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Sample records for barker napsas salman

  1. Properties of even length Barker codes and specific polyphase codes with Barker type autocorrelation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, S.

    1982-07-01

    Properties of even-length Barker codes, if they exist, are derived. The analysis leads to the analysis of polyphase codes. Similar properties are derived for specific types of polyphase codes, with Barker type autocorrelation functions. The analysis is done in the time and frequency domains (including linear algebra and Z transform treatments), and suggests a procedure to search for codes with Barker type autocorrelation functions. The search problem is reduced by using the properties of such codes.

  2. A Powerful Theory and a Paradox: Ecological Psychologists after Barker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, M. M.

    2005-01-01

    Roger Barker, influenced by Lewin, developed a powerful theory in psychology, behavior setting theory. Paradoxically, this theory is still not widely known or understood in mainstream American psychology. Oral histories of the core group who worked with Barker were collected and examined to determine influences on them and subsequent directions in…

  3. Embryos, DOHaD and David Barker.

    PubMed

    Fleming, T P; Velazquez, M A; Eckert, J J

    2015-10-01

    The early embryo and periconceptional period is a window during which environmental factors may cause permanent change in the pattern and characteristics of development leading to risk of adult onset disease. This has now been demonstrated across small and large animal models and also in the human. Most evidence of periconceptional 'programming' has emerged from maternal nutritional models but also other in vivo and in vitro conditions including assisted reproductive treatments, show consistent outcomes. This short review first reports on the range of environmental in vivo and in vitro periconceptional models and resulting long-term outcomes. Second, it uses the rodent maternal low protein diet model restricted to the preimplantation period and considers the stepwise maternal-embryonic dialogue that comprises the induction of programming. This dialogue leads to cellular and epigenetic responses by the embryo, mainly identified in the extra-embryonic cell lineages, and underpins an apparently permanent change in the growth trajectory during pregnancy and associates with increased cardiometabolic and behavioural disease in adulthood. We recognize the important advice of David Barker some years ago to investigate the sensitivity of the early embryo to developmental programming, an insight for which we are grateful. PMID:25952250

  4. Postcards from the Edge: Salman Rushdie and Postmodern Global Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Allen

    1994-01-01

    Sketches contours of the postmodern movement and implications for a research agenda in mass media and international communication. Analyzes the furor over Salman Rushdie's novel "The Satanic Verses" to illustrate the difficulties that result from Western interpretations of events whose origins are distant culturally. Offers a number of suggestions…

  5. THE BARKER HYPOTHESIS: IMPLICATIONS FOR FUTURE DIRECTIONS IN TOXICOLOGY RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers the past year’s papers germane to the Barker hypothesis. While much of the literature has centered on maternal and developmental nutrition, new findings have emerged on the ability of toxic exposures during development to impact fetal/developmental programming....

  6. The Value of Post-Colonial Literature for Education Processes: Salman Rushdie's "Midnight's Children"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrottner, Barbara Theresia

    2009-01-01

    The author Salman Rushdie's post-colonial essay, "Midnight's Children," highlights a different perspective on the problems created by the colonial power where place and displacement are central themes and migration is a painful but emancipating process; both are expressed through the life of the writer, Salman Rushdie. The primary aim of this…

  7. Barker-coded excitation in ophthalmological ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Chun; Yang, Jun; Ji, Jian-Jun; Wang, Yan-Qun

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasound is an attractive means to obtain fine-resolution images of biological tissues for ophthalmologic imaging. To solve the tradeoff between axial resolution and detection depth, existing in the conventional single-pulse excitation, this study develops a new method which uses 13-bit Barker-coded excitation and a mismatched filter for high-frequency ophthalmologic imaging. A novel imaging platform has been designed after trying out various encoding methods. The simulation and experiment result show that the mismatched filter can achieve a much higher out signal main to side lobe which is 9.7 times of the matched one. The coded excitation method has significant advantages over the single-pulse excitation system in terms of a lower MI, a higher resolution, and a deeper detection depth, which improve the quality of ophthalmic tissue imaging. Therefore, this method has great values in scientific application and medical market. PMID:25356093

  8. Checkmate: Linguistic and Literary Play in Salman Rushdie's "Haroun and the Sea of Stories"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bongartz, Christiane; Richey, Esther Gilman

    2010-01-01

    The authors use Noam Chomsky's theories about generative grammar to discuss the notion of linguistic creativity they believe lies at the core of storytelling as Salman Rushdie pictures it in his novel, "Haroun and the Sea of Stories." The production of meaning through the use of narrative helps explain the rules of the literary game,…

  9. Official portrait of Payload Specialist Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Official portrait of Payload Specialist Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud. He is wearing the blue shuttle flight suit and holding his helmet under his arm. Behind him to the right is the Saudi Arabian flag. To his left is the American flag and a model of the Space Shuttle.

  10. Payload specialist Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud floats over pilots chair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Payload specialist Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud floats above the pilot's station on Discovery's forward flight deck. On one side of him floats a clipboard, on the other side a fire extinguisher is attached to the wall. Through overhead windows beyond him are seen reflections of the Earth's horizon.

  11. Tour by Saudi prince Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud prior to mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Tour by Saudi prince Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud, payload specialists for STS 51-G mission, prior to mission. Al-Saud and Abdulmohsen Hamad Al-Bassam, the backup payload specialist, man the controls on the flight deck of the crew compartment trainer in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory (29788); the Saudi payload specialists share the hatch of the crew compartment trainer (29789); Portrait view of Abdulmohsen Hamad Al-Bassam during a visit to the Shuttle mockup and integraion laboratory (29790); Don Sirroco, left, explains the middeck facilities in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory (29791); Portrait view of Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud in the Shuttle Mockup and Integration laboratory (29792); The Saudi payload specialists witness a space food demonstration in the life sciences laboratory at JSC. Al-Saud (left) and Al-Bassam (second left) listen as Rita M. Rapp, food specialist, discusses three preparations of re-hydratable food for space travelers. Lynn S. Coll

  12. A New Way of Thinking about Technology: An Interview with Futurists Joel Barker and Scott Erickson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, James L.; Barker, Joel; Erickson, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Editor-in-chief James Morrison interviews Joel Barker and Scott Erickson, co-authors of the book "Five Regions of the Future: A New Way to Think about Technology". In their book, the authors propose an ecological model that classifies technology according to different clusters or regions, each of which entails its own perspective of technology and…

  13. Toward an Instructional Philosophy: "A Theoretical Framework for Teaching and Training at Salman Bin Abdulaziz University (SAU)"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qandile, Yasine A.; Al-Qasim, Wajeeh Q.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to construct a clear instructional philosophy for Salman bin Abdulaziz University as a fundamental basis for teaching and training as well as a theoretical framework for curriculum design and development. The study attempts to answer the main questions about pertaining to the basic structure of contemporary higher…

  14. Salman Rushdie and the sea of stories: a not-so-simple fable about creativity.

    PubMed

    Segal, H

    1994-06-01

    This paper examines Salman Rushdie's tale 'Haroun and the Sea of Stories', written for his younger son while Rushdie was in hiding from the fatwa. It is a fairy tale about the boy Haroun, who travels to the moon to find a cure for his father's loss of capacity to tell stories. There he discovers that the Ocean of Stories-source of all stories--is polluted. The author sees this tale as a parable of creativity, which can be used on many levels. On one level, it describes the artist's struggle against forms of political oppression, which aims at destroying all art, speech and thought. On another level, it could be seen as an internal conflict between the creative forces derived from the life instinct and those which are destructive and self-destructive deriving from the death instinct. Rushdie describes ways of dealing with this conflict and different outcomes depending on the way the conflict is faced. PMID:7960434

  15. Maternal Engineered Nanomaterial Exposure and Fetal Microvascular Function: Does the Barker Hypothesis Apply?

    PubMed Central

    STAPLETON, Phoebe A.; MINARCHICK, Ms. Valerie C.; YI, Jinghai; ENGELS, Mr. Kevin; McBRIDE, Mr. Carroll R.; NURKIEWICZ, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The continued development and use of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) has given rise to concerns over the potential for human health effects. While the understanding of cardiovascular ENM toxicity is improving, one of the most complex and acutely demanding “special” circulations is the enhanced maternal system to support fetal development. The “Barker Hypothesis” proposes that fetal development within a hostile gestational environment may predispose/program future sensitivity. Therefore, the objective of this study was two-fold: 1) to determine if maternal ENM exposure alters uterine and/or fetal microvascular function and 2) test the Barker Hypothesis at the microvascular level. Study Design Pregnant (gestation day 10) Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to nano-titanium dioxide aerosols (11.3±0.039 (mg/m3)*hour, 5 hours/day, 8.2±0.85 days) to evaluate the maternal and fetal microvascular consequences of maternal exposure. Microvascular tissue isolation (gestation day 20) and arteriolar reactivity studies (<150μm passive diameter) of the uterine premyometrial and fetal tail arteries were conducted. Results ENM exposures led to significant maternal and fetal microvascular dysfunction which presented as robustly compromised endothelium-dependent and -independent reactivity to pharmacologic and mechanical stimuli. Isolated maternal uterine arteriolar reactivity was consistent with a metabolically impaired profile and hostile gestational environment, impacting fetal weight. The fetal microvessels isolated from exposed dams demonstrate significant impairments to signals of vasodilation specific to mechanistic signaling and shear stress. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report providing evidence that maternal ENM inhalation is capable of influencing fetal health, thereby supporting that the Barker Hypothesis is applicable at the microvascular level. PMID:23643573

  16. Adult phenotype of Russell-Silver syndrome: A molecular support for Barker-Brenner's theory.

    PubMed

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Awazu, Midori; Eggermann, Thomas; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2015-08-01

    Developmental Origins of Health and Disease theory stems from large-scale epidemiologic observation. The presumed mechanism for this hypothesis includes epigenetic changes; however, it remains to be elucidated if individuals with intrauterine growth retardation and epigenetic changes confirmed at the molecular level are indeed susceptible to adult-onset disease. Here we document three individuals with Russell-Silver syndrome, a prototypic condition caused by hypomethylation of the differently methylated imprinting center region 1 (ICR1) between the IGF2 and H19 loci on chromosome 11p15. At follow-up, the three patients developed adult-onset diseases such as obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus in their early 20s. The presence of molecularly confirmed epigenetic changes in these patients provides a biological basis for Barker-Brenner's theory at an individual level. PMID:25639378

  17. Assessing the Watson-Barker Listening Test (WBLT)-Form C in Measuring Listening Comprehension of Post-Secondary Hispanic-American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Debra L.; Keaton, Shaughan; Cook, John; Fitch-Hauser, Margaret; Powers, William G.

    2014-01-01

    The Watson-Barker Listening Test (WBLT) is one of the most popular measures of listening comprehension. However, participants in studies utilizing this scale have been almost exclusively Anglo-American. At the same time, previous research questions the psychometric properties of the test. This study addressed both of these issues by testing the…

  18. Effects on water quality due to flood-water detention by Barker and Addicks Reservoirs, Houston, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liscum, Fred; Paul, E.M.; Goss, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Barker and Addicks Reservoirs, located about 16 mi west of Houston, Texas, provide flood detention storage for storm runoff. Of interest are the water quality characteristics in the study area and changes in water quality during detention. Study area sampling sites were selected upstream along Buffalo Bayou for Barker Reservoir and on Bear Creek and Langham Creek for Addicks Reservoir, within the reservoirs, near the reservoir outflows, and below the confluence of each reservoir outflow at the streamflow station Buffalo Bayou near Addicks. Flow data were available at all sites except in the reservoirs. Analyses of samples collected during both low flow and storm runoff show that in general, the water of the study areas was low in mineralization, but the aesthetics of the water was a problem. The inorganic constituents, trace metals, and pesticides rarely exceeded maximum contaminant levels recommended by the EPA for public supply using 1976 and 1977 criteria for primary and secondary standards. All species of nutrients, except ammonia nitrogen and phosphorus, almost always were below the recommended maximum contaminant levels. Large values of suspended solids, turbidity, and color were common. Possible bacterial problems are indicated because coliform bacteria densities exceeded recommended levels in about 25% of the samples. The effects of the reservoirs on the water quality characteristics of storm runoff were analyzed using three approaches: (1) a comparison of the discharge weighted average values of nine selected constituents at each streamflow-gaging station during four storms (biochemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, turbidity, color, total nitrogen, total organic carbon, dissolved solids and total phosphorus); (2) an analysis of the means of the discharge weighted average values computed for the four hydrologic events using the Student t-test, indicating that reservoir detention significantly reduced suspended solids; and (3) a comparison at each

  19. Application of wavelet filtering and Barker-coded pulse compression hybrid method to air-coupled ultrasonic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhenggan; Ma, Baoquan; Jiang, Jingtao; Yu, Guang; Liu, Kui; Zhang, Dongmei; Liu, Weiping

    2014-10-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic testing (ACUT) technique has been viewed as a viable solution in defect detection of advanced composites used in aerospace and aviation industries. However, the giant mismatch of acoustic impedance in air-solid interface makes the transmission efficiency of ultrasound low, and leads to poor signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio of received signal. The utilisation of signal-processing techniques in non-destructive testing is highly appreciated. This paper presents a wavelet filtering and phase-coded pulse compression hybrid method to improve the SNR and output power of received signal. The wavelet transform is utilised to filter insignificant components from noisy ultrasonic signal, and pulse compression process is used to improve the power of correlated signal based on cross-correction algorithm. For the purpose of reasonable parameter selection, different families of wavelets (Daubechies, Symlet and Coiflet) and decomposition level in discrete wavelet transform are analysed, different Barker codes (5-13 bits) are also analysed to acquire higher main-to-side lobe ratio. The performance of the hybrid method was verified in a honeycomb composite sample. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method is very efficient in improving the SNR and signal strength. The applicability of the proposed method seems to be a very promising tool to evaluate the integrity of high ultrasound attenuation composite materials using the ACUT.

  20. The Stories We Hear, the Stories We Tell What Can the Life of Jane Barker (1652-1732) Tell Us about Women's Leadership in Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Carol Shiner

    2009-01-01

    Jane Barker--poet, novelist, farm manager, student and practitioner of medical arts--was not allowed to attend university because she was a woman. Yet she was Oxford-educated in the most modern of medical theories of her time. By the end of her life, unmarried by choice, Barker was writing for pay under her own name in an emerging genre--the…

  1. How Bob Barker Would (Probably) Teach Discrete Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urness, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a discrete mathematics course in which games from "The Price Is Right" are used to engage students in a deeper, practical study of discrete mathematics. The games themselves are not the focus of the course; rather, the mathematical principles of the games give motivation for the concepts being taught. The game examples are…

  2. Zachary D. Barker: Final DHS HS-STEM Report

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Z D

    2008-08-14

    Working at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) this summer has provided a very unique and special experience for me. I feel that the research opportunities given to me have allowed me to significantly benefit my research group, the laboratory, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Department of Energy. The researchers in the Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) group were very welcoming and clearly wanted me to get the most out of my time in Livermore. I feel that my research partner, Veena Venkatachalam of MIT, and I have been extremely productive in meeting our research goals throughout this summer, and have learned much about working in research at a national laboratory such as Lawrence Livermore. I have learned much about the technical aspects of research while working at LLNL, however I have also gained important experience and insight into how research groups at national laboratories function. I believe that this internship has given me valuable knowledge and experience which will certainly help my transition to graduate study and a career in engineering. My work with Veena Venkatachalam in the SPAMS group this summer has focused on two major projects. Initially, we were tasked with an analysis of data collected by the group this past spring in a large public environment. The SPAMS instrument was deployed for over two months, collecting information on many of the ambient air particles circulating through the area. Our analysis of the particle data collected during this deployment concerned several aspects, including finding groups, or clusters, of particles that seemed to appear more during certain times of day, analyzing the mass spectral data of clusters and comparing them with mass spectral data of known substances, and comparing the real-time detection capability of the SPAMS instrument with that of a commercially available biological detection instrument. This analysis was performed in support of a group report to the Department of Homeland Security on the results of the deployment. The analysis of the deployment data revealed some interesting applications of the SPAMS instrument to homeland security situations. Using software developed in-house by SPAMS group member Dr. Paul Steele, Veena and I were able to cluster a subset of data over a certain timeframe (ranging from a single hour to an entire week). The software used makes clusters based on the mass spectral characteristics of the each particle in the data set, as well as other parameters. By looking more closely at the characteristics of individual clusters, including the mass spectra, conclusions could be made about what these particles are. This was achieved partially through examination and discussion of the mass spectral data with the members of the SPAMS group, as well as through comparison with known mass spectra collected from substances tested in the laboratory. In many cases, broad conclusions could be drawn about the identity of a cluster of particles.

  3. Evolution of Energy Metabolism, Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells: How the Warburg and Barker Hypotheses Might Be Linked

    PubMed Central

    Trosko, James E.; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2012-01-01

    The evolutionary transition from single cells to the metazoan forced the appearance of adult stem cells and a hypoxic niche, when oxygenation of the environment forced the appearance of oxidative phosphorylation from that of glycolysis. The prevailing paradigm in the cancer field is that cancers start from the “immortalization” or “re-programming” of a normal, differentiated cell with many mitochondria, that metabolize via oxidative phosphorylation. This paradigm has been challenged with one that assumes that the target cell for carcinogenesis is the normal, immortal adult stem cell, with few mitochondria. This adult organ-specific stem cell is blocked from “mortalizing” or from “programming” to be terminally differentiated. Two hypotheses have been offered to explain cancers, namely, the “stem cell theory” and the “de-differentiation” or “re-programming” theory. This Commentary postulates that the paleochemistry of the oceans, which, initially, provided conditions for life’ s energy to arise via glycolysis, changed to oxidative phosphorylation for life’ s processes. In doing so, stem cells evolved, within hypoxic niches, to protect the species germinal and somatic genomes. This Commentary provides support for the “stem cell theory”, in that cancer cells, which, unlike differentiated cells, have few mitochondria and metabolize via glycolysis. The major argument against the “de-differentiation theory” is that, if re-programming of a differentiated cell to an “induced pluri-potent stem cell” happened in an adult, teratomas, rather than carcinomas, should be the result. PMID:24298354

  4. Kodamaea Y. Yamada, T. Suzuki, Matsuda & Mikata emend. Rosa, Lachance, Starmer, Barker, Bowles & Schlag-Edler (1999)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter describes the ascomycete yeast genus Kodamaea and is to be published in The Yeasts, A Taxonomic Study, 5th edition. The genus Kodamaea has five assigned species and all are associated with wood boring insects. Many of the species appear worldwide in distribution. One of the species, K...

  5. An Introduction to Student Quality Circle at College of Business Administration, Salman Bin Abdulaziz University, Al Kharj, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia--An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faridi, Mohammad Rishad; Al Kahtani, Nasser Saad; Alam, Teg; Malki, Said

    2014-01-01

    Catch 'em young for imparting hands-on rigorous academic training. This is what has been relentlessly pursued while dealing with the undergraduate students of business management who are to be thoroughly exposed to the whole gamut of quality work life. Whether they opt for corporate career or pursue masters or choose be an entrepreneur, their…

  6. National Adult Protective Services Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... and administrators, professionals in the aging and disabilities networks, students in social service programs, or anyone committed to protecting our most vulnerable citizens. NAPSA will connect you with peers throughout the country, provide the most ... Our supporters have become part of a network whose valuable donations of time and money are ...

  7. ADULT BASIC EDUCATION, A GUIDE FOR TEACHERS AND TEACHER TRAINERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    A TEACHER TRAINING MANUAL DEVELOPED IN THREE ADULT BASIC EDUCATION WORKSHOPS SPONSORED BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR PUBLIC SCHOOL ADULT EDUCATION (NAPSAE) OUTLINES A SCHEME APPLICABLE BOTH TO TRAINEES AND TO THEIR DISADVANTAGED CLIENTELE. TEACHER TRAINING METHODS INCLUDE ROLE PLAYING, TALKS BY EXPERTS, DEMONSTRATIONS AND EXHIBITIONS, FIELD…

  8. Alternative Computational Protocols for Supercharging Protein Surfaces for Reversible Unfolding and Retention of Stability

    PubMed Central

    Der, Bryan S.; Kluwe, Christien; Miklos, Aleksandr E.; Jacak, Ron; Lyskov, Sergey; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Georgiou, George; Ellington, Andrew D.; Kuhlman, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Reengineering protein surfaces to exhibit high net charge, referred to as “supercharging”, can improve reversibility of unfolding by preventing aggregation of partially unfolded states. Incorporation of charged side chains should be optimized while considering structural and energetic consequences, as numerous mutations and accumulation of like-charges can also destabilize the native state. A previously demonstrated approach deterministically mutates flexible polar residues (amino acids DERKNQ) with the fewest average neighboring atoms per side chain atom (AvNAPSA). Our approach uses Rosetta-based energy calculations to choose the surface mutations. Both protocols are available for use through the ROSIE web server. The automated Rosetta and AvNAPSA approaches for supercharging choose dissimilar mutations, raising an interesting division in surface charging strategy. Rosetta-supercharged variants of GFP (RscG) ranging from −11 to −61 and +7 to +58 were experimentally tested, and for comparison, we re-tested the previously developed AvNAPSA-supercharged variants of GFP (AscG) with +36 and −30 net charge. Mid-charge variants demonstrated ∼3-fold improvement in refolding with retention of stability. However, as we pushed to higher net charges, expression and soluble yield decreased, indicating that net charge or mutational load may be limiting factors. Interestingly, the two different approaches resulted in GFP variants with similar refolding properties. Our results show that there are multiple sets of residues that can be mutated to successfully supercharge a protein, and combining alternative supercharge protocols with experimental testing can be an effective approach for charge-based improvement to refolding. PMID:23741319

  9. "No Change There Then!" (? ): The Onward March of School Markets and Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lupton, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews Bernard Barker's claims that "the pendulum is swinging", in relation to school markets and competition. Barker's arguments are complex in this regard. He rejects markets and competition as a means of improving outcomes and equity, but supports some of the system features that are often associated with marketisation, such as…

  10. A Policy Sociology Reflection on School Reform in England: From the "Third Way" to the "Big Society"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingard, Bob; Sellar, Sam

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a policy sociology reflection on Bernard Barker's book, "The Pendulum Swings: Transforming School Reform". The book represents Barker's attempt to intervene in education policy during the lead-up to the 2010 UK general election and is framed by what he imagined might be possible under a new Conservative government. Barker…

  11. Reply to ``Comment on `Spectroscopic factors for bound s-wave states derived from neutron scattering lengths' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, P.; Herndl, H.; Oberhummer, H.; Staudt, G.

    1997-12-01

    In a recent comment Barker [Phys. Rev. C 56, 3423 (1997), the preceding paper] criticized our procedure for the extraction of spectroscopic factors from neutron scattering lengths [Phys. Rev. C 55, 1591 (1997)]. In this reply we compare the R-matrix analysis by Barker to our potential model calculation, and we discuss the applicability of both models for the extraction of spectroscopic factors.

  12. New and little-known pygmy grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Tetrigidae) from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Storozhenko, Sergey Yu; Dawwrueng, Pattarawich

    2015-01-01

    An annotated list of 39 species in 25 genera and seven subfamilies of the pygmy grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Tetrididae) from Thailand is given; from these 18 species are recorded from this country for the first time. Five new species are described: Cotysoides gaponi sp. nov. (subfamily Metrodorinae), Eucriotettix anisyutkini sp. nov., Gavialidium bufocrocodil sp. nov., Scelimena bellula sp. nov. (subfamily Scelimeninae) and Phaesticus uvarovi sp. nov. (subfamily Discotettiginae). One species is transferred from Scelimena to Amphibotettix and a new combination is proposed: Scelimena hafizhaii Mahmmod, Idris et Salman, 2007 = Amphibotettix hafizhaii (Mahmmod, Idris et Salman, 2007), comb. nov. The previously unknown male of Falconius tschernovi Storozhenko, 2014 is described. PMID:26701451

  13. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Laurence E. Tilley, Photographer May, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Laurence E. Tilley, Photographer May, 1958 WEST (FRONT) AND SOUTH ELEVATIONS. - William C. Barker Building, 266-268 South Main Street, Providence, Providence County, RI

  14. Could Diet in Pregnancy Raise Child's Odds for ADHD?

    MedlinePlus

    ... published Aug. 18 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry . SOURCES: Edward Barker, Ph.D., director, ... N.Y.; Aug. 18, 2016, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry HealthDay Copyright (c) 2016 HealthDay . All ...

  15. Linking Early Environmental Exposures to Adult Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... David Barker, for example, put forward the “fetal programming or developmental basis of health and disease” hypothesis, ... mechanisms by which fetal insults lead to altered programming and to disease later in life. RESEARCH FINDINGS ...

  16. 50. Trash strainer and sluice gate at top of castiron ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Trash strainer and sluice gate at top of cast-iron pipe penstock leading to Barker turbine. HAER PR, 6-MAGU, 1D-2 - Hacienda Buena Vista, PR Route 10 (Ponce to Arecibo), Magueyes, Ponce Municipio, PR

  17. 75 FR 69433 - City of Boulder, CO; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ... Regulatory Commission's (Commission) regulations, 18 CFR part 380 (Order No. 486, 52 FR 47879), the Office of...; (5) the valve house; (6) the concrete Barker gravity pipeline; (7) the Kossler Reservoir,...

  18. Can Khan Move the Bell Curve to the Right?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronholz, June

    2012-01-01

    More than 1 million people have watched the online video in which Salman Khan--a charming MIT math whiz, Harvard Business School graduate, and former Boston hedge-fund analyst--explains how he began tutoring his cousins in math by posting short lessons for them on YouTube. Other people began watching the lessons and sending Khan adulatory notes.…

  19. Communicating with Parents of Children with Special Needs in Saudi Arabia: Parents' and Teachers' Perceptions of Using Email for Regular and Ongoing Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubis, Snaa; Bernadowski, Carianne

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study, by Snaa Dubis from Salman Bin Abdu Aziz University, Saudi Arabia, and Robert Morris University, USA, and Carianne Bernadowski from Robert Morris University, was to investigate parents' and special education teachers' perceptions of using email as a component of parental involvement in the academic and/or behavioural…

  20. Commentary: The Khan Academy and the Day-Night Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parslow, Graham R.

    2012-01-01

    Teaching by night and reflecting on a subject by day is the way that Salman Khan sees education evolving in the age of online lectures. Khan believes he is onto something in what he styles the "flipped classroom." In Khan's view, there is no need for students to be divided into grades by age. Instead, they should learn at their own pace, moving on…

  1. Can Khan Move the Bell Curve to the Right?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronholz, June

    2012-01-01

    This article features Khan Academy which offers an online math program and short video lectures embedded in the "module", or math concept, that fit students' goals. By now, more than 1 million people have watched the online video in which Salman Khan--a charming MIT math whiz, Harvard Business School graduate, and former Boston hedge-fund…

  2. Schools "Flip" for Lesson Model Promoted by Khan Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    The author reports on a "flip model" of instruction that has gotten national media attention lately, thanks to its promotion by Khan Academy, the high-profile nonprofit online-tutoring library created by Salman A. Khan, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology graduate who was looking for a way to help his young relatives with their homework. The…

  3. Contemporary World Classics in Literature and Film. Fall, 1998. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad 1998 (India).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Leslie J.

    This packet includes the syllabus of a trimester-long senior elective course on India, designed to begin with two writers of Indian descent, Salman Rushdie and Bharati Mukherjee. The packet contains the daily assignments for the first half of the trimester, which include all of the reading assignments from Rushdie and Mukherjee, as well as the…

  4. Transmitters of Culture in the Stream of Stories: Two "East-West" Storytellers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withington, Aileen

    1996-01-01

    Examines the work of two "East-West" storytellers, six-year-old Navdeep (born in Britain into a Punjabi Sikh heritage family) and Salman Rushdie. Looks at Navdeep's "The Witch and the Gang" for its narrative competencies. Uses Rushdie's "Haroun and the Sea of Stories" as a means of contextualizing Navdeep's story. (TB)

  5. A Clash between Cultures: An Approach To Reducing Cultural Hostility in a Homogeneous Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, David Marshall

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the need to teach cultural awareness and reduce cultural hostility with culturally homogeneous college classes. Recounts use, in a class of graduate business students, of the case of Salman Rushdie being placed under an Iranian death threat for his writings. Explains the six-step process used to structure reading and discussion of the…

  6. Toward a One-World Schoolhouse: Interview with Sal Khan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkus, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, Salman Khan, with three degrees from MIT and an MBA from Harvard, agreed to help tutor his cousin Nadia, who was struggling in math. Using Yahoo's Doodle notepad, Khan offered Nadia a sequence of mini lessons designed to scaffold her learning. Over time, other friends and relatives heard about Khan's success and asked for similar…

  7. Payload specialists Baudry and Al-Saud in the middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The two payload specialists for the STS 51-G flight share a middeck scene on Discovery. Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud (left) is in the midst of a meal while Patrick Baudry conducts a phase of the French Postural Experiment (FPE) on himself. Sleep restraints are in the background.

  8. Payload specialists Baudry and Al-Saud conduct Postural experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Payload specialists Patrick Baudry (left) and Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud team up to conduct a French Postural Experement (FPE) on the middeck of the Space shuttle Discovery during the STS 51-G flight. Behind them on the middeck walls are two sleep restraints.

  9. STS 51-G simulate meal session on orbiter's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Three members of the STS 51-G crew simulate a meal session on the orbiter's middeck during training in the crew compartment trainer at JSC's shuttle mockup and integration facility. Pictured (l.-r.) are Sultan Salman Abdelzize Al-Saud, John N. Fabian and Patrick Baudry. Fabian is a mission specialist and the other two men are payload specialists.

  10. Payload specialist Sultan Abdelazize Al-Saud conducts Postural experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Payload specialist Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud assists in conducting a French Postural Experement (FPE) on the middeck of the Space shuttle Discovery during the STS 51-G flight. Behind him on the middeck walls are two sleep restraints. At the bottom of the frame, foot restraints are visible.

  11. STS 51-G crew photo on the flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    STS 51-G crew photo on the flight deck. Left to right in the front are John O. Creighton, Shannon W. Lucid, Daniel C. Brandenstein; and in the back row are Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud, Steven R. Nagel, John N. Fabian and Patrick Baudry.

  12. Portrait of STS 51-G Payload Specialists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Portrait of STS 51-G Payload specialists. Left to right are Patrick Baudry, for the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales of France; Abdulmohsen Hamad Al-Bassan, backup payload specialist to Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud of Saudi Arabia. They are standing in front of a small table containing a model of the Space Shuttle.

  13. Portrait of STS 51-G crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Portrait of STS 51-G crew. Kneeling in front are Astronauts Daniel C. Brandenstein (left) and John O. Creighton, commander and pilot, respectively. Astronauts Shannon W. Lucid, Steven R. Nagel, and John M. Fabian, mission specialist (l.-r.) joing Payload specialists Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud (second right) and Patrick Baudry on the back row.

  14. Payload specialist Al-Saud siting in middeck area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Payload specialist Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud seated in a posture common to weightlessness as he logs notes in Discovery's middeck area. He has headphones on connected to a portable tape recorder. Behind him on the middeck lockers is a sign which reads 'Welcome to Riyadh'. On the other wall, a sleep restraint is attached to the lockers.

  15. Flip or Flop: Are Math Teachers Using Khan Academy as Envisioned by Sal Khan?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cargile, Lori A.; Harkness, Shelly Sheats

    2014-01-01

    Khan Academy (KA) is a free web-based intelligent tutor, which has been featured in countless media outlets for its potential to change mathematics instruction. The founder and executive director, Salman Khan, recommends that KA be used to personalize instruction, freeing up class time for engaging high yield activities like student discourse and…

  16. Height, infant-feeding practices and cardiovascular functioning among 3 or 4 year old children in three ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, T; Bryan, G T; Harrison, J A; Rassin, D K; Greaves, K A; Baranowski, J H

    1992-05-01

    Barker recently hypothesized that factors affecting prenatal and infant growth are related to adult blood pressure and CVD mortality. Predictions from Barker's hypothesis in regard to infant feeding were tested among a sample of 3 or 4 year old children. The relationship of infant-feeding characteristics (duration of breast-feeding, times of introduction of high fat, high carbohydrate, high potassium foods and table salt) to indicators of cardiovascular functioning (resting blood pressures and heart rates, and heart rate response to graded activity) while controlling for anthropometric (height, sum of seven skinfolds, BMI) and demographic (ethnicity, gender, social status) characteristics revealed that infant-feeding practices were not related to CV functioning in the predicted directions among this sample of 3 or 4 year old children. Furthermore, the positive relationship between height and systolic blood pressure was inconsistent with the Barker hypothesis. PMID:1588357

  17. Crew of the STS 51-G Discovery egress the orbiter in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The crew of the STS 51-G Discovery egress the orbiter in California at the end of the mission. Astronaut Danel C. Brandenstein, crew commander, shakes hands with George W.S. Abbey, Director of Flight Crew Operations at JSC. Behind Brandenstein are (bottom to top) John O. Creighton, John M. Fabian, Shannon W. Lucid, Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud, Patrick Baudry and Steven R. Nagel.

  18. STS 51-G crewmembers depart KSC's operations and checkout building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    STS 51-G crewmembers depart the Kennedy Space Center's operations and checkout building on their way to the launch pad for the launch of the Discovery. Leading the seven are Daniel C. Brandenstein, commander; and John O. Creighton, pilot. Following are Payload specialist Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud; John M. Fabian, mission specialist; Patrick Baudry, payload specialist; Shannon Lucid and Steven R. Nagel, mission specialists.

  19. Don't wait for the crisis. Finding the paradigm in the pattern. Interview by Joe Flower.

    PubMed

    Barker, J

    1991-01-01

    Joel Barker has been talking about the future for a long time past. His message: Change happens. Change happens as paradigms shift--the way we picture the universe shifts, and life is different. Relationships and values change their meaning. And because they mean something different, we change them. Barker's question is: How do you manage this change? How do you get ahead of it, and not lag behind it? How do you become its partner and not its victim? These are challenging questions, and hundreds of corporations have invited Barker to come ask them. His client list ranges over much of the Fortune 500--from IBM and DuPont to Honeywell, Boeing, and Gulf Oil--and it includes such healthcare clients as Merck, Upjohn, the Mayo clinics, and the Sisters of Charity. Barker has worked with these questions for the past 17 years, first as director of the pioneering Future Studies Department of the Science Museum of Minnesota, then as president of Infinity Limited, Inc. He has put his answers into a video, "Discovering the Future," and two books, the 1985 Discovering the Future: The Business of Paradigms, and the new Future Edge: The Paradigm Principles Guide for the '90s. We spent a recent morning talking with him about what a paradigm is, and what happens when a paradigm shifts. PMID:10115418

  20. Improving Exam Results, but to What End? The Limitations of New Labour's Control Mechanism for Schools: Assessment-Based Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansell, Warwick

    2011-01-01

    Bernard Barker's thesis that schools have been undermined over the past quarter of a century by a damaging combination of top-down, centralised reform and a desire to impose a market philosophy on education is powerful. This article analyses the nature of the apparatus of control--both statist and free-market--which has been applied to schools…

  1. 78 FR 25331 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc.; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... link to FINRA BrokerCheck, as prescribed by FINRA, on their Web sites, social media pages, and any comparable Internet presence, and on Web sites, social media pages, and any comparable Internet presence.... 68700 (Jan. 18, 2013), 78 FR 5542. \\4\\ See Letter from Charles Barker, dated Jan. 29, 2013; Letter...

  2. 76 FR 7817 - Announcing Draft Federal Information Processing Standard 180-4, Secure Hash Standard, and Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... sent to: Chief, Computer Security Division, Information Technology Laboratory, Attention: Comments on...-975-2911, e-mail: elaine.barker@nist.gov ; or Quynh Dang, Computer Security Division, National... activities to develop computer security standards to protect Federal sensitive (unclassified) systems...

  3. 77 FR 21538 - Announcing DRAFT Revisions to Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 186-3, Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... subject line. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Elaine Barker, Computer Security Division, National... approve Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS). NIST activities to develop computer security... must be received on or before May 25, 2012. ADDRESSES: Written comments may be sent to: Chief,...

  4. Adding a New Dimension to Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2013-01-01

    Much of what is taught, especially in college, is designed to support other disciplines. To determine the current mathematical needs of twenty-three partner disciplines, the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) conducted the Curriculum Foundations Project (Ganter and Barker 2004; Ganter and Haver 2011), as discussed in the appendix…

  5. The Acquisition of Case in Spanish Pronominal Object Clitics in English-Speaking College-Level L2 Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Michael Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The second language acquisition (SLA) of Spanish pronominal object clitics (POCs) has been a topic of research with regards to clitic placement (Houston, 1997; Lee, 1987; LoCoco, 1987; VanPatten, 1984; and VanPatten & Houston 1998), acquiring specific dialectal norms (Geeslin, Garcia-Amaya, Hasler-Barker, Henriksen, & Killam, 2010), and…

  6. The Market for Vocational Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Chris, Ed.; Kenyon, Richard, Ed.

    These 43 conference papers on vocational education and training (VET) markets are grouped under three broad themes describing them. Sixteen papers deal with the VET product and providers: "The VET Market" (Kemp); "Market Frameworks in VET" (FitzGerald); "The New Zealand Market Approach" (Barker); "An Economic Primer to Government's Role in VET"…

  7. Facing Up to Radical Changes in Universities and Colleges. Staff and Educational Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Steve, Ed.; And Others

    This collection of 18 essays focuses on efforts to manage change in higher education, primarily at universities in the United Kingdom. It includes: (1) "Changing Universities: From Evolution to Revolution" (Gail Thompson); (2) "Assessing Attitudes to Electronic Lectures" (Philip Barker); (3) "Teaching and Learning Technology: Shifting the Culture"…

  8. The Reality of Sustaining Community-Based Sport and Physical Activity Programs to Enhance the Development of Underserved Youth: Challenges and Potential Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitley, Meredith A.; Forneris, Tanya; Barker, Bryce

    2015-01-01

    Many community-based sport and physical activity programs take a positive youth development approach when operating in underserved communities around the world (Forneris, Whitley, & Barker, 2013). However, one of the biggest challenges for these programs is sustainability (Lindsey, 2008). The purpose of this article is to present the 3…

  9. Mentoring Influence on Socially Responsible Leadership Capacity Based on Institutional Carnegie Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Higher education institutions are being called to provide leaders capable of operating in increasingly complex environments (Astin & Astin, 2000; Daloz Parks, 2005; Longo & Gibson, 2011; Rost & Barker, 2000). As immersion into these complex environments has been found to assist students in developing leadership capacities, mentoring is…

  10. Novel concepts in the developmental origins of adult health and disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The seminal epidemiological observations of David Barker demonstrated that birth weight across the normal range is inversely proportional to the risk for hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes in adulthood. Increasing evidence suggests that either low birth weight or accelerated p...

  11. PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO LOW DOSE PFOA INDUCES LOW DEVELOPMENTAL BODY WEIGHT FOLLOWED BY ADULT ONSET OBESITY THAT IS BLUNTED IN OVARIECTOMIZED ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Barker hypothesis, or fetal origins of adult disease, proposes that individuals born to mothers who were pregnant during lean times develop a "thrifty" phenotype with a smaller body size and lowered metabolic rates, leading to a propensity for obesity and development of disor...

  12. Transformational Leadership and Organizational Commitment: A Study of UNC System Business School Department Chairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luton, Bill

    2010-01-01

    Ample evidence is available citing a positive relationship between transformational leadership and organizational commitment (Boerner et al., 2007; Bono & Judge, 2003; Bycio, Hackett, & Allen, 1995; Chen, 2004; Emery & Barker, 2007; Walumbwa, Orwa, Wang, & Lawler, 2005). The majority of research on leadership in higher education, however, is based…

  13. EMBRYONIC AND FETAL PROGRAMMING OF PHYSIOLOGICAL DISORDERS IN ADULTHOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past decade, numerous epidemiological studies have indicated strong inverse associations between birth weight and risk of coronary heart disease, hypertension, type 2-diabetes and other diseases in adulthood. The ¿Barker hypothesis¿ thus postulates that a number of organ ...

  14. Animal Models for Testing the DOHaD Hypothesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the seminal work in human populations by David Barker and colleagues, several species of animals have been used in the laboratory to test the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis. Rats, mice, guinea pigs, sheep, pigs and non-human primates have bee...

  15. Conflicting Perceptions of the Status of Field Biology and Identification Skills in UK Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulder, Raymond; Scott, Graham W.

    2016-01-01

    Reviews of the state of biology fieldwork in UK schools and universities at the beginning of the twenty-first century (Barker, Slingsby, and Tilling 2002; Smith 2004) were not entirely pessimistic; rather they suggested ways forward that might lead to an increase in fieldwork. Whether their hopes have been realised has, perhaps, been revealed by…

  16. Traditional-Aged College Juniors' Career Planning Self-Efficacy: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Dawn C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this single-site case study was to explore and describe traditional-age college juniors' reports of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) regarding Career Planning (Barker & Kellen, 1998). More specifically, the career planning confidence levels of college juniors enrolled in a required career development course at a private…

  17. Manliness and Exploration: The Discovery of the North Pole.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Americans crowded newsstands in early 1910 to read Robert Peary's firsthand account of his expedition to the North Pole. As they read "The Discovery of the North Pole," serialized exclusively in Hampton's Magazine, few knew that this harrowing, hypermasculine tale was really crafted by New York poet Elsa Barker. Barker's authorship of the North Pole story put her at the center of a large community of explorers, writers, patrons, and fans who were taken with Arctic exploration as much for its national symbolism as for its thrilling tales. The fact that Barker was a woman made her ascent into elite expeditionary circles remarkable. Yet this essay argues that it was also representative: women shaped the ideas and practices of manly exploration at home as well as in the field. Peary's dependence upon women writers, patrons, and audiences came at a time when explorers were breaking away from their traditional base of support: male scientific networks that had promoted their expeditions since the 1850s. Despite the "go-it-alone" ideals of their expedition accounts, explorers adopted masculine roles shaped by the world around them: by the growing influence of women writers, readers, and lecture-goers and, simultaneously, by the declining influence of traditional scientific peers and patrons. Barker and Peary's story, then, reveals a new fault line that opened up between scientists and explorers in the late nineteenth century over the issue of manliness, a fault line still largely uncharted in historical scholarship. PMID:27066620

  18. Teaching Web Search Skills: Techniques and Strategies of Top Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notess, Greg R.

    2006-01-01

    Here is a unique and practical reference for anyone who teaches Web searching. Greg Notess shares his own techniques and strategies along with expert tips and advice from a virtual "who's who" of Web search training: Joe Barker, Paul Barron, Phil Bradley, John Ferguson, Alice Fulbright, Ran Hock, Jeff Humphrey, Diane Kovacs, Gary Price, Danny…

  19. [Papers of the ELF Project].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Philip; And Others

    The five papers in this collection discuss various aspects of the Electronic Learning-Package Factory (ELF) project at the University of Bradford in England. In the first paper, "Adoption of CAL in Higher Education: A Cooperative Approach to Research, Development and Implementation," Philip Barker considers the opportunities for collaborative…

  20. Misexpression of ELF5 Disrupts Lung Branching and Inhibits Epithelial Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, David E.; Stahlman, Mildred T.; Shannon, John M.

    2008-01-01

    ELF5, an Ets family transcription factor found exclusively in epithelial cells, is expressed in the distal lung epithelium during embryogenesis, then becomes restricted to proximal airways at the end of gestation and postnatally. To test the hypothesis that ELF5 represses distal epithelial differentiation, we generated a transgenic mouse model in which a doxycycline inducible HA-tagged mouse Elf5 transgene was placed under the control of the lung epithelium-specific human SFTPC promoter. We found that expressing high levels of ELF5 during early lung development disrupted branching morphogenesis and produced a dilated epithelium. The effects of ELF5 on morphogenesis were stage dependent, since inducing the transgene on E16.5 had no effect on branching. ELF5 reduced expression of the distal lung epithelial differentiation markers Erm, Napsa and Sftpc, and type II cell ultrastructural differentiation was immature. ELF5 overexpression did not induce the proximal airway epithelial markers Ccsp and Foxj1, but did induce expression of p63, a marker of basal cells in the trachea and esophagus. High ELF5 levels also induced the expression of genes found in other endodermal epithelia but not normally associated with the lung. These results suggest that precise levels of ELF5 regulate the specification and differentiation of epithelial cells in the lung. PMID:18544451

  1. The lung-specific proteome defined by integration of transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.

    PubMed

    Lindskog, Cecilia; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn; Edlund, Karolina; Hellwig, Birte; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlén, Mathias; Pontén, Fredrik; Micke, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    The combined action of multiple cell types is essential for the physiological function of the lung, and increased awareness of the molecular constituents characterizing each cell type is likely to advance the understanding of lung biology and disease. In the current study, we used genome-wide RNA sequencing of normal lung parenchyma and 26 additional tissue types, combined with antibody-based protein profiling, to localize the expression to specific cell types. Altogether, 221 genes were found to be elevated in the lung compared with their expression in other analyzed tissues. Among the gene products were several well-known markers, but also several proteins previously not described in the context of the lung. To link the lung-specific molecular repertoire to human disease, survival associations of pneumocyte-specific genes were assessed by using transcriptomics data from 7 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cohorts. Transcript levels of 10 genes (SFTPB, SFTPC, SFTPD, SLC34A2, LAMP3, CACNA2D2, AGER, EMP2, NKX2-1, and NAPSA) were significantly associated with survival in the adenocarcinoma subgroup, thus qualifying as promising biomarker candidates. In summary, based on an integrated omics approach, we identified genes with elevated expression in lung and localized corresponding protein expression to different cell types. As biomarker candidates, these proteins may represent intriguing starting points for further exploration in health and disease. PMID:25169055

  2. Markov bases and toric ideals for some contingency tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, N. F.; Rakhimov, I. S.; Shitan, M.

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this work is to study Markov bases and toric ideals for p/(v -1 )(p -v ) 2 v ×v ×p/v - contingency tables that has fixed two-dimensional marginal when p is a multiple of v and greater than or equal to 2v. Moreover, the connected bipartite graph is also constructed by using elements of Markov basis. This work is an extension on results, that has been found by Hadi and Salman in 2014.

  3. Saudi payload specialists during tour of center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud and Abdulmohsen Hamad Al-Bassan, payload specialists from Saudi Arabia, are briefed in one of the mission control center support rooms by Kathleen V. Cannon (facing camera), payloads officer. Looking on is Erlinda Stevenson, secretary in the payload specialist coordination office (29713); Visitors tour the payload operations control center (POCC) in the mission control center during a Spacelab 3 simulation (29714); Visitors pose for picture in one of the Mission Control Center support rooms (29715); Visitors briefed by Kathleen V. Cannon (right) in one of the Mission Control Center support rooms. Erlinda Stevenson is also pictured (29716).

  4. STS-51G Crew Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The crew assigned to the STS-51G mission included (kneeling front left to right) Daniel C. Brandenstein, commander; and John O. Creighton, pilot. Standing, left to right, are mission specialists Shannon W. Lucid, Steven R. Nagel, and John M. Fabian; and payload specialists Sultan Salman Al-Saud, and Patrick Baudrey. Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery on June 17, 1985 at 7:33:00 am (EDT), the STS-51G mission's primary payloads were three communications satellites: MORELOS-A for Mexico; ARABSAT-A , for Arab Satellite communications; and TELSTAR-3D, for ATT.

  5. View of the STS 51-L Memorial service on JSC's main mall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Memorial services for the Challenger Seven were conducted on the morning of Jan. 31, 1986 at JSC's main mall. Among those in attendance were former and present astronauts and Space Shuttle payload specialists (PS). U.S. Sen. Jake Garn (R., Utah) vists at center with Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud of Saudi Arabia. Others pictured include German PS Ulf Merbold, French PS Patrick Baudry and NASA Astronauts Robert L. Stewart, Marsha S. Ivins, David C. Leestma and C. Gordon Fullerton, along with former astronaut Eugene A. Cernan.

  6. Improved determination of the astrophysical S(0) factor of the {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}){sup 12}C reaction

    SciTech Connect

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Tribble, R. E.

    2009-07-15

    We present new improved R matrix fits of direct data and indirect Trojan Horse data for the {sup 15}N(p,{alpha}){sup 12}C reaction and provide a more accurate recommended value of S(0)=73.0{+-}5.0 MeV b from direct Redder data [A. Redder et al., Z. Phys. A 305, 325 (1982)] and S(0)=70.0{+-}13.5 MeV b from the Trojan Horse data [M. La Cognata et al., Phys. Rev. C 76, 065804 (2007)]. We also analyze a recent fit by Barker [F. C. Barker, Phys. Rev. C 78, 044611 (2008)] and demonstrate that when all the uncertainties are taken into account, our results overlap with his. We also provide a fit of the Trojan Horse data that properly takes into account finite residual energy resolution of the data.

  7. Record length, mass, and clutch size in the nonindigenous Burmese Python, Python bivittatus Kuhl 1820 (Squamata: Pythonidae), in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krysko, Kenneth L.; Hart, Kristen M.; Smith, Brian J.; Selby, Thomas H.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Coutu, Nicholas T.; Reichart, Rebecca M.; Nuñez, Leroy P.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Snow, Ray W.

    2012-01-01

    The Burmese Python, Python bivittatus Kuhl 1820 (Squamata: Pythonidae), is indigenous to northern India,east to southern China, and south to Vietnam and a few islands in Indonesia (Barker and Barker 2008, Reed and Rodda 2009). This species has been introduced since at least 1979 in southern Florida, USA, where it likely began reproducing and became established during the 1980s (Meshaka et al. 2000, Snowet al. 2007b,Kraus 2009, Krysko et al. 2011, Willson et al. 2011). Python bivittatus has been documented in Florida consuming a variety of mammals and birds, and the American Alligator(Alligator mississippiensis) (Snowet al. 2007a, 2007b; Harvey et al. 2008; Rochford et al. 2010b; Holbrook and Chesnes 2011), many of which are protected species. Herein, we provide details on two of the largest known wild P. bivittatus in Florida to date, including current records on length,mass,clutch size, and diet.

  8. Vagueness as Probabilistic Linguistic Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassiter, Daniel

    Consideration of the metalinguistic effects of utterances involving vague terms has led Barker [1] to treat vagueness using a modified Stalnakerian model of assertion. I present a sorites-like puzzle for factual beliefs in the standard Stalnakerian model [28] and show that it can be resolved by enriching the model to make use of probabilistic belief spaces. An analogous problem arises for metalinguistic information in Barker's model, and I suggest that a similar enrichment is needed here as well. The result is a probabilistic theory of linguistic representation that retains a classical metalanguage but avoids the undesirable divorce between meaning and use inherent in the epistemic theory [34]. I also show that the probabilistic approach provides a plausible account of the sorites paradox and higher-order vagueness and that it fares well empirically and conceptually in comparison to leading competitors.

  9. STS 51-G crewmembers undergoing emergency egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Mission specialist John M. Fabian, STS 51-G, listens to briefing on use of the Sky-Genie as an aid for emergency egress from the Shuttle vehicle, during a training session in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory at JSC. Phillip Morgan, left, of McDonnell Douglas, lends a hand (31930); A portrait view of Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud during a training session in the Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory. He is wearing a flight suit and helmet (31931); Jean Loup Chretien, a spationaut representing the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CMES) of France, participates in emergency egress training. He is shown suspended in the Sky-Genie about to be lowered from the top of the crew compartment trainer (31932).

  10. Supercomputing Sheds Light on the Dark Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Salman Habib

    2012-11-15

    At Argonne National Laboratory, scientists are using supercomputers to shed light on one of the great mysteries in science today, the Dark Universe. With Mira, a petascale supercomputer at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, a team led by physicists Salman Habib and Katrin Heitmann will run the largest, most complex simulation of the universe ever attempted. By contrasting the results from Mira with state-of-the-art telescope surveys, the scientists hope to gain new insights into the distribution of matter in the universe, advancing future investigations of dark energy and dark matter into a new realm. The team's research was named a finalist for the 2012 Gordon Bell Prize, an award recognizing outstanding achievement in high-performance computing.

  11. SDAV Viz July Progress Update: LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, Christopher Meyer

    2012-07-30

    SDAV Viz July Progress Update: (1) VPIC (Vector Particle in Cell) Kinetic Plasma Simulation Code - (a) Implemented first version of an in-situ adapter based on Paraview CoProcessing Library, (b) Three pipelines: vtkDataSetMapper, vtkContourFilter, vtkPistonContour, (c) Next, resolve issue at boundaries of processor domains; add more advanced viz/analysis pipelines; (2) Halo finding/merger trees - (a) Summer student Wathsala W. from University of Utah is working on data-parallel halo finder algorithm using PISTON, (b) Timo Bremer (LLNL), Valerio Pascucci (Utah), George Zagaris (Kitware), and LANL people are interested in using merger trees for tracking the evolution of halos in cosmo simulations; discussed possible overlap with work by Salman Habib and Katrin Heitmann (Argonne) during their visit to LANL 7/11; (3) PISTON integration in ParaView - Now available from ParaView github.

  12. Development of a new type of germanium detector for dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenzhao

    Monte Carlo simulation is an important tool used to develop a better understanding of important physical processes. This thesis describes three Monte Carlo simulations used to understand germanium detector response to low energy nuclear recoils and radiogenic backgrounds for direct dark matter searches. The first simulation is the verification of Barker-Mei model, a theoretical model for calculating the ionization efficiency for germanium detector for the energy range of 1 - 100 keV. Utilizing the shape analysis, a bin-to-bin comparison between simulation and experimental data was performed for verifying the accuracy of the Barker-Mei model. A percentage difference within 4% was achieved between data and simulation, which showed the validity of the Barker-Mei model. The second simulation is the study of a new type of germanium detector for n/gamma discrimination at 77 K with plasma time difference in pulse shape. Due to the poor time resolution, conventional P-type Point Contact (PPC) and coaxial germanium detectors are not capable of discriminating nuclear recoils from electron recoils. In this thesis, a new idea of using great detector granularity and plasma time difference in pulse shape to discriminate nuclear recoils from electron recoils with planar germanium detectors in strings was discussed. The anticipated sensitivity of this new detector array is shown for detecting dark matter. The last simulation is a study of a new type of germanium-detector array serving as a PMT screening facility for ultra-low background dark matter experiments using noble liquid xenon as detector material such LUX/LZ and XENON100/XENON1T. A well-shaped germanium detector array and a PMT were simulated to study the detector response to the signal and background for a better understanding of the radiogenic gamma rays from PMTs. The detector efficiency and other detector performance were presented in this work.

  13. Sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic Ocean from 30ka to 10ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrack, Kerr; Greenop, Rosanna; Burke, Andrea; Barker, Stephen; Chalk, Thomas; Crocker, Anya

    2016-04-01

    Some of the most striking features of the Late Pleistocene interval are the rapid changes in climate between warmer interstadial and cold stadial periods which, when coupled, are termed Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events. This shift between warm and cold climates has been interpreted to result from changes in the thermohaline circulation (Broecker et al., 1985) triggered by, for instance, freshwater input from the collapse of the Laurentide ice sheet (Zahn et al., 1997). However, a recent study suggests that major ice rafting events cannot be the 'trigger' for the centennial to millennial scale cooling events identified over the past 500kyr (Barker at al., 2015). Polar planktic foraminiferal and lithogenic/terrigenous grain counts reveal that the southward migration of the polar front occurs before the deposition of ice rafted debris and therefore the rafting of ice during stadial periods. Based upon this evidence, Barker et al. suggest that the transition to a stadial state is a non-linear response to gradual cooling in the region. In order to test this hypothesis, our study reconstructs sea surface temperature across D-O events and the deglaciation in the North Atlantic between 30ka and 10ka using Mg/ Ca paleothermometry in Globigerina bulloides at ODP Sites 980 and 983 (the same sites as used in Barker et al., 2015) with an average sampling resolution of 300 years. With our new record we evaluate the timing of surface ocean temperature change, frontal shift movement, and ice rafting to investigate variations in the temperature gradient across the polar front over D-O events. References: Barker, S., Chen, J., Gong, X., Jonkers, L., Knorr, G., Thornalley, D., 2015. Icebergs not the trigger for North Atlantic cold events. Nature, 520(7547), pp.333-336. Broecker, W.S., Peteer, D.M., Rind, D., 1985. Does the ocean-atmosphere system have more than one stable mode of operation? Nature, 315 (6014), pp.21-26. Zahn, R., Schönfeld, J., Kudrass, H.-R., Park, M

  14. In Franklin's Path: Establishing Physics at the University of Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Paul

    2008-04-01

    In 1751 Benjamin Franklin established the Academy of Philadelphia, the precursor of the University of Pennsylvania. Among its curricular mandates he envisioned included ``Natural and Mechanic History,'' using a popular text he suggested by No"el Antoine Pluche that encompassed optics and celestial dynamics among its subjects. This talk will trace the history of physics research and education at Penn from its establishment, to the appointment of the first designated physics professor, George Frederic Barker, in 1873, to the opening of the Randall Morgan Laboratory in 1901 under the directorship of Arthur Goodspeed, and finally to the inauguration of the David Rittenhouse Laboratory in 1954 under the university leadership of Gaylord Harnwell.

  15. Mercedes–Benz water molecules near hydrophobic wall: Integral equation theories vs Monte Carlo simulations

    PubMed Central

    Urbic, T.; Holovko, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    Associative version of Henderson-Abraham-Barker theory is applied for the study of Mercedes–Benz model of water near hydrophobic surface. We calculated density profiles and adsorption coefficients using Percus-Yevick and soft mean spherical associative approximations. The results are compared with Monte Carlo simulation data. It is shown that at higher temperatures both approximations satisfactory reproduce the simulation data. For lower temperatures, soft mean spherical approximation gives good agreement at low and at high densities while in at mid range densities, the prediction is only qualitative. The formation of a depletion layer between water and hydrophobic surface was also demonstrated and studied. PMID:21992334

  16. Mercedes-Benz water molecules near hydrophobic wall: Integral equation theories vs Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbic, T.; Holovko, M. F.

    2011-10-01

    Associative version of Henderson-Abraham-Barker theory is applied for the study of Mercedes-Benz model of water near hydrophobic surface. We calculated density profiles and adsorption coefficients using Percus-Yevick and soft mean spherical associative approximations. The results are compared with Monte Carlo simulation data. It is shown that at higher temperatures both approximations satisfactory reproduce the simulation data. For lower temperatures, soft mean spherical approximation gives good agreement at low and at high densities while in at mid range densities, the prediction is only qualitative. The formation of a depletion layer between water and hydrophobic surface was also demonstrated and studied.

  17. Mercedes-Benz water molecules near hydrophobic wall: integral equation theories vs Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Urbic, T; Holovko, M F

    2011-10-01

    Associative version of Henderson-Abraham-Barker theory is applied for the study of Mercedes-Benz model of water near hydrophobic surface. We calculated density profiles and adsorption coefficients using Percus-Yevick and soft mean spherical associative approximations. The results are compared with Monte Carlo simulation data. It is shown that at higher temperatures both approximations satisfactory reproduce the simulation data. For lower temperatures, soft mean spherical approximation gives good agreement at low and at high densities while in at mid range densities, the prediction is only qualitative. The formation of a depletion layer between water and hydrophobic surface was also demonstrated and studied. PMID:21992334

  18. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 3, Long term testing at the ECTC

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, K.H.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this task is to demonstrate long term operation of a condensing heat exchanger for coal-fired conditions. A small condensing heat exchanger will be installed at the Environmental Control Technology Center in Barker, New York. It will be installed downstream of the flue gas particulate removal system. The test will determine the amount of wear, if any, on the Teflon{trademark} covered internals of the heat exchanger. Visual inspection and measurements will be obtained for the Teflon{trademark} covered tubes during the test. The material wear study will conducted over a one year calendar period, and the CHX equipment will be operated to the fullest extent allowable.

  19. Pulse Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojek, Zbigniew

    The idea of imposing potential pulses and measuring the currents at the end of each pulse was proposed by Barker in a little-known journal as early as in 1958 [1]. However, the first reliable trouble-free and affordable polarographs offering voltammetric pulse techniques appeared on the market only in the 1970s. This delay was due to some limitations on the electronic side. In the 1990s, again substantial progress in electrochemical pulse instrumentation took place. This was related to the introduction of microprocessors, computers, and advanced software.

  20. Comment on ‘Evidence of slow-light effects from rotary drag of structured beams’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, G. G.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Ryzhov, I. I.; Zapasskii, V. S.

    2014-03-01

    The paper Wisniewski-Barker E et al (2013 New J. Phys. 15 083020) is intended to distinguish experimentally between two mechanisms of pulse delay in ruby and to provide evidence in favor of the slow-light model. The proposed test is based on the idea of monitoring time delay of a ‘dark pulse’ or ‘intensity null’, rather than that of some Gaussian-like pulse. We show that, because of certain experimental inconsistencies, the results of the measurements do not allow one to prefer one of the models and, thus, are interpreted inadequately. In this comment, we propose and realize a simple modification of the experiment Wisniewski-Barker E et al (2013 New J. Phys. 15 083020), which allows us to unambiguously resolve this dilemma. We show that the effect of pulse delay in ruby is perfectly described by the simple model of pulse reshaping and does not require invoking the coherent population oscillation-based slow-light effects.

  1. Experimental investigation of the transient dynamics of slow light in ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski-Barker, Emma; Gibson, Graham M.; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Shi, Zhimin; Narum, Paul; Boyd, Robert W.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2014-12-01

    When a pulsed light beam propagates through ruby, it is delayed by a slow-light mechanism. This mechanism has been the subject of debate (Wisniewski-Barker et al 2013 New J. Phys. 15 083020; Kozlov et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 038001; Wisniewski-Barker et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 038002). To distinguish between the two main proposed mechanisms, we investigate the trailing edge of a square-wave pulsed laser beam propagating through ruby. Our observation of a pronounced tail on the trailing edge of the transmitted pulse cannot be explained solely by the effects of a time-varying absorber acting upon the incident pulse. Therefore, our observation of the creation of a tail at the trailing edge of the pulse provides evidence for a complicated model of slow light in ruby that requires more than pulse reshaping. The different delays of individual Fourier components of the pulse signal explain the pulse distortion that occurs upon transmission through the ruby and must be accounted for by any model that attempts to describe the effects of slow light in ruby.

  2. Vitrinite reflectance of sinkhole coals, east central Missouri fire clay district

    SciTech Connect

    Laudon, R.C. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-03-01

    East central Missouri contains numerous sinkholes many of which are filled with commercial quantities of fire clay and some contain small amounts of coal. Vitrinite reflectance averages from 513 samples taken from eleven of these coals ranged from 0.71 to 0.78. Data were remarkably consistent and no local trends were observed. Using Barker and Goldstein (1990) and Barker and Pawlewicz (1986) temperature correlations, these measurements suggest that the coals have been heated to temperatures on the order of 108 C to 128 C (average = 116). These temperatures are considered anomalously high when compared against known geothermal gradients and burial depths for these rocks. The temperatures suggest that the sinkhole coals have been heated by some thermal event, possibly associated with Mississippi Valley type mineralization. These temperatures are consistent with regional trends in the state. This data, when combined with other vitrinite reflectance and fluid inclusion data (right), suggest that southwest Missouri (Tristate) and southeast Missouri (Viburnum Trend) were hot spots, and that temperatures decrease regionally away from these two areas.

  3. The development of the VISAR, and its use in shock compression science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Lynn M.

    2000-04-01

    VISAR predecessors are described, including the displacement and velocity interferometer techniques for shock instrumentation. The advance to the VISAR in 1972 made laser interferometry applicable to a very wide range of shockwave experiments. With a 1974 refinement of the VISAR data reduction equation, the VISAR was shown to produce velocity measurements with better than 1% accuracy, and with time resolution to about 2 ns. The power of the VISAR was demonstrated in a plate impact study of the 13 GPa phase transition in iron. Rate effects in shock compressed iron were measured and correlated with theory, and the unloading stress-volume path was determined, revealing the reverse phase transition stress to unprecedented accuracy. Later improvements in VISARs are reviewed, including the lens delay VISAR (Amery), the push-pull VISAR (Hemsing), the ORVIS (Bloomquist and Sheffield), the line VISAR (Hemsing), the fixed-cavity VISAR (Sweat, et al.), the "never-search-for-fringes" VISAR (Barker), and the multi-beam VISAR (Barker).

  4. An overview on the effect of manufacturing on the shock response of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kister, G.; Wood, D. C.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Leighs, J. A.; Goff, M.; Barnes, N. R.; Hazell, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    Scatter and non-linearity of the Hugoniot in the Us-up plane has been seen in a number of polymers including poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), the polymer considered here. In this study the plate impact technique has been used to investigate the shock response of PMMA between particle velocities of 0.13 and 0.77 mm μs-1. From this data no scatter was seen between our data and the experimental data of Barker and Hollenbach, and Carter and Marsh. Also a linear Hugoniot in the Us-up plane was found, with the equation Us = 2.99 + 0.92up. The non-linearity observed by Barker and Hollenbach was not present in this data, probably due to the non-linearity occur at particle velocities of below 0.13 mm μs-1, within their experimental data. Gruneisen gamma has also been briefly considered using a shock reverberation experiment but more work is needed before a value can be ascertained.

  5. Adhesive papillae on the brachiolar arms of brachiolaria larvae in two starfishes, Asterina pectinifera and Asterias amurensis, are sensors for metamorphic inducing factor(s).

    PubMed

    Murabe, Naoyuki; Hatoyama, Hideo; Komatsu, Miéko; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Yoko

    2007-10-01

    It has been hypothesized by Barker that starfish brachiolaria larvae initiate metamorphosis by sensing of metamorphic inducing factor(s) with neural cells within the adhesive papillae on their brachiolar arms. We present evidence supporting Barker's hypothesis using brachiolaria larvae of the two species, Asterina pectinifera and Asterias amurensis. Brachiolaria larvae of these two species underwent metamorphosis in response to pebbles from aquaria in which adults were kept. Time-lapse analysis of A. pectinifera indicated that the pebbles were explored with adhesive papillae prior to establishment of a stable attachment for metamorphosis. Microsurgical dissections, which removed adhesive papillae, resulted in failure of the brachiolaria larvae to respond to the pebbles, but other organs such as the lateral ganglia, the oral ganglion, the adhesive disk or the adult rudiment were not required. Immunohistochemical analysis with a neuron-specific monoclonal antibody and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the adhesive papillae contained neural cells that project their processes towards the external surface of the adhesive papillae and they therefore qualify as sensory neural cells. PMID:17711475

  6. Metabolic imprinting by prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal overnutrition: a review.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Jennifer Shine; Rosenfeld, Charles R

    2011-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that metabolic programming is one of the critical factors contributing to the etiology of obesity as well as concurrent increase in related chronic diseases (e.g., type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease). Metabolic programming is the phenomenon whereby a nutritional stress/stimulus applied during critical periods of early development permanently alters an organism's physiology and metabolism, the consequences of which are often observed much later in life. The idea of metabolic programming originated from the fetal origins hypothesis proposed by Barker in which he suggested that disproportionate size at birth of the newborn due to an adverse intrauterine environment correlated well with an increased risk of adult-onset ill health outcomes (type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease). The fetal origins hypothesis, proposed by Barker, suggests that adequate nutrition during fetal development is critical. Overnutrition is a form of malnutrition that has increased in the United States over the past several decades in which nutrients are oversupplied relative to the amounts required for normal growth, development, and metabolism. Evidence for the effects of maternal obesity and overnutrition on metabolic programming is reviewed during critical prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal periods. PMID:21769766

  7. Fetal origins of adult disease.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Kara; Devaskar, Sherin U

    2011-07-01

    Dr. David Barker first popularized the concept of fetal origins of adult disease (FOAD). Since its inception, FOAD has received considerable attention. The FOAD hypothesis holds that events during early development have a profound impact on one's risk for development of future adult disease. Low birth weight, a surrogate marker of poor fetal growth and nutrition, is linked to coronary artery disease, hypertension, obesity, and insulin resistance. Clues originally arose from large 20th century, European birth registries. Today, large, diverse human cohorts and various animal models have extensively replicated these original observations. This review focuses on the pathogenesis related to FOAD and examines Dr. David Barker's landmark studies, along with additional human and animal model data. Implications of the FOAD extend beyond the low birth weight population and include babies exposed to stress, both nutritional and nonnutritional, during different critical periods of development, which ultimately result in a disease state. By understanding FOAD, health care professionals and policy makers will make this issue a high health care priority and implement preventive measures and treatment for those at higher risk for chronic diseases. PMID:21684471

  8. Ultrasound Transducer and System for Real-Time Simultaneous Therapy and Diagnosis for Noninvasive Surgery of Prostate Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong Seob; Chang, Jin Ho; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    For noninvasive treatment of prostate tissue using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), this paper proposes a design of an integrated multi-functional confocal phased array (IMCPA) and a strategy to perform both imaging and therapy simultaneously with this array. IMCPA is composed of triple-row phased arrays: a 6 MHz array in the center row for imaging and two 4 MHz arrays in the outer rows for therapy. Different types of piezoelectric materials and stack configurations may be employed to maximize their respective functionalities, i.e., therapy and imaging. Fabrication complexity of IMCPA may be reduced by assembling already constructed arrays. In IMCPA, reflected therapeutic signals may corrupt the quality of imaging signals received by the center row array. This problem can be overcome by implementing a coded excitation approach and/or a notch filter when B-mode images are formed during therapy. The 13-bit Barker code, which is a binary code with unique autocorrelation properties, is preferred for implementing coded excitation, although other codes may also be used. From both Field II simulation and experimental results, whether these remedial approaches would make it feasible to simultaneously carry out imaging and therapy by IMCPA was verifeid. The results showed that the 13-bit Barker code with 3 cycles per bit provided acceptable performances. The measured −6 dB and −20 dB range mainlobe widths were 0.52 mm and 0.91 mm, respectively, and a range sidelobe level was measured to be −48 dB regardless of whether a notch filter was used. The 13-bit Barker code with 2 cycles per bit yielded −6dB and −20dB range mainlobe widths of 0.39 mm and 0.67 mm. Its range sidelobe level was found to be −40 dB after notch filtering. These results indicate the feasibility of the proposed transducer design and system for real-time imaging during therapy. PMID:19811994

  9. Origins of Western diseases

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, MJ

    2011-01-01

    Recent gynaecological studies show that childbirth, constipation, trauma and surgery cause injuries to autonomic nerves at different anatomical sites in the female pelvis resulting in endometriosis, adenomyosis and fibroids. Re-growth of abnormal nerves causes allodynic symptoms (‘light touch causing pain or discomfort’) some years later including vulvodynia, dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea, irritative bladder and bowel symptoms. Further consequences of autonomic denervation include tissue hypoplasia and hyperplasia, visceral dysfunction, susceptibility to infection, alcohol, tobacco and drugs, as well as pain with sensitization of the central nervous system. The ‘autonomic denervation’ view extrapolates these observations from the female pelvis to the varied anatomy of branches of the cardiac and coeliac plexi to provide primary mechanisms for many forms of Western disease. This account sets out the autonomic denervation view, identifies features of autonomic denervation in extrapelvic organs, and, contrasts it with prior accounts of chronic Western diseases including those of DP Burkitt, PRJ Burch and DP Barker. PMID:22048676

  10. Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, M.; Kong, M. G.; Morfill, G.; Stolz, W.

    2012-05-01

    Foreword R. Satava and R. J. Barker; Part I. Introduction to Non-equilibrium Plasma, Cell Biology, and Contamination: 1. Introduction M. Laroussi; 2. Fundamentals of non-equilibrium plasmas M. Kushner and M. Kong; 3. Non-equilibrium plasma sources M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 4. Basic cell biology L. Greene and G. Shama; 5. Contamination G. Shama and B. Ahlfeld; Part II. Plasma Biology and Plasma Medicine: 6. Common healthcare challenges G. Isbary and W. Stolz; 7. Plasma decontamination of surfaces M. Kong and M. Laroussi; 8. Plasma decontamination of gases and liquids A. Fridman; 9. Plasma-cell interaction: prokaryotes M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 10. Plasma-cell interaction: eukaryotes G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 11. Plasma based wound healing G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 12. Plasma ablation, surgery, and dental applications K. Stalder, J. Woloszko, S. Kalghatgi, G. McCombs, M. Darby and M. Laroussi; Index.

  11. Acidic episodes and surface-water chemistry: a comparison of northeast and southeast study sites. Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, D.E.; Malcom, J.T.; Murdoch, P.S.; Olem, H.; Witt, E.C.

    1987-05-01

    Much of the emphasis in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) has been on historical or long-term trends in surface-water acidification. Short-term acidic episodes, however, also might have significant adverse effects on aquatic ecosystems. The U.S. EPA is presently designing an Episodic Response Project to investigate the regional extent, frequency, duration and magnitude of acidic episodes. The studies discussed in the report, however, were conducted under NAPAP Task Group E2-Aquatic Effects. A total of four episodic studies were conducted in the Catskill Mountains of New York (Murdoch, USGS), Laurel Hills, PA (Witt and Barker, USGS), Southern Blue Ridge Province, NC, TN (Olem, TVA), and Ouachita Mountains, AR (Nix et al., Ouachita Baptist University).

  12. Diurnal behaviour of water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. M.; Goody, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical model of the diurnal transport of water across the Martian surface is developed. The atmospheric boundary layer is modeled in terms of local radiative-convective processes, and radiative effects of ice fogs near the surface are included. Diffusion of water in the ground is treated for the cases of adsorption and condensation. The model is applied to the diurnal variation of water vapor in the atmosphere as observed by Barker (1974). The morning rise in the amount of water vapor can be explained in terms of the evaporation of ground fogs. The evening decrease is compatible with the model if adsorption dominates in the soil. The average level of vapor concentration requires that the atmosphere above the boundary layer be relatively dry. The ground fogs persist until midmorning and should be observable. Some consequences of these conclusions are discussed.

  13. Electric Utility Rate Design Study: comments on An Evaluation of Four Marginal-Costing Methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-12

    This report is an extension of NP-24255 (EAPA 6:1820), An Evaluation of Four Marginal Costing Methodologies (RDS No. 66), which summarizes, contrasts, and evaluates four marginal costing methodologies currently in use by various electric utilities. The proponents of the four methodologies evaluated by Temple, Barker, and Sloane (TBS) were asked to comment on the TBS report (RDS No. 66). Other selected reviewers were asked to comment on the TBS report. This report, RDS No. 67, is an anthology of all those comments plus a response to them by TBS. The rebuttal comments from TBS appear first, followed by comments submitted by Ralph Turvey, an authority in microeconomics. The next comments are to the Rate Design Study by members of Advisory Group I, experts in the field of electricity pricing. The next four sections present detailed comments submitted by the four marginal-cost proponents: Cicchetti, Gillen, and Smolensky; Ernst and Ernst; Gordian Associates; and National Economic Research Associates.

  14. A fully implicit domain decomposition based ALE framework for three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction with application in blood flow computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuqi; Cai, Xiao-Chuan

    2014-02-01

    Due to the rapid advancement of supercomputing hardware, there is a growing interest in parallel algorithms for modeling the full three-dimensional interaction between the blood flow and the arterial wall. In [4], Barker and Cai developed a parallel framework for solving fluid-structure interaction problems in two dimensions. In this paper, we extend the idea to three dimensions. We introduce and study a parallel scalable domain decomposition method for solving nonlinear monolithically coupled systems arising from the discretization of the coupled system in an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework with a fully implicit stabilized finite element method. The investigation focuses on the robustness and parallel scalability of the Newton-Krylov algorithm preconditioned with an overlapping additive Schwarz method. We validate the proposed approach and report the parallel performance for some patient-specific pulmonary artery problems. The algorithm is shown to be scalable with a large number of processors and for problems with millions of unknowns.

  15. Magnetic fields in noninvasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dourado, Marcos; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Scaff, Milberto; Guilhoto, Laura Maria de Figueiredo Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2014-04-01

    The idea that magnetic fields could be used therapeutically arose 2000 years ago. These therapeutic possibilities were expanded after the discovery of electromagnetic induction by the Englishman Michael Faraday and the American Joseph Henry. In 1896, Arsène d'Arsonval reported his experience with noninvasive brain magnetic stimulation to the scientific French community. In the second half of the 20th century, changing magnetic fields emerged as a noninvasive tool to study the nervous system and to modulate neural function. In 1985, Barker, Jalinous, and Freeston presented transcranial magnetic stimulation, a relatively focal and painless technique. Transcranial magnetic stimulation has been proposed as a clinical neurophysiology tool and as a potential adjuvant treatment for psychiatric and neurologic conditions. This article aims to contextualize the progress of use of magnetic fields in the history of neuroscience and medical sciences, until 1985. PMID:23787954

  16. Killing Me Softly: The Fetal Origins Hypothesis*

    PubMed Central

    Almond, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    In the epidemiological literature, the fetal origins hypothesis associated with David J. Barker posits that chronic, degenerative conditions of adult health, including heart disease and type 2 diabetes, may be triggered by circumstance decades earlier, in utero nutrition in particular. Economists have expanded on this hypothesis, investigating a broader range of fetal shocks and circumstances and have found a wealth of later-life impacts on outcomes including test scores, educational attainment, and income, along with health. In the process, they have provided some of the most credible observational evidence in support of the hypothesis. The magnitude of the impacts is generally large. Thus, the fetal origins hypothesis has not only survived contact with economics, but has flourished. PMID:25152565

  17. Sustainable development of geothermal fields in the Pannonian Basin - A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Panu, Dumitru; Mitrofan, Horia; Serbu, Viorel

    1996-01-24

    As suggested by the discusssion of Barker, 1988, on the influence of flow dimension on the late-time behaviour of the generalized line source solution, it was inferred that observed long term reservoir pressure decline was an outcome of the 1D (linear) flow geometry, indicated by well tests. The detrimental effects of the reservoir pressure decline can be partly mitigated by taking advantage of the two-phase flow which occurs when methane, originally dissolved in the geothermal brine, is released within the well bore. Sustainable artesiar withdrawal scenarios for existing geothermal fields are devised, based on an accurate prediction of bottomhole pressure decline trends and an adequate selection of the diameter and length of the production tubing. Overall analysis and forecast are performed by an integrated reservoir & well bore simulator.

  18. A remarkable new genus and a new species of chewing louse (Phthiraptera, Ischnocera, Philopteridae) from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Valim, Michel P.; Cicchino, Armando C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new genus of chewing louse as Bobdalgleishia, and its type species Bobdalgleishia stephanophallus sp. n. (Phthiraptera) belonging to the Brueelia-complex (Ischnocera: Philopteridae) are described. Adults of the new species are fully described, illustrated and compared morphologically with the type species of Motmotnirmus Mey & Barker, 2014, which is its closest relative. The type host of Bobdalgleishia stephanophallus is a subspecies of the great jacamar Jacamerops aureus ridgwayi Todd, 1943, an endemic Amazonian bird distributed in northern Brazil, and the type locality is the State of Pará. Bobdalgleishia is a remarkable genus with unique morphological and chaetotaxic characters which readily separate it from other members of the Brueelia-complex, in particular by having the first two marginal temporal and ocular setae very long. PMID:26798280

  19. [Developmental origin of health and adult diseases (DOHaD): evolution of a concept over three decades].

    PubMed

    Charles, Marie-Aline; Delpierre, Cyrille; Bréant, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    In the 1980s, D. Barker and his team proposed the hypothesis of a fetal origin of adult diseases. The concept subsequently evolved into the developmental origins of health and diseases. Progresses in various domains such as social epidemiology, neuroscience, toxicology have contributed to establish the early years of life as a key period for future health. Finally, epigenetics has provided biological plausibility to long-term programming of health by early exposures. The convergence of all these currents has led to conceptualize human health in a complex and dynamic continuum, the Lifecourse Health Development, beginning in the prenatal period and covering the whole life. Many animal models have been developed to try to unravel the mechanisms involved. Their contributions are described in this paper with the example of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26850602

  20. Fetal origin of vascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Pitale, Shailesh; Sahasrabuddhe, Anagha

    2011-01-01

    Aging is increasingly regarded as an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension and their complications (e.g. MI and Stroke). It is well known that vascular disease evolve over decades with progressive accumulation of cellular and extracellular materials and many inflammatory processes. Metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes are conventionally recognized as risk factors for development of coronary vascular disease (CVD). These conditions are known to accelerate ageing process in general and vascular ageing in particular. Adverse events during intrauterine life may programme organ growth and favour disease later in life, popularly known as, ‘Barker's Hypothesis’. The notion of fetal programming implies that during critical periods of prenatal growth, changes in the hormonal and nutritional milieu of the conceptus may alter the full expression of the fetal genome, leading to permanent effects on a range of physiological. PMID:22145131

  1. New signatures of underground nuclear tests revealed by satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vincent, P.; Larsen, S.; Galloway, D.; Laczniak, R.J.; Walter, W.R.; Foxall, W.; Zucca, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    New observations of surface displacement caused by past underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are presented using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). The InSAR data reveal both coseismic and postseismic subsidence signals that extend one kilometer or more across regardless of whether or not a surface crater was formed from each test. While surface craters and other coseismic surface effects (ground cracks, etc.) may be detectable using high resolution optical or other remote sensing techniques, these broader, more subtle subsidence signals (one to several centimeters distributed over an area 1-2 kilometers across) are not detectable using other methods [Barker et al., 1998]. A time series of interferograms reveal that the postseismic signals develop and persist for months to years after the tests and that different rates and styles of deformation occur depending on the geologic and hydrologic setting and conditions of the local test area.

  2. Characterizing the scientific potential of satellite sensors. [San Francisco, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Eleven thematic mapper (TM) radiometric calibration programs were tested and evaluated in support of the task to characterize the potential of LANDSAT TM digital imagery for scientific investigations in the Earth sciences and terrestrial physics. Three software errors related to integer overflow, divide by zero, and nonexist file group were found and solved. Raw, calibrated, and corrected image groups that were created and stored on the Barker2 disk are enumerated. Black and white pixel print files were created for various subscenes of a San Francisco scene (ID 40392-18152). The development of linear regression software is discussed. The output of the software and its function are described. Future work in TM radiometric calibration, image processing, and software development is outlined.

  3. An efficient method for unfolding kinetic pressure driven VISAR data

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Harry Hess; Peterson, Kyle; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James

    2015-08-18

    Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) [Barker and Hollenbach, J. Appl. Phys. 43, 4669 (1972)] is a well-known diagnostic that is employed on many shock physics and pulsed-power experiments. With the VISAR diagnostic, the velocity on the surface of any metal flyer can be found. For most experiments employing VISAR, either a kinetic pressure [Grady, Mech. Mater. 29, 181 (1998)] or a magnetic pressure [Lemke et al., Intl J. Impact Eng. 38, 480 (2011)] drives the motion of the flyer. Moreover, reliable prediction of the time-dependent pressure is often a critical component to understanding the physics of these experiments. Although VISAR can provide a precise measurement of a flyer’s surface velocity, the real challenge of this diagnostic implementation is using this velocity to unfold the time-dependent pressure. The purpose of this study is to elucidate a new method for quickly and reliably unfolding VISAR data.

  4. Mercury emissions control by wet FGD systems: EPRI pilot-scale results

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.R.; Hargrove, O.W. Jr.; Seeger, D.M.

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents results from pilot-scale tests that investigated mercury removal across wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The program was conducted at EPRIs Environmental Control Technology Center, located in Barker, NY. The test results showed that mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) was efficiently removed across the FGD system, while elemental mercury was not collected. The practical implication of this study is that although FGD systems efficiently remove some forms of mercury from flue gas, the overall mercury removal efficiency, and therefore the total mercury emissions from a coal-fired power plant equipped with an FGD system, will depend on the chemical form of the mercury in the flue gas. Unfortunately, no validated gas sampling method is available for speciating the different forms of mercury in flue gas. It is, therefore, difficult to predict mercury removal across FGD systems and to interpret any mercury removal data that have been collected.

  5. Perturbation theory for multicomponent fluids based on structural properties of hard-sphere chain mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hlushak, Stepan

    2015-09-28

    An analytical expression for the Laplace transform of the radial distribution function of a mixture of hard-sphere chains of arbitrary segment size and chain length is used to rigorously formulate the first-order Barker-Henderson perturbation theory for the contribution of the segment-segment dispersive interactions into thermodynamics of the Lennard-Jones chain mixtures. Based on this approximation, a simple variant of the statistical associating fluid theory is proposed and used to predict properties of several mixtures of chains of different lengths and segment sizes. The theory treats the dispersive interactions more rigorously than the conventional theories and provides means for more accurate description of dispersive interactions in the mixtures of highly asymmetric components.

  6. HR 7578 - A K dwarf double-lined spectroscopic binary with peculiar abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, F. C., Jr.; Beavers, W. I.

    1983-01-01

    The number of double-lined K and M dwarf binaries which is currently known is quite small, only a dozen or less of each type. The HR 7578 system was classified as dK5 on the Mount Wilson system and as K2 V on the MK ystem. A summary of radial-velocity measurements including the observatory and weight of each observation is given in a table. The star with the stronger lines has been called component A. The final orbital element solution with all observations appropriately weighted was computed with a differential corrections computer program described by Barker et al. (1967). The program had been modified for the double-lined case. Of particular interest are the very large eccentricity of the system and the large minimum masses for each component. These large minimum masses suggest that eclipses may be detectable despite the relatively long period and small radii of the stars.

  7. Prenatal Programming of Mental Illness: Current Understanding of Relationship and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Tracy L.; Epperson, C. Neill

    2015-01-01

    The British epidemiologist Dr. David J. Barker documented the relationship between infant birth weight and later onset of hypertension, coronary heart disease, insulin resistance, and type II diabetes. A stressful in utero environment can cause long-term consequences for offspring through prenatal programming. Prenatal programming most commonly occurs through epigenetic mechanisms and can be dependent on the type and timing of exposure as well as the sex of the fetus. In this review, we highlight the most recent evidence that prenatal programming is implicated in the development of psychiatric disorders in offspring exposed to maternal stress during pregnancy. Methodological differences between studies contribute to unavoidable heterogeneity in study findings. Current data suggest that fetal exposure to maternal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation, excessive glucocorticoids, and inflammation with resulting epigenetic changes at both the placental and fetal levels are important areas of continued investigation. PMID:25617041

  8. Killing Me Softly: The Fetal Origins Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Almond, Douglas; Currie, Janet

    2011-01-01

    In the epidemiological literature, the fetal origins hypothesis associated with David J. Barker posits that chronic, degenerative conditions of adult health, including heart disease and type 2 diabetes, may be triggered by circumstance decades earlier, in utero nutrition in particular. Economists have expanded on this hypothesis, investigating a broader range of fetal shocks and circumstances and have found a wealth of later-life impacts on outcomes including test scores, educational attainment, and income, along with health. In the process, they have provided some of the most credible observational evidence in support of the hypothesis. The magnitude of the impacts is generally large. Thus, the fetal origins hypothesis has not only survived contact with economics, but has flourished. PMID:25152565

  9. Dissociative adsorption of O2 on unreconstructed metal (100) surfaces: Pathways, energetics, and sticking kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2014-05-06

    An accurate description of oxygen dissociation pathways and kinetics for various local adlayer environments is key for an understanding not just of the coverage dependence of oxygen sticking, but also of reactive steady states in oxidation reactions. Density functional theory analysis for M(100) surfaces with M=Pd, Rh, and Ni, where O prefers the fourfold hollow adsorption site, does not support the traditional Brundle-Behm-Barker picture of dissociative adsorption onto second-nearest-neighbor hollow sites with an additional blocking constraint. Rather adsorption via neighboring vicinal bridge sites dominates, although other pathways can be active. The same conclusion also applies for M=Pt and Ir, where oxygen prefers the bridge adsorption site. Statistical mechanical analysis is performed based on kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of a multisite lattice-gas model consistent with our revised picture of adsorption. This analysis determines the coverage and temperature dependence of sticking for a realistic treatment of the oxygen adlayer structure.

  10. An A643V amino acid substitution in Upc2p contributes to azole resistance in well-characterized clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hoot, Samantha J; Smith, Adam R; Brown, Ryan P; White, Theodore C

    2011-02-01

    The Candida albicans Upc2p transcription factor regulates ERG11, encoding the target of azole drugs. Gain-of-function mutations that contribute to resistance were recently identified in a series of sequential clinical isolates (N. Dunkel, T. T. Liu, K. S. Barker, R. Homayouni, J. Morschhauser, and P. D. Rogers, Eukaryot. Cell 7:1180-1190, 2008). In the present study, UPC2 was sequenced from a matched set of 17 isolates. An A643V substitution was present in all of the isolates in the series that overexpressed ERG11. Azole susceptibility, ergosterol levels, and expression of ERG genes were elevated in the A643V clinical isolates and in reconstructed strains. PMID:21078937

  11. What veterinary practice managers can learn from other health care professions.

    PubMed

    Wood, F

    1996-02-01

    Joel Barker, a noted futurist, points out that the best ideas usually come from outside an industry or profession. As a management consultant, I often get new ideas from industries completely unrelated to my clients' industry. For example, companies interested in offering outstanding customer service might study Nordstrom's, L.L. Bean, or Lexus. Those interested in world class distribution might research Federal Express or United Parcel Service. Airlines, trying to minimize downtime of jets at the terminal, learn secrets from Indianapolis 500 pit crews. Similarly, in observing optometrists and dentists, there are valuable lessons for veterinarians. Dentists identified a business model or organizational structure that generates healthy profits. Independent optometrists experienced the onslaught of intense competition from huge corporate players and weathered the storm. The veterinary profession is not so unique. By studying other professions, we need not recreate the wheel. PMID:8778948

  12. Binary Pulse Compression Techniques for MST Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, R. F.; Sulzer, M. P.; Farley, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    In most mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) applications pulsed radars are peak power limited and have excess average power capability. Short pulses are required for good range resolution but the problem of range biguity (signals received simultaneously from more than one altitude) sets a minimum limit on the interpulse period (IPP). Pulse compression is a echnique which allows more of the transmitter average power capacity to be used without scarificing range resolution. Binary phase coding methods for pulse compression are discussed. Many aspects of codes and decoding and their applications to MST experiments are addressed; this includes Barker codes and longer individual codes, and then complementary codes and other code sets. Software decoding, hardware decoders, and coherent integrators are also discussed.

  13. Volcano monitoring using short wavelength infrared data from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothery, D. A.; Francis, P. W.; Wood, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that Landsat TM and MSS data provide useful and sometimes unique information on magmatic and fumarolic events at poorly monitored active volcanoes. The digital number data recorded in each spectral band by TM and MSS can be converted into spectral radiance, measured in W/sq m per micron per sr, using calibration data such as those provided by Markham and Barker (1986) and can provide temperature information on the lava fountain, lava lakes, pahoehoe flows, blocky lava, pyroclastic flow, and fumarole. The examples of Landsat data documenting otherwise unobserved precursors and/or activity include the September 1986 eruption of Lascar volcano, Chile; the continued presence of lava lakes at Erta 'Ale, Ethiopia (in the absence of any ground-based observations); and minor eruptions at Mount Erebus, Antarctica.

  14. Volcano monitoring using short wavelength infrared data from satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothery, D. A.; Francis, P. W.; Wood, C. A.

    1988-07-01

    It is shown that Landsat TM and MSS data provide useful and sometimes unique information on magmatic and fumarolic events at poorly monitored active volcanoes. The digital number data recorded in each spectral band by TM and MSS can be converted into spectral radiance, measured in W/sq m per micron per sr, using calibration data such as those provided by Markham and Barker (1986) and can provide temperature information on the lava fountain, lava lakes, pahoehoe flows, blocky lava, pyroclastic flow, and fumarole. The examples of Landsat data documenting otherwise unobserved precursors and/or activity include the September 1986 eruption of Lascar volcano, Chile; the continued presence of lava lakes at Erta 'Ale, Ethiopia (in the absence of any ground-based observations); and minor eruptions at Mount Erebus, Antarctica.

  15. Spatial probing of nebular properties via Bowen pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of detailed calculations of O III line intensities under optically thin and optically thick conditions, an analysis is proposed for spatially resolved observations of the Bowen lines which could yield the local photoexcitation rate and an estimate of the local optical depth, more specifically the local mean escape probability associated with the line of sight. The importance of such newly defined escape probabilities is emphasized. An illustrative application is made to the data of Barker for the planetary nebula NGC 6720. The far-infrared line ratio I (88 microns)/I(52 microns) is also sensitive to Bowen pumping at low optical depths, and interpretation of the ratio may need to take this effect into account in some H II regions. It is noted that the S III far-infrared line ratio could provide an independent check on whether the effect is present.

  16. Environmental induction of the fetal epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Odom, Lawrence N; Taylor, Hugh S

    2011-01-01

    The healthy adult is the result of successful interaction between the maternal environment and the developing fetal epigenome. The Barker hypothesis first suggested that in utero exposure to the maternal environment impacts adult health and disease. Since the origin of this theory, numerous studies have lent further support. Epigenomic alteration involves DNA methylation and histone modifications. Pregnancy, when the epigenome is typically actively programmed, is a vulnerable time, when exposures may have the most profound epigenetic effect. Recent advances have allowed an understanding of the extent and mechanism by which environmental exposures alter the epigenome of the fetus. Healthcare providers who treat and counsel reproductive-age women are in a unique position to protect against these epigenetic alterations and therefore prevent adverse impact on the developing fetus that may manifest throughout life. PMID:21297874

  17. Effect of salt identity on the phase diagram for a globularprotein in aqueous electrolyte solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bostrom, Mathias; Tavares, Frederico W.; Ninham, Barry W.; Prausnitz, John M.

    2006-02-22

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to establish the potential of mean force between two globular proteins in an aqueous electrolyte solution. This potential includes nonelectrostatic contributions arising from dispersion forces first, between the globular proteins, and second, between ions in solution and between each ion and the globular protein. These latter contributions are missing from standard models. The potential of mean force, obtained from simulation, is fitted to an analytic equation. Using our analytic potential of mean force and Barker-Henderson perturbation theory, we obtain phase diagrams for lysozyme solutions that include stable and metastable fluid-fluid and solid-fluid phases when the electrolyte is 0.2 M NaSCN or NaI or NaCl. The nature of the electrolyte has a significant effect on the phase diagram.

  18. A species pair of Bivesicula Yamaguti, 1934 (Trematoda: Bivesiculidae) in unrelated Great Barrier Reef fishes: implications for the basis of speciation in coral reef fish trematodes.

    PubMed

    Trieu, Nancy; Cutmore, Scott C; Miller, Terrence L; Cribb, Thomas H

    2015-07-01

    Combined morphological and molecular analysis shows that a species of Bivesicula Yamaguti, 1934 from four species of Apogonidae Günther [Nectamia fusca (Quoy & Gaimard), Ostorhinchus angustatus (Smith & Radcliffe), O. cookii (Macleay) and Taeniamia fucata (Cantor)] on the Great Barrier Reef is morphologically similar to, but clearly distinct from B. unexpecta Cribb, Bray & Barker, 1994 which infects a sympatric pomacentrid, Acanthochromis polyacanthus (Bleeker). Bivesicula neglecta n. sp. is proposed for the form from apogonids. Novel ITS2 rDNA sequences generated for the two species differ at just one consistent base position, implying that the two species are closely related. The combination of their close relationship, high but distinct specificity and co-occurrence suggests that speciation was driven by a recent host switching event enabled by similar dietary ecomorphology. PMID:26063300

  19. Low birth weight: causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    During our phylogenetic evolution we have selected genes, the so called thrifty genes, that can help to maximize the amount of energy stored from every consumed calorie. An imbalance in the amount of stored calories can lead to many diseases. In the early 80’s the distinguished English epidemiologist David Barker, formulated a hypothesis suggesting that many events that occur during the intrauterine life and early in infancy can influence the occurrence of many diseases that will develop in adulthood. This theory proposes that under-nutrition and other insult or adverse stimulus in utero and during infancy can permanently change the body’s structure, physiology and metabolism. The lasting or lifelong effects of under-nutrition will depend on the period in the development at which it occurs. The clues that led Barker to his conclusions started to be discovered when he was studying the temporal trends in the incidence of ischemic heart disease in England and Wales. Examining data found in The Hertfordshire records, collected in the beginning of the last century, he found that the rates of mortality by ischemic heart disease was much higher in children born in less affluent counties and mostly in those with low birth weight. After his initial findings a myriad of diseases have been found to be linked to low birth weight and under-nutrition in utero and in the neonatal period. These diseases were then nominated adult diseases with fetal origin. Epidemiological studies that led to these findings suggest that in utero and early postnatal life have critical importance for long-term programming of health and disease, opening unique chances for primary prevention of chronic diseases. PMID:24128325

  20. [Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) and Epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Sata, Fumihiro

    2016-01-01

    Japan has the highest proportion of low-birth-weight infants among OECD countries for over 20 years. In 2011, the proportion of low-birth-weight infants in Japan was 9.6%, whereas the mean proportion in OECD countries was only 6.8%. In particular, young Japanese women's strong desire to be thin has been pointed out as the underlying cause. Indeed, the frequencies of unhealthy thinness among third-year female junior and senior high school Japanese students have been increasing since the start of "Healthy Parents and Children 21", and both groups have reached about 20%. The hypothesis of the fetal origins of adult disease (Barker's theory) was proposed by Professor David J. Barker of Southampton University, who had conducted descriptive epidemiological studies in England and Wales and birth cohort studies in Hertfordshire, for example. In early 21st century, it became the wider theory known as the "Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD)", which was composed of developmental plasticity and the mismatch concept. Birth cohort studies are believed to be suitable for epidemiological studies to demonstrate the DOHaD theory. These studies and their collaborations are very popular in European countries, whereas such collaborations lagged behind in Japan. Recently, a new paradigm, "preemptive medicine", has been proposed in Japan. The importance of interdisciplinary studies focusing on fetal and childhood periods was also recommended as a political strategy. We just expect the realization of nationwide large-scale interdisciplinary research projects based on DOHaD and preemptive medicine and the establishment of a central research institute of these studies. PMID:26832616

  1. Auxological perspectives on 'growth' in DOHaD.

    PubMed

    Lampl, M; Mummert, A; Schoen, M

    2015-10-01

    David Barker established growth as a seminal link between early development and later health attainment and disease risk. This was nothing less than a paradigm shift in health and medicine, turning the focus of disease causality away from contemporary environmental influences to earliest growth as a time when functional anatomy and physiology sets in place critical structures and function for a lifetime. Barker's prodigious work investigated time- and place-specific interactions between maternal condition and exogenous environmental influences, focusing on how growth unfolds across development to function as a mechanistic link to ensuing health. Subsequent applications do not always attend to the specificity and sensitivity issues included in his original work, and commonly overlook the long-standing methods and knowledge base of auxology. Methodological areas in need of refinement include enhanced precision in how growth is represented and assessed. For example, multiple variables have been used as a referent for 'growth,' which is problematic because different body dimensions grow by different biological clocks with unique functional physiologies. In addition, categorical clinical variables obscure the spectrum of variability in growth experienced at the individual level. Finally, size alone is a limited measure as it does not capture how individuals change across age, or actually grow. The ground-breaking notion that prenatal influences are important for future health gave rise to robust interest in studying the fetus. Identifying the many pathways by which size is realized permits targeted interventions addressing meaningful mechanistic links between growth and disease risk to promote health across the lifespan. PMID:26268724

  2. Estimation of ultrasonic attenuation in a bone using coded excitation.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, A; Litniewski, J; Secomski, W; Lewin, P A; Trots, I

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to estimate broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) in a bone structure in human in vivo using coded excitation. BUA is an accepted indicator for assessment of osteoporosis. In the tested approach a coded acoustic signal is emitted and then the received echoes are compressed into brief, high amplitude pulses making use of matched filters and correlation receivers. In this way the acoustic peak pressure amplitude probing the tissue can be markedly decreased whereas the average transmitted intensity increases proportionally to the length of the code. This paper examines the properties of three different transmission schemes, based on Barker code, chirp and Golay code. The system designed is capable of generating 16 bits complementary Golay code (CGC), linear frequency modulated (LFM) chirp and 13-bit Barker code (BC) at 0.5 and 1 MHz center frequencies. Both in vivo data acquired from healthy heel bones and in vitro data obtained from human calcaneus were examined and the comparison between the results using coded excitation and two cycles sine burst is presented. It is shown that CGC system allows the effective range of frequencies employed in the measurement of broadband acoustic energy attenuation in the trabecular bone to be doubled in comparison to the standard 0.5 MHz pulse transmission. The algorithm used to calculate the pairs of Golay sequences of the different length, which provide the temporal side-lobe cancellation is also presented. Current efforts are focused on adapting the system developed for operation in pulse-echo mode; this would allow examination and diagnosis of bones with limited access such as hip bone. PMID:14585473

  3. Active Negative Pressure Peritoneal Therapy After Abbreviated Laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Derek J.; Faris, Peter D.; Ball, Chad G.; Kubes, Paul; Tiruta, Corina; Xiao, Zhengwen; Holodinsky, Jessalyn K.; McBeth, Paul B.; Doig, Christopher J.; Jenne, Craig N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether active negative pressure peritoneal therapy with the ABThera temporary abdominal closure device reduces systemic inflammation after abbreviated laparotomy. Background: Excessive systemic inflammation after abdominal injury or intra-abdominal sepsis is associated with poor outcomes. Methods: We conducted a single-center, randomized controlled trial. Forty-five adults with abdominal injury (46.7%) or intra-abdominal sepsis (52.3%) were randomly allocated to the ABThera (n = 23) or Barker's vacuum pack (n = 22). On study days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 28, blood and peritoneal fluid were collected. The primary endpoint was the difference in the plasma concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6) 24 and 48 hours after temporary abdominal closure application. Results: There was a significantly lower peritoneal fluid drainage from the ABThera at 48 hours after randomization. Despite this, there was no difference in plasma concentration of IL-6 at baseline versus 24 (P = 0.52) or 48 hours (P = 0.82) between the groups. There was also no significant intergroup difference in the plasma concentrations of IL-1β, −8, −10, or −12 p70 or tumor necrosis factor α between these time points. The cumulative incidence of primary fascial closure at 90 days was similar between groups (hazard ratio, 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 0.82–3.0; P = 0.17). However, 90-day mortality was improved in the ABThera group (hazard ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.11–0.93; P = 0.04). Conclusions: This trial observed a survival difference between patients randomized to the ABThera versus Barker's vacuum pack that did not seem to be mediated by an improvement in peritoneal fluid drainage, fascial closure rates, or markers of systemic inflammation. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01355094. PMID:25536308

  4. Autecology in Rhizospheres and Nodulating Behavior of Indigenous Rhizobium trifolii†

    PubMed Central

    Demezas, David H.; Bottomley, Peter J.

    1986-01-01

    Indigenous serotype 1-01 of Rhizobium trifolii occupied significantly fewer nodules (6%) on plants of soil-grown noninoculated subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum L.) cv. Woogenellup than on cv. Mt. Barker (36%) sampled at the flowering stage of growth. Occupancy by indigenous serotype 2-01, was not significantly different on the two cultivars (16 and 26%). Serotype-specific, fluorescent-antibody conjugates were synthesized and used to enumerate the indigenous serotypes in host (clovers) and nonhost (annual rye-grass, Lolium multiflorum L.) rhizospheres and in nonplanted soil. The form and concentration of Ca2+ in the flocculating mixture and the presence of phosphate anions in the extracting solution were both critical for enumerating R. trifolii in Whobrey soil. The two serotypes were present in similar numbers in nonplanted soil (ca. 106 per g of soil) and each represented ca. 10% of the total R. trifolii population. Although host rhizospheres did not preferentially stimulate either serotype, the mean population densities of serotype 2-01 were significantly greater (P = 0.05) than those of serotype 1-01 in clover rhizospheres on 8 of 14 samplings made between the time of seeding and the appearance of nodules (day 12). In this experiment, and in contrast to our earlier findings, serotype 1-01 occupied significantly fewer (P ≤ 0.05) of the nodules (7 to 16%) on both cultivars than serotype 2-01 (51%) when sampled at 4 weeks. Differences between cultivars became apparent as the plants matured. There was a threefold increase (7 to 21%) in nodules occupied by serotype 1-01 on cv. Mt. Barker between 4 and 16 weeks. This was accompanied by increases in nodules coinhabited by both nonidentifiable occupants and either serotype 1-01 (0 to 20%) or 2-01 (11 to 51%). No increases in either of these parameters were observed on cv. Woogenellup. PMID:16347198

  5. Imaging the Impact of Impurities on Topological Surface States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Jennifer

    2013-03-01

    Harnessing the technological potential of the spin-polarized surface states on topological insulators requires a detailed understanding of the impact of nanoscale disorder on those surface states. We employ spectroscopic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in the presence of a magnetic field to visualize the impact of intrinsic impurities on topological surface states in Sb and Bi2Se3. We find a variety of impurities with different energy profiles that elastically scatter surface states through dispersive quasiparticle interference (QPI), that inelastically scatter surface states into the bulk, that locally destroy the extended surface state Landau level wavefunctions, or that form local resonant states interacting with the Dirac quasiparticles. By identifying impurities that strongly interact with and limit the mobility of the topological surface states, our impurity studies can directly advise the growth and development of future topological materials. Measurements carried out by Anjan Soumyanarayanan, Michael Yee, Yang He. Samples grown by Dillon Gardner & Young Lee; Zahir Salman & Amit Kanigel; Zhi Ren & Kouji Segawa & Yoichi Ando.

  6. Nonlinear Binormal Flow of Vortex Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Scott; Carr, Lincoln

    2015-11-01

    With the current advances in vortex imaging of Bose-Einstein condensates occurring at the Universities of Arizona, São Paulo and Cambridge, interest in vortex filament dynamics is experiencing a resurgence. Recent simulations, Salman (2013), depict dissipative mechanisms resulting from vortex ring emissions and Kelvin wave generation associated with vortex self-intersections. As the local induction approximation fails to capture reconnection events, it lacks a similar dissipative mechanism. On the other hand, Strong&Carr (2012) showed that the exact representation of the velocity field induced by a curved segment of vortex contains higher-order corrections expressed in powers of curvature. This nonlinear binormal flow can be transformed, Hasimoto (1972), into a fully nonlinear equation of Schrödinger type. Continued transformation, Madelung (1926), reveals that the filament's square curvature obeys a quasilinear scalar conservation law with source term. This implies a broader range of filament dynamics than is possible with the integrable linear binormal flow. In this talk we show the affect higher-order corrections have on filament dynamics and discuss physical scales for which they may be witnessed in future experiments. Partially supported by NSF.

  7. Exact reconstruction formula for the spherical mean Radon transform on ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haltmeier, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Many modern imaging and remote sensing applications require reconstructing a function from spherical averages (mean values). Examples include photoacoustic tomography, ultrasound imaging or SONAR. Several formulas of the back-projection type for recovering a function in n spatial dimensions from mean values over spheres centered on a sphere have been derived by D Finch, S K Patch and Rakesh (2004 SIAM J. Math. Anal. 35 1213-1240) for odd spatial dimension and by D Finch, M Haltmeier and Rakesh (2007 SIAM J. Appl. Math. 68 392-412) for even spatial dimension. In this paper we generalize some of these formulas to the case where the centers of integration lie on the boundary of an arbitrary ellipsoid. For the special cases n = 2 and n = 3 our results have recently been established by Y Salman (2014 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 420 612-20). For the higher dimensional case n\\gt 3 we establish proof techniques extending the ones in the above references. Back-projection type inversion formulas for recovering a function from spherical means with centers on an ellipsoid have first been derived by F Natterer (2012 Inverse Problems Imaging 6 315-20) for n = 3 and by V Palamodov (2012 Inverse Problems 28 065014) for arbitrary dimension. The results of Natterer have later been generalized to arbitrary dimension by M Haltmeier (2014 SIAM J. Math. Anal. 46 214-32). Note that these formulas are different from the ones derived in the present paper.

  8. Evaluation of knowledge of Health care professionals on warfarin interactions with drug and herb medicinal in Central Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Arifi, Mohamed N.; Wajid, Syed; Al-Manie, Nawaf K.; Al-Saker, Faisal M.; Babelgaith, Salmeen D.; Asiri, Yousif A.; Sales, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate health care professionals’ knowledge on warfarin interactions with drugs and herbs. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was developed to assess health care professionals’ knowledge on warfarin interactions with drug and herb. Respondents were asked to classify 15 drugs that may effect on warfarin action as “enhance”, “inhibit “, “no effect”. The study sample involved health care professionals (physicians, pharmacists and nurses) from king Salman hospital, Saudi Arabia. Results: About 92.2% of health care professionals identified warfarin interactions with aspirin, 4.4% for warfarin and fluoxetine. Warfarin and cardiac agents (atenolol) was correctly identified by 11.1% of respondents. In warfarin –herb interactions section, the majority of respondents (66.7%) identified the interaction between green tea and warfarin. Approximately one-third of respondents (n=33) correctly classified warfarin interactions with cardamom. No significant difference was found between the health care professionals (p=0.49) for warfarin-drug interactions knowledge score and p= 0.52 for warfarin- herb interactions knowledge score. Conclusion: This study suggests that health care professionals’ knowledge of warfarin- drug-herb interactions was inadequate. Therefore, health care professionals should receive more education programs about drug-drug/herb interactions to provide appropriate patient counseling and optimal therapeutic outcomes. PMID:27022381

  9. Splenectomy in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease in Tabuk

    PubMed Central

    Ghmaird, Asmaa; Alnoaiji, Mohammad Mohammad; Al-Blewi, Sawsan; Zaki, Shaimaa; El-lewi, Ahmad; Ahmad, Nehal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sickle cell disease is a common genetic disease in Saudi Arabia; it is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by production of abnormal hemoglobin S and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Acute splenic sequestration is a life-threatening complication for this disease. Prophylactic splenectomy is the only effective strategy for preventing future life-threatening episodes. AIM: The aim of this study was to study hospital records for all children aged 2 to 12 year old with Sickle cell disease who underwent splenectomy in Tabuk in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: Records of 24 children (13 males, 11 females) who underwent splenectomy in surgery department of King Salman North West Armed Hospital, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia between 2008 and 2015 were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed for age, sex, indications for splenectomy, surgical technique, preoperative and postoperative length of stay, operative and postoperative complications, acute chest syndrome, painful crises, blood transfusion and fever (preoperative and postoperative). RESULTS: We stressed on the information about the details of operation, the frequency of blood transfusion, fever, acute chest syndrome and painful crisis before and after operation. CONCLUSION: Here we found that blood transfusion frequency decreased after splenectomy.

  10. Trabasa - Traditional Architecture Recorded by Means of Building Archaeology in Saudi Arabia: Workshop in Jeddah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, U.; Jäger-Klein, C.; Mayer, I.; Mortada, H.; Styhler-Aydın, G.

    2013-07-01

    Saudi Arabia has a rich architectural heritage that can be found in all regions of the vast country. Except for a small number of publications the recording and documentation of the traditional built environment was not content of detailed scientific investigations so far. But with the increasing decay of the architectural heritage the interest for this kind of research is rising. A mirror of this efforts is the National Built Heritage Forum, annual conference, launched in 2010 by his excellency Prince Sultan bin Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud and the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities (SCTA). In that frame Saudi universities are intensifying research and educational programs for the research of traditional architecture. In 2008 the Department of Architecture of the College of Environmental Design at the King Abdulaziz University established a cooperation with the Department of History of Architecture and Building Archaeology of the Vienna University of Technology with the aim to start an exchange of knowledge and experience in building archaeology and building survey. An important part of this cooperation was a workshop for staff and students in the historic centre of Jeddah. The aim was to train methods and techniques on typical examples in the old town of Jeddah, Al Balad. This paper is describing the layout of the workshop, the process of the work and examples of the results.

  11. Use of an Extract of Indian Sacred Plant Ocimum sanctum as an Anticariogenic Agent: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Sham S; Salman, Afreen; Chandra, Jagadish

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To analyze the efficacy of three different concentrations of Ocimum sanctum extract against various microorganisms, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus sanguis, Lactobacillus acidophilus. Materials and methods: Ethanolic extract of Ocimum sanctum was prepared by the hot extraction method. The extract was diluted with an inert solvent, dimethyl sulfoxide to obtain 3 different concentrations (2.5, 5 and 10%) of the extract. 0.2% chlorhexidine was used as a positive control and dimethyl sul-foxide was used as a negative control. The extract, along with the controls, was then subjected to microbiological investigation to determine which concentration among the 3 different concentrations of extract gave a wider inhibition zone against S. mutans, S. mitis, S. sanguis, L. acidophilus. The zones of inhibition were measured in millimeters. Results: Ocimum sanctum leaf extract demonstrated maximum antimicrobial activity against microorganisms responsible for dental caries at the 10% concentration level although 5 and 2.5% were also effective. Maximum activity was seen against S. mutans and S. sanguis with 10% extract. Conclusion: Ocimum sanctum leaf extract was effective against all the microorganisms. How to cite this article: Pai RK, Bhat SS, Salman A, Chandra J. Use of an Extract of Indian Sacred Plant Ocimum Sanctum as an Anticariogenic Agent: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):99-101. PMID:26379375

  12. Interview: partnering with the industry: the Olympic laboratory model.

    PubMed

    Cowan, David A; Barker, Campbell P

    2012-07-01

    David A Cowan and Campbell P Barker speak to Ryan De Vooght-Johnson at Bioanalysis in May 2012 about the partnership between industry and academia for the setup and running of the doping-control laboratory for the London 2012 Olympic Games. David A Cowan is Director of the London 2012 anti-doping laboratory as well as Director of the King's College London Drug Control Centre, the UK's only WADA-accredited anti-doping laboratory, and Head of the Department of Forensic Science and Drug Monitoring. Cowan co-founded the Drug Control Centre in 1978 and became its Director in 1990. He has published extensively in the field of pharmaceutical analysis, especially as it relates to detecting drug administration in sport, and was awarded a personal chair in pharmaceutical toxicology in 1996. Cowan became Head of the Department of Forensic Science and Drug Monitoring at King's College London in 2002. He has served on a number of national and international committees, including the Council of Europe Working Party Investigating Drug Abuse in Sport that led to the first World Anti-Doping Convention, the Laboratory Representative on the International Olympic Committee's Medical Commission, and WADA's Laboratory Accreditation Subcommittee. He is a member of the Crippen Club for Distinguished Toxicologists. In 1998 he was awarded the IOC Trophy for Sport Ethics by the BOA. He was a founding member of the World Association of Anti-Doping Scientists and became its first President serving on its Executive Board between 2001 and 2004. He was a Visiting Laboratory Director at the Salt Lake City Winter Olympic Games 2002, where the first novel erythropoiesis-stimulating protein (NESP) positive was discovered. He was also a senior advisory scientist at both the Turin Winter Olympic Games in 2006 and the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008. He was also a member of the IOC Medical Commission for the Sydney Olympic Games in 2000 and the Vancouver Winter Olympic Games in 2010. The Drug Control

  13. Metal levels in seston and marine fish flesh near industrial and metropolitan centres in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J W; Edyvane, K S; Boxall, V A; Hamann, M; Soole, K L

    2001-05-01

    Port Pirie is the site of the largest lead smelter in the world, depositing 250 t of zinc, and 100 t of lead annually into Spencer Gulf. Barker Inlet is adjacent to metropolitan Adelaide, and receives unknown quantities of urban and industrial discharges. Both areas are sites of major commercial and recreational fisheries, contained within delicately balanced marine wetland ecosystems, comprising large areas of mangrove and seagrass habitats. Aldrichetta forsteri and Sillago schomburgkii are major species within these fisheries and as estuarine-dependent species were chosen for this study as indicator species for the detection and monitoring of pollutant impacts in the nearshore marine ecosystems of South Australia. Seston sediment collectors were deployed at each site and analysed seasonally for the presence of cadmium, lead and copper. Flesh samples from A. forsteri and S. schomburgkii were examined seasonally for the presence of cadmium, lead and copper and the results correlated with levels found in the seston sediment at each site. Metal concentrations were also correlated with a biomarker of genotoxicity measured in the same animals (micronuclei in erythrocytes) that were reported previously. Seston levels of cadmium, lead and copper were highest at Port Pirie, followed by Barker Inlet and were lowest at Wills Creek, with cadmium undetectable at the latter site. Metals in seston varied considerably with season, with generally higher levels in winter samples. In fish flesh, metal levels followed broadly similar trends as for seston. Spearman rank correlations between metals in seston and in flesh were strongly positive. There was also a significant correlation between flesh concentrations of each metal and the frequency of micronuclei in erythrocytes. This study has shown that seston concentration of pollutant metals are high in areas of industrial activity, and that these levels are also reflected in metal content of fish flesh. Mean flesh levels of cadmium

  14. Geochemistry of sedimentary-derived migmatite from NE Sardinia, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, Gabriele; Fancello, Dario; Franceschelli, Marcello; Scodina, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    In NE Sardinia at Porto Ottiolu, about 30 km south of Olbia (NE Sardinia), crops out a sequence of migmatized ortho and paragneiss, belonging to the Variscan basement's axial zone. Sedimentary-derived migmatite, which have a layered appearance in the field, were affected by three major variscan folding phase. D2, which is characterized by tight folds, is the most widespread deformation in the field. Leucosomes consists of discontinuous centimetre-thick, coarse-grained layers, that follow the S2 schistosity and are folded by D2 deformation phase. The contact with mesosome is sharp and sometimes marked by melanosome trails. They consist of quartz, plagioclase, very rare K-feldspar, muscovite, biotite, fibrolite, and rare kyanite. Plagioclase is unzoned oligoclase, though in some cases a thin albite rim is observed. Muscovite occurs as: i) single small- to medium-grained flakes enclosed in feldspar; ii) coarse grained crystals associated to biotite, fibrolite, and opaques, iii) in intergrowth with biotite to form thin elongated, slightly oriented trails, marking the faint foliation. Mesosomes are medium-grained, well foliated rocks, consisting of quartz, plagioclase muscovite, , biotite, fibrolite ± K-feldspar ± garnet. Fibrolite, muscovite and biotite are associated, to form strongly oriented, thick levels. Muscovite also occurs as unoriented crystals, showing quartz exsolutions and thin rims. A few mm-thick melanosome is usually present at the boundary between the leucosomes and mesosomes. Leucosomes are characterized by: SiO2: 75.4-77.9; Al2O3: 13.2-14.5; Fe2O3tot: 0.3-0.5; MgO: 0.1-0.2; CaO: 2.7- 3.7; Na2O: 3.9-4.6; K2O: 0.4-0.6 wt.%. An interesting feature is the relative high calcium content already described in other sedimentary-derived migmatite from Sardinia (Cruciani et al., 2008). In the normative Ab-An-Or diagram (Barker, 1979) the leucosomes plot at the boundary between trondhjemite/tonalite fields. All leucosomes are corundum normative and peraluminous

  15. Screening of coeliac disease in undetected adults and patients diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Ajlan, Abdulrahman S

    2016-07-01

    The present study is to determine the prevalence and implication of coeliac disease (CD) among adult Saudis and compared to those with diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome. This prospective study was conducted among 980 adults. Out of that, 482 subjects (staff and students of Riyadh Health Science College) were designated as control cohorts for undetected coeliac disease. Furthermore, another contingent of 498 subjects diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) at Prince Salman Hospital and Al-Iman General Hospital also constituted a segment of the overall initial 1020 subjects. Both cases and control were tested for serological markers of coeliac disease (tissues transglutaminase (tTGAs) and endomysial autoantibody (EMAs) and were confirmed by histopathology test. All the positive for cases of coeliac disease were screened for iron deficiency anaemia, Vitamin D deficiency, and osteoporosis and weight assessment. The percentage of coeliac disease in control subjects and patients diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were found to be 1.9% and 9.6% respectively, about 38% of the total coeliac disease patients are among females of middle age (20-39-years) and 16% of the males in the same age range. Whereas, 20% and 25% of all coeliac disease cases with ages of 40-59 were remarked as females and males respectively. The identical nature and overlap of symptoms of the two conditions could possibly result in misdiagnosis of coeliac diseases or over-diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome. The findings of the study might also give considerable implications of the disease in the nutritional level which is noticeable. PMID:27298578

  16. Active transport on disordered microtubule networks: The generalized random velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahana, Aviv; Kenan, Gilad; Feingold, Mario; Elbaum, Michael; Granek, Rony

    2008-11-01

    The motion of small cargo particles on microtubules by means of motor proteins in disordered microtubule networks is investigated theoretically using both analytical tools and computer simulations. Different network topologies in two and three dimensions are considered, one of which has been recently studied experimentally by Salman [Biophys. J. 89, 2134 (2005)]. A generalization of the random velocity model is used to derive the mean-square displacement of the cargo particle. We find that all cases belong to the class of anomalous superdiffusion, which is sensitive mainly to the dimensionality of the network and only marginally to its topology. Yet in three dimensions the motion is very close to simple diffusion, with sublogarithmic corrections that depend on the network topology. When details of the thermal diffusion in the bulk solution are included, no significant change to the asymptotic time behavior is found. However, a small asymmetry in the mean microtubule polarity affects the corresponding long-time behavior. We also study a three-dimensional model of the microtubule network in living animal cells. Three first-passage-time problems of intracellular transport are simulated and analyzed for different motor processivities: (i) cargo that originates near the nucleus and has to reach the membrane, (ii) cargo that originates from the membrane and has to reach the nucleus, and (iii) cargo that leaves the nucleus and has to reach a specific target in the cytoplasm. We conclude that while a higher motor processivity increases the transport efficiency in cases (i) and (ii), in case (iii) it has the opposite effect. We conjecture that the balance between the different network tasks, as manifested in cases (i) and (ii) versus case (iii), may be the reason for the evolutionary choice of a finite motor processivity.

  17. Polar Climate Connections of the Last Glacial Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Rial, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Ever since the cross-core chronology became available, the connection between the Earth's polar regions - or the lack of such [Wunsch, 2003; 2006] - has been an on-going debate in the paleoclimate community. While the inverse relationship inferred from the bipolar seesaw model [Crowley, 1992] could not account for the difference in signal shape of the polar records, integration/differentiation (I/D) has been proposed as the linkage between them [Schmittner et al., 2003; Huybers, 2004; Roe and Steig, 2004; Schmittner et al., 2004]. Stoker and Johnsen [2003] have proposed a revised (thermal) bipolar seesaw model (TBS), demonstrating that the climate record from Antarctic is that of the Greenland convolved with an exponential decaying function, which represents the heat reservoir of the Southern Ocean. More recently, Rial [2012] has proposed phase synchronization (PS) as the polar climate connection from which polar climate records can be treated approximately as a Hilbert transform pair. All three models (I/D, TBS, and PS) have been used to reconstruct past climate of the north from the longer climate record of the south [Siddall et al., 2006; Barker et al., 2011; Oh et al., 2014]. However, no comparison has been made to test and analyze these models against one another for their performance and stabilities. Here we investigated the aforementioned models with polar climate data on the recent AICC2012 chronology to derive the similarities and differences among them in both time and frequency domains. Most importantly we discussed how such differences translate to the discrepancies in reconstructions of the northern climate and possible physical mechanism(s) of connection each model limits and allows. ReferencesBarker et al., 2011, Science, 334(6054), 347-351. Crowley, 1992, Paleoceanography, 7(4), 489-497. Huybers, 2004, QSR, 23(1-2), 207-210. Oh et al., 2014, QSR, 83, 129-142. Rial, 2012, Am J Sci, 312(4), 417-448. Roe & Steig, 2004, Journal of Climate, 17(10), 1929

  18. Assimilation of DMSP/SSUSI UV data into IDA4D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelinas, L. J.; Bust, G. S.; Brinkman, D. G.; Straus, P. R.; Swartz, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Ionospheric Data Assimilation Four-Dimensional (IDA4D) is a continuous-time, three-dimensional imaging algorithm that can produce 4D electron density specifications for various science investigations [e.g., Bust et al., 2007]. IDA4D is based on three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) data assimilation [Daley and Barker, 2001]. The algorithm combines various data sources and their associated error covariances with a background model (in this case the IRI) and its covariances to produce an ionospheric specification with formal uncertainties. IDA4D employs a Gauss- Markov Kalman filter technique similar to that used by operational assimilation models. The model can ingest a broad spectrum of data types that are either linearly or non-linearly related to electron density, including ground-based TEC, space-based TEC as measured by GPS occultation sensors and UV emissions associated with nightside recombination of O+. IDA4D has been undergoing testing at The Aerospace Corporation to determine its performance with respect to combinations of input data sets under different conditions (solar minimum, solar maximum, geomagnetic activity). The results presented here summarize the performance of IDA4D when UV data is ingested, both with and without additional TEC measurements. The UV data used in the study summarized here are 135.6 nm emissions measured the SSUSI instruments on F16 and F18 DMSP. We discuss the process by which UV data is ingested into IDA4D, including data binning, error estimation and correction of 135.6 nm contamination from mutual neutralization of O+ and O-. Model performance is then assessed using comparisons to various ground truth data, including ISR data, Jason VTEC, CNOF/S in-situ plasma density and ionosonde-derived NmF2 values. The results of this study show that UV data improves model performance, particularly when TEC data coverage is sparse. Bust, G. S., G. Crowley, T. W. Garner, T. L. Gaussiran II, R. W. Meggs, C. N. Mitchell, P. S. J. Spencer, P

  19. Heavy metal content (Cd, Ni, Cr and Pb) in soil amendment with a low polluted biosolid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Lucas, Ignacio; Lag Brotons, Alfonso; Navarro-Pedreño, Jose; Belén Almendro-Candel, Maria; Jordán, Manuel M.; Bech, Jaume; Roca, Nuria

    2016-04-01

    The progressively higher water quality standards in Europe has led to the generation of large quantities of sewage sludge derived from wastewater treatment (Fytili and Zabaniotou 2008). Composting is an effective method to minimize these risks, as pathogens are biodegraded and heavy metals are stabilized as a result of organic matter transformations (Barker and Bryson 2002; Noble and Roberts 2004). Most of the studies about sewage sludge pollution are centred in medium and high polluted wastes. However, the aim of this study was to assess the effects on soil heavy metal content of a low polluted sewage sludge compost in order to identify an optimal application rate based in heavy metal concentration under a period of cultivation of a Mediterranean horticultural plant (Cynara carducnculus). The experiment was done between January to June: rainfall was 71 mm, the volume of water supplied every week was 10.5 mm, mean air temperatures was 14.2, 20.4 (maximum), and 9.2◦C (minimum). The soil was a clay-loam anthrosol (WRB 2006). The experimental plot (60 m2) was divided into five subplots with five treatments corresponding to 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 kg compost/m2. Three top-soil (first 20 cm) samples from each treatment were taken (January, April and June) and these parameters were analysed: pH, electrical conductivity, organic matter and total content of heavy metals (microwave acid digestion followed by AAS-spectrometry determination). The results show that sewage sludge compost treatments increase the organic matter content and salinity (electrical conductivity of the soils) and diminish the pH. Cd and Ni total content in top-soil was affected and both slightly reduce their concentration. Pb and Cr show minor changes. In general, the application of this low polluted compost may affect the mobility of Cd and Ni due to the pH modification and the water added by irrigation along time but Pb and Cr remain their content in the top-soil. References Barker, A.V., and G.M. Bryson

  20. A 400-kyr record of millennial-scale carbonate preservation events in the Southern Ocean: Implications for Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodell, D. A.; Vautravers, M. J.; Barker, S.; Charles, C.; Crowhurst, S.

    2014-12-01

    Hodell et al. (2001) suggested that carbonate preservation in the deep Cape Basin represented a qualitative, high-resolution record of the temporal evolution of the carbonate saturation state of the deep sea. The carbonate signal reflects both transient events in the redistribution of alkalinity and DIC in the deep ocean and steady-state mass balance processes. Here we re-analyzed the carbonate records of Sites 1089/TN057-21 using an Avaatech XRF core scanner and measured elemental variations at 2.5-mm resolution for the past 400 kyrs. Log Ca/Ti is highly correlated to weight percent carbonate content and other dissolution proxies and resolves millennial-scale events in carbonate preservation. A high-pass filter removes the low-frequency (orbital) variability in carbonate preservation, which is attributed mainly to steady-state mass balance processes. The high-frequency (suborbital) component reflects transient responses to the redistribution of carbonate ion that is related mainly to changing deep-water circulation. During the last glacial period, distinct millennial-scale increases in carbonate preservation in piston core TN057-21 occurred during times of enhanced Atlantic Meridional Overtunring Circulation (AMOC) (Barker et al., 2010; Barker and Diz, 2014), as supported by increases in benthic δ13C and less radiogenic ɛNd values. Carbonate preservation peaked particularly during long, warm interstadials in Greenland when a deep water mass with high carbonate ion concentration was formed in the North Atlantic. Export of NADW may have been greater than the Holocene during some of these events ("overshoots") and/or preformed carbonate ion concentrations in North Atlantic source areas may have been higher owing to lower atmospheric CO2 and less carbonate production in surface water. Each South Atlantic carbonate peak is associated with the start of Antarctic cooling and declining or leveling of atmospheric CO2, reflecting the signature of a thermal bipolar seesaw

  1. Liquid theory with high accuracy and broad applicability: Coupling parameter series expansion and non hard sphere perturbation strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2011-12-01

    Thermodynamic and structural properties of liquids are of fundamental interest in physics, chemistry, and biology, and perturbation approach has been fundamental to liquid theoretical approaches since the dawn of modern statistical mechanics and remains so to this day. Although thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) is widely used in the chemical physics community, one of the most popular versions of the TPT, i.e. Zwanzig (Zwanzig, R. W. J. Chem. Phys. 1954, 22, 1420-1426) 1st-order high temperature series expansion (HTSE) TPT and its 2nd-order counterpart under a macroscopic compressibility approximation of Barker-Henderson (Barker, J. A.; Henderson, D. J. Chem. Phys. 1967, 47, 2856-2861), have some serious shortcomings: (i) the nth-order term of the HTSE is involved with reference fluid distribution functions of order up to 2n, and the higher-order terms hence progressively become more complicated and numerically inaccessible; (ii) the performance of the HTSE rapidly deteriorates and the calculated results become even qualitatively incorrect as the temperature of interest decreases. This account deals with the developments that we have made over the last five years or so to advance a coupling parameter series expansion (CPSE) and a non hard sphere (HS) perturbation strategy that has scored some of its greatest successes in overcoming the above-mentioned difficulties. In this account (i) we expatiate on implementation details of our schemes: how input information indispensable to high-order truncation of the CPSE in both the HS and non HS perturbation schemes is calculated by an Ornstein-Zernike integral equation theory; how high-order thermodynamic quantities, such as critical parameters and excess constant volume heat capacity, are extracted from the resulting excess Helmholtz free energy with irregular and inevitable numerical errors; how to select reference potential in the non HS perturbation scheme. (ii) We give a quantitative analysis on why convergence

  2. Ovarian LGR5 is critical for successful pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofei; Terakawa, Jumpei; Clevers, Hans; Barker, Nick; Daikoku, Takiko; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2014-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) is expressed in many organs, including female reproductive organs, and is a stem cell marker in the stomach and intestinal epithelium, hair follicles, and ovarian surface epithelium. Despite ongoing studies, the definitive physiological functions of Lgr5 remain unclear. We utilized mice with conditional deletion of Lgr5 (Lgr5d/d) in the female reproductive organs by progesterone receptor-Cre (PgrCre) to determine Lgr5's functions during pregnancy. Only 30% of plugged Lgr5d/d females delivered live pups, and their litter sizes were lower. We found that pregnancy failure in Lgr5d/d females was due to insufficient ovarian progesterone (P4) secretion that compromised decidualization, terminating pregnancy. The drop in P4 levels was reflected in elevated levels of P4-metabolizing enzyme 20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in corpora lutea (CL) inactivated of Lgr5. Of interest, P4 supplementation rescued decidualization failure and supported pregnancy to full term in Lgr5d/d females. These results provide strong evidence that Lgr5 is critical to normal CL function, unveiling a new role of LGR5 in the ovary.—Sun, X., Terakawa, J., Clevers, H., Barker, N., Daikoku, T., Dey, S. K. Ovarian LGR5 is critical for successful pregnancy. PMID:24469993

  3. Enacting a social ecology: radically embodied intersubjectivity

    PubMed Central

    McGann, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Embodied approaches to cognitive science frequently describe the mind as “world-involving,” indicating complementary and interdependent relationships between an agent and its environment. The precise nature of the environment is frequently left ill-described, however, and provides a challenge for such approaches, particularly, it is noted here, for the enactive approach which emphasizes this complementarity in quite radical terms. This paper argues that enactivists should work to find common cause with a dynamic form of ecological psychology, a theoretical perspective that provides the most explicit theory of the psychological environment currently extant. In doing so, the intersubjective, cultural nature of the ecology of human psychology is explored, with the challenges this poses for both enactivist and ecological approaches outlined. The theory of behavior settings (Barker, 1968; Schoggen, 1989) is used to present a framework for resolving some of these challenges. Drawing these various strands together an outline of a radical embodied account of intersubjectivity and social activity is presented. PMID:25477844

  4. Developmental Immunotoxicity, Perinatal Programming, and Noncommunicable Diseases: Focus on Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dietert, Rodney R.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental immunotoxicity (DIT) is a term given to encompass the environmentally induced disruption of normal immune development resulting in adverse outcomes. A myriad of chemical, physical, and psychological factors can all contribute to DIT. As a core component of the developmental origins of adult disease, DIT is interlinked with three important concepts surrounding health risks across a lifetime: (1) the Barker Hypothesis, which connects prenatal development to later-life diseases, (2) the hygiene hypothesis, which connects newborns and infants to risk of later-life diseases and, (3) fetal programming and epigenetic alterations, which may exert effects both in later life and across future generations. This review of DIT considers: (1) the history and context of DIT research, (2) the fundamental features of DIT, (3) the emerging role of DIT in risk of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and (4) the range of risk factors that have been investigated through human research. The emphasis on the human DIT-related literature is significant since most prior reviews of DIT have largely focused on animal research and considerations of specific categories of risk factors (e.g., heavy metals). Risk factors considered in this review include air pollution, aluminum, antibiotics, arsenic, bisphenol A, ethanol, lead (Pb), maternal smoking and environmental tobacco smoke, paracetamol (acetaminophen), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polyfluorinated compounds. PMID:26556429

  5. The role of poly-hydroxy-alkanoate form in determining the response of enhanced biological phosphorus removal biomass to volatile fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Hua; Geiger, Cherie; Randall, Andrew Amis

    2002-01-01

    Anaerobic-aerobic batch experiments indicated that poly-hydroxy-alkanoate (PHA) form was important in determining the net phosphorus removal resulting from different volatile fatty acids (VFAs). Poly-3-hydroxy-butyrate (3HB) content was found to correlate fairly well with higher observed aerobic phosphorus uptake per unit PHA carbon degraded. Poly-3-hydroxy-valerate (3HV) correlated with lower aerobic phosphorus uptakes per unit PHA carbon degraded. These experiments, conducted with synthetic wastewater, imply that VFA speciation might have a significant effect on aerobic phosphorus uptakes and net phosphorus removal. In addition, the model parameter fP.UPT (Barker and Dold, 1997) could vary with the proportion of acetic to propionic acid received (i.e., the acetic/propionic acid ratio may be an important parameter for these systems). Carbohydrate data implied that the lower aerobic phosphorus uptake resulting from 3HV might have been caused by a greater fraction of PHA carbon shunting to carbohydrate biosynthesis during aerobiosis. PMID:11995868

  6. Mate loss affects survival but not breeding in black brant geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicolai, Christopher A.; Sedinger, James S.; Ward, David H.; Boyd, W. Sean

    2012-01-01

    For birds maintaining long-term monogamous relationships, mate loss might be expected to reduce fitness, either through reduced survival or reduced future reproductive investment. We used harvest of male brant during regular sport hunting seasons as an experimental removal to examine effects of mate loss on fitness of female black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans; hereafter brant). We used the Barker model in program MARK to examine effects of mate loss on annual survival, reporting rate, and permanent emigration. Survival rates decreased from 0.847 ± 0.004 for females who did not lose their mates to 0.690 ± 0.072 for birds who lost mates. Seber ring reporting rate for females that lost their mates were 2 times higher than those that did not lose mates, 0.12 ± 0.086 and 0.06 ± 0.006, respectively, indicating that mate loss increased vulnerability to harvest and possibly other forms of predation. We found little support for effects of mate loss on fidelity to breeding site and consequently on breeding. Our results indicate substantial fitness costs to females associated with mate loss, but that females who survived and were able to form new pair bonds may have been higher quality than the average female in the population.

  7. The identification and characteristics of Echinoparyphium rubrum (Cort. 1914) new comb. (Trematoda, Echinostomatidae) based on experimental evidence of the life cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanev, I.; Sorensen, R.; Sterner, M.; Cole, R.; Fried, B.

    1998-01-01

    The life cycle of Echinoparyphium rubrum (Cort, 1914) comb. n. has been completed experimentally. All of the developmental stages egg, miracidium, sporocyst, mother and daughter rediae, cercaria, metacercaria, and adult were examined and described. The miracidia infected freshwater snails of the genus Physa , P. gyrina and P. occidentalis. Attempts to infect snails of the genera Lymnaea, L. auricularis, L. peregra, L. truncatula and Bulinus, B. truncatus failed. Cercariae infected various pulmonate and prosobranch freshwater snails, mussels, frogs, water turtles and planarians. The adults developed in the small intestine of birds and mammals. The identity and major characteristics of Echinoparyphium rubrum are discussed. Synonyms of E. rubrum are Cercaria rubra Cort, 1914; Cercaria biflexa Faust, 1917; Cercaria chisolenata Faust, 1918; Echinostoma callawayensis Barker et Noll, 1915; Echinostoma revolutum of Johnson (1920); Echinoparyphium elegans of Cannon (1938), of Bain and Trelfall (1977), of Mahoney and Trelfall (1977); and Echinoparyphium recurvatum of Jilek (1977), Harley (1972), Sankurathri and Holmes (1976). Comparisons are made between E. rubrum and its 43-collar-spined allies: E. flexum from North America, E. cinctum from Europe, E. dunni from Asia and E. elegans from Africa.

  8. The origins of health and disease: the influence of maternal diseases and lifestyle during gestation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    According to the Barker hypothesis, the period of pregnancy and the intrauterine environment are crucial to the tendency to develop diseases like hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, metabolic disorders, pulmonary, renal and mental illnesses. The external environment affects the development of a particular phenotype suitable for an environment with characteristics that closely resemble intrauterine conditions. If the extra-uterine environment differs greatly from the intra-uterine one, the fetus is more prone to develop disease. Subsequent studies have shown that maternal diseases like depression and anxiety, epilepsy, asthma, anemia and metabolic disorders, like diabetes, are able to determine alterations in growth and fetal development. Similarly, the maternal lifestyle, particularly diet, exercise and smoking during pregnancy, have an important role in determining the risk to develop diseases that manifest themselves both during childhood and particularly in adulthood. Finally, there are abundant potential sources of pollutants, both indoor and outdoor, in the environment in which the child lives, which can contribute to an increased probability to the development of several diseases and that in some cases could be easily avoided. PMID:23343462

  9. Infants in cocktail parties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Rochelle S.

    2003-04-01

    Most work on listeners' ability to separate streams of speech has focused on adults. Yet infants also find themselves in noisy environments. In order to learn from their caregivers' speech in these settings, they must first separate it from background noise such as that from television shows and siblings. Previous work has found that 7.5-month-old infants can separate streams of speech when the target voice is more intense than the distractor voice (Newman and Jusczyk, 1996), when the target voice is known to the infant (Barker and Newman, 2000) or when infants are presented with an audiovisual (rather than auditory-only) signal (Hollich, Jusczyk, and Newman, 2001). Unfortunately, the paradigm in these studies can only be used on infants at least 7.5 months of age, limiting the ability to investigate how stream segregation develops over time. The present work uses a new paradigm to explore younger infants' ability to separate streams of speech. Infants aged 4.5 months heard a female talker repeat either their own name or another infants' name, while several other voices spoke fluently in the background. We present data on infants' ability to recognize their own name in this cocktail party situation. [Work supported by NSF and NICHD.

  10. Feasibility of coded vibration in a vibro-ultrasound system for tissue elasticity measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinxin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua; Li, Tianjie; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2016-07-01

    The ability of various methods for elasticity measurement and imaging is hampered by the vibration amplitude on biological tissues. Based on the inference that coded excitation will improve the performance of the cross-correlation function of the tissue displacement waves, the idea of exerting encoded external vibration on tested samples for measuring its elasticity is proposed. It was implemented by integrating a programmable vibration generation function into a customized vibro-ultrasound system to generate Barker coded vibration for elasticity measurement. Experiments were conducted on silicone phantoms and porcine muscles. The results showed that coded excitation of the vibration enhanced the accuracy and robustness of the elasticity measurement especially in low signal-to-noise ratio scenarios. In the phantom study, the measured shear modulus values with coded vibration had an R(2 )= 0.993 linear correlation to that of referenced indentation, while for single-cycle pulse the R(2) decreased to 0.987. In porcine muscle study, the coded vibration also obtained a shear modulus value which is more accurate than the single-cycle pulse by 0.16 kPa and 0.33 kPa at two different depths. These results demonstrated the feasibility and potentiality of the coded vibration for enhancing the quality of elasticity measurement and imaging. PMID:27475130

  11. Quantum vs Classical Mechanics for a 'Simple' Dissociation Reaction. Should They Give the Same Results?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Stephen

    1997-03-01

    When performing molecular dynamical simulations on light systems at low energies, there is always the risk of producing data that bear no similarity to experiment. Indeed, John Barker himself was particularly anxious about treating Ar scattering from surfaces using classical mechanics where it had been shown experimentally in his own lab that diffraction occurs. In such cases, the correct procedure is probably to play the trump card "... well of course, quantum effects will modify this so that....." and retire gracefully. For our particular interests, the tables are turned in that we are interested in gas-surface dynamical studies for highly quantized systems, but would be interested to know when it is possible to use classical mechanics in order that a greater dimensionality might be treated. For molecular dissociation and scattering, it has been oft quoted that the greater the number of degrees of freedom, the more appropriate is classical mechanics, primarily because of the mass averaging over the quantized dimensions. Is this true? We have been investigating the dissociation of hydrogen molecules at surfaces and in this talk I will present quantum results for dissociation and scattering, along with a novel method for their interpretation based upon adiabatic potential energy surfaces. Comparison with classical calculations will be made and conclusions drawn. a novel method for their interpretation based upon adiabatic potential energy surfaces

  12. Theoretical study of three-body correlations in atomic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Sane, R.N.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical study of triplet correlations in simple classical fluids has been made from two distinct approaches. In one approach the first order terms in the h-bond expansion for triplet correlations as given by Abe is accurately evauluated numerically for the Lennard-Jones fluid using a technique developed by Barker and Monoghan. Results are otain,ed for a range of fluid densities and comparisons are made to the accurate data obtained through Monte Carlo computer simulations by Raveche, Mountain, and Streett. These comparisons indicate that the first order term is inadequate near and beyond the trip point of the system. In the other approach the description of triplet correlations is discussed in terms of fitting computer generated data to a truncated expansion in orthonormal functions. A novel set of functions that are orthonormal over a finite triangular domain is introduced. The expansion method is illustrated with an application to the rigid sphere model. This second approach could lead to the best method of describing triplet correlations in simple fluids.

  13. 3rd College of paediatrics and child health lecture--the past, the present and the shape of things to come...

    PubMed

    Loke, Kah Yin; Lin, Jeremy By; Mabel, Deurenberg Yap

    2008-05-01

    The growth trends of Singapore children spanning 5 decades are reviewed, based on 8 anthropometric studies from 1957 till 2002. The heights of pre-school children and school age children appear to have optimised according to their genetic potential, but the weights and body mass indices of children still appear to be increasing from 6 to 18 years for both sexes, probably as a consequence of increasing affluence. This trend is reflected in the increasing obesity prevalence in school children over the past 30 years, and the concomitant increased morbidity associated with the metabolic syndrome, necessitates further research into the causes of obesity. Barker's hypothesis first suggested that changes in the intra-uterine environment can cause fetal adaptations which persist into adulthood, and are responsible for many chronic diseases of adult life. More recently, intense research in the field of epigenetics suggests that the environment can also influence the phenotype through gene expression, through modification of DNA methylation and histones which, in turn, influences gene expression. The challenge for the future is to determine if there are clear epigenetic changes, which are responsible for the increased prevalence of childhood and adolescent obesity, and whether these changes are transmitted through generations. Unravelling these epigenetic mechanisms may be the key to the prevention of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:18536833

  14. Microvascular and mitochondrial dysfunction in the female F1 generation after gestational TiO2 nanoparticle exposure

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Nichols, Cody E.; Yi, Jinghai; McBride, Carroll R.; Minarchick, Valerie C.; Shepherd, Danielle L.; Hollander, John M.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the ongoing evolution of nanotechnology, there is a growing need to assess the toxicological outcomes in under-studied populations in order to properly consider the potential of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) and fully enhance their safety. Recently, we and others have explored the vascular consequences associated with gestational nanomaterial exposure, reporting microvascular dysfunction within the uterine circulation of pregnant dams and the tail artery of fetal pups. It has been proposed (via work derived by the Barker Hypothesis) that mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent oxidative stress mechanisms as a possible link between a hostile gestational environment and adult disease. Therefore, in this study, we exposed pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats to nanosized titanium dioxide aerosols after implantation (gestational day 6). Pups were delivered, and the progeny grew into adulthood. Microvascular reactivity, mitochondrial respiration and hydrogen peroxide production of the coronary and uterine circulations of the female offspring were evaluated. While there were no significant differences within the maternal or litter characteristics, endothelium-dependent dilation and active mechanotransduction in both coronary and uterine arterioles were significantly impaired. In addition, there was a significant reduction in maximal mitochondrial respiration (state 3) in the left ventricle and uterus. These studies demonstrate microvascular dysfunction and coincide with mitochondrial inefficiencies in both the cardiac and uterine tissues, which may represent initial evidence that prenatal ENM exposure produces microvascular impairments that persist throughout multiple developmental stages. PMID:25475392

  15. Heparin binding to platelet factor-4. An NMR and site-directed mutagenesis study: arginine residues are crucial for binding.

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, K H; Ilyina, E; Roongta, V; Dundas, M; Joseph, J; Lai, C K; Maione, T; Daly, T J

    1995-01-01

    Native platelet factor-4 (PF4) is an asymmetrically associated, homo-tetrameric protein (70 residues/subunit) known for binding polysulphated glycosaminoglycans like heparin. PF4 N-terminal chimeric mutant M2 (PF4-M2), on the other hand, forms symmetric tetramers [Mayo, Roongta, Ilyina, Milius, Barker, Quinlan, La Rosa and Daly (1995) Biochemistry 34, 11399-11409] making NMR studies with this 32 kDa protein tractable. PF4-M2, moreover, binds heparin with a similar affinity to that of native PF4. NMR data presented here indicate that heparin (9000 Da cut-off) binding to PF4-M2, while not perturbing the overall structure of the protein, does perturb specific side-chain proton resonances which map to spatially related residues within a ring of positively charged side chains on the surface of tetrameric PF4-M2. Contrary to PF4-heparin binding models which centre around C-terminal alpha-helix lysines, this study indicates that a loop containing Arg-20, Arg-22, His-23 and Thr-25, as well as Lys-46 and Arg-49, are even more affected by heparin binding. Site-directed mutagenesis and heparin binding data support these NMR findings by indicating that arginines more than C-terminal lysines, are crucial to the heparin binding process. Images Figure 4 PMID:8526843

  16. Volumetric imaging of the auroral ionosphere: Initial results from PFISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeter, Joshua; Butler, Thomas; Heinselman, Craig; Nicolls, Michael; Kelly, John; Hampton, Donald

    2009-05-01

    The Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) is the first dedicated ISR built with an electronically steerable array. This paper demonstrates the capabilities of PFISR for producing three-dimensional volumetric images of E-region ionization patterns produced by the aurora. The phase table was configured to cycle through 121 beam positions arranged in an 11×11 grid. A 13-baud Barker coded pulse was used, which provided ~1.5-km range resolution out to a maximum range of 250 km. Backscattered power was converted to electron density by correcting for path loss and applying the Buneman approximation assuming equal electron and ion temperatures. The results were then interpolated onto a three-dimensional cartesian grid. Volumetric images are presented at 5-min, 1-min, and 14.6-s integration times (corresponding to 960, 192, and 48 pulses-per-position, respectively) to illustrate the tradeoff between spatio-temporal resolution and data quality. At 14.6 s cadence, variability in plasma density within the volume appears to be fully resolved in space and time, a result that is supported by both observational evidence and theoretical predictions of ionospheric response times. Some potential applications of this mode for studying magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions in the auroral zone are discussed.

  17. Demonstration of LED Retrofit Lamps at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Naomi J.

    2011-09-01

    The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene, Oregon, houses a remarkable permanent collection of Asian art and antiquities, modern art, and sculpture, and also hosts traveling exhibitions. In the winter and spring of 2011, a series of digital photographs by artist Chris Jordan, titled "Running the Numbers," was exhibited in the Coeta and Donald Barker Special Exhibitions Gallery. These works graphically illustrate waste (energy, money, health, consumer objects, etc.) in contemporary culture. The Bonneville Power Administration and the Eugene Water and Electricity Board provided a set of Cree 12W light-emitting diode (LED) PAR38 replacement lamps (Cree LRP38) for the museum to test for accent lighting in lieu of their standard Sylvania 90W PAR38 130V Narrow Flood lamps (which draw 78.9W at 120V). At the same time, the museum tested LED replacement lamps from three other manufacturers, and chose the Cree lamp as the most versatile and most appropriate color product for this exhibit. The lamps were installed for the opening of the show in January 2011. This report describes the process for the demonstration, the energy and economic results, and results of a survey of the museum staff and gallery visitors on four similar clusters of art lighted separately by four PAR38 lamps.

  18. The offspring of the diabetic mother--short- and long-term implications.

    PubMed

    Mitanchez, D; Yzydorczyk, C; Siddeek, B; Boubred, F; Benahmed, M; Simeoni, U

    2015-02-01

    In the 1980s, David Barker and Colleagues proposed that the major causes of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases have their roots in early development. There is now robust evidence that an hyperglycemic intrauterine environment is responsible not only for significant short-term morbidity in the fetus and the neonate but also for an increased risk of developing diabetes as well as other chronic, noncommunicable diseases at adulthood. The risk is higher in pregestational diabetes, but unrecognized and/or poorly managed gestational diabetes (GDM) may have similar consequences. Although a relatively clear picture of the pathogenesis of the fetal and neonatal complications of maternal diabetes and of their interrelationship is available today, the intimate molecular mechanisms involved in the long term are far from being understood. While the rate of GDM is sharply increasing in association with the pandemic of obesity and of type 2 diabetes over the world, we review here the current understanding of short- and long-term outcomes of fetuses exposed to a diabetic environment. PMID:25267399

  19. Secure wireless actuation of an implanted microvalve for drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikka, Ajay C.; Faulkner, Michael; Al-Sarawi, Said F.

    2011-10-01

    The capability to wirelessly control fluid flow through a microvalve can emerge as an attractive technology enabling various biomedical applications such as remote drug delivery and in vitro diagnostics. Contactless powering of such a microvalve is best addressed by near-field inductive coupling due to its close proximity to the external interrogator. In this paper, we propose the use of the same technique for secure remote interrogation and powering of a human implantable, surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlation-based, passive microvalve. This is carried out by interrogating the microvalve with a Barker sequence-encoded BPSK signal. A numerical and experimental analysis of the biotelemetry link for the microvalve was undertaken in the vicinity of numerical and physical human body phantoms, respectively. To accurately account for the path losses and to address the design optimization, the receiver coil/antenna was solved simultaneously with the transmitter coil/antenna in the presence of a human body simulant using three-dimensional, high frequency electromagnetic FEM modelling. The received relative signal strength was numerically and experimentally derived for a miniature (6 mm × 6 mm × 0.5 mm), square spiral antenna/coil when interrogated by a handheld 8 cm × 5 cm × 0.2 cm square spiral antenna/coil in the near-field. Finally, the experimental results agreed well with the FEM analysis predictions and hence ascertained the applicability of the developed system for secure interrogation and remote powering of the newly proposed microvalve.

  20. Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-26

    PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

  1. Microelectrodes in microbial ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Boots, S.

    1989-03-15

    Understanding the microenvironment of bacteria has presented many challenges for the microbial ecologist. Simple intracellular capillary electrodes have been used in neurophysiology since the 1950s to measure action potentials in ion transport over biological membranes, and ion-selective electrodes were developed soon thereafter for the determination of H{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Ca{sup 2+}. However, these analytical techniques did not receive much attention until 1978, when Niels Peter Revsbech and Bo Barker Joergensen at the Institute of Ecology and Genetics, University of Aarhus, Denmark, began using oxygen microelectrodes in their studies of the ecology and biogeochemistry of marine sediments and other microbial environments. Today, Revsbech and Joergensen use five types of microelectrodes, two types of oxygen microelectrodes, a combined microelectrode for nitrous oxide and oxygen, a sulfide microelectrode, and a pH microelectrode. The first three microelectrodes have diameters of about 10 {mu}m and the last two of about 50 {mu}m. Some of the electrodes actually contain two or three cathodes plus a reference electrode, all situated behind a polymer membrane. In situ experiments have been done for several years at a water depth of several meters, where the micromanipulator is operated by a diver. Recently measurements were obtained in the deep sea with the microelectrodes mounted on a free-falling vehicle or operated from a submersible vessel.

  2. Influence of Past Changes in Atmospheric CO2 on Boron/Calcium of Planktic Fossil Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeyko, R. A.; Allen, K. A.; deMenocal, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    Culture experiments have revealed that B/Ca of shells grown by the foraminiferal species Globigerinoides ruber increase with increasing seawater pH. Specifically, B/Ca responds to changes in the relative abundance of pH-sensitive dissolved carbon and boron species (Allen et al. 2011, 2012). Here, we present a high-resolution study on fossilized G. ruber from two sites in North Atlantic subtropical gyres (VM25-21 and ODP 1055B) through 20 ka BP to evaluate how B/Ca responds to past changes in atmospheric CO2. Forams were picked and crushed gently, then cleaned and dissolved using a variation of the Boyle and Keigwin (1985) and Barker et al. (2003) cleaning protocols prior to analysis. ODP 1055B (from Carolina Slope, West Atlantic) produced a high-resolution record with lower B/Ca values during the glacial period followed by a rapid shift to higher B/Ca values in the early deglaciation, with values remaining high through the Holocene. These results were not predicted by culture calibrations, but they are consistent with B/Ca records from the Caribbean (ODP 999, Foster et al. 2008), suggesting this pattern is characteristic of surface waters in the greater North Atlantic region.

  3. Rural Alaska Coal Bed Methane: Application of New Technologies to Explore and Produce Energy

    SciTech Connect

    David O. Ogbe; Shirish L. Patil; Doug Reynolds

    2005-06-30

    The Petroleum Development Laboratory, University of Alaska Fairbanks prepared this report. The US Department of Energy NETL sponsored this project through the Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory (AETDL) of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The financial support of the AETDL is gratefully acknowledged. We also acknowledge the co-operation from the other investigators, including James G. Clough of the State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys; Art Clark, Charles Barker and Ed Weeks of the USGS; Beth Mclean and Robert Fisk of the Bureau of Land Management. James Ferguson and David Ogbe carried out the pre-drilling economic analysis, and Doug Reynolds conducted post drilling economic analysis. We also acknowledge the support received from Eric Opstad of Elko International, LLC; Anchorage, Alaska who provided a comprehensive AFE (Authorization for Expenditure) for pilot well drilling and completion at Fort Yukon. This report was prepared by David Ogbe, Shirish Patil, Doug Reynolds, and Santanu Khataniar of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and James Clough of the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Survey. The following research assistants, Kanhaiyalal Patel, Amy Rodman, and Michael Olaniran worked on this project.

  4. Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) habitat preference in a heterogeneous, urban, coastal environment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited information is available regarding the habitat preference of the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) in South Australian estuarine environments. The need to overcome this paucity of information is crucial for management and conservation initiatives. This preliminary study investigates the space-time patterns of habitat preference by the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin in the Port Adelaide River-Barker Inlet estuary, a South Australian, urbanised, coastal environment. More specifically, the study aim was to identify a potential preference between bare sand substrate and seagrass beds, the two habitat types present in this environment, through the resighting frequency of recognisable individual dolphins. Results Photo-identification surveys covering the 118 km2 sanctuary area were conducted over 2 survey periods May to August 2006 and from March 2009 to February 2010. Sighting frequency of recognisable individual Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins established a significant preference for the bare sand habitat. More specifically, 72 and 18% of the individuals sighted at least on two occasions were observed in the bare sand and seagrass habitats respectively. This trend was consistently observed at both seasonal and annual scales, suggesting a consistency in the distinct use of these two habitats. Conclusions It is anticipated that these results will benefit the further development of management and conservation strategies. PMID:23369354

  5. Theoretical and numerical investigations of inverse patchy colloids in the fluid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Bianchi, Emanuela Ferrari, Silvano; Kahl, Gerhard

    2015-03-21

    We investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of a new class of patchy colloids, referred to as inverse patchy colloids (IPCs) in their fluid phase via both theoretical methods and simulations. IPCs are nano- or micro- meter sized particles with differently charged surface regions. We extend conventional integral equation schemes to this particular class of systems: our approach is based on the so-called multi-density Ornstein-Zernike equation, supplemented with the associative Percus-Yevick approximation (APY). To validate the accuracy of our framework, we compare the obtained results with data extracted from NpT and NVT Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, other theoretical approaches are used to calculate the properties of the system: the reference hypernetted-chain (RHNC) method and the Barker-Henderson thermodynamic perturbation theory. Both APY and RHNC frameworks provide accurate predictions for the pair distribution functions: APY results are in slightly better agreement with MC data, in particular at lower temperatures where the RHNC solution does not converge.

  6. An accurate Van der Waals-type equation of state for the Lennard-Jones fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Mecke, M.; Mueller, A.; Winkelmann, J.

    1996-03-01

    A new equation of state (EOS) is proposed for the Helmholtz energy F of the Lennard-Jones fluid which represents the thermodynamic properties over a wide range of temperatures and densities. The EOS is written in the form of a generalized van der Waals equation, F= F{sub H} + F{sub A}, where F{sub H} is a hard body contribution and FA an attractive dispersion force contribution. The expression for F{sub H} is closely related to the hybrid Barker-Henderson pertubation theory. The construction of FA is accomplished with the Setzmann-Wagner optimization procedure on the basis of virial coefficients and critically assessed computer simulation data. A comparison with the EOS shows improvement in the description of the vapor-liquid coexistence properties, the pvT data, and in peculiar, of the caloric properties. A comparison with the EOS of Kolafa and Nezbeda which appeared after the bulk of this work was finished shows still an improvement in the standard deviations of the pressure and internal energy by about 30%.

  7. Association of maternal blood pressure in pregnancy with blood pressure of their offspring through adolescence.

    PubMed

    Royal-Thomas, Tamika; McGee, Daniel; Sinha, Debajyoti; Osmond, Clive; Forrester, Terrence

    2015-11-01

    This article looks at the association of maternal blood pressure with the blood pressure of the offspring from birth to childhood. The Barker hypothesis states that maternal and "in utero" attributes during pregnancy affect a child's cardiovascular health throughout life. We present an analysis of a unique dataset that consists of three distinct developmental processes: maternal cardiovascular health during pregnancy; fetal development; and child's cardiovascular health from birth to 14 years. This study explored whether a mother's blood pressure reading in pregnancy predicts fetal development and determines if this in turn is related to the future cardiovascular health of the child. This article uses data that have been collected prospectively from a Jamaican cohort which involves the following three developmental processes: (1) maternal cardiovascular health during pregnancy which is the blood pressure and anthropometric measurements at seven time-points on the mother during pregnancy; (2) fetal development which consists of ultrasound measurements of the fetus taken at six time-points during pregnancy; and (3) child's cardiovascular health which consists of the child's blood pressure measurements at 24 time-points from birth to 14 years. The inter-relationship of these three processes was examined using linear mixed effects models. Our analyses indicated that attributes later in childhood development, such as child's weight, child's baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP), age and sex, predict the future cardiovascular health of children. The results also indicated that maternal attributes in pregnancy, such as mother's baseline SBP and SBP change, predicted significantly child's SBP over time. PMID:25178900

  8. Extensive Frequency Comb Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy of ThF^+ for Use in the Jila Electron Edm Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresh, Dan; Cossel, Kevin; Ye, Jun; Cornell, Eric

    2014-06-01

    The metastable ^3Δ_1 state in trapped HfF^+ is being used for an ongoing measurement of the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) ThF^+, which has a larger effective electric field and a longer-lived ^3Δ_1 state, offers increased sensitivity for an eEDM measurement. Recently, the Heaven group has spectroscopically studied the low-lying states of ThF^+. However, to date there is no detailed information available about technically-accessible laser transitions in the near-infrared region of the spectrum, which are necessary for state preparation and detection in an eEDM experiment. By applying the technique of frequency comb velocity modulation spectroscopy (VMS) to ThF^+ we can acquire 150 cm-1 of continuous, ion-sensitive spectra with 150 MHz resolution in 25 minutes. Here, we report on extensive broadband, high-resolution survey spectroscopy of ThF^+ in the near-IR where we have observed and accurately fit several rovibronic transitions. In addition, we have observed and characterized numerous rovibronic transitions from an unknown thoriated species of molecular ions. H. Loh, K. C. Cossel, M. C. Grau, K.-K. Ni, E. R. Meyer, J. L. Bohn, J. Ye, E. A. Cornell, Science 342, 1220 (2013). B. J. Barker, I. O. Antonov, M. C. Heaven, K. A. Peterson, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 104305 (2012). L. C. Sinclair, K. C. Cossel, T. Coffey, J. Ye, E. A. Cornell, PRL 107, 093002 (2011).

  9. Magnetic flimmers: 'light in the electromagnetic darkness'.

    PubMed

    Martens, Johannes W; Koehler, Peter J; Vijselaar, Joost

    2013-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation has become an important field for both research in neuroscience and for therapy since Barker in 1985 showed that it was possible to stimulate the human motor cortex with an electromagnet. Today for instance, transcranial magnetic stimulation can be used to measure nerve conduction velocities and to create virtual lesions in the brain. The latter option creates the possibility to inactivate parts of the brain temporarily without permanent damage. In 2008, the American Food and Drugs Administration approved repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation as a therapy for major depression under strict conditions. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation has not yet been cleared for treatment of other diseases, including schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, obesity and Parkinson's disease, but results seem promising. Transcranial magnetic stimulation, however, was not invented at the end of the 20th century. The discovery of electromagnetism, the enthusiasm for electricity and electrotherapy, and the interest in Beard's concept of neurasthenia already resulted in the first electromagnetic treatments in the late 19th and early 20th century. In this article, we provide a history of electromagnetic stimulation circa 1900. From the data, we conclude that Mesmer's late 18th century ideas of 'animal magnetism' and the 19th century absence of physiological proof had a negative influence on the acceptance of this therapy during the first decades of the 20th century. Electromagnetism disappeared from neurological textbooks in the early 20th century to recur at the end of that century. PMID:23043145

  10. Fetal Origins of Adult Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, Kara; Devaskar, Sherin U.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. David Barker first popularized the concept of fetal origins of adult disease (FOAD). Since its inception, FOAD has received considerable attention. The FOAD hypothesis holds that events during early development have a profound impact on one’s risk for development of future adult disease. Low birth weight, a surrogate marker of poor fetal growth and nutrition, is linked to coronary artery disease, hypertension, obesity, and insulin resistance. Clues originally arose from large 20th century, European birth registries. Today, large, diverse human cohorts and various animal models have extensively replicated these original observations. This review will focus on the pathogenesis related to FOAD and examines Dr. David Barker’s landmark studies, along with additional human and animal model data. Implications of the FOAD extend beyond the low birth weight population and include babies exposed to stress, both nutritional and non-nutritional, during different critical periods of development, which ultimately result in a disease state. By understanding FOAD, health care professionals and policy makers will make this issue a high healthcare priority and implement preventative measures and treatment for those at higher risk for chronic diseases. PMID:21684471

  11. Molecular equilibria and condensation sequences in carbon rich gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, C. M.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical equilibria in stellar atmospheres have been investigated by many authors. Lattimer, Schramm, and Grossman presented calculations in both O rich and C rich environments and predicted possible presolar condensates. A recent paper by Cherchneff and Barker considered a C rich composition with PAH's included in the calculations. However, the condensation sequences of C bearing species have not been investigated in detail. In a carbon rich gas surrounding an AGB star, it is often assumed that graphite (or diamond) condenses out before TiC and SiC. However, Lattimer et al. found some conditions under which TiC condenses before graphite. We have performed molecular equilibrium calculations to establish the stability fields of C(s), TiC(s), and SiC(s) and other high temperature phases under conditions of different pressures and C/O. The preserved presolar interstellar dust grains so far discovered in meteorites are graphite, diamond, SiC, TiC, and possibly Al2O3.

  12. The Role of Clouds: An Introduction and Rapporteur Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of discussions during the Cloud s Role session at the Observing and Modelling Earth s Energy Flows Workshop. N. Loeb and B. Soden convened this session including 10 presentations by B. Stevens, B. Wielicki, G. Stephens, A. Clement, K. Sassen, D. Hartmann, T. Andrews, A. Del Genio, H. Barker, and M. Sugi addressing critical aspects of the role of clouds in modulating Earth energy flows. Presentation topics covered a diverse range of areas from cloud microphysics and dynamics, cloud radiative transfer, and the role of clouds in large-scale atmospheric circulations patterns in both observations and atmospheric models. The presentations and discussions, summarized below, are organized around several key questions raised during the session. (1) What is the best way to evaluate clouds in climate models? (2) How well do models need to represent clouds to be acceptable for making climate predictions? (3) What are the largest uncertainties in clouds? (4) How can these uncertainties be reduced? (5) What new observations are needed to address these problems? Answers to these critical questions are the topics of ongoing research and will guide the future direction of this area of research.

  13. Gender differences in developmental programming of cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Dasinger, John Henry; Alexander, Barbara T

    2016-03-01

    Hypertension is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death worldwide. Although multiple factors contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension, studies by Dr David Barker reporting an inverse relationship between birth weight and blood pressure led to the hypothesis that slow growth during fetal life increased blood pressure and the risk for cardiovascular disease in later life. It is now recognized that growth during infancy and childhood, in addition to exposure to adverse influences during fetal life, contributes to the developmental programming of increased cardiovascular risk. Numerous epidemiological studies support the link between influences during early life and later cardiovascular health; experimental models provide proof of principle and indicate that numerous mechanisms contribute to the developmental origins of chronic disease. Sex has an impact on the severity of cardiovascular risk in experimental models of developmental insult. Yet, few studies examine the influence of sex on blood pressure and cardiovascular health in low-birth weight men and women. Fewer still assess the impact of ageing on sex differences in programmed cardiovascular risk. Thus, the aim of the present review is to highlight current data about sex differences in the developmental programming of blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26814204

  14. Effects of Atmospheric Dust on Residual South Polar Cap Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonrv, B. P.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Hansen, G. B.; James, P. B.; Wolff, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    The Martian polar caps have been studied from the time of Herschel. Neither polar cap normally disappears in summer. The Residual North Polar Cap (portion that remains through summer) is composed of a mixture of water ice and dust, and its interannual stability is due to its low sublimation rate at the summer temperatures in the North Polar Region. The Residual South Polar Cap (RSPC) is more enigmatic, surviving the relatively hot perihelic summer season despite being composed of much more volatile CO2. It is able to do so because of its unusually high albedo, which is larger than that of other bright regions in the seasonal cap (e.g. Mountains of Mitchel). The proximity of the albedo of the RSPC to the critical albedo for stability raises the question of whether the RSPC exists in every Martian year. The ground based record is somewhat ambivalent. Douglass and Lowell reported that RSPC suddenly vanished at Ls=297deg in 1894 and did not reappear until Ls=0deg [1], and Kuiper reported that it disappeared in 1956 [2]; but both observations were questioned by contemporaries, who tended to attribute them to obscuring dust. Barker [3] reported a large amount of water vapor over the south polar cap in 1969 that could be attributed to exposure of near surface water ice during partial removal of the CO2 in the RSPC in 1969.

  15. Behavior analysis and ecological psychology: past, present, and future. a review of Harry Heft's Ecological Psychology in context.

    PubMed

    Morris, Edward K

    2009-09-01

    Relations between behavior analysis and ecological psychology have been strained for years, notwithstanding the occasional comment on their affinities. Harry Heft's (2001)Ecological Psychology in Context provides an occasion for reviewing anew those relations and affinities. It describes the genesis of ecological psychology in James's radical empiricism; addresses Holt's neorealism and Gestalt psychology; and synthesizes Gibson's ecological psychology and Barker's ecobehavioral science as a means for understanding everyday human behavior. Although behavior analysis is excluded from this account, Heft's book warrants a review nonetheless: It describes ecological psychology in ways that are congruent and complementary with behavior analysis (e.g., nonmediational theorizing; the provinces of natural history and natural science). After introducing modern ecological psychology, I comment on (a) Heft's admirable, albeit selective, historiography; (b) his ecological psychology-past and present-as it relates to Skinner's science and system (e.g., affordances, molar behavior); (c) his misunderstandings of Skinner's behaviorism (e.g., reductionistic, mechanistic, molecular); and (d) the theoretical status of Heft's cognitive terms and talk (i.e., in ontology, epistemology, syntax). I conclude by considering the alliance and integration of ecological psychology and behavior analysis, and their implications for unifying and transforming psychology as a life science, albeit more for the future than at present. PMID:20354604

  16. Paternal HLA-C and Maternal Killer-Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Genotypes in the Development of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Gamliel, Moriya; Anderson, Karen L.; Ebstein, Richard P.; Yirmiya, Nurit; Mankuta, David

    2016-01-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are a family of cell surface proteins found on natural killer cells, which are components of the innate immune system. KIRs recognize MHC class I proteins, mainly HLA-C and are further divided into two groups: short-tailed 2/3DS activating receptors and long-tailed 2/3DL inhibitory receptors. Based on the Barker Hypothesis, the origins of illness can be traced back to embryonic development in the uterus, and since KIR:HLA interaction figures prominently in the maternal–fetal interface, we investigated whether specific KIR:HLA combinations may be found in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) children compared with their healthy parents. This study enrolled 49 ASD children from different Israeli families, and their healthy parents. Among the parents, a higher frequency of HLA-C2 allotypes was found in the fathers, while its corresponding ligand 2DS1 was found in higher percentage in the maternal group. However, such skewing in KIR:HLA frequencies did not appear in the ASD children. Additionally, analysis of “overall activation” indicated higher activation in maternal than in paternal cohorts. PMID:27517034

  17. The early life origin theory in the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, Runa; Ververis, Katherine; Tortorella, Stephanie M; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2015-04-01

    Life expectancy has been examined from a variety of perspectives in recent history. Epidemiology is one perspective which examines causes of morbidity and mortality at the population level. Over the past few 100 years there have been dramatic shifts in the major causes of death and expected life length. This change has suffered from inconsistency across time and space with vast inequalities observed between population groups. In current focus is the challenge of rising non-communicable diseases (NCD), such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In the search to discover methods to combat the rising incidence of these diseases, a number of new theories on the development of morbidity have arisen. A pertinent example is the hypothesis published by David Barker in 1995 which postulates the prenatal and early developmental origin of adult onset disease, and highlights the importance of the maternal environment. This theory has been subject to criticism however it has gradually gained acceptance. In addition, the relatively new field of epigenetics is contributing evidence in support of the theory. This review aims to explore the implication and limitations of the developmental origin hypothesis, via an historical perspective, in order to enhance understanding of the increasing incidence of NCDs, and facilitate an improvement in planning public health policy. PMID:25270249

  18. Innovation in Hydrology: Lessons from the Business World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, F. W.; Fang, Y. C.

    2005-12-01

    There are more and more indications that contributions to research in science and engineering are stratified. A few influential papers distinguish themselves among large numbers of quite ordinary papers. The most influential papers are typically pioneering, commonly marking the beginning of some important new research strand and encouraging follow-on papers. In many respects, the pattern of activity in a research strand follows a life-cycle growth curve or a business product cycle. Our analysis of papers published in Water Resources Research shows that as a strand matures, papers lose their impact. In many respects, business is ahead of science because the process of innovation is accepted as a normal business practice for successful companies. While researchers acknowledge the importance of innovation, the topic is not commonly considered as something that one would learn or even talk about. Our paper here explores some of the lessons on designing for innovation, which come from the world of business. For example, leadership gurus like Tom Peters have much to say about the need for purposefully destroying successful enterprises, in other words, providing the motivation to adjust the focus of research to new strands or directions. Writers like Joel Barker let us understand ways to innovate within research strands. A more formalized understanding of the innovation process in hydrology will yield important dividends.

  19. [Intrauterine growth retardation and adult outcome].

    PubMed

    Lapillonne, Alexandre

    2011-03-01

    The epidemiologist David Barker was among the first to develop the concept that some adult diseases might have their origins during fetal life, based notably on a strong association between low birth weight and the risk of chronic diseases in adulthood (coronary artery disease, hypertension and stroke, type 2 diabetes, and osteoporosis). Several other groups replicated these results in other populations, thus confirming that birth weight is a determining factor of adult health. Intra-uterine growth retardation (IUGR) has been widely used as a marker of poor fetal nutrition and health, but some antenatal nutritional disturbances can increase the risk of diseases later in life without affecting fetal growth. The risk of diseases in adulthood appears to be further increased when IUGR is associated with rapid postnatal catch-up growth. This suggests that fetal malnutrition induces adaptations necessary for fetal survival and health, but that it also undermines future health if the postnatal environment is unfavorable. The fetal origins of adult diseases has major public health implications and calls for reinforced pre- and post-natal prevention strategies. PMID:22292298

  20. Developmental Immunotoxicity, Perinatal Programming, and Noncommunicable Diseases: Focus on Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Dietert, Rodney R

    2014-01-01

    Developmental immunotoxicity (DIT) is a term given to encompass the environmentally induced disruption of normal immune development resulting in adverse outcomes. A myriad of chemical, physical, and psychological factors can all contribute to DIT. As a core component of the developmental origins of adult disease, DIT is interlinked with three important concepts surrounding health risks across a lifetime: (1) the Barker Hypothesis, which connects prenatal development to later-life diseases, (2) the hygiene hypothesis, which connects newborns and infants to risk of later-life diseases and, (3) fetal programming and epigenetic alterations, which may exert effects both in later life and across future generations. This review of DIT considers: (1) the history and context of DIT research, (2) the fundamental features of DIT, (3) the emerging role of DIT in risk of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and (4) the range of risk factors that have been investigated through human research. The emphasis on the human DIT-related literature is significant since most prior reviews of DIT have largely focused on animal research and considerations of specific categories of risk factors (e.g., heavy metals). Risk factors considered in this review include air pollution, aluminum, antibiotics, arsenic, bisphenol A, ethanol, lead (Pb), maternal smoking and environmental tobacco smoke, paracetamol (acetaminophen), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polyfluorinated compounds. PMID:26556429

  1. Epigenetics and life-long consequences of an adverse nutritional and diabetic intrauterine environment.

    PubMed

    El Hajj, Nady; Schneider, Eberhard; Lehnen, Harald; Haaf, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The phenomenon that adverse environmental exposures in early life are associated with increased susceptibilities for many adult, particularly metabolic diseases, is now referred to as 'developmental origins of health and disease (DOHAD)' or 'Barker' hypothesis. Fetal overnutrition and undernutrition have similar long-lasting effects on the setting of the neuroendocrine control systems, energy homeostasis, and metabolism, leading to life-long increased morbidity. There are sensitive time windows during early development, where environmental cues can program persistent epigenetic modifications which are generally assumed to mediate these gene-environment interactions. Most of our current knowledge on fetal programing comes from animal models and epidemiological studies in humans, in particular the Dutch famine birth cohort. In industrialized countries, there is more concern about adverse long-term consequences of fetal overnutrition, i.e. by exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus and/or maternal obesity which affect 10-20% of pregnancies. Epigenetic changes due to maternal diabetes/obesity may predispose the offspring to develop metabolic disease later in life and, thus, transmit the adverse environmental exposure to the next generation. This vicious cycle could contribute significantly to the worldwide metabolic disease epidemics. In this review article, we focus on the epigenetics of an adverse intrauterine environment, in particular gestational diabetes, and its implications for the prevention of complex disease. PMID:25187623

  2. Industrially induced changes in Earth structure at the geysers geothermal area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foulger, G.R.; Grant, C.C.; Ross, A.; Julian, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Industrial exploitation is causing clearly-measurable changes in Earth structure at The Geysers geothermal area, California. Production at The Geysers peaked in the late 1980s at ???3.5 ?? 103 kg s-1 of steam and 1800 MW of electricity. It subsequently decreased by about 10% per year [Barker et al., 1992] because of declining reservoir pressure. The steam reservoir coincides with a strong negative anomaly (???0.16, ???9%) in the compressional-to-shear seismic wave speed ratio vP/vS, consistent with the expected effects of low-pressure vapor-phase pore fluid [Julian et al., 1996]. Between 1991 and 1994 this anomaly increased in amplitude by up to about 0.07 (???4%). This is consistent with the expected effects of continued pressure reduction and conversion of pore water to steam as a result of exploitation. These unique results show that vP/vS tomography can easily detect saturation changes caused by exploitation of reservoirs, and is a potentially valuable technique for monitoring environmental change. They also provide geophysical observational evidence that geothermal energy is not a renewable energy source.

  3. The role of three-body interactions in the adsorption of argon in silicalite-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Alonso, Félix; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Nicholson, David

    The significance of three-body interactions for argon adsorption in silicalite at 77K is considered, for triplets involving two or more argon atoms. Configurations from previous simulations, obtained using a new potential function for single argon atoms interacting with the zeolite, and a conventional 12-6 argon-argon effective pair potential were used as a starting point. The total energy of these configurations was recalculated with the Barker-Fisher-Watts potential for argon pair interactions, and three-body dispersion terms up to the triple quadrupole term. The overall contribution from the higher order nonadditive terms is always negative, and decreases with adsorbate loading. A substantial part (˜ 20%) of the total interaction was found to come from the non-additive contributions, in contrast to other calculations on zeolitic systems; and largely from Ar-Ar-O triplets. The cancellation between fourth-order terms and third-order quadrupole terms which occurs in isotropic homogeneous systems does not occur here. An iterative scheme is described by which heats of adsorption can be obtained. A first-order calculation of this type shows that effect of the non-additive contributions is initially to reduce the adsorbate-adsorbate contribution. This has the effect of producing an isosteric heat curve which is nearly invariant with loading for low adsorbate loading. Thus it appears that energetic homogeneity need not be invoked as an explanation of experimental observations showing this type of behaviour.

  4. Waveform diversity for wireless sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Tariq; Zoltowski, Michael

    2008-04-01

    In active sensing systems such as radar and sensor networks, one is interested in transmitting waveforms that possess an ideal thumbtack shaped ambiguity function. However, the synthesis of waveforms with the desired ambiguity function is a difficult problem in applied mathematics and more often than not, one needs to rely on developing waveforms with an ambiguity function that is close to the desired ambiguity function in some sense. Designing waveforms with ambiguity functions that possess certain desirable properties has been a well researched problem in the field of signal analysis. In this paper, we present a methodology for designing multiantenna adaptive waveforms with autocorrelation functions that allow perfect separation at the receiver. We focus on the 4×4 case and derive the conditions that the four waveforms must satisfy in order to achieve perfect separation. Using these conditions, we show that waveforms constructed using Golay complementary sequences, barker codes and quarter-band signals through kronecker products satisfy these conditions and are therefore seperable at the receiver. We also give examples of more general wavefom families that are matched to the environment and also of waveforms that do not necessarily satisfy the conditions for perfect separation but still have good delay-Doppler ambiguity functions making them suitable for sensing environments.

  5. Electron backscattered diffraction investigation of the texture of feathery crystals in aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, S.; Jouneau, P.H.; Rappaz, M.; Jarry, P.

    1997-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), metallographic observations, and automated electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) experiments were carried out on feathery crystals of a unidirectionally solidified (1D) Al-Cu alloy and of a direct-chill (DC) cast Al-Mg-Si alloy. The results clearly show that the feathery grains are made of twinned lamellae, which are parallel to a (111) twin plane. The contrast seen in the metallographic sections after a Barker etching or observed in an SEM is perfectly corroborated with the EBSD reconstructed microstructure. The lamellae are separated by an alternance of straight and wavy lines. Some equiaxed grains are also observed occasionally in the specimens. From the {l_angle}111{r_angle} pole figures of the various grains, it is concluded that the thermal gradient direction is close to, but not necessarily within, the (111) twin plane: its direction is in between a [01{bar 1}] and a [{bar 1}{bar 1}2] direction. Within a given feathery grain, small variations of the crystallographic orientations (subgrain boundaries) are observed. The lamellae of one grain can sometimes penetrate into another one. Based upon this information, the mechanism of feathery grain growth previously proposed by Eady and Hogan is ruled out. Although no other growth mechanism is proposed yet, it is believed that feathery grains are the result of a competition similar to that occurring in normal dendritic alloys, but with twinned dendrites.

  6. Clonal groups of Salmonella typhimurium in New York State.

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, P L; Timoney, J F; Jacobson, R H; Khakhria, R

    1989-01-01

    The epidemiology of 278 strains of Salmonella typhimurium isolated from 1973 to 1981 from animals in New York State was studied by using four "fingerprinting" techniques, bacteriophage type (B.R. Callow, J. Hyg. 57:346-359, 1959), biotype (J. P. Duguid, E. S. Anderson, G. A. Alfredsson, R. Barker, and D. C. Old, J. Med. Microbiol. 8:149-166, 1975), plasmid profile, and antibiogram. Phage type with biotype was the most useful marker for distinguishing clonal groups of S. typhimurium. Four clones of S. typhimurium predominated, i.e., phage type/biotypes U275/26, 49/26, 10/3, and 2/3. U275/26 and 49/26 were commonly found until 1976, but clones 10/3 and 2/3 were predominant after 1976. Comparison of results with data from Canada suggested a dissemination of strains of S. typhimurium between Canada and New York. Cattle were a common source of phage type 49, as has been observed in other countries. PMID:2656740

  7. Super-resolution processing for multi-functional LPI waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengzheng; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Shang; Cai, Jingxiao

    2014-05-01

    Super-resolution (SR) is a radar processing technique closely related to the pulse compression (or correlation receiver). There are many super-resolution algorithms developed for the improved range resolution and reduced sidelobe contaminations. Traditionally, the waveforms used for the SR have been either phase-coding (such as LKP3 code, Barker code) or the frequency modulation (chirp, or nonlinear frequency modulation). There are, however, an important class of waveforms which are either random in nature (such as random noise waveform), or randomly modulated for multiple function operations (such as the ADS-B radar signals in [1]). These waveforms have the advantages of low-probability-of-intercept (LPI). If the existing SR techniques can be applied to these waveforms, there will be much more flexibility for using these waveforms in actual sensing missions. Also, SR usually has great advantage that the final output (as estimation of ground truth) is largely independent of the waveform. Such benefits are attractive to many important primary radar applications. In this paper the general introduction of the SR algorithms are provided first, and some implementation considerations are discussed. The selected algorithms are applied to the typical LPI waveforms, and the results are discussed. It is observed that SR algorithms can be reliably used for LPI waveforms, on the other hand, practical considerations should be kept in mind in order to obtain the optimal estimation results.

  8. Pulse compression techniques to improve modulated pulsed laser line scan systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Robert W.; Nash, Justin K.; Cochenour, Brandon M.; Mullen, Linda J.

    2015-05-01

    A modulated pulse laser imaging system has been developed which utilizes coded/chirped RF modulation to mitigate the adverse effects of optical scattering in degraded visual underwater environments. Current laser imaging techniques employ either short pulses or single frequency modulated pulses to obtain both intensity and range images. Systems using short pulses have high range resolution but are susceptible to scattering due to the wide bandwidth nature of the pulse. Range gating can be used to limit the effects of backscatter, but this can lead to blind spots in the range image. Modulated pulse systems can help suppress the contribution from scattered light in generated imagery without gating the receiver. However, the use of narrowband, single tone modulation results in limited range resolution where small targets are camouflaged within the background. This drives the need for systems which have high range resolution while still suppressing the effects of scattering caused by the environment. Coded/chirped modulated pulses enable the use of radar pulse compression techniques to substantially increase range resolution while also providing a way to discriminate the object of interest from the light scattered from the environment. Linearly frequency chirped waveforms and phase shift keyed barker codes were experimentally investigated to determine the effects that pulse compression would have on intensity/range data. The effect of modulation frequency on the data produced with both wideband and narrowband modulation was also investigated. The results from laboratory experiments will be presented and compared to model predictions.

  9. New alignment marks for improved measurement maturity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidenmueller, U.; Alves, H.; Schnabel, B.; Icard, B.; Pain, L.; Le Denmat, J.-C.; Manakli, S.; Pradelles, J.

    2008-04-01

    With shrinking dimensions in the semiconductor industry the lithographic demands are exceeding the parameters of the standard optical lithography. Electron beam direct write (EBDW) presents a good solution to overcome these limits and to successfully use this technology in R&D as well as in prototyping and some niche applications. For the industrial application of EBDW an alignment strategy adapted to the industrial standards is required to be compatible with optical lithography. In this context the crucial factor is the overlay performance, i.e. the maturity of the alignment strategy under different process conditions. New alignment marks improve the alignment repeatability and increase the window of the signal-to-noise ratio towards smaller or noisier signals. Particularly the latter has proved to be a major contribution to a higher maturity of the alignment. A comparison between the double cross and the new Barker mark type is presented in this paper. Furthermore, the mark reading repeatability and the final overlay results achieved are discussed.

  10. From square-well to Janus: Improved algorithm for integral equation theory and comparison with thermodynamic perturbation theory within the Kern-Frenkel model

    SciTech Connect

    Giacometti, Achille; Gögelein, Christoph; Lado, Fred; Sciortino, Francesco; Ferrari, Silvano

    2014-03-07

    Building upon past work on the phase diagram of Janus fluids [F. Sciortino, A. Giacometti, and G. Pastore, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 237801 (2009)], we perform a detailed study of integral equation theory of the Kern-Frenkel potential with coverage that is tuned from the isotropic square-well fluid to the Janus limit. An improved algorithm for the reference hypernetted-chain (RHNC) equation for this problem is implemented that significantly extends the range of applicability of RHNC. Results for both structure and thermodynamics are presented and compared with numerical simulations. Unlike previous attempts, this algorithm is shown to be stable down to the Janus limit, thus paving the way for analyzing the frustration mechanism characteristic of the gas-liquid transition in the Janus system. The results are also compared with Barker-Henderson thermodynamic perturbation theory on the same model. We then discuss the pros and cons of both approaches within a unified treatment. On balance, RHNC integral equation theory, even with an isotropic hard-sphere reference system, is found to be a good compromise between accuracy of the results, computational effort, and uniform quality to tackle self-assembly processes in patchy colloids of complex nature. Further improvement in RHNC however clearly requires an anisotropic reference bridge function.

  11. Temporal patterns of ascospore release in Leptosphaeria maculans vary depending on geographic region and time of observation.

    PubMed

    Savage, David; Barbetti, Martin J; MacLeod, William J; Salam, Moin U; Renton, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Diurnal patterns of spore release have been observed in a number of fungal pathogens that undergo wind-assisted dispersal. The mechanisms that drive these patterns, while not well understood, are thought to relate to the ability of dispersing spores to survive their journey and infect new hosts. In this paper, we characterise the diurnal pattern of ascospore release by a Western Australian population of Leptosphaeria maculans. Although L. maculans has been previously shown to exhibit diurnal patterns of ascospore release, these patterns appear to vary from region to region. In order to characterise the pattern of release in the Mediterranean climate of Western Australia, we analysed historical data describing the bi-hourly count of airborne ascospores at Mt Barker, Western Australia. Results of this analysis showed diurnal patterns that differ from those previously observed in other countries, with ascospore release in our study most likely to occur in the afternoon. Furthermore, we found that the time of peak release can shift from month to month within any one season, and from year to year. In explaining the hourly pattern of spore release over an entire season, time since rainfall, time since last release, temperature, hour and month were all shown to be significant variables. PMID:23271454

  12. Industrially induced changes in Earth structure at the Geysers Geothermal Area, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulger, G. R.; Grant, C. C.; Ross, A.; Julian, B. R.

    Industrial exploitation is causing clearly-measurable changes in Earth structure at The Geysers geothermal area, California. Production at The Geysers peaked in the late 1980s at ˜3.5 × 10³ kg s-1 of steam and 1800 MW of electricity. It subsequently decreased by about 10% per year [Barker et al., 1992] because of declining reservoir pressure. The steam reservoir coincides with a strong negative anomaly (˜0.16, ˜9%) in the compressional-to-shear seismic wave speed ratio VP/ VS, consistent with the expected effects of low-pressure vapor-phase pore fluid [Julian et al., 1996]. Between 1991 and 1994 this anomaly increased in amplitude by up to about 0.07 (˜4%). This is consistent with the expected effects of continued pressure reduction and conversion of pore water to steam as a result of exploitation. These unique results show that VP/VS tomography can easily detect saturation changes caused by exploitation of reservoirs, and is a potentially valuable technique for monitoring environmental change. They also provide geophysical observational evidence that geothermal energy is not a renewable energy source.

  13. An efficient method for unfolding kinetic pressure driven VISAR data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mark Harry Hess; Peterson, Kyle; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James

    2015-08-18

    Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) [Barker and Hollenbach, J. Appl. Phys. 43, 4669 (1972)] is a well-known diagnostic that is employed on many shock physics and pulsed-power experiments. With the VISAR diagnostic, the velocity on the surface of any metal flyer can be found. For most experiments employing VISAR, either a kinetic pressure [Grady, Mech. Mater. 29, 181 (1998)] or a magnetic pressure [Lemke et al., Intl J. Impact Eng. 38, 480 (2011)] drives the motion of the flyer. Moreover, reliable prediction of the time-dependent pressure is often a critical component to understanding the physics of these experiments.more » Although VISAR can provide a precise measurement of a flyer’s surface velocity, the real challenge of this diagnostic implementation is using this velocity to unfold the time-dependent pressure. The purpose of this study is to elucidate a new method for quickly and reliably unfolding VISAR data.« less

  14. No, management is not a profession.

    PubMed

    Barker, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Because managers hold a status in society similar to that of doctors and lawyers, it is natural to think of business as a profession--and of business schools as professional schools. But, argues Barker, a professor at Cambridge University's Judge Business School, that can lead to inappropriate analysis and misguided perceptions. We turn to professionals for advice, he writes, because they have knowledge that we don't. We trust their advice because they've been guaranteed by professional associations that establish the boundaries of the field and reach consensus on what body of learning is required for formal training and certification. These associations make a market for professional services feasible. Although business schools might be able to reach consensus on what they should teach, the proper question is whether what they teach qualifies students to manage. After all, successful businesses are commonly run by people without MBAs. Managers' roles are inherently general, variable, and indefinable; their core skill is to integrate across functional areas, groups of people, and circumstances. Integration is learned in the minds of MBA students, whose experiences and careers are widely diverse, rather than taught in the content of program modules. Thus business education must be highly collaborative, with grading downplayed, and learning must differ according to the stage of a student's career. Business schools are not professional schools. They are incubators for business leadership. PMID:20607963

  15. Pulse compression using binary phase codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, D. T.

    1983-01-01

    In most MST applications pulsed radars are peak power limited and have excess average power capacity. Short pulses are required for good range resolution, but the problem of range ambiguity (signals received simultaneously from more than one altitude) sets a minimum limit on the interpulse period (IPP). Pulse compression is a technique which allows more of the transmitter average power capacity to be used without sacrificing range resolution. As the name implies, a pulse of power P and duration T is in a certain sense converted into one of power nP and duration T/n. In the frequency domain, compression involves manipulating the phases of the different frequency components of the pulse. One way to compress a pulse is via phase coding, especially binary phase coding, a technique which is particularly amenable to digital processing techniques. This method, which is used extensively in radar probing of the atmosphere and ionosphere is discussed. Barker codes, complementary and quasi-complementary code sets, and cyclic codes are addressed.

  16. Detection optimization using linear systems analysis of a coded aperture laser sensor system

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Minimum detectable irradiance levels for a diffraction grating based laser sensor were calculated to be governed by clutter noise resulting from reflected earth albedo. Features on the earth surface caused pseudo-imaging effects on the sensor`s detector arras that resulted in the limiting noise in the detection domain. It was theorized that a custom aperture transmission function existed that would optimize the detection of laser sources against this clutter background. Amplitude and phase aperture functions were investigated. Compared to the diffraction grating technique, a classical Young`s double-slit aperture technique was investigated as a possible optimized solution but was not shown to produce a system that had better clutter-noise limited minimum detectable irradiance. Even though the double-slit concept was not found to have a detection advantage over the slit-grating concept, one interesting concept grew out of the double-slit design that deserved mention in this report, namely the Barker-coded double-slit. This diffractive aperture design possessed properties that significantly improved the wavelength accuracy of the double-slit design. While a concept was not found to beat the slit-grating concept, the methodology used for the analysis and optimization is an example of the application of optoelectronic system-level linear analysis. The techniques outlined here can be used as a template for analysis of a wide range of optoelectronic systems where the entire system, both optical and electronic, contribute to the detection of complex spatial and temporal signals.

  17. Teacher management behaviors and pupil task involvement during small group laboratory activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, Warren

    A major concern of many beginning and experienced teachers is that of classroom management and control. This article describes recent research into defining classroom management procedures that are used by high school science teachers and their relationship to pupil ontaskness. The classroom is conceptualized as a manipulable behavioral system. This construct arises directly from Barker's (1968) ecological psychology, the classroom and its occupants being conceptualized as a behavior setting. The behaviors of the teacher and the pupils are an integral part of the unit (behavior setting), which in turn coerces certain behaviors from its participants. Thus settings, and, in particular, subsettings, are seen as more important determiners of social behavior than the personality of individual teacher or pupil. The methodology employed in this research has involved the extensive use of video in naturalistic science classrooms. Tapes of both teacher and pupil behaviors were continuously and independently recorded. Intensive analysis using electronic recording instruments interfaced with the computer has allowed the collection and sophisticated analysis of the observational data. Data relating to teacher management behavior in small group settings have been analyzed and the relationships to pupil task involvement have been explored.

  18. From square-well to Janus: improved algorithm for integral equation theory and comparison with thermodynamic perturbation theory within the Kern-Frenkel model.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Achille; Gögelein, Christoph; Lado, Fred; Sciortino, Francesco; Ferrari, Silvano; Pastore, Giorgio

    2014-03-01

    Building upon past work on the phase diagram of Janus fluids [F. Sciortino, A. Giacometti, and G. Pastore, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 237801 (2009)], we perform a detailed study of integral equation theory of the Kern-Frenkel potential with coverage that is tuned from the isotropic square-well fluid to the Janus limit. An improved algorithm for the reference hypernetted-chain (RHNC) equation for this problem is implemented that significantly extends the range of applicability of RHNC. Results for both structure and thermodynamics are presented and compared with numerical simulations. Unlike previous attempts, this algorithm is shown to be stable down to the Janus limit, thus paving the way for analyzing the frustration mechanism characteristic of the gas-liquid transition in the Janus system. The results are also compared with Barker-Henderson thermodynamic perturbation theory on the same model. We then discuss the pros and cons of both approaches within a unified treatment. On balance, RHNC integral equation theory, even with an isotropic hard-sphere reference system, is found to be a good compromise between accuracy of the results, computational effort, and uniform quality to tackle self-assembly processes in patchy colloids of complex nature. Further improvement in RHNC however clearly requires an anisotropic reference bridge function. PMID:24606350

  19. Translationally invariant calculations of form factors, nucleon densities and momentum distributions for finite nuclei with short-range correlations included

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebeko, A. V.; Grigorov, P. A.; Iurasov, V. S.

    2012-11-01

    Relying upon our previous treatment of the density matrices for nuclei (in general, nonrelativistic self-bound finite systems) we are studying a combined effect of center-of-mass motion and short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations on the nucleon density and momentum distributions in light nuclei (4He and 16O). Their intrinsic ground-state wave functions are constructed in the so-called fixed center-of-mass approximation, starting with mean-field Slater determinants modified by some correlator ( e.g., after Jastrow or Villars). We develop the formalism based upon the Cartesian or boson representation, in which the coordinate and momentum operators are linear combinations of the creation and annihilation operators for oscillatory quanta in the three different space directions, and get the own "Tassie-Barker" factors for each distribution and point out other model-independent results. After this separation of the center-of-mass motion effects we propose additional analytic means in order to simplify the subsequent calculations ( e.g., within the Jastrow approach or the unitary correlation operator method). The charge form factors, densities and momentum distributions of 4He and 16O evaluated by using the well-known cluster expansions are compared with data, our exact (numerical) results and microscopic calculations.

  20. Evaluation of a Regional Climate Ensemble using Self-Organizing Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaye, A.; Bruyere, C. L.; Seefeldt, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    A Regional Climate Ensemble is used to investigate the limits of predictability of climate simulations, with a focus on high-impact weather. A twenty-four member physics ensemble of climate simulations using the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting Model at sufficient resolution to capture high-impact weather has been run over an extended North American domain of approximately 25° S to 70° N and from the African coast to the East Pacific. A diverse set of approaches are being applied to examine the impact of the different physics parameterizations on the simulated climate and high-impact weather statistics and to determine the physics combinations that result in physically realistic scenarios. In this paper we explore one such approach that evaluates the performance of the ensemble using Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs). The SOMs are used to: 1) identify the ensemble members that are able to capture current climate weather patterns and their relative frequencies, and 2) investigate the underlying interactions between the different physics components that leads to differences in these patterns across the ensemble. Results will be used to inform selection of ensemble members for future climate change impact studies. Skamarock, W., J. B. Klemp, J. Dudhia, D. O. Gill, D. Barker, M. G. Duda, X. Huang, and W. Wang, 2008: A Description of the Advanced Research WRF Version 3. NCAR Technical Note NCAR/TN-475+STR. Boulder, CO.

  1. Evaluation of a High-Resolution Regional Climate Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruyere, C. L.; Tye, M. R.; Keellings, D.; Jaye, A.

    2014-12-01

    A high-resolution Regional Climate Ensemble is used to investigate the limits of predictability of climate simulations, with a focus on high-impact weather. A diverse set of approaches are being applied to examine the impact of the different physics parameterizations on the simulated climate and high-impact weather statistics and to determine the physics combinations that result in realistic scenarios. In this paper we focus on the ensemble members' ability to correctly simulate current climate variability in terms of: 1) extreme temperature and precipitation over different regions, and 2) tropical cyclone statistics. A twenty-four member physics ensemble of climate simulations has been generated using the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting Model (Skamarock et al. 2008). The ensemble model has been run over an extended North American domain of approximately 25° S to 70° N and from the African coast to the East Pacific, and at sufficient resolution to capture high-impact weather events. Skamarock, W., J. B. Klemp, J. Dudhia, D. O. Gill, D. Barker, M. G. Duda, X. Huang, and W. Wang, 2008: A Description of the Advanced Research WRF Version 3. NCAR Technical Note NCAR/TN-475+STR. Boulder, CO.

  2. Behavior Analysis and Ecological Psychology: Past, Present, and Future. A Review of Harry Heft's Ecological Psychology in Context

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Edward K

    2009-01-01

    Relations between behavior analysis and ecological psychology have been strained for years, notwithstanding the occasional comment on their affinities. Harry Heft's (2001) Ecological Psychology in Context provides an occasion for reviewing anew those relations and affinities. It describes the genesis of ecological psychology in James's radical empiricism; addresses Holt's neorealism and Gestalt psychology; and synthesizes Gibson's ecological psychology and Barker's ecobehavioral science as a means for understanding everyday human behavior. Although behavior analysis is excluded from this account, Heft's book warrants a review nonetheless: It describes ecological psychology in ways that are congruent and complementary with behavior analysis (e.g., nonmediational theorizing; the provinces of natural history and natural science). After introducing modern ecological psychology, I comment on (a) Heft's admirable, albeit selective, historiography; (b) his ecological psychology—past and present—as it relates to Skinner's science and system (e.g., affordances, molar behavior); (c) his misunderstandings of Skinner's behaviorism (e.g., reductionistic, mechanistic, molecular); and (d) the theoretical status of Heft's cognitive terms and talk (i.e., in ontology, epistemology, syntax). I conclude by considering the alliance and integration of ecological psychology and behavior analysis, and their implications for unifying and transforming psychology as a life science, albeit more for the future than at present. PMID:20354604

  3. Epigenetic and developmental influences on the risk of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Caitlin J; Ryckman, Kelli K

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a growing cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Metabolic syndrome is characterized by the presence of a variety of metabolic disturbances including obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and elevated fasting blood sugar. Although the risk for metabolic syndrome has largely been attributed to adult lifestyle factors such as poor nutrition, lack of exercise, and smoking, there is now strong evidence suggesting that predisposition to the development of metabolic syndrome begins in utero. First posited by Hales and Barker in 1992, the “thrifty phenotype” hypothesis proposes that susceptibility to adult chronic diseases can occur in response to exposures in the prenatal and perinatal periods. This hypothesis has been continually supported by epidemiologic studies and studies involving animal models. In this review, we describe the structural, metabolic and epigenetic changes that occur in response to adverse intrauterine environments including prenatal and postnatal diet, maternal obesity, and pregnancy complications. Given the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome in both the developed and developing worlds, a greater understanding and appreciation for the role of the intrauterine environment in adult chronic disease etiology is imperative. PMID:26170704

  4. Global stabilization using LSS-Theorem: Applications to Robotics and Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selman, AbdulRazzak

    Underactuated mechanical systems are gaining interest as they can sometimes provide the desired motion or functionality at reduced cost due to their using fewer expensive actuators. The term "underactuated" refers to the fact that such mechanical systems have fewer actuators than degrees of freedom, which makes them very difficult to control. Moreover, underactuated robots have nonlinear dynamics which must be tackled with nonlinear control techniques. Furthermore, control theory for underactuated mechanical systems has been an active area of research for the past 15-20 years. Most of the research has focused on local and global asymptotic stabilization by feedback. Underactuated systems can either possess nonminimum phase or minimum phase characteristics. For minimum phase underactuated systems, the stabilization problem is rather simple and many existing control design methodologies have been proved powerful in providing a solution to this problem. For nonminimum phase underactuated systems, asymptotic stabilization problem has been, and still is, an attractive subject to the researchers in the field of nonlinear control system and theory. In particular, global asymptotic stabilization (GAS) at a desired equilibrium point of such systems by means of a single smooth static or dynamic state feedback law is still largely an open problem in the literature. In this thesis, the problem of GAS via a smooth static state feedback law is addressed for a class of an underactuated nonlinear system that is affine (possibly non affine) in the control, partially feedback linearizable, nonminimum phase and (possibly) has a non-integrable acceleration constraint. The core result of the thesis is formulated through a theorem that the author refers to through this thesis as the Legend of Salah Salman (LSS) Theorem. LSS theorem states the existence of a smooth static state feedback law that globally asymptotically stabilizes the origin of the nonlinear underactuated system that is

  5. Pharmacokinetics of a novel sublingual spray formulation of the antimalarial drug artemether in African children with malaria.

    PubMed

    Salman, Sam; Bendel, Daryl; Lee, Toong C; Templeton, David; Davis, Timothy M E

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of sublingual artemether (ArTiMist) was investigated in 91 young African children with severe malaria or who could not tolerate oral antimalarial therapy. Each received 3.0 mg/kg of body weight of artemether at 0, 8, 24, 36, 48, and 60 h or until the initiation of oral treatment. Few blood samples were drawn postdose. Plasma artemether and dihydroartemisinin (DHA) levels were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the data were analyzed using established population compartmental pharmacokinetic models. Parasite clearance was prompt (median parasite clearance time, 24 h), and there were no serious adverse events. Consistent with studies in healthy adults (S. Salman, D. Bendel, T. C. Lee, D. Templeton, and T. M. E. Davis, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 59:3197-3207, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.05013-14), the absorption of sublingual artemether was biphasic, and multiple dosing was associated with the autoinduction of the metabolism of artemether to DHA (which itself has potent antimalarial activity). In contrast to studies using healthy volunteers, pharmacokinetic modeling indicated that the first absorption phase did not avoid first-pass metabolism, suggesting that the drug is transferred to the upper intestine through postdose fluid/food intake. Simulations using the present data and those from an earlier study in older Melanesian children with uncomplicated malaria treated with artemether-lumefantrine tablets suggested that the bioavailability of sublingual artemether was at least equivalent to that after conventional oral artemether-lumefantrine (median [interquartile range] areas under the concentration-time curve for artemether, 3,403 [2,471 to 4,771] versus 3,063 [2,358 to 4,514] μg · h/liter, respectively; and for DHA, 2,958 [2,146 to 4,278] versus 2,839 [1,812 to 3,488] μg · h/liter, respectively; P ≥ 0.42). These findings suggest that sublingual artemether could be used as prereferral treatment for sick

  6. Pharmacokinetics of a Novel Sublingual Spray Formulation of the Antimalarial Drug Artemether in African Children with Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Sam; Bendel, Daryl; Lee, Toong C.; Templeton, David

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of sublingual artemether (ArTiMist) was investigated in 91 young African children with severe malaria or who could not tolerate oral antimalarial therapy. Each received 3.0 mg/kg of body weight of artemether at 0, 8, 24, 36, 48, and 60 h or until the initiation of oral treatment. Few blood samples were drawn postdose. Plasma artemether and dihydroartemisinin (DHA) levels were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the data were analyzed using established population compartmental pharmacokinetic models. Parasite clearance was prompt (median parasite clearance time, 24 h), and there were no serious adverse events. Consistent with studies in healthy adults (S. Salman, D. Bendel, T. C. Lee, D. Templeton, and T. M. E. Davis, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 59:3197–3207, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.05013-14), the absorption of sublingual artemether was biphasic, and multiple dosing was associated with the autoinduction of the metabolism of artemether to DHA (which itself has potent antimalarial activity). In contrast to studies using healthy volunteers, pharmacokinetic modeling indicated that the first absorption phase did not avoid first-pass metabolism, suggesting that the drug is transferred to the upper intestine through postdose fluid/food intake. Simulations using the present data and those from an earlier study in older Melanesian children with uncomplicated malaria treated with artemether-lumefantrine tablets suggested that the bioavailability of sublingual artemether was at least equivalent to that after conventional oral artemether-lumefantrine (median [interquartile range] areas under the concentration-time curve for artemether, 3,403 [2,471 to 4,771] versus 3,063 [2,358 to 4,514] μg · h/liter, respectively; and for DHA, 2,958 [2,146 to 4,278] versus 2,839 [1,812 to 3,488] μg · h/liter, respectively; P ≥ 0.42). These findings suggest that sublingual artemether could be used as prereferral treatment for sick

  7. A Lightweight, High-performance I/O Management Package for Data-intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun

    2011-06-22

    Our group has been working with ANL collaborators on the topic bridging the gap between parallel file system and local file system during the course of this project period. We visited Argonne National Lab -- Dr. Robert Ross's group for one week in the past summer 2007. We looked over our current project progress and planned the activities for the incoming years 2008-09. The PI met Dr. Robert Ross several times such as HEC FSIO workshop 08, SC08 and SC10. We explored the opportunities to develop a production system by leveraging our current prototype to (SOGP+PVFS) a new PVFS version. We delivered SOGP+PVFS codes to ANL PVFS2 group in 2008.We also talked about exploring a potential project on developing new parallel programming models and runtime systems for data-intensive scalable computing (DISC). The methodology is to evolve MPI towards DISC by incorporating some functions of Google MapReduce parallel programming model. More recently, we are together exploring how to leverage existing works to perform (1) coordination/aggregation of local I/O operations prior to movement over the WAN, (2) efficient bulk data movement over the WAN, (3) latency hiding techniques for latency-intensive operations. Since 2009, we start applying Hadoop/MapReduce to some HEC applications with LANL scientists John Bent and Salman Habib. Another on-going work is to improve checkpoint performance at I/O forwarding Layer for the Road Runner super computer with James Nuetz and Gary Gridder at LANL. Two senior undergraduates from our research group did summer internships about high-performance file and storage system projects in LANL since 2008 for consecutive three years. Both of them are now pursuing Ph.D. degree in our group and will be 4th year in the PhD program in Fall 2011 and go to LANL to advance two above-mentioned works during this winter break. Since 2009, we have been collaborating with several computer scientists (Gary Grider, John bent, Parks Fields, James Nunez, Hsing

  8. Integrated magnetobiostratigraphy at the Oligocene/Miocene transition in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean (DSDP Leg 72, Hole 516F)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennari, Rocco; Persico, Davide; Florindo, Fabio; Turco, Elena; Villa, Giuliana

    2014-05-01

    A high-resolution integrated magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic (planktonic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils) record of the interval encompassing the Oligocene/Miocene transition (OMT) at DSDP Hole 516F is here presented. This stratigraphic interval was previously studied by Berggren et al. (1983), Pujol (1983) and Spezzaferri (1994), although with a lower sample resolution. The magnetobiostratigraphic results of Berggren et al. (1983) are, moreover, considered as reference data for the age calibration of several bioevents along the OMT (Gradstein et al., 2012). Dealing with the same stratigraphic interval, other authors (Pagani et al., 2000; Plancq et al., 2012) based their paleoceanographic reconstruction on age model derived by Berggren et al. (1983). Our high-resolution integrated stratigraphy approach allowed us to obtain: 1) a more detailed succession of magnetic reversals across the OMT, including a better constraining of the base of Subchron C6Cn.2n, which formally defines the base of the Neogene (Steininger et al., 1997); 2) an integrated planktonic foraminifer and calcareous nannofossil quantitative biostratigraphy across the OMT. Particular focus has been addressed to the Lowest Common Occurrence of Paragloborotalia kugleri and the Highest Occurrences of Sphenolithus delphix and Sphenolithus capricornutus, which approximate the O/M boundary; 3) an updated age model of the OMT at Hole 516F. Finally, the new data here presented contributed to a critical review of the calcareous planktonic biostratigraphy across the OMT. References Berggren, W.A., Aubry, M.P. and Hamilton, N., 1983. Neogene magnetobiostratigraphy of deep sea drilling project site 516 (Rio Grande Rise, South Atlantic). In: Barker, P., et al. (Eds.), Initial Reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project, 72, 675-713. Pagani, M., Arthur, M. A. and Freeman, K. H. 2000. Variations in Miocene phytoplankton growth rates in the southwest Atlantic: Evidence for changes in ocean circulation

  9. The lost church of Montemurro (Basilicata, Italy): Ground Penetrating Radar and Electrical Resistivity Tomography for detecting its buried remains in S. Maria Square.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavusi, Massimo; Giocoli, Alessandro; de Martino, Gregory; Loperte, Antonio; Lapenna, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    one in the central part and constituted by 48 electrodes 1 m spaced for a length of 47 m, allowed to investigate up to about 4.5 m. Both Wenner and dipole-dipole sequences gathered along two arrays were inverted by using Res2DInv software (Loke and Barker, 1996). They showed several shallow high resistive nuclei. Their positions are in good agreement with those of the reflectors showed in the radargrams and time slices. Joint interpretation of GPR and ERT results suggests the presence of cavities and manmade structures under the square. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the traffic policeman, the technicians, the workers and the mayor Mario Di Sanzio of the Commune of Montemurro. References Bavusi M., Chianese D., Giano S.I., Mucciarelli M. (2004). Multidisciplinary investigations on the Roman aqueduct of Grumentum (Basilicata, Southern Itlay). Annals of geophysics, 47 (6), 1791-1801. Cello G., , Tondi E., Micarelli L. and Mattioni L. (2003). Active tectonics and earthquake sources in the epicentral area of the 1857 Basilicata earthquake (southern Italy). Journal of Geodynamics, 36 (1,2), 37-50. Loke M.H., Barker R.D., (1996). Rapid least-square inversion of apparent resistivity pseudosections using a quasi-Newton method. Geophysical Prospecting, 44, 131 -152. Mallet R. (1862) - Great Neapolitan Earthquake of 1857. London 1862, 2, Chapmann and Hall.

  10. A complex of species related to Paradiscogaster glebulae (Digenea: Faustulidae) in chaetodontid fishes (Teleostei: Perciformes) of the Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Pablo E; Bray, Rodney A; Cutmore, Scott C; Ward, Selina; Cribb, Thomas H

    2015-10-01

    A total of 1523 individuals of 34 species of chaetodontids from the Great Barrier Reef were examined for faustulid trematodes. Specimens resembling Paradiscogaster glebulae Bray, Cribb & Barker, 1994 were found in nine chaetodontid species at three localities. These specimens are shown, on the basis of combined morphological and molecular analyses, to comprise a complex of morphologically similar and partly cryptic species. The complex may comprise as many as six distinct species of which three are resolved here. The true P. glebulae is identified in Chaetodon ornatissimus Cuvier, 1831, Chaetodon aureofasciatus Macleay, 1878, Chaetodon plebeius Cuvier, 1831, Chaetodon rainfordi McCulloch, 1923 and Chaetodon speculum Cuvier, 1831. Two new species are described, Paradiscogaster munozae n. sp. from Heniochus varius (Cuvier, 1829), Heniochus chrysostomus Cuvier, 1831 and Chaetodon citrinellus Cuvier, 1831 and Paradiscogaster melendezi n. sp. from Chaetodon kleinii Bloch, 1790. In terms of morphology the three species differ most clearly in the development of the appendages on the ventral sucker. The three species differ at 3-6consistent bp of ITS2 rDNA. The host-specificity of the three species differs strikingly. P. melendezi n. sp. infects just one fish species, P. glebulae infects species of only one clade of Chaetodon, and P. munozae n. sp. infects quite unrelated species. The basis of this unusual pattern of host-specificity requires further exploration. Two of the species recognised here, P. glebulae and P. munozae n. sp., showed apparent intra-individual variation in the ITS2 rDNA sequences as demonstrated by clear, replicated double peaks in the electropherograms. PMID:26096311

  11. Revisions to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the Abiquiu Formation, Abiquiu and contiguous areas, north-central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maldonado, Florian; Kelley, Shari A.

    2009-01-01

    Stratigraphic studies and geologic mapping on the Abiquiu 7.5-min quadrangle have led to revision of the stratigraphic nomenclature for the Oligocene to Miocene Abiquiu Formation in north-central New Mexico. The Abiquiu Formation had previously been defined to include informal upper, middle (Pedernal chert member), and lower members. The basement-derived conglomeratic lower member in the northern Jemez Mountains and Abiquiu embayment is here redefined. We propose removing the "lower member" from the Abiquiu Formation because provenance of these coarse sediments is dramatically different than the volcaniclastic strata of the "upper member." Furthermore, we propose that the term "lower member of the Abiquiu Formation" be replaced with an existing unit name, the Ritito Conglomerate of Barker (1958), and that the name Abiquiu Formation be restricted to the volcaniclastic succession. The lower part of the Ritito Conglomerate in Arroyo del Cobre on the Abiquiu quadrangle is 47 m (155 ft) thick and is composed of arkosic conglomeratic beds interbedded with arkosic sands and siltstones. Clasts include, in descending order of abundance, Proterozoic quartzite, granite, metavolcanic rocks, quartz, schist, and gneiss and a trace of Mesozoic sandstone and Paleozoic chert. Clasts are predominantly of pebble and cobble size but range from granule to boulder size. Paleocurrent data collected in the Arroyo del Cobre area indicate that the Ritito Conglomerate was deposited by a south-flowing river system during the Oligocene, eroding Laramide highlands such as the Tusas Mountains to the northeast, which contain predominantly Proterozoic rocks. This depositional setting has also been suggested by previous workers. The middle member or Pedernal chert member is present both at the top of the Ritito Conglomerate and as lenses within the lower part of the Abiquiu Formation. This post-depositional diagenetic chert remains an informal unit called the Pedernal chert.

  12. Density functional theory for the description of spherical non-associating monomers in confined media using the SAFT-VR equation of state and weighted density approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malheiro, Carine; Mendiboure, Bruno; Plantier, Frédéric; Blas, Felipe J.; Miqueu, Christelle

    2014-04-01

    As a first step of an ongoing study of thermodynamic properties and adsorption of complex fluids in confined media, we present a new theoretical description for spherical monomers using the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory for potential of Variable Range (SAFT-VR) and a Non-Local Density Functional Theory (NLDFT) with Weighted Density Approximations (WDA). The well-known Modified Fundamental Measure Theory is used to describe the inhomogeneous hard-sphere contribution as a reference for the monomer and two WDA approaches are developed for the dispersive terms from the high-temperature Barker and Henderson perturbation expansion. The first approach extends the dispersive contributions using the scalar and vector weighted densities introduced in the Fundamental Measure Theory (FMT) and the second one uses a coarse-grained (CG) approach with a unique weighted density. To test the accuracy of this new NLDFT/SAFT-VR coupling, the two versions of the theoretical model are compared with Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) molecular simulations using the same molecular model. Only the version with the "CG" approach for the dispersive terms provides results in excellent agreement with GCMC calculations in a wide range of conditions while the "FMT" extension version gives a good representation solely at low pressures. Hence, the "CG" version of the theoretical model is used to reproduce methane adsorption isotherms in a Carbon Molecular Sieve and compared with experimental data after a characterization of the material. The whole results show an excellent agreement between modeling and experiments. Thus, through a complete and consistent comparison both with molecular simulations and with experimental data, the NLDFT/SAFT-VR theory has been validated for the description of monomers.

  13. Natural and Anthropogenic Controls on the Ecosystem Services Provided by Dissolved Organic Matter: A Case Study of the Boulder Creek Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, R. S.; McKnight, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) performs a number of vital functions in aquatic ecosystems, playing a substantial role in carbon and nitrogen cycles and the bioavailability of metals as well as generally affecting water chemistry. Additionally, it is considered the main cause of the the formation of harmful disinfection byproducts during water treatment processes. Because DOM is vital for ecosystem functioning, but potentially problematic for some direct human uses of water, it proves a complex case study for the application of the ecosystem services framework. To add to the complexity, human behavior can affect the amount and composition of DOM in water. Increasing concentrations of DOM have been observed in many areas of Northern Europe and North America. Hypotheses which have been suggested to explain these increased concentrations include changing land use, thawing peatlands, increased nitrogen deposition, and a lessening of acid rain, a particularly interesting idea because it would be an unintended consequence of a policy designed to protect other ecosystem functions. This multi-year study investigates DOM in the Boulder Creek Watershed in Colorado to better understand seasonal cycling of DOM and the link between DOM in the river and organic matter in the catchment, which is a substantial DOM source. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to analyze the chemical character of the DOM in an attempt to elucidate the watershed processes driving changes in DOM concentration. Because flow in Boulder Creek is partially controlled by Barker dam and reservoir, this study site provides an opportunity to investigate both natural DOM cycling and the impact of an anthropogenic influence. By better understanding DOM cycling and the ecosystem services it provides, we can better predict how DOM dynamics may shift in the future and be prepared to adjust our behavior and water treatment processes accordingly.

  14. Ethnopharmacological survey of wild medicinal plants in Showbak, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Qura'n, S

    2009-05-01

    Two main research questions are framing this investigation: (1) the main taxa of the medicinal importance value altered the Showbak forest stand and species composition? (2) The most safe species and what are the toxic ones (unsafe). These two research questions are the vital ones to draw a clear image about the wild medicinal plants of this investigated area of Showbak region in Jordan. 79 wild medicinal plant species were investigated in this study which are used in traditional medication for the treatment of various diseases. Most of the locals interviewed dealt with well-known safe medicinal plants such as Aaronsohnia factorovskyi Warb. et Eig., Achillea santolina L., Adiantum capillus-veneris L., Artemisia herba-alba L., Ceratonia siliqua L., Clematis recta L., Herniaria hirsuta L., Malva neglecta Wallr., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Ruta chalepensis L., Salvia triloba L., Sarcopoterium spinosa (L.) Spach., Thymbra capitata (L.) Hof, and Urginea maritima Barker. Many of the wild medicinal plants investigated were toxic and needed to be practiced by practitioners and herbalists rather than the local healers. These plants include Calotropis procera Willd R.Br., Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Sch., Datura stramonium L., Digitalis purpurea L., Ecballium elaterium (L.) A.Rich., Euphorbia helioscopia L., Euphorbia tinctoria Boiss., Glaucium corniculatum (L.) Curt., Hyoscyamus aureus L., Mandragora officinarum L., Nerium oleander L., Ricinus communis L., Solanum nigrum L., Withania somnifera (L.) Dunel. The conservation of medicinal plants and natural resources is becoming increasingly important, so this research is trying to collect information from local population concerning the use of medicinal plants in Showbak; identify the most important specie; determine the relative importance value of the species and calculate the informant consensus factor (ICF) for the medicinal plants. Obtaining results is relied on the interviewee's personal information and the medicinal use

  15. Fast Gamma Rhythms in the Hippocampus Promote Encoding of Novel Object–Place Pairings123

    PubMed Central

    Wood Bieri, Kevin; Hwaun, Ernie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hippocampal gamma rhythms increase during mnemonic operations (Johnson and Redish, 2007; Montgomery and Buzsáki, 2007; Sederberg et al., 2007; Jutras et al., 2009; Trimper et al., 2014) and may affect memory encoding by coordinating activity of neurons that code related information (Jensen and Lisman, 2005). Here, a hippocampal-dependent, object–place association task (Clark et al., 2000; Broadbent et al., 2004; Eacott and Norman, 2004; Lee et al., 2005; Winters et al., 2008; Barker and Warburton, 2011) was used in rats to investigate how slow and fast gamma rhythms in the hippocampus relate to encoding of memories for novel object–place associations. In novel object tasks, the degree of hippocampal dependence has been reported to vary depending on the type of novelty (Eichenbaum et al., 2007; Winters et al., 2008). Therefore, gamma activity was examined during three novelty conditions: a novel object presented in a location where a familiar object had been (NO), a familiar object presented in a location where no object had been (NL), and a novel object presented in a location where no object had been (NO+NL). The strongest and most consistent effects were observed for fast gamma rhythms during the NO+NL condition. Fast gamma power, CA3–CA1 phase synchrony, and phase-locking of place cell spikes increased during exploration of novel, compared to familiar, object–place associations. Additionally, place cell spiking during exploration of novel object–place pairings was increased when fast gamma rhythms were present. These results suggest that fast gamma rhythms promote encoding of memories for novel object–place associations. PMID:27257621

  16. Monitoring the geothermal fluid using time lapse electrical resistivity tomography: The Pisciarelli fumarolic field test site (Campi Flegrei, South Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Alessandro; Giulia Di Giuseppe, Maria; Troiano, Antonio; Somma, Reanto; Caputo, Teresa; Patella, Domenico; Troise, Claudia; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Pisciarelli area is a fumarolic field subject to very short time morphological changes. A number of critical problems affect this area, i.e. increase of temperature of the fumaroles above the average background temperature, local seismicity and occurrence of fumaroles mixed with jets of boiling water. The presence of a very shallow aquifer seem to have the control on the behavior and composition of the fumaroles. This fumarolic field is still largely unknown regarding geophysical surveys mainly because of its limited space, surrounded on the eastern side by intense urbanization inside the large Agnano crater (Troiano et al. 2014). Currently is mainly affected by geochemical, thermal and seismic monitoring which may not fully explain the behaviour of fluids surface. Many monitoring or time lapse (TL) applications are discussed in literature (e.g., White, 1994; Daily et al., 1995; Barker and Moore, 1998; Ramirez and Daily, 2001; Carter, 2002; Slater et al., 2002; Singha and Gorelick, 2005; Cassiani et al., 2006; Swarzenski et al., 2006; de Franco et al., 2009). However all these experiments are devoted to the use of the ERT for tracer tests or in contaminant hydrology and are characterized by a short monitoring period due to the complexity and problems of long-time instrument maintenance. We propose and present a first approach of a geophysical monitoring by time lapse electrical resistivity in a fumarolic field. The profiles were acquired in January 2013, in January, March, May, July, September and November 2014 respectively. They cross the Pisciarelli area following approximately the NS direction and were characterized by a 2.5 m electrode spacing and maximum penetration depth of about 20 m. and will supply fundamental evidences on the possible seasonal resistivity fluctuations or if the resistivity changes are indicative of an increase in volcanic gases present in the hydrothermal system.

  17. TIDALLY DRIVEN DYNAMOS IN A ROTATING SPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R. E-mail: r.hollerbach@leeds.ac.uk

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker and Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  18. An analysis of the chemical character of dissolved organic matter and soluble soil organic matter within the same catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, R. S.; Russell, N.; McKnight, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Trends of increasing dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentrations have been reported in many parts of the world. To better understand how organic matter is transported throughout and used within watersheds, it is important to measure not only how much there is, but to also its chemical character. In this study, spectroscopic techniques were used to analyze the DOM from Boulder Creek in Colorado, as well as the soluble organic matter in soil from a smaller catchment within the watershed. Samples from the creek were taken at regular intervals for several years and the DOM quantity and quality was analyzed to determine both seasonal impacts and the affect of Barker Dam halfway up the watershed. Observed trends followed similar patterns to that seen in other alpine ecosystems, with a peak in microbial DOM just before snowmelt, followed by increasing terrestrial input. However, the storage in the reservoir made the signal less clear below the dam. Soil organic matter samples were taken with an aim to observing both spatial and temporal patterns. A large number of both surface and deep samples were taken in one time snapshot, and surface samples were taken from the same plots over several months beginning during snowmelt and reaching the end of the growing season. Surface samples displayed a stronger correlation with DOM in the stream than samples taken at depth, indicating much of the DOM comes from overland flow. However, strong microbial signals from samples at depth indicated the possibility that microbes may be using OM as an electron acceptor during bedrock weathering processes. Little variation was shown temporally in surface samples, although there was some seen in the riparian zone during snowmelt.

  19. Extension of the AURIC Radiative Transfer Model for Mars Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. S.; Lumpe, J. D.; Correira, J.; Stewart, A. I.; Schneider, N. M.; Deighan, J.

    2013-12-01

    We present recent updates to the Atmospheric Ultraviolet Radiance Integrated Code (AURIC) model that allow it to be used as a forward model for Mars atmospheric research. AURIC is a state of the art far ultraviolet (FUV) to near-infrared (NIR) atmospheric radiance model that has been used extensively for analysis and modeling of terrestrial upper atmospheric remote sensing data. We present recent updates to the Atmospheric Ultraviolet Radiance Integrated Code (AURIC) model that allow it to be used as a forward model for Mars atmospheric research. AURIC is a state of the art far ultraviolet (FUV) to near-infrared (NIR) atmospheric radiance model that has been used extensively for analysis and modeling of terrestrial upper atmospheric remote sensing data. The airglow modeling capabilities of AURIC make it a powerful tool that can be used to characterize optical backgrounds, simulate data from both rocket and satellite-borne optical instrumentation, and serve as a forward model driver for geophysical retrieval algorithms. Upgrades made to allow modeling of the Martian atmosphere include 1-D Mars photochemistry and molecular transport and the addition of the following molecular band systems: CO Cameron; CO Fourth Positive Group; CO2+ Fox-Duffendack-Barker; CO2+ UV Doublet; CO Hopfield-Birge (B-X); and CO+ First Negative Group. Furthermore, a prototype AURIC-Titan model has also been developed, allowing comparison of AURIC spectral radiances with Cassini-Huygens/UVIS data [Stevens et al., 2011; Stevens et al., in preparation]. Extension of AURIC to the atmospheres of Pluto and it's largest moon, Charon, is also ongoing in support of NASA's New Horizons mission [Stevens, Evans, and Gladstone, 2012; 2013].

  20. Tidally Driven Dynamos in a Rotating Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R.

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker & Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  1. Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1992-01-31

    PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

  2. Density functional theory for the description of spherical non-associating monomers in confined media using the SAFT-VR equation of state and weighted density approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Malheiro, Carine; Mendiboure, Bruno; Plantier, Frédéric; Miqueu, Christelle; Blas, Felipe J.

    2014-04-07

    As a first step of an ongoing study of thermodynamic properties and adsorption of complex fluids in confined media, we present a new theoretical description for spherical monomers using the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory for potential of Variable Range (SAFT-VR) and a Non-Local Density Functional Theory (NLDFT) with Weighted Density Approximations (WDA). The well-known Modified Fundamental Measure Theory is used to describe the inhomogeneous hard-sphere contribution as a reference for the monomer and two WDA approaches are developed for the dispersive terms from the high-temperature Barker and Henderson perturbation expansion. The first approach extends the dispersive contributions using the scalar and vector weighted densities introduced in the Fundamental Measure Theory (FMT) and the second one uses a coarse-grained (CG) approach with a unique weighted density. To test the accuracy of this new NLDFT/SAFT-VR coupling, the two versions of the theoretical model are compared with Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) molecular simulations using the same molecular model. Only the version with the “CG” approach for the dispersive terms provides results in excellent agreement with GCMC calculations in a wide range of conditions while the “FMT” extension version gives a good representation solely at low pressures. Hence, the “CG” version of the theoretical model is used to reproduce methane adsorption isotherms in a Carbon Molecular Sieve and compared with experimental data after a characterization of the material. The whole results show an excellent agreement between modeling and experiments. Thus, through a complete and consistent comparison both with molecular simulations and with experimental data, the NLDFT/SAFT-VR theory has been validated for the description of monomers.

  3. Protein structures of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shih-Chieh; Gepts, Paul L; Whitaker, John R

    2002-10-23

    Two nucleotide sequences for genes that encode alpha-amylase inhibitor 4 (alphaAI-4) from white kidney bean (WKB) cv. 858, designated gene alphaAI-4 (Accession No. ), and alpha-amylase inhibitor 5 (alphaAI-5) from black bean (BB), designated gene alphaAI-5 (Accession No. ), were determined. Genes alphaAI-4 and alphaAI-5 encode 244 amino acid prepro-alphaAI-4 and prepro-alphaAI-5 polypeptides that are 93 and 95% identical with alpha-amylase inhibitor l (alphaAI-l; Hoffman, L. M.; Ma, Y.; Barker, R. F. Nucleic Acids Res. 1982, 10, 7819-7828), 40 and 43% identical with red kidney bean lectin, and 52 and 55% identical with arcelin l of wild-type bean. The high degree of sequence similarity indicates the evolutionary relationship among these genes. PCR analysis of genomic DNA purified from six genotypes of Phaseolus vulgaris showed very similar band patterns in 2% agarose gel, another indication of the conserved size homology among these genes. Proteolytic processing sites were located between Asn77 and Ser78 for pro-alphaAI-4 and pro-alphaAI-5. A bend next to Asn77 in three-dimensional model structures of alphaAI-4 and alphaAI-5 proinhibitors indicates that the proteolytic cleavage is necessary to remove the conformational constraint for activation to the mature protein. Mature WKB alphaAI-4 was composed of four subunits (2alpha2beta) and had a molecular weight of 50000 determined by multiangle laser light scattering and 56714 determined by laser-assisted time-of-flight mass spectrometry. PMID:12381161

  4. Broadband Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions for Use in the Jila Electron Edm Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresh, Daniel N.; Cossel, Kevin C.; Cornell, Eric A.; Ye, Jun

    2013-06-01

    The JILA electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) experiment will use a low-lying, metastable ^3Δ_1 state in trapped molecular ions of HfF^+ or ThF^+. Prior to this work, the low-lying states of these molecules had been investigated by PFI-ZEKE spectroscopy. However, there were no detailed studies of the electronic structure. The recently developed technique of frequency comb velocity modulation spectroscopy (VMS) provides broad-bandwidth, high-resolution, ion-sensitive spectroscopy, allowing the acquisition of 150 cm^{-1} of continuous spectra in 30 minutes over 1500 simultaneous channels. By supplementing this technique with cw-laser VMS, we have investigated the electronic structure of HfF^+ in the frequency range of 9950 to 14600 cm^{-1}, accurately fitting and assigning 16 rovibronic transitions involving 8 different electronic states including the X^1Σ^+ and a^3Δ_1 states. In addition, an observed ^3Π_{0+} state with coupling to both the X and a states has been used in the actual eEDM experiment to coherently transfer population from the rovibronic ground state of HfF^+ to the eEDM science state. Furthermore, we report on current efforts of applying frequency comb VMS at 700 - 900 nm to the study of ThF^+, which has a lower energy ^3Δ_1 state and a greater effective electric field, and will provide increased sensitivity for a measurement of the eEDM. A. E. Leanhardt et. al., Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy 270, 1-25 (2011). B. J. Barker, I. O. Antonov, M. C. Heaven, K. A. Peterson, Journal of Chemical Physics 136, 104305 (2012). L. C. Sinclair, K. C. Cossel, T. Coffey, J. Ye, E. A. Cornell, Physical Review Letters 107, 093002 (2011). K.C. Cossel et. al., Chemical Physics Letters 546, 1-11 (2012).

  5. Broadband Frequency Comb and Cw-Laser Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy of ThF+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresh, Dan; Cossel, Kevin; Ye, Jun; Cornell, Eric

    2015-06-01

    An experimental search for the permanent electric dipole moment of the electron (eEDM) is currently being performed using the metastable ^3Δ_1 state in trapped HfF^+ ^(^). The use of ThF^+ could significantly increase the sensitivity due to the larger effective electric field and longer ^3Δ_1 state lifetime. Previous work by the Heaven group has identified several low-lying ThF^+ electronic states; however, the ground state could not be conclusively assigned. In addition, transitions to intermediate electronic states have not been identified, but they are necessary for state detection, manipulation, and readout in an eEDM experiment. To date we have acquired 3700 wn of densely-sampled ThF^+ spectra in the 695 - 1020 nm region with frequency comb and cw-laser velocity modulation spectroscopy. With high resolution, we have accurately fit more than 20 ThF^+ vibronic transitions, including electronic states spaced by the known X-a energy separation^b. We will report on the ThF^+ ground state assignment and its implications for an eEDM experiment. H. Loh, K. C. Cossel, M. C. Grau, K.-K. Ni, E. R. Meyer, J. L. Bohn, J. Ye, E. A. Cornell, Science 342, 1220 (2013). B. J. Barker, I. O. Antonov, M. C. Heaven, K. A. Peterson, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 104305 (2012). L. C. Sinclair, K. C. Cossel, T. Coffey, J. Ye, E. A. Cornell, PRL 107, 093002 (2011). K.C. Cossel et. al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 546, 1 (2012).

  6. Environmental quality, developmental plasticity and the thrifty phenotype: a review of evolutionary models.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan C K

    2007-01-01

    The concept of the thrifty phenotype, first proposed by Hales and Barker, is now widely used in medical research, often in contrast to the thrifty genotype model, to interpret associations between early-life experience and adult health status. Several evolutionary models of the thrifty phenotype, which refers to developmental plasticity, have been presented. These include (A) the weather forecast model of Bateson, (B) the maternal fitness model of Wells, (C) the intergenerational phenotypic inertia model of Kuzawa, and (D) the predictive adaptive response model of Gluckman and Hanson. These models are compared and contrasted, in order to assess their relative utility for understanding human ontogenetic development. The most broadly applicable model is model A, which proposes that developing organisms respond to cues of environmental quality, and that mismatches between this forecast and subsequent reality generate significant adverse effects in adult phenotype. The remaining models all address in greater detail what kind of information is provided by such a forecast. Whereas both models B and C emphasise the adaptive benefits of exploiting information about the past, encapsulated in maternal phenotype, model D assumes that the fetus uses cues about the present external environment to predict its probable adult environment. I argue that for humans, with a disproportionately long period between the closing of sensitive windows of plasticity and the attainment of reproductive maturity, backward-looking models B and C represent a better approach, and indicate that the developing offspring aligns itself with stable cues of maternal phenotype so as to match its energy demand with maternal capacity to supply. In contrast, the predictive adaptive response model D over-estimates the capacity of the offspring to predict the future, and also fails to address the long-term parent-offspring dynamics of human development. Differences between models have implications for the

  7. Low birth weight: impact on women’s health

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Barbara T.; Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira

    2014-01-01

    Purpose First proposed by Dr. David Barker and now supported by numerous epidemiological and experimental studies, the theory of the developmental origins of health and disease hypothesizes that low birth weight (5.5 pounds or less) indicative of poor fetal growth is associated with an increased risk for chronic, non-communicable disease in later life including hypertension, type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. Whether women are at greater risk than men is not clear. Experimental studies that mimic the cause of slow fetal growth are being used to examine the underlying mechanisms that link a poor fetal environment with later chronic disease and investigate how sex and age impact programmed risk. Thus, the aim of this review is to summarize the current literature related to the impact of low birth weight on women’s health and provide insight into potential mechanisms that program increased risk of chronic disease across the lifespan. Methods A search of PubMed was utilized with key words related to low birth weight, women’s health, female and sex differences; additional terms included blood pressure, hypertension, renal, cardiovascular, obesity, glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, bone health, reproductive senescence, menopause and aging. Findings The major chronic diseases associated with low birth weight include high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease, impaired glucose homeostasis and Type 2 Diabetes, impaired bone mass and osteoporosis, and early reproductive aging. Implications Low birth weight increases the risk for chronic disease in men and women. Low birth weight is also associated with increased risk for early menopause. Further studies are needed to fully address the impact of sex and age on the developmental programming of adult health and disease in women across their lifespan. PMID:25064626

  8. Chemical decomposition of high-level nuclear waste storage/disposal glasses under irradiation. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Griscom, D.L.; Merzbacher, C.I.

    1997-01-01

    'The objective of this research is to use the sensitive technique of electron spin resonance (ESR) to look for evidence of radiation-induced chemical decomposition of vitreous forms contemplated for immobilization of plutonium and/or high-level nuclear wastes, to interpret this evidence in terms of existing knowledge of glass structure, and to recommend certain materials for further study by other techniques, particularly electron microscopy and measurements of gas evolution by high-vacuum mass spectroscopy. Previous ESR studies had demonstrated that an effect of y rays on a simple binary potassium silicate glass was to induce superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup -}) and ozonide (O{sub 3}{sup -}) as relatively stable product of long-term irradiation Accordingly, some of the first experiments performed as a part of the present effort involved repeating this work. A glass of composition 44 K{sub 2}O: 56 SiO{sub 2} was prepared from reagent grade K{sub 2}CO3 and SiO{sub 2} powders melted in a Pt crucible in air at 1,200 C for 1.5 hr. A sample irradiated to a dose of 1 MGy (1 MGy = 10{sup 8} rad) indeed yielded the same ESR results as before. To test the notion that the complex oxygen ions detected may be harbingers of radiation-induced phase separation or bubble formation, a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment was performed. SANS is theoretically capable of detecting voids or bubbles as small as 10 \\305 in diameter. A preliminary experiment was carried out with the collaboration of Dr. John Barker (NIST). The SANS spectra for the irradiated and unirradiated samples were indistiguishable. A relatively high incoherent background (probably due to the presence of protons) may obscure scattering from small gas bubbles and therefore decrease the effective resolution of this technique. No further SANS experiments are planned at this time.'

  9. Long-term survival and integration of porcine expanded neural precursor cell grafts in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Harrower, T P; Tyers, P; Hooks, Y; Barker, R A

    2006-01-01

    Porcine fetal neural tissue has been considered as an alternative source to human allografts for transplantation in neurodegenerative disorders by virtue of the fact that it can overcome the ethical and practical difficulties using human fetal neural tissue. However, primary porcine neural xenografts are rejected while porcine expanded neural precursor neural cells (PNPCs) seem to be less immunogenic and thus survive better [Armstrong, R.J., Harrower, T.P., Hurelbrink, C.B., McLaughin, M., Ratcliffe, E.L., Tyers, P., Richards, A., Dunnett, S.B., Rosser, A.E., Barker, R.A., 2001a. Porcine neural xenografts in the immunocompetent rat: immune response following grafting of expanded neural precursor cells. Neuroscience 106, 201-216]. In this study, we extended these observations to investigate the long-term survival of such transplants in immunosuppressed rats. Unilateral 6 OHDA lesioned rats received grafts into the dopamine denervated striatum of either primary porcine fetal neural tissue dissected from the E26 cortex or cortically derived neural stem cells which had been derived from the same source but expanded in vitro for 21 days. All cortically derived neural stem cell grafts survived up to 5 months in contrast to the poor survival of primary porcine xenografts. Histological analysis demonstrated good graft integration with fibers extending into the surrounding host tissue including white matter with synapse formation, and in addition there was evidence of host vascularization and myelinated fibers within the graft area. This study has therefore shown for the first time the reliable long-term survival of grafts derived from porcine expanded neural precursors in a rat model of PD, with maturation and integration into the host brain. This demonstrates that such xenografted cells may be able to recreate the damaged circuitry in PD although strategies for dopaminergic differentiation of the porcine neural precursor cell remain to be refined. PMID:16246328

  10. Problem Solving in the Natural Sciences and Early Adolescent Girls' Gender Roles and Self-Esteem a Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis from AN Ecological Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavkin, Michael

    What impact do gender roles and self-esteem have on early adolescent girls' abilities to solve problems when participating in natural science-related activities? Bronfenbrenner's human ecology model and Barker's behavior setting theory were used to assess how environmental contexts relate to problem solving in scientific contexts. These models also provided improved methodology and increased understanding of these constructs when compared with prior research. Early adolescent girls gender roles and self-esteem were found to relate to differences in problem solving in science-related groups. Specifically, early adolescent girls' gender roles were associated with levels of verbal expression, expression of positive affect, dominance, and supportive behavior during science experiments. Also, levels of early adolescent girls self-esteem were related to verbal expression and dominance in peer groups. Girls with high self-esteem also were more verbally expressive and had higher levels of dominance during science experiments. The dominant model of a masculine-typed and feminine-typed dichotomy of problem solving based on previous literature was not effective in Identifying differences within girls' problem solving. Such differences in the results of these studies may be the result of this study's use of observational measures and analysis of the behavior settings in which group members participated. Group behavior and problem-solving approaches of early adolescent girls seemed most likely to be defined by environmental contexts, not governed solely by the personalities of participants. A discussion for the examination of environmental factors when assessing early adolescent girls' gender roles and self-esteem follows this discussion.