTEX was degraded through the process. SEM elemental spectra of the evolved show that sulfur was not present, which may exclude BaSO{sub 4} and BaS as a possible precipitates. The XRD analysis suggests that barium probably ended in BaS complexing with other amorphous species. Results from this study suggest that SRB may be able to use the sulfate from barite (BaSO{sub 4}) as an electron acceptor, resulting in the release of free barium ions (Ba{sup 2+}), and re-precipitate it in BaS, which exposes more toxicity to human and ecological health.

  15. Modeling investigation of controlling factors in the increasing ratio of nitrate to non-seasalt sulfate in precipitation over Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itahashi, Syuichi; Uno, Itsushi; Hayami, Hiroshi; Fujita, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Anthropogenic emissions in East Asia have been increasing during the three decades since 1980, as the population of East Asia has grown and the economies in East Asian countries have expanded. This has been particularly true in China, where NOx emissions have been rising continuously. However, because of fuel-gas desulfurization systems introduced as part of China’s 11th Five-Year Plan (2006-2010), SO2 emissions in China reached a peak in 2005-2006 and have declined since then. These drastic changes in emission levels of acidifying species are likely to have caused substantial changes in the precipitation chemistry. The absolute concentration of compounds in precipitation is inherently linked to precipitation amount; therefore, we use the ratio of nitrate (NO) to non-seasalt sulfate (nss-SO2-) concentration in precipitation as an index for evaluating acidification, which we call Ratio. In this study, we analyzed the long-term behavior of Ratio in precipitation over the Japanese archipelago during 2000-2011 and estimated the factors responsible for changes in Ratio in precipitation by using a model simulation. This analysis showed that Ratio was relatively constant at 0.5-0.6 between 2000 and 2005, and subsequently increased to 0.6-0.7 between 2006 and 2011. These changes in Ratio corresponded remarkably well to the changes of NOx/SO2 emissions ratio in China; this correspondence suggests that anthropogenic emissions from China were responsible for most of the change in precipitation chemistry over Japan. Sensitivity analysis elucidated that the increase in NOx emissions and the decrease in SO2 emissions contributed equally to the increases in Ratio. Considering both emission changes in China enables to capture the observed increasing trend of Ratio in Japan.

  16. Characterization of chemical speciation of titanyl sulfate solutions for production of titanium dioxide precipitates.

    PubMed

    Szilgyi, Istvn; Knigsberger, Erich; May, Peter M

    2009-03-01

    Ion association in concentrated aqueous solutions of titanyl sulfate in sulfuric acid has been investigated at 25 degrees C by Raman spectroscopy under conditions like those used in the preparation of titania nanoparticles. Systematic variation of titanyl (M), sulfate (L), and hydrogen ion concentrations and a detailed quantitative analysis of the spectra reveal that two weak titanyl sulfato complexes (ML and ML(2)) are formed, with ML predominating. This assignment conflicts with the recent results of Baillon et al. (J. Mol. Liq. 2008, 143, 8-12). PMID:19235979

  17. ACID PRECIPITATION: EFFECTS OF SULFUR DIOXIDE AND SULFATE AEROSOL PARTICLES ON HUMAN HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    While human health impairment has been attributed to pollution by sulfur dioxide (SO2), data from inhalation studies in animals show that its oxidation products are more irritating. Population surveys in which suspended sulfate was a co-variant suggest that certain health paramet...

  18. Metal and acidity fluxes controlled by precipitation/dissolution cycles of sulfate salts in an anthropogenic mine aquifer.

    PubMed

    Cánovas, C R; Macías, F; Pérez-López, R

    2016-05-01

    Underground mine drainages are extremely difficult to study due to the lack of information about the flow path and source proximity in relation to the outflow adit. Geochemical processes controlling metals and acidity fluxes in a complex anthropogenic mine aquifer in SW Spain during the dry and rainy season were investigated by geochemical and statistical tools. High concentrations of acidity, sulfate, metals and metalloids (e.g. Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Ni, Co) were observed due to intense sulfide oxidation processes. The high residence time inside the anthropogenic aquifer, around 40days, caused the release of significant quantities of metals linked to host rocks (e.g. Al, Ca, Ge, Li, Mg, REE). The most outstanding characteristic of the acid mine drainage (AMD) outflows is the existence of higher Fe/SO4 molar ratios than those theoretical of pyrite (0.50) during most of the monitored period, due to a fire which occurred in 1949 and remained active for decades. Permanent and temporal retention mechanisms of acidity and metals were observed in the galleries. Once released from sulfide oxidation, Pb and As are sorbed on Fe oxyhydroxysulfate or precipitated as low solubility minerals (i.e. anglesite) inside the galleries. The precipitation of evaporitic sulfate salts during the dry season and the subsequent re-dissolution after rainfall control the fluxes of acidity and main metals (i.e. Fe, Mg, Al) from this anthropogenic aquifer. Some elements, such as Cd, Cu, Ni, REE and Zn, are retained in highly soluble sulfate salts while other elements, such as Ge, Pb and Sc, have a lower response to washout processes due to its incorporation in less soluble sulfate salts. In this way, metal concentration during the washout processes would be controlled by the proportion and solubility of each type of evaporitic sulfate salt stored during the dry season. The recovery of metals of economic interest contained in the AMD could help to self-finance the remediation of these waters in derelict mines worldwide. PMID:26972101

  19. Metal and acidity fluxes controlled by precipitation/dissolution cycles of sulfate salts in an anthropogenic mine aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cánovas, C. R.; Macías, F.; Pérez-López, R.

    2016-05-01

    Underground mine drainages are extremely difficult to study due to the lack of information about the flow path and source proximity in relation to the outflow adit. Geochemical processes controlling metals and acidity fluxes in a complex anthropogenic mine aquifer in SW Spain during the dry and rainy season were investigated by geochemical and statistical tools. High concentrations of acidity, sulfate, metals and metalloids (e.g. Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Ni, Co) were observed due to intense sulfide oxidation processes. The high residence time inside the anthropogenic aquifer, around 40 days, caused the release of significant quantities of metals linked to host rocks (e.g. Al, Ca, Ge, Li, Mg, REE). The most outstanding characteristic of the acid mine drainage (AMD) outflows is the existence of higher Fe/SO4 molar ratios than those theoretical of pyrite (0.50) during most of the monitored period, due to a fire which occurred in 1949 and remained active for decades. Permanent and temporal retention mechanisms of acidity and metals were observed in the galleries. Once released from sulfide oxidation, Pb and As are sorbed on Fe oxyhydroxysulfate or precipitated as low solubility minerals (i.e. anglesite) inside the galleries. The precipitation of evaporitic sulfate salts during the dry season and the subsequent re-dissolution after rainfall control the fluxes of acidity and main metals (i.e. Fe, Mg, Al) from this anthropogenic aquifer. Some elements, such as Cd, Cu, Ni, REE and Zn, are retained in highly soluble sulfate salts while other elements, such as Ge, Pb and Sc, have a lower response to washout processes due to its incorporation in less soluble sulfate salts. In this way, metal concentration during the washout processes would be controlled by the proportion and solubility of each type of evaporitic sulfate salt stored during the dry season. The recovery of metals of economic interest contained in the AMD could help to self-finance the remediation of these waters in derelict mines worldwide.

  20. Barium Peritonitis in Small Animals

    PubMed Central

    KO, Jae Jin; MANN, F. A. (Tony)

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Barium peritonitis is extremely rare, but is difficult to treat and may be life-threatening. Barium suspension leakage from the gastrointestinal tract into the abdominal cavity has a time-dependent and synergistically deleterious effect in patients who have generalized bacterial peritonitis. The severity of barium peritonitis is dependent on the quantity of barium in the abdominal cavity. Barium sulfate leakage results in hypovolemia and hypoproteinemia by worsening the exudation of extracellular fluid and albumin. Abdominal fluid analysis is a useful and efficient method to diagnose barium peritonitis. Serial radiographs may not be a reliable or timely diagnostic technique. Initial aggressive fluid resuscitation and empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment should be instituted promptly, followed quickly by celiotomy. During exploratory surgical intervention, copious irrigation and direct wiping with gauze are employed to remove as much barium as possible. Omentectomy should be considered when needed to expedite barium removal. Despite aggressive medical and surgical treatments, postoperative prognosis is guarded to poor due to complications, such as acute vascular shock, sepsis, diffuse peritonitis, hypoproteninemia, electrolyte imbalance, cardiac arrest, small bowel obstruction related to progression of granulomas and adhesions in the abdominal cavity. Therefore, intensive postoperative monitoring and prompt intervention are necessary to maximize chances for a positive outcome. For those that do survive, small bowel obstruction is a potential consequence due to progression of abdominal adhesions. PMID:24430662

  1. Relative role of decreasing precipitation sulfate and climate on recent lake recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houle, Daniel; Couture, Suzanne; Gagnon, Christian

    2010-12-01

    In the last 2 decades, acidic sulfur (S) depositions and SO4 concentration in surface water significantly decreased in many regions of the world, while at the same time temperatures have been increasing, particularly in the decade 1995-2005, which was one of the warmest ever recorded in the Northern Hemisphere. Understanding the potentially antagonistic or additive effects of decreasing S depositions and increasing temperatures on lake chemistry is essential to adequately evaluate the effectiveness of reduction programs for S emissions. By assessing the rate of change in climate variables, precipitation SO4 and lake chemistry for 47 temperate and boreal catchments, we found that changes in climate, particularly higher annual temperatures, were more often correlated to lake's pH and alkalinity than was the rate of decreasing S depositions between 1989 and 2005. It suggests that the recent improvement in the acid-base status of the studied lakes that cover a large area of northeastern North America as well as a large array of acid-base conditions cannot be attributed solely to a decrease in SO4 precipitation, but also to climatic variations. Not taking this information into account could lead to an overestimation of the benefit of lower SO4 deposition on aquatic ecosystems recovery.

  2. Experimental analysis of arsenic precipitation during microbial sulfate and iron reduction in model aquifer sediment reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Matthew F.; Roden, Eric E.; Crossey, Laura J.; Brealey, Adrian J.; Spilde, Michael N.

    2010-05-01

    Microbial SO 42- reduction limits accumulation of aqueous As in reducing aquifers where the sulfide that is produced forms minerals that sequester As. We examined the potential for As partitioning into As- and Fe-sulfide minerals in anaerobic, semi-continuous flow bioreactors inoculated with 0.5% (g mL -1) fine-grained alluvial aquifer sediment. A fluid residence time of three weeks was maintained over a ca. 300-d incubation period by replacing one-third of the aqueous phase volume of the reactors with fresh medium every seven days. The medium had a composition comparable to natural As-contaminated groundwater with slightly basic pH (7.3) and 7.5 μM aqueous As(V) and also contained 0.8 mM acetate to stimulate microbial activity. Medium was delivered to a reactor system with and without 10 mmol L -1 synthetic goethite (α-FeOOH). In both reactors, influent As(V) was almost completely reduced to As(III). Pure As-sulfide minerals did not form in the Fe-limited reactor. Realgar (As 4S 4) and As 2S 3(am) were undersaturated throughout the experiment. Orpiment (As 2S 3) was saturated while sulfide content was low (˜50 to 150 μM), but precipitation was likely limited by slow kinetics. Reaction-path modeling suggests that, even if these minerals had formed, the dissolved As content of the reactor would have remained at hazardous levels. Mackinawite (Fe 1 + xS; x ⩽ 0.07) formed readily in the Fe-bearing reactor and held dissolved sulfide at levels below saturation for orpiment and realgar. The mackinawite sequestered little As (<0.1 wt.%), however, and aqueous As accumulated to levels above the influent concentration as microbial Fe(III) reduction consumed goethite and mobilized adsorbed As. A relatively small amount of pyrite (FeS 2) and greigite (Fe 3S 4) formed in the Fe-bearing reactor when we injected a polysulfide solution (Na 2S 4) to a final concentration of 0.5 mM after 216, 230, 279, and 286 days. The pyrite, and to a lesser extent the greigite, that formed did sequester As from solution, containing 0.84 and 0.23 wt.% As on average, respectively. Our results suggest that As precipitation during Fe-sulfide formation in nature occurs mainly in conjunction with pyrite formation. Our findings imply that the effectiveness of stimulating microbial SO 42- reduction to remediate As contamination may be limited by the rate and extent of pyrite formation and the solubility of As-sulfides.

  3. Dissolution-precipitation processes in tank experiments for testing numerical models for reactive transport calculations: Experiments and modelling.

    PubMed

    Poonoosamy, Jenna; Kosakowski, Georg; Van Loon, Luc R; Mäder, Urs

    2015-01-01

    In the context of testing reactive transport codes and their underlying conceptual models, a simple 2D reactive transport experiment was developed. The aim was to use simple chemistry and design a reproducible and fast to conduct experiment, which is flexible enough to include several process couplings: advective-diffusive transport of solutes, effect of liquid phase density on advective transport, and kinetically controlled dissolution/precipitation reactions causing porosity changes. A small tank was filled with a reactive layer of strontium sulfate (SrSO4) of two different grain sizes, sandwiched between two layers of essentially non-reacting quartz sand (SiO2). A highly concentrated solution of barium chloride was injected to create an asymmetric flow field. Once the barium chloride reached the reactive layer, it forced the transformation of strontium sulfate into barium sulfate (BaSO4). Due to the higher molar volume of barium sulfate, its precipitation caused a decrease of porosity and lowered the permeability. Changes in the flow field were observed with help of dye tracer tests. The experiments were modelled using the reactive transport code OpenGeosys-GEM. Tests with non-reactive tracers performed prior to barium chloride injection, as well as the density-driven flow (due to the high concentration of barium chloride solution), could be well reproduced by the numerical model. To reproduce the mineral bulk transformation with time, two populations of strontium sulfate grains with different kinetic rates of dissolution were applied. However, a default porosity permeability relationship was unable to account for measured pressure changes. Post mortem analysis of the strontium sulfate reactive medium provided useful information on the chemical and structural changes occurring at the pore scale at the interface that were considered in our model to reproduce the pressure evolution with time. PMID:25805363

  4. Dissolution-precipitation processes in tank experiments for testing numerical models for reactive transport calculations: Experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonoosamy, Jenna; Kosakowski, Georg; Van Loon, Luc R.; Mäder, Urs

    2015-06-01

    In the context of testing reactive transport codes and their underlying conceptual models, a simple 2D reactive transport experiment was developed. The aim was to use simple chemistry and design a reproducible and fast to conduct experiment, which is flexible enough to include several process couplings: advective-diffusive transport of solutes, effect of liquid phase density on advective transport, and kinetically controlled dissolution/precipitation reactions causing porosity changes. A small tank was filled with a reactive layer of strontium sulfate (SrSO4) of two different grain sizes, sandwiched between two layers of essentially non-reacting quartz sand (SiO2). A highly concentrated solution of barium chloride was injected to create an asymmetric flow field. Once the barium chloride reached the reactive layer, it forced the transformation of strontium sulfate into barium sulfate (BaSO4). Due to the higher molar volume of barium sulfate, its precipitation caused a decrease of porosity and lowered the permeability. Changes in the flow field were observed with help of dye tracer tests. The experiments were modelled using the reactive transport code OpenGeosys-GEM. Tests with non-reactive tracers performed prior to barium chloride injection, as well as the density-driven flow (due to the high concentration of barium chloride solution), could be well reproduced by the numerical model. To reproduce the mineral bulk transformation with time, two populations of strontium sulfate grains with different kinetic rates of dissolution were applied. However, a default porosity permeability relationship was unable to account for measured pressure changes. Post mortem analysis of the strontium sulfate reactive medium provided useful information on the chemical and structural changes occurring at the pore scale at the interface that were considered in our model to reproduce the pressure evolution with time.

  5. Barium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Barium cyanide ; CASRN 542 - 62 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  6. Selectivity in biomineralization of barium and strontium.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Minna R; Wasserman, Brian; Finney, Lydia; McNulty, Ian; Legnini, Daniel; Vogt, Stefan; Joester, Derk

    2011-11-01

    The desmid green alga Closterium moniliferum belongs to a small number of organisms that form barite (BaSO(4)) or celestite (SrSO(4)) biominerals. The ability to sequester Sr in the presence of an excess of Ca is of considerable interest for the remediation of (90)Sr from the environment and nuclear waste. While most cells dynamically regulate the concentration of the second messenger Ca(2+) in the cytosol and various organelles, transport proteins rarely discriminate strongly between Ca, Sr, and Ba. Herein, we investigate how these ions are trafficked in C. moniliferum and how precipitation of (Ba,Sr)SO(4) crystals occurs in the terminal vacuoles. Towards this goal, we simultaneously visualize intracellular dynamics of multiple elements using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) of cryo-fixed/freeze-dried samples. We correlate the resulting elemental maps with ultrastructural information gleaned from freeze-fracture cryo-SEM of frozen-hydrated cells and use micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (micro-XANES) to determine sulfur speciation. We find that the kinetics of Sr uptake and efflux depend on external Ca concentrations, and Sr, Ba, and Ca show similar intracellular localization. A highly ion-selective cross-membrane transport step is not evident. Based on elevated levels of sulfate detected in the terminal vacuoles, we propose a "sulfate trap" model, where the presence of dissolved barium leads to preferential precipitation of (Ba,Sr)SO(4) due to its low solubility relative to SrSO(4) and CaSO(4). Engineering the sulfate concentration in the vacuole may thus be the most direct way to increase the Sr sequestered per cell, an important consideration in using desmids for phytoremediation of (90)Sr. PMID:21871966

  7. Replacement of sodium ions by cryptate (C222) complexes barium ions in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles studied by electron spin resonance and electron spin-echo modulation of 5-doxylstearic acid and N,N,N prime ,N prime -tetramethylbenzidine photoionization and by viscosity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, T. ); Kevan, L. )

    1989-03-09

    Ultraviolet irradiation of solubilized N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and viscosity measurements have been carried out at room temperature in mixed micellar solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and barium dodecyl sulfate (Ba(DS){sub 2}). The barium ions were complexed by the macrocyclic cryptate C222. The irradiations did not lead to constant photoionization yields in the barium/C222-containing solutions because of secondary reactions. The viscosity as a function of the Ba{sup 2+}/2 mole fraction (X) changed from 1.47 mPa s at X = 0 to 1.33 mPa s at X = 1, passing through a maximum at X = 0.2. At 77 K in frozen solutions the TMB photoionization yield as measured by electron spin resonance increased by a factor of 1.8 in the range X = 0-0.2 and leveled off at larger X. Deuterium modulation depths of electron spin-echo decay curves measured at 4.2 K for TMB{sup +} and 5-doxylstearic acid increase as a function of X in a similar way as the photoionization yields. The results indicate a higher local concentration of water molecules in the micellar surface region when the C222-complexed barium ions are present.

  8. Tailored Barium Swallow Study

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Programs & Services > Tests We Offer > Imaging Tests Tailored Barium Swallow Study The TBS is a special study ... close to them while the study is completed. Barium Taste Barium is heavy and has a chalky ...

  9. Influence of the Flow Rate on Dissolution and Precipitation Features during Percolation of CO2-Rich Sulfate Solutions through Limestone Fractured Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luquot, L.; Garcia-Rios, M.; Cama, J.; Soler Matamala, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    A test site for a prospective CO2 geological storage is situated in Hontomín (Burgos, northern Spain) with a reservoir rock that is composed of limestone (calcite). Calcite dissolution and gypsum precipitation are expected to occur when injecting CO2 in a limestone reservoir with sulfate-rich resident brine. If the reservoir is fractured, these reactions will take place mainly in the fractures which serve as conduits for flow of fluids. As a consequence, the structure of the fractures will vary leading to changes in their hydraulic and transport properties. In this study, a set of percolation experiments which consisted of injecting CO2-rich solutions through limestone fractured cores were performed under P = 150 bar and T = 60 ºC. Different flow rates ranging from 0.2 to 60 mL/h and sulfate-rich and sulfate-free solutions were used. Variation in fracture volume induced by calcite dissolution and gypsum precipitation was measured by means of X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) and aqueous chemistry. An increase in flow rate led to an increase in volume of dissolved limestone per unit of time, which indicated that calcite dissolution in the fracture was transport controlled. Moreover, the dissolution pattern varied from face dissolution to wormhole formation and uniform dissolution by increasing the flow rate (i.e., Pe from 1 to 346). Fracture permeability always increased and depended on the forming dissolution pattern.

  10. Radioactive Barium Ion Trap Based on Metal-Organic Framework for Efficient and Irreversible Removal of Barium from Nuclear Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yaguang; Huang, Hongliang; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2016-04-01

    Highly efficient and irreversible capture of radioactive barium from aqueous media remains a serious task for nuclear waste disposal and environmental protection. To address this task, here we propose a concept of barium ion trap based on metal-organic framework (MOF) with a strong barium-chelating group (sulfate and sulfonic acid group) in the pore structures of MOFs. The functionalized MOF-based ion traps can remove >90% of the barium within the first 5 min, and the removal efficiency reaches 99% after equilibrium. Remarkably, the sulfate-group-functionalized ion trap demonstrates a high barium uptake capacity of 131.1 mg g(-1), which surpasses most of the reported sorbents and can selectively capture barium from nuclear wastewater, whereas the sulfonic-acid-group-functionalized ion trap exhibits ultrafast kinetics with a kinetic rate constant k2 of 27.77 g mg(-1) min(-1), which is 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than existing sorbents. Both of the two MOF-based ion traps can capture barium irreversibly. Our work proposes a new strategy to design barium adsorbent materials and provides a new perspective for removing radioactive barium and other radionuclides from nuclear wastewater for environment remediation. Besides, the concrete mechanisms of barium-sorbent interactions are also demonstrated in this contribution. PMID:26999358

  11. A revised seawater sulfate oxygen isotope record for the last 4 Myr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Stefan; Paytan, Adina; Li, Hong; Wortmann, Ulrich G.

    2016-02-01

    Using a new method to purify barium sulfate from marine barite, we produce a highly resolved seawater sulfate oxygen isotope data set for the past 4 million years. We show that the overall magnitude of the δ18O shift is smaller than previously thought (1-1.5‰ vs 6 ‰). Expanding on previous work, we explore the effects of Quaternary sea level variations on the global sulfur cycle. Our modeling results confirm the earlier hypothesis that the increased duration and amplitude of sea level lowstands during the Quaternary favors direct sulfide oxidation over microbial disproportionation. We show that oxygen isotope ratios of core top barite are up to 2.5‰ lower than the seawater sulfate δ18O value. We hypothesize that this offset is caused by incorporation of sulfate from oxidized organic sulfur compounds during precipitation of barite. Our results provide another puzzle piece in the attempt to understand the origin of marine barite.

  12. Experimental and numerical analysis of parallel reactant flow and transverse mixing with mineral precipitation in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Don T.; Guo, Luanjing; Fujita, Yoshiko; Huang, Hai; Redden, George

    2015-12-17

    Formation of mineral precipitates in the mixing interface between two reactant solutions flowing in parallel in porous media is governed by reactant mixing by diffusion and dispersion and is coupled to changes in porosity/permeability due to precipitation. The spatial and temporal distribution of mixing-dependent precipitation of barium sulfate in porous media was investigated with side-by-side injection of barium chloride and sodium sulfate solutions in thin rectangular flow cells packed with quartz sand. The results for homogeneous sand beds were compared to beds with higher or lower permeability inclusions positioned in the path of the mixing zone. In the homogeneous and high permeability inclusion experiments, BaSO4 precipitate (barite) formed in a narrow deposit along the length and in the center of the solution–solution mixing zone even though dispersion was enhanced within, and downstream of, the high permeability inclusion. In the low permeability inclusion experiment, the deflected BaSO4 precipitation zone broadened around one side and downstream of the inclusion and was observed to migrate laterally toward the sulfate solution. A continuum-scale fully coupled reactive transport model that simultaneously solves the nonlinear governing equations for fluid flow, transport of reactants and geochemical reactions was used to simulate the experiments and provide insight into mechanisms underlying the experimental observations. Lastly, migration of the precipitation zone in the low permeability inclusion experiment could be explained by the coupling effects among fluid flow, reactant transport and localized mineral precipitation reaction.

  13. Extraction and characterization of lignin from oil palm biomass via ionic liquid dissolution and non-toxic aluminium potassium sulfate dodecahydrate precipitation processes.

    PubMed

    Mohtar, S S; Tengku Malim Busu, T N Z; Md Noor, A M; Shaari, N; Yusoff, N A; Bustam Khalil, M A; Abdul Mutalib, M I; Mat, H B

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to extract and characterize lignin from oil palm biomass (OPB) by dissolution in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([bmim][Cl]), followed by the lignin extraction through the CO2 gas purging prior to addition of aluminum potassium sulfate dodecahydrate (AlK(SO4)2 · 12H2O). The lignin yield, Y(L) (%wt.) was found to be dependent of the types of OPB observed for all precipitation methods used. The lignin recovery, RL (%wt.) obtained from CO2-AlK(SO4)2 · 12H2O precipitation was, however dependent on the types of OPB, which contradicted to that of the acidified H2SO4 and HCl solutions of pH 0.7 and 2 precipitations. Only about 54% of lignin was recovered from the OPB. The FTIR results indicate that the monodispersed lignin was successfully extracted from the OPT, OPF and OPEFB having a molecular weight (MW) of 1331, 1263 and 1473 g/mol, and degradation temperature of 215, 207.5 and 272 °C, respectively. PMID:26038325

  14. Barium enema (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    A barium enema is performed to examine the walls of the colon. During the procedure, a well lubricated enema tube is inserted gently into the rectum. The barium, a radiopaque (shows up on X-ray) contrast ...

  15. Effect of hydrolysis conditions on hydrous TiO2 polymorphs precipitated from a titanyl sulfate and sulfuric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hao; Liang, Bin; Lü, Li; Wu, Pan; Li, Chun

    2012-07-01

    The relationship between hydrolysis conditions and hydrous titania polymorphs obtained in a titanyl sulfate and sulfuric acid solution was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results revealed that the feeding rate of the titanyl sulfate stock solution, the concentration of sulfuric acid, and the seed dosage of rutile crystal could significantly affect the hydrolysis rate, thus influencing the titania crystal phase. Hydrous TiO2 in the form of rutile, anatase, or the mixture of both could be obtained in solutions of low titanium concentrations and 2.5wt% to 15wt% sulfuric acid at 100°C. When the hydrolysis rate of titanium expressed by TiO2 was more than or equal to 0.04 g/(L·min), the hydrolysate was almost phase-pure anatase, while the main phase state was rutile when the hydrolysis rate was less than or equal to 0.01 g/(L·min). With the hydrolysis rate between 0.02 and 0.03 g/(L·min), the hydrolysate contained almost equal magnitude of rutile and anatase. It seems that although rutile phase is thermodynamically stable in very acidic solutions, anatase is a kinetically stable phase.

  16. Emission spectrographic determination of barium in sea water using a cation exchange concentration procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, B. J.; Joensuu, O.

    1967-01-01

    A concentration technique employing Dowex 50W cation exchange resin is described for the determination of barium in sea water. The separated barium is precipitated as fluoride together with calcium and strontium and measured by emission spectrographic analysis. The vertical distribution of barium in sea water has been measured in the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. The barium content varied between 7 and 23 ??g. per liter; in two profiles, the lowest concentrations were at a depth of about 1000 meters.

  17. Chemistry of atmospheric precipitation in the north-central united states: Influence of sulfate, nitrate, ammonia and calcareous soil particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, James William

    The supply of alkaline soil dust and gaseous NH 3 available to neutralize anthropogenic acids in the atmosphere controls the acidity of precipitation in the north-central United States. Major ions and trace metals were determined in precipitation-event and snow-core samples from sites along a 600 km transect from the North Dakota prairie to the forests of northeastern Minnesota, collected during the period April 1978-June 1979. Acidity increased 4-fold from west to east as the effect of alkaline dust and NH 3 decreased with increasing distance from the cultivated prairie; calcium and Mg 2+ decreased 2 to 3-fold across the transect. However, minimum concentrations of NH 4+ and SO 42- were observed at Itasca, the central site. Natural emissions of these elements were important in the west, while anthropogenic emissions were responsible for the higher concentrations in the east. Wet deposition of H + decreased 8-fold and deposition of NO 3- and SO 42- decreased 1.5 to 2-fold from Hovland in the east to Tewaukon in the west. Wet deposition of the metal cations increased from Hovland to Tewaukon. Dry deposition followed a similar trend. Winter snow cover and freezing temperatures, which decreased airborne soil dust and the evolution of NH 3 from the prairie soils, led to an increase in precipitation acidity at all sites. The acid increase was accompanied by a decrease in alkaline metal cations, especially Ca 2+, and in NH 4+. At Hovland SO 42- and NO 3- also increased during the winter. The occurrence of snow events at Tewaukon that were appreciably more acid than the snowpack accumulated there indicates that snow was neutralized after it fell by alkaline dust entrained in resuspended snow, or deposited separately. Winter inputs of acid are especially important because they are released during a short period in the spring. Over half of the acid input at Hovland occurred during the winter. Precipitation inputs of P and N probably benefit nutrient-poor ecosystems in the north-central United States. However, acid precipitation at Hovland is approaching levels known to cause adverse effects in sensitive regions. The geology of northeastern Minnesota, adjoining Ontario, and northern Wisconsin is similar to that in areas where lake acidification and losses of fish populations have occurred, so that such problems may eventually occur in central North America.

  18. An in situ XAS study of ferric iron hydrolysis and precipitation in the presence of perchlorate, nitrate, chloride and sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Richard N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Rose, Andrew L.; Glover, Chris J.; David Waite, T.

    2016-03-01

    Using a novel combination of in situ potentiometric experiments and quick-scanning XAS we present Fe K-edge XAS spectra (to k = 12 Å-1) during FeIII hydrolysis and precipitation in 0.33 M Fe(ClO4)3, Fe(NO3)3, FeCl3 and Fe2(SO4)3 solutions up to pH 4.8. Edge-sharing FeIII polymers appeared almost immediately upon hydrolysis with strong evidence for a μ-oxo dimer species forming in the Fe(ClO4)3, Fe(NO3)3 and FeCl3 solutions. The effects of SO4 on hydrolysis and polymerization pathways included inhibition of both the formation of the μ-oxo dimer and double corner FeIII bonding, ultimately resulting in the precipitation of schwertmannite. As such, under these experimental conditions, double corner FeIII bonding appears to be critical to the formation of ferrihydrite. The spectral trends indicated that the decomposition/transformation of the dimer was sudden and broadly coincident with shortening average Fe-O bond distances, increased Fe neighbors at ∼3.43 Å and a pre-edge energy transformation suggestive of decreased ligand field strength as well as increasing proportions of tetrahedral FeIII. This result suggests that the incorporation of tetrahedral FeIII into ferrihydrite occurs only at the latter stages of extended polymerization.

  19. Glucosamine sulfate

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Glucosamine Sulphate KCl, Glucosamine-6-Phosphate, GS, Mono-Sulfated Saccharide, Poly-(1->3)-N-Acetyl-2-Amino- ... Sulfate de Glucosamine, Sulfate de Glucosamine 2KCl, SG, Sulfated Monosaccharide, Sulfated Saccharide, Sulfato de Glucosamina. Glucosamine Hydrochloride ...

  20. Sulfate-reducing bacteria-dominated biofilms that precipitate ZnS in a subsurface circumneutral-pH mine drainage system.

    PubMed

    Labrenz, M; Banfield, J F

    2004-04-01

    The microbial diversity of ZnS-forming biofilms in 8 degrees C, circumneutral-pH groundwater in tunnels within the abandoned Piquette Zn, Pb mine (Tennyson, Wisconsin, USA) has been investigated by molecular methods, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and cultivation techniques. These biofilms are growing on old mine timbers that generate locally anaerobic zones within the mine drainage system. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) exclusively of the family Desulfobacteriaceae comprise a significant fraction of the active microbiota. Desulfosporosinus strains were isolated, but could not be detected by molecular methods. Other important microbial clusters belonged to the beta-, gamma-, and epsilon-Proteobacteria, the Cytophaga/Flexibacter/Bacteroides-group (CFB), Planctomycetales, Spirochaetales, Clostridia, and green nonsulfur bacteria. Our investigations indicated a growth dependence of SRB on fermentative, cellulolytic, and organic acid-producing Clostridia. A few clones related to sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were detected, suggesting a sulfur cycle related to redox gradients within the biofilm. Sulfur oxidation prevents sulfide accumulation that would lead to precipitation of other sulfide phases. FISH analyses indicated that Desulfobacteriaceae populations were not early colonizers in freshly grown and ZnS-poor biofilms, whereas they were abundant in older, naturally established, and ZnS-rich biofilms. Gram-negative SRB have been detected in situ over a period of 6 months, supporting the important role of these organisms in selective ZnS precipitation in Tennyson mine. Results demonstrate the complex nature of biofilms responsible for in situ bioremediation of toxic metals in a subsurface mine drainage system. PMID:14994175

  1. Radioactive mineral spring precipitates, their analytical and statistical data and the uranium connection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, R.A.; Felmlee, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    Major radioactive mineral springs are probably related to deep zones of active metamorphism in areas of orogenic tectonism. The most common precipitate is travertine, a chemically precipitated rock composed chiefly of calcium carbonate, but also containing other minerals. The mineral springs are surface manifestations of hydrothermal conduit systems which extend downward many kilometers to hot source rocks. Conduits are kept open by fluid pressure exerted by carbon dioxide-charged waters rising to the surface propelled by heat and gas (CO2 and steam) pressure. On reaching the surface, the dissolved carbon dioxide is released from solution, and calcium carbonate is precipitated. Springs also contain sulfur species (for example, H2S and HS-), and radon, helium and methane as entrained or dissolved gases. The HS- ion can react to form hydrogen sulfide gas, sulfate salts, and native sulfur. Chemical salts and native sulfur precipitate at the surface. The sulfur may partly oxidize to produce detectable sulfur dioxide gas. Radioactivity is due to the presence of radium-226, radon-222, radium-228, and radon-220, and other daughter products of uranium-238 and thorium-232. Uranium and thorium are not present in economically significant amounts in most radioactive spring precipitates. Most radium is coprecipitated at the surface with barite. Barite (barium sulfate) forms in the barium-containing spring water as a product of the oxidation of sulfur species to sulfate ions. The relatively insoluble barium sulfate precipitates and removes much of the radium from solution. Radium coprecipitates to a lesser extent with manganese-barium- and iron-oxy hydroxides. R-mode factor analysis of abundances of elements suggests that 65 percent of the variance of the different elements is affected by seven factors interpreted as follows: (1) Silica and silicate contamination and precipitation; (2) Carbonate travertine precipitation; (3) Radium coprecipitation; (4) Evaporite precipitation; (5) Hydrous limonite precipitation and coprecipitated elements including uranium; (6) Rare earth elements deposited with detrital contamination (?); (7) Metal carbonate adsorption and precipitation. Economically recoverable minerals occurring at some localities in spring precipitates are ores of iron, manganese, sulfur, tungsten and barium and ornamental travertine. Continental radioactive mineral springs occur in areas of crustal thickening caused by overthrusting of crustal plates, and intrusion and metamorphism. Sedimentary rocks on the lower plate are trapped between the plates and form a zone of metamorphism. Connate waters, carbonate rocks and organic-carbon-bearing rocks react to extreme pressure and temperature to produce carbon dioxide, and steam. Fractures are forced open by gas and fluid pressures. Deep-circulating meteoric waters then come in contact with the reactive products, and a hydrothermal cell forms. When hot mineral-charged waters reach the surface they form the familiar hot mineral springs. Hot springs also occur in relation to igneous intrusive action or volcanism both of which may be products of the crustal plate overthrusting. Uranium and thorium in the sedimentary rocks undergoing metamorphism are sometimes mobilized, but mobilization is generally restricted to an acid hydrothermal environment; much is redeposited in favorable environments in the metamorphosed sediments. Radium and radon, which are highly mobile in both acid and alkaline aqueous media move upward into the hydrothermal cell and to the surface.

  2. Esophagram (Barium Swallow Study)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... study is completed in a radiology (x-ray/fluoroscopy) room. If a child is having the barium ... or a Radiology Practitioner Assistant (RPA) operates the fluoroscopy equipment and takes images of the esophagus. The ...

  3. The effect of copper on the precipitation of scorodite (FeAsO4·2H2O) under hydrothermal conditions: evidence for a hydrated copper containing ferric arsenate sulfate-short lived intermediate.

    PubMed

    Gomez, M A; Becze, L; Celikin, M; Demopoulos, G P

    2011-08-15

    The effect of copper sulfate on scorodite precipitation and its mechanism of formation at 150 °C was investigated. Scorodite was determined to be the dominant phase formed under all conditions explored (0.61 < Fe(III)/As(V) < 1.87, 0.27-0.30 M Fe(SO(4))(1.5), 0-0.3 M CuSO(4), 0-0.3 M MgSO(4), at 2.5 h and 150 °C). The produced scorodite was found to incorporate up to 5% SO(4) and ≤1% Cu or Mg in its structure. The precipitation of scorodite was stoichiometric, i.e. the Fe/As molar ratio in the solids was equal to one independent of the starting Fe/As ratio in the solution. The presence of excess ferric sulfate in the initial solution (Fe/As>1) was found to slow down the ordering of the H-bond structure in scorodite. Precipitation under equimolar concentrations (As = Fe = Cu = 0.3 M), short times and lower temperatures (30-70 min and 90-130 °C) revealed the formation of a Cu-Fe-AsO(4)-SO(4)-H(2)O short lived gelatinous intermediate that closely resembled the basic ferric arsenate sulfate (BFAS) type of phase, before ultimately converting fully to the most stable scorodite phase (96 min and 138 °C). This phase transition has been traced throughout the reaction via elemental (ICP-AES, XPS), structural (PXRD, TEM) and molecular (ATR-IR, Raman) analysis. ATR-IR investigation of an arsenic containing industrial residue produced during pressure leaching of a copper concentrate (1 h and 150 °C) found evidence of the formation of an arsenate mineral form resembling the intermediate basic ferric arsenate sulfate phase. PMID:21621789

  4. Sulfate scale dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.L.; Paul, J.M.

    1992-01-28

    This patent describes a method for removing barium sulfate scale. It comprises contacting the scale with an aqueous solution having a pH of about 8 to about 14 and consisting essentially of a chelating agent comprising a polyaminopolycarboxylic acid or salt of such an acid in a concentration of 0.1 to 1.0 M, and anions of a monocarboxylic acid selected form mercaptoacetic acid, hydroxyacetic acid, aminoacetic acid, or salicyclic acid in a concentration of 0.1 to 1.0 M and which is soluble in the solution under the selected pH conditions, to dissolve the scale.

  5. Experimental and numerical analysis of parallel reactant flow and transverse mixing with mineral precipitation in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fox, Don T.; Guo, Luanjing; Fujita, Yoshiko; Huang, Hai; Redden, George

    2015-12-17

    Formation of mineral precipitates in the mixing interface between two reactant solutions flowing in parallel in porous media is governed by reactant mixing by diffusion and dispersion and is coupled to changes in porosity/permeability due to precipitation. The spatial and temporal distribution of mixing-dependent precipitation of barium sulfate in porous media was investigated with side-by-side injection of barium chloride and sodium sulfate solutions in thin rectangular flow cells packed with quartz sand. The results for homogeneous sand beds were compared to beds with higher or lower permeability inclusions positioned in the path of the mixing zone. In the homogeneous andmore » high permeability inclusion experiments, BaSO4 precipitate (barite) formed in a narrow deposit along the length and in the center of the solution–solution mixing zone even though dispersion was enhanced within, and downstream of, the high permeability inclusion. In the low permeability inclusion experiment, the deflected BaSO4 precipitation zone broadened around one side and downstream of the inclusion and was observed to migrate laterally toward the sulfate solution. A continuum-scale fully coupled reactive transport model that simultaneously solves the nonlinear governing equations for fluid flow, transport of reactants and geochemical reactions was used to simulate the experiments and provide insight into mechanisms underlying the experimental observations. Lastly, migration of the precipitation zone in the low permeability inclusion experiment could be explained by the coupling effects among fluid flow, reactant transport and localized mineral precipitation reaction.« less

  6. Radium and barium removal through blending hydraulic fracturing fluids with acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kondash, Andrew J; Warner, Nathaniel R; Lahav, Ori; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-01-21

    Wastewaters generated during hydraulic fracturing of the Marcellus Shale typically contain high concentrations of salts, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), and metals, such as barium, that pose environmental and public health risks upon inadequate treatment and disposal. In addition, fresh water scarcity in dry regions or during periods of drought could limit shale gas development. This paper explores the possibility of using alternative water sources and their impact on NORM levels through blending acid mine drainage (AMD) effluent with recycled hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids (HFFFs). We conducted a series of laboratory experiments in which the chemistry and NORM of different mix proportions of AMD and HFFF were examined after reacting for 48 h. The experimental data combined with geochemical modeling and X-ray diffraction analysis suggest that several ions, including sulfate, iron, barium, strontium, and a large portion of radium (60-100%), precipitated into newly formed solids composed mainly of Sr barite within the first ∼ 10 h of mixing. The results imply that blending AMD and HFFF could be an effective management practice for both remediation of the high NORM in the Marcellus HFFF wastewater and beneficial utilization of AMD that is currently contaminating waterways in northeastern U.S.A. PMID:24367969

  7. Chondroitin sulfate

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in combination with glucosamine sulfate, shark cartilage, and camphor. Some people also inject chondroitin sulfate into the ... in combination with glucosamine sulfate, shark cartilage, and camphor seems to reduce arthritis symptoms. However, any symptom ...

  8. Dissolution of Barium from Barite in Sewage Sludges and Cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, F.; Pepi, M.; Burrini, D.; Kniewald, G.; Scali, D.; Lanciotti, E.

    1996-01-01

    High concentrations of total barium, ranging from 0.42 to 1.58 mg(middot)g(sup-1) (dry weight) were found in sludges of two sewage treatment plants near Florence, Italy. Barium concentrations in the suspended matter decreased as redox potential values changed from negative to positive. An anoxic sewage sludge sample was aerated, and 30% of the total barium was removed in 24 h. To demonstrate that barium was solubilized from barite by sulfate-reducing bacteria, a strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used to study the solubilization of barium from barite under laboratory conditions. During cell growth with different concentrations of barite from 0.01 to 0.3 g(middot)liter(sup-1) (the latter is the MIC) as the only source of sulfates in the cultures, the D. desulfuricans strain accumulated barium up to 0.58 (mu)g(middot)mg(sup-1) (dry weight). Three times the quantity of barium was dissolved by bacteria than in the uninoculated medium (control). The unexpectedly low concentration of soluble barium (1.2 mg of Ba(middot)liter(sup-1)) with respect to the quantity expected (109 mg of Ba(middot)liter(sup-1)), calculated on the basis of the free H(inf2)S evolved from the dissimilatory reduction of sulfate from barite, was probably due to the formation of other barium compounds, such as witherite (BaCO(inf3)) and the transient species barium sulfide (BaS). The D. desulfuricans strain, growing on barite, formed visible aggregates. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that aggregates consisted of bacteria and barite. After 3 days of incubation, several autofluorescent crystals surrounded by a dissolution halo were observed. The crystals were identified as BaS by comparison with the commercial compound. PMID:16535353

  9. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  10. Barium and Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Barium and Compounds ; CASRN 7440 - 39 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  11. Production of potassium manganate and barium manganate from spent zinc-MnO2 dry cells via fusion with potassium hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Rocha, Renan Azevedo; Quintanilha, Carolina Leão; Lanxin, Thayná Viana; Afonso, Júlio Carlos; Vianna, Cláudio Augusto; Gante, Valdir; Mantovano, José Luiz

    2014-12-01

    This work describes a route for extracting manganese and zinc from spent zinc-manganese dioxide dry cells via fusion of the electroactive components with potassium hydroxide to form potassium manganate (K2MnO4) and soluble zincates. The fused mass was dissolved in aqueous KOH and the insoluble matter was separated. Under the best optimal conditions, 70-78 wt% of manganese was solubilized as K2MnO4 whereas 30-44 wt% of zinc was solubilized as [Zn(OH)4]2- ions. Lead was the only minor component dissolved in detectable amounts. Manganese was isolated by a one-step precipitation procedure as barium manganate (BaMnO4) or via crystallization of K2MnO4. Lead and excess barium were isolated as sulfate by adding K2SO4. Zinc was precipitated as hydroxide after neutralizing the alkaline solution with H2SO4. pH control is essential to avoid decomposition of manganate ions and for the sequential precipitation of leached elements. K2SO4 was partially recovered as by-product after partial evaporation of the neutralized solution.

  12. Pulsating aurora induced by upper atmospheric barium releases.

    PubMed

    Deehr, C; Romick, G

    1977-05-12

    An effect which appeared to be pulsating aurora was observed to be associated with explosive releases of barium vapour near 250 km altitude, but only when the explosions were in the path of precipitating electrons associated with the visible aurora. PMID:16073415

  13. Isotopic Zonation Within Sulfate Evaporite Mineral Crystals Reveal Quantitative Paleoenvironment Details

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, M.; Rhorssen, M.; Mielke, R. E.

    2008-12-01

    Isotopic variations measured within a single crystal of hydrated magnesium sulfate are greater than 30 permil for delta 2-H, almost 10 permil for δ18O in water of hydration; and greater than 3 permil in sulfate oxygen. These results are interpreted to indicate the relative humidity of the system during evaporation (15 to 20 percent in this test case) and constrain the volume of water involved. The theoretical basis of this system is the isotopic fractionation between the species in solution and those precipitated as evaporite salts. Precipitation preferentially accumulates more of the heavy isotopes of sulfur and oxygen in mineral sulfate, relative to sulfate in solution. During the course of mineral growth this leads to successive depletion of the respective heavier isotopes in the residual brine reflected in a parallel trend in successive precipitates or even in successive zones within a single crystal. The change in isotopic composition at any one time during the process, relative to the initial value, can be described by an isotopic version of the Rayleigh Fractionation equation, depending only on the extent of the completion of the process and the relevant fractionation factor. Evaporation preferentially removes isotopically lighter hydrogen and oxygen leading to successive extents of enrichment in the respective heavier isotopes in the residual water. However, the relative effects on hydrogen and oxygen isotopes differs as function of relative humidity [1]. ALL OF THESE CHANGES ARE PRESERVED IN THE MINERAL ISOTOPE COMPOSITIONS. We precipitated barium sulfate from epsomite or gypsum samples, which was reduced at 1450°C in the presence of graphite and glassy carbon in a Finnigan TC/EA to produce CO for O isotopic analysis in a Finnigan 253 mass spectrometer, while a separate subsample was oxidized to SO2 in a Costech Elemental Analyzer. However, to make progress with this approach we needed to make a large number of measurements of hydration water and so we developed a new analytical method [2]. We use a modification of the standard TC/EA continuous-flow protocol to measure both hydrogen and oxygen of water of hydration from the same small sample. We have proved the concept of this new approach by analyzing zones within crystals and individual grains, growing epsomite (magnesium sulfate heptahydrate) in the laboratory and by analysis of natural gypsum evaporites. We are now exploring the effects of varying the controlling parameters. Eventual application to Martian sulfates will reveal amount of water involved in sulfate formation, its isotopic composition(s) and details of the paleo-atmospheric humidity. [1] Gat JR and Gonfiantini R, (Eds) (1981) IAEA Technical Report Series. [2] Rohrssen MK, Brunner B Mielke RE and Coleman M (2008) Analyt. Chem. (in press).

  14. Dissolution of [(226)Ra]BaSO4 and partial separation of (226)Ra from radium/barium sulfate: A new treatment method for NORM waste from petroleum industry.

    PubMed

    Al Abdullah, Jamal; Al Masri, M S; Amin, Yusr

    2016-01-01

    Complete dissolution of [(226)Ra]BaSO4 precipitate was successfully performed using NaNO2 as a reducing agent in acidic solution at room temperature. Results showed a significant effect of acid and NaNO2 concentrations and temperature on the dissolution efficiency. The method was successfully used for separation of radium from NORM scale samples from the petroleum industry; sufficient volume reduction of NORM waste was achieved. The obtained (226)Ra solution was purified using two separation methods. The dissolution method can be of great interest in the development of radiochemical analysis of radium isotopes. PMID:26623931

  15. Barium Stars: Theoretical Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husti, Laura; Gallino, Roberto; Bisterzo, Sara; Straniero, Oscar; Cristallo, Sergio

    2009-09-01

    Barium stars are extrinsic Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. They present the s-enhancement characteristic for AGB and post-AGB stars, but are in an earlier evolutionary stage (main sequence dwarfs, subgiants, red giants). They are believed to form in binary systems, where a more massive companion evolved faster, produced the s-elements during its AGB phase, polluted the present barium star through stellar winds and became a white dwarf. The samples of barium stars of Allen & Barbuy (2006) and of Smiljanic et al. (2007) are analysed here. Spectra of both samples were obtained at high-resolution and high S/N. We compare these observations with AGB nucleosynthesis models using different initial masses and a spread of 13C-pocket efficiencies. Once a consistent solution is found for the whole elemental distribution of abundances, a proper dilution factor is applied. This dilution is explained by the fact that the s-rich material transferred from the AGB to the nowadays observed stars is mixed with the envelope of the accretor. We also analyse the mass transfer process, and obtain the wind velocity for giants and subgiants with known orbital period. We find evidence that thermohaline mixing is acting inside main sequence dwarfs and we present a method for estimating its depth.

  16. Methods for producing monodispersed particles of barium titanate

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a low-temperature controlled method for producing high-quality, ultrafine monodispersed nanocrystalline microsphere powders of barium titanate and other pure or composite oxide materials having particles ranging from nanosized to micronsized particles. The method of the subject invention comprises a two-stage process. The first stage produces high quality monodispersed hydrous titania microsphere particles prepared by homogeneous precipitation via dielectric tuning in alcohol-water mixed solutions of inorganic salts. Titanium tetrachloride is used as an inorganic salt precursor material. The second stage converts the pure hydrous titania microsphere particles into crystalline barium titanate microsphere powders via low-temperature, hydrothermal reactions.

  17. Yielding Unexpected Results: Precipitation of Ba[subscript3](PO[subscript4])[subscript2] and Implications for Teaching Solubility Principles in the General Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazen, Jeffery L.; Cleary, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Precipitation of barium phosphate from aqueous solutions of a barium salt and a phosphate salt forms the basis for a number of conclusions drawn in general chemistry. For example, the formation of a solid white precipitate is offered as evidence that barium phosphate is insoluble. Furthermore, analysis of the supernatant is used to illustrate the…

  18. Yielding Unexpected Results: Precipitation of Ba[subscript3](PO[subscript4])[subscript2] and Implications for Teaching Solubility Principles in the General Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazen, Jeffery L.; Cleary, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Precipitation of barium phosphate from aqueous solutions of a barium salt and a phosphate salt forms the basis for a number of conclusions drawn in general chemistry. For example, the formation of a solid white precipitate is offered as evidence that barium phosphate is insoluble. Furthermore, analysis of the supernatant is used to illustrate the

  19. Barium uranyl diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Anna-Gay D.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2012-08-15

    Three Ba{sup 2+}/UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} methylenediphosphonates have been prepared from mild hydrothermal treatment of uranium trioxide, methylendiphosphonic acid (C1P2) with barium hydroxide octahydrate, barium iodate monohydrate, and small aliquots of HF at 200 Degree-Sign C. These compounds, Ba[UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{center_dot}1.4H{sub 2}O (Ba-1), Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2}F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O (Ba-2), and Ba{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2})F{sub 4}]{center_dot}5.75H{sub 2}O (Ba-3) all adopt layered structures based upon linear uranyl groups and disphosphonate molecules. Ba-2 and Ba-3 are similar in that they both have UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged and chelated by the diphosphonate moiety into a two-dimensional zigzag anionic sheet (Ba-2) and a one-dimensional ribbon anionic chain (Ba-3). Ba-1, has a single crystallographically unique uranium metal center where the C1P2 ligand solely bridges to form [UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} sheets. The interlayer space of the structures is occupied by Ba{sup 2+}, which, along with the fluoride ion, mediates the structure formed and maintains overall charge balance. - Graphical abstract: Illustration of the stacking of the layers in Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2})F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramidal units, U(1)O{sub 7}=gray, U(2)O{sub 7}=yellow, barium=blue, phosphorus=magenta, fluorine=green, oxygen=red, carbon=black, and hydrogen=light peach. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymerization of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} sites to form uranyl dimers leads to structural variations in compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barium cations stitch uranyl diphosphonate anionic layers together, and help mediate structure formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HF acts as both a mineralizing agent and a ligand.

  20. Correlation studies of barium on pulmonary infection under the assessment of VFSS

    PubMed Central

    SUN, JIE; CHEN, WEI

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a common clinical disease resulting in somatic dyskinesia as well as different degrees of dysphagia. The aim of the study was to assess the results obtained from the utilization of 60% barium sulfate suspension and iohexol as contrast agents in video fluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS), and compare the association between the clinical application of the two contrast agents and the incidence of pneumonia. A total of 60 cases of in-patients with dysphagia caused by stroke were selected and divided into two groups based on the diagnostic standard. No obvious differences were evident between the groups with regard to gender, age, position of stroke and the nature of stroke. The patients were divided into an iohexol group of 30 patients administered with 350 mgI/ml iohexol as a contrast agent, and a barium sulfate group of 30 patients administered with 60% barium sulfate suspension as a contrast agent. A VFSS evaluation was implemented before and after 3 weeks of treatment, respectively, and the pharynx transit time was compared between the two groups of contrast agents according to the position of stroke. By using case-control studies, the incidence of pneumonia between the two groups of patients within 2 weeks after hospitalization was analyzed and the association between the complication probability with different contrast agents was analyzed. After 2 weeks in hospital, the incidence of aspiration pneumonia of the two groups was statistically significant (P<0.05). The incidence of pneumonia of the iohexol group was markedly lower than that of the barium sulfate group, which may be important for barium aspiration. In conclusion, in the VFSS of dysphagia after stroke and barium sulfate increased the incidence of pneumonia, and that iohexol was widely used in video fluoroscopy. PMID:26893627

  1. Comparing the relationship between precipitation and river geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epp, A.; Luymes, R.; Bennett, M.; DaSilva, J.; Marsh, S. J.; Gillies, S. L.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Voss, B.

    2013-12-01

    The geochemistry of precipitation affects the geochemistry of river water. Ideally, studies of river biogeochemistry should therefore include collection and analyses of dry and wet deposition. The Global Rivers Observatory has studied the Fraser River near Vancouver since the summer of 2009 at roughly bi-weekly resolution. The interpretation of this temporal record of river biogeochemistry, particularly the various sources of solutes, could be improved with a better understanding of atmospheric contributions. In this study precipitation and river water will be analysed from the Fraser River basin for nutrients as well as major and select trace ion concentrations. The nutrients analyzed will include ammonium (NH4), nitrate and nitrate (NO3-NO2), phosphate (PO4) and silicate (SiO4). Major ions include sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), chloride (Cl), and sulfate (SO4). Trace elements may include molybdenum, strontium, barium, uranium, rubidium, manganese and iron. Samples will be collected using the bulk method which collects both wet and dry deposition . Correlating precipitation chemistry with data on wind direction may help elucidate sources of nutrients and major ions. For instance, westerly sources may transport pollution from the City of Vancouver and agricultural lands in the Fraser delta. Such pollutants may increase the acidity of precipitation and imprint the water chemistry with a unique chemical signature . The results of this study will be helpful in correcting Fraser River water data for contributions from atmospheric deposition.

  2. Removal of carbon dioxide by reactive crystallization in a scrubber—kinetics of barium carbonate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pao-Chi; Kou, K. L.; Tai, H. K.; Jin, S. L.; Lye, C. L.; Lin, C. Y.

    2002-04-01

    A bubble column scrubber was utilized to remove simulated CO 2 waste gas under a constant pH value. Using barium chloride solution as an absorbent reacting with CO 2-gas in the scrubber under an alkaline solution condition, precipitates of barium carbonate were formed during the operation. Measured crystal size distributions at a given time were used to calculate the growth rate of barium carbonate crystals, which is proportional to a 1.49 order of relative supersaturation. This demonstrates that both mass transfer and surface integration are important to the crystal growth of barium carbonate. The classical nucleation theory can be used to describe the nucleation rate of barium carbonate. In addition, the agglomeration kernel is proportional to a 2.86 order of relative supersaturation.

  3. Sources of sulfate supporting anaerobic metabolism in a contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ulrich, G.A.; Breit, G.N.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Suflita, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Field and laboratory techniques were used to identify the biogeochemical factors affecting sulfate reduction in a shallow, unconsolidated alluvial aquifer contaminated with landfill leachate. Depth profiles of 35S-sulfate reduction rates in aquifer sediments were positively correlated with the concentration of dissolved sulfate. Manipulation of the sulfate concentration in samples revealed a Michaelis-Menten-like relationship with an apparent Km and Vmax of approximately 80 and 0.83 ??M SO4-2??day-1, respectively. The concentration of sulfate in the core of the leachate plume was well below 20 ??M and coincided with very low reduction rates. Thus, the concentration and availability of this anion could limit in situ sulfate-reducing activity. Three sulfate sources were identified, including iron sulfide oxidation, barite dissolution, and advective flux of sulfate. The relative importance of these sources varied with depth in the alluvium. The relatively high concentration of dissolved sulfate at the water table is attributed to the microbial oxidation of iron sulfides in response to fluctuations of the water table. At intermediate depths, barite dissolves in undersaturated pore water containing relatively high concentrations of dissolved barium (???100 ??M) and low concentrations of sulfate. Dissolution is consistent with the surface texture of detrital barite grains in contact with leachate. Laboratory incubations of unamended and barite-amended aquifer slurries supported the field observation of increasing concentrations of barium in solution when sulfate reached low levels. At a deeper highly permeable interval just above the confining bottom layer of the aquifer, sulfate reduction rates were markedly higher than rates at intermediate depths. Sulfate is supplied to this deeper zone by advection of uncontaminated groundwater beneath the landfill. The measured rates of sulfate reduction in the aquifer also correlated with the abundance of accumulated iron sulfide in this zone. This suggests that the current and past distributions of sulfate-reducing activity are similar and that the supply of sulfate has been sustained at these sites.

  4. A model validation study of the washout/rainout contribution of sulfate and nitrate in wet deposition compared with precipitation chemistry data in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, Mizuo; Aikawa, Masahide

    2015-09-01

    We simulated washout/rainout ratios of non-sea-salt (nss)-SO42- and NO3- using a chemical transport model and compared the estimates with precipitation measurements sampled at 0.5/1 mm intervals at sites located in Kobe (urban), Toyo-oka (suburban), and Tamba (rural) cities, Japan. The 25th and 75th percentile range of the simulated washout contributions was 30-70%. The simulated washout contribution range of NO3- (40-70%) was greater than that of nss-SO42 - (30-60%). There was good agreement between the simulated and observed values, and the observed washout contribution of NO3- was also greater than that of SO42-. The simulated washout contribution range was higher (60-75%) in emission source regions and lower (40-55%) in downwind areas. The wet deposition process is one of the key causes of uncertainty in chemical transport modeling. Comparing model results with such high-frequency precipitation chemistry data has been extremely rare. Thus the current study is providing useful information for evaluating and improving wet deposition modeling and for the better understanding of the wet deposition mechanism.

  5. Barium light source method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, John J. (Inventor); MacDonagh-Dumler, Jeffrey (Inventor); Anderson, Heidi M. (Inventor); Lawler, James E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Visible light emission is obtained from a plasma containing elemental barium including neutral barium atoms and barium ion species. Neutral barium provides a strong green light emission in the center of the visible spectrum with a highly efficient conversion of electrical energy into visible light. By the selective excitation of barium ionic species, emission of visible light at longer and shorter wavelengths can be obtained simultaneously with the green emission from neutral barium, effectively providing light that is visually perceived as white. A discharge vessel contains the elemental barium and a buffer gas fill therein, and a discharge inducer is utilized to induce a desired discharge temperature and barium vapor pressure therein to produce from the barium vapor a visible light emission. The discharge can be induced utilizing a glow discharge between electrodes in the discharge vessel as well as by inductively or capacitively coupling RF energy into the plasma within the discharge vessel.

  6. Optimized photorefractive barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warde, Cardinal; Jenssen, Hans P.

    1992-03-01

    The goal of this research program was to investigate new and modified crystal-growth techniques that would lead to high-optical-quality BaTiO3 with increased photorefractive speed and sensitivity. The research program consisted of four parts: (1) feed material purification; (2) crystal growth by the top-seeded-solution technique as well as by a barium borate flux technique; (3) new furnace design studies; and (4) photorefractive characterization experiments. Iron and nickel-doped BaTiO3 crystals were grown under the program. BaTiO3 is a promising photorefractive material due to its large electrooptic coefficient and excellent self-pumped phase conjugation. Our furnaces were limited by certain design and operating characteristics, and crystals grown in these furnaces were easily contaminated by the furnace itself. Two new furnaces, cylindrical and octagonal furnaces, were developed with commercially available parts that are cleaner, more mechanically reproducible, more uniform in temperature and more responsive to control action through reduced thermal mass. The two furnaces are equipped with precise computer control of the pulling and rotation system. The cylindrical furnace was found to be susceptible to cracking due to expansion when heated and to shrinkage after heating. To prevent cracking, expansion joints were provided and the insulation set was made of flat plates set up in an octagonal pattern.

  7. Interaction between Barium Oxide and Barium Containing Chloride Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Elena V.; Zakiryanova, Irina D.; Korzun, Iraida V.; Bovet, Andrey L.; Antonov, Boris D.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal analysis was applied to determine the liquidus temperatures in the NaCl-KCl-BaCl2-BaO system, with BaO concentration varied from 0 to 6 mole%. The temperature dependence of the BaO solubility in the NaCl-KCl-BaCl2 eutectic melt was investigated; the thermodynamic parameters of BaO dissolution were calculated. The caloric effects of melting of the NaCl-KCl-BaCl2 eutectic with barium oxide and barium oxychloride additions were studied. The type, morphology, and composition of oxychloride ionic groupings in the melt were determined in situ using Raman spectroscopy.

  8. Barium swallow study in routine clinical practice: a prospective study in patients with chronic cough*,**

    PubMed Central

    Nin, Carlos Shuler; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Paludo, Artur de Oliveira; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Hochhegger, Daniela Reis; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the routine use of barium swallow study in patients with chronic cough. METHODS: Between October of 2011 and March of 2012, 95 consecutive patients submitted to chest X-ray due to chronic cough (duration > 8 weeks) were included in the study. For study purposes, additional images were obtained immediately after the oral administration of 5 mL of a 5% barium sulfate suspension. Two radiologists systematically evaluated all of the images in order to identify any pathological changes. Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test for categorical data were used in the comparisons. RESULTS: The images taken immediately after barium swallow revealed significant pathological conditions that were potentially related to chronic cough in 12 (12.6%) of the 95 patients. These conditions, which included diaphragmatic hiatal hernia, esophageal neoplasm, achalasia, esophageal diverticulum, and abnormal esophageal dilatation, were not detected on the images taken without contrast. After appropriate treatment, the symptoms disappeared in 11 (91.6%) of the patients, whereas the treatment was ineffective in 1 (8.4%). We observed no complications related to barium swallow, such as contrast aspiration. CONCLUSIONS: Barium swallow improved the detection of significant radiographic findings related to chronic cough in 11.5% of patients. These initial findings suggest that the routine use of barium swallow can significantly increase the sensitivity of chest X-rays in the detection of chronic cough-related etiologies. PMID:24473762

  9. Diethyl sulfate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Diethyl sulfate ; CASRN 64 - 67 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  10. Dimethyl sulfate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Dimethyl sulfate ; CASRN 77 - 78 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  11. Observation and theory of the barium releases from the CRRES satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Huba, J. D.; Scales, W. A.; Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between releases of barium from the NASA Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) and enhanced auroral activity is discussed with reference to observational data. Barium releases were conducted at a variety of altitudes and injection velocities, and plasma irregularities are reported as a result of the interactions. Auroral activity increased within 5 min of each release, and references are made to the effects on diamagnetic cavities, bulk ion motion, and stimulated electron and ion precipitation. Artificially created structured diamagnetic cavities are noted for each release, plasma waves are generated by the high-speed ion clouds, and enhanced ionization is found in the critical ionization-velocity process. Barium releases are effective in stimulating electron precipitation, and the observed irregularities are related to cycloid bunching of the initial ion distributions.

  12. Thoracoscopic treatment of barium-induced lung entrapment complicating esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Francesco; Silvestry, Scott C

    2008-02-01

    Patients with suspected esophageal perforations are routinely evaluated with a swallow study using a water-soluble contrast medium followed by thin-barium administration when the first fails to demonstrate a leak. Intrapleural barium instillation has been historically correlated with mild degree of pleural inflammation and a low-grade talclike reactive process. Still, if administered in excessive quantities, it may contribute to complicate the clinical scenario of pleural contamination secondary to the perforated esophagus. We report the case of a patient that presented with a malignant esophageal perforation and developed a trapped lung from extensive pleural contamination with barium sulfate that required video-assisted thoracic drainage and decortication with successful reexpansion of the lung and resolution of the acute symptoms. PMID:18288003

  13. 21 CFR 82.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) The term blanc fixe means a suspension in water of precipitated barium sulfate. (i) The term gloss white means a suspension in water of co-precipitated aluminum hydroxide and barium sulfate. (j) The...

  14. Distribution and source of barium in ground water at Cattaraugus Indian Reservation, southwestern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.; Staubitz, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    High concentrations of dissolved barium have been found in ground water from bedrock wells on the Seneca Nation of Indians Reservation on Cattaraugus Creek in southwestern New York. Concentrations in 1982 were as high as 23.0 milligrams per liter , the highest found reported from any natural ground-water system in the world. The highest concentrations are in a bedrock aquifer and in small lenses of saturated gravel between bedrock and the overlying till. The bedrock aquifer is partly confined by silt, clay, and till. The high barium concentrations are attributed to dissolution of the mineral barite (BaSO4), which is present in the bedrock and possibly in overlying silt, clay, or till. The dissolution of barite seems to be controlled by action of sulfate-reducing bacteria, which alter the BaSO4 equilibrium by removing sulfate ions and permitting additional barite to dissolve. Ground water from the surficial, unconsolidated deposits and surface water in streams contain little or no barium. Because barium is chemically similar to calcium, it probably could be removed by cation exchange or treatments similar to those used for water softening. (USGS)

  15. Barium hexaferrite (M-phase) exhibiting superstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapathi, L.; Gopalakrishnan, J.; Rao, C.N.R.

    1984-05-01

    Barium hexaferrite (M-phase) prepared by the flux method is found to exhibit a ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure similar to barium hexaaluminate. Morgan and Shaw as well as Iyi et al have recently reported the formation of a barium-rich phase of barium hexaaluminate possessing a ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure of the magnetoplumbite structure. In view of the similarities between the layer structures of ..beta..-aluminas and the corresponding ferrites the authors have been carrying out electron microscopic investigations of potassium ..beta..-alumina and BaA1/sub 12/O/sub 19/ along with ferrites of similar compositions. They have obtained electron diffraction patterns of barium hexaaluminate identical to those obtained by Morgan and Shaw and Iyi et al, but more interestingly, they have found a phase of barium hexaferrite (M-phase) exhibiting the ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure.

  16. Barium in planktonic foraminifera

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, D.W.; Boyle, E.A. )

    1991-11-01

    Reconstructions of Ba distributions in ancient oceanic surface waters could provide new insight into paleoceanographic change. Calcite shells of planktonic foraminifera potentially provide a means of reconstructing such paleo-Ba distributions if lattice-bound Ba can be determined on shells recovered from deep-sea cores. Planktonic foraminifera shells from a series of cores were purified of non-lattice-bound Ba associated with organic or sedimentary phases by a combination of physical agitation, oxidative-reductive steps, acid leaches, and a novel alkaline-DTPA step to dissolve barite. A sequential dissolution of a large sample of cleaned shells of the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides conglobatus indicates homogeneous distribution of Ba in the shell material. Comparison of shells from sediments, sediment traps, and plankton tows indicates no significant differences in the Ba content of the purified shells. Variation in foraminiferal Ba contents between the Pacific, Atlantic, and Mediterranean Sea is consistent with the trend in surface seawater Ba. The calculated distribution coefficient for Ba incorporation in five species based on these data is 0.19 {plus minus} 0.05. Several species of the non-spinose planktonic foraminifera Globorotalia have Ba/Ca ratios ranging from 2 to 13 {mu}mol; these high Ba contents might be explained by differences in the way these foraminifera precipitate their shells. A temporal record of Ba/Ca in samples of Globigerinoides and Orbulina from a core in the northwest Atlantic suggests that the Ba concentration of surface waters at this site has not changed by more than 20% over the last 14 kyr.

  17. The problem of the barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, E.; Nemec, J.; Proffitt, C.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet observations of barium stars and other cool stars with peculiar element abundances are reported. Those observations attempted to find hot white dwarf companions. Among six real barium stars studied, only Zeta Cap was found to have a white dwarf companion. Among seven mild, or marginal, barium stars studied, at least three were found to have hot subluminous companions. It is likely that all of them have white dwarf companions.

  18. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  19. The L equals 6.7 quiet time barium shaped charge injection experiment 'Chachalaca'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Rieger, E. P.; Peek, H. M.; Bottoms, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Near dawn on October 9, 1972, UT, a barium plasma injection experiment was carried out from Poker Flat, Alaska, during quiet magnetic conditions (Kp equals 1+). The visible plasma flux tube produced was more diffuse than the flux tubes in previous experiments, but it could be tracked for 30 min out to an altitude of 2.5 earth radii. The flux tube remained integral for about 20 min, when a single striation separated from the main streak. Comparisons of the observed flux tube orientation with theoretical field models show no significant deviations ascribable to field-aligned currents. Cross-field drift rates of the foot of the flux tube indicate an E field of approximately 7 mV/m at 200-km altitude. Although an attempt was made via a jet aircraft flight, barium ions were not detected in the southern conjugate region. No energetic particle precipitation phenomena were observed which could be ascribed to the barium plasma injection.

  20. Zinc-sulfate thermoelectrochemical hydrogen cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Remick, R.J.; Carty, R.H.; Sammells, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology is currently developing a hybrid thermochemical-electrochemical water-splitting cycle based on zinc sulfate chemistry. The zinc sulfate cycle is similar to other metal oxide/metal sulfate cycles in that it uses metal oxide to concentrate electrolytically produced sulfuric acid. The zinc sulfate is precipitated by taking advantage of its retrograde solubility, which allows the recovery of the zinc sulfate as a monohydrate by supplying sensible rather than latent heat. This cycle has been completely demonstrated in the laboratory using recycled materials. Research on the electrochemical step indicates that cell performance goals of 200 mA/cm/sup 2/ at 0.5 volts can be achieved on relatively inexpensive electrode materials with overall cycle efficiencies in excess of 35%.

  1. Chinese hamster ovary cell mutants defective in heparan sulfate biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bame, K.J.; Kiser, C.S.; Esko, J.D.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have isolated Chinese hamster ovary cell mutants defective in proteoglycan synthesis by radiographic screening for cells unable to incorporate TVSO4 into acid-precipitable material. Some mutants did not incorporate TVSO4 into acid-precipitable material, whereas others incorporated about 3-fold less radioactivity. HPLC anion exchange chromatographic analysis of radiolabelled glycosaminoglycans isolated from these mutants revealed many are defective in heparan sulfate biosynthesis. Mutants 803 and 677 do not synthesize heparan sulfate, although they produce chondroitin sulfate: strain 803 makes chondroitin sulfate normally, whereas 677 overaccumulates chondroitin sulfate by a factor of three. These mutants fall into the same complementation group, suggesting that the mutations are allelic. A second group of heparan sulfate biosynthetic mutants, consisting of cell lines 625, 668 and 679, produce undersulfated heparan sulfate and normal chondroitin sulfate. Treatment of the chains with nitrous acid should determine the position of the sulfate groups along the chain. These mutants may define a complementation group that is defective in the enzymes which modify the heparan sulfate chain. To increase the authors repertoire of heparan sulfate mutants, they are presently developing an in situ enzyme assay to screen colonies replica plated on filter discs for sulfotransferase defects.

  2. Rapid variablity of Cenozoic weawater sulfate concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortmann, U. G.; Paytan, A.

    2012-12-01

    Fluid inclusion data suggest that the composition of major elements in seawater changes slowly over geological time scales. This view contrasts with high resolution isotope data that imply more rapid fluctuations of seawater chemistry. We use a non-steady state box model of the global sulfur cycle to show that the marine S-isotope record can be explained by variable marine sulfate concentrations triggered by basin scale evaporite precipitation/dissolution events. We propose that the deep time evolution of seawater sulfate concentrations is best characterized by long phases of stasis, punctuated by short intervals of rapid change. This has far reaching implications as sulfate concentrations affect several important biological processes including carbonate mineralogy, microbially mediated organic matter remineralization, sedimentary phosphorous regeneration, and nitrogen fixation. These changes are likely to impact ocean productivity, and the the global carbon cycle. Moreover, because the ocean is a major source for sulfate aerosols, lower marine sulfate concentrations could have affected atmospheric aerosol chemistry as well. Thus, times of high sulfate concentrations correlate with an increased aerosol load and global cooling, whereas times of low marine sulfate concentrations correspond with greenhouse periods. Specifically, the rapid rise of the marine sulfate concentrations during the Early Eocene likely increased the aerosol load in the atmosphere, which may have contributed to the demise of the Eocene Climatic Optimum and the onset of the longterm Cenozoic cooling trend.

  3. Sulfate adsorption on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1999-10-15

    Recent spectroscopic work has suggested that only one surface species of sulfate is dominant on hematite. Sulfate is therefore a very suitable anion to test and develop adsorption models for variable charge minerals. The authors have studied sulfate adsorption on goethite covering a large range of sulfate concentrations, surface coverages, pH values, and electrolyte concentrations. Four different techniques were used to cover the entire range of conditions. For characterization at low sulfate concentrations, below the detection limit of sulfate with ICP-AES, the authors used proton-sulfate titrations at constant pH. Adsorption isotherms were studied for the intermediate sulfate concentration range. Acid-base titrations in sodium sulfate and electromobility were used for high sulfate concentrations. All the data can be modeled with one adsorbed species if it is assumed that the charge of adsorbed sulfate is spatially distributed in the interface. The charge distribution of sulfate follows directly from modeling the proton-sulfate adsorption stoichoimemtry sine this stoichiometry is independent of the intrinsic affinity constant of sulfate. The charge distribution can be related to the structure of the surface complex by use of the Pauling bond valence concept and is in accordance with the microscopic structure found by spectroscopy. The intrinsic affinity constant follows from the other measurements. Modeling of the proton-ion stoichoimetry with the commonly used 2-pK models, where adsorbed ions are treated as point charges, is possible only if at least two surface species for sulfate are used.

  4. Novel Thermally Stable Poly (vinyl chloride) Composites for Sulfate Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    BaCO3 dispersed PVC composites were prepared through a polymer re-precipitation method. The composites were tested for sulfate removal using rapid small scale column test (RSSCT) and found to significantly reduce sulfate concentration. The method was extended to synthe...

  5. Radium/Barium Waste Project

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, Allen K.; Ellefson, Mark D.; McDonald, Kent M.

    2015-06-25

    The treatment, shipping, and disposal of a highly radioactive radium/barium waste stream have presented a complex set of challenges requiring several years of effort. The project illustrates the difficulty and high cost of managing even small quantities of highly radioactive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-regulated waste. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research activities produced a Type B quantity of radium chloride low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in a number of small vials in a facility hot cell. The resulting waste management project involved a mock-up RCRA stabilization treatment, a failed in-cell treatment, a second, alternative RCRA treatment approach, coordinated regulatory variances and authorizations, alternative transportation authorizations, additional disposal facility approvals, and a final radiological stabilization process.

  6. Experimental study of an ionospheric disturbance during the cumulative injection of barium vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhulin, I. A.; Milinevskii, G. P.; Loevskii, A. S.; Moisia, R. I.; Romanovskii, Iu. A.; Ruzhin, Iu. Ia.; Skomarovskii, V. S.

    1984-05-01

    The cumulative injection of a barium vapor jet and disturbances arising during the deceleration of a plasma jet in the ionosphere was investigated on June 29, 1978 (21.05 LT) over the Volgograd test area in the course of the Spolokh-2 rocket experiment. Features characterizing the disturbance of the ionosphere during the initial stage of the barium-jet dispersion are examined; particular attention is given to effects associated with shock wave propagation, including collisional ionization. The stimulated precipitation of energetic electrons is disclosed which has the character of artificial pulsations of electron fluxes; it is noted that this stimulated precipitation may be connected with the excitation of MHD waves in the ionosphere during injection of the jet.

  7. Barium Isotopes in Single Presolar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellin, M. J.; Davis, A. M.; Savina, M. R.; Kashiv, Y.; Clayton, R. N.; Lewis, R. S.; Amari, S.

    2001-01-01

    Barium isotopic compositions of single presolar grains were measured by laser ablation laser resonant ionization mass spectrometry and the implications of the data for stellar processes are discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Fabrication of Barium Zirconate Coated Crucibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wayne

    2000-05-01

    Erb et al. have shown that barium zirconate crucibles are inert to the YBCO molten flux during the crystal growth process. Since these crucibles are not commercially available and they are costly and time-consuming to fabricate, a barium zirconate coating process on inexpensive and commerically available crucibles was developed to replicate the properties of actual barium zirconate crucibles. Specifically, the coating process entailed barium zirconium isopropoxide being painted onto an alumina crucible and a yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) crucible. Then the alumina crucible was fired at 1385 degrees Celcius for 53 hours and the YSZ crucible was fired at 1200 degrees Celsius for 24 hours. After the firing process, crystals were grown in these coated crucibles. The crystals were analyzed with the SQUID magnetometer to determine the transition temperature and with the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to determine the crystal composition.

  9. Tyrosine sulfation in precursors of collagen V.

    PubMed

    Fessler, L I; Brosh, S; Chapin, S; Fessler, J H

    1986-04-15

    Radioactive labeling of p-collagens V, collagens V, and, to a small extent, of procollagen V occurred when [35S]sulfate was incubated with tendons or primary tendon cell cultures, or blood vessels and crops of 17- to 19-day-old chick embryos, or with lung slices from neonatal rats. Most or all of this label is in the form of 1 or more sulfated tyrosine residues/chain of p alpha 1(V), alpha 1(V), p alpha 1'(V), alpha 1'(V), p alpha 2(V), and alpha 2(V), and it remains attached through purification by dialysis, ammonium sulfate precipitation, CsCl-GdnCl2 equilibrium buoyant density and velocity sedimentations, ion-exchange chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Radioactive tyrosine sulfate was identified in alkaline hydrolysates of these collagen V chains, after labeling the tissues with either [35S]sulfate or [3H]tyrosine, by electrophoretic and chromatographic comigration with a tyrosine sulfate standard. Tunicamycin A1, which inhibits the attachment of N-linked complex carbohydrate, did not interfere with the sulfation process. The tyrosine sulfate is located in a noncollagenous domain, which is probably adjacent to the amino end of the collagen helix, and is retained throughout the physiological proteolytic processing of procollagens V. After digestion with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, 35S-labeled p alpha 1(V) and alpha 1(V) chains gave the same map of labeled peptides, and this differed from the map given by p alpha 1'(V) and alpha 1'(V) chains. Little sulfation of p alpha 2(V) and alpha 2(V) chains occurs. The implications of these observations for the structure and properties of procollagens V and their derivatives are considered. PMID:3082875

  10. Barium potentiates the conditioned aversion to, but not the somatic signs of, morphine withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mio; Wada, Kiyoshi; Funada, Masahiko

    2005-09-20

    The effect of barium, a putative blocker of G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels, on naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent mice was investigated. Mice were chronically treated with morphine (8-45 mg/kg) for 6 days. The morphine-dependent mice were then given naltrexone (1 and 3 mg/kg), after which they showed several somatic signs of withdrawal, as well as conditioned aversion, increased cortical noradrenaline turnover, and decreased dopamine turnover in the limbic forebrain. Pretreatment with barium (1.25 and 2.5 nmol) significantly potentiated the naltrexone-precipitated conditioned aversion and augmented the decrease in dopamine turnover in the limbic forebrain. However, barium pretreatment did not affect the naltrexone-precipitated somatic signs of withdrawal and increased cortical noradrenaline turnover. These findings suggest that modification of GIRK channels may be involved in the expression of aversion to morphine withdrawal mediated through the dopaminergic system but it is not involved in the somatic signs of morphine withdrawal mediated through the noradrenergic system. PMID:16122731

  11. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  12. Pulsating aurora induced by upper atmospheric barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deehr, C.; Romick, G.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reports the apparent generation of pulsating aurora by explosive releases of barium vapor near 250 km altitude. This effect occurred only when the explosions were in the path of precipitating electrons associated with the visible aurora. Each explosive charge was a standard 1.5 kg thermite mixture of Ba and CuO with an excess of Ba metal which was vaporized and dispersed by the thermite explosion. Traces of Sr, Na, and Li were added to some of the charges, and monitoring was achieved by ground-based spectrophotometric observations. On March 28, 1976, an increase in emission at 5577 A and at 4278 A was observed in association with the first two bursts, these emissions pulsating with roughly a 10 sec period for approximately 60 to 100 sec after the burst.

  13. Geophysical disturbance environment during the NASA/MPE barium release at 5 earth radii on September 21, 1971.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. N.; Stanley, G. M.; Boyd, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    The geophysical disturbance environment was quiet during the NASA/MPE barium release at 5 earth radii on September 21, 1971. At the time of the release, the magnetosphere was in the late recovery phase of a principal magnetic storm, the provisional Dst value was -13 gammas, and the local horizontal disturbance at Great Whale River was near zero. Riometer and other observations indicated low-level widespread precipitation of high-energy electrons at Great Whale River before, during, and after the release. Cloudy sky at this station prevented optical observation of aurora. No magnetic or ionospheric effects attributable to the barium release were detected at Great Whale River.

  14. Microbial Sulfate Reduction at Cold Seeps Based on Analysis of Carbonate Associated Sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D.; Peng, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction and coupled anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) are the dominant biogeochemical processes occurring at cold seeps in marine settings. These processes not only support the growth of chemosynthetic communities but also promote the precipitation of authigenic carbonates. However, investigations of microbial sulfate reduction have been conducted only using porewaters or seep-related barites. The fact is that many seeps are either inactive or do not precipitate any barite minerals. Thus, little is known about the microbial sulfate reduction at these seep environments. The occurrence of authigenic carbonate has been documented at almost all cold seep sites, which provide a unique opportunity to investigate the microbial sulfate reduction using such carbonate. The presentation is focused on the concentrations and isotopic signatures of carbonate associated sulfate (CAS). The aim of the project is to determine the role of sulfate and sulfate reduction during carbonate precipitation at cold seeps. The CAS concentrations are 67-537 ppm in high-Mg calcite, 51-181 ppm in low-Mg calcite, and 116-565 in aragonite. The δ34SCAS and δ18OCAS also vary considerably, ranging from 21.9‰ to 56.2‰ (V-CDT) and from 10.1‰ to 24.8‰ (V-SMOW), respectively. On δ34SCAS versus δ18OCAS plots, both aragonite and calcite show linear trends that project down toward those of open seawater sulfate. The trends suggest that sulfate has been isotopically modified to various degrees in pore fluids before being incorporated into carbonate lattice. The much narrower δ34SCAS and δ18OCAS ranges for aragonite than for calcite suggests a much "pickier" condition for aragonite formation during early diagenesis. Our results suggest that concentration and isotopic composition of CAS in seep carbonates may be controlled by the supply of pore-water sulfate during carbonate precipitation. The reliability of CAS in carbonate of early diagenetic origin as a proxy of contemporaneous seawater sulfate is therefore questioned. Acknowledgment: This study was partially supported by NSFC (41373085).

  15. Preparation and characterization of uniform particles of flufenamic acid and its calcium and barium salts.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amr Ali; Matijević, Egon

    2012-09-01

    Uniform fully dispersed particles of flufenamic acid, a widely used anti-inflammatory drug, were prepared by two different methods. In the first one, the drug solution in organic solvents was added to a non-solvent (water or aqueous solutions of stabilizers); while in the second procedure the drug was precipitated by acidifying its basic aqueous solutions. In addition calcium and barium salts of uniform spherical particles were obtained by precipitation in aqueous basic solutions of the drug. These salts are supposed to improve the drug reactivity. The prepared dispersions of the drug and its salts were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and electrophoresis. PMID:22703985

  16. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Silva, J. V. Sales

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scale height, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, alpha-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars can not be represented by a single gaussian distribution. The abundances of alpha-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anti-correlated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90% of the barium stars belong to the thin disk population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an AGB star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  17. Effects of barium chlorine treatment of uranium ore on /sup 222/Rn emanation and /sup 226/Ra leachability from mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, S.A.; Church, S.L.; Whicker, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this laboratory study was to investigate the effectiveness of barium chloride treatment of uranium ore on /sup 222/Rn emanation from mill tailings, /sup 226/Ra level in waste-water, and the leachability of radium from tailings. It has been shown that barium sulfate is an excellent carrier for radium and that barium sulfate crystals have high retention capacity for radon gas produced by radium trapped within the lattice. Ground uranium ore from a mine in Wyoming was mixed with water to form a 1:1 ratio before barium and potassium chlorides were added at concentrations of 0, 10, 25, 50, and 100 mg per liter of slurry. The ore was then subjected to a simulated mill process using sulfuric acid leaching. The liquid representing tailings pond water was separated and analyzed for /sup 226/Ra and the solid fraction, representing mill tailings, was tested for radon emanation and the leachability of radium by deionized water. This study suggests that barium treatment of uranium ore prior to sulfuric acid leaching could be effective in reducing radon emanation from tailings and also in reducing the /sup 226/Ra concentration of waste-water. Leachability of radium from treated tailings was markedly reduced.

  18. Constraining the oceanic barium cycle with stable barium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhimian; Siebert, Christopher; Hathorne, Ed C.; Dai, Minhan; Frank, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of barium (Ba) concentrations in seawater resembles that of nutrients and Ba has been widely used as a proxy of paleoproductivity. However, the exact mechanisms controlling the nutrient-like behavior, and thus the fundamentals of Ba chemistry in the ocean, have not been fully resolved. Here we present a set of full water column dissolved Ba (DBa) isotope (δ137BaDBa) profiles from the South China Sea and the East China Sea that receives large freshwater inputs from the Changjiang (Yangtze River). We find pronounced and systematic horizontal and depth dependent δ137BaDBa gradients. Beyond the river influence characterized by generally light signatures (0.0 to + 0.3 ‰), the δ137BaDBa values in the upper water column are significantly higher (+ 0.9 ‰) than those in the deep waters (+ 0.5 ‰). Moreover, δ137BaDBa signatures are essentially constant in the entire upper 100 m, in which dissolved silicon isotopes are fractionated during diatom growth resulting in the heaviest isotopic compositions in the very surface waters. Combined with the decoupling of DBa concentrations and δ137BaDBa from the concentrations of nitrate and phosphate this implies that the apparent nutrient-like fractionation of Ba isotopes in seawater is primarily induced by preferential adsorption of the lighter isotopes onto biogenic particles rather than by biological utilization. The subsurface δ137BaDBa distribution is dominated by water mass mixing. The application of stable Ba isotopes as a proxy for nutrient cycling should therefore be considered with caution and both biological and physical processes need to be considered. Clearly, however, Ba isotopes show great potential as a new tracer for land-sea interactions and ocean mixing processes.

  19. Crystallization of Chicken Egg White Lysozyme from Sulfate Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    It has been "known" that chicken egg white lysozyme does not crystallize from sulfate, particularly ammonium sulfate, salts, but instead gives amorphous precipitates. This has been the basis of several studies using lysozyme comparing macromolecule crystal nucleation and amorphous precipitation. Recently Ries-Kautt et al (Acta Cryst D50, (1994) 366) have shown that purified isoionic CEWL could be crystallized from low concentrations of sulfate at basic pH, and we subsequently showed that in fact CEWL could be purified in both the tetragonal and orthorhombic forms using ammonium sulfate over the pH range 4.0 to 7.8 (Acta Cryst D53, (1997) 795). We have now extended these observations to include a range of common sulfate salts, specifically sodium, potassium, rubidium, magnesium, and manganese sulfates. In all cases but the manganese sulfates both the familiar tetragonal and orthorhombic forms were obtained, with unit cell dimensions close to those known for the "classic" sodium chloride crystallized forms. Manganese sulfate has only yielded orthorhombic crystals to date. All crystallizations were carried out using low (typically less than or equal to 6 M) salt and high (greater than approximately 90 mg/ml) protein concentrations. As with ammonium sulfate, the tetragonal - orthorhombic phase shift appears to be a function of both the temperature and the protein concentration, with higher temperatures and concentrations favoring the orthorhombic and lower the tetragonal form. The phase change range is somewhat reduced for the sulfate salts, depending upon conditions being typically between approximately 15 - 20 C. Both the magnesium and manganese sulfates gave crystals at salt concentrations over 0.6 M as well, with magnesium sulfate giving a very slowly nucleating and growing hexagonal form. A triclinic crystal form, characterized by aggressively small crystals (typically 0.1 mm in size) has been occasionally obtained from ammonium sulfate. Finally, preliminary spot solubility determinations have suggested that in some cases the solubility increases with increasing salt concentrations.

  20. Development of a rapid method for simultaneous separation of hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate and heparin by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Song, Xinlei; Tan, Xiaoqing; Xu, Linghua; Yu, Mingxiu; Wang, Siyi; Liu, Xiumei; Wang, Fengshan

    2016-05-01

    This study reports the use of diethylenetriamine as background electrolyte for the simultaneous separation of hyaluronan acid, chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate and heparin. The analytes were baseline separated by using an uncoated fused silica capillary at 37°C with a run time of 23min. The migration order, with hyaluronan acid at first and heparin at last, was related to the sulfation degree. The effect of salt concentration on resolution and migration order was also investigated. The developed method was applied to the simultaneous determination of hyaluronan acid and chondroitin sulfate in mouse plasma. Interferences in plasma were removed by protein precipitation and glycosaminoglycans were further purified by ethanol precipitation. The method was validated over the concentration range from 50 to 600μg/mL for hyaluronan acid and 500 to 6000μg/mL for chondroitin sulfate in mouse plasma. Results from assay validations showed that the method was selective and robust. PMID:26877013

  1. A relict sulfate-methane transition zone in the mid-Devonian Marcellus Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Danielle; Renock, Devon; Whitehouse, Martin; Leone, James; Rowe, Harry; Landis, Joshua; Hamren, Keith; Symcox, Carl W.; Sharma, Mukul

    2016-06-01

    A barium-enriched interval of Marcellus Shale (Middle Devonian Oatka Creek Formation) from a core in Chenango County, NY contains ∼100 μm diameter ellipsoidal grains with variable mineralogical compositions between pure barite and pure pyrite endmembers. Petrographic characterization and in-situ sulfur isotope analysis by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) was performed to better understand the diagenetic conditions under which these grains form and are preserved in the shale. Textural relationships suggest partial to complete pseudomorphic replacement of ellipsoidal barite by pyrite. Spatially, the ellipsoidal grains are concentrated in discrete layers parallel to original bedding and intervals within these layers often contain grains with similar degrees of replacement. The fraction of barite replaced by pyrite between these intervals can vary significantly, which is remarkable considering these intervals are separated by stratigraphic distances on the order of mm to cm in the shale (depths equivalent to deposition over 10's-1000's of years). The mean δ34S of barite and pyrite in ellipsoidal grains is 63.3 ± 3.6‰ and 2.2 ± 3.0‰, respectively, indicating that the grains are authigenic. Mass balance calculations based on density and stoichiometric differences between barite and pyrite indicate that reduction of sulfate from barite alone cannot be the sole source of sulfur in the replaced grains: only ∼23% of sulfur in pyrite comes from the dissolution of barite while the remainder derives from an additional source with δ34S = -17.6 ± 1.3‰. We suggest that pseudomorphic replacement of barite led first to the formation of greigite (Fe3S4), where one mole of sulfur was provided by barite and the other three moles of sulfur were contributed by FeS(aq); the latter formed by reaction of Fe2 + with sulfide from microbial sulfate reduction. Transformation of greigite to pyrite occurred via the sulfur addition and/or iron loss pathways. These observations suggest the following mechanism for the replacement of barite by pyrite in the ellipsoidal barite grains: (1) burial of authigenic barite below the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ), and (2) partial to complete dissolution of the grain and concomitant precipitation of greigite (and its subsequent transformation to pyrite) in the presence of pore water depleted in sulfate and enriched in FeS(aq) and polysulfides. We suggest that closely-spaced intervals containing different barite to pyrite ratios may reflect fine-scale temporal shifts or fluctuations in the position of the SMTZ due to variable rates of methanogenesis and/or sedimentation during diagenesis.

  2. Sulfated glycans in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2015-03-01

    Sulfated glycans such as glycosaminoglycans on proteoglycans are key players in both molecular and cellular events of inflammation. They participate in leukocyte rolling along the endothelial surface of inflamed sites; chemokine regulation and its consequential functions in leukocyte guidance, migration and activation; leukocyte transendothelial migration; and structural assembly of the subendothelial basement membrane responsible to control tissue entry of cells. Due to these and other functions, exogenous sulfated glycans of various structures and origins can be used to interventionally down-regulate inflammation processes. In this review article, discussion is given primarily on the anti-inflammatory functions of mammalian heparins, heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate and related compounds as well as the holothurian fucosylated chondroitin sulfate and the brown algal fucoidans. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of action of these sulfated glycans in inflammation, helps research programs involved in developing new carbohydrate-based drugs aimed to combat acute and chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:25576741

  3. pH control of the structure, composition, and catalytic activity of sulfated zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Vladimir K.; Materials Science Department, Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 ; Baranchikov, Alexander Ye.; Kopitsa, Gennady P.; Lermontov, Sergey A.; Yurkova, Lyudmila L.; Gubanova, Nadezhda N.; Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Orlova Roscha, Gatchina 188300 ; Ivanova, Olga S.; Lermontov, Anatoly S.; Rumyantseva, Marina N.; Vasilyeva, Larisa P.; Sharp, Melissa; Pranzas, P. Klaus; Tretyakov, Yuri D.

    2013-02-15

    We report a detailed study of structural and chemical transformations of amorphous hydrous zirconia into sulfated zirconia-based superacid catalysts. Precipitation pH is shown to be the key factor governing structure, composition and properties of amorphous sulfated zirconia gels and nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia. Increase in precipitation pH leads to substantial increase of surface fractal dimension (up to {approx}2.7) of amorphous sulfated zirconia gels, and consequently to increase in specific surface area (up to {approx}80 m{sup 2}/g) and simultaneously to decrease in sulfate content and total acidity of zirconia catalysts. Complete conversion of hexene-1 over as synthesized sulfated zirconia catalysts was observed even under ambient conditions. - Graphical abstract: Surface fractal dimension of amorphous sulfated zirconia and specific surface area and catalytic activity of crystalline sulfated zirconia as a function of precipitation pH. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural transformation of amorphous hydrous zirconia into sulfated zirconia is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation pH controls surface fractal dimension of amorphous zirconia gels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation pH is the key factor governing properties of sulfated zirconia.

  4. Hydrometallurgical process for recovering iron sulfate and zinc sulfate from baghouse dust

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, S.; Lawson, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    A process for recovering zinc-rich and iron-rich fractions from the baghouse dust that is generated in various metallurgical operations, especially in steel-making and other iron-making plants, comprises the steps of leaching the dust by hot concentrated sulfuric acid so as to generate dissolved zinc sulfate and a precipitate of iron sulfate, separating the precipitate from the acid by filtration and washing with a volatile liquid, such as methanol or acetone, and collecting the filtered acid and the washings into a filtrate fraction. The volatile liquid may be recovered by distillation, and the zinc may be removed from the filtrate by alternative methods, one of which involves addition of a sufficient amount of water to precipitate hydrated zinc sulfate at 10 C, separation of the precipitate from sulfuric acid by filtration, and evaporation of water to regenerate concentrated sulfuric acid. The recovery of iron may also be effected in alternative ways, one of which involves roasting the ferric sulfate to yield ferric oxide and sulfur trioxide, which can be reconverted to concentrated sulfuric acid by hydration. The overall process should not generate any significant waste stream. 1 figure.

  5. Hydrometallurgical process for recovering iron sulfate and zinc sulfate from baghouse dust

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, Solomon; Lawson, Daniel B.

    1994-01-01

    A process for recovering zinc/rich and iron-rich fractions from the baghouse dust that is generated in various metallurgical operations, especially in steel-making and other iron-making plants, comprises the steps of leaching the dust by hot concentrated sulfuric acid so as to generate dissolved zinc sulfate and a precipitate of iron sulfate, separating the precipitate from the acid by filtration and washing with a volatile liquid, such as methanol or acetone, and collecting the filtered acid and the washings into a filtrate fraction. The volatile liquid may be recovered distillation, and the zinc may be removed from the filtrate by alternative methods, one of which involves addition of a sufficient amount of water to precipitate hydrated zinc sulfate at 10.degree. C., separation of the precipitate from sulfuric acid by filtration, and evaporation of water to regenerate concentrated sulfuric acid. The recovery of iron may also be effected in alternative ways, one of which involves roasting the ferric sulfate to yield ferric oxide and sulfur trioxide, which can be reconverted to concentrated sulfuric acid by hydration. The overall process should not generate any significant waste stream.

  6. Improved spectrophotometric analysis of barium styphnate

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N E; Blasi, J A

    1983-01-01

    A spectrophotometric procedure to determine the purity of barium styphnate monohydrate based upon the absorbance of the styphnate ion at 326 and 413.3 nm has been developed. The purity is determined by comparing the absorbance of the styphnate ion in barium styphnate and in styphnic acid. Our investigation has shown that the molar absorptivity and lambda maxima of the styphnate ion are quite pH dependent; therefore, the pH is buffered to 6.8 to 7.0 with ammonium acetate. Under these conditions the molar absorptivity is 1.6 x 10/sup 4/ L/mol-cm. Analyses following the procedure in the Navy specification WS13444A using water were found to give low molar absorptivities (1.3 x 10/sup 4/ L/mol-cm) for the styphnic acid calibration resulting in erroneous values for barium styphnate purity.

  7. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  12. Sulfate in fetal development.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul A

    2011-08-01

    Sulfate (SO(4)(2-)) is an important nutrient for human growth and development, and is obtained from the diet and the intra-cellular metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, including methionine and cysteine. During pregnancy, fetal tissues have a limited capacity to produce sulfate, and rely on sulfate obtained from the maternal circulation. Sulfate enters and exits placental and fetal cells via transporters on the plasma membrane, which maintain a sufficient intracellular supply of sulfate and its universal sulfonate donor 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) for sulfate conjugation (sulfonation) reactions to function effectively. Sulfotransferases mediate sulfonation of numerous endogenous compounds, including proteins and steroids, which biotransforms their biological activities. In addition, sulfonation of proteoglycans is important for maintaining normal structure and development of tissues, as shown for reduced sulfonation of cartilage proteoglycans that leads to developmental dwarfism disorders and four different osteochondrodysplasias (diastrophic dysplasia, atelosteogenesis type II, achondrogenesis type IB and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia). The removal of sulfate via sulfatases is an important step in proteoglycan degradation, and defects in several sulfatases are linked to perturbed fetal bone development, including mesomelia-synostoses syndrome and chondrodysplasia punctata 1. In recent years, interest in sulfate and its role in developmental biology has expanded following the characterisation of sulfate transporters, sulfotransferases and sulfatases and their involvement in fetal growth. This review will focus on the physiological roles of sulfate in fetal development, with links to human and animal pathophysiologies. PMID:21419855

  13. An assessment of the redistribution of Barium during diagenesis of Marcellus Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renock, D.; Symcox, C.; Lanids, J. D.; Sharma, M.

    2012-12-01

    Produced water from the hydrofracturing of Marcellus Shale have been reported to contain barium at concentrations >4000 ppm (Gregory et al, 2011). Understanding the reactions responsible for the leaching of Ba into produced water is important for improving the economic viability of gas extraction and to mitigate environmental concerns. Core samples of Marcellus Shale from New York and Pennsylvania were shown to contain Ba in the range of 400-2200 μg/g. In some of these samples, barite (BaSO4) grains are shown to be partially replaced by pyrite (massive and framboidal varieties) suggesting that Ba is remobilized in the zone of sulfate reduction sometime after sedimentation. Sequential extraction experiments show Ba being released into buffered acetic acid (carbonate fraction), aqua regia (sulfide fraction), and hydrofluoric acid (silicate fraction) extractions despite ~50% of the barium remaining undissolved as barite. Laser ablation ICP-MS showed negligible concentrations of Ba in calcite veins and elevated concentrations in areas of the shale that are predominantly clay + organics. These results suggest that some of the Ba is associated with the clay fraction of the shale (e.g., sorbed to clay surfaces as a result of the anoxic dissolution of barite). These results may inform future strategies for mitigating the release of barium into produced water.

  14. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Sarrazin, Stephane; Lamanna, William C.; Esko, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are found at the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix, where they interact with a plethora of ligands. Over the last decade, new insights have emerged regarding the mechanism and biological significance of these interactions. Here, we discuss changing views on the specificity of protein–heparan sulfate binding and the activity of HSPGs as receptors and coreceptors. Although few in number, heparan sulfate proteoglycans have profound effects at the cellular, tissue, and organismal level. PMID:21690215

  15. Interaction of fibrinogen with dextran sulfate.

    PubMed

    SASAKI, S; NOGUCHI, H

    1959-09-01

    Interactions of fibrinogen with dextran sulfate, dextran, and carboxymethyl cellulose were investigated by turbidity measurement, chemical analysis, and electrophoresis. Dextran sulfate and fibrinogen combined even in the physiological pH region where both of them have negative net charges, and formed a precipitate and soluble complex. Since no complex formation was observed in the case of dextran, it seems that the electrostatic force plays a part in complex formation. However, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose which carries -COO(-) groups did not combine with fibrinogen. Therefore, it is considered that there is a specificity for the interaction among ionized groups. Further, temperature and molecular size of dextran sulfate influenced the interaction to a large extent. It is concluded from these facts that other intermolecular binding forces should be taken into consideration in addition to the electrostatic force. PMID:14441863

  16. A barium chemobezoar in an infant.

    PubMed

    Anatol, T; Maharaj, P; Leach, J

    2007-10-01

    A case report is presented of an infant who developed a large barium concretion proximal to a jejunal anastomosis. A brief literature review outlines the issues involved in the indications for, and choice of, contrast material for use in the precise radiological diagnosis of upper intestinal obstruction in infants. PMID:18303763

  17. 75 FR 19657 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... Commission found that the domestic interested party group response to its notice of institution (74 FR 31757... COMMISSION Barium Chloride From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice of Commission determination to conduct a full five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on...

  18. 75 FR 20625 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... established a schedule for the conduct of this review (74 FR 62587, November 30, 2010). Subsequently, counsel... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Barium Chloride From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION:...

  19. Methods for sulfate removal in liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C; Oyler, James R

    2014-11-04

    Processing of wet biomass feedstock by liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a pre-treatment temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent removal of soluble sulfate contaminants, or combinations thereof. Processing further includes reacting the soluble sulfate contaminants with cations present in the feedstock material to yield a sulfate-containing precipitate and separating the inorganic precipitates and/or the sulfate-containing precipitates out of the wet feedstock. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfate contaminants that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogeneous catalyst for gasification.

  20. Methods for sulfate removal in liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C; Oyler, James

    2013-12-17

    Processing of wet biomass feedstock by liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a pre-treatment temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent removal of soluble sulfate contaminants, or combinations thereof. Processing further includes reacting the soluble sulfate contaminants with cations present in the feedstock material to yield a sulfate-containing precipitate and separating the inorganic precipitates and/or the sulfate-containing precipitates out of the wet feedstock. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfate contaminants that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogenous catalyst for gasification.

  1. Mössbauer and X-ray diffraction study of Co2+-Si4+ substituted M-type barium hexaferrite BaFe12-2хСохSiхO19±γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyova, E. D.; Pashkova, E. V.; Ivanitski, V. P.; V‧yunov, O. I.; Belous, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    Using X-ray powder diffractions, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements, the effect of dopants (Co2++Si4+) on the fine structure and magnetic properties of M-type barium hexaferrite prepared by hydroxide and carbonate precipitations has been studied. It has been shown that the magnetic properties of M-type barium hexaferrite can be controlled by heterovalent substitution 2Fe3+→Со2++Sі4+.

  2. Response of Ned Wilson Lake watershed, Colorado, to changes in atmospheric deposition of sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D.H.; Turk, J.T.; Spahr, N.E. )

    1991-08-01

    The Ned Wilson Lake watershed responds directly and rapidly to changes in precipitation inputs of sulfate, which has important implications for effect of acid deposition on the aquatic system. Chemistry at three precipitation collection sites and three watershed sites (a pond, a lake, and a spring) has been monitored in and near the Flattops Wilderness Area in northwestern Colorado beginning in 1981-1983. Bulk snowpack concentration of sulfate in the watershed and volume-weighted annual mean concentration of sulfate in precipitation at two nearby sites generally decreased from 1981 to 1985, were small through 1987, and increased in 1988-1989. Changes in concentration of sulfate at the watershed sites are controlled by precipitation inputs. Responsiveness of the individual sites was dependent on their position along the hydrologic flow path. The fastest response was in the pond, which has a hydrologic residence time of less than 1 year; over 90% of the variance in concentration of sulfate in the pond was explained by changes in concentration in precipitation. The lake has a hydrologic residence time of 1 to 4 years; a regression model of the concentration of sulfate in the lake, as a function of the concentration in the lake during the previous year and the concentration in precipitation, explained 87% of the variance in concentration of sulfate in the lake. The hydrologic response time of the spring is unknown; it was not responsive to changes in concentration of sulfate in precipitation. The recent increase of sulfate concentration in precipitation and in the pond and lake is evidence for a rapid rather than a delayed response, which could not be determined when only a decreasing trend in sulfate concentration was reported in 1982-1987.

  3. Precipitation Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1996-01-01

    The water cycle regulates and reflects natural variability in climate at the regional and global scales. Large-scale human activities that involve changes in land cover, such as tropical deforestation, are likely to modify climate through changes in the water cycle. In order to understand, and hopefully be able to predict, the extent of these potential global and regional changes, we need first to understand how the water cycle works. In the past, most of the research in hydrology focused on the land branch of the water cycle, with little attention given to the atmospheric branch. The study of precipitation recycling which is defined as the contribution of local evaporation to local precipitation, aims at understanding hydrologic processes in the atmospheric branch of the water cycle. Simply stated, any study on precipitation recycling is about how the atmospheric branch of the water cycle works, namely, what happens to water vapor molecules after they evaporate from the surface, and where will they precipitate?

  4. Automotive sulfate emission data.

    PubMed Central

    Somers, J H

    1975-01-01

    This paper discusses automotive sulfate emission results obtained by the Office of Mobile Source Air Pollution Control of EPA, General Motors, Ford, Chrysler, and Esso. This work has been directed towards obtaining sulfate emission factors for cars with and without catalyst. While the EPA and Chrysler investigations have found significant sulfate formation in noncatalyst cars, GM, Ford, and Esso have found only trace levels from noncatalyst cars. All of these investigators agree that much higher quantities of sulfate are emitted from catalyst cars. The work done to date shows pelleted catalysts to have much lower sulfate emissions over the low speed-EPA Federal Test Procedures than monolith catalysts. This is probably due to temporary storage of sulfates on the catalyst due to chemical interaction with the alumina pellets. The sulfate compounds are, to a large degree, emitted later under higher speed conditions which result in higher catalyst temperatures which decompose the alumina salt. Future work will be directed towards further elucidation of this storage mechanism as well as determining in detail how factors such as air injection rate and catalyst location affect sulfate emissions. PMID:50932

  5. STRONTIUM PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    McKenzie, T.R.

    1960-09-13

    A process is given for improving the precipitation of strontium from an aqueous phosphoric-acid-containing solution with nickel or cobalt ferrocyanide by simultaneously precipitating strontium or calcium phosphate. This is accomplished by adding to the ferrocyanide-containing solution calcium or strontium nitrate in a quantity to yield a concentration of from 0.004 to 0.03 and adjusting the pH of the solution to a value of above 8.

  6. On the suppression of superconducting phase formation in YBCO materials by templated synthesis in the presence of a sulfated biopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elliott; Schnepp, Zoe; Wimbush, Stuart C.; Hall, Simon R.

    2008-11-01

    The use of biopolymers as templates to control superconductor crystallization is a recent phenomenon and is generating a lot of interest both from the superconductor community and in materials chemistry circles. This work represents a critical finding in the use of such biopolymers, in particular the contraindicatory nature of sulfur when attempting to affect a morphologically controlled synthesis. Synthesis of superconducting nanoparticles was attempted using carrageenan as a morphological template. Reactive sulfate groups on the biopolymer prevent this, producing instead significant quantities of barium sulfate nanotapes. By substituting the biopolymer for structurally analogous, non-sulfated agar, we show that superconducting nanoparticles could be successfully synthesized.

  7. PRECIPITATION METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM CONTAMINATING ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-02-24

    S>A method is described for separating plutonium, in a valence state of less than five, from an aqueous solution in which it is dissolved. The niethod consists in adding potassium and sulfate ions to such a solution while maintaining the solution at a pH of less than 7.1, and isolating the precipitate of potassium plutonium sulfate thus formed.

  8. Mine water treatment with limestone for sulfate removal.

    PubMed

    Silva, Adarlêne M; Lima, Rosa M F; Leão, Versiane A

    2012-06-30

    Limestone can be an option for sulfate sorption, particularly from neutral mine drainages because calcium ions on the solid surface can bind sulfate ions. This work investigated sulfate removal from mine waters through sorption on limestone. Continuous stirred-tank experiments reduced the sulfate concentration from 588.0mg/L to 87.0mg/L at a 210-min residence time. Batch equilibrium tests showed that sulfate loading on limestone can be described by the Langmuir isotherm, with a maximum loading of 23.7mg/g. Fixed-bed experiments were utilized to produce breakthrough curves at different bed depths. The Bed Depth Service Time (BDST) model was applied, and it indicated sulfate loadings of up to 20.0gSO(4)(2-)/L-bed as the flow rate increased from 1 to 10mL/min. Thomas, Yoon-Nelson and dose-response models, predicted a maximum particle loading of 19mg/g. Infrared spectrometry indicated the presence of sulfate ions on the limestone surface. Sulfate sorption on limestone seems to be an alternative to treating mine waters with sulfate concentrations below the 1200-2000mg/L range, where lime precipitation is not effective. In addition, this approach does not require alkaline pH values, as in the ettringite process. PMID:22541641

  9. A new process for sulfate removal from industrial waters

    SciTech Connect

    Reinsel, M.A.

    1999-07-01

    Many waters associated with mining and mineral processing contain high concentrations of sulfate. These concentrations typically exceed the drinking water guideline of 250 mg/L and may be subject to future discharge limits between 250 and 2,000 mg/L. In the Cost-Effective Sulfate Removal (CESR) process used by Hydrometrics, Inc., a proprietary reagent is added after standard lime treatment to precipitate a compound called ettringite, which can be removed using a clarifier and filter pressed. Sulfate, heavy metals and other contaminants may be removed in the process, which generates no liquid waste. Sulfate concentrations lower than 100 mg/L are easily achievable using this process, with the final concentration dependent upon the reagent dosage and contact time. The CESR process is simpler and less expensive than other sulfate-removal technologies such as sodium aluminate addition, reverse osmosis or evaporation, and is more effective than standard lime precipitation. This process is a true reduction of total dissolved solids (TDS) in that all chemicals added for treatment are precipitated during the reactions. Operating costs for near-complete sulfate removal using the process, which has been used successfully in electroplating, battery recycling and agricultural applications, are estimated at $3 to $6 per 1,000 gallons treated. The process has been demonstrated at the bench scale for waters associated with mining and mineral processing.

  10. Electron microscopic study of barium hexaaluminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyi, N.; Takekawa, S.; Bando, Y.; Kimura, S.

    1983-03-01

    The crystallographic relation between phase I and phase II of barium hexaaluminates, which were conventionally considered as the single compound "barium hexaaluminate (BaAl 12O 19)," was investigated using principally the electron diffraction method. Phase I (Ba 0.79Al 10.9O 17.14) was found to have β-alumina type structure with space group {P6 3}/{mmc}. On the other hand, phase II (Ba 2.34Al 21.0O 33.84) exhibited an a√3 × a√3 superstructure, which is probably due to the ordering of excess Ba ions within BaO layers. Possible structure models of both phases are presented.

  11. Gas hydrate decomposition and migration of the sulfate/methane transition zone recorded by authigenic barite in cold seep sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, S.; Hensen, C.; Spiess, V.; Blumenberg, M.; Schneider, R. R.

    2010-12-01

    After deposition of sediments a whole suite of geochemical/biogeochemical and transport processes - subsumed under the term early diagenesis - can potentially alter the primary sediment composition. Post-depositional overprint is not only restricted to the topmost part of the sediment but well extends into more deeply buried sediments. A biogeochemical reaction front which is of particular importance for deep post-depositional alteration is the so-called sulfate/methane transition zone (SMTZ) where the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) by sulfate occurs. This front is often located several meters to several tens of meters within the sediment and can heavily impact a number of sedimentary components and attributes - like carbonates, barite, iron oxide and iron sulfide minerals as well as rock magnetic properties (e.g., magnetic susceptibility). In this way the primary sediment composition is distinctly altered several thousands to tens of thousands of years after deposition. Identifying and quantifying such diagenetic overprint is of the utmost importance to accurately interpret the sedimentary record. In marine environments affected by hydrocarbon seepage and/or the presence of gas hydrates the geochemical zonation is often significantly condensed and the sulfate/methane transition zone is typically located close to the sediment surface - in this way impacting the initial sediment composition at relatively shallow depth. While the process of AOM induces the destruction of several primary sediment components it also goes along with the diagenetic formation of secondary signals. One of these diagenetically formed compounds is authigenic barite which precipitates slightly above the SMTZ. We demonstrate that - following the approach of Dickens (2001) - authigenic barite can be a valuable geochemical proxy to trace the downward migration of the SMTZ over time as a result of the decomposition of gas hydrates and/or a decrease in the upward flux of hydrocarbons. Reference Dickens, G.R. (2001) Sulfate profiles and barium fronts in sediment on the Blake Ridge: Present and past methane fluxes through a large gas hydrate reservoir. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 65, 529-543.

  12. Non-aqueous titration of quinine and quinidine sulphates by use of barium perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Zakhari, N; Ibrahim, F; Kovar, K A

    1989-07-01

    A simple non-aqueous titration method has been devised for determining the sulphates of quinine and quinidine. The sulphate is precipitated by addition of excess of barium perchlorate solution in acetic and the liberated alkaloid is then titrated in 1:2 anhydrous acetic-dioxan mixture, with an acetic acid solution of perchloric acid. The end-point is determined either visually with Crystal Violet as indicator or potentiometrically with a glass-Ag/AgCl combination electrode. The method is accurate, precise and suitable for routine analysis of pure materials and tablets. PMID:18964803

  13. Resonance-fluorescence in barium ion clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horak, H. G.; Whitaker, R. W.

    1982-09-01

    The problem of resonant-fluorescent scattering of sunlight by a high altitude, plane-parallel, barium ion cloud is solved numerically. Line strengths and profiles are computed using a modified version of the computer program LINEAR (Auer, Heasley and Milkey, 1972). Hyperfine structure of the spectral lines becomes important for very thick layers and is taken into account. Comparisons are made between coherent and completely noncoherent scattering results, and finally the influence of collisions on the radiation field is estimated.

  14. Survey of barium in Italian drinking water supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Lanciotti, E.; Comodo, N.; Gambassini, L.; Cerbai, E. ); Vallone, G.; Griffini, E. ); Mugelli, A. )

    1989-12-01

    Trace metal contamination in public water supplies may be detrimental to human health. In recent years there has been increasing attention paid to the presence of barium in public water supplies and to its possible effects on human health. Recently the maximum allowed level for barium in drinking water in Europe has been reduced from 1 mg/L to 0.1 mg/L. The toxic effects following acute ingestion of soluble barium salts are well characterized. Elevated barium levels in drinking water have been associated with higher mortality rates due to cardiovascular or heart diseases. The present survey was undertaken to evaluate the extent of exposure of the Tuscany population to barium. Levels of barium were measured in drinking water supplies.

  15. Nanoparticles of barium induce apoptosis in human phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mores, Luana; França, Eduardo Luzia; Silva, Núbia Andrade; Suchara, Eliane Aparecida; Honorio-França, Adenilda Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nutrients and immunological factors of breast milk are essential for newborn growth and the development of their immune system, but this secretion can contain organic and inorganic toxins such as barium. Colostrum contamination with barium is an important issue to investigate because this naturally occurring element is also associated with human activity and industrial pollution. The study evaluated the administration of barium nanoparticles to colostrum, assessing the viability and functional activity of colostral mononuclear phagocytes. Methods Colostrum was collected from 24 clinically healthy women (aged 18–35 years). Cell viability, superoxide release, intracellular Ca2+ release, and phagocyte apoptosis were analyzed in the samples. Results Treatment with barium lowered mononuclear phagocyte viability, increased superoxide release, and reduced intracellular calcium release. In addition, barium increased cell death by apoptosis. Conclusion These data suggest that nanoparticles of barium in colostrum are toxic to cells, showing the importance of avoiding exposure to this element. PMID:26451108

  16. Barium Titanate Nanoparticles for Biomarker Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, O.; Posada, O. M.; Hondow, N. S.; Wälti, C.; Saunders, M.; Murray, C. A.; Brydson, R. M. D.; Milne, S. J.; Brown, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    A tetragonal crystal structure is required for barium titanate nanoparticles to exhibit the nonlinear optical effect of second harmonic light generation (SHG) for use as a biomarker when illuminated by a near-infrared source. Here we use synchrotron XRD to elucidate the tetragonal phase of commercially purchased tetragonal, cubic and hydrothermally prepared barium titanate (BaTiO3) nanoparticles by peak fitting with reference patterns. The local phase of individual nanoparticles is determined by STEM electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), measuring the core-loss O K-edge and the Ti L3-edge energy separation of the t2g, eg peaks. The results show a change in energy separation between the t2g and eg peak from the surface and core of the particles, suggesting an intraparticle phase mixture of the barium titanate nanoparticles. HAADF-STEM and bright field TEM-EDX show cellular uptake of the hydrothermally prepared BaTiO3 nanoparticles, highlighting the potential for application as biomarkers.

  17. DHEA-sulfate test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... done in children who are maturing too early ( precocious puberty ). It may also be done in women ... tumor of the adrenal gland Polycystic ovary syndrome Precocious puberty A decrease in DHEA sulfate may be ...

  18. Incorporation of /sup 35/S-sulfate and /sup 3/H-glucosamine into heparan and chondroitin sulfates during the cell cycle of B16-F10 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, O.C.; Sartorelli, A.C.

    1984-05-01

    Changes in glycosaminoglycan composition occurring during the cell cycle were determined in B16-F10 cells sorted flow cytometrically with respect to DNA content. Incorporation of /sup 35/S-sulfate into heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate of unsorted and G1,S, and G2 +M sorted cells was determined following chondroitinase ABC or nitrous acid treatment; the incorporation into surface material was measured as the difference between the radioactivity of control and trypsin-treated cells. Incorporation of /sup 35/S-sulfate and /sup 3/H-glucosamine into cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC)-precipitable material was characterized before and after chondroitinase or nitrous acid treatment by Sephadex G50 chromatography. Long-term (48 h) and short-term (1 h) labeling studies demonstrate that (a) the amount of total cellular chondroitin sulfate is greater than that of heparan sulfate, with larger amounts of unsulfated heparan than chondroitin being present; (b) the rate of turnover of heparan sulfate is greater than that of chondroitin sulfate; (c) greatest short-term incorporation of 3H-glucosamine into CPC-precipitable material occurs during S phase; and (d) the rate of turnover of both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate is decreased in S phase relative to G1 and G2 + M.

  19. Precipitation Gage

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    During August 2013, the Beaver Creek wildfire burned more than 114,000 acres near the south-central Idaho communities of Sun Valley, Ketchum, and Hailey. Partnering with Blaine County, the USGS installed a network of real-time precipitation gages in the burn area. Real-time information from the gage...

  20. Precipitation Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Although weather, including its role in the water cycle, is included in most elementary science programs, any further examination of raindrops and snowflakes is rare. Together rain and snow make up most of the precipitation that replenishes Earth's life-sustaining fresh water supply. When viewed individually, raindrops and snowflakes are quite…

  1. Precipitation Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Although weather, including its role in the water cycle, is included in most elementary science programs, any further examination of raindrops and snowflakes is rare. Together rain and snow make up most of the precipitation that replenishes Earth's life-sustaining fresh water supply. When viewed individually, raindrops and snowflakes are quite

  2. Removal of sulfate from high-strength wastewater by crystallisation.

    PubMed

    Tait, Stephan; Clarke, William P; Keller, Jurg; Batstone, Damien J

    2009-02-01

    Sulfate causes considerable problems in anaerobic digesters, related to generation of sulfides, loss of electrons (and hence methane), and contamination of gas streams. Removal of sulfides is generally expensive, and still results in methane losses. In this paper, we evaluate the use of precipitation for low-cost sulfate removal, in highly contaminated streams (>1 gS L(-1)). The main precipitate assessed is calcium sulfate (gypsum), though the formation of complex precipitates such as jarosite and ettringite to remove residual sulfate is also evaluated. The four main concerns in contaminated wastewater are:- high solubility, caused by high ion activity and ion pairing; slow kinetics; inhibition of nucleation; and poisoning of crystals by impurities, rendering product unsuitable for reuse as seed. These concerns were addressed through batch experiments on a landfill wastewater with a similar composition to other sulfate rich industrial wastewaters (high levels of organic and inorganic contaminants). Crystallisation rates were rapid and comparable to what is observed by others for pure solutions (2-5 h). The kinetics of crystallisation showed a 2nd order dependence on supersaturation, which have implications for crystalliser design, as discussed in the paper. No spontaneous nucleation was observed (seed was required). Seed poisoning did not occur, and product crystals were as effective as pure seed. Solubility was increased by an order of magnitude compared to a pure solution (2.6x10(-3) M2 vs. 0.22x10(-3) M2). As evaluated using equilibrium modelling, this was caused equally by non-specific ion activity, and specific ion pairing. Jarosite and ettringite could not be formed at reasonable pH and temperature levels. Given the lack of complex precipitates, and relatively high solubility, gypsum crystallisation cannot practically be used to remove sulfate to very low levels, and gas-sulfide treatment will likely still be required. It can however, be used for low-cost bulk removal of sulfate. PMID:19059623

  3. Creating unstable velocity-space distributions with barium injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pongratz, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    Ion velocity-space distributions resulting from barium injections from orbiting spacecraft and shaped charges are discussed. Active experiments confirm that anomalous ionization processes may operate, but photoionization accounts for the production of the bulk of the barium ions. Pitch-angle diffusion and/or velocity-space diffusion may occur, but observations of barium ions moving upwards against gravity suggests that the ions retain a significant enough fraction of their initial perpendicular velocity to provide a mirror force. The barium ion plasmas should have a range of Alfven Mach numbers and plasma betas. Because the initial conditions can be predicted these active experiments should permit testing plasma instability hypotheses.

  4. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  5. Uranium Immobilization by Sulfate-reducing Biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Beyenal, Haluk; Sani, Rajesh K.; Peyton, Brent M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E.; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2004-04-01

    Hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] was immobilized using biofilms of the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20. The biofilms were grown in flat-plate continuous-flow reactors using lactate as the electron donor and sulfate as the electron acceptor. U(VI) was continuously fed into the reactor for 32 weeks at a concentration of 126 íM. During this time, the soluble U(VI) was removed (between 88 and 96% of feed) from solution and immobilized in the biofilms. The dynamics of U immobilization in the sulfate-reducing biofilms were quantified by estimating: (1) microbial activity in the SRB biofilm, defined as the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production rate and estimated from the H2S concentration profiles measured using microelectrodes across the biofilms; (2) concentration of dissolved U in the solution; and (3) the mass of U precipitated in the biofilm. Results suggest that U was immobilized in the biofilms as a result of two processes: (1) enzymatically and (2) chemically, by reacting with microbially generated H2S. Visual inspection showed that the dissolved sulfide species reacted with U(VI) to produce a black precipitate. Synchrotron-based U L3-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy analysis of U precipitated abiotically by sodium sulfide indicated that U(VI) had been reduced to U(IV). Selected-area electron diffraction pattern and crystallographic analysis of transmission electron microscope lattice-fringe images confirmed the structure of precipitated U as being that of uraninite.

  6. pH control of the structure, composition, and catalytic activity of sulfated zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vladimir K.; Baranchikov, Alexander Ye.; Kopitsa, Gennady P.; Lermontov, Sergey A.; Yurkova, Lyudmila L.; Gubanova, Nadezhda N.; Ivanova, Olga S.; Lermontov, Anatoly S.; Rumyantseva, Marina N.; Vasilyeva, Larisa P.; Sharp, Melissa; Pranzas, P. Klaus; Tretyakov, Yuri D.

    2013-02-01

    We report a detailed study of structural and chemical transformations of amorphous hydrous zirconia into sulfated zirconia-based superacid catalysts. Precipitation pH is shown to be the key factor governing structure, composition and properties of amorphous sulfated zirconia gels and nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia. Increase in precipitation pH leads to substantial increase of surface fractal dimension (up to ˜2.7) of amorphous sulfated zirconia gels, and consequently to increase in specific surface area (up to ˜80 m2/g) and simultaneously to decrease in sulfate content and total acidity of zirconia catalysts. Complete conversion of hexene-1 over as synthesized sulfated zirconia catalysts was observed even under ambient conditions.

  7. Thermoelectric Properties of Barium Plumbate Doped by Alkaline Earth Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eufrasio, Andreza; Bhatta, Rudra; Pegg, Ian; Dutta, Biprodas

    Ceramic oxides are now being considered as a new class of thermoelectric materials because of their high stability at elevated temperatures. Such materials are especially suitable for use as prospective thermoelectric power generators because high temperatures are encountered in such operations. The present investigation uses barium plumbate (BaPbO3) as the starting material, the thermoelectric properties of which have been altered by judicious cation substitutions. BaPbO3 is known to exhibit metallic properties which may turn semiconducting as a result of compositional changes without precipitating a separate phase and/or altering the basic perovskite crystal structure. Perovskite structures are noted for their large interstitial spaces which can accommodate a large variety of ``impurity'' ions. As BaPbO3 has high electrical conductivity, σ = 2.43x105Ω-1 m-1 at room temperature, its thermopower, S, is relatively low, 23 μV/K, as expected. With a thermal conductivity, k, of 4.83Wm-1K-1, the figure of merit (ZT =S2 σ Tk-1) of BaPbO3 is only 0.01 at T = 300K. The objective of this investigation is to study the variation of thermoelectric properties of BaPbO3 as Ba and Pb ions are systematically substituted by alkaline earth ions.

  8. Binding and Leakage of Barium in Alginate Microbeads

    PubMed Central

    Mørch, Yrr A.; Qi, Meirigeng; Gundersen, Per Ole M.; Formo, Kjetil; Lacik, Igor; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Oberholzer, Jose; Strand, Berit L.

    2013-01-01

    Microbeads of alginate cross-linked with Ca2+ and/or Ba2+ are popular matrices in cell-based therapy. The aim of this study was to quantify the binding of barium in alginate microbeads and its leakage under in vitro and accumulation under in vivo conditions. Low concentrations of barium (1 mM) in combination with calcium (50 mM) and high concentrations of barium (20 mM) in gelling solutions were used for preparation of microbeads made of high-G and high-M alginates. High-G microbeads accumulated barium from gelling solution and contained higher concentrations of divalent ions for both low- and high-Ba exposure compared to high-G microbeads exposed to calcium solely and to high-M microbeads for all gelling conditions. Although most of the unbound divalent ions were removed during the wash and culture steps, leakage of barium was still detected during storage. Barium accumulation in blood and femur bone of mice implanted with high-G beads was found to be dose-dependent. Estimated barium leakage relevant to transplantation to diabetic patients with islets in alginate microbeads showed that the leakage was 2.5 times lower than the tolerable intake value given by WHO for high-G microbeads made using low barium concentration. The similar estimate gave 1.5 times higher than is the tolerable intake value for the high-G microbeads made using high barium concentration. In order to reduce the risk of barium accumulation that may be of safety concern, the microbeads made of high-G alginate gelled with a combination of calcium and low concentration of barium ions is recommended for islet transplantation. PMID:22700168

  9. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  10. Biological Sulfate Reduction Rates in Hydrothermal Recharge Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, B.; Lowell, R. P.

    2007-12-01

    We develop a model to determine the rate of removal of seawater sulfate in the recharge regions of deep-sea hydrothermal systems as a result of biogenic sulfate reduction. The rate of sulfate reduction as a function of temperature derived from laboratory measurements on cores from the Guaymas Basin in Mexico [Jorgensen et al., 1992] is incorporated into a steady state 1-D advection-diffusion temperature equation, and a 1-D, steady- state, advection dominated conservation of solute equation. The diffusivity of sulfate in seawater is on the order of ~ 10-10 m2/s, and unless the flow speeds are < 10-12 m/s, the effects of diffusion are negligible, except within thin diffusive boundary layers. This model is then compared with a model that utilizes Gibbs free energy to quantify biogenic sulfate reduction [Bach and Edwards, 2003] in the upper oceanic crust of aging lithosphere. Using the high rates determined by Jorgensen et al. [1992], our model indicates that biological activity would reduce all seawater sulfate transported into the system within the upper 10 meters or less of the crust, which is inconsistent with the estimates of Bach and Edwards [2003]. Sulfate concentrations from ODP borehole Legs 64 and 168, at the sedimented Guaymas Basin and Juan de Fuca Ridge, respectively, show that most of the seawater sulfate is removed in the upper 100 meters. If the sulfate is assumed to all be reduced biogenically, the sulfate reduction rates at the ODP sites are at least 2 orders of magnitude less than the laboratory estimates of Jorgenson et al. [1992]. Finally, we compare the rate of seawater sulfate removal as a result of the precipitation of anhydrite, with the rate of biogenic sulfate reduction. We find that if hydrothermal recharge occurs rapidly through highly permeable faults, that biogenic sulfate reduction is negligible and that anhydrite precipitation would rapidly clog the recharge zone [Lowell and Yao, 2002]. If recharge occurs through broad zones of slow downwelling (u precipitation would seal pore on the order of thousands of years even in the absence of biogenic sulfate reduction. At these slower flow speeds, the biogenic sulfate reduction may provide an important mechanism for the removal of seawater sulfate from the deeper parts of the reaction zone. Bach, W. and K.J. Edwards (2003), Iron and sulfide oxidation within the basaltic ocean crust: Implications for chemolithoautotrophic microbial biomass production, Geochim.Cosmochim. Acta, 67, 3871-3887. Jorgensen, B.B., M.F. Isaksen and H.W. Jannasch (1992), Bacterial sulfate reduction above 100 degrees C in deep-sea hydrothermal vent sediments, Science, 258, 1756-1757. Lowell, R.P. and Y. Yao (2002), Anhydrite precipitation and the extent of hydrothermal recharge zones at ocean ridge crests, J. Geophys. Res., 107(B9), 2183, doi:10.1029/2001JB001289.

  11. Biological Sulfate Reduction Rates in Hydrothermal Recharge Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, B.; Lowell, R. P.

    2004-12-01

    We develop a model to determine the rate of removal of seawater sulfate in the recharge regions of deep-sea hydrothermal systems as a result of biogenic sulfate reduction. The rate of sulfate reduction as a function of temperature derived from laboratory measurements on cores from the Guaymas Basin in Mexico [Jorgensen et al., 1992] is incorporated into a steady state 1-D advection-diffusion temperature equation, and a 1-D, steady- state, advection dominated conservation of solute equation. The diffusivity of sulfate in seawater is on the order of ~ 10-10 m2/s, and unless the flow speeds are < 10-12 m/s, the effects of diffusion are negligible, except within thin diffusive boundary layers. This model is then compared with a model that utilizes Gibbs free energy to quantify biogenic sulfate reduction [Bach and Edwards, 2003] in the upper oceanic crust of aging lithosphere. Using the high rates determined by Jorgensen et al. [1992], our model indicates that biological activity would reduce all seawater sulfate transported into the system within the upper 10 meters or less of the crust, which is inconsistent with the estimates of Bach and Edwards [2003]. Sulfate concentrations from ODP borehole Legs 64 and 168, at the sedimented Guaymas Basin and Juan de Fuca Ridge, respectively, show that most of the seawater sulfate is removed in the upper 100 meters. If the sulfate is assumed to all be reduced biogenically, the sulfate reduction rates at the ODP sites are at least 2 orders of magnitude less than the laboratory estimates of Jorgenson et al. [1992]. Finally, we compare the rate of seawater sulfate removal as a result of the precipitation of anhydrite, with the rate of biogenic sulfate reduction. We find that if hydrothermal recharge occurs rapidly through highly permeable faults, that biogenic sulfate reduction is negligible and that anhydrite precipitation would rapidly clog the recharge zone [Lowell and Yao, 2002]. If recharge occurs through broad zones of slow downwelling (u < 10-9 m/s); however, anhydrite precipitation would seal pore on the order of thousands of years even in the absence of biogenic sulfate reduction. At these slower flow speeds, the biogenic sulfate reduction may provide an important mechanism for the removal of seawater sulfate from the deeper parts of the reaction zone. Bach, W. and K.J. Edwards (2003), Iron and sulfide oxidation within the basaltic ocean crust: Implications for chemolithoautotrophic microbial biomass production, Geochim.Cosmochim. Acta, 67, 3871-3887. Jorgensen, B.B., M.F. Isaksen and H.W. Jannasch (1992), Bacterial sulfate reduction above 100 degrees C in deep-sea hydrothermal vent sediments, Science, 258, 1756-1757. Lowell, R.P. and Y. Yao (2002), Anhydrite precipitation and the extent of hydrothermal recharge zones at ocean ridge crests, J. Geophys. Res., 107(B9), 2183, doi:10.1029/2001JB001289.

  12. Physico-chemical transformations of sulfated compounds during the leaching of highly sulfated cemented wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lovera, P.; Bescop, P. le; Adenot, F.; Tanaka, Y.; Owaki, E.

    1997-10-01

    Cementation of sulfated evaporator concentrates leads to highly sulfated low level wastes, (ca. 25% w/w sodium sulfate solution as mix water), which exhibit the presence of U-phase, a sodium-bearing calcium monosulfphoaluminate-like phase. During the leaching of simulated highly sulfated OPC/BFS cements, cured at room temperature and containing U-phase, sodium sulfate, and ettringite, physico-chemical transformations have been pointed out (transformation of U-phase into ettringite). Samples having the same chemical composition, but cured at high temperature (maximal temperature during curing: 120 C), do not contain ettringite initially, but secondary ettringite is formed during leaching. XRD spectra point out the existence of precipitation fronts (or of phase formation fronts) varying linearly versus the square root of time. The analysis of leaching solutions has provided complementary data used in a code, the aim of which is to assess cement degradation, based on coupling between transport by diffusion and chemical reactions (DIFFUZON code). The U-phase-ettringite transformation is confirmed.

  13. Effect of antiscalants on precipitation of an RO concentrate: metals precipitated and particle characteristics for several water compositions.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Lauren F; Testa, Fabrice; Lawler, Desmond F; Freeman, Benny D; Moulin, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    Inland brackish water reverse osmosis (RO) is economically and technically limited by the large volume of salty waste (concentrate) produced. The use of a controlled precipitation step, followed by solid/liquid separation (filtration), has emerged as a promising side-stream treatment process to treat reverse osmosis concentrate and increase overall system recovery. The addition of antiscalants to the RO feed prevents precipitation within the membrane system but might have a deleterious effect on a concentrate treatment process that uses precipitation to remove problematic precipitates. The effects of antiscalant type and concentration on salt precipitation and precipitate particle morphology were evaluated for several water compositions. The primary precipitate for the synthetic brackish waters tested was calcium carbonate; the presence of magnesium, sulfate, minor ions, and antiscalant compounds affected the amount of calcium precipitated, as well as the phases of calcium carbonate formed during precipitation. Addition of antiscalant decreased calcium precipitation but increased incorporation of magnesium and sulfate into precipitating calcium carbonate. Antiscalants prevented the growth of nucleated precipitates, resulting in the formation of small (100-200 nm diameter) particles, as well as larger (6-10 microm) particles. Elemental analysis revealed changes in composition and calcium carbonate polymorph with antiscalant addition and antiscalant type. Results indicate that the presence of antiscalants does reduce the extent of calcium precipitation and can worsen subsequent filtration performance. PMID:20172582

  14. Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauri, James F.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed

  15. Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauri, James F.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed…

  16. Cardiotoxic and bronchoconstrictor effects of industrial metal fumes containing barium.

    PubMed

    Hicks, R; Caldas, L Q; Dare, P R; Hewitt, P J

    1986-01-01

    For certain metal arc-welding and other metal processing operations, compounds of barium are used as flux components. Airborne fumes generated by welding with electrodes using barium fluoride or carbonate fluxes may contain 15-30% of barium in readily water-soluble form (Dare et al. 1984). Urine of welders inhaling such fumes was shown to contain elevated levels of barium ions (up to 234 micrograms/l). To assess the possible hazards of such exposure, the toxic potencies of fume samples, expressed in terms of their water-soluble barium ion contents, were compared with effects of solutions of barium salts in anaesthetised guinea-pigs. Dose-effect relationships were established and it was verified that acute toxic effects of inhaled aerosols or of intravenous bolus administration correlated with the barium contents of various forms of welding fumes. Bronchopulmonary reactivity to the barium was observed as marked increases in resistance to ventilatory air-flow, indicating bronchoconstriction. Simultaneously, marked pressor effects on blood pressure occurred. ECG abnormalities indicated myocardial hyperexcitability. Effects were modified by nifedipine and propranolol pretreatments. PMID:3468925

  17. BARIUM IN TEETH AS INDICATOR OF BODY BURDEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to determine the biological availability of naturally occurring barium in a municipal drinking water by the analysis of barium in deciduous teeth of children. The grade school children of two Illinois towns were chosen for the study. The towns were chosen ba...

  18. Composition and structure measurements in an ionospheric barium cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narcisi, R.; Tracinski, E.; Federico, G.; Wlodyka, L.; Bench, P.

    1981-12-01

    A 48 kg barium payload was launched from Eglin Air Force Base, Florida on 12 December 1980 at 2311 GMT and detonated at 183.7 km. At 2342:50.25 GMT, a second rocket, instrumented with an ion mass spectrometer and pulsed plasma probes, was fired to traverse the barium cloud. Composition, ion density, and structure measurements were acquired up to 241.2 km in both the natural and disturbed ionosphere. The rocket penetrated the barium cloud between 147 and 184 km. In addition to the Ba+, Ba++ produced by H Lyman alpha ionization, and Ca+, an impurity in the barium were detected in the cloud. A peak barium ion concentration of about 6,000,000 ions cu cm was measured at 161 km where the ionospheric NO+ and O2+ ions were essentially eliminated by large recombination loss. The bottom side of the barium cloud had a relatively smooth structure while the top side showed significant density fluctuations. The first experimental evidence of a theoretically predicted E region 'image cloud' was found in the form of an enhanced NO+ layer just below the barium cloud. Unexplained wave-like density variations in O+, NO+, and O2(+) also were seen above the barium cloud to 195 km. A quantitative estimate of the outgassing water vapor concentrations near the payload's surface was made using the fast change transfer rate coefficient for O+ + H2O yields H2O+ + O that created the observed water vapor ions.

  19. Europium-doped barium bromide iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiah, Gautam; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Hollander, Fredrick J.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    2009-10-21

    Single crystals of Ba0.96Eu0.04BrI (barium europium bromide iodide) were grown by the Bridgman technique. The title compound adopts the ordered PbCl2 structure [Braekken (1932). Z. Kristallogr. 83, 222-282]. All atoms occupy the fourfold special positions (4c, site symmetry m) of the space group Pnma with a statistical distribution of Ba and Eu. They lie on the mirror planes, perpendicular to the b axis at y = +-0.25. Each cation is coordinated by nine anions in a tricapped trigonal prismatic arrangement.

  20. Short-cavity squeezing in barium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hope, D. M.; Bachor, H-A.; Manson, P. J.; Mcclelland, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Broadband phase sensitive noise and squeezing were experimentally observed in a system of barium atoms interacting with a single mode of a short optical cavity. Squeezing of 13 +/- 3 percent was observed. A maximum possible squeezing of 45 +/- 8 percent could be inferred for out experimental conditions, after correction for measured loss factors. Noise reductions below the quantum limit were found over a range of detection frequencies 60-170 MHz and were best for high cavity transmission and large optical depths. The amount of squeezing observed is consistent with theoretical predictions from a full quantum statistical model of the system.

  1. Vacancy ordering in reduced barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, David I.; Reaney, Ian M.; Yang, Gaiying Y.; Dickey, Elizabeth C.; Randall, Clive A.

    2004-06-01

    A crystal structure is proposed for reduced barium titanate, BaTiO3-δ, δ≈0.33, formed during the degradation of Ni-BaTiO3 X7R multilayer ceramic capacitors. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction have been used in combination with computer simulations to show that oxygen vacancies accrete on every third pseudocubic {111} plane, resulting in a cell with space group P3m1. Additionally, from electron energy loss spectroscopy, it is proposed that Ti4+ is reduced to Ti3+ as a mechanism of charge compensation within oxygen-deficient octahedra.

  2. Sulfate attack expansion mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Müllauer, Wolfram Beddoe, Robin E.; Heinz, Detlef

    2013-10-15

    A specially constructed stress cell was used to measure the stress generated in thin-walled Portland cement mortar cylinders caused by external sulfate attack. The effects of sulfate concentration of the storage solution and C{sub 3}A content of the cement were studied. Changes in mineralogical composition and pore size distribution were investigated by X-ray diffraction and mercury intrusion porosimetry, respectively. Damage is due to the formation of ettringite in small pores (10–50 nm) which generates stresses up to 8 MPa exceeding the tensile strength of the binder matrix. Higher sulfate concentrations and C{sub 3}A contents result in higher stresses. The results can be understood in terms of the effect of crystal surface energy and size on supersaturation and crystal growth pressure.

  3. Determination of residual dextran sulfate in protein products by SEC-HPLC.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Loubna M; Jayawickreme, Shiranthi

    2016-02-01

    Dextran sulfate is a polyanionic derivative of dextran, produced by esterification of dextran with chlorosulphonic acid. Dextran sulfate with an average molecular weight of 8000Da can be added to the cell culture to inhibit binding of proteins to cells, increasing cellular growth and productivity. Residual dextran sulfate levels must be monitored during the purification process development to insure clearance. A size-exclusion chromatography based HPLC assay has been developed for the separation and quantitation of dextran sulfate in a highly concentrated purified protein drug substance sample. Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) was used to precipitate the protein and separate the dextran sulfate. Detection and quantitation of dextran sulfate was achieved by post column reaction with dimethylene blue to form a metachromatic complex that absorbs visible light at 530nm. The quantitation limit (LOQ) was determined to be 1.5μg/mL dextran sulfate in high concentration protein samples. PMID:26773880

  4. Barium cardiotoxicity: Relationship between ultrastructural damage and mechanical effects.

    PubMed

    Delfino, G; Amerini, S; Mugelli, A

    1988-01-01

    The ultrastructural damage in guinea-pig ventricular strips caused by barium was analysed. At a concentration of 1 mmol/litre, barium chloride caused a dramatic increase in the developed tension associated with the onset of automaticity. The ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that barium caused notable and consistent alterations which affected most myocyte components. Various degenerative aspects were observed in mitochondria and in the contractile apparatus. Glycogen deposits were completely depleted. Preparations driven at 4 Hz (i.e. the rate of spontaneous firing of barium-treated preparations) showed moderate ultrastructural alterations, thus demonstrating that the increase in the rate of beating is not the only determinant of the observed damage. These results suggest that the myocardial toxicity of barium is due not only to the well-known modifications in membrane permeability, but possibly also to alterations in cell function. PMID:20702358

  5. Sulfate Transport and Release in Technogenic Soil Substrates: Experiments and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonsky, H.; Peters, A.; Lang, F.; Mekiffer, B.; Wessolek, G.

    2012-04-01

    In Berlin and many other cities technogenic soil substrates from World War II and building and construction debris in general play an important role for soil formation and solute transport in the vadose zone. The largest debris landfill in Berlin is the Teufelsberg. Sulfate release from the landfill poses threats for groundwater quality. The scope of this study is to determine the processes controlling sulfate release from soils containing rubble. Column leaching experiments were conducted to analyze sulfate mobilization from Teufelsberg topsoil material. Flow interruptions of one and seven days were introduced. Sulfate release was modeled using a geochemical simulation tool (HP1). The model considered water flux, solute transport and precipitation/dissolution with first order kinetics. Sulfate release increased after flow interruptions, although bromide breakthrough indicated physical equilibrium of transport processes. The model was applicable for qualitative description of our experimental results. The estimated equilibrium concentrations of sulfate were one to two orders of magnitude smaller than expected according to the equilibrium constant of gypsum. It is assumed that the mobilization of sulfate from calcite/gypsum co-precipitates determines the sulfate concentrations in the soil solution of the studied soils. If Sulfate release and transport from soils containing debris is modeled with literature values, sulfate concentrations will be overestimated by one to two orders of magnitude.

  6. 21 CFR 82.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... part: (a)-(f) (g) The term alumina means a suspension in water of precipitated aluminum hydroxide. (h) The term blanc fixe means a suspension in water of precipitated barium sulfate. (i) The term gloss white means a suspension in water of co-precipitated aluminum hydroxide and barium sulfate. (j) The...

  7. 21 CFR 82.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... part: (a)-(f) (g) The term alumina means a suspension in water of precipitated aluminum hydroxide. (h) The term blanc fixe means a suspension in water of precipitated barium sulfate. (i) The term gloss white means a suspension in water of co-precipitated aluminum hydroxide and barium sulfate. (j) The...

  8. 21 CFR 82.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... part: (a)-(f) (g) The term alumina means a suspension in water of precipitated aluminum hydroxide. (h) The term blanc fixe means a suspension in water of precipitated barium sulfate. (i) The term gloss white means a suspension in water of co-precipitated aluminum hydroxide and barium sulfate. (j) The...

  9. 21 CFR 82.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... part: (a)-(f) (g) The term alumina means a suspension in water of precipitated aluminum hydroxide. (h) The term blanc fixe means a suspension in water of precipitated barium sulfate. (i) The term gloss white means a suspension in water of co-precipitated aluminum hydroxide and barium sulfate. (j) The...

  10. Impact of glacial/interglacial changes in water column geochemistry on the diagenetic cycling of barium in Black Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, S.; Henkel, S.; Mogollón, J. M.; Nöthen, K.; Franke, C.; Bogus, K.; Robin, E.; Bahr, A.; Blumenberg, M.; Pape, T.; Seifert, R.; Marz, C.; De Lange, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in depositional conditions and redox environment over time affect biogeochemical processes in the seabed and in this way control the variable and selective preservation, alteration and formation of various sediment constituents and attributes - including particulate organic matter, mineral assemblages and magnetic properties. As many of these solid-phase compounds are used as paleo-environmental tracers or stratigraphic tools an assessment of diagenetic influences on the sedimentary record is crucial for accurate environmental reconstructions. We present an integrated approach of pore-water and solid-phase geochemistry as well as transport reaction modeling for sediments of the Black Sea to assess the biogeochemical history of these deposits with particular emphasis on post-depositional redistribution of barium as a consequence of changes in water column geochemistry and redox (Henkel et al., 2012). High-resolution sedimentary records of major and minor elements (Al, Ba, Ca, Sr, Ti), total organic carbon (TOC), and profiles of pore-water constituents (SO42-, CH4, Ca2+, Ba2+, Mg2+, alkalinity) were obtained for two gravity cores (core 755, 501 m water depth and core 214, 1686 m water depth) from the northwestern Black Sea. The records were examined in order to gain insight into the cycling of Ba in anoxic marine sediments characterized by a shallow sulfate-methane transition (SMT) as well as the applicability of barite as a primary productivity proxy in such a setting. The Ba records are strongly overprinted by diagenetic barite (BaSO4) remobilization and precipitation; authigenic Ba enrichments were found at both sites at and slightly above the current SMT. Transport reaction modeling was applied to simulate the migration of the SMT during the changing geochemical conditions after the Holocene seawater intrusion into the Black Sea. Based on this, sediment intervals affected by diagenetic Ba redistribution were identified. Results reveal that the intense overprint of Ba and Baxs (Ba excess above detrital average) strongly limits its correlation to primary productivity. These findings have implications for other modern and ancient anoxic basins, such as sections covering the Oceanic Anoxic Events for which Ba is frequently used as a primary productivity indicator. Our study also demonstrates the limitations concerning the use of Baxs as a tracer for downward migrations of the SMT: due to high sedimentation rates at the investigated sites, diagenetic barite fronts are buried below the SMT within a relatively short period. Thus, "relict" barite fronts would only be preserved for a few thousands of years, if at all. References Henkel, S., Mogollón, J.M., Nöthen, K., Franke, C., Bogus, K., Robin, E., Bahr, A., Blumenberg, M., Pape, T., Seifert, R., März, C., de Lange, G.J., Kasten, S. (2012) Diagenetic barium cycling in Black Sea sediments - A case study for anoxic marine environments. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 88, 88-105.

  11. Hydrazine/Hydrazine sulfate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrazine / Hydrazine sulfate ; CASRN 302 - 01 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Non

  12. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  13. Sulfate metabolism. I. Sulfate uptake and redistribution of acid rain sulfate by edible plants

    SciTech Connect

    Dallam, R.D.

    1987-03-23

    Sulfur is the major component of polluted air in industrialized societies. Atmospheric sulfur is converted to sulfuric acid through a series of chemical reactions which can eventually reenter many ecosystems. When edible plants are grown in soils containing varying amounts of sulfate, the roots take up and transport inorganic sulfate to the stems and leaves. The sulfate taken up by the roots and the amount transported to the stem and leaves was found to be a function of the concentration of sulfate in the soil. Inorganic sulfate taken up by a corn plant seedling can be rapidly converted to organic sulfate by the root system. Nine days after one of a pair of pea plants was inoculated with artificial acid rain sulfate (dilute H/sub 2//sup 35/SO/sub 4/) it was found that the sulfate was translocated not only in the inoculated plant, but also to the uninoculated pea plant in the same container. Also, when the leaves of a mature potato plant were inoculated with artificial acid rain sulfate it was found that the sulfate was translocated into the edible potatoes. Fractionation of the potatoes showed that most of the sulfate was water soluble of which 30% was inorganic sulfate and 70% was in the form of organic sulfur. One third of the non-water soluble translocated acid rain sulfate was equally divided between lipid and non-lipid organic sulfur of the potato. 9 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  14. Do all barium stars have a white dwarf companion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominy, J. F.; Lambert, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    International Ultraviolet Explorer short-wavelength, low-dispersion spectra were analyzed for four barium, two mild barium, and one R-type carbon star in order to test the hypothesis that the barium and related giants are produced by mass transfer from a companion now present as a white dwarf. An earlier tentative identification of a white dwarf companion to the mild barium star Zeta Cyg is confirmed. For the other stars, no ultraviolet excess attributable to a white dwarf is seen. Limits are set on the bolometric magnitude and age of a possible white dwarf companion. Since the barium stars do not have obvious progenitors among main-sequence and subgiant stars, mass transfer must be presumed to occur when the mass-gaining star is already on the giant branch. This restriction, and the white dwarf's minimum age, which is greater than 8 x 10 to the 8th yr, determined for several stars, effectively eliminates the hypothesis that mass transfer from an asymptotic giant branch star creates a barium star. Speculations are presented on alternative methods of producing a barium star in a binary system.

  15. Photoluminescence of barium titanate and barium zirconate in multilayer disordered thin films at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Moreira, M L; Gurgel, M F C; Mambrini, G P; Leite, E R; Pizani, P S; Varela, J A; Longo, E

    2008-09-25

    The emission of wide band photoluminescence showed a synergic effect on barium zirconate and barium titanate thin films in alternate multilayer system at room temperature by 488 nm exiting wavelength. The thin films obtained by spin-coating were annealed at 350, 450, and 550 degrees C for 2 h. The X-ray patterns revealed the complete separation among the BaTiO3 and BaZrO3 phases in the adjacent films. Visible and intense photoluminescence was governed by BaZrO3 thin films in the multilayer system. Quantum mechanics calculations were used in order to simulate ordered and disordered thin films structures. The disordered models, which were built by using the displacement of formers and modifier networks, showed a different symmetry in each system, which is in accordance with experimental photoluminescence emission, thus allowing to establish a correlation among the structural and optical properties of these multilayered systems. PMID:18593105

  16. The crystal structure of barium hexaaluminate phase I (barium β-alumina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyi, N.; Inoue, Z.; Takekawa, S.; Kimura, S.

    1984-03-01

    The crystal structure of barium hexaaluminate phase I (Ba 0.79Al 10.9O 17.14) was determined by single crystal X-ray reflection data. The refinements were carried out by the least-square method to give a final R-value of 0.023. The structure was revealed to be essentially of a β-alumina type and the Ba ion was detected only at the 6 h site near the Beevers-Ross site (2 d site). The charge compensation for nonstoichiometry was found to be principally effected by the interstitial oxygen due to Frenkel defects of Al ions. From the structural point of view, phase I was referred to as "barium β-alumina."

  17. Experimental study of acid-sulfate alteration of basalt and implications for sulfate deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Robbins, Mark; Moskowitz, Bruce; Berquó, Thelma S.; Jöns, Niels; Hynek, Brian M.

    2013-04-01

    Acid-sulfate alteration of basalt by SO2-bearing volcanic vapors has been proposed as one possible origin for sulfate-rich deposits on Mars. To better define mineralogical signatures of acid-sulfate alteration, laboratory experiments were performed to investigate alteration pathways and geochemical processes during reaction of basalt with sulfuric acid. Pyroclastic cinders composed of phenocrysts including plagioclase, olivine, and augite embedded in glass were reacted with sulfuric acid at 145 °C for up to 137 days at a range of fluid : rock ratios. During the experiments, the phenocrysts reacted rapidly to form secondary products, while the glass was unreactive. Major products included amorphous silica, anhydrite, and Fe-rich natroalunite, along with minor iron oxides/oxyhydroxides (probably hematite) and trace levels of other sulfates. At the lowest fluid : rock ratio, hexahydrite and an unidentified Fe-silicate phase also occurred as major products. Reaction-path models indicated that formation of the products required both slow dissolution of glass and kinetic inhibitions to precipitation of a number of minerals including phyllosilicates and other aluminosilicates as well as Al- and Fe-oxides/oxyhydroxides. Similar models performed for Martian basalt compositions predict that the initial stages of acid-sulfate alteration of pyroclastic deposits on Mars should result in formation of amorphous silica, anhydrite, Fe-bearing natroalunite, and kieserite, along with relict basaltic glass. In addition, analysis of the experimental products indicates that Fe-bearing natroalunite produces a Mössbauer spectrum closely resembling that of jarosite, suggesting that it should be considered an alternative to the component in sulfate-rich bedrocks at Meridiani Planum that has previously been identified as jarosite.

  18. Proton conductivity of potassium doped barium zirconates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaoxiang; Tao Shanwen; Irvine, John T.S.

    2010-01-15

    Potassium doped barium zirconates have been synthesized by solid state reactions. It was found that the solubility limit of potassium on A-sites is between 5% and 10%. Introducing extra potassium leads to the formation of second phase or YSZ impurities. The water uptake of barium zirconates was increased even with 5% doping of potassium at the A-site. The sintering conditions and conductivity can be improved significantly by adding 1 wt% ZnO during material synthesis. The maximum solubility for yttrium at B-sites is around 15 at% after introducing 1 wt% zinc. The conductivity of Ba{sub 0.95}K{sub 0.05}Zr{sub 0.85}Y{sub 0.11}Zn{sub 0.04}O{sub 3-{delta}} at 600 deg. C is 2.2x10{sup -3} S/cm in wet 5% H{sub 2}. The activation energies for bulk and grain boundary are 0.29(2), 0.79(2) eV in wet 5% H{sub 2} and 0.31(1), 0.74(3) eV in dry 5% H{sub 2}. A power density of 7.7 mW/cm{sup 2} at 718 deg. C was observed when a 1 mm thick Ba{sub 0.95}K{sub 0.05}Zr{sub 0.85}Y{sub 0.11}Zn{sub 0.04}O{sub 3-{delta}} pellet was used as electrolyte and platinum electrodes. - Graphical abstract: Potassium doped barium zirconates have been synthesized by solid state reactions. It was found that the solubility limit of potassium on A-sites is between 5% and 10 %. The sintering conditions and conductivity can be improved significantly by adding 1 wt% ZnO during material synthesis. Five percent doping of potassium at A-site can double the total conductivity.

  19. Designed microstructures in textured barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, David Brian

    It is a fundamental principle of materials science that the microstructure of a material defines its properties and ultimately its performance for a given application. A prime example of this can be found in the large conch shell Strombus gigas, which has an intricate microstructure extending across five distinct length scales. This microstructure gives extraordinary damage tolerance to the shell. The structure of Strombus gigas cannot be replicated in a modern engineering ceramic with any existing processing technique, so new processing techniques must be developed to apply this structure to a model material. Barium hexaferrite was chosen as a model material to create microstructures reminiscent of Strombus gigas and evaluate its structure-property relations. This work describes novel processing methods to produce textured barium hexaferrite with no coupling between the sample geometry and the texture direction. This technique, combining magnetic field-assisted gelcasting with templated grain growth, also allows multilayer samples to be fabricated with different texture directions in adjacent layers. The effects of adding either B2O3 or excess BaCO 3 on the densification and grain growth of barium hexaferrite was studied. The texture produced using this technique was assessed using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These measurements showed peak textures as high as 60 MRD and sharp interfaces between layers cast with different texture directions. The effect of oxygen on the quality of gelcasting is also discussed, and it is shown that with proper mold design, it is possible to gelcast multiple layers with differing texture directions without delamination. Monolithic and multilayer samples were produced and tested in four point bending to measure the strength and work of fracture. Modulus measurements, made with the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, show clear signs of microcracking in both the isotropic and textured samples. Both the strength and work of fracture were shown to be affected by the texture direction. The multilayer samples did not show significant improvements in either strength or work of fracture, but they did show much less variability than the monolithic samples.

  20. 21 CFR 184.1307 - Ferric sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....1307 Ferric sulfate. (a) Ferric sulfate (iron (III) sulfate, Fe2(SO4)3 CAS Reg. No. 10028-22-5) is a yellow substance that may be prepared by oxidizing iron (II) sulfate or by treating ferric oxide...

  1. Precipitation chemistry in central Amazonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Talbot, R. W.; Berresheim, H.; Beecher, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    Rain samples from three sites in central Amazonia were collected over a period of 6 weeks during the 1987 wet season and analyzed for ionic species and dissolved organic carbon. A continuous record of precipitation chemistry and amount was obtained at two of these sites, which were free from local or regional pollution, for a time period of over 1 month. The volume-weighted mean concentrations of most species were found to be about a factor of 5 lower during the wet season compared with previous results from the dry season. Only sodium, potassium, and chloride showed similar concentrations in both seasons. When the seasonal difference in rainfall amount is taken into consideration, the deposition fluxes are only slightly lower for most species during the wet season than during the dry season, again with the exception of chloride, potassium, and sodium. Sodium and chloride are present in the same ratio as in sea salt; rapid advection of air masses of marine origin to the central Amazon Basin during the wet season may be responsible for the observed higher deposition flux of these species. Statistical analysis suggests that sulfate is, to a large extent, of marine (sea salt and biogenic) origin, but that long-range transport of combustion-derived aerosols also makes a significant contribution to sulfate and nitrate levels in Amazonian rain. Organic acid concentrations in rain were responsible for a large fraction of the observed precipitation acidity; their concentration was strongly influenced by gas/liquid interactions.

  2. A high-altitude barium radial injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T. J.; Deehr, C. S.; Romick, G. J.; Olson, J. V.; Roederer, J. G.; Sydora, R.

    1980-01-01

    A rocket launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, carried a new type of high-explosive barium shaped charge to 571 km, where detonation injected a thin disk of barium vapor with high velocity nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. The TV images of the injection are spectacular, revealing three major regimes of expanding plasma which showed early instabilities in the neutral gas. The most unusual effect of the injection is a peculiar rayed barium-ion structure lying in the injection plane and centered on a 5 km 'black hole' surrounding the injection point. Preliminary electrostatic computer simulations show a similar rayed development.

  3. Large Flexoelectric Anisotropy in Paraelectric Barium Titanate.

    PubMed

    Narvaez, Jackeline; Saremi, Sahar; Hong, Jiawang; Stengel, Massimiliano; Catalan, Gustau

    2015-07-17

    The bending-induced polarization of barium titanate single crystals has been measured with an aim to elucidate the origin of the large difference between theoretically predicted and experimentally measured flexoelectricity in this material. The results indicate that part of the difference is due to polar regions (short-range order) that exist above T(C) and up to T*≈200-225 °C. Above T*, however, the flexovoltage coefficient still shows an unexpectedly large anisotropy for a cubic material, with (001)-oriented crystals displaying 10 times more flexoelectricity than (111)-oriented crystals. Theoretical analysis shows that this anisotropy cannot be a bulk property, and we therefore interpret it as indirect evidence for the theoretically predicted but experimentally elusive contribution of surface piezoelectricity to macroscopic bending-induced polarization. PMID:26230825

  4. Large Flexoelectric Anisotropy in Paraelectric Barium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narvaez, Jackeline; Saremi, Sahar; Hong, Jiawang; Stengel, Massimiliano; Catalan, Gustau

    2015-07-01

    The bending-induced polarization of barium titanate single crystals has been measured with an aim to elucidate the origin of the large difference between theoretically predicted and experimentally measured flexoelectricity in this material. The results indicate that part of the difference is due to polar regions (short-range order) that exist above TC and up to T*≈2 00 - 2 2 5 °C . Above T* , however, the flexovoltage coefficient still shows an unexpectedly large anisotropy for a cubic material, with (001)-oriented crystals displaying 10 times more flexoelectricity than (111)-oriented crystals. Theoretical analysis shows that this anisotropy cannot be a bulk property, and we therefore interpret it as indirect evidence for the theoretically predicted but experimentally elusive contribution of surface piezoelectricity to macroscopic bending-induced polarization.

  5. Response of Ned Wilson Lake Watershed, Colorado, to Changes in Atmospheric Deposition of Sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Donald H.; Turk, John T.; Spahr, Norman E.

    1991-08-01

    The Ned Wilson Lake watershed responds directly and rapidly to changes in precipitation inputs of sulfate, which has important implications for effects of acid deposition on the aquatic system. Chemistry at three precipitation collection sites and three watershed sites (a pond, a lake, and a spring) has been monitored in and near the Flattops Wilderness Area in northwestern Colorado beginning in 1981-1983. Bulk snowpack concentration of sulfate in the watershed and volume-weighted annual mean concentration of sulfate in precipitation at two nearby sites generally decreased from 1981 to 1985, were small through 1987, and increased in 1988-1989. Changes in concentration of sulfate at the watershed sites are controlled by precipitation inputs. Responsiveness of the individual sites was dependent on their position along the hydrologic flow path. The fastest response was in the pond, which has a hydrologic residence time of less than 1 year; over 90% of the variance in concentration of sulfate in the pond was explained by changes in concentration in precipitation. The lake has a hydrologic residence time of 1 to 4 years; a regression model of the concentration of sulfate in the lake, as a function of the concentration in the lake during the previous year and the concentration in precipitation, explained 87% of the variance in concentration of sulfate in the lake. The hydrologic response time of the spring is unknown; it was not responsive to changes in concentration of sulfate in precipitation. The recent increase of sulfate concentration in precipitation and in the pond and lake is evidence for a rapid rather than a delayed response, which could not be determined when only a decreasing trend in sulfate concentration was reported in 1982-1987. Watersheds of this type are sensitive to acidification (acid-neutralizing capacity less than 60 μeq L-1), and these results indicate conservative behavior of sulfate. This is important in predicting effects of future changes in atmospheric deposition, which could potentially be caused by anthropogenic emissions or climatic change.

  6. Calcium sulfate crystallization along citrus root channels in a Florida soil exhibiting acid sulfate properties

    SciTech Connect

    Syslo, S.K.; Myhre, D.L.; Harris, W.G.

    1988-02-01

    The authors observed euhedral crystals in Manatee soil in a citrus grove in St. Lucie County, Florida. The material was identified as gypsum (CaSO/sub 4/ /times/ 2H/sub 2/O) using x-ray diffraction and infrared spectra. Photomicrography and scanning electron microscopy revealed that gypsum accumulated both in old root channels and within citrus root tissue of the Btg horizon. The subsurface horizons had elevated sulfate levels, a low initial pH, a drop (0.5 unit) in pH upon air-drying. Electrical conductivity paralleled the concentration of water-soluble sulfate. High levels of calcium and sulfate occurred for horizons above the water table. This accumulation is attributed to groundwater bearing these ions and subsequently discharging them to the overlying soil. Dead citrus roots appear to act as wicks to aid water transfer from lower to higher horizons. The roots and their empty channels provide spaces in which the gypsum can precipitate if the concentrations of calcium and sulfate in the evaporating groundwater exceed the solubility product of gypsum.

  7. Adeninium cytosinium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Cherouana, Aouatef; Bousboua, Raja; Bendjeddou, Lamia; Dahaoui, Slimane; Lecomte, Claude

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, C(5)H(6)N(5) (+)·C(4)H(6)N(3)O(+)·SO(4) (2-), the adeninium (AdH(+)) and cytosinium (CytH(+)) cations and sulfate dianion are involved in a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network with four different modes, viz. AdH(+)⋯AdH(+), AdH(+)⋯CytH(+), AdH(+)⋯SO(4) (2-) and CytH(+)⋯SO(4) (2-). The adeninium cations form N-H⋯N dimers through the Hoogsteen faces, generating a characteristic R(2) (2)(10) motif. This AdH(+)⋯AdH(+) hydrogen bond in combination with AdH(+)⋯CytH(+ )H-bonds leads to two-dimensional cationic ribbons parallel to the a axis. The sulfate anions inter-link the ribbons into a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network and thus reinforce the crystal structure. PMID:21577678

  8. Phased surgical treatment of barium enema-induced rectal injury and retention of barium in the pelvic floor space

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuefei; Xia, Ligang; Huang, Jun; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries caused by barium enema are rarely reported. Following a phased surgical protocol for up to one year, we have successfully treated a patient with rectal injury and severe infection of the pelvic floor space complicated with retention of large amounts of barium and vaginal fistula. In this article, the phased surgery planning for the treatment of rectal injury complicated with vaginal fistula is discussed in terms of the pros and cons, and the observed effect and evolution of barium retained in the pelvic floor space are described. PMID:25405155

  9. Mineralogy and autoradiography of selected mineral-spring precipitates in the Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bove, Dana; Felmlee, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray diffaction analysis of 236 precipitate or sediment samples from 97 mineral-spring sites in nine Western States showed the presence of 25 minerals, some precipitated and some detrital. Calcite and (or) aragonite are the most common of all the precipitated minerals. Gypsum and (or) anhydrite, as well as barite and native sulfur, are less common but are also believed to be precipitated minerals. Precipitated manganese and iron oxides, including romanechite, manganite, pyrolusite, goethite, and hematite, were found in some of the samples. Various salts of sodium, including halite and thenardite, were also identified. Dolomite and an unknown type of siliceous material are present in some of the samples and were possibly precipitated at the spring sites. Quartz, feldspar, and mica are present in many of the samples and are believed to be detrital contaminants. An autoradiographic and thin section study of 11 samples from nine of the most radioactive spring sites showed the radioactivity, which is due primarily to radium, to be directly associated with mineral phases containing barium, manganese, iron, and (or) calcium as major constituents. Furthermore, the radioactivity has an exclusive affinity for the manganese-bearing minerals, which in these samples contain a substantial amount of barium, even if calcite or iron oxides are present. Where calcite predominates and manganese- and barium-bearing minerals are absent, the radioactivity shows a close association with the iron oxides present, especially hematite, but also shows a moderate association with the calcite and (or) aragonite cementing phases. In other samples composed predominantly of calcite but lacking iron oxides, the radioactivity is preferentially associated with an early stage of calcite development and is considerably lower in the later cementing stages. The radioactivity observed in all these samples is believed to be caused by radium substituting for barium in mineral lattices, filling irregularities in other crystal structures, or adsorbing on the surfaces of precipitated molecules.

  10. Sulfation of chondroitin. Specificity, degree of sulfation, and detergent effects with 4-sulfating and 6-sulfating microsomal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sugumaran, G.; Silbert, J.E.

    1988-04-05

    Microsomal preparations from chondroitin 6-sulfate-producing chick embryo epiphyseal cartilage, and from chondroitin 4-sulfate-producing mouse mastocytoma cells, were incubated with UDP-(14C)glucuronic acid and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine to form non-sulfated proteo(14C)chondroitin. Aliquots of the incubations were then incubated with 3'-phosphoadenylylphosphosulfate (PAPS) in the presence or absence of various detergents. In the absence of detergents, there was good sulfation of this endogenous proteo(14C)chondroitin by the original microsomes from both sources. Detergents, with the exception of Triton X-100, markedly inhibited sulfation in the mast cell system but not in the chick cartilage system. These results indicate that sulfation and polymerization are closely linked on cell membranes and that in some cases this organization can be disrupted by detergents. When aliquots of the original incubation were heat inactivated, and then reincubated with new microsomes from chick cartilage and/or mouse mastocytoma cells plus PAPS, there was no significant sulfation of this exogenous proteo(14C) chondroitin with either system unless Triton X-100 was added. Sulfation of exogenous chondroitin and chondroitin hexasaccharide was compared with sulfation of endogenous and exogenous proteo(14C)chondroitin. Sulfate incorporation into hexasaccharide and chondroitin decreased as their concentrations (based on uronic acid) approached that of the proteo(14C)chondroitin. At the same time, the degree of sulfation in percent of substituted hexosamine increased. However, the degree of sulfation did not reach that of the endogenous proteo(14C)chondroitin. Hexasaccharide and chondroitin sulfation were stimulated by the presence of Triton X-100. However, in contrast to the exogenous proteo(14C)chondroitin, there was some sulfation of hexasaccharide and chondroitin in the absence of this detergent.

  11. Relationship between microbial sulfate reduction rates and sulfur isotopic fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsu'Ura, F.

    2009-12-01

    Sulfate reduction is one of the common processes to obtain energy for certain types of microorganisms.They use hydrogen gas or organic substrates as electron donor and sulfates as electron acceptor, and reduce sulfates to sulfides. Sulfate reducing microbes extend across domains Archea and Bacteria, and are believed to be one of the earliest forms of terrestrial life (Shen 2004). The origin of 34S-depleted (light) sulfide sulfur, especially δ34S < -30 ‰, around hydrothermal vents or beneath the sea-floor is speculated to be the products of sulfate reducers. But laboratory experiments using sulfate reducers fail to produce such light sulfur, and many models were proposed to explain the discrepancy. Canfield et al. (2006) proposed so-called "standard model" based on previous studies. The standard model explained the reason for the large fractionation by temperature dependence of sulfur isotopic fractionation factor and rate of sulfate reduction, which indicated the growth conditions of microbes. However, they failed to prove their model by their other experiments (Canfield et al., 2006). In this study, I performed laboratory culture experiment of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) to explain the 34S-depleted sulfide sulfur. [Experiments] To compare the result with Canfield et al. (2006), I used Desulfovibrio desulfuricans for my laboratory culture experiment. D. desulfuricans was inoculated into glass vials, which contain 40ml of liquid culture media slightly modified from DSMZ #63 medium.Excess amount of Fe (II) is added to the DSMZ#63 medium to precipitate sulfide as iron sulfide. The vials were incubated at 25°C, 30°C, and 37°C, respectively. 21 vials were used for one temperature and sulfide and sulfate was collected from each three glass vials at every 12 hours from 72 hours to 144 hours after start of incubation. The sulfide was precipitated as iron sulfide and the sulfate was precipitated as barite. Sulfur isotope compositions of sulfate and sulfide were measured by standard method using Delta Plus mass-spectrometer. [Results and Discussion] The fractionation between sulfide and sulfate ranged from 2.7 to 11.0. The fractionation values varied among the different incubation temperature and growth phase of D. desulfuricans. The maximum fractionation values of three incubation temperatures were 9.9, 11.0, and 9.7, for 25 °C, 30°C, and 37°C, respectively. These results were different from standard model and Canfield et al. (2006). I could not find the clear correlation between ∂34S values and incubation temperatures in this experiment. The measured fractionation values during the incubation varied with incubation stage. The fractionation values clearly increased with incubation time at every temperature, and at 25°C ∂34S value was 3.6 at the 72h and it increased to 7.9 at 144 hours. This indicated the difference of sulfate reduction rate due to the growth phase of SRB. In the early logarithmic growth phase, metabolic activity of SRB is high and sulfate reduction rate is fast. In contrast at the stationary phase, SRB stop growing and sulfate reduction rate get slower. My result suggested that the sulfur isotopic fractionation is controlled by growth phase of SRB and lighter sulfide would be produced by the stationary phase or half-dormant SRB in natural environment.

  12. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of making non-volatile digital memory devices of barium titanate, BaTiO3, that are integrated onto a silicon substrate with the required ferroelectric film produced by processing, compatible with silicon technology was examined.

  13. Calculated emission rates for barium releases in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    The optical emissions from barium releases in space are caused by resonance and fluorescent scattering of sunlight. Emission rates for the dominant ion and neutral lines are calculated assuming the release to be optically thin and the barium to be in radiative equilibrium with the solar radiation. The solar spectrum has deep Fraunhofer absorption lines at the primary barium ion resonances. A velocity component toward or away from the sun will Doppler shift the emission lines relative to the absorption lines and the emission rates will increase many-fold over the rest value. The Doppler brightening is important in shaped charge or satellite releases where the barium is injected at high velocities. Emission rates as a function of velocity are calculated for the 4554, 4934, 5854, 6142 and 6497 A ion emission lines and the dominant neutral line at 5535 A. Results are presented for injection parallel to the ambient magnetic field, B, and for injection at an angle to B.

  14. Upper gastrointestinal barium evaluation of duodenal pathology: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Debi, Uma; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor

    2014-01-01

    Like other parts of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), duodenum is subject to a variety of lesions both congenital and acquired. However, unlike other parts of the GIT viz. esophagus, rest of the small intestine and large intestine, barium evaluation of duodenal lesions is technically more challenging and hence not frequently reported. With significant advances in computed tomography technology, a thorough evaluation including intraluminal, mural and extramural is feasible in a single non-invasive examination. Notwithstanding, barium evaluation still remains the initial and sometimes the only imaging study in several parts of the world. Hence, a thorough acquaintance with the morphology of various duodenal lesions on upper gastrointestinal barium examination is essential in guiding further evaluation. We reviewed our experience with various common and uncommon barium findings in duodenal abnormalities. PMID:25170399

  15. PRECIPITATION METHOD OF SEPARATION OF NEPTUNIUM

    DOEpatents

    Magnusson, L.B.

    1958-07-01

    A process is described for the separation of neptunium from plutonium in an aqueous solution containing neptunium ions in a valence state not greater than +4, plutonium ioms in a valence state not greater than +4, and sulfate ions. The Process consists of adding hypochlorite ions to said solution in order to preferentially oxidize the neptunium and then adding lanthanum ions and fluoride ions to form a precipitate of LaF/sub 3/ carrying the plutonium, and thereafter separating the supernatant solution from the precipitate.

  16. Polymorphic change from vaterite to aragonite under influence of sulfate: The "morning star" habit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagterveld, R. M.; Yu, M.; Miedema, H.; Witkamp, G. J.

    2014-02-01

    The presence of sulfate in reverse osmosis drinking water concentrate and its effect on calcium carbonate precipitation was studied, notably the overall kinetics of CaCO3 formation and the types of polymorphs formed. CaCO3 formation slows down with increasing sulfate concentration and the preferential polymorph shifts from vaterite to aragonite with increasing sulfate concentration. With this polymorphic change, a new combined habit is observed where aragonite spikes grow on top of vaterite ("morning star" habit). The presence of a moderate magnesium concentration results in the shift of vaterite to aragonite at relatively low sulfate concentrations; where sulfate and magnesium appear to have an additive effect. Without magnesium, spikes on top of vaterite were also observed, but only at relatively high sulfate concentration. Without the presence of magnesium, single crystals of aragonite were not found.

  17. Synthesis, photoluminescence and magnetic properties of barium vanadate nanoflowers

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jing; Chongqing University of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401331 ; Hu, Chenguo; Xi, Yi; Peng, Chen; Wan, Buyong; He, Xiaoshan

    2011-06-15

    Graphical abstract: The flower-shaped barium vanadate was obtained for the first time. The photoluminescence and magnetic properties of the barium vanadate nanoflowers were investigated at room temperature. Research highlights: {yields} In the paper, the flower-shaped barium vanadate were obtained for the first time. The CHM method used here is new and simple for preparation of barium vanadate. {yields} The photoluminescence and magnetic properties of the barium vanadate nanoflowers were investigated at room temperature. The strong bluish-green emission was observed. {yields} The ferromagnetic behavior of the barium vanadate nanoflowers was found with saturation magnetization of about 83.50 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, coercivity of 18.89 Oe and remnant magnetization of 4.63 x 10{sup -3} emu/g. {yields} The mechanisms of PL and magnetic property of barium vanadate nanoflowers have been discussed. -- Abstract: The flower-shaped barium vanadate has been obtained by the composite hydroxide mediated (CHM) method from V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and BaCl{sub 2} at 200 {sup o}C for 13 h. XRD and XPS spectrum of the as-synthesized sample indicate it is hexagonal Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}O{sub 8} with small amount of Ba{sub 3}VO{sub 4.8} coexistence. Scan electron microscope and transmission electron microscope display that the flower-shaped crystals are composed of nanosheets with thickness of {approx}20 nm. The UV-visible spectrum shows that the barium vanadate sample has two optical gaps (3.85 eV and 3.12 eV). Photoluminescence spectrum of the barium vanadate flowers exhibits a visible light emission centered at 492 and 525 nm which might be attributed to VO{sub 4} tetrahedron with T{sub d} symmetry in Ba{sub 3}V{sub 2}O{sub 8}. The ferromagnetic behavior of the barium vanadate nanoflowers has been found with saturation magnetization of about 83.50 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, coercivity of 18.89 Oe and remnant magnetization of 4.63 x 10{sup -3} emu/g, which is mainly due to the presence of a non-orthovanadate phase with spin S = 1/2.

  18. A search for technetium (Tc II) in barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little-Marenin, Irene R.; Little, Stephen J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched without success for the lines of Tc II at 2647.02, 2610.00 and 2543.24 A in IUE spectra of the barium stars HR 5058, Omicron Vir, and Zeta Cap. The lack of Tc II implies that the observed s-process enhancements were produced more than half a million years ago and supports the suggestion that the spectral peculiarities of barium stars are probably related to the binary nature of the stars.

  19. 'Skidding' of the CRRES G-9 barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huba, J. D.; Mitchell, H. G.; Fedder, J. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    A simulation study and experimental data of the CRRES G-9 ionospheric barium release are presented. The simulation study is based on a 2D electrostatic code that incorporates time-dependent coupling to the background plasma. It is shown that the densest portion of the barium ion cloud 'skids' about 15 km within the first three seconds following the release, consistent with the optical data analyses.

  20. Fatal barium chloride poisoning: four cases report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ananda, Sunnassee; Shaohua, Zhu; Liang, Liu

    2013-06-01

    Barium is an alkaline earth metal which has a variety of uses including in the manufacturing industry and in medicine. However, adverse health effects and fatalities occur due to absorption of soluble barium compounds, notably the chloride, nitrate, and hydroxide, which are toxic to humans. Although rare, accidental and suicidal modes of poisoning are sporadically reported in the literature.We describe 4 cases of poisoning due to barium chloride in China. In witnessed cases, severe gastrointestinal symptoms, hypokalemia leading to muscle weakness, cardiac arrhythmias, and respiratory failure were noted. Autopsy showed some nonspecific but common findings, such as subendocardial hemorrhage in the ventricles, visceral petechiae, and fatty changes in the liver. Interestingly, microscopic examination showed degenerative changes and amorphous, flocculent foamy materials in the renal tubules. Toxicology was relevant for barium in blood and tissues. Three of the cases were accidental and 1 homicidal in nature. A round-up of relevant literature on fatal barium compounds poisoning is also provided. Forensic pathologists should be aware of the clinical presentations of barium compound poisoning and especially look for any evidence of hypokalemia. Still, postmortem toxicological and histological studies are essential for an accurate identification of the cause of death. PMID:23629399

  1. Developmental effects of barium exposure in a marine bivalve (Mytilus californianus)

    SciTech Connect

    Spangenberg, J.V.; Cherr, G.N. |

    1996-10-01

    Produced water, an aqueous waste of variable composition associated with petroleum and natural gas extraction, is frequently discharged into the marine environment in significant quantities. Concern and controversy exist regarding potential adverse environmental effects related to such discharges. Previous reports indicated that barium (Ba) and/or strontium (Sr) were primarily responsible for the toxicity of a southern California produced water to developing marine embryos. To further investigate toxicity of Ba and Sr in seawater, mussel embryos (Mytilus californianus) were subjected to static exposures of barium acetate and strontium chloride from fertilization through veliger formation. Only Ba exhibited bioactivity at environmentally relevant levels. Adverse effects occurred between 200 and 900 {micro}g/L (ppb); higher concentrations were associated with decreased toxicity and apparent precipitation of Ba salts from seawater. Nominal Ba exposure concentrations between 100 and 900 {micro}g/L yielded measured concentrations of 100 to 550 {micro}g/L soluble Ba when analyzed by inductively coupled argon plasma emission spectroscopy. Adverse developmental effects included abnormal shell calcification and embryo morphology. Exposure of embryos to Ba in state-specific experiments revealed that developmental stages were differentially affected, though they exhibited similar abnormalities. Gastrulae were the most sensitive, while blastula and trochophore larvae were less so. Adverse effects in embryos exposed during the gastrula stage were not reversible despite washing and return to clean seawater. These findings are among the first to demonstrate that low concentrations of soluble Ba in seawater can be toxic and are of potential concern in the marine environment.

  2. Influence of chondroitin sulfate, heparin sulfate, and citrate on Proteus mirabilis-induced struvite crystallization in vitro.

    PubMed

    McLean, R J; Downey, J; Clapham, L; Nickel, J C

    1990-11-01

    Struvite crystals were produced by Proteus mirabilis growth in artificial urine, in the presence of a number of naturally occurring crystallization inhibitors. The use of phase contrast light microscopy enabled the effects of added chondroitin sulfate A, chondroitin sulfate C, heparin sulfate, or sodium citrate, on struvite crystal growth rates to be rapidly monitored as changes in crystal habit. Struvite crystals formed as a consequence of the urease activity of P. mirabilis under all chemical conditions. In the absence of inhibitor, early crystal development was marked by large quantities of amorphous precipitate, followed immediately by the appearance of rapidly growing X-shaped or planar crystals. Addition of the glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate A, chondroitin sulfate C, or heparin sulfate to the artificial urine mixture had no effect on the rate of crystal growth or appearance. When sodium citrate was present in elevated concentrations, crystal appearance was generally slowed, and the crystals assumed an octahedral, slow growing appearance. None of the added compounds had any influence on bacterial viability, pH, or urease activity. It is therefore likely that the inhibitory activity displayed by sodium citrate might be related to its ability to complex magnesium or to interfere with the crystal structure during struvite formation. From these experiments it would appear that citrate may be a factor in the natural resistance of whole urine to struvite crystallization. PMID:2122009

  3. Crystal structure of tris-(piperidinium) hydrogen sulfate sulfate.

    PubMed

    Lukianova, Tamara J; Kinzhybalo, Vasyl; Pietraszko, Adam

    2015-12-01

    In the title molecular salt, 3C5H12N(+)·HSO4 (-)·SO4 (2-), each cation adopts a chair conformation. In the crystal, the hydrogen sulfate ion is connected to the sulfate ion by a strong O-H⋯O hydrogen bond. The packing also features a number of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which lead to a three-dimensional network structure. The hydrogen sulfate anion accepts four hydrogen bonds from two cations, whereas the sulfate ion, as an acceptor, binds to five separate piperidinium cations, forming seven hydrogen bonds. PMID:26870401

  4. Crystal structure of tris­(piperidinium) hydrogen sulfate sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova, Tamara J.; Kinzhybalo, Vasyl; Pietraszko, Adam

    2015-01-01

    In the title molecular salt, 3C5H12N+·HSO4 −·SO4 2−, each cation adopts a chair conformation. In the crystal, the hydrogen sulfate ion is connected to the sulfate ion by a strong O—H⋯O hydrogen bond. The packing also features a number of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which lead to a three-dimensional network structure. The hydrogen sulfate anion accepts four hydrogen bonds from two cations, whereas the sulfate ion, as an acceptor, binds to five separate piperidinium cations, forming seven hydrogen bonds. PMID:26870401

  5. Ferric sulfates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the possible existence of ferric sulfato complexes and hydroxo ferric sulfate minerals in the permafrost of Mars. A sequential combination of ten unique conditions during the cooling history of Mars is suggested which is believed to have generated an environment within Martian permafrost that has stabilized Fe(3+)-SO4(2-)-bearing species. It is argued that minerals belonging to the jarosite and copiapite groups could be present in Martian regolith analyzed in the Viking XRF measurements at Chryse and Utopia, and that maghemite suspected to be coating the Viking magnet arrays is a hydrolysate of dissolved ferric sulfato complexes from exposed Martian permafrost.

  6. Optimum viscosity of barium suspension for use in the double contrast barium meal.

    PubMed

    Cumberland, D C

    1977-10-25

    The effect of viscosity of barium sulphate suspensions on coating was assessed by glass slides as in vitro, and the rat as in vivo models. It was found that below a certain viscosity (as measured by a cup viscometer) coating was impaired. As increasing viscosity is associated with increasing bubble retention and, eventually, when very high viscosities are reached, poor surface flow of suspension, it is recommended that the viscosity of the medium employed should be kept within a narrow range, approximately equal to 70% w/v Baritop, 80% Micropaque, 115% E--Z-paque, 150% Barosperse, or 200% HD 200. PMID:615819

  7. Sulfate Budget and a Model for Sulfate Concentrations in Stream Water at Birkenes, a Small Forested Catchment in Southernmost Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophersen, Nils; Wright, Richard F.

    1981-04-01

    As part of the Norwegian SNSF project, the volume and chemical composition of precipitation and stream water have been measured for 6 years at Birkenes, a small (0.41 km2), gaged, coniferous-forested catchment on granitic bedrock in southernmost Norway. Daily measurements of SO2 gas and SO4 aerosol have also been collected and provide the basis for estimation of dry deposition. The sulfate budget for the period November 1972 to October 1978 indicates that about 15% more sulfate left the catchment in runoff (7880 mg SO4 m-2 yr-1) than entered in dry (1870 mg SO4 m-2 yr-1) and wet (4970 mg SO4 m-2 yr-1) deposition. This difference is probably not significantly different from zero, given the difficulties inherent in the measurements. The input-output budget reveals a marked seasonal pattern (accumulation during summer and winter; washout during spring and autumn). The annual sulfate flux is perhaps 5-10 times larger than natural. The result is an acidification of stream water and an increased leaching of base cations from the soil. The concentration of sulfate in stream water at Birkenes shows a characteristic pattern of high levels (10-13 mg l-1) in the first stormflow following a dry summer period and low levels (˜ 5 mg l-1) in baseflow. For the summer half-year we have simulated sulfate concentrations using a simple two-compartment model. Sulfate is assumed to accumulate in the uppermost soil layers because of dry deposition and evapotranspiration of rainwater. Mineralization of other sulfur compounds is included indirectly. In the lower mineral soil layers, adsorption/desorption of sulfate is assumed to occur. The ability of this simple model to simulate sulfate concentrations in stream water suggests that the model quantitively accounts for these processes.

  8. Preparation, characterization, and manipulation of iron platinum, barium titanate, and vanadium oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, William Homer, III

    2008-12-01

    New synthesis strategies for preparation of FePt, BaTiO 3, VO2, V2O3, V2O5 , and V6O13 nanoparticles are presented in this thesis. Electron microscopy, diffraction, elemental analysis, and physical property measurement studies confirm the composition and structure of the synthesized material. Also reported is size-selection of ferromagnetic nanoparticles by binding PEG (2000 MW) ligand to particle surfaces and fractionally precipitating more narrowed size cuts. Large (30--100 nm) ferromagnetic nanoparticles are prepared by employing vesicle templates. Barium titanate nanoparticles with an average diameter of 3.8 nm have been synthesized within inverse micelles. A variety of vanadium oxide compositions within the nanometer size regime have been prepared using sol-gel chemistry.

  9. Adeninium cytosinium sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Cherouana, Aouatef; Bousboua, Raja; Bendjeddou, Lamia; Dahaoui, Slimane; Lecomte, Claude

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, C5H6N5 +·C4H6N3O+·SO4 2−, the adeninium (AdH+) and cytosinium (CytH+) cations and sulfate dianion are involved in a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network with four different modes, viz. AdH+⋯AdH+, AdH+⋯CytH+, AdH+⋯SO4 2− and CytH+⋯SO4 2−. The adeninium cations form N—H⋯N dimers through the Hoogsteen faces, generating a characteristic R 2 2(10) motif. This AdH+⋯AdH+ hydrogen bond in combination with AdH+⋯CytH+ H-bonds leads to two-dimensional cationic ribbons parallel to the a axis. The sulfate anions inter­link the ribbons into a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network and thus reinforce the crystal structure. PMID:21577678

  10. Prospects for Barium Tagging in Gaseous Xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D.; Rollin, E.; Smith, J.; Mommers, A.; Ackerman, N.; Aharmim, B.; Auger, M.; Barbeau, P.S.; Benitez-Medina, C.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Cook, S.; Coppens, A.; Daniels, T.; DeVoe, R.; Dobi, A.; Dolinski, M.J.; Donato, K.; Fairbank, W., Jr.; Farine, J.; Giroux, G.; /Bern U., LHEP /Carleton U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Carleton U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /SLAC /Indiana U. /Indiana U., CEEM /Korea U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Alabama U. /Colorado State U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Alabama U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /SLAC /Alabama U. /SLAC /Maryland U. /Moscow, ITEP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Maryland U. /Bern U., LHEP /Laurentian U. /SLAC /Maryland U.

    2012-05-03

    Tagging events with the coincident detection of a barium ion would greatly reduce the background for a neutrino-less double beta decay search in xenon. This paper describes progress towards realizing this goal. It outlines a source that can produce large quantities of Ba++ in gas, shows that this can be extracted to vacuum, and demonstrates a mechanism by which the Ba++ can be efficiently converted to Ba+ as required for laser identification. It is clear from this study that electrospray is a convenient mechanism for producing Ba++ is gas at atmospheric pressure. It is likely that the source will perform just as effectively at higher pressures. Even though the source region has water vapour and methanol vapour at the 0.3% level, there is no evidence for molecular formation. The use of TEA offers an effective method to achieve the charge state conversion. The overall design of the ion extraction from high pressure to vacuum is very similar to the scheme proposed for the final detector and this appears to work well although the efficiency is not yet determined.

  11. Development of advanced barium ferrite tape media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Osamu; Oyanagi, Masahito; Morooka, Atsushi; Mori, Masahiko; Kurihashi, Yuich; Tada, Toshio; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    We developed an advanced particulate magnetic tape using fine barium ferrite (BaFe) particles for magnetic-tape storage systems. The new tape showed a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that was 3.5 dB higher than that of the commercially available BaFe tape used for the Linear Tape Open generation 6 tape-storage system, at a linear density of 300 kfci measured with a giant magnetoresistive head with a reader width of 0.45 μm. Such significant increase in SNR was achieved by reducing the magnetic particle volume from 1950 to 1350 nm3, while maintaining a sufficiently high thermal stability, improving the perpendicular squareness ratio from 0.66 to 0.83, and improving the surface roughness from 2.5 to 2.0 nm when measured by atomic force microscopy and from 2.4 to 0.9 nm when measured by optical interferometry. This paper describes the characteristics of the new BaFe particles and media, which are expected to be employed for future high-capacity linear-tape systems.

  12. High H- ionic conductivity in barium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbraeken, Maarten C.; Cheung, Chaksum; Suard, Emmanuelle; Irvine, John T. S.

    2015-01-01

    With hydrogen being seen as a key renewable energy vector, the search for materials exhibiting fast hydrogen transport becomes ever more important. Not only do hydrogen storage materials require high mobility of hydrogen in the solid state, but the efficiency of electrochemical devices is also largely determined by fast ionic transport. Although the heavy alkaline-earth hydrides are of limited interest for their hydrogen storage potential, owing to low gravimetric densities, their ionic nature may prove useful in new electrochemical applications, especially as an ionically conducting electrolyte material. Here we show that barium hydride shows fast pure ionic transport of hydride ions (H-) in the high-temperature, high-symmetry phase. Although some conductivity studies have been reported on related materials previously, the nature of the charge carriers has not been determined. BaH2 gives rise to hydride ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm-1 at 630 °C. This is an order of magnitude larger than that of state-of-the-art proton-conducting perovskites or oxide ion conductors at this temperature. These results suggest that the alkaline-earth hydrides form an important new family of materials, with potential use in a number of applications, such as separation membranes, electrochemical reactors and so on.

  13. Co-doped Barium Phosphate Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, J. A.

    2014-09-01

    Co-doping of a P2O5:BaO glass matrix with divalent tin and trivalent samarium ions has been realized by the melt-quenching technique with the purpose of investigating the material's luminescent properties. Photoluminescence excitation spectra obtained by monitoring Sm3+ 4G5/2 emission showed a broad excitation band around 290 nm (absent in a Sm3+-doped reference), typical of donor/acceptor energy transfer. Under such excitation, the material exhibits a reddish-white emission. Time-resolved spectra recorded under the 290-nm excitation (non-resonant with Sm3+ excitation peaks) exposed a broad blue-white band characteristic of twofold-coordinated Sn centers and orange-red emission bands of Sm3+ ions, which appeared well separated in time in accord with their emission decay dynamics. Consequently, the data indicate that light absorption occurs at Sn centers (donors) followed by energy transfer to samarium ions (acceptors) which results in populating the 4G5/2 emitting state in Sm3+. Energy transfer pathways likely resulting in the sensitization of Sm3+ photoluminescence are discussed. Results are put into context in terms of the potential of SnO and rare-earth co-doped barium phosphate glasses for use in white light-emitting devices.

  14. Theoretical isotope shifts in neutral barium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, C.; Li, J. G.; Godefroid, M.

    2015-03-01

    The present work deals with a set of problems in isotope shifts of neutral barium spectral lines. Some well-known transitions (6 s2 1S0-6 s 6 p 1,3P1o and 6 s2 1S0-6 p2 3P0) are investigated. Values of the changes in the nuclear mean-square charge radius are deduced from the available experimental isotope shifts using our ab initio electronic factors. The three sets {? A ,A'} obtained from these lines are consistent with each other. The combination of the available nuclear mean-square radii with our electronic factors for the 6 s 5 d 3D1 ,2-6 s 6 p 1P1o transitions produces isotope shift values in conflict with the laser spectroscopy measurements of U. Dammalapati et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 53, 1 (2009), 10.1140/epjd/e2009-00076-x].

  15. Extraction, isolation and analysis of chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takuo; Betti, Mirko; Pietrasik, Zeb

    2010-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) including chondroitin sulfate (CS) and chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) copolymers are anionic straight chain polysaccharides. They are galactosamine containing GAGs (galactosaminoglycans) having wide range of applications in pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industries. This article reviews techniques to isolate and characterize these galactosaminoglycans from animal and poultry tissues. Patent based information is also discussed. Cartilaginous tissues are the major source of CS consisting entirely of D-glucuronosyl-N-acetylgalactosamine repeating disaccharide units, in which the galactosamine is sulfated at C4 or C6. In contrast, most galactosaminoglycans in non-cartilaginous connective tissues (e.g. skin and tendon) are CS/DS copolymers comprised of varying proportions of D-glucuronosyl-N-acetylgalactosamine and L-iduronosyl-N-acetylgalactosamine. Tissues are digested with proteinase (e.g. papain) to liberate GAGs, which are fractionated to isolate and purify galactosaminoglycans. Common techniques used for fractionation of GAGs include: precipitation with different concentrations of ethanol; solubilization of GAG precipitated as GAG-quarternary ammonium compound complexes with different concentrations of NaCl; anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Purified galactosaminoglycans are examined by various methods including chondroitinase digestion, high performance liquid chromatography and electrophoresis. Histological methods are used to localize galactosaminoglycans in tissues. The patent information on the CS hydrolase and ultraviolet irradiation may be useful for the preparation of CS oligosaccharide. PMID:20653551

  16. Sulfate in acid rain data - do the patterns make sense?

    SciTech Connect

    Stensland, G.J.

    1997-12-31

    A high quality national record of precipitation chemistry is being collected through the operation of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). This network began in 1978 with less than 20 sites and by the mid 1980`s had grown to about 200 sites which is about the number of sites currently in operation. Lynch et al. have been reporting time trend results for this data, with their most recent analysis showing that sulfate in NADP/NTN decreased dramatically in 1995 which agrees with the substantial decrease in sulfur dioxide emissions. The various network data available before NADP/NTN have been reported to have a variety of problems, especially related to the effect on pH of the elevated levels of base cations. The sulfate and nitrate data may be more useable. This paper reassesses the sulfate data available from the Junge network to see if these data can be used to extend the comparison of sulfate in precipitation and sulfur dioxide emissions back to the mid 1950`s.

  17. Remediation of acid mine drainage with sulfate reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Hauri, J.F.; Schaider, L.A.

    2009-02-15

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed changes in dissolved metal concentrations and pH. Using synthetic acid mine drainage and combinations of inputs, students monitor their bioreactors for decreases in dissolved copper and iron concentrations.

  18. Mononuclear barium diketonate polyamine adducts. Synthesis, structures, and use in MOCVD of barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, R.A.; Gordon, D.C.; Stauf, G.T.; Vaartstra, B.A.; Ostrander, R.L.; Rheingold, A.L.

    1994-11-01

    Mononuclear barium {beta}-diketonate Lewis base adducts have been synthesized by reaction of Ba(thd){sub 2} (thd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate) with polyamines 1,1,4,7,7-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (pmdt) and 1,1,4,7,10,10-hexamethyltriethylenetetramine (hmtt). The adducts [Ba(thd){sub 2}(pmdt)] (I) and [Ba(thd){sub 2}(hmtt)] (II) have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, elemental analyses and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound I crystallizes in the space group P2{sub 1}/c with a = 10.577(3) {angstrom}, b = 23.547(7) {angstrom}, c = 15.963(5) {angstrom}, {beta} = 105.21(2){degrees}, and Z = 4. Compound II crystallizes in the space group P2{sub 1}/c with a = 10.833(6) {angstrom}, b = 20.442(12) {angstrom}, c = 19.404(9) {angstrom}, {beta} = 104.35(4){degrees}, and Z = 4. The adducts are seven- and eight-coordinate, respectively, with all nitrogen atoms of the polyamine bound to a single barium center. Compound I has been used for thin-film growth of BaTiO{sub 3} which has revealed that, compared to Ba(thd){sub 2}(tetraglyme), the polyamine adduct allows a larger temperature window for effective vapor transport. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Acceleration of barium ions near 8000 km above an aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T. J.; Wescott, E. M.; Foeppl, H.

    1984-01-01

    A barium shaped charge, named Limerick, was released from a rocket launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, on March 30, 1982, at 1033 UT. The release took place in a small auroral breakup. The jet of ionized barium reached an altitude of 8100 km 14.5 min after release, indicating that there were no parallel electric fields below this altitude. At 8100 km the jet appeared to stop. Analysis shows that the barium at this altitude was effectively removed from the tip. It is concluded that the barium was actually accelerated upward, resulting in a large decrease in the line-of-sight density and hence the optical intensity. The parallel electric potential in the acceleration region must have been greater than 1 kV over an altitude interval of less than 200 km. The acceleration region, although presumably auroral in origin, did not seem to be related to individual auroral structures, but appeared to be a large-scale horizontal structure. The perpendicular electric field below, as deduced from the drift of the barium, was temporally and spatially very uniform and showed no variation related to individual auroral structures passing through.

  20. Preparation of barium hexaferrite powders using oxidized steel scales waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Septiani, Ardita; Idayanti, Novrita; Kristiantoro, Tony

    2016-02-01

    Research on preparation of barium hexaferrite powders has been done using Hot Strip Mill scales as raw materials. Hot Strip Mill scales are oxidized steel scales waste from steel industrial process. The method used for preparing the barium hexaferrite powders was solid state reaction method. Oxidized steel scales were milled using ball mill for 10 hours, then screened through a 250 mesh sieve to obtain powders with maximum size of 63 µm. Powders were roasted at 600°C temperature for 4 hours to obtain hematite (Fe2O3) phase. Roasted powders were then mixed with barium carbonate, and were subsequently milled for 16 hours. After mixing, powders were calcined with an increasing rate of 10°C/min and maintained at 1100°C for 3 hours. Calcination process was performed to acquire barium hexaferrite phase. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) characterization in conjunction with RIR analysis showed that 85 wt. % of barium hexaferrite is formed. The magnetic properties of powders were characterized using Permagraph. It is found the value of remanent induction is 1.09 kG, coercivity of 2.043 kOe, and the maximum energy product of 0.25 MGOe.

  1. Both barium and calcium activate neuronal potassium currents

    SciTech Connect

    Ribera, A.B.; Spitzer, N.C.

    1987-09-01

    Amphibian spinal neurons in culture possess both rapidly inactivating and sustained calcium-dependent potassium current components, similar to those described for other cells. Divalent cation-dependent whole-cell outward currents were isolated by subtracting the voltage-dependent potassium currents recorded from Xenopus laevis neurons in the presence of impermeant cadmium from the currents produced without cadmium but in the presence of permeant divalent cations. These concentrations of permeant ions were low enough to avoid contamination by macroscopic inward currents through calcium channels. Calcium-dependent potassium currents were reduced by 1 ..mu..M tetraethylammonium. These currents can also be activated by barium or strontium. Barium as well as calcium activated outward currents in young neurons (6-8 hr) and in relatively mature neurons (19-26 hr in vitro). However, barium influx appeared to suppress the sustained voltage-dependent potassium current in most cells. Barium also activated at least one class of potassium channels observed in excised membrane patches, whole blocking others. The blocking action may have masked and hindered detection of the stimulatory action of barium in other systems.

  2. Determination of trace elements in triglycine sulfate solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadros, Shawky H.

    1993-01-01

    Ten elements were divided into 2 groups. The elements in the first group included iron, nickel, chromium, manganese, copper, and gold. The elements in the second group included zinc, cobalt, lead, cadmium, and gold. Five ppm of each element in each group was spiked in a 1 percent triglycine sulfate (TGS) solution. Glycine was removed with 1-naphthyl isocyanate in ether medium. The glycine derivative 1-naphthyl isocyanate glycine was removed by filtration, and the filtrates were analyzed for the different elements. Analysis of these elements was performed by using the 5100 Perkin-Elmer Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The result of these experiments was the observation that there was a decrease in the concentration of chromium and gold, which was interpreted to be due to the chelation of these elements by the derivative 1-naphthyl isocyanate glycine. Further research is needed to determine the concentration of other elements in triglycine sulfate (TGS) solutions. These elements will include lithium, sodium, rubidium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, aluminum, and silicon. These are the most likely elements to be found in the sulfuric acid used in manufacturing the TGS crystal. Moreover, we will extend our research to investigate the structural formula of the violet colored chelated compounds, which had been formed by interaction of the derivative 1-naphthyl isocyanate glycine with the different elements, such as gold, chromium.

  3. Barium Depletion in the NSTAR Discharge Cathode After 30,000 Hours of Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of barium released by impregnant materials in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. Examinations of cathode inserts from long duration ion engine tests show deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of barium from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of barium transport in the insert plasma indicates that the barium partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant barium-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress barium loss in the upstream part of the insert. New measurements of the depth of barium depletion from a cathode insert operated for 30,352 hours reveal that barium loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis.

  4. Rocket having barium release system to create ion clouds in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J. (inventors)

    1974-01-01

    A chemical system for releasing a good yield of free barium atoms and barium ions to create ion clouds in the upper atmosphere and interplanetary space for the study of the geophysical properties of the medium is presented.

  5. PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONOUS PEROXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Manion, J.P.

    1961-08-15

    A precipitation process for recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution is described. In the process for precipitating plutonium as plutonous peroxide, hydroxylamine or hydrazine is added to the plutoniumcontaining solution prior to the addition of peroxide to precipitate plutonium. The addition of hydroxylamine or hydrazine increases the amount of plutonium precipitated as plutonous peroxide. (AEC)

  6. Natural or anthropogenic? On the origin of atmospheric sulfate deposition in the Andes of southeastern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski Giannoni, S.; Rollenbeck, R.; Trachte, K.; Bendix, J.

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric sulfur deposition above certain limits can represent a threat to tropical forests, causing nutrient imbalances and mobilizing toxic elements that impact biodiversity and forest productivity. Atmospheric sources of sulfur deposited by precipitation have been roughly identified in only a few lowland tropical forests. Even scarcer are studies of this type in tropical mountain forests, many of them mega-diversity hotspots and especially vulnerable to acidic deposition. In these places, the topographic complexity and related streamflow conditions affect the origin, type, and intensity of deposition. Furthermore, in regions with a variety of natural and anthropogenic sulfur sources, like active volcanoes and biomass burning, no source emission data has been used for determining the contribution of each source to the deposition. The main goal of the current study is to evaluate sulfate (SO4- deposition by rain and occult precipitation at two topographic locations in a tropical mountain forest of southern Ecuador, and to trace back the deposition to possible emission sources applying back-trajectory modeling. To link upwind natural (volcanic) and anthropogenic (urban/industrial and biomass-burning) sulfur emissions and observed sulfate deposition, we employed state-of-the-art inventory and satellite data, including volcanic passive degassing as well. We conclude that biomass-burning sources generally dominate sulfate deposition at the evaluated sites. Minor sulfate transport occurs during the shifting of the predominant winds to the north and west. Occult precipitation sulfate deposition and likely rain sulfate deposition are mainly linked to biomass-burning emissions from the Amazon lowlands. Volcanic and anthropogenic emissions from the north and west contribute to occult precipitation sulfate deposition at the mountain crest Cerro del Consuelo meteorological station and to rain-deposited sulfate at the upriver mountain pass El Tiro meteorological station.

  7. Natural or anthropogenic? On the origin of atmospheric sulfate deposition in the Andes of southeastern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski Giannoni, S.; Rollenbeck, R.; Trachte, K.; Bendix, J.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric sulfur deposition above certain limits can represent a threat to tropical forests, causing nutrient imbalances and mobilizing toxic elements that impact biodiversity and forest productivity. Atmospheric sources of sulfur deposited by precipitation have being roughly identified in only a few lowland tropical forests. Even scarcer are these type of studies in tropical mountain forests, many of them megadiversity hotspots and especially vulnerable to acidic deposition. Here, the topographic complexity and related streamflow condition the origin, type, and intensity of deposition. Furthermore, in regions with a variety of natural and anthropogenic sulfur sources, like active volcanoes and biomass-burning, no source-emission data has been used for determining the contribution of each of them to the deposition. The main goal of the current study is to evaluate sulfate (SO4-) deposition by rain and occult precipitation at two topographic locations in a tropical mountain forest of southern Ecuador, and to trace back the deposition to possible emission sources applying back trajectory modeling. To link upwind natural (volcanic) and anthropogenic (urban/industrial and biomass-burning) sulfur emissions and observed sulfate deposition, we employed state of the art inventory and satellite data, including volcanic passive degassing as well. We conclude that biomass-burning sources generally dominate sulfate deposition at the evaluated sites. Minor sulfate transport occurs during the shifting of the predominant winds to the north and west. Occult precipitation sulfate deposition and likely rain sulfate deposition are mainly linked to biomass-burning emissions from the Amazon lowlands. Volcanic and anthropogenic emissions from the north and west contribute to occult precipitation sulfate deposition at the mountain crest Cerro del Consuelo meteorological station and to rain-deposited sulfate at the upriver mountain-pass El Tiro meteorological station.

  8. 21 CFR 184.1315 - Ferrous sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...SO4·7H2O, CAS Reg. No. 7782-63-0) is prepared by the action of sulfuric acid on iron. It occurs as... ferrous sulfate (dried). Ferrous sulfate (dried) consists primarily of ferrous sulfate monohydrate...

  9. Some characteristics of protein precipitation by salts.

    PubMed

    Shih, Y C; Prausnitz, J M; Blanch, H W

    1992-12-01

    The solubilities of lysozyme, alpha-chymotrypsin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied in aqueous electrolyte solution as a function of ionic strength, pH, the chemical nature of salt, and initial protein concentration. Compositions were measured for both the supernatant phase and the precipitate phase at 25 degrees C. Salts studied were sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, and sodium phosphate. For lysozyme, protein concentrations in supernatant and precipitate phases are independent of the initial protein concentration; solubility can be represented by the Cohn salting-out equation. Lysozyme has a minimum solubility around pH 10, close to its isoelectric point (pH 10.5). The effectiveness of the three salts studied for precipitation were in the sequence sulfate > phosphate > chloride, consistent with the Hofmeister series. However, for alpha-chymotrypsin and BSA, initial protein concentration affects the apparent equillibrium solubility. For these proteins, experimental results show that the compositions of the precipitate phase are also affected by the initial protein concentration. We define a distribution coefficient kappa(e) to represent the equilibrium ratio of the protein concentration in the supernatant phase to that in the precipitate phase. When the salt concentration is constant, the results show that, for lysozyme, the protein concentrations in both phases are independent of the initial protein concentrations, and thus kappa(e) is a constant. For alpha-chymotrypsin and BSA, their concentrations in both phases are nearly proportional to the initial protein concentrations, and therefore, for each protein, at constant salt concentration, the distribution coefficient kappa(e) is independent of the initial protein concentration. However, for both lysozyme and alpha-chymotrypsin, the distribution coefficient falls with increasing salt concentration. These results indicate that care must be used in the definition of solubility. Solubility is appropriate when the precipitate phase is pure, but when it is not, the distribution coefficient better describes the phase behavior. PMID:18601066

  10. Ion Exchange Studies for Removal of Sulfate from Hanford Tank Waste Envelope C (241-AN-107) Using SuperLig 655 Resin

    SciTech Connect

    DE Kurath; JR Bontha; DL Blanchard; SK Fiskum; BM Rapko

    2000-08-23

    BNFL Inc. is evaluating various pretreatment technologies to mitigate the impacts of sulfate on the LAW vitrification system. One pretreatment technology for separating sulfate from LAW solutions involves the use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 655 (SL-655), a proprietary ion exchange material developed and supplied by IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT. This report describes testing of SL-655 with diluted ([Na] {approximately} 5 M) waste from Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division. Batch contact studies were conducted from 4 to 96 hours to determine the sulfate distribution coefficient and reaction kinetics. A small-scale ion exchange column test was conducted to evaluate sulfate removal, loading, breakthrough, and elution from the SL-655. In all of these tests, an archived 241-AN-107 tank waste sample (pretreated to remove Cs, Sr, and transuranics elements) was used. The experimental details and results are described in this report. Under the test conditions, SL-655 was found to have no significant ion exchange affinity for sulfate in this matrix. The batch contact study resulted in no measurable difference in the aqueous sulfate concentration following resin contact (K{sub d} {approximately} 0). The column test also demonstrated SL-655 had no practical affinity for sulfate in the tested matrix. Within experimental error, the sulfate concentration in the column effluent was equal to the concentration in the feed after passing 3 bed volumes of sample through the columns. Furthermore, some, if not all, of the decreased sulfate concentration in these first three column volumes of effluent can be ascribed to mixing and dilution of the 241-AN-107 feed with the interstitial liquid present in the column at the start of the loading cycle. Finally, ICP-AES measurements on the eluate solutions showed the presence of barium as soon as contact with the feed solution is completed. Barium is a metal not detected in the feed solution. Should the loss of barium be correlated with the resin's ability to selectively complex sulfate, then maintaining even the current limited resin characteristics for sulfate complexation over multiple cycles becomes questionable.

  11. Application of Biostimulation for Remediation of Sulfate-Contaminated Groundwater at a Mining Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Z.; Carroll, K. C.; Carreon, C.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    There is growing concern regarding sulfate contamination of groundwater. One innovative in-situ remediation option under investigation is biostimulation through addition of electron-donor amendments to enhance sulfate reduction. Two pilot-scale ethanol-injection tests were conducted at a former uranium mining site that is contaminated with sulfate and nitrate (with a lack of heavy metals), and for which there appears to be minimal natural attenuation of sulfate. The first test was a push-pull test that had a limited zone of influence, while the second test was a single-well injection test in which additional downgradient wells were monitored. For both tests, sulfate concentrations began to decline within a few weeks of injection, after nitrate concentrations were significantly reduced. Concomitantly, aqueous concentrations of manganese, iron, and hydrogen sulfide increased from background. Monitoring over many months revealed that the declines in sulfate concentration conformed to exponential decay, with first-order decay rates of approximately 0.01 /d. Analysis of sulfur stable isotope data indicated that the decrease in sulfate concentrations was microbially mediated. The results also indicated that sulfides formed during sulfate reduction may have undergone partial re-oxidation. This study illustrates the feasibility of using ethanol injection for remediation of sulfate-contaminated groundwater. However, re-oxidation of sulfides (both metal sulfide precipitates and hydrogen sulfide gas) is a potential issue of significance that would need to be addressed.

  12. White dwarf kicks and implications for barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.; Church, R. P.; Dermine, T.

    The barium stars have caused much grief in the field of binary stellar evolution. They are often eccentric when they should be circular and are not found to have periods longer than 104 days even though wind accretion should still be efficient at such separations. We address both these problems by introducing a kick to white dwarfs when they are born, thus solving the eccentricity problem, and imposing strong orbital angular momentum loss to shrink barium-star binaries down to the observed periods. Whilst our angular momentum prescription is hard to justify for the barium stars it shows that strong angular momentum loss is necessary to reproduce the observed period-eccentricity distribution. We are investigating whether this can be obtained from a circumbinary disc.

  13. Effect of preparation conditions on fractal structure and phase transformations in the synthesis of nanoscale M-type barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashkova, E. V.; Solovyova, E. D.; Kotenko, I. E.; Kolodiazhnyi, T. V.; Belous, A. G.

    2011-10-01

    The conditions of the synthesis of carbonate-hydroxide precursors (pH of FeOOH precipitation and heat treatment regimes) were studied in terms of their effect on the fractal structure and physical-chemical properties of precursors. Phase transformations which occur during the synthesis of nanosize M-type barium hexaferrite (BHF) were studied as well. The first structural level of precursors' aggregation for mass fractals, the correlation between fractal dimension and precursors' activity during the synthesis of BHF were determined. Synthesis parameters for the precursors with the optimal fractal structure were determined. These data permit an enhancement of the filtration coefficient of the precipitates by a factor of 4-5, obtaining substantial decrease in the temperature required for synthesis of a single-phase BHF, and monodispersed plate-like nanoparticles (60 nm diameter) with the shape anisotropy and good magnetic characteristics (saturation magnetization ( Ms)=68,7 emu/g and coercitivity ( Hc)=5440 Oe).

  14. METHOD OF IMPROVING THE CARRIER PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Kamack, H.J.; Balthis, J.H.

    1958-12-01

    Plutonium values can be recovered from acidic solutlons by adding lead nitrate, hydrogen fluoride, lantha num nitrate, and sulfurlc acid to the solution to form a carrler preclpitate. The lead sulfate formed improves the separatlon characteristics of the lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate,

  15. Compact pulse forming line using barium titanate ceramic material.

    PubMed

    Kumar Sharma, Surender; Deb, P; Shukla, R; Prabaharan, T; Shyam, A

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic material has very high relative permittivity, so compact pulse forming line can be made using these materials. Barium titanate (BaTiO(3)) has a relative permittivity of 1200 so it is used for making compact pulse forming line (PFL). Barium titanate also has piezoelectric effects so it cracks during high voltages discharges due to stresses developed in it. Barium titanate is mixed with rubber which absorbs the piezoelectric stresses when the PFL is charged and regain its original shape after the discharge. A composite mixture of barium titanate with the neoprene rubber is prepared. The relative permittivity of the composite mixture is measured to be 85. A coaxial pulse forming line of inner diameter 120 mm, outer diameter 240 mm, and length 350 mm is made and the composite mixture of barium titanate and neoprene rubber is filled between the inner and outer cylinders. The PFL is charged up to 120 kV and discharged into 5 ? load. The voltage pulse of 70 kV, 21 ns is measured across the load. The conventional PFL is made up of oil or plastics dielectrics with the relative permittivity of 2-10 [D. R. Linde, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90th ed. (CRC, 2009); Xia et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 086113 (2008); Yang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 43303 (2010)], which increases the length of PFL. We have reported the compactness in length achieved due to increase in relative permittivity of composite mixture by adding barium titanate in neoprene rubber. PMID:22129008

  16. Compact pulse forming line using barium titanate ceramic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Sharma, Surender; Deb, P.; Shukla, R.; Prabaharan, T.; Shyam, A.

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic material has very high relative permittivity, so compact pulse forming line can be made using these materials. Barium titanate (BaTiO3) has a relative permittivity of 1200 so it is used for making compact pulse forming line (PFL). Barium titanate also has piezoelectric effects so it cracks during high voltages discharges due to stresses developed in it. Barium titanate is mixed with rubber which absorbs the piezoelectric stresses when the PFL is charged and regain its original shape after the discharge. A composite mixture of barium titanate with the neoprene rubber is prepared. The relative permittivity of the composite mixture is measured to be 85. A coaxial pulse forming line of inner diameter 120 mm, outer diameter 240 mm, and length 350 mm is made and the composite mixture of barium titanate and neoprene rubber is filled between the inner and outer cylinders. The PFL is charged up to 120 kV and discharged into 5 Ω load. The voltage pulse of 70 kV, 21 ns is measured across the load. The conventional PFL is made up of oil or plastics dielectrics with the relative permittivity of 2-10 [D. R. Linde, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90th ed. (CRC, 2009); Xia et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 086113 (2008); Yang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 43303 (2010)], which increases the length of PFL. We have reported the compactness in length achieved due to increase in relative permittivity of composite mixture by adding barium titanate in neoprene rubber.

  17. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  18. 21 CFR 201.304 - Tannic acid and barium enema preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tannic acid and barium enema preparations. 201.304... Tannic acid and barium enema preparations. (a) It has become a widespread practice for tannic acid to be added to barium enemas to improve X-ray pictures. Tannic acid is capable of causing diminished...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10010 - Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). 721... Substances § 721.10010 Barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium manganese oxide (BaMnO3) (PMN...

  20. Tunable dielectric properties of lead barium zirconate niobate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ya-Ling; Wu, Jenn-Ming

    2006-09-01

    The effect of substitution of niobium for zirconium on tunable behavior of lead barium zirconate (PBZ) films was investigated. Lead barium zirconate niobate films were grown on Pt /Ti/SiO2/Si substrates using chemical solution deposition method. The substitution of Nb for Zr enhances tunable properties of PBZ films. The dielectric tunabilities are excellent, all higher than 45% with a maximum=60%. The substitution of Nb for Zr raises values of figure of merit (FOM) of films. The maximum FOM takes place at 5mol% Nb with a value of 90, which is about three times that of the corresponding PBZ film.

  1. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1981-01-01

    The photoelectric effect in structures consisting of metal deposited barium titanate film silicon is described. A radio frequency sputtering technique is used to deposit ferroelectric barium titantate films on silicon and quartz. Film properties are measured and correlated with the photoelectric effect characteristics of the films. It was found that to obtain good quality pin hole free films, it is necessary to reduce the substrate temperature during the last part of the deposition. The switching ability of the device with internal applied voltage is improved when applied with a ferroelectric memory device.

  2. Ionization and expansion of barium clouds in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, T.-Z.; Schunk, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    A recently envelope 3D model is used here to study the motion of the barium clouds released in the ionosphere, including the ionization stage. The ionization and the expansion of the barium clouds and the interaction between the clouds and the background ions are investigated using three simulations: a cloud without a directional velocity, a cloud with an initial velocity of 5 km/s across the B field, and a cloud with initial velocity components of 2 km/s both along and across the B field.

  3. Thermally Induced Rearrangement of Molecules in Barium Stearate Multilayer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englisch, U.; Gutberlet, T.; Steitz, R.; Oeser, R.; Oietsch, U.

    1997-05-01

    Barium stearate multilayer films have been prepared by use of the Langmuir-Blodgett technique transferring sequentially deuterated and nondeuterated bilayers on a silicon support. Combined X-ray and neutron scattering experiments show a rearrangement of the molecules when the films have been annealed at temperatures higher than 60 °C. Whereas the periodicity of the barium sheets is unchanged, the intensity of the superstructure peak decreases close to the melting point of the stearic acid component (about 70 °C) and vanishes completely above. This behaviour is explained by the vertical movements and rearrangements of stearic acid molecules without noticeable evaporation of molecules.

  4. Emission mechanism of barium-containing thermionic cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Enqui, Z.; Xeuque, L.

    1991-03-27

    Through the analysis and synthesis of data obtained from barium containing thermionic cathodes, especially those by modern surface analysis technique, the authors have come to a unified theory--the dynamical surface emission center model. Barium absorbed on the surface of alkaline earth metal oxides in case of oxide cathode or of aluminate, tungstate etc. in case of dispenser cathode may form the emission center. Its size should be large enough to screen off the attractive field produced by the substrate, but small enough to facilitate the transport of electrons from the substrate to the emitting center. The compositions and the dynamical characters of the surface emission center are also discussed.

  5. Glycosaminoglycan sulfation in murine splenocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, C.C.; Hart, G.W.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have studied the incorporation of /sup 35/sulfate into glycosaminoglycans (GAG) in splenocytes incubated in medium RPMI 1640 containing 3..mu..M sulfate. Addition of Concanavalin A (Con A) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) caused within 24 hr a 10- to 20-fold increase in incorporation into secreted GAG and a 2- to 4-fold increase in cell-retained GAG. PMA added alone caused only 2- to 4-fold increases in both fractions. Between 0 and 3 h however, PMA either alone or with Con A caused a substantial decrease in the incorporation of sulfate into the cellular GAG fraction, suggesting that an immediate effect of these agents is to cause the clearance of nascent GAG chains from the Golgi. The composition of newly sulfated lymphocyte GAG has been found to be approximately 75% chondroitin sulfate and 25% heparan sulfates in both secreted and non-secreted GAG irrespective of the presence of Con A and PMA. Amino column HPLC analysis of disaccharides released by chondroitinase ABC digestion indicates that both ..delta.. Di-4S and ..delta.. Di-6S are produced with the proportion of the latter increasing gradually from initially low levels such that at 24 h, equal proportions of the two are found. Possible mechanisms for this change in the position of sulfation will be discussed.

  6. Ferroelastic domains in lead-free barium zirconate titanate - barium calcium titanate piezoceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmke, Matthias Claudius

    Piezoelectricity was first discovered by Pierre and Jaque Curie in the year 1880. Nowadays, piezoelectric materials are used in many application such as high voltage generation in gas igniters, actuation in micro-positioning devices, generation and detection of acoustic waves, emitters and receivers for sonar technology, ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasound medical therapy, and micropumps for ink-jet printers. The most commonly used piezoelectric material since the 1950's is the solid solution system lead zirconate titanate (PZT) that offers high piezoelectric performance under a large range of operating conditions. However, the toxicity of lead requires the replacement of PZT. The studied lead-free alternatives are commonly based on potassium sodium niobate (KNN) and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT), and more recently zirconium and calcium substituted barium titanate (BZT-BCT). The BZT-BCT system exhibits large piezoelectric coefficients that can exceed even those of most PZT compositions under certain conditions. Piezoelectricity was first discovered by Pierre and Jaque Curie in the year 1880. Nowadays, piezoelectric materials are used in many application such as high voltage generation in gas igniters, actuation in micro-positioning devices, generation and detection of acoustic waves, emitters and receivers for sonar technology, ultrasonic cleaning, ultrasound medical therapy, and micropumps for ink-jet printers. The most commonly used piezoelectric material since the 1950's is the solid solution system lead zirconate titanate (PZT) that offers high piezoelectric performance under a large range of operating conditions. However, the toxicity of lead requires the replacement of PZT. The studied lead-free alternatives are commonly based on potassium sodium niobate (KNN) and bismuth sodium titanate (BNT), and more recently zirconium and calcium substituted barium titanate (BZT-BCT). The BZT-BCT system exhibits large piezoelectric coefficients that can exceed even those of most PZT compositions under certain conditions.

  7. Annual sulfate budgets for Dutch lowland peat polders: The soil is a major sulfate source through peat and pyrite oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaat, Jan E.; Harmsen, Joop; Hellmann, Fritz A.; van der Geest, Harm G.; de Klein, Jeroen J. M.; Kosten, Sarian; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Verhoeven, Jos T. A.; Mes, Ron G.; Ouboter, Maarten

    2016-02-01

    Annual sulfate mass balances have been constructed for four low-lying peat polders in the Netherlands, to resolve the origin of high sulfate concentrations in surface water, which is considered a water quality problem, as indicated amongst others by the absence of sensitive water plant species. Potential limitation of these plants to areas with low sulfate was analyzed with a spatial match-up of two large databases. The peat polders are generally used for dairy farming or nature conservation, and have considerable areas of shallow surface water (mean 16%, range 6-43%). As a consequence of continuous drainage, the peat in these polders mineralizes causing subsidence rates generally ranging between 2 and 10 mm y-1. Together with pyrite oxidation, this peat mineralization the most important internal source of sulfate, providing an estimated 96 kg SO4 ha-1 mm-1 subsidence y-1. External sources are precipitation and water supplied during summer to compensate for water shortage, but these were found to be minor compared to internal release. The most important output flux is discharge of excess surface water during autumn and winter. If only external fluxes in and out of a polder are evaluated, inputs average 37 ± 9 and exports 169 ± 17 kg S ha-1 y-1. During summer, when evapotranspiration exceeds rainfall, sulfate accumulates in the unsaturated zone, to be flushed away and drained off during the wet autumn and winter. In some polders, upward seepage from early Holocene, brackish sediments can be a source of sulfate. Peat polders export sulfate to the regional water system and the sea during winter drainage. The available sulfate probably only plays a minor role in the oxidation of peat: we estimate that this is less than 10% whereas aerobic mineralization is the most important. Most surface waters in these polders have high sulfate concentrations, which generally decline during the growing season when aquatic sediments are a sink. In the sediment, this sulfur is reduced and binds iron more strongly than phosphorus, which can be released to the overlying water and potentially fuels eutrophication. About 76% of the sampled vegetation-sites exceeded a threshold of 50 mg l-1 SO4, above which sensitive species, such as Stratiotes aloides, and several species of Potamogeton were significantly less abundant. Thus high sulfate concentrations, mainly due to land drainage and consequent mineralization, appear to affect aquatic plant community composition.

  8. Relation of precipitation quality to storm type, and deposition of dissolved chemical constituents from precipitation in Massachusetts, 1983-85

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gay, F.B.; Melching, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    Precipitation samples were collected for 83 storms at a rural inland site in Princeton, Mass., and 73 storms at a rural coastal site in Truro, Mass., to examine the quality of precipitation from storms and relate quality to three storm types (oceanic cyclone, continental cyclone, and cold front). At the inland site, Princeton, ranked-means of precipitation depth, storm duration, specific conductance, and concentrations and loads of hydrogen, sulfate, aluminum, bromide, and copper ions were affected by storm type. At the coastal site, Truro, ranked means of precipitation depth, storm duration, and concentrations and loads of calcium, chloride, magnesium, potassium, and sodium ions were affected by storm type. Precipitation chemistry at the coastal site was 85 percent oceanic in orgin, whereas precipitation 72 kilometers inland was 60 percent hydrogen, nitrate, and sulfate ions, reflecting fossil-fuel combustion. Concentrations and loads for specific conductance and 9 chemical constituents on an annual and seasonal basis were determined from National Atmospheric Deposition Program data for spring 1983 through winter 1985 at Quabbin (rural, inland), Waltham (suburban, inland) and Truro (rural, coastal), Massachusetts. Concentrations of magnesium, potassium, sodium, and chloride concentrations were highest at the coast and much lower inland, with very little difference between Waltham and Quabbin. Loads of ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, and hydrogen are highest at Quabbin and are about equal at Waltham and Truro. About twice as much nitrate and hydrogen and about 35 percent more sulfate is deposited at Quabbin than at Waltham or Truro; this pattern indicates that the interior of Massachusetts receives more acidic precipitation than do the eastern or the coastal areas of Massachusetts.

  9. Chemical abundance analysis of 19 barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo-Chao; Liang, Yan-Chun; Spite, Monique; Chen, Yu-Qin; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Guo-Qing; Liu, Yu-Juan; Liu, Nian; Deng, Li-Cai; Spite, Francois; Hill, Vanessa; Zhang, Cai-Xia

    2016-01-01

    We aim at deriving accurate atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of 19 barium (Ba) stars, including both strong and mild Ba stars, based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra obtained from the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The chemical abundances of the sample stars were obtained from an LTE, plane-parallel and line-blanketed atmospheric model by inputting the atmospheric parameters (effective temperatures Teff, surface gravities log g, metallicity [Fe/H] and microturbulence velocity ξt) and equivalent widths of stellar absorption lines. These samples of Ba stars are giants as indicated by atmospheric parameters, metallicities and kinematic analysis about UVW velocity. Chemical abundances of 17 elements were obtained for these Ba stars. Their Na, Al, α- and iron-peak elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni) are similar to the solar abundances. Our samples of Ba stars show obvious overabundances of neutron-capture (n-capture) process elements relative to the Sun. Their median abundances of [Ba/Fe], [La/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] are 0.54, 0.65 and 0.40, respectively. The Y I and Zr I abundances are lower than Ba, La and Eu, but higher than the α- and iron-peak elements for the strong Ba stars and similar to the iron-peak elements for the mild stars. There exists a positive correlation between Ba intensity and [Ba/Fe]. For the n-capture elements (Y, Zr, Ba, La), there is an anti-correlation between their [X/Fe] and [Fe/H]. We identify nine of our sample stars as strong Ba stars with [Ba/Fe] >0.6 where seven of them have Ba intensity Ba=2-5, one has Ba=1.5 and another one has Ba=1.0. The remaining ten stars are classified as mild Ba stars with 0.17<[Ba/Fe] <0.54.

  10. Fluids and Sulfate Vein Formation in Gale Crater, Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bridges, J.; Leveille, R. J.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; McAdam, A.; Conrad, P. G.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Curiosity detected sulfate veins crosscutting mudstones in the Sheepbed member of Gale Crater (Grotzinger et al., DOI: 10.1126/science.1242777; Manchon et al., DOI:10.1002/2013JE004588). We have used this information to evaluate the clay formation conditions in detail through thermochemical modeling (Bridges et al. submitted to JGR; this conference, session 2128) and compare the calculated fluid to those modeled for the nakhlite alteration mineralogy (Hicks et al. DOI: 10.1016/j.gca.2014.04.010, Bridges and Schwenzer, DOI: 10.1016/j.epsl.2012.09.044) and other Martian fluids. Concentrating the modeled Gale fluid though evaporation (or freezing) leads to a complex set of precipitates, which include silica, sulfate and halite. For example, 1 kg of brine produced by the alteration of a mixture of 70 % amorphous component, 20 % olivine and 10 % host rock (W/R 1000, T= 10 °C) evaporated to dryness (less that 1 % water left) will precipitate 70 mg of anhydrite, 46 mg of silica, 6.5 mg of halite and traces of pyrite, sulfur, calcite, and apatite. A fluid from this host rock with more mature alteration (W/R 100, T = 10 °C) precipitates the same minerals, but in very different abundances: the most abundant phase at dryness is halite (330 mg), followed by silica (88 mg) and anhydrite (30 mg). The calculated pH varies between 8 and 7.3 in both cases. If the evaporating brine is allowed to interact with the precipitate, a 'dirty' sulfate layer or vein filling would result, which could subsequently be refined through dissolution and re-precipitation, a mechanism that, for example, is proposed for the gypsum veins at the UK Triassic coast near Watchet (Philipp doi:10.1017/S0016756808005451). Factors that influence the nature of the precipitate include alteration stage of the host rock during clay formation, and pH and degree of fractionation of the early formed minerals from the evaporating fluid. Using REMS data we also consider desiccation of sulfates in the near surface.

  11. Cement composition and sulfate attack

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, Natalya; Zayed, Abla . E-mail: zayed@eng.usf.edu

    2007-04-15

    Four cements were used to address the effect of tricalcium silicate content of cement on external sulfate attack in sodium sulfate solution. The selected cements had similar fineness and Bogue-calculated tricalcium aluminate content but variable tricalcium silicates. Durability was assessed using linear expansion and compressive strength. Phases associated with deterioration were examined using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Mineralogical phase content of the as-received cements was studied by X-ray diffraction using two methods: internal standard and Rietveld analysis. The results indicate that phase content of cements determined by X-ray mineralogical analysis correlates better with the mortar performance in sulfate environment than Bogue content. Additionally, it was found that in cements containing triclacium aluminate only in the cubic form, the observed deterioration is affected by tricalcium silicate content. Morphological similarities between hydration products of high tricalcium aluminate and high tricalcium silicate cements exposed to sodium sulfate environment were also observed.

  12. Final report on the safety assessment of sodium cetearyl sulfate and related alkyl sulfates as used in cosmetics.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Fiume M; Bergfeld WF; Belsito DV; Klaassen CD; Marks JG Jr; Shank RC; Slaga TJ; Snyder PW; Alan Andersen F

    2010-05-01

    Sodium cetearyl sulfate is the sodium salt of a mixture of cetyl and stearyl sulfate. The other ingredients in this safety assessment are also alkyl salts, including ammonium coco-sulfate, ammonium myristyl sulfate, magnesium coco-sulfate, sodium cetyl sulfate, sodium coco/hydrogenated tallow sulfate, sodium coco-sulfate, sodium decyl sulfate, sodium ethylhexyl sulfate, sodium myristyl sulfate, sodium oleyl sulfate, sodium stearyl sulfate, sodium tallow sulfate, sodium tridecyl sulfate, and zinc coco-sulfate. These ingredients are surfactants used at concentrations from 0.1% to 29%, primarily in soaps and shampoos. Many of these ingredients are not in current use. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel previously completed a safety assessment of sodium and ammonium lauryl sulfate. The data available for sodium lauryl sulfate and ammonium lauryl sulfate provide sufficient basis for concluding that sodium cetearyl sulfate and related alkyl sulfates are safe in the practices of use and concentration described in the safety assessment.

  13. Could binary mixture of Nd-Ni ions control the electrical behavior of strontium-barium M-type hexaferrite nanoparticles?

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Muhammad Javed; Farooq, Saima

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Strontium-barium hexaferrites (Sr{sub 0.5}Ba{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 19}) in single magnetoplumbite phase solid structure are synthesized by the co-precipitation method. {yields} Structural and electrical properties of Nd-Ni substituted ferrites are investigated. {yields} These ferrite materials possess high electrical resistivity (108 {Omega} cm) that is essential to curb the eddy current loss, which is pre-requisite for surface mount devices. -- Abstract: Cationic substitution in M-type hexaferrites is considered to be an important tool for modification of their electrical properties. This work is part of our comprehensive study on the synthesis and characterization of Nd-Ni doped strontium-barium hexaferrite nanomaterials of nominal composition Sr{sub 0.5}Ba{sub 0.5-x}Nd{sub x}Fe{sub 12-y}Ni{sub y}O{sub 19} (x = 0.00-0.10; y = 0.00-1.00). Doping with this binary mixture modulates the physical and electrical properties of strontium-barium hexaferrite nanoparticles. Structural and electrical properties of the co-precipitated ferrites are investigated using state-of-the-art techniques. The results of X-ray diffraction analysis reveal that the lattice parameters and cell volume are inversely related to the dopant content. Temperature dependent DC-electrical resistivity measurements infer that resistivity of strontium-barium hexaferrites decreases from 1.8 x 10{sup 10} to 2.0 x 10{sup 8} {Omega} cm whereas the drift mobility, dielectric constant and dielectric loss tangent are directly related to the Nd-Ni content. The results of the study demonstrate a relationship between the modulation of electrical properties of substituted ferrites and nature of cations and their lattice site occupancy.

  14. Dielectric Behavior of Nano Barium Titanate Filled Polymeric Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratap, A.; Joshi, N. J.; Rakshit, P. B.; Grewal, G. S.; Shrinet, V.

    Rapid growth of electronic industry requires development of new materials that combine the high dielectric constant intrinsic to ferroelectric ceramic materials with easy processing characteristics of polymers. Ceramic-polymeric composites possess interesting properties for a variety of electronic applications including passive electronic devices. In fact, polymer-ceramic materials have drawn lot attention for use in microelectronic packaging, because they can give higher performance with lower cost, size and weight. In this work, attempts are made to prepare ceramic polymer composites followed by characterization of dielectric properties. The Barium Titanate ceramic powders are synthesized using the hydrothermal process. Crystal structure and crystallite size of particles are determined using X-ray diffraction. Silane treatment is carried out on Barium Titanate powder to increase its compatibility with polymer, followed with preparation of ceramic polymer composites. Epoxy and polyvinyledene fluoride (PVDF) polymers are used as matrices for preparation of the composites. The proportion of nanopowder is varied from 60 to 90 wt%. Dielectric properties such as volume resistivity, dielectric constant, dissipation factor are evaluated. Results indicate that the dielectric constant and dissipation factor vary between 18 -140 and 0.01 to 0.09, respectively as the relative ratio of polymer and silane modified Barium Titanate is varied. Specifically, at 90 wt% of 0.1 wt% silane modified Barium Titanate, the highest dielectric constant of 140 along with dissipation factor of 0.07 is obtained in the epoxy based system.

  15. Modeling of low-pressure barium-rare-gas discharges

    PubMed

    Lister; Curry; Lawler

    2000-10-01

    The fundamental principles of low-pressure discharges containing a minority of barium (5-20 mtorr) in a rare gas at pressure 1-20 torr have been investigated, using a numerical model of the positive column, with a view to assessing the potential of these discharges as a light source. The principle resonance line of neutral barium is from the 6p(1)P1 state and has a wavelength of 553 nm, which is close to the center of the photopic eye response curve. This green line can be augmented by radiation from barium ions to produce a "white" light. Published cross-section measurements suggest that the 6p(1)P1 state is heavily quenched by collisions with rare-gas atoms, reducing the radiation efficiency. The measured quenching cross section is much smaller for neon than other rare gases. Spectral line broadening by these same collisions, on the other hand, enhances the escape of radiation from the discharge through the line wings. The present paper reports the results of detailed calculations of the influence of rare-gas quenching and line broadening on discharge parameters (power balance, electric field, electron temperature, and density) as a function of discharge current, rare-gas, and barium vapor pressure. PMID:11089116

  16. PROPOSED ORAL REFERENCE DOSE (RFD) FOR BARIUM AND COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is a database of EPA's consensus opinion of the human health effects that may result from exposure to various substances found in the environment. A Toxicological Review and IRIS Summary were prepared for barium and compounds in 1998 ...

  17. BARIUM AND RADIUM REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER BY ION EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the applicability of weak acid exchange resin in the hydrogen form for removal of hardness, barium and radium from groundwater. Weak acid resin in the hydrogen form eliminates the addition of sodium to drinking water. The capac...

  18. Dynamics of a barium release in the magnetospheric tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Swenson, G. R.; Geller, S. P.; Doolittle, J. H.; Haerendel, G.

    1989-01-01

    The late time behavior of the May 13, 1985 magnetotail barium cloud is examined. The bulk dynamics of the cloud are studied based on triangulated data and data from Fabry-Perot Doppler velocity measurements. The changes in cloud morphology in relation to the in situ measurements made by the Ion Release Module satellite are discussed.

  19. SEPARATION OF BARIUM VALUES FROM URANYL NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Tompkins, E.R.

    1959-02-24

    The separation of radioactive barium values from a uranyl nitrate solution of neutron-irradiated uranium is described. The 10 to 20% uranyl nitrate solution is passed through a flrst column of a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring the adsorption of barium and certain other cations. The loaded resin is first washed with dilute sulfuric acid to remove a portion of the other cations, and then wash with a citric acid solution at pH of 5 to 7 to recover the barium along with a lesser amount of the other cations. The PH of the resulting eluate is adjusted to about 2.3 to 3.5 and diluted prior to passing through a smaller second column of exchange resin. The loaded resin is first washed with a citric acid solution at a pH of 3 to elute undesired cations and then with citric acid solution at a pH of 6 to eluts the barium, which is substantially free of undesired cations.

  20. Sulfate decomposition by bacterial leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Deveci, N.; Delaloglu, C.G.

    1995-04-01

    Sulfate disposal is the main problem of many industrial effluents, such as excess sulfuric acid, gypsum, coal desulfurization byproducts, acid-mine waters, and general metallurgical effluents. It has been established that sulfate present in wastes can be converted to elemental sulfur by bacterial mutualism. This study presents the results of an investigation of the industrial feasibility of utilizing a biological system capable of converting hydrous calcium sulfate (gypsum) to elemental sulfur. Gypsum, which was used in this study, is a byproduct of the fertilizer industry. The biological system is referred to as a bacterial mutualism, and involves Desulfovibrio desulfuricans for sulfate conversion and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum for hydrogen sulfide conversion. Bacterial mutualism and utilization of sulfate were investigated by means of a two-stage anaerobic system. In the first stage, a gas purge system was used for sulfate conversion to sulfide, and it was found that maximum conversion is 34%. In the second stage, a static culture system was used for sulfide conversion to sulfur with a conversion of 92%. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1307 - Ferric sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1307 Ferric sulfate. (a) Ferric sulfate (iron (III) sulfate, Fe2(SO4)3 CAS Reg. No. 10028-22-5) is a yellow substance that may be prepared by oxidizing iron (II) sulfate or by treating ferric oxide or ferric hydroxide with sulfuric acid. (b) The ingredient must be of a...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1307 - Ferric sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1307 Ferric sulfate. (a) Ferric sulfate (iron (III) sulfate, Fe2(SO4)3 CAS Reg. No. 10028-22-5) is a yellow substance that may be prepared by oxidizing iron (II) sulfate or by treating ferric oxide or ferric hydroxide with sulfuric acid. (b) The ingredient must be of a...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1307 - Ferric sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1307 Ferric sulfate. (a) Ferric sulfate (iron (III) sulfate, Fe2(SO4)3 CAS Reg. No. 10028-22-5) is a yellow substance that may be prepared by oxidizing iron (II) sulfate or by treating ferric oxide or ferric hydroxide with sulfuric acid. (b) The ingredient must be of a...

  4. Ultra-low temperature processing of barium tellurate dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Do-Kyun

    Ceramics, metals and polymers have unique electrical properties that are combined for electronic devices and systems. It necessitates lower processing temperatures for ceramics to be compatible with metal and polymer systems. In this thesis, the synthesis, crystal structure, and dielectric properties of barium tellurate are studied for temperatures between 500 and 900°C. Barium tellurate dielectric ceramics (BaTe4O9, BaTe 2O5, BaTe2O6, BaTeO3, BaTeO 4, and Ba2TeO5) are extensively investigated as new LTCC (Low-Temperature Cofired Ceramics) dielectric systems integrated with low resistivity metal electrodes such as silver and aluminum for microwave application. Studies on the phase formation and crystal structure through thermal analyses (Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermogravimetric Analysis, DSC-TGA) and X-ray diffraction phase analysis attest that barium tellurates are formed in the temperature range of 500 ˜ 900°C, through the sequential phase formations from Te-rich to Ba-rich phases. The oxygen coordination of the tellurium ion progresses from TeO4 to TeO6 via TeO 3+1 and TeO3 with increasing barium content as confirmed by structural analysis using infrared spectroscopy. High density barium tellurate ceramics are achieved at temperatures as low as 550°C, which provides the potential to be co-fired with low-melting aluminum metal electrodes in LTCC processing. Dielectric permittivity, loss, and temperature stability of barium tellurate dielectric ceramics were measured from 100 Hz to 13 GHz. Barium tellurate ceramics exhibit excellent microwave dielectric properties with intermediate dielectric permittivities and high quality factors (Q). The dielectric properties at microwave frequencies are epsilonr = 17.5, Qxf = 54700 GHz, TCf = -90 ppm/°C for BaTe4O9, epsilonr = 21, Qxf = 50300 GHz, TCf = -51 ppm/°C for BaTe2O6, epsilonr = 10, Qxf = 34000 GHz, TCf = -54 ppm/°C for BaTeO3, and epsilonr = 17, Qx f = 49600 GHz, TCf = -124 ppm/°C for Ba 2TeO5. Co-firing studies of barium tellurate ceramics with metal electrodes establish new LTCC systems for microwave devices. Chemical compatibility of barium tellurates with silver electrodes was achieved in the barium rich compositions. Ba2TeO5 was found to be covetable with silver electrodes at 850°C by adding CuO and B2O3 as fluxing agents. During the co-firing, a thin interfacial layer of AgTe is metastable according to the thermodynamic equilibrium between the Ba2TeO5-Ag/Ag 2O pseudo-binary system. A breakthrough LTCC technology with aluminum is based upon the ultra-low processing temperature and chemical compatibility of BaTe4O 9, which enables co-firing and fabrication of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) with aluminum inner electrodes. The aluminum base metal electrode (BME) BaTe4O9 MLCCs provide good dielectric properties of epsilonr = 17.5, TCepsilon = 100 ppm/°C, and tan delta = 2.1 x 10-3 (Q ≈ 500) at 1 MHz, which are suitable for the class-1 MLCCs. Aluminum microstrip ring resonators on the BaTe4O9 substrates realized good electromagnetic performance of the new materials at microwave frequency exhibiting resonant frequency of 2.97 GHz and Q factor of 278.

  5. Preliminary study of the CRRES magnetospheric barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huba, J. D.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Lyon, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary theoretical and computational analyses of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) magnetospheric barium releases are presented. The focus of the studies is on the evolution of the diamagnetic cavity which is formed by the barium ions as they expand outward, and on the structuring of the density and magnetic field during the expansion phase of the releases. Two sets of simulation studies are discussed. The first set is based upon a 2D ideal MHD code and provides estimates of the time and length scales associated with the formation and collapse of the diamagnetic cavity. The second set uses a nonideal MHD code; specifically, the Hall term is included. This additional term is critical to the dynamics of sub-Alfvenic plasma expansions, such as the CRRES barium releases, because it leads to instability of the expanding plasma. Detailed simulations of the G4 and G10 releases were performed. In both cases the expanding plasma rapidly structured: the G4 release structured at time t less than about 3 s and developed scale sizes of about 1-2 km, while the G10 release structured at time t less than about 22 s and developed scale sizes of about 10-15 km. It is also found that the diamagnetic cavity size is reduced from those obtained from the ideal MHD results because of the structure. On the other hand, the structuring allows the formation of plasma blobs which appear to free stream across the magnetic field; thus, the barium plasma can propagate to larger distances traverse to the magnetic field than the case where no structuring occurs. Finally, a new normal mode of the system was discovered which may be excited at the leading edge of the expanding barium plasma.

  6. Synthesis of nanocomposites comprising iron and barium hexaferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, M.; Bid, S.; Pradhan, S. K.; Nath, B. K.; Das, D.; Chakravorty, D.

    2004-02-01

    Composites of nanometre-sized α-iron and barium hexaferrite phases, respectively, have been synthesized by the ceramic processing route. Pure barium hexaferrite (BaO·6Fe 2O 3) was first of all prepared by calcinations of the precursor oxides at a maximum temperature of 1200°C for 4 h. By subjecting the resulting powder having particle size of the order of 1 μm to a reduction treatment in the temperature range 500-650°C for a period varying from 10 to 15 min it was possible to obtain a composite consisting of nanosized barium hexaferrite and α-Fe. At reduction temperature of 650°C for a period greater than 15 min all the ferrite phase was converted to α-Fe and Ba—the particle sizes being 59.4 and 43.6 nm, respectively. These conclusions are based on X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer studies of different samples. During reduction H + ions are introduced into the hexaferrite crystallite. It is believed that due to a tensile stress the crystals are broken up into smaller dimensions and the reduction brings about the growth of nanosized α-Fe and barium, respectively, around the hexaferrite particles. Magnetic measurements show coercivity values for the reduced samples in the range 120-440 Oe and saturation magnetization varying from 158 to 53.7 emu/g. These values have been ascribed to the formation and growth of α-Fe particles as the reduction treatment is increased. By heating the nanocomposites at a temperature of 1000°C for 1 h in ordinary atmosphere it was found that they were reconverted to the barium hexaferrite phase with a particle size ˜182.3 nm. The reaction described in this study is thus reversible.

  7. Bacterially Induced Dolomite Formation in the Presence of Sulfate Ions under Aerobic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Roman, M.; McKenzie, J. A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Rivadeneyra, M.

    2005-12-01

    The origin of dolomite remains a long-standing enigma in sedimentary geology because, although thermodynamically favorable, precipitation of dolomite from modern seawater does not occur. Experiments conducted at elevated temperatures (200 oC) indicated that the presence of small concentrations of sulfate ions inhibits the transformation of calcite to dolomite [1]. Indeed, sulfate ions appeared to inhibit dolomite formation above 2 mM concentration (versus 28 mM in modern seawater). Recently, culture experiments have demonstrated that sulfate-reducing bacteria mediate the precipitation of dolomite at Earth surface conditions in the presence of sustained sulfate ion concentrations [2,3]. Additionally, in a number of modern hypersaline environments, dolomite forms from solutions with high sulfate ion concentrations (2 to 70 times seawater). These observations suggest that the experimentally observed sulfate-ion inhibition [1] may not apply to all ancient dolomite formation. Here, we report aerobic culture experiments conducted at low temperatures (25 and 35 oC) and variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5, 1 and 2 x seawater values) using moderately halophilic bacteria, Halomonas meridiana. After an incubation period of 15 days, experiments at 35 oC with variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5 x and seawater values) contained crystals of Ca-dolomite and stochiometric dolomite. The experiment at 35 oC with 2 x seawater sulfate ion concentration produced dolomite crystals after 20 days of incubation. In a parallel set of experiments at 25 oC, precipitation of dolomite was observed after 25 days of incubation in cultures with variable sulfate ion concentrations (0, 0.5 x and seawater values). In the culture with 2 x seawater sulfate ion concentration, dolomite crystals were observed after 30 days. Our study demonstrates that halophilic bacteria (or heterotrophic microorganisms), which do not require sulfate ions for metabolism, can mediate dolomite precipitation in the presence of sulfate ions. Apparently, microbial dolomite precipitation is not intrinsically linked to any particular group of organisms or specific metabolic processes or even specific environment. Furthermore, because heterotrophic microorganisms appear to be able to mediate microbial dolomite precipitation with or without sulfate ions in the media, our results indicate that the kinetic inhibition effect of sulfate ions can be overcome under specific sedimentary conditions. The present study adds a new insight to the dolomite problem, which could lead to a better clarification of the mechanism(s) involved in the massive dolomite formation observed in the geological record. References: [1] Baker, P.A., and Kastner, M., (1981), Science, 213, 214-216. [2] Vasconcelos, C., McKenzie, J.A., Bernasconi, S., Grujic, D. and Tien, A.J., (1995), Nature 377, 220-222.. [3] Warthmann R., van Lith Y., Vasconcelos C., McKenzie J.A. and Karpoff A.M., (2000), Geology 28, 1091-1094.

  8. CLOUD AND CHEMICAL PATHWAY CHARACTERIZATION OF THE NONLINEAR RESPONSE OF SULFUR DEPOSITION AND SULFATE AIR CONCENTRATIONS TO CHANGES IN SO2 EMISSIONS IN THE RADM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aqueous-phase chemistry that occurs in both precipitating and nonprecipitating clouds provides a major mechanism for the conversion of S02 to sulfate in the troposphere. ccording to the Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM), cloud production of sulfate dominates over gas-phas...

  9. Sulfate-rich Archean Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brainard, J. L.; Choney, A. P.; Ohmoto, H.

    2012-12-01

    There is a widely held belief that prior to 2.4 Ga, the Archean oceans and atmosphere were reducing, and therefore sulfate poor (concentrations <0.1 mmol). However, there is mounting evidence from diverse rock types of Archean ages that sulfate concentrations were likely similar to those in the modern ocean (~28 mmol). In this study we demonstrate that in different lithologies, representing a wide range of marine environments, there is ubiquitous evidence for abundant seawater sulfate. One of the more apparent lines of evidence for sulfate rich Archean waters are bedded barite (BaSO4) deposits, such as those in the ~3.4 Ga Fig Tree Group, South Africa and ~3.5 Ga Dresser Formation, Western Australia (WA). These deposits are thick (>100 m), widely distributed (> km2), and contain only minor amounts of sulfides. These barite beds may have developed from reactions between Ba-rich hydrothermal fluids and evaporate bodies. Simple mass balance calculations suggest that the sulfate contents of the pre-evaporitic seawater must have been greater than ~1 mM. Some researchers have suggested that the SO4 for these beds was derived from the hydrolysis of SO2-rich magmatic fluids. However, this was unlikely as the reaction, 4SO2 + 4H2O → 3H2SO4 + H2S would have produced large amounts of sulfide, as well as sulfate minerals. Many Archean-aged volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits, much like those of the younger ages, record evidence for abundant seawater sulfate. As VMS deposits are most likely formed by submarine hydrothermal fluids that developed from seawater circulating through the seafloor rock, much of the seawater sulfate is reduced to from sulfides at depths. However, some residual sulfate in the hydrothermal fluids, with or without the addition of sulfate from the local seawater, can form sulfate minerals such as barite at near the seafloor. The d34S relationships between barites and pyrites in the Archean VMS deposits are similar to those of the younger VMS deposits, except for the lower d34S values for the seawater SO4. The abundance of pyrite in Archean black shales is also evidence of sulfate rich seawater. Pyrites in Archean-aged black shales were most likely the products of either bacterial or thermochemical sulfate reduction during diagenesis of the sediments. Their abundance in sedimentary rocks is determined by: (a) the availability of reactive carbon; (b) the availability of reactive Fe (Fe3+ hydroxides and Fe2+-rich pore fluid); (c) the sedimentation rate; and (d) the flux of SO42- in the sediments, which depends on the seawater SO42- contents. Contrary to a widely held belief, pyrite- and organic C rich black Archean shales are quite common, such as the 2.7 Ga Jeerinah and the 2.5 Ga McRae Shales in WA. Our modeling suggests that the formation of such pyrite-rich shales requires seawater SO4 contents greater than ~1 mM. As for the main source of SO4 in the Archean oceans, the current paradigm, based on mass independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes (MIF-S) in some pyrite and barite samples from some pre-2.4 Ga sedimentary rocks, postulates that the seawater SO4 was produced by UV photolysis of volcanic SO2 gas in an O2-poor atmosphere. However, the recent findings of the absence of MIF-S in many Archean sedimentary rocks, as well as those of oxidized paleosols of Archean ages, suggest that the abundant SO4 in the Archean oceans were generated by the oxidative weathering of sulfides.

  10. The biogeography of export productivity across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary as inferred from sediment mixing and biogenic barium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, P. M.; Norris, R. D.; Franks, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    The impact at the Cretaceous-Paleogene (KPg) boundary is thought to have precipitated a sudden decrease in global export productivity, in addition to widespread extinction. A global decrease in oceanic export productivity gains support from the collapse in δ13C gradients between surface-dwelling and deep-ocean foraminifera and decreased sedimentation rates. However, a growing body of evidence suggests a milder, spatially heterogeneous perturbation. Here we investigate the magnitude and spatial distribution of export production across the KPg boundary using two proxies, the depth of sediment mixing and the accumulation of biogenic barium. In the modern ocean, the depth of sediment mixing is correlated to the amount of organic matter reaching the sea floor as a function of water depth and export production. We calculate the relative depth of sediment mixing by fitting mixing models to the shape of iridium anomalies. In all 10 sites examined globally, export productivity is indicated by the presence of sediment mixing. The depth of mixing inferred from a subset of these sites records an inter-site range in mixing depths greater than the range measured in the modern ocean. Biogenic barium (measured by Ba/Al ratios) indicates a spatially heterogeneous effect of boundary events on export production as well. While biogenic barium decreases at most sites studied, the magnitude of this decline varies among sites, with one site in the North Pacific failing to record a sustained depression. Together, our results suggest that the decrease in export productivity following the KPg boundary event may have been a regional, albeit widespread, phenomenon.

  11. Bioengineered heparins and heparan sulfates.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li; Suflita, Matthew; Linhardt, Robert J

    2016-02-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfates are closely related linear anionic polysaccharides, called glycosaminoglycans, which exhibit a number of important biological and pharmacological activities. These polysaccharides, having complex structures and polydispersity, are biosynthesized in the Golgi of animal cells. While heparan sulfate is a widely distributed membrane and extracellular glycosaminoglycan, heparin is found primarily intracellularly in the granules of mast cells. While heparin has historically received most of the scientific attention for its anticoagulant activity, interest has steadily grown in the multi-faceted role heparan sulfate plays in normal and pathophysiology. The chemical synthesis of these glycosaminoglycans is largely precluded by their structural complexity. Today, we depend on livestock animal tissues for the isolation and the annual commercial production of hundred ton quantities of heparin used in the manufacture of anticoagulant drugs and medical device coatings. The variability of animal-sourced heparin and heparan sulfates, their inherent impurities, the limited availability of source tissues, the poor control of these source materials and their manufacturing processes, suggest a need for new approaches for their production. Over the past decade there have been major efforts in the biotechnological production of these glycosaminoglycans, driven by both therapeutic applications and as probes to study their natural functions. This review focuses on the complex biology of these glycosaminoglycans in human health and disease, and the use of recombinant technology in the chemoenzymatic synthesis and metabolic engineering of heparin and heparan sulfates. PMID:26555370

  12. Growth of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Sulfate Brines and the Astrobiological Implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marnocha, C. L.; Chevrier, V. F.; Ivey, D. M.

    2011-03-01

    We suggest sulfate-reducing bacteria as a model for life on Mars, as sulfate brines have been shown to be stable in martian conditions. We have performed experiments to determine the survivability of these bacteria in high sulfate concentrations.

  13. Methods of producing sulfate salts of cations from heteroatomic compounds and dialkyl sulfates and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Cody A.; Wolfe, Derek; Johnson, Paul Bryan

    2015-09-29

    Methods of preparing sulfate salts of heteroatomic compounds using dialkyl sulfates as a primary reactant are disclosed. Also disclosed are methods of making ionic liquids from the sulfate salts of the heteroatomic compound, and electrochemical cells comprising the ionic liquids.

  14. Calcium Sulfate Characterized by ChemCam/Curiosity at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachon, M.; Clegg, S. M.; Mangold, N.; Schröder, S.; Kah, L. C.; Dromart, G.; Olilla, A.; Johnson, J. R.; Oehler, D. Z.; Bridges, J. C.; Le Mouélic, S.; Forni, O.; Wiens, R. C.; Rapin, W.; Anderson, R. B.; Blaney, D. L.; Bell, J. F.; Clark, B.; Cousin, A.; Dyar, M. D.; Ehlmann, B.; Fabre, C.; Gasnault, O.; Grotzinger, J.; Lasue, J.; Lewin, E.; Léveillé, R.; McLennan, S.; Maurice, S.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Rice, M.; Squyres, S. W.; Stack, K.; Sumner, D. Y.; Vaniman, D.; Wellington, D.

    2014-07-01

    Within Gale crater an assemblage of veins were observed, mainly into Yellowknife Bay region. The ChemCam instrument was able to demonstrate they consist of Ca-sulfate veins. We interpret them as a precipitation posterior to the sediments they cross.

  15. LONG-RANGE TRANSPORT AND TRANSFORMATION OF SO2 AND SULFATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical descriptions and computer programs are presented for two models that calculate long-range transport, diffusion, transformation of SO2 to sulfate, and dry and precipitation deposition of initially emitted SO2. One model treats the mixing layer height as constant; the oth...

  16. Early Triassic seawater sulfate drawdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huyue; Tong, Jinnan; Algeo, Thomas J.; Song, Haijun; Qiu, Haiou; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Tian, Li; Bates, Steven; Lyons, Timothy W.; Luo, Genming; Kump, Lee R.

    2014-03-01

    The marine sulfur cycle is intimately linked to global carbon fluxes, atmospheric composition, and climate, yet relatively little is known about how it responded to the end-Permian biocrisis, the largest mass extinction of the Phanerozoic. Here, we analyze carbonate-associated-sulfate (CAS) from three Permo-Triassic sections in South China in order to document the behavior of the C-S cycle and its relationship to marine environmental changes during the mass extinction and its aftermath. We find that δ34SCAS varied from +9‰ to +44‰ at rates up to 100‰ Myr-1 during the Griesbachian-Smithian substages of the Early Triassic. We model the marine sulfur cycle to demonstrate that such rapid variation required drawdown of seawater sulfate concentrations to ⩽4 mM and a reduction in its residence time to ⩽200 kyr. This shorter residence time resulted in positive covariation with δ13Ccarb due to strong coupling of the organic carbon and pyrite burial fluxes. Carbon and sulfur isotopic shifts were associated with contemporaneous changes in climate, marine productivity, and microbial sulfate reduction rates, with negative shifts in δ13Ccarb and δ34SCAS linked to warming, decreased productivity, and reduced sulfate reduction. Sustained cooling during the Spathian re-invigorated oceanic overturning circulation, reduced marine anoxia, and limited pyrite burial. As seawater sulfate built to higher concentrations during the Spathian, the coupling of the marine C and S cycles came to an end and a general amelioration of marine environmental conditions set the stage for a recovery of invertebrate faunas. Variation in seawater sulfate during the Early Triassic was probably controlled by climate change, possibly linked to major eruptive phases of the Siberian Traps.

  17. Isotope evidence for secondary sulfide precipitation along the Marsyandi River, Nepal, Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Tipper, Edward T.; Galy, Albert; Lo, Jun-Kai; Bickle, Mike J.

    2013-07-01

    We present sulfur and oxygen isotope data from 41 samples of dissolved riverine sulfate from along 65 km of the Marsyandi River in the Northern Himalayas. Coupled sulfur and oxygen isotopic composition of riverine sulfate (δ34S and δ18O respectively) yield unique constraints on the source of sulfur to the river system. The headwaters of the Marsyandi River have light δ34S and δ18O, which requires that the source of sulfate to the river is through the anoxic weathering of pyrite (likely via Fe3+). The δ34S and δ18O of sulfate in tributaries to the Marsyandi increase downstream, which could result either from inputs from evaporites or bacterial sulfate reduction with subsequent sulfide precipitation in warmer and wetter catchments; either of these processes could result in heavy δ34S and δ18O of the residual river sulfate. Elemental ratios such as Sr/Ca and Ca/SO4 suggest, as previous studies have also concluded, that evaporite weathering is not important in the Marsyandi River. We conclude that the isotope data is most consistent with the onset of bacterial sulfate reduction and secondary sulfide precipitation in the soils in the warmer and wetter downstream catchments. Our results have implications for understanding the source of sulfate to the ocean as well as the redox and acidity budget within rapidly eroding catchments.

  18. Surface studies of barium and barium oxide on tungsten and its application to understanding the mechanism of operation of an impregnated tungsten cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R.

    1976-01-01

    Surface studies have been made of multilayer and monolayer films of barium and barium oxide on a tungsten substrate. The purpose of the investigation was to synthesize the surface conditions that exist on an activated impregnated tungsten cathode and obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of operation of such cathodes. The techniques employed in these measurements were Auger spectroscopy and work-function measurements. The results of this study show that the surface of an impregnated cathode is identical to that observed for a synthesized monolayer or partial monolayer of barium on oxidized tungsten by evaluating Auger spectra and work-function measurements. Data obtained from desorption studies of barium monolayers on a tungsten substrate in conjunction with Auger and work-function results have been interpreted to show that throughout most of its life an impreganated cathode has a partial monolayer, rather than a monolayer, of barium on its surface.

  19. Design, testing, fabrication and launch support of a liquid chemical barium release payload (utilizing the liquid fluorine-barium salt/hydrazine system)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    A payload was designed which included a cryogenic oxidizer tank, a fuel tank, and burner section. Release of 30 lb of chemicals was planned to occur in 2 seconds at the optimum oxidizer to fuel ratio. The chemicals consisted of 17 lb of liquid fluorine oxidizer and 13 lb of hydrazine-barium salt fuel mixture. The fuel mixture was 17% barium chloride, 16% barium nitrate, and 67% hydrazine, and contained 2.6 lb of available barium. Two significant problem areas were resolved during the program: explosive valve development and burner operation. The release payload was flight tested, from Wallops Island, Virginia. The release took place at an altitude of approximately 260 km. The release produced a luminous cloud which expanded very rapidly, disappearing to the human eye in about 20 seconds. Barium ion concentration slowly increased over a wide area of sky until measurements were discontinued at sunrise (about 30 minutes).

  20. Acid Sulfate Alteration on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of mineralogical and geochemical indicators for aqueous alteration on Mars have been identified by a combination of surface and orbital robotic missions, telescopic observations, characterization of Martian meteorites, and laboratory and terrestrial analog studies. Acid sulfate alteration has been identified at all three landing sites visited by NASA rover missions (Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity). Spirit landed in Gusev crater in 2004 and discovered Fe-sulfates and materials that have been extensively leached by acid sulfate solutions. Opportunity landing on the plains of Meridiani Planum also in 2004 where the rover encountered large abundances of jarosite and hematite in sedimentary rocks. Curiosity landed in Gale crater in 2012 and has characterized fluvial, deltaic, and lacustrine sediments. Jarosite and hematite were discovered in some of the lacustrine sediments. The high elemental abundance of sulfur in surface materials is obvious evidence that sulfate has played a major role in aqueous processes at all landing sites on Mars. The sulfate-rich outcrop at Meridiani Planum has an SO3 content of up to 25 wt.%. The interiors of rocks and outcrops on the Columbia Hills within Gusev crater have up to 8 wt.% SO3. Soils at both sites generally have between 5 to 14 wt.% SO3, and several soils in Gusev crater contain around 30 wt.% SO3. After normalization of major element compositions to a SO3-free basis, the bulk compositions of these materials are basaltic, with a few exceptions in Gusev crater and in lacustrine mudstones in Gale crater. These observations suggest that materials encountered by the rovers were derived from basaltic precursors by acid sulfate alteration under nearly isochemical conditions (i.e., minimal leaching). There are several cases, however, where acid sulfate alteration minerals (jarosite and hematite) formed in open hydrologic systems, e.g., in Gale crater lacustrine mudstones. Several hypotheses have been suggested for the aqueous formation of sulfate-bearing phases under acidic conditions on the surface of Mars including (1) sulfuric acid weathering of basaltic materials; (2) oxidative weathering of ultramafic igneous rocks containing sulfides; (3) acid fog weathering of basaltic materials, and (4) near-neutral pH subsurface solutions rich in Fe2(+) that were rapidly oxidized to Fe3(+), which produced excess acidity as iron was oxidized on exposure to O2 or photo-oxidized by ultraviolet radiation at the martian surface. Next, we briefly describe evidence for these hypothesis.

  1. The possible role of sulfate-reduction kinetics in the formation of hydrothermal uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spirakis, Charles S.

    1981-01-01

    Sulfate is known to be an active oxidizing agent at high temperatures; however, both experimental and geologic evidence indicate that as a hydrothermal solution cools (to about 200 degrees C, depending on pH) kinetic factors slow the rate at which sulfate enters into redox reactions. This retardation of sulfate reduction diminishes the effectiveness of sulfate as an oxidizing agent. Consequently, as cooling proceeds, the reducing effect of H2S (and other reduced species) is not balanced with the oxidizing effect of SO (super -2) 4 to the same extent as at higher temperatures. The result is a progressively more reducing solution, which is precisely what is needed to precipitate reduced uranium minerals and to generate the paragenetic sequence observed in these deposits. The same mechanism may apply to other types of epithermal deposits.

  2. Microwave-assisted hydrothermal extraction of sulfated polysaccharides from Ulva spp. and Monostroma latissimum.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Shuntaro; Oono, Kiriyo; Hiraoka, Masanori; Onda, Ayumu; Mitani, Tomohiko

    2016-11-01

    Microwave-assisted hydrothermal extraction was applied for production of sulfated polysaccharides from Ulva spp. and Monostroma latissimum. The maximum ulvan yields attained 40.4±3.2% (Ulva meridionalis) and 36.5±3.1% (Ulva ohnoi) within 4min of come-up time and 10min of extraction time at 160°C, respectively. The rhamnan sulfate yield from M. latissimum further attained 53.1±7.2% at 140°C. The sulfated polysaccharides were easily recovered from the extract by simple ethanol precipitation. In addition, molecular weights and viscosity of the extracted polysaccharides could be controlled by varying the extraction temperature. Dielectric measurement revealed that ionic conduction was the important parameter that affect the microwave susceptibility of algae-water mixture. The sulfated polysaccharides extracts are expected as potential feedstock for medical and food applications. PMID:27211652

  3. Volumetric determination of uranium titanous sulfate as reductant before oxidimetric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlberg, J.S.; Skinner, D.L.; Rader, L.F., Jr.

    1957-01-01

    Need for a more rapid volumetric method for the routine determination of uranium in uranium-rich materials has led to the development of a method that uses titanous sulfate as a reductant before oxidimetric titration. Separation of the hydrogen sulfide group is not necessary. Interfering elements precipitated by cupferron are removed by automatic filtrations made simultaneously rather than by the longer chloroform extraction method. Uranium is reduced from VI to IV by addition of an excess of titanous sulfate solution, cupric ion serving as an indicator by forming red metallic copper when reduction is complete. The copper is reoxidized by addition of mercuric perchlorate. The reduced uranium is then determined by addition of excess ferric sulfate and titration with ceric sulfate. The method has proved to be rapid, accurate, and economical.

  4. Aqueous sulfates from the Stripa groundwater system

    SciTech Connect

    Fontes, J.C.; Louvat, D.; Michelot, J.L. ); Fritz, P. )

    1989-08-01

    The isotopic composition of aqueous sulfate in the groundwater in the Stripa pluton reflects the geochemical history of the groundwater as well as the origin of the sulfur or sulfate. In shallow, modern groundwater, sulfate originates from fallout and the oxidation of pyrite or other reduced forms of sulfur. At intermediate depths, sulfate of surface origin is lost through bacterial reduction. The origin of sulfate of the deep and more saline water is not clearly defined but could be derived from a sedimentary brine which was subject to substantial modification through rock-water interaction. Bacterial sulfate reduction also occurs locally at depths below about 800 m.

  5. Aerobic sulfate reduction in microbial mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Des Marais, David J.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of bacterial sulfate reduction and dissolved oxygen (O2) in hypersaline bacterial mats from Baja California, Mexico, revealed that sulfate reduction occurred consistently within the well-oxygenated photosynthetic zone of the mats. This evidence that dissimilatory sulfate reduction can occur in the presence of O2 challenges the conventional view that sulfate reduction is a strictly anaerobic process. At constant temperature, the rates of sulfate reduction in oxygenated mats during daytime were similar to rates in anoxic mats at night: thus, during a 24-hour cycle, variations in light and O2 have little effect on rates of sulfate reduction in these mats.

  6. NASA/Max Planck Institute Barium Ion Cloud Project.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brence, W. A.; Carr, R. E.; Gerlach, J. C.; Neuss, H.

    1973-01-01

    NASA and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE), Munich, Germany, conducted a cooperative experiment involving the release and study of a barium cloud at 31,500 km altitude near the equatorial plane. The release was made near local magnetic midnight on Sept. 21, 1971. The MPE-built spacecraft contained a canister of 16 kg of Ba CuO mixture, a two-axis magnetometer, and other payload instrumentation. The objectives of the experiment were to investigate the interaction of the ionized barium cloud with the ambient medium and to deduce the properties of electric fields in the proximity of the release. An overview of the project is given to briefly summarize the organization, responsibilities, objectives, instrumentation, and operational aspects of the project.

  7. Relationship of pheasant occurrence to barium in Illinois soils.

    PubMed

    Jones, R L

    1992-04-01

    Distribution of the ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) is nearly co-extensive with the boundary of Wisconsinan glaciation; this is an area of base-rich soils that are mostly developed in calcareous tills. Anderson and Stewart (1973) speculated that barium in the diet might be a factor limiting the pheasant establishment in habitats adjacent to areas of long-term sustaining populations in Illinois. Total Ba was calculated for soils of 74 conterminous counties for which there were pheasant population data. Barium over the range of about 480 to 700 mg kg(-1) soil was unrelated to pheasant occurrence or to population indeces. The selective eating of iron-manganese concretions that are enriched in Ba might present a unique pathway for Ba loading. PMID:24197899

  8. The Skylab barium plasma injection experiments. I - Convection observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Peek, H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Two barium-plasma injection experiments were carried out during magnetically active periods in conjunction with the Skylab 3 mission. The high-explosive shaped charges were launched near dawn on November 27 and December 4, 1973, UT. In both cases, the AE index was near 400 gammas, and extensive pulsating auroras covered the sky. The first experiment, Skylab Alpha, occurred in the waning phase of a 1000-gamma substorm, and the second, Skylab Beta, occurred in the expansive phase of an 800-gamma substorm. In both, the convection was generally magnetically eastward, with 100-km-level electric fields near 40 mV/m. However, in the Alpha experiment the observed orientation of the barium flux tube fit theoretical field lines having no parallel current, but the Beta flux-tube orientation indicated a substantial upward parallel sheet current.

  9. Numerical simulation of a radially injected barium cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, D. W.; Wescott, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic two-dimensional numerical simulations of a radially symmetric barium injection experiment demonstrate that ions created by solar UV irradiation are electrostatically bound to the electrons which remain tied to the field lines on which they are created. Two possible instabilities are identified, but neither of them causes the barium plasma cloud to polarize in a way that would permit the plasma to keep up with the neutrals. In a second model, the velocity of the neutrals is allowed to be a function of the azimuthal angle. Here, a portion of the cloud does polarize in a way that allows a portion of the plasma to detach and move outward at the approximate speed of the neutrals. No rapid detachment is found when only the density of the neutrals is given an azimuthal asymmetry.

  10. Observations and theory of the AMPTE magnetotail barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Roussel-Dupre, R. A.; Pongratz, M. B.; Haerendel, G.; Valenzuela, A.

    1987-01-01

    The barium releases in the magnetotail during the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) operation were monitored by ground-based imagers and by instruments on the Ion Release Module. After each release, the data show the formation of a structured diamagnetic cavity. The cavity grows until the dynamic pressure of the expanding ions balances the magnetic pressure on its surface. The magnetic field inside the cavity is zero. The barium ions collect on the surface of the cavity, producing a shell. Plasma irregularities form along magnetic field lines draped over the surface of the cavity. The scale size of the irregularities is nearly equal to the thickness of the shell. The evolution and structuring of the diamagnetic cavity are modeled using magnetohydrodynamics theory.

  11. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ferroelectric films of barium titanate were synthesized on silicon and quartz substrates, and the photoelectric effect in the structure consisting of metal deposited ferroelectric barium titanate film silicon was studied. A photovoltage with polarity that depends on the direction of the remanent polarization was observed. The deposition of BaTiO3 on silicon and fused quartz substrates was accomplished by an rf sputtering technique. A series of experiments to study the growth of ferroelectric BaTiO3 films on single crystal silicon and fused quartz substrates were conducted. The ferroelectric character in these films was found on the basis of evidence from the polarization electric field hysteresis loops, capacitance voltage and capacitance temperature techniques and from X-ray diffraction studies.

  12. Barium titanate nanoparticles: promising multitasking vectors in nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Genchi, Giada Graziana; Marino, Attilio; Rocca, Antonella; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2016-06-10

    Ceramic materials based on perovskite-like oxides have traditionally been the object of intense interest for their applicability in electrical and electronic devices. Due to its high dielectric constant and piezoelectric features, barium titanate (BaTiO3) is probably one of the most studied compounds of this family. Recently, an increasing number of studies have been focused on the exploitation of barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs) in the biomedical field, owing to the high biocompatibility of BTNPs and their peculiar non-linear optical properties that have encouraged their use as nanocarriers for drug delivery and as label-free imaging probes. In this review, we summarize all the recent findings about these 'smart' nanoparticles, including the latest, most promising potential as nanotransducers for cell stimulation. PMID:27145888

  13. Particularities of Radiation Defect Formation in Ceramic Barium Cerate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khromushin, I. V.; Aksenova, T. I.; Tuseev, T.; Munasbaeva, K. K.; Ermolaev, Yu V.; Ermolaev, V. N.; Seitov, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    The effects of irradiation with electrons, ions of noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr) and oxygen on the structure and properties of neodymium-doped barium cerate have been studied using the methods of X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy. It was shown that irradiation by low-energy ions of noble gases stimulates the blistering processes on the sample surface, while the high-energy ions contribute to formation of the structures on the irradiated surface that resemble the various stages of spherulitegrowth. The similar structures were not observed in the case of irradiation with high-energy oxygen ions. According to the data on thermal desorption of water and oxygen molecules from the irradiated barium cerate it was supposed that irradiation by the noble gas ions promotes neodymium oxidation state change. It was noticed that the electron irradiation leads to the formation of the nano-sized acicular structures on the cerate surface.

  14. Photoionization and photoelectric loading of barium ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, A. V.; Churchill, L. R.; Griffin, P. F.; Chapman, M. S.

    2007-05-15

    Simple and effective techniques for loading barium ions into linear Paul traps are demonstrated. Two-step photoionization of neutral barium is achieved using a weak intercombination line (6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible}6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 1}, {lambda}=791 nm) followed by excitation above the ionization threshold using a nitrogen gas laser ({lambda}=337 nm). Isotopic selectivity is achieved by using a near Doppler-free geometry for excitation of the triplet 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 1} state. Additionally, we report a particularly simple and efficient trap loading technique that employs an inexpensive uv epoxy curing lamp to generate photoelectrons.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of barium ferrite–silica nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-González, M.A.; Mendoza-Suárez, G.; Padmasree, K.P.

    2013-10-15

    In this work, we prepared barium ferrite-silica (BaM-SiO{sub 2}) nanocomposites of different molar ratios by high-energy ball milling, followed by heat-treatment at different temperatures. The microstructure, morphology and magnetic properties were characterized for different synthesis conditions by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The results indicate that 15 h of milling was enough to avoid the generation of hematite phase and to get a good dispersion of barium ferrite particles in the ceramic matrix. For milling periods beyond 15 h and heat treatment above 900 °C, the XRD patterns showed the presence of hematite phase caused by the decomposition of BaM. The agglomerate size observed through SEM analysis was around 150 nm with a good BaM dispersion into the SiO{sub 2} matrix. The highest saturation magnetization (Ms) value obtained was 43 emu/g and the corresponding coercivity (Hc) value of 3.4 kOe for the composition 60BaM-40SiO{sub 2} milled for 15 h and heat treated at 900 °C. This coercivity value is acceptable for the application in magnetic recording media. Highlights: • Barium ferrite–silica nanocomposites were prepared by high energy ball milling. • Optimal processing time is 15 h milling and heat treatment at 900 °C. • This is enough to avoid the generation of hematite phase. • Obtain good dispersion of barium ferrite particles in the ceramic matrix • Above this processing time shows the presence of increased amount of hematite.

  16. Barium hexaferrite based on the waste products from electroplating processes

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, A.S.; Stepanchikova, I.G.; Makarov, S.V.; Zaitsev, V.A.; Danilov, A.S.

    1987-11-01

    The authors assess the possibility of simultaneously treating and using waste electroplating slurries containing large amounts of iron hydroxides for obtaining barium hexaferrite ceramics. Differential thermal analysis was employed to determine the processing and recovery parameters and the resulting hexaferrites were tested, mechanically and by x-ray diffraction, for their mechanical and magnetic properties as well as for their phase composition and structure. The consequences of the process on pollution abatement are also evaluated.

  17. Barium borohydride chlorides: synthesis, crystal structures and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Grube, Elisabeth; Olesen, Cathrine H; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Jensen, Torben R

    2016-05-10

    Here we report the synthesis, mechanism of formation, characterization and thermal decomposition of new barium borohydride chlorides prepared by mechanochemistry and thermal treatment of MBH4-BaCl2, M = Li, Na or K in ratios 1 : 1 and 1 : 2. Initially, orthorhombic barium chloride, o-BaCl2 transforms into o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.15. Excess LiBH4 leads to continued anion substitution and a phase transformation into hexagonal barium borohydride chloride h-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, which accommodates higher amounts of borohydride, possibly x ∼ 0.85 and resembles h-BaCl2. Thus, two solid solutions are in equilibrium during mechano-chemical treatment of LiBH4-BaCl2 (1 : 1) whereas LiBH4-BaCl2 (2 : 1) converts to h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15. Upon thermal treatment at T > ∼200 °C, h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15 transforms into another orthorhombic barium borohydride chloride compound, o-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15, which is structurally similar to o-BaBr2. The samples with M = Na and K have lower reactivity and form o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.1 and a solid solution of sodium chloride dissolved in solid sodium borohydride, Na(BH4)1-xClx, x = 0.07. The new compounds and reaction mechanisms are investigated by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mass spectroscopy (MS) and temperature programmed photographic analysis (TPPA). PMID:27109871

  18. Life Model of Hollow Cathodes Using a Barium Calcium Aluminate Impregnated Tungsten Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Hollow cathodes with barium calcium aluminate impregnated tungsten emitters for thermionic emission are widely used in electric propulsion. These high current, low power cathodes are employed in ion thrusters, Hall thrusters, and on the International Space Station in plasma contactors. The requirements on hollow cathode life are growing more stringent with the increasing use of electric propulsion technology. The life limiting mechanism that determines the entitlement lifetime of a barium impregnated thermionic emission cathode is the evolution and transport of barium away from the emitter surface. A model is being developed to study the process of barium transport and loss from the emitter insert in hollow cathodes. The model accounts for the production of barium through analysis of the relevant impregnate chemistry. Transport of barium through the approximately static gas is also being treated. Finally, the effect of temperature gradients within the cathode are considered.

  19. Vanadium doped barium germanate microrods and photocatalytic properties under solar light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, L. Z.; Wang, S.; Liu, H. D.; Lin, N.; Yu, H. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Vanadium doped barium germanate microrods have been prepared by a facile hydrothermal process. The obtained vanadium doped barium germanate microrods are proved to be hexagonal BaGe4O9 and orthorhombic Ba2V2O7 phases by X-ray diffraction. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the vanadium doped barium germanate products consist of microrods with the diameter of microscale size. The diameter of the mirorods decreases from 800 nm to 150 nm with the vanadium doping mass percentage increasing from 1% to 10%. Solid UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra show that the band gap of the vanadium doped barium germanate is smaller than that of the undoped barium germanate. The photocatalytic activity has been greatly enhanced by the vanadium doping. The vanadium doped barium germanate microrods exhibit great application potential for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under solar light irradiation.

  20. The Tordo 1 polar cusp barium plasma injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Jeffries, R. A.; Roach, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    In January 1975, two barium plasma injection experiments were carried out with rockets launched into the upper atmosphere where field lines from the dayside cusp region intersect the ionosphere. The Tordo 1 experiment took place near the beginning of a worldwide magnetic storm. It became a polar cap experiment almost immediately as convection perpendicular to the magnetic field moved the fluorescent plasma jet away from the cusp across the polar cap in an antisunward direction. Convection across the polar cap with an average velocity of more than 1 km/s was observed for nearly 40 min until the barium flux tubes encountered large electron fields associated with a poleward bulge of the auroral oval near Greenland. Prior to the encounter with the aurora near Greenland there is evidence of upward acceleration of the barium ions while they were in the polar cap. The three-dimensional observations of the plasma orientation and motion give an insight into convection from the cusp region across the polar cap, the orientation of the polar cap magnetic field lines out to several earth radii, the causes of polar cap magnetic perturbations, and parallel acceleration processes.

  1. Barium aluminosilicate reinforced in situ with silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, K.K.; Freitag, D.W.; Hunn, D.L.

    1995-10-01

    Advanced ceramic composite materials that exhibit high strength and toughness with good thermal shock resistance are needed for emerging high-temperature engineering applications. A recently developed in situ reinforced barium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic shows promise of meeting many of the requirements for these types of applications with the added benefit of low-cost fabrication through densification by pressureless sintering. The material is toughened through in situ growth of rodlike {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grains resulting from the {alpha}-{beta} silicon nitride phase transformation. Microstructural development and material properties for temperatures up to 1,400 C are discussed. When compared to monolithic barium aluminosilicate, barium aluminosilicate reinforced with 70% by volume of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} shows a significant increase in flexural strength (from 80 to 565 MPa) and fracture toughness (from 1.8 to 5.74 MPa {center_dot} m{sup 1/2}) with a high resistance to thermal shock.

  2. Scanning electron and tunneling microscopy of palladium barium emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiburin, V. B.; Volkov, U. P.; Semenov, S. V.; Semenov, A. S.

    2003-06-01

    The results of study of metal-alloyed palladium-barium emitters' of modern very high frequency high-powered electronic vacuum tubes by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) are presented. Since the Pd/Ba foil surface is fairly smooth and is not oxidized in air STM/STS investigations are carried out in air in normal laboratory environment. SEM and STM images show that the emitter surface has a complex porous structure. The cathode surface study by STS in tunneling gap modulation mode allowed to take a map of phase distribution with various work function values and high lateral resolution. Obtained images demonstrate the presence of three phases on the Pd/Ba emitter surface, viz. barium-oxygen compounds, intermetallic, and palladium. As it is seen from presented STS image the phase with a low work function value (barium oxides) is concentrated along boundaries of the substance inclusions with work function corresponding to the intemetallic compound Pd 5Ba. This supports the model of low work function areas obtained via Ba segregation from the intermetallic compound and oxidation. The presented methods may be used in the Pd/Ba cathode manufacturing process for increasing the yield of electronic devices in microwave tube production and optimize the emitters' characteristics.

  3. Time constraints on sulfate-related diagenesis, Capitan Reef Complex, west Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Darke, G. ); Harwood, G. )

    1990-05-01

    Petrographic, paleomagnetic, and outcrop studies of the middle Capitan Reef Complex in the Guadalupe Mountains have provided time constraints on diagenetic events and demonstrated the crucial role of calcium sulfate. Sulfate emplacement occurred at an early stage. The sulfate emplacement post-dated and replaced syndepositional marine margins and lath forms demonstrate replacement was by anhydrite rather then gypsum. Fabric-selective dolomitization and kaolinite precipitation derived from reworking shelf evaporite sequences moving downdip during early stages of drawdown within the Delaware basin. A second period of brine migration causing sulfate emplacement and dolomitization, occurred as the Delaware basin gradually filled with the Castile evaporites, when all remaining porosity within the Capitan shelf margin became indurated by calcium sulfate-laden fluids. This caused pervasive dolomitization, particularly in the lower foreslope, with formation of dolomite rhombs and overgrowths on earlier dolomitized marine cements, coeval with replacive clusters of anhydrite. Most porosity was plugged, some with syndepositional marine cements, but the greater proportion with evaporites until uplift in the Tertiary. Then a meteoric groundwater system became established with subsequent sulfate dissolution. Minor sulfate reduction formed iron sulfides. This oxidized to hematite, which was enclosed within a first generation of zoned calcite spar along some pore margins. Most hematite has a paleomagnetic age of 20 Ma, although minor hematite formation continues to the present. A second, also zoned, coarser calcite spar generation was followed by the latest nonluminescent calcite spar. These calcite spars form the vast bulk of that visible at outcrop.

  4. Characterisation of titanium tetrachloride and titanium sulfate flocculation in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Okour, Y; Shon, H K; El Saliby, I

    2009-01-01

    Flocculation with titanium tetrachloride (TiCl(4)) and titanium sulfate (Ti(SO(4))(2)) was investigated in terms of different coagulant doses, pH, turbidity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV-254, colour, zeta potential, particle size and molecular weight distribution. The two coagulants were compared with the commonly used coagulants such as ferric chloride (FeCl(3)) and aluminium sulfate (Al(2)(SO(4))(3)). Titanium tetrachloride showed the highest turbidity removal, while titanium sulfate showed the highest reduction of UV-254 and colour at all pH values. The four coagulants were found to have similar organic removal up to 60-67% and resulted in similar organic removal in terms of various MW ranges. The decantability of the settled flocs was very high for titanium tetrachloride, titanium sulfate and ferric chloride compared with aluminium sulfate. The dominating coagulation mechanisms for titanium tetrachloride and titanium sulfate are still to be studied, since different precipitation reactions might take place at different pH even without flocculant addition. Titanium tetrachloride and titanium sulfate were found as effective new coagulants in wastewater treatment not only in terms of organic matter removal, but also in sludge reduction through the production of titanium dioxide. PMID:19542653

  5. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet, must be packed in wooden boxes (4C1, 4C2, 4D, or 4F) or fiber drums (1G) with inner...

  6. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet, must be packed in wooden boxes (4C1, 4C2, 4D, or 4F) or fiber drums (1G) with inner...

  7. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet, must be packed in wooden boxes (4C1, 4C2, 4D, or 4F) or fiber drums (1G) with inner...

  8. Status of copper sulfate - 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A brief overview of the Technical Sections completed and being worked on for the New Animal Drug Application (NADA) for copper sulfate will be presented. Various aspects of these technical sections will be open for discussion. The update will include information and dates for both the initial labe...

  9. Status of Copper Sulfate - 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is brief overview of the Technical Sections completed and being worked on for the New Animal Drug Application (NADA) for copper sulfate. Initial Label Claim (Ich on catfish): 1) Human Food Safety - Complete for all fin fish - February 2004. This includes human intestinal microflora issues,...

  10. Status of copper sulfate - 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is brief overview of the Technical Sections completed and being worked on for the New Animal Drug Application (NADA) for copper sulfate. Initial Label Claim (Ich on catfish): 1) Human Food Safety - Complete for all fin fish – February 2004. This includes human intestinal microflora issues,...

  11. Chiral Crystallization of Ethylenediamine Sulfate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koby, Lawrence; Ningappa, Jyothi B.; Dakesssian, Maria; Cuccia, Louis A.

    2005-01-01

    The optimal conditions for the crystallization of achiral ethylenediamine sulfate into large chiral crystals that are ideal for polarimetry studies and observation using Polaroid sheets are presented. This experiment is an ideal undergraduate experiment, which clearly demonstrates the chiral crystallization of an achiral molecule.

  12. 21 CFR 582.5315 - Ferrous sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5315 Ferrous sulfate. (a) Product. Ferrous sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 582.5315 - Ferrous sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 582.5315 Ferrous sulfate. (a) Product. Ferrous sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5315 - Ferrous sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 582.5315 Ferrous sulfate. (a) Product. Ferrous sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 582.5315 - Ferrous sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 582.5315 Ferrous sulfate. (a) Product. Ferrous sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. Keratan sulfate: biosynthesis, structures, and biological functions.

    PubMed

    Uchimura, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Keratan sulfate is a glycosaminoglycan that has been investigated in the cornea and skeletal tissues for decades. Endoglycosidases and monoclonal antibodies specific for keratan sulfate have been developed. These materials have facilitated the analysis of keratan sulfate biosynthesis and structures. Likewise, they have expedited study of the biological roles of keratan sulfate in vitro and in vivo. It has been shown that keratan sulfate is also expressed in the central nervous system and functions as a regulator of neuronal regeneration/sprouting. Here, we describe methods to determine the enzymatic activity of GlcNAc6ST, which is involved in keratan sulfate biosynthesis, and to extract and prepare ocular keratan sulfate for a disaccharide composition analysis. Immunohistochemistry for an anti-keratan sulfate epitope in the brain is also described. PMID:25325967

  20. Mechanism of action of barium ion on rat aortic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hansen, T R; Dineen, D X; Petrak, R

    1984-03-01

    The mechanism of action of barium ion on the aortic smooth muscle of the normal rat was investigated using in vitro calcium-depleted aortic strips. Aortic strips were depleted of calcium by repeated exposure to norepinephrine in a calcium-free bathing solution. Although calcium depletion abrogated the response of strips to catecholamines and depolarizing agents, the response to barium chloride remained quantitatively intact. The calcium influx blocker D 600 prevented the contractile response to barium but not to catecholamines, whereas phentolamine prevented the response to catecholamines but not barium. The strip response to barium was depressed by a twofold increase in extracellular magnesium concentration whether the strip was intact or calcium depleted. Although increased concentrations of calcium in the extracellular medium inhibited the contractile response to potassium ion, increases in barium merely potentiated the potassium contracture. These findings indicate that barium produces its contractile effect on vascular smooth muscle by a direct intracellular interaction with the contractile or regulatory proteins. Barium enters these cells via calcium influx channels and is probably not sequestered in a physiologically releasable pool. Unlike calcium, barium does not stabilize the smooth muscle sarcolemma when present in high concentration. PMID:6703038

  1. Barium can replace calcium in calmodulin-dependent contractions of skinned renal arteries of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Kreye, V A; Hofmann, F; Mühleisen, M

    1986-03-01

    Renal arteries of the rabbit were chemically skinned using Triton X-100. In EGTA-buffered solutions containing calmodulin and ATP, small strips of the skinned preparations were found to develop contractile force which was dependent on the concentrations of either free calcium or of free barium. However, a 220 times greater concentration of barium than of calcium was necessary for comparable effects. Quantitatively, the response to barium was dependent on the concentration of calmodulin added to the test solutions. The contractile effect of barium was partly antagonized by the calmodulin antagonist, trifluoperazine. PMID:3960707

  2. Determination of silicon, barium, and titanium in fresnoite single crystals and raw materials for them

    SciTech Connect

    Sizonenko, N.T.; Egorova, L.A.; Gaiduk, O.V.; Khukhryanskii, A.K.

    1985-09-01

    Single crystals of fresnoite show good electroptic parameters and high resistance to laser radiation, and are being examined for use in acoustoelectronics and optoelectronics. This paper investigates simple and reliable methods of determining silicon, barium, and titanium without preliminary separation. The authors examined the effects of large amounts of titanium and barium on the determination of silicon; it was found that titanium interferes. Barium does not interfere with the determination of silicon. Barium and titanium were determined by EDTA titration. The relative standard deviation in determining each of the elements did not exceed 6 x 10/sup -3/.

  3. FY-15 Progress Report on Cleanup of irradiated SHINE Target Solutions Containing 140g-U/L Uranyl Sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Megan E.; Bowers, Delbert L.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2015-09-01

    During FY 2012 and 2013, a process was developed to convert the SHINE Target Solution (STS) of irradiated uranyl sulfate (140 g U/L) to uranyl nitrate. This process is necessary so that the uranium solution can be processed by the UREX (Uranium Extraction) separation process, which will remove impurities from the uranium so that it can be recycled. The uranyl sulfate solution must contain <0.02 M SO42- so that the uranium will be extractable into the UREXsolvent. In addition, it is desired that the barium content be below 0.0007 M, as this is the limit in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

  4. Complexation between sodium dodecyl sulfate and amphoteric polyurethane nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yong; Zhang, Shifeng; Lin, Ouya; Deng, Liandong; Dong, Anjie

    2007-09-27

    The complexation between negatively charged sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and positively charged amphoteric polyurethane (APU) self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) containing nonionic hydrophobic segments is studied by dynamic light scattering, pyrene fluorescent probing, zeta-potential, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the present paper. With increasing the mol ratio of SDS to the positive charges on the surface of APU NPs, the aqueous solution of APU NPs presents precipitation at pH 2, around stoichiometric SDS concentration, and then the precipitate dissociates with excess SDS to form more stable nanoparticles of ionomer complexes. Three stages of the complexation process are clearly shown by the pyrene I1/I3 variation of the complex systems, which only depends on the ratio of SDS/APU, and demonstrate that the process is dominated by electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic aggregation. PMID:17803299

  5. Stability of Magnesium Sulfate Minerals in Martian Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marion, G. M.; Kargel, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    Viking Lander, Pathfinder, and Mars Exploration Rover missions to Mars have found abundant sulfur in surface soils and rocks, and the best indications are that magnesium sulfates are among the key hosts. At Meridiani Planum, MgSO4 salts constitute 15 to 40 wt.% of sedimentary rocks. Additional S is hosted by gypsum and jarosite. Reflectance and thermal emission spectroscopy is consistent with the presence of kieserite (MgSO4 H2O) and epsomite (MgSO4*7H2O). Theoretically, the dodecahydrate (MgSO4*12H2O) should also have precipitated. We first examine theoretically which MgSO4 minerals should have precipitated on Mars, and then how dehydration might have altered these minerals.

  6. Global Precipitation Measurement Poster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarbarzin, Art

    2010-01-01

    This poster presents an overview of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) constellation of satellites which are designed to measure the Earth's precipitation. It includes the schedule of launches for the various satellites in the constellation, and the coverage of the constellation, It also reviews the mission capabilities, and the mission science objectives.

  7. PRECIPITATION OF PROTACTINIUM

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.L.

    1958-07-15

    An lmprovement in the separation of protactinium from aqueous nitric acid solutions is described. 1t covers the use of lead dioxide and tin dioxide as carrier precipitates for the protactinium. In carrying out the process, divalent lead or divalent tin is addcd to the solution and oxidized, causing formation of a carrier precipitate of lead dioxide or stannic oxide, respectively.

  8. 21 CFR 184.1261 - Copper sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Copper sulfate. 184.1261 Section 184.1261 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1261 Copper sulfate. (a) Copper sulfate (cupric sulfate, CuSO4·5H2O, CAS... the reaction of sulfuric acid with cupric oxide or with copper metal. (b) The ingredient must be of...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1261 - Copper sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Copper sulfate. 184.1261 Section 184.1261 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1261 Copper sulfate. (a) Copper sulfate (cupric sulfate, CuSO4·5H2O, CAS... the reaction of sulfuric acid with cupric oxide or with copper metal. (b) The ingredient must be of...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1261 - Copper sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Copper sulfate. 184.1261 Section 184.1261 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1261 Copper sulfate. (a) Copper sulfate (cupric sulfate, CuSO4·5 H2O, CAS... the reaction of sulfuric acid with cupric oxide or with copper metal. (b) The ingredient must be of...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1261 - Copper sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Copper sulfate. 184.1261 Section 184.1261 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1261 Copper sulfate. (a) Copper sulfate (cupric sulfate, CuSO4·5 H2O, CAS... the reaction of sulfuric acid with cupric oxide or with copper metal. (b) The ingredient must be of...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1261 - Copper sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copper sulfate. 184.1261 Section 184.1261 Food and....1261 Copper sulfate. (a) Copper sulfate (cupric sulfate, CuSO4·5 H2O, CAS Reg. No. 7758-99-8) usually... sulfuric acid with cupric oxide or with copper metal. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable...

  13. Precipitation and floodiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, E.; Day, J. J.; Pappenberger, F.; Cloke, H.

    2015-12-01

    There are a number of factors that lead to nonlinearity between precipitation anomalies and flood hazard; this nonlinearity is a pertinent issue for applications that use a precipitation forecast as a proxy for imminent flood hazard. We assessed the degree of this nonlinearity for the first time using a recently developed global-scale hydrological model driven by the ERA-Interim/Land precipitation reanalysis (1980-2010). We introduced new indices to assess large-scale flood hazard, or floodiness, and quantified the link between monthly precipitation, river discharge, and floodiness anomalies at the global and regional scales. The results show that monthly floodiness is not well correlated with precipitation, therefore demonstrating the value of hydrometeorological systems for providing floodiness forecasts for decision-makers. A method is described for forecasting floodiness using the Global Flood Awareness System, building a climatology of regional floodiness from which to forecast floodiness anomalies out to 2 weeks.

  14. 21 CFR 582.5997 - Zinc sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc sulfate. 582.5997 Section 582.5997 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5997 Zinc sulfate. (a) Product. Zinc sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  15. 21 CFR 182.8997 - Zinc sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc sulfate. 182.8997 Section 182.8997 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8997 Zinc sulfate. (a) Product. Zinc sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5997 - Zinc sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc sulfate. 582.5997 Section 582.5997 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5997 Zinc sulfate. (a) Product. Zinc sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5997 - Zinc sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc sulfate. 582.5997 Section 582.5997 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5997 Zinc sulfate. (a) Product. Zinc sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5997 - Zinc sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc sulfate. 582.5997 Section 582.5997 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5997 Zinc sulfate. (a) Product. Zinc sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5997 - Zinc sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc sulfate. 582.5997 Section 582.5997 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5997 Zinc sulfate. (a) Product. Zinc sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  20. 21 CFR 182.8997 - Zinc sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc sulfate. 182.8997 Section 182.8997 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8997 Zinc sulfate. (a) Product. Zinc sulfate. (b) Conditions...

  1. 21 CFR 182.8997 - Zinc sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc sulfate. 182.8997 Section 182.8997 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8997 Zinc sulfate. (a) Product. Zinc sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  2. 21 CFR 182.8997 - Zinc sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc sulfate. 182.8997 Section 182.8997 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8997 Zinc sulfate. (a) Product. Zinc sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  3. 21 CFR 182.8997 - Zinc sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc sulfate. 182.8997 Section 182.8997 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8997 Zinc sulfate. (a) Product. Zinc sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1643 - Potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium sulfate. 582.1643 Section 582.1643 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1643 Potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 184.1643 - Potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium sulfate. 184.1643 Section 184.1643 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1643 Potassium sulfate. (a) Potassium sulfate (K2SO4, CAS Reg... having a bitter, saline taste. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with...

  6. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6... crystalline powder. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  7. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6... crystalline powder. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  8. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and....1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6), also known as Glauber's salt... by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient is used as...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese sulfate. 582.5461 Section 582.5461 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5230 - Calcium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium sulfate. 582.5230 Section 582.5230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5230 Calcium sulfate. (a) Product. Calcium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1230 - Calcium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium sulfate. 184.1230 Section 184.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1230 Calcium sulfate. (a) Calcium sulfate (CaSO4, CAS Reg....

  1. 21 CFR 582.5230 - Calcium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium sulfate. 582.5230 Section 582.5230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5230 Calcium sulfate. (a) Product. Calcium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5230 - Calcium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium sulfate. 582.5230 Section 582.5230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5230 Calcium sulfate. (a) Product. Calcium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1230 - Calcium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium sulfate. 184.1230 Section 184.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1230 Calcium sulfate. (a) Calcium sulfate (CaSO4, CAS Reg....

  4. 21 CFR 582.5230 - Calcium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium sulfate. 582.5230 Section 582.5230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5230 Calcium sulfate. (a) Product. Calcium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5230 - Calcium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium sulfate. 582.5230 Section 582.5230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5230 Calcium sulfate. (a) Product. Calcium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  6. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6... crystalline powder. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  7. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6... crystalline powder. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1315 - Ferrous sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... heptahydrate, FeSO4·7H2O, CAS Reg. No. 7782-63-0) is prepared by the action of sulfuric acid on iron. It occurs... produces ferrous sulfate (dried). Ferrous sulfate (dried) consists primarily of ferrous sulfate...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  10. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  12. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  14. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  17. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 582.1143 Section 582.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 582.1143 Section 582.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium sulfate. 184.1143 Section 184.1143 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4, CAS Reg... is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with ammonium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 184.1143 Section 184.1143 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4, CAS Reg... is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with ammonium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1643 - Potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium sulfate. 582.1643 Section 582.1643 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1643 Potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. 21 CFR 184.1643 - Potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium sulfate. 184.1643 Section 184.1643 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1643 Potassium sulfate. (a) Potassium sulfate (K2SO4, CAS Reg... having a bitter, saline taste. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1643 - Potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium sulfate. 184.1643 Section 184.1643 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1643 Potassium sulfate. (a) Potassium sulfate (K2SO4, CAS Reg... having a bitter, saline taste. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1643 - Potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium sulfate. 582.1643 Section 582.1643 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1643 Potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 184.1643 - Potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium sulfate. 184.1643 Section 184.1643 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1643 Potassium sulfate. (a) Potassium sulfate (K2SO4, CAS Reg... having a bitter, saline taste. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1643 - Potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium sulfate. 184.1643 Section 184.1643 Food... GRAS § 184.1643 Potassium sulfate. (a) Potassium sulfate (K2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7778-80-5) occurs.... It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with potassium hydroxide or potassium...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1643 - Potassium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium sulfate. 582.1643 Section 582.1643 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1643 Potassium sulfate. (a) Product. Potassium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 582.1143 Section 582.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 524.1484e - Neomycin sulfate and polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neomycin sulfate and polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic solution. 524.1484e Section 524.1484e Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484e Neomycin sulfate and polymyxin B sulfate ophthalmic solution....

  12. Antarctic polar stratospheric aerosols: The roles of nitrates, chlorides and sulfates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Goodman, J. K.; Ferry, G. V.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Verma, S.; Fong, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nitric and hydrochloric acids have been postulated to condense in the winter polar stratosphere to become an important component of polar stratospheric clouds. One implication is that the removal of NO(y) from the gas phase by this mechanism allows high Cl(x) concentrations to react with O3, because the formation of ClNO3 is inhibited. Contributions of NO3 and Cl to the stratospheric aerosol were determined during the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment by testing for the presence of nitrates and chlorides in the condensed phase. Aerosol particles were collected on four 500 micron diameter gold wires, each pretreated differently to give results that were specific to certain physical and chemical aerosol properties. One wire was carbon-coated for concentration and size analyses by scanning electron microscopy; X-ray energy dispersive analyses permitted the detection of S and Cl in individual particles. Three more wires were coated with Nitron, barium chloride and silver nitrate, respectively, to detect nitrate, sulfate and chloride in aerosol particles. All three ions, viz., sulfates, nitrates and chlorides were detected in the Antarctic stratospheric aerosol. In terms of number concentrations, the aerosol was dominated by sulfates, followed by chlorides and nitrates. An inverse linear regression can be established between nitrate concentrations and ozone mixing ratio, and between temperature and nitrates.

  13. Dissolved Organic Carbon In Precipitation At A Coastal Rural Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liptzin, D.; Daley, M.; Sive, B. C.; Talbot, R. W.; McDowell, W. H.

    2013-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a ubiquitous component of precipitation. This DOC is a complex mixture of compounds from biogenic and anthropogenic sources. The amount and chemistry of the DOC in precipitation has been studied for a variety of reasons: as a source of acidity, as a source of C to marine and terrestrial ecosystems, or to track the fate of individual compounds or pollutants. In most cases, past studies have focused on particular compounds or a limited number of precipitation events. Very little is known about the temporal trends in DOC or the relationship between DOC and other constituents of precipitation. We collected precipitation events for more than five years at a rural coastal site in New Hampshire. We evaluated the seasonal patterns and compared the DOC concentrations to other typical measures of the wet atmospheric deposition (ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, and chloride). In addition, we compared the DOC in precipitation to the concentrations of various organic constituents of the atmosphere. The volume weighted mean C concentration was 0.75 mg C/L with concentrations in the summer significantly higher than in the other three seasons. The DOC concentration was most strongly associated with ammonium concentrations (r=0.81), but was also significantly related to nitrate (r=0.50) and sulfate (r=0.63) concentrations. There was no significant association between DOC and chloride concentrations. Preliminary regression tree analysis suggests that the DOC concentration in precipitation was best predicted by the atmospheric concentration of methyl vinyl ketone, an oxidation product of isoprene. These results suggest that both terrestrial biogenic and anthropogenic sources may be important precursors to the C removed from the atmosphere during precipitation events.

  14. Emission sources contributing to acid precipitation in the western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    To identify the sources of acid-precursor emissions that are contributing to acidic deposition in the western United States, particularly in the mountain region of Colorado, precipitation samples were collected at two sites in southeastern Arizona and one in western Colorado. The most acidic events at the Arizona sites occurred when upper-atmosphere winds were from the directions of two copper smelters, located within 100 km. High acidity occurred with high concentrations of sulfate, arsenic, cadmium, copper, and lead. Precipitation acidity at Gothic, in western Colorado, was associated equally with sulfate and nitrate. Eighty percent of the nitrate deposition and 83% of the sulfate deposition occurred during months when the mean 700-mb wind directions at Grand Junction, Colorado (130 km west of Gothic) were between 210 and 270/sup 0/. Sulfate and nitrate deposition during individual precipitation events were low when surface winds at Denver, Colorado (180 km northeast of Gothic) were blowing toward Gothic. Electric utilities located in the quadrants northwest and southwest of Gothic accounted on average for 65% (bounded as 60 to 70%) of the nitrate deposition and 49% (bounded as 39 to 61%) of the sulfate deposition at Gothic. Smelters located in Arizona accounted on average for 37% of the sulfate deposition (bounded as 25 to 50%).

  15. Magnetic and Microwave Properties of Barium Hexaferrite Ceramics Doped with Gd and Nd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamalian, Majid; Ghasemi, Ali; Pourhosseini Asl, Mohammad Javad

    2015-08-01

    Substituted barium hexaferrite nanoparticles with the chemical formula BaFe12- x (GdNd) x/2O19 ( x = 0-2, in steps of 0.5) were prepared by a co-precipitation method. Phase identification and crystal structure of the nanoparticles were investigated by x-ray diffraction. The morphology of the nanopowders was investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Results from Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy enabled identification of stretching and bending modes. Magnetic properties were measured by use of a vibrating sample magnetometer. The results revealed that saturation magnetization and coercivity decreased as x increased. Investigation of microwave-absorption properties, by use of a vector network analyzer, revealed that the maximum reflection loss of substituted Ba-ferrite of thickness 1.6 mm reached -41.8 dB at a frequency of 4.3 GHz and a bandwidth of 7.5 GHz, with reflection loss being >-20 dB. From these results it was concluded that the composites had good potential as absorbers in the gigahertz frequency range.

  16. Mineralogy and Organic Geochemistry of Acid Sulfate Environments from Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Habitability, Weathering and Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, M. B.; Des Marais, D. J.; Jahnke, L. L.; Kubo, M.

    2009-12-01

    We report on the mineralogy, organic preservation potential and habitability of sulfate deposits in acid sulfate volcanic settings at Valles Caldera, New Mexico. Fumaroles and acidic springs are potential analogs for aqueous environments on Mars and may offer insights into habitability of sulfate deposits such as those at Meridiani Planum. Sulfates recently detected on Mars are posited to have formed from fluids derived from basaltic weathering and igneous volatile input, ultimately precipitating from acidic brines subjected to desiccation and freeze-thaw cycles (McClennan and Grotzinger, 2008). Key issues concerning martian sulfate deposits are their relationship to aqueous clay deposits, and whether or not specific sulfates deposits represent former habitable environments (see Soderblum and Bell, 2008; Tosca et al., 2008). Modern terrestrial volcanic fumaroles and hot springs precipitate various Ca-, Mg- and Fe- sulfates along with clays, and can help clarify whether certain acid sulfate mineral assemblages reflect habitable environments. Valles caldera is a resurgent caldera last active in the Pleistocene (1.4 - 1.0 Ma) that hosts several active fumaroles and over 40 geothermal exploration wells (see Goff, 2009). Fumaroles and associated mudpots and springs at Valles range from pH < 1 to 3, and affect argillic alteration upon rhylolitic tuffs and sedimentary deposits (Charles et al., 1986). We identified assemblages containing gypsum, quartz, Al-sulfates, elemental sulfur, clays and other minerals using XRD and SEM-EDS. Our previous research has shown that sulfates from different marine depositional environments display textural and morphological traits that are indicative of biological influence, or specific conditions in the depositional environments (Vogel et al., 2009). Gypsum crystals that develop in the presence of microbial biofilms in marine environments may have distorted crystal morphologies, biofilm - associated dissolution features, and accessory carbonate minerals. Gypsum from Valles Caldera fumaroles develops in the absence of microbial biofilms and differs from biologically influenced marine gypsum in terms of is highly prismatic morphology, lack of texture, and association with clays, and other sulfates. Studies of Valles gypsum crystals therefore support the uniqueness of the putative morphological biosignatures in marine gypsum. We also assayed organic matter from fumarole encrustations to understand how low pH and sulfate content may discriminate against or enhance preservation of specific classes of organic compounds in acid sulfate environments. Similar to gypsiferous marine environments, organics are characterized by abundant organosulfur complexes. Long chain alkanes (> nC22) are abundant from acid sulfate environments. As with hypersaline marine depositional environments, sulfidation appears to be a major diagenetic pathway for organic matter in acid sulfate environments.

  17. Characterization of Jarosite Formed upon Bacterial Oxidation of Ferrous Sulfate in a Packed-Bed Reactor †

    PubMed Central

    Grishin, Sergei I.; Bigham, Jerry M.; Tuovinen, Olli H.

    1988-01-01

    A packed-bed bioreactor with activated-carbon particles as a carrier matrix material inoculated with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was operated at a pH of 1.35 to 1.5 to convert ferrous sulfate to ferric sulfate. Despite the low operating pH, trace amounts of precipitates were produced in both the reactor and the oxidized effluent. X-ray diffraction and chemical analyses indicated that the precipitates were well-ordered potassium jarosite. The chemical analyses also revealed a relative deficiency of Fe and an excess of S in the reactor sample compared with the theoretical composition of potassium jarosite. Images PMID:16347799

  18. Volumetric determination of uranium using titanous sulfate as reductant before oxidimetric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlberg, James S.; Skinner, Dwight L.; Rader, Lewis F.

    1956-01-01

    A new method for determining uranium in samples containing 0.05 percent or more U3O8, using titanous sulfate as reducing agent, is much shorter, faster, and has fewer interferences than conventional methods using reductor columns. The sample is dissolved with sulfuric, nitric, perchloric, and hydrofluoric acids. Elements that would otherwise form insoluble fluorides are kept in solution by complexing the fluoride ion with boric acid. A precipitation is made with cupferron to remove interfering elements. The solution is filtered to remove the precipitated cupferrates instead of extracting them with chloroform as is usually done. Filtration is preferred to extraction because any niobium that may be in solution forms an insoluble cupferrate that may be removed by filtering but is very difficult to extract with chloroform. Excess cupferron is destroyed by oxidizing with nitric and perchloric acids, and evaporating to dense fumes of sulfuric acid. The uranium is reduced to U(IV) by the addition of titanous sulfate, with cupric sulfate used as an indicator of the completeness of the reduction. Metallic copper is formed when all the uranium is reduced. The reduced copper is then reoxidized by the addition of mercuric perchlorate, an excess of ferric sulfate added, and the solution titrated immediately with standard ceric sulfate with ferroin as an indicator. Precision of the method compared favorable with methods in common use, both for uranium ores and for most types of uranium-rich materials.

  19. Efflorescence as a source of hydrated sulfate minerals in valley settings on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szynkiewicz, Anna; Borrok, David M.; Vaniman, David T.

    2014-05-01

    A distinctive sulfur cycle dominates many geological processes on Mars and hydrated sulfate minerals are found in numerous topographic settings with widespread occurrences on the Martian surface. However, many of the key processes controlling the hydrological transport of sulfur, including sulfur sources, climate and the depositional history that led to precipitation of these minerals, remain unclear. In this paper, we use a model for the formation of sulfate efflorescent salts (Mg-Ca-Na sulfates) in the Rio Puerco watershed of New Mexico, a terrestrial analog site from the semiarid Southwest U.S., to assess the origin and environmental conditions that may have controlled deposition of hydrated sulfates in Valles Marineris on Mars. Our terrestrial geochemical results (?S34 of -36.0 to +11.1) show that an ephemeral arid hydrological cycle that mobilizes sulfur present in the bedrock as sulfides, sulfate minerals, and dry/wet atmospheric deposition can lead to widespread surface accumulations of hydrated sulfate efflorescences. Repeating cycles of salt dissolution and reprecipitation appear to be major processes that migrate sulfate efflorescences to sites of surface deposition and ultimately increase the aqueous SO42- flux along the watershed (average 41,273 metric tons/yr). We suggest that similar shallow processes may explain the occurrence of hydrated sulfates detected on the scarps and valley floors of Valles Marineris on Mars. Our estimates of salt mass and distribution are in accord with studies that suggest a rather short-lived process of sulfate formation (minimum rough estimate ?100 to 1000 years) and restriction by prevailing arid conditions on Mars.

  20. Tungsten and barium transport in the internal plasma of hollow cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2009-06-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport, and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from 8200 h and 30 352 h ion engine wear tests. Erosion and subsequent redeposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduce the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the flow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  1. A review of the health impacts of barium from natural and anthropogenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Julia; Darrah, Thomas H; Miller, Richard K; Lyerly, H Kim; Vengosh, Avner

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing public awareness of the relatively new and expanded industrial barium uses which are potential sources of human exposure (e.g., a shale gas development that causes an increased awareness of environmental exposures to barium). However, absorption of barium in exposed humans and a full spectrum of its health effects, especially among chronically exposed to moderate and low doses of barium populations, remain unclear. We suggest a systematic literature review (from 1875 to 2014) on environmental distribution of barium, its bioaccumulation, and potential and proven health impacts (in animal models and humans) to provide the information that can be used for optimization of future experimental and epidemiological studies and developing of mitigative and preventive strategies to minimize negative health effects in exposed populations. The potential health effects of barium exposure are largely based on animal studies, while epidemiological data for humans, specifically for chronic low-level exposures, are sparse. The reported health effects include cardiovascular and kidney diseases, metabolic, neurological, and mental disorders. Age, race, dietary patterns, behavioral risks (e.g., smoking), use of medications (those that interfere with absorbed barium in human organism), and specific physiological status (e.g., pregnancy) can modify barium effects on human health. Identifying, evaluating, and predicting the health effects of chronic low-level and moderate-level barium exposures in humans is challenging: Future research is needed to develop an understanding of barium bioaccumulation in order to mitigate its potential health impacts in various exposured populations. Further, while occupationally exposed at-risk populations exist, it is also important to identify potentially vulnerable subgroups among non-occupationally exposed populations (e.g., elderly, pregnant women, children) who are at higher risk of barium exposure from drinking water and food. PMID:24844320

  2. Composite nanoplatelets combining soft-magnetic iron oxide with hard-magnetic barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primc, D.; Makovec, D.

    2015-01-01

    By coupling two different magnetic materials inside a single composite nanoparticle, the shape of the magnetic hysteresis can be engineered to meet the requirements of specific applications. Sandwich-like composite nanoparticles composed of a hard-magnetic Ba-hexaferrite (BaFe12O19) platelet core in between two soft-magnetic spinel iron oxide maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) layers were synthesized using a new, simple and inexpensive method based on the co-precipitation of Fe3+/Fe2+ ions in an aqueous suspension of hexaferrite core nanoparticles. The required close control of the supersaturation of the precipitating species was enabled by the controlled release of the Fe3+ ions from the nitrate complex with urea ([Fe((H2N)2C&z.dbd;O)6](NO3)3) and by using Mg(OH)2 as a solid precipitating agent. The platelet Ba-hexaferrite nanoparticles of different sizes were used as the cores. The controlled coating resulted in an exclusively heterogeneous nucleation and the topotactic growth of the spinel layers on both basal surfaces of the larger hexaferrite nanoplatelets. The direct magnetic coupling between the core and the shell resulted in a strong increase of the energy product |BH|max. Ultrafine core nanoparticles reacted with the precipitating species and homogeneous product nanoparticles were formed, which differ in terms of the structure and composition compared to any other compound in the BaO-Fe2O3 system.By coupling two different magnetic materials inside a single composite nanoparticle, the shape of the magnetic hysteresis can be engineered to meet the requirements of specific applications. Sandwich-like composite nanoparticles composed of a hard-magnetic Ba-hexaferrite (BaFe12O19) platelet core in between two soft-magnetic spinel iron oxide maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) layers were synthesized using a new, simple and inexpensive method based on the co-precipitation of Fe3+/Fe2+ ions in an aqueous suspension of hexaferrite core nanoparticles. The required close control of the supersaturation of the precipitating species was enabled by the controlled release of the Fe3+ ions from the nitrate complex with urea ([Fe((H2N)2C&z.dbd;O)6](NO3)3) and by using Mg(OH)2 as a solid precipitating agent. The platelet Ba-hexaferrite nanoparticles of different sizes were used as the cores. The controlled coating resulted in an exclusively heterogeneous nucleation and the topotactic growth of the spinel layers on both basal surfaces of the larger hexaferrite nanoplatelets. The direct magnetic coupling between the core and the shell resulted in a strong increase of the energy product |BH|max. Ultrafine core nanoparticles reacted with the precipitating species and homogeneous product nanoparticles were formed, which differ in terms of the structure and composition compared to any other compound in the BaO-Fe2O3 system. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis (ESI #1) and properties (ESI #2) of the barium hexaferrite core nanoparticles, TEM of the nanoparticles synthesized under an excessive supersaturation (ESI #3), and magnetic properties of physical mixtures of the hard-magnetic hexaferrite and the soft-magnetic spinel ferrite (ESI #4). See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05854b

  3. Regeneration of sulfated metal oxides and carbonates

    DOEpatents

    Hubble, Bill R.; Siegel, Stanley; Cunningham, Paul T.

    1978-03-28

    Alkali metal or alkaline earth metal carbonates such as calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate found in dolomite or limestone are employed for removal of sulfur dioxide from combustion exhaust gases. The sulfated carbonates are regenerated to oxides through use of a solid-solid reaction, particularly calcium sulfide with calcium sulfate to form calcium oxide and sulfur dioxide gas. The regeneration is performed by contacting the sulfated material with a reductant gas such as hydrogen within an inert diluent to produce calcium sulfide in mixture with the sulfate under process conditions selected to permit the sulfide-sulfate, solid-state reaction to occur.

  4. Conversion of alkali metal sulfate to the carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Sheth, A.C.

    1979-10-01

    A process is described for converting potassium sulfate to potassium carbonate in which a mixture of potassium sulfate and calcium oxide are reacted at a temperature in the range of between about 700/sup 0/C and about 800/sup 0/C with a gaseous mixture having a minor amount of hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide in a diluent with the calcium oxide being present in an amount not greater than about 20 percent by weight of the potassium sulfate to produce an aqueous mixture of potassium sulfide, potassium bisulfide, potassium hydroxide and calcium sulfide and a gaseous mixture of steam and hydrogen sulfide. The potassium and calcium salts are quenched to produce an aqueous slurry of soluble potassium salts and insoluble calcium salts and a gaseous mixture of steam and hydrogen sulfide. The insoluble calcium salts are then separated from the aqueous solution of soluble potassium salts. The calcium salts are dried to produce calcium sulfide, calcium bisulfide and steam, and then, the calcium sulfide and calcium bisulfide are converted to the oxide and recycled. The soluble potassium salts are carbonated to produce potassium carbonate which is concentrated and the precipitated crystals separated. the sulfur-containing compounds are further treated. This process was developed for desulfurization and reprocessing of spent seed from open-cycle coal-fired MHD generators for reuse.

  5. Conversion of alkali metal sulfate to the carbonate

    DOEpatents

    Sheth, Atul C.

    1982-01-01

    A process for converting potassium sulfate to potassium carbonate in which a mixture of potassium sulfate and calcium oxide are reacted at a temperature in the range of between about 700.degree. C. and about 800.degree. C. with a gaseous mixture having a minor amount of hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide in a diluent with the calcium oxide being present in an amount not greater than about 20 percent by weight of the potassium sulfate to produce an aqueous mixture of potassium sulfide, potassium bisulfide, potassium hydroxide and calcium sulfide and a gaseous mixture of steam and hydrogen sulfide. The potassium and calcium salts are quenched to produce an aqueous slurry of soluble potassium salts and insoluble calcium salts and a gaseous mixture of steam and hydrogen sulfide. The insoluble calcium salts are then separated from the aqueous solution of soluble potassium salts. The calcium salts are dried to produce calcium sulfide, calcium bisulfide and steam, and then, the calcium sulfide and calcium bisulfide are converted to the oxide and recycled. The soluble potassium salts are carbonated to produce potassium carbonate which is concentrated and the precipitated crystals separated. The sulfur-containing compounds are further treated.

  6. Correlation of plume opacity with particles and sulfates from boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, J.C.; Lee, M.; Chen, K.S.

    1997-07-01

    The effects of emission concentrations of particulate matters and sulfates on plume opacity are investigated by in situ measurements. The studies are conducted for three processes of two coal-fired plants and one oil-fired that are all equipped with electrostatic precipitators. Flue-gas sampling and analysis include the concentrations of particles and total water soluble sulfates, particle size distribution, and flue-gas composition; while in-stack and out-of-stack opacities are determined by a transmissometer and certified smoke inspectors, respectively. Experimental results show that plume opacity outside the stack linearly correlates well with the in-stack opacity. The mixing of hot flue gas with cold ambient air would result in the condensation of hygroscopic sulfuric acid aerosols and an increase about 1.6% out of typical 15--25% measured opacity. An empirical equation similar to the Beer-Lambert-Bouger form is derived for predicting the plume opacity in terms of the stack diameter and the concentrations of particles and total water soluble sulfates. Good comparisons are achieved between predictions by the empirical equation and other available field data.

  7. Crystallization of Chicken Egg White Lysozyme from Assorted Sulfate Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Snell, Edward H.; Malone, Christine C.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Chicken egg white lysozyme has been found to crystallize from ammonium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, magnesium, and manganese sulfates at acidic and basic pH, with protein concentrations from 60 to 190 mg/ml. Four different crystal morphologies have been obtained, depending upon the temperature, protein concentration, and precipitating salt employed, Crystals grown at 15 C were generally tetragonal, with space group P43212. Crystallization at 20 C typically resulted in the formation of orthorhombic crystals, space group P21212 1. The tetragonal much less than orthorhombic morphology transition appeared to be a function of both the temperature and protein concentration, occurring between 15 and 20 C and between 100 and 125 mg/ml protein concentration. Crystallization from 0.8 -1.2M magnesium sulfate at pH 7.6 - 8.0 gave a hexagonal (trigonal) crystal form, space group P3121, which diffracted to 2.8 A. Ammonium sulfate was also found to result in a monoclinic form, space group C2. Small twinned monoclinic crystals of approx. 0.2 mm on edge were grown by dialysis followed by seeded sitting drop crystallization.

  8. Changes in precipitation chemistry in Lithuania for 1981-2004.

    PubMed

    Sopauskiene, Dalia; Jasineviciene, Dalia

    2006-03-01

    This paper considers the spatial and temporal variability in concentrations of the potentially acidifying ions in precipitation in Lithuania during the 1981-2004 period. Chemical analysis of precipitation included measurements of pH, conductivity, sulfate (SO4(2-)), nitrate (NO3-), chloride (Cl-), ammonium (NH4+), sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), and calcium (Ca2+). Temporal trends in the potentially acidifying ion concentrations in precipitation and wet deposition were evaluated using the non-parametric Mann-Kendall test and Sen's slope estimator. A statistically significant decline was observed in non-sea salt sulfate (nssSO4(2-)) and hydrogen (H+) ions concentrations (82% and 79%, respectively) and wet depositions (88% and 74%, respectively). Temporal trends both in concentration and wet deposition of nitrate and ammonium were not as pronounced as trends in sulfate concentration. Analysis of air mass backward trajectories was applied to reveal the influence of air mass originating in different regions on wet deposition of acidifying species in Lithuania. Sector analysis clearly showed that wet deposition of sulfur and nitrogen in Lithuania is to a large extent anthropogenic and the main source regions of acidifying species contributing to wet deposition in Lithuania are in South and Central Europe. PMID:16528418

  9. Sulfate ingress in Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Lothenbach, Barbara; Bary, Benoit; Le Bescop, Patrick; Leterrier, Nikos

    2010-08-15

    The interaction of mortar with sulfate solutions leads to a reaction front within the porous material and to expansion. Thermodynamic modelling coupled with transport codes was used to predict sulfate ingress. Alternatively, 'pure' thermodynamic models - without consideration of transport - were used as a fast alternative to coupled models: they are more flexible and allow easy parameter variations but the results relate neither to distance nor to time. Both transport and pure thermodynamic modelling gave comparable results and were able to reproduce the changes observed in experiments. The calculated total volume of the solids did not exceed the initial volume of the paste indicating that not the overall volume restriction leads to the observed expansion but rather the formation of ettringite within the matrix and the development of crystallisation pressure in small pores. The calculations indicate that periodic changing of the Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution results in more intense degradation.

  10. Method for magnesium sulfate recovery

    DOEpatents

    Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.

    1987-08-25

    A method is described for obtaining magnesium sulfate substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7,000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is then contacted with a concentrated sulfuric acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a solid product. The particulate solid product and a minor amount of the liquid is then treated to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium sulfate substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than 1,000 pCi/gm. In accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention, a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the initial acid treatment and a final solid residue has a radioactivity level of less than about 50 pCi/gm.

  11. Method for magnesium sulfate recovery

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Richard L.; Grantham, LeRoy F.

    1987-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium sulfate substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is then contacted with a concentrated sulfuric acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a solid product. The particulate solid product and a minor amount of the liquid is then treated to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium sulfate substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention, a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the initial acid treatment and a final solid residue has a radioactivity level of less than about 50 pCi/gm.

  12. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  13. Removal of sulfide, sulfate and sulfite ions by electro coagulation.

    PubMed

    Murugananthan, M; Raju, G Bhaskar; Prabhakar, S

    2004-06-18

    The removal of various species of sulfur from beamhouse of tannery wastewater and also from synthetic samples was studied by electro-flotation technique. Consumable anodes of iron and aluminum and insoluble anode of titanium were tested as anodes. It was found that iron and aluminum anodes were effective for the removal of suspended solids, sulfide, sulfite and sulfate. Progress of simultaneous coagulation of suspended solids during electro-flotation was measured using particle size analysis. Coagulation was found to be essential for effective flotation of suspended solids. Metal ions generated in situ by electrolytic oxidation of anode were found to react with dissolved sulfide ions. Metal sulfides thus formed as colloidal suspension were coagulated and floated simultaneously by hydrogen bubbles generated from cathode. Simultaneous occurrence of precipitation, coagulation and flotation was observed during electro-flotation. X-ray diffraction studies were conducted to identify the nature of sulfide phase formed during electrolytic precipitation. The effect of pH, current density and initial concentration of pollutants was studied and the results are discussed. The removal of sulfite and sulfate ions is explained by zeta-potential measurements. PMID:15177743

  14. Sulfates on Mars: Indicators of Aqueous Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Lane, Melissa D.; Dyar, M. Darby; Brown, Adrian J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent analyses by MER instruments at Meridiani Planum and Gusev crater and the OMEGA instrument on Mars Express have provided detailed information about the presence of sulfates on Mars [1,2,3]. We are evaluating these recent data in an integrated multi-disciplinary study of visible-near-infrared, mid-IR and Mossbauer spectra of several sulfate minerals and sulfate-rich analog sites. Our analyses suggest that hydrated iron sulfates may account for features observed in Mossbauer and mid-IR spectra of Martian soils [4]. The sulfate minerals kieserite, gypsum and other hydrated sulfates have been identified in OMEGA spectra in the layered terrains in Valles Marineris and Terra Meridiani [2]. These recent discoveries emphasize the importance of studying sulfate minerals as tracers of aqueous processes. The sulfate-rich rock outcrops observed in Meridiani Planum may have formed in an acidic environment similar to acid rock drainage environments on Earth [5]. Because microorganisms typically are involved in the oxidation of sulfides to sulfates in terrestrial sites, sulfate-rich rock outcrops on Mars may be a good location to search for evidence of past life on that planet. Whether or not life evolved on Mars, following the trail of sulfate minerals will lead to a better understanding of aqueous processes and chemical weathering.

  15. Diel cycles in dissolved barium, lead, iron, vanadium, and nitrite in a stream draining a former zinc smelter site near Hegeler, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kay, R.T.; Groschen, G.E.; Cygan, G.; Dupre, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Diel variations in the concentrations of a number of constituents have the potential to substantially affect the appropriate sampling regimen in acidic streams. Samples taken once during the course of the day cannot adequately reflect diel variations in water quality and may result in an inaccurate understanding of biogeochemical processes, ecological conditions, and of the threat posed by the water to human health and the associated wildlife. Surface water and groundwater affected by acid drainage were sampled every 60 to 90. min over a 48-hour period at a former zinc smelter known as the Hegeler Zinc Superfund Site, near Hegeler, Illinois. Diel variations related to water quality in the aquifer were not observed in groundwater. Diel variations were observed in the temperature, pH, and concentration of dissolved oxygen, nitrite, barium, iron, lead, vanadium, and possibly uranium in surface water. Temperature, dissolved oxygen, nitrite, barium, lead, and uranium generally attained maximum values during the afternoon and minimum values during the night. Iron, vanadium, and pH generally attained minimum values during the afternoon and maximum values during the night. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen were affected by the intensity of photosynthetic activity and respiration, which are dependent upon insolation. Nitrite, an intermediary in many nitrogen reactions, may have been formed by the oxidation of ammonium by dissolved oxygen and converted to other nitrogen species as part of the decomposition of organic matter. The timing of the pH cycles was distinctly different from the cycles found in Midwestern alkaline streams and likely was the result of the photoreduction of Fe3+ to Fe 2+ and variations in the intensity of precipitation of hydrous ferric oxide minerals. Diel cycles of iron and vanadium also were primarily the result of variations in the intensity of precipitation of hydrous ferric oxide minerals. The diel variation in the concentrations of lead, uranium, and barium may have been affected by competition with Fe+2 for sorption sites on hydrous ferric oxide minerals. ?? 2010.

  16. Long-term retention of /sup 133/Ba in the rat trachea following local administration as barium sulfate particles

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Patrick, G.

    1987-06-01

    Long-term retention of /sup 133/Ba in the trachea from intratracheally administered BaSO/sub 4/ particles was determined by both serial sacrifice and external scanning methods up to 6 months after injection. The amount of /sup 133/Ba retained 1 week after injection in the caudal region of the trachea, where the tip of the cannula had been at injection, was 0.41% of the initial dose. Thereafter the /sup 133/Ba was cleared exponentially with a mean half-time of 88 days, as determined from the autopsy samples. The cranial region of the trachea, including the site of the tracheostomy, contained /sup 133/Ba at 10 times the level in the caudal region 1 week after injection and was cleared with a half-time of 66 days. These clearance rates were confirmed by repeated external scanning over the trachea. The 133Ba was drained to the lymph nodes not only in the thoracic cavity but also in the cervical region, suggesting the possibility of lymphatic drainage from the trachea to the cervical lymph nodes.

  17. Thermodynamics of molten sulfate mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, A.K.; Whittle, D.P.; Worrell, W.L.

    1982-08-01

    Quantitative studies of the formation of low melting point sulfates were made by equilibrating NiO-Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ mixtures with argon-SO/sub 2/-SO/sub 3/-air mixtures of different compositions in the temperature range 1000-1173 K. Using these data and the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-NiSO/sub 4/ phase diagram, the enthalpy of fusion and melting temperature of NiSO/sub 4/ were estimated. An equation is given for the free energy change for the reaction NiO(s)+SO/sub 3/(g).NiSO/sub 4/(l) (dissolved in Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/). This has then been used to calculate the minimum P/sub SO(3)/ required for liquid sulfate formation. Similar calculations were carried out from existing data for the CoSO/sub 4/-Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ system, and verified by a limited number of experiments. The calculated minimum P/sub SO(3)/ required for liquid sulfate formation is approximately an order of magnitude lower for Co-base alloys compared with Ni-base alloys, and the implications of this with regard to hot corrosion are briefly discussed. 16 refs.

  18. Wideband and enhanced microwave absorption performance of doped barium ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Pingyuan; Xiong, Kun; Ju, Kui; Li, Shengnan; Xu, Guangliang

    2015-07-01

    To achieve stronger microwave attenuation and larger bandwidth in electromagnetic absorber, the nickel ions (Ni2+) and manganese ions (Mn2+) were employed to partially replace the cobalt ions (Co2+) in BaCoTiFe10O19, and the doped barium hexaferrite (Ba(MnNi)0.2Co0.6TiFe10O19 and Ba(MnNi)0.25Co0.5TiFe10O19) powders were synthesized via the sol-gel combustion method. Subsequently, the microwave absorbing composites were prepared by mixing the ferrite powders with the paraffin. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the doped ferrites confirmed the formation of the M-type barium ferrite, and no other types of barium ferrite could be found. Based on the electromagnetic parameters measured by the vector net-analyzer, it was found that the composite (Ba(MnNi)0.2Co0.6TiFe10O19) possessed a minimum reflection loss of -52.8 dB at 13.4 GHz with a matching thickness of 1.8 mm and the bandwidth below -15 dB was 5.8 GHz. Moreover, the maximum attenuation of Ba(MnNi)0.25Co0.5TiFe10O19 could reach -69 dB when its thickness was 1.8 mm, and also the bandwidth less than -20 dB was ranging from 13.2 GHz to 18 GHz. Thus, Ba(MnNi)0.2Co0.6TiFe10O19 and Ba(MnNi)0.25Co0.5TiFe10O19 could be the good microwave absorbers, which have great potentials to be applied in the high frequency fields of the microwave absorbing materials.

  19. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  20. Precipitation Estimates for Hydroelectricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapiador, Francisco J.; Hou, Arthur Y.; de Castro, Manuel; Checa, Ramiro; Cuartero, Fernando; Barros, Ana P.

    2011-01-01

    Hydroelectric plants require precise and timely estimates of rain, snow and other hydrometeors for operations. However, it is far from being a trivial task to measure and predict precipitation. This paper presents the linkages between precipitation science and hydroelectricity, and in doing so it provides insight into current research directions that are relevant for this renewable energy. Methods described include radars, disdrometers, satellites and numerical models. Two recent advances that have the potential of being highly beneficial for hydropower operations are featured: the Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM) mission, which represents an important leap forward in precipitation observations from space, and high performance computing (HPC) and grid technology, that allows building ensembles of numerical weather and climate models.

  1. Lack of effect of drinking water barium on cardiovascular risk factors

    SciTech Connect

    Wones, R.G.; Stadler, B.L.; Frohman, L.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Higher cardiovascular mortality has been associated in a single epidemiological study with higher levels of barium in drinking water. The purpose of this study was to determine whether drinking water barium at levels found in some U.S. communities-alters the known risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Eleven healthy men completed a 10-week dose-response protocol in which diet was controlled. Other aspects of the subjects' lifestyles known to affect cardiac risk factors were controlled, and the barium content (as barium chloride) of the drinking water was varied from 0, to 5 ppm, to 10 ppm. Multiple blood and urine samples, morning and evening blood pressure measurements, and 48-hr electrocardiographic monitoring were performed at each dose of barium. There were no changes in morning or evening systolic or diastolic blood pressures, plasma cholesterol or lipoprotein or apolipoprotein levels, serum potassium or glucose levels, or urine catecholamine levels. There were no arrythmias related to barium exposure detected on continuous electrocardiographic monitoring. A trend was seen toward increased total serum calcium levels with exposure to barium, which was of borderline statistical significance and of doubtful clinical significance. In summary, drinking water barium at levels of 5 and 10 ppm did not appear to affect any of the known modifiable cardiovascular risk factors.

  2. 75 FR 36629 - Barium Chloride From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... Barium Chloride From China, 75 FR 33824 (June 15, 2010), and Barium Chloride from China (Inv. No. 731-TA... Five-year (``Sunset'') Review, 74 FR 31412 (July 1, 2009). As a result of its review, the Department... China: Final Results of Expedited Third Sunset Review of Antidumping Duty Order, 74 FR 55814 (October...

  3. LACK OF EFFECT OF DRINKING WATER BARIUM ON CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Higher cardiovascular mortality has been associated in a single epidemiological study with higher levels of barium in drinking water. he purpose of this study was to determine whether drinking water barium at levels found in some U.S. communities alters the known risk factors for...

  4. Composition and structure measurements in an ionospheric barium cloud. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Narcisi, R.; Trzcinski, E.; Federico, G.; Wlodyka, L.; Bench, P.

    1981-12-23

    A 48 kg barium payload was launched from Eglin Air Force Base, Florida on 12 December 1980 at 2311 GMT and detonated at 183.7 km. At 2342:50.25 GMT, a second rocket, instrumented with an ion mass spectrometer and pulsed plasma probes, was fired to traverse the barium cloud. Composition, ion density, and structure measurements were acquired up to 241.2 km in both the natural and disturbed ionosphere. The rocket penetrated the barium cloud between 147 and 184 km. In addition to the Ba+, Ba++ produced by H Lyman alpha ionization, and Ca+, an impurity in the barium were detected in the cloud. A peak barium ion concentration of about 6,000,000 ions cu cm was measured at 161 km where the ionospheric NO+ and O2+ ions were essentially eliminated by large recombination loss. The bottom side of the barium cloud had a relatively smooth structure while the top side showed significant density fluctuations. The first experimental evidence of a theoretically predicted E region 'image cloud' was found in the form of an enhanced NO+ layer just below the barium cloud. Unexplained wave-like density variations in O+, NO+, and O2(+) also were seen above the barium cloud to 195 km. A quantitative estimate of the outgassing water vapor concentrations near the payload's surface was made using the fast change transfer rate coefficient for O+ + H2O yields H2O+ + O that created the observed water vapor ions.

  5. The effect of barium on perceptions of taste intensity and palatability

    PubMed Central

    Dietsch, Angela M.; Solomon, Nancy Pearl; Steele, Catriona M.; Pelletier, Cathy A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Barium may affect the perception of taste intensity and palatability. Such differences are important considerations in the selection of dysphagia assessment strategies and interpretation of results. Methods Eighty healthy women grouped by age (younger, older) and genetic taste status (supertaster, non-taster) rated intensity and palatability for seven tastants prepared in deionized water with and without 40% w/v barium: non-carbonated and carbonated water, diluted ethanol, and high concentrations of citric acid (sour), sodium chloride (salty), caffeine (bitter) and sucrose (sweet). Mixed model analyses explored the effects of barium, taster status, and age on perceived taste intensity and acceptability of stimuli. Results Barium was associated with lower taste intensity ratings for sweet, salty, and bitter tastants, higher taste intensity in carbonated water, and lower palatability in water, sweet, sour, and carbonated water. Older subjects reported lower palatability (all barium samples, sour) and higher taste intensity scores (ethanol, sweet, sour) compared to younger subjects. Supertasters reported higher taste intensity (ethanol, sweet, sour, salty, bitter) and lower palatability (ethanol, salty, bitter) than non-tasters. Refusal rates were highest for younger subjects and supertasters, and for barium (regardless of tastant), bitter, and ethanol. Conclusions Barium suppressed the perceived intensity of some tastes and reduced palatability. These effects are more pronounced in older subjects and supertasters, but younger supertasters are least likely to tolerate trials of barium and strong tastant solutions. PMID:24037100

  6. Participation of the Pennsylvania State University in the MAP3S precipitation chemistry network. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, D.; de Pena, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    Precipitation in central Pennsylvania was collected for more than 14 years on behalf of the Multistate Atmospheric Power Production Pollution Study (MAP3S). The MAP3S protocol, based on the sampling of precipitation from individual meteorological events over a long period of time, has allowed both for the development of a chemical climatology of precipitation in the eastern region of the United States and for a vastly improved understanding of the atmospheric processes responsible for wet acidic deposition. The precipitation chemistry data from the Penn State MAP3S site provide evidence of links to the anthropogenic emissions of sulfur dioxide and oxidant precursors. There is now little doubt that the free acidity in the precipitation of the region is due to the presence of unneutralized sulfate in the aqueous phase. In the absence of significant sources of this sulfur species and in view of supplemental enrichment studies, it is concluded that the sulfate enters cloud and rain water primarily through the aqueous-phase oxidation of sulfur dioxide emitted into the air within the geographical region of deposition. Within the source region the local abundances of sulfur dioxide often exceed those of the oxidants, so the depositions of sulfate and free acidity tend to be modulated by the availability of the strong oxidants. As a consequence, the deposition of sulfate exhibits a very strong seasonal dependence and little response to changes in the emissions of sulfur dioxide.

  7. Participation of the Pennsylvania State University in the MAP3S precipitation chemistry network

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, D.; de Pena, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    Precipitation in central Pennsylvania was collected for more than 14 years on behalf of the Multistate Atmospheric Power Production Pollution Study (MAP3S). The MAP3S protocol, based on the sampling of precipitation from individual meteorological events over a long period of time, has allowed both for the development of a chemical climatology of precipitation in the eastern region of the United States and for a vastly improved understanding of the atmospheric processes responsible for wet acidic deposition. The precipitation chemistry data from the Penn State MAP3S site provide evidence of links to the anthropogenic emissions of sulfur dioxide and oxidant precursors. There is now little doubt that the free acidity in the precipitation of the region is due to the presence of unneutralized sulfate in the aqueous phase. In the absence of significant sources of this sulfur species and in view of supplemental enrichment studies, it is concluded that the sulfate enters cloud and rain water primarily through the aqueous-phase oxidation of sulfur dioxide emitted into the air within the geographical region of deposition. Within the source region the local abundances of sulfur dioxide often exceed those of the oxidants, so the depositions of sulfate and free acidity tend to be modulated by the availability of the strong oxidants. As a consequence, the deposition of sulfate exhibits a very strong seasonal dependence and little response to changes in the emissions of sulfur dioxide.

  8. Meteorological and chemical factors controlling the composition of precipitation in eastern North America

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, D.; Comrie, L.

    1991-07-01

    Precipitation in eastern North America is characterized by high concentrations of free acidity and sulfate that are generally attributed to anthropogenic air pollution. The relatively long record of precipitation chemistry measurements at the Penn State MAP3S site is used to analyze the seasonal and interannual variability of precipitation composition in terms of specific mechanisms of atmospheric transport and chemical transformation. The interrelationships of the chemical variables in the precipitation record and in recent air measurements clearly link the precipitation acidity with the wet deposition of sulfate derived from the in-cloud oxidation of sulfur dioxide. High-deposition events are shown through meteorological trajectory analyses to be associated with moist air from the Gulf of Mexico that passes through the upper midwestern parts of the United States. The main chemical factor controlling the deposition of sulfate appears to be the availability of strong oxidants for transforming dissolved sulfur dioxide into aqueous sulfate. Excess sulfur dioxide is expected to exit the storm systems at high altitudes and experience truly long-range transport. This interpretation of the data gives confidence that episodes will occur even after sulfur dioxide emissions have been reduced substantially.

  9. Monohydrated Sulfates in Aurorae Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of sulfate-containing deposits in Aurorae Chaos was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 0653 UTC (2:53 a.m. EDT) on June 10, 2007, near 7.5 degrees south latitude, 327.25 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    Aurorae Chaos lies east of the Valles Marineris canyon system. Its western edge extends toward Capri and Eos Chasmata, while its eastern edge connects with Aureum Chaos. Some 750 kilometers (466 miles) wide, Aurorae Chaos is most likely the result of collapsed surface material that settled when subsurface ice or water was released.

    The top panel in the montage above shows the location of the CRISM image on a mosaic taken by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). The CRISM data covers an area featuring several knobs of erosion-resistant material at one end of what appears to be a large teardrop shaped plateau. Similar plateaus occur throughout the interior of Valles Marineris, and they are formed of younger, typically layered rocks that post-date formation of the canyon system. Many of the deposits contain sulfate-rich layers, hinting at ancient saltwater.

    The center left image, an infrared false color image, reveals a swath of light-colored material draped over the knobs. The center right image unveils the mineralogical composition of the area, with yellow representing monohydrated sulfates (sulfates with one water molecule incorporated into each molecule of the mineral).

    The lower two images are renderings of data draped over topography with 5 times vertical exaggeration. These images provide a view of the topography and reveal how the monohydrated sulfate-containing deposits drape over the knobs and also an outcrop in lower-elevation parts of the plateau.

    CRISM is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Led by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md., the CRISM team includes expertise from universities, government agencies and small businesses in the United States and abroad. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and the Mars Science Laboratory for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the orbiter.

  10. Nanodielectric system for cryogenic applications: Barium titanate filled polyvinyl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Duckworth, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    In the current study the focus is on dielectric properties (as a function of frequency and temperature) of a polymeric composite system composed of polyvinyl alcohol and barium titanate nano powder. In the investigations, the temperature range is between 50-295 K, and the frequency range is between $20\\ \\hertz-1\\ \\mega\\hertz$. Polarization and conduction processes are investigated in the linear regime. Dielectric breakdown strengths of samples are also reported. The materials presented have potential to be implemented in cryogenic capacitor or field grading applications.

  11. Highly efficient white light generation from barium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmadhikari, A. K.; Rajgara, F. A.; Reddy, N. C. S.; Sandhu, A. S.; Mathur, D.

    2004-02-01

    We demonstrate highly efficient white light generation by focusing 45 fs long pulses of 800 nm laser radiation with 1 mJ energy onto a 10 cm long barium fluoride crystal. The entire wavelength band from 400-1000 nm was generated with efficiency greater than 40%. We also observe multiphoton absorption induced fluorescence in the crystal. By employing line focusing geometry at low intensity, we show that white light fringes are formed with a single laser beam, indicative of the coherent property of the white light that is produced.

  12. Dielectric behavior of barium modified strontium bismuth titanate ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, P.; Badapanda, T.; Anwar, S.; Panigrahi, S.

    2014-04-01

    Barium Modified Strontium Bismuth Titanate(SBT) ceramic with general formula Sr1-xBaxBi4Ti4O15 is prepared by solid state reaction route. The structural analysis of the ceramics was done by X-ray diffraction technique. The X-ray patterns show that all the compositions are of single phase with orthorhombic structure. The temperature dependent dielectric behavior shows that the transition temperature decreases with Ba content but the maximum dielectric constant increases. The decreases of the transition with increase in Ba2+ ion, may be due to the decrease of orthorhombicity by the incorporation of Ba2+ ion in SBT lattice.

  13. Strain engineered barium strontium titanate for tunable thin film resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Khassaf, H.; Khakpash, N.; Sun, F.; Sbrockey, N. M.; Tompa, G. S.; Kalkur, T. S.; Alpay, S. P.

    2014-05-19

    Piezoelectric properties of epitaxial (001) barium strontium titanate (BST) films are computed as functions of composition, misfit strain, and temperature using a non-linear thermodynamic model. Results show that through adjusting in-plane strains, a highly adaptive rhombohedral ferroelectric phase can be stabilized at room temperature with outstanding piezoelectric response exceeding those of lead based piezoceramics. Furthermore, by adjusting the composition and the in-plane misfit, an electrically tunable piezoelectric response can be obtained in the paraelectric state. These findings indicate that strain engineered BST films can be utilized in the development of electrically tunable and switchable surface and bulk acoustic wave resonators.

  14. Radium and barium in the Amazon River system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.S.; Edmond, J.M.

    1984-03-20

    Data for /sup 226/Ra and /sup 228/Ra in the Amazon River system show that the activity of each radium isotope is strongly correlated with barium concentrations. Two trends are apparent, one for rivers which drain shield areas and another for all other rivers. These data suggest that there has been extensive fractionation of U, Th, and Ba during weathering in the Amazon basin. The /sup 226/Ra data fit a flux model for the major ions indicating that /sup 226/Ra behaves conservatively along the main channel of the Amazon River.

  15. Enhanced flexoelectricity through residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garten, Lauren M.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Residual ferroelectricity is observed in barium strontium titanate ceramics over 30 °C above the global phase transition temperature, in the same temperature range in which anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients are reported. The application of a strain gradient leads to strain gradient-induced poling or flexoelectric poling. This was observed by the development of a remanent polarization in flexoelectric measurements, an induced d33 piezoelectric response even after the strain gradient was removed, and the production of an internal bias of 9 kV m-1. It is concluded that residual ferroelectric response considerably enhances the observed flexoelectric response.

  16. Agglomeration behavior of solid nickel on polycrystalline barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K Scott; Mast, Eric S; Sprenkle, Vince

    2007-11-01

    This letter describes the phenomenon that takes place between nickel/barium titanate couples when heated under conditions employed in multilayer ceramic capacitor manufacturing practice: a 4hr, 1300°C isothermal anneal in 1% H2 – 99% N2. Dense, sputtered nickel films were observed to dewet the titanate and agglomerate into discrete or interconnected islands via a solid-state process. Up to a critical film thickness value of ~1.4 μm, the degree of agglomeration was found to display an exponential dependence on the thickness of the original nickel film.

  17. Enhanced flexoelectricity through residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, Lauren M. Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-07

    Residual ferroelectricity is observed in barium strontium titanate ceramics over 30 °C above the global phase transition temperature, in the same temperature range in which anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients are reported. The application of a strain gradient leads to strain gradient-induced poling or flexoelectric poling. This was observed by the development of a remanent polarization in flexoelectric measurements, an induced d{sub 33} piezoelectric response even after the strain gradient was removed, and the production of an internal bias of 9 kV m{sup −1}. It is concluded that residual ferroelectric response considerably enhances the observed flexoelectric response.

  18. CNO and F abundances in the barium star HD 123396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves-Brito, A.; Karakas, A. I.; Yong, D.; Meléndez, J.; Vásquez, S.

    2011-12-01

    Context. Barium stars are moderately rare, chemically peculiar objects, which are believed to be the result of the pollution of an otherwise normal star by material from an evolved companion on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Aims: We aim to derive carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine abundances for the first time from the infrared spectra of the barium red giant star HD 123396 to quantitatively test AGB nucleosynthesis models for producing barium stars via mass accretion. Methods: High-resolution and high S/N infrared spectra were obtained using the Phoenix spectrograph mounted at the Gemini South telescope. The abundances were obtained through spectrum synthesis of individual atomic and molecular lines, using the MOOG stellar line analysis program, together with Kurucz's stellar atmosphere models. The analysis was classical, using 1D stellar models and spectral synthesis under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. Results: We confirm that HD 123396 is a metal-deficient barium star ([Fe/H] = -1.05), with A(C) = 7.88, A(N) = 6.65, A(O) = 7.93, and A(Na) = 5.28 on a logarithmic scale where A(H) = 12, leading to [(C+N)/Fe] ≈ 0.5. The A(CNO) group, as well as the A(Na) abundances, is in excellent agreement with those previously derived for this star using high-resolution optical data. We also found A(F) = 4.16, which implies [F/O] = 0.39, a value that is substantially higher than the F abundances measured in globular clusters of a similar metallicity, noting that there are no F measurements in field stars of comparable metallicity. Conclusions: The observed abundance pattern of the light elements (CNO, F, and Na) recovered here as well as the heavy elements (s-process) studied elsewhere suggest that the surface composition of HD 123396 is well fitted by the predicted abundance pattern of a 1.5 M⊙ AGB model star with Z = 0.001. Thus, the AGB mass transfer hypothesis offers a quantitatively viable framework.

  19. Comportement des materiaux cimentaires: Actions des sulfates et de la temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarulo, Remi

    The research work presented in this Ph.D. thesis is related to the nuclear waste underground repository concept. Concrete could be used in such a repository, and would be subjected to variations of temperature in presence of sulfate, a situation that could induce expansion of concrete. The research was lead in three parts: an experimental study of the possibility of an internal sulfate attack on mortars; an experimental study and modeling of the chemical equilibriums of the CaO-SiO2-Al2O 3-SO-H2O system; and a modeling of the mechanisms of internal and external sulfate attacks, and the effect of temperature. The results show that mortars can develop expansions after a steam-cure during hydration, but also when a long steam-cure is applied to one-year-old mortars, which is a new point. Ettringite precipitation can be considered as responsible for these expansions. The experimental study of the CaO-SiO2-Al2O 3-SO3-H2O system clarified the role of Calcium Silicate Hydrates (C-S-H) on chemical equilibriums of cementitious materials. Sulfate sorption on C-S-H has been studied in detail. The quantity of sulfate bound to the C-S-H mainly depends on the sulfate concentration in solution, on the Ca/Si ratio of the C-S-H and is not significantly influenced by temperature. Aluminium inclusion in the C-S-H seems to be a significant phenomenon. Temperature increases the calcium sulfoaluminate solubilities and thus increases sulfates concentration in solution. A modeling of the chemical system is proposed. Simulations of external sulfate attack (15 mmol/L of Na2SO 4) predict ettringite precipitation at 20 and 85°C. Simulation of internal sulfate attack was performed at a local scale (a hydrated cement grain). An initial inhomogeneity can lead, after a thermal curing at 85°C, to ettringite precipitation in zones originally free from ettringite. This new-formed ettringite could be the origin of the expansions.

  20. Chemical quality of precipitation at Greenville, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smath, J.A.; Potter, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Weekly composite precipitation samples were collected at a rural site located in Greenville, Maine for analysis of trace metals and organic compounds. Samples collected during February 1982, through May 1984, were analyzed for cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, and zinc and during February 1982, through March 1983, for chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides, pthalate ester plasticizers, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Deposition rates were computed. Data reported by the NADP (National Atmospheric Deposition Program) was used to evaluate the general chemical quality of the precipitation. The precipitation had relatively high concentrations of hydrogen ions, sulfate, and nitrate, compared to other constituents. Of the trace metals included for analysis, only copper, lead, and zinc were consistently detected. Lead concentrations exceeded the U.S. EPA recommended limit for domestic water supply in three samples. High deposition rates for some of the metals were episodic. Alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane was the only organic compound that was consistently detected (maximum 120 nanograms/L). None of the other organic compounds were detected in any of the samples. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Inhibition of nickel precipitation by organic ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, H.L.; Nikolaidis, N.P.; Grasso, D.

    1996-11-01

    Wastewaters from electroplating are very complex due to the composition of the plating baths. A nickel plating bath typically consists of a nickel source (nickel chloride or nickel sulfate), complexing agents to solubilize nickel ions controlling their concentration in the solution, buffering agents to maintain pH, brighteners to improve brightness of the plated metal, stabilizers (inhibitors) to prevent undesired reactions, accelerators to enhance speed of reactions, wetting agents to reduce surface tension at the metal surface, and reducing agents (only for electroless nickel plating) to supply electrons for reduction of the nickel. Alkaline precipitation is the most common method of recovering nickel from wastewaters. However, organic constituents found in the wastewaters can mask or completely inhibit the precipitation of nickel. The objective of this study was to conduct an equilibrium study to explore the inhibition behavior of various organic ligands on nickel precipitation. This will lay the groundwork for development of technologies efficacious in the treatment of complexed nickel. The organic ligands used in this study are EDTA, triethanolamine (TEA), gluconate, and tartrate.

  2. Method of precipitating ADU

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, P.T.

    1981-03-10

    A process is disclosed for improving the quality of an ammonium diuranate (ADU) precipitate. Ammonium hydroxide is added to a solution of uranyl fluoride in the presence of a polymer such as polyacrylic acid, polyacrylonitrile, or polyacrylamide. The presence of the polymer reduces the particle size of the precipitate and increases its settling rate. A reduced particle size provides an adu powder which is suitable for nuclear fuel fabrication and an increased settling rate enhances the dewatering operation of the adu slurry.

  3. Evidence against Barium in the Mushroom Trogia venenata as a Cause of Sudden Unexpected Deaths in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Yanchun; Wu, Gang; Feng, Bang; Yoell, Shanze; Yu, Zefen; Zhang, Keqin

    2012-01-01

    This study examined barium concentrations in the mushroom Trogia venenata, the leading culprit for sudden unexpected deaths in Yunnan, southwest China. We found that barium concentrations in T. venenata from Yunnan were low and comparable to other foods, inconsistent with barium concentrations in this mushroom as a significant contributor to these deaths. PMID:23042168

  4. Heparin cofactor II is degraded by heparan sulfate and dextran sulfate.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akio

    2015-02-20

    Heparan sulfate normally binds to heparin cofactor II and modulates the coagulation pathway by inhibiting thrombin. However, when human heparin cofactor II was incubated with heparan sulfate, heparin cofactor II became degraded. Other glycosaminoglycans were tested, including hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfates, dermatan sulfate, and heparin, but only dextran sulfate also degraded heparin cofactor II. Pretreatment of heparan sulfate with heparinase reduced its heparin cofactor II-degrading activity. Heparan sulfate and dextran sulfate diminished the thrombin inhibitory activity of heparin cofactor II. Other serpins, including antithrombin III and pigment epithelium-derived factor, were also degraded by heparan sulfate. This is the first evidence of acidic polysaccharides exhibiting protein-degrading activity without the aid of other proteins. PMID:25600805

  5. Mine wastewater treatment using Phalaris arundinacea plant material hydrolyzate as substrate for sulfate-reducing bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Nevatalo, Laura M; Kaksonen, Anna H; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2010-06-01

    A low-cost substrate, Phalaris arundinacea was acid hydrolyzed (Reed Canary Grass hydrolyzate, RCGH) and used to support sulfate reduction. The experiments included batch bottle assays (35 degrees C) and a fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR) experiment (35 degrees C) treating synthetic mine wastewater. Dry plant material was also tested as substrate in batch bottle assays. The batch assays showed sulfate reduction with the studied substrates, producing 540 and 350mgL(-1) dissolved sulfide with RCGH and dry plant material, respectively. The soluble sugars of the RCGH presumably fermented into volatile fatty acids and hydrogen, which served as electron donors for sulfate reducing bacteria. A sulfate reduction rate of 2.2-3.3gL(-1)d(-1) was obtained in the FBR experiment. The acidic influent was neutralized and the highest metal precipitation rates were 0.84g FeL(-1)d(-1) and 15mg ZnL(-1)d(-1). The sulfate reduction rate in the FBR was limited by the acetate oxidation rate of the sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:20137922

  6. Setting process of lime-based conservation mortars with barium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Karatasios, Ioannis . E-mail: ikarat@ims.demokritos.gr; Kilikoglou, Vassilis; Colston, Belinda; Theoulakis, Panagiotis; Watt, David

    2007-06-15

    This paper presents the effect of barium hydroxide on the setting mechanism of lime-based conservation mortars, when used as an additive material. The study focuses on the monitoring of the setting process and the identification of the mineral phases formed, which are essential for furthering the study of the durability of barium mixtures against chemical degradation. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal analysis (DTA-TG) were used to monitor the setting processes of these mixtures and identify new phases formed. The results suggest that barium hydroxide is evenly distributed within the lime and produces a homogeneous binding material, consisting of calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), witherite (BaCO{sub 3}) and barium-calcium carbonate [BaCa(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}]. Finally, it was found that barium carbonate can be directly bonded to calcitic aggregates and therefore increases its chemical compatibility with the binding material.

  7. Barium impaction therapy with balloon occlusion for deep colonic diverticular bleeding: a three-case series

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Mikinori; Kusano, Chika; Gotoda, Takuji; Suzuki, Sho; Sato, Takemasa; Fukuzawa, Masakatsu; Itoi, Takao; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: In hemostasis for colonic diverticular bleeding, the incidence of recurrent bleeding is higher in deep colonic diverticulum than in shallow. We aimed to improve and evaluate barium impaction therapy using an enteroscopic overtube with balloon. Patients and method: We performed barium impaction therapy in three patients with a diagnosis of deep colonic diverticular bleeding. The tip of the overtube was inserted to reach the cecum using the conventional method. After deflating the colon, the enteroscope was removed. The balloon in the tube was inflated, followed by barium filling via the tube. Sufficient pressure was applied by ensuring no regurgitation into the small intestine side. The entire colon was continuously filled with barium in stages. Results: Post-treatment bleeding was controllable without adverse events in all three patients. Conclusion: This novel barium impaction therapy using an enteroscopic overtube with balloon was effectively performed without adverse events. PMID:27227115

  8. Centrifugal Jet Spinning for Highly Efficient and Large-scale Fabrication of Barium Titanate Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Liyun; Kotha, Shiva P.

    2014-01-01

    The centrifugal jet spinning (CJS) method has been developed to enable large-scale synthesis of barium titanate nanofibers. Barium titanate nanofibers with fiber diameters down to 50 nm and grain sizes around 25 nm were prepared with CJS by spinning a sol-gel solution of barium titanate and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) with subsequent heat treatment at 850 °C. XRD and FTIR analysis demonstrated high purity and tetragonal perovskite structured barium titanate nanofibers. SEM and TEM images confirm the continuous high aspect ratio structure of barium titanate nanofibers after heat treatment. It is demonstrated that the CJS technique offers a highly efficient method for large-scale fabrication of ceramic nanofibers at production rates of up to 0.3 gram/minute. PMID:24563566

  9. Impacts on Global Agriculture of Stratospheric Sulfate Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, A.; Xia, L.

    2014-12-01

    Impacts on global food supply are one of the most important concerns in the discussion of stratospheric sulfate geoengineering. Stratospheric sulfate injection could reduce surface temperature, precipitation, and insolation, which could affect agricultural production. We use output from climate model simulations using the two most "realistic" scenarios from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, G3 and G4. G3 posits balancing the increasing radiative forcing from the RCP4.5 business-as-usual scenario with stratospheric sulfate aerosols from 2020 through 2070. The G4 scenario also uses RCP4.5, but models simulate the stratospheric injection of 5 Tg SO2 per year from 2020 to 2070. In total, there are three modeling groups which have completed G3 and four for G4. We use two crop models, the global gridded Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (gDSSAT) crop model and the crop model in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM-crop), to predict global maize yield changes. Without changing agricultural technology, we find that compared to the reference run forced by the RCP4.5 scenario, maize yields could increase in both G3 and G4 due to both the cooling effect of stratospheric sulfate injection and the CO2 fertilization effect, with the cooling effect contributing more to the increased productivity. However, the maize yield changes are not much larger than natural variability under G3, since the temperature reduction is smaller in G3 than in G4. Both crop models show similar results.

  10. Tungsten and Barium Transport in the Internal Plasma of Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the flow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushedback to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. Thisbarium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream endgreater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length,so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollowcathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  11. Functionalized synchrotron in-line phase-contrast computed tomography: a novel approach for simultaneous quantification of structural alterations and localization of barium-labelled alveolar macrophages within mouse lung samples.

    PubMed

    Dullin, Christian; dal Monego, Simeone; Larsson, Emanuel; Mohammadi, Sara; Krenkel, Martin; Garrovo, Chiara; Biffi, Stefania; Lorenzon, Andrea; Markus, Andrea; Napp, Joanna; Salditt, Tim; Accardo, Agostino; Alves, Frauke; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized computed tomography (CT) in combination with labelled cells is virtually non-existent due to the limited sensitivity of X-ray-absorption-based imaging, but would be highly desirable to realise cell tracking studies in entire organisms. In this study we applied in-line free propagation X-ray phase-contrast CT (XPCT) in an allergic asthma mouse model to assess structural changes as well as the biodistribution of barium-labelled macrophages in lung tissue. Alveolar macrophages that were barium-sulfate-loaded and fluorescent-labelled were instilled intratracheally into asthmatic and control mice. Mice were sacrificed after 24 h, lungs were kept in situ, inflated with air and scanned utilizing XPCT at the SYRMEP beamline (Elettra Synchrotron Light Source, Italy). Single-distance phase retrieval was used to generate data sets with ten times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than absorption-based CT (in our setup), thus allowing to depict and quantify structural hallmarks of asthmatic lungs such as reduced air volume, obstruction of airways and increased soft-tissue content. Furthermore, we found a higher concentration as well as a specific accumulation of the barium-labelled macrophages in asthmatic lung tissue. It is believe that XPCT will be beneficial in preclinical asthma research for both the assessment of therapeutic response as well as the analysis of the role of the recruitment of macrophages to inflammatory sites. PMID:25537601

  12. Functionalized synchrotron in-line phase-contrast computed tomography: a novel approach for simultaneous quantification of structural alterations and localization of barium-labelled alveolar macrophages within mouse lung samples

    PubMed Central

    Dullin, Christian; dal Monego, Simeone; Larsson, Emanuel; Mohammadi, Sara; Krenkel, Martin; Garrovo, Chiara; Biffi, Stefania; Lorenzon, Andrea; Markus, Andrea; Napp, Joanna; Salditt, Tim; Accardo, Agostino; Alves, Frauke; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized computed tomography (CT) in combination with labelled cells is virtually non-existent due to the limited sensitivity of X-ray-absorption-based imaging, but would be highly desirable to realise cell tracking studies in entire organisms. In this study we applied in-line free propagation X-ray phase-contrast CT (XPCT) in an allergic asthma mouse model to assess structural changes as well as the biodistribution of barium-labelled macrophages in lung tissue. Alveolar macrophages that were barium-sulfate-loaded and fluorescent-labelled were instilled intratracheally into asthmatic and control mice. Mice were sacrificed after 24 h, lungs were kept in situ, inflated with air and scanned utilizing XPCT at the SYRMEP beamline (Elettra Synchrotron Light Source, Italy). Single-distance phase retrieval was used to generate data sets with ten times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than absorption-based CT (in our setup), thus allowing to depict and quantify structural hallmarks of asthmatic lungs such as reduced air volume, obstruction of airways and increased soft-tissue content. Furthermore, we found a higher concentration as well as a specific accumulation of the barium-labelled macrophages in asthmatic lung tissue. It is believe that XPCT will be beneficial in preclinical asthma research for both the assessment of therapeutic response as well as the analysis of the role of the recruitment of macrophages to inflammatory sites. PMID:25537601

  13. Inhibition of synthesis of heparan sulfate by selenate: Possible dependence on sulfation for chain polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, C.P.; Nader, H.B. ); Buonassisi, V.; Colburn, P. )

    1988-01-01

    Selenate, a sulfation inhibitor, blocks the synthesis of heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate by cultured endothelial cells. In contrast, selenate does not affect the production of hyaluronic acid, a nonsulfated glycosaminoglycan. No differences in molecular weight, ({sup 3}H)glucosamine/({sup 35}S)sulfuric acid ratios, or disaccharide composition were observed when the heparan sulfate synthesized by selenate-treated cells was compared with that of control cells. The absence of undersulfated chains in preparations from cultures exposed to selenate supports the concept that, in the intact cell, the polymerization of heparan sulfate might be dependent on the sulfation of the saccharide units added to the growing glycosaminoglycan chain.

  14. Brillouin function characteristics for La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuanjian; Yu, Zhong; Yang, Yan; Sun, Ke; Guo, Rongdi; Jiang, Xiaona; Lan, Zhongwen

    2015-09-01

    La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites with the chemical formula of Ba1-xLaxFe12-xCoxO19 (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5), prepared by a conventional ceramic method, were systematically investigated by Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction patterns, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The result manifests that all the compounds are crystallized in magnetoplumbite hexagonal structure. Trivalent cobalt ions prevailingly occupy the 2a, 4f1, and 12k sites. According to Néel model of collinear-spin ferrimagnetism, the molecular-field coefficients ωbf2, ωkf1, ωaf1, ωkf2, and ωbk of La-Co substituted barium hexaferrites have been calculated using the nonlinear fitting method, and the magnetic moment of five sublattices (2a, 2b, 4f1, 4f2, and 12k) versus temperature T has been also investigated. The fitting results are coincided well with the experimental data. Moreover, with the increase of La-Co substitution amount x, the molecular-field coefficients ωbf2 and ωaf1 decrease constantly, while the molecular-field coefficients ωkf1, ωkf2, and ωbk show a slight change.

  15. Plasma waves associated with the first AMPTE magnetotail barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Anderson, R. R.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Luehr, H.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma waves observed during the March 21, 1985, AMPTE magnetotail barium release are described. Electron plasma oscillations provided local measurements of the plasma density during both the expansion and decay phases. Immediately after the explosion, the electron density reached a peak of about 400,000/cu cm, and then started decreasing approximately as t to the -2.4 as the cloud expanded. About 6 minutes after the explosion, the electron density suddenly began to increase, reached a secondary peak of about 240/cu cm, and then slowly decayed down to the preevent level over a period of about 15 minutes. The density increase is believed to be caused by the collapse of the ion cloud into the diamagnetic cavity created by the initial expansion. The plasma wave intensities observed during the entire event were quite low. In the diamagnetic cavity, electrostatic emissions were observed near the barium ion plasma frequency, and in another band at lower frequencies. A broadband burst of electrostatic noise was also observed at the boundary of the diamagnetic cavity. Except for electron plasma oscillations, no significant wave activity was observed outside of the diamagnetic cavity.

  16. Results of magnetospheric barium ion cloud experiment of 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, D.; Fricke, C. L.; Long, S. A. T.

    1975-01-01

    The barium ion cloud experiment involved the release of about 2 kg of barium at an altitude of 31 482 km, a latitude of 6.926 N., and a longitude of 74.395 W. Significant erosion of plasma from the main ion core occurred during the initial phase of the ion cloud expansion. From the motion of the outermost striational filaments, the electric field components were determined to be 0.19 mV/m in the westerly direction and 0.68 mV/m in the inward direction. The differences between these components and those measured from balloons flown in the proximity of the extremity of the field line through the release point implied the existence of potential gradients along the magnetic field lines. The deceleration of the main core was greater than theoretically predicted. This was attributed to the formation of a polarization wake, resulting in an increase of the area of interaction and resistive dissipation at ionospheric levels. The actual orientation of the magnetic field line through the release point differed by about 10.5 deg from that predicted by magnetic field models that did not include the effect of ring current.

  17. The crystal structure of barium lead hexaaluminate phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyi, N.; Inoue, Z.; Takekawa, S.; Kimura, S.

    1985-11-01

    A refinement was performed on the average crystal structure of barium lead hexaaluminate phase II ((Ba 0.8Pb 0.2) 2.34Al 21.0O 33.84) using single crystal X-ray diffraction data, giving a final R value of 0.030 with space group symmetry P overline6m2 . The structure is essentially of a β-alumina type, but contains a lot of defects and interstitials. Inside the spinel block were found Ba(Pb) ions at 12-coordinated polyhedral sites, formed by complex defects, including triple Reidinger defects, in the same unit cell. Barium lead hexaaluminate phase II was found to consist of two kinds of unit cells with formulae "(BaPb) 3.0Al 20.0O 35.0" and "Ba 2.0Al 22.0O 34.0" in a 1 : 2 ratio; these three cells combine to form an a√3 × a√3 superstructure.

  18. Barium titanate core – gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatments

    PubMed Central

    FarrokhTakin, Elmira; Ciofani, Gianni; Puleo, Gian Luigi; de Vito, Giuseppe; Filippeschi, Carlo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Piazza, Vincenzo; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-01-01

    The development of new tools and devices to aid in treating cancer is a hot topic in biomedical research. The practice of using heat (hyperthermia) to treat cancerous lesions has a long history dating back to ancient Greece. With deeper knowledge of the factors that cause cancer and the transmissive window of cells and tissues in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, hyperthermia applications have been able to incorporate the use of lasers. Photothermal therapy has been introduced as a selective and noninvasive treatment for cancer, in which exogenous photothermal agents are exploited to achieve the selective destruction of cancer cells. In this manuscript, we propose applications of barium titanate core–gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatment against cancer cells. We explored the effect of increasing concentrations of these nanoshells (0–100 μg/mL) on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, testing the internalization and intrinsic toxicity and validating the hyperthermic functionality of the particles through near infrared (NIR) laser-induced thermoablation experiments. No significant changes were observed in cell viability up to nanoparticle concentrations of 50 μg/mL. Experiments upon stimulation with an NIR laser revealed the ability of the nanoshells to destroy human neuroblastoma cells. On the basis of these findings, barium titanate core–gold shell nanoparticles resulted in being suitable for hyperthermia treatment, and our results represent a promising first step for subsequent investigations on their applicability in clinical practice. PMID:23847415

  19. Growth of nanofibrous barium carbonate on calcium carbonate seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeijer, Sara J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Barrett, Richard A.; Gower, Laurie B.

    2008-05-01

    Fibrous barium carbonate (BaCO 3/witherite) crystals 50-100 nm in diameter and several microns in length were grown on calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) seeds at temperatures as low as 4 °C. The BaCO 3 fibers were deposited onto calcite rhombs or CaCO 3 films using the polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process, which was induced with the sodium salt of polyacrylic acid (PAA). The structure and morphology of the resultant fibers were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), and polarized light microscopy (PLM). Fibers were successfully grown on calcite seeds of various morphologies, with a range of barium concentrations, and PAA molecular weight and concentration. Two categories of fibers were grown: straight and twisted. Both types of fibers displayed single-crystalline SAED diffraction patterns, but after examining high-resolution TEM lattice images, it was revealed that the fibers were in fact made up of nanocrystalline domains. We postulate that these nanocrystalline domains are well aligned due to a singular nucleation event (i.e., each fiber propagates from a single nucleation event on the seed crystal) with the nanocrystalline domains resulting from stresses caused by dehydration during crystallization of the highly hydrated precursor phase. These BaCO 3 fibers grown on calcite substrates further illustrate the robustness and non-specificity of the PILP process.

  20. Proton trapping in yttrium-doped barium zirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Blanc, Frdric; Okuyama, Yuji; Buannic, Lucienne; Lucio-Vega, Juan C.; Grey, Clare P.; Haile, Sossina M.

    2013-07-01

    The environmental benefits of fuel cells have been increasingly appreciated in recent years. Among candidate electrolytes for solid-oxide fuel cells, yttrium-doped barium zirconate has garnered attention because of its high proton conductivity, particularly in the intermediate-temperature region targeted for cost-effective solid-oxide fuel cell operation, and its excellent chemical stability. However, fundamental questions surrounding the defect chemistry and macroscopic proton transport mechanism of this material remain, especially in regard to the possible role of proton trapping. Here we show, through a combined thermogravimetric and a.c. impedance study, that macroscopic proton transport in yttrium-doped barium zirconate is limited by proton-dopant association (proton trapping). Protons must overcome the association energy, 29?kJ?mol-1, as well as the general activation energy, 16?kJ?mol-1, to achieve long-range transport. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies show the presence of two types of proton environment above room temperature, reflecting differences in proton-dopant configurations. This insight motivates efforts to identify suitable alternative dopants with reduced association energies as a route to higher conductivities.