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Sample records for barrier infrared detector

  1. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2009-01-01

    The complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) is designed to eliminate the major dark current sources in the superlattice infrared detector. The concept can also be applied to bulk semiconductor- based infrared detectors. CBIRD uses two different types of specially designed barriers: an electron barrier that blocks electrons but not holes, and a hole barrier that blocks holes but not electrons. The CBIRD structure consists of an n-contact, a hole barrier, an absorber, an electron barrier, and a p-contact. The barriers are placed at the contact-absorber junctions where, in a conventional p-i-n detector structure, there normally are depletion regions that produce generation-recombination (GR) dark currents due to Shockley-Read- Hall (SRH) processes. The wider-bandgap complementary barriers suppress G-R dark current. The barriers also block diffusion dark currents generated in the diffusion wings in the neutral regions. In addition, the wider gap barriers serve to reduce tunneling dark currents. In the case of a superlattice-based absorber, the superlattice itself can be designed to suppress dark currents due to Auger processes. At the same time, the barriers actually help to enhance the collection of photo-generated carriers by deflecting the photo-carriers that are diffusing in the wrong direction (i.e., away from collectors) and redirecting them toward the collecting contacts. The contact layers are made from materials with narrower bandgaps than the barriers. This allows good ohmic contacts to be made, resulting in lower contact resistances. Previously, THALES Research and Technology (France) demonstrated detectors with bulk InAsSb (specifically InAs0.91Sb0.09) absorber lattice-matched to GaSb substrates. The absorber is surrounded by two wider bandgap layers designed to minimize impedance to photocurrent flow. The wide bandgap materials also serve as contacts. The cutoff wavelength of the InAsSb absorber is fixed. CBIRD may be considered as a modified

  2. Barrier infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A superlattice-based infrared absorber and the matching electron-blocking and hole-blocking unipolar barriers, absorbers and barriers with graded band gaps, high-performance infrared detectors, and methods of manufacturing such devices are provided herein. The infrared absorber material is made from a superlattice (periodic structure) where each period consists of two or more layers of InAs, InSb, InSbAs, or InGaAs. The layer widths and alloy compositions are chosen to yield the desired energy band gap, absorption strength, and strain balance for the particular application. Furthermore, the periodicity of the superlattice can be "chirped" (varied) to create a material with a graded or varying energy band gap. The superlattice based barrier infrared detectors described and demonstrated herein have spectral ranges covering the entire 3-5 micron atmospheric transmission window, excellent dark current characteristics operating at least 150K, high yield, and have the potential for high-operability, high-uniformity focal plane arrays.

  3. Complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An infrared detector having a hole barrier region adjacent to one side of an absorber region, an electron barrier region adjacent to the other side of the absorber region, and a semiconductor adjacent to the electron barrier.

  4. HgCdTe barrier infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytko, M.; Rogalski, A.

    2016-05-01

    In the last decade, new strategies to achieve high-operating temperature (HOT) detectors have been proposed, including barrier structures such as nBn devices, unipolar barrier photodiodes, and multistage (cascade) infrared detectors. The ability to tune the positions of the conduction and valence band edges independently in a broken-gap type-II superlattices is especially helpful in the design of unipolar barriers. This idea has been also implemented in HgCdTe ternary material system. However, the implementation of this detector structure in HgCdTe material system is not straightforward due to the existence of a valence band discontinuity (barrier) at the absorber-barrier interface. In this paper we present status of HgCdTe barrier detectors with emphasis on technological progress in fabrication of MOCVD-grown HgCdTe barrier detectors achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology. Their performance is comparable with state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. From the perspective of device fabrication their important technological advantage results from less stringent surface passivation requirements and tolerance to threading dislocations.

  5. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) Contact Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the CBIRD detector is enhanced by using new device contacting methods that have been developed. The detector structure features a narrow gap adsorber sandwiched between a pair of complementary, unipolar barriers that are, in turn, surrounded by contact layers. In this innovation, the contact adjacent to the hole barrier is doped n-type, while the contact adjacent to the electron barrier is doped p-type. The contact layers can have wider bandgaps than the adsorber layer, so long as good electrical contacts are made to them. If good electrical contacts are made to either (or both) of the barriers, then one could contact the barrier(s) directly, obviating the need for additional contact layers. Both the left and right contacts can be doped either n-type or ptype. Having an n-type contact layer next to the electron barrier creates a second p-n junction (the first being the one between the hole barrier and the adsorber) over which applied bias could drop. This reduces the voltage drop over the adsorber, thereby reducing dark current generation in the adsorber region.

  6. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) with Double Tunnel Junction Contact and Quantum Dot Barrier Infrared Detector (QD-BIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.-Y; Soibel, Alexander; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Keo, Sam A.; Nguyen, Jean; Hoglund, Linda; Mumolo, Jason M.; Liu, John K.; Rafol, Sir B.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    The InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice based complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) has already demonstrated very good performance in long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) detection. In this work, we describe results on a modified CBIRD device that incorporates a double tunnel junction contact designed for robust device and focal plane array processing. The new device also exhibited reduced turn-on voltage. We also report results on the quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD). By incorporating self-assembled InSb quantum dots into the InAsSb absorber of the standard nBn detector structure, the QD-BIRD extend the detector cutoff wavelength from approximately 4.2 micrometers to 6 micrometers, allowing the coverage of the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) transmission window. The device has been observed to show infrared response at 225 K.

  7. High Operating Temperature Barrier Infrared Detector with Tailorable Cutoff Wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Seibel, Alexander (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith Y. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A barrier infrared detector with absorber materials having selectable cutoff wavelengths and its method of manufacture is described. A GaInAsSb absorber layer may be grown on a GaSb substrate layer formed by mixing GaSb and InAsSb by an absorber mixing ratio. A GaAlAsSb barrier layer may then be grown on the barrier layer formed by mixing GaSb and AlSbAs by a barrier mixing ratio. The absorber mixing ratio may be selected to adjust a band gap of the absorber layer and thereby determine a cutoff wavelength for the barrier infrared detector. The absorber mixing ratio may vary along an absorber layer growth direction. Various contact layer architectures may be used. In addition, a top contact layer may be isolated into an array of elements electrically isolated as individual functional detectors that may be used in a detector array, imaging array, or focal plane array.

  8. Superlattice Barrier Infrared Detector Development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Rafol, Sir B.; Nguyen, Jean; Hoglund, Linda; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Keo, Sam A.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.

    2011-01-01

    We report recent efforts in achieving state-of-the-art performance in type-II superlattice based infrared photodetectors using the barrier infrared detector architecture. We used photoluminescence measurements for evaluating detector material and studied the influence of the material quality on the intensity of the photoluminescence. We performed direct noise measurements of the superlattice detectors and demonstrated that while intrinsic 1/f noise is absent in superlattice heterodiode, side-wall leakage current can become a source of strong frequency-dependent noise. We developed an effective dry etching process for these complex antimonide-based superlattices that enabled us to fabricate single pixel devices as well as large format focal plane arrays. We describe the demonstration of a 1024x1024 pixel long-wavelength infrared focal plane array based the complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) design. An 11.5 micron cutoff focal plane without anti-reflection coating has yielded noise equivalent differential temperature of 53 mK at operating temperature of 80 K, with 300 K background and cold-stop. Imaging results from a recent 10 ?m cutoff focal plane array are also presented.

  9. Surface Leakage Mechanisms in III-V Infrared Barrier Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidor, D. E.; Savich, G. R.; Wicks, G. W.

    2016-09-01

    Infrared detector epitaxial structures employing unipolar barriers exhibit greatly reduced dark currents compared to simple pn-based structures. When correctly positioned within the structure, unipolar barriers are highly effective at blocking bulk dark current mechanisms. Unipolar barriers are also effective at suppressing surface leakage current in infrared detector structures employing absorbing layers that possess the same conductivity type in their bulk and at their surface. When an absorbing layer possesses opposite conductivity types in its bulk and at its surface, unipolar barriers are not solutions to surface leakage. This work reviews empirically determined surface band alignments of III-V semiconductor compounds and modeled surface band alignments of both gallium-free and gallium-containing type-II strained layer superlattice material systems. Surface band alignments are used to predict surface conductivity types in several detector structures, and the relationship between surface and bulk conductivity types in the absorbing layers of these structures is used as the basis for explaining observed surface leakage characteristics.

  10. High Operating Temperature Midwave Quantum Dot Barrier Infrared Detector (QD-BIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam A.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    The nBn or XBn barrier infrared detector has the advantage of reduced dark current resulting from suppressed Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination and surface leakage. High performance detectors and focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on InAsSb absorber lattice matched to GaSb substrate, with a matching AlAsSb unipolar electron barrier, have been demonstrated. The band gap of lattice-matched InAsSb yields a detector cutoff wavelength of approximately 4.2 ??m when operating at 150K. We report results on extending the cutoff wavelength of midwave barrier infrared detectors by incorporating self-assembled InSb quantum dots into the active area of the detector. Using this approach, we were able to extend the detector cutoff wavelength to 6 ?m, allowing the coverage of the full midwave infrared (MWIR) transmission window. The quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD) shows infrared response at temperatures up to 225 K.

  11. Self-guarding Schottky barrier infrared detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, F. D., Jr.; Pellegrini, P. W.; Ludington, C. E.; Weeks, M. M.

    1985-07-01

    A two dimensional focal plane array of Schottky photodiodes on a silicon substrate for infrared imaging is presented. The array is designed for mating with multiplexing circuitry and has a self-guarding feature wherein adjacent Schottky electrodes act as guard electrodes. This feature allows a substantial increase of the focal plane area coverage ratio.

  12. Theoretical Aspects of Minority Carrier Extraction in Unipolar Barrier Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, David Z.-Y.; Soibel, Alexander; Höglund, Linda; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2015-09-01

    We have examined, theoretically, minority carrier collection in unipolar barrier infrared photodetectors. In barrier infrared detectors, for example the nBn, the unipolar barrier should block only majority carriers and allow unimpeded flow of minority carriers. However, an imperfect barrier would also block minority carriers, resulting in higher than expected turn-on bias. Minority carrier blocking can be caused by barrier doping or unintended band offset between the barrier and the absorber. The distinct manner in which these two mechanisms affect device performance were investigated. We found that introduction of an appropriate amount of barrier doping can reduce depletion dark current without increasing turn-on bias. We examined the effects of band structure on conductivity effective masses when the n-type absorber was a type-II superlattice (T2SL). We showed that for a long-wavelength infrared InAs/GaSb T2SL the vertical conductivity hole effective mass can be much smaller than that predicted by the simple band-edge effect mass picture, implying that the vertical hole mobility estimated from the band-edge effective mass can be unduly pessimistic.

  13. High-Operating-Temperature Barrier Infrared Detector with Tailorable Cutoff Wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory, J.; Soibel, Alexander; Bandara, Sumith V.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-01-01

    A mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) barrier photodetector is capable of operating at higher temperature than the prevailing MWIR detectors based on InSb. The standard high-operating-temperature barrier infrared detector (HOT-BIRD) is made with an InAsSb infrared absorber that is lattice-matched to a GaSb substrate, and has a cutoff wavelength of approximately 4 microns. To increase the versatility and utility of the HOT-BIRD, it is implemented with IR absorber materials with customizable cutoff wavelengths. The HOT-BIRD can be built with the quaternary alloy GaInAsSb as the absorber, GaAlSbAs as the barrier, on a lattice-matching GaSb substrate. The cutoff wavelength of the GaInAsSb can be tailored by adjusting the alloy composition. To build a HOT-BIRD requires a matching pair of absorber and barrier materials with the following properties: (1) their valence band edges must be approximately the same to allow unimpeded hole flow, while their conduction band edges should have a large difference to form an electron barrier; and (2) the absorber and the barrier must be respectively lattice-matched and closely lattice-matched to the substrate to ensure high material quality and low defect density. To make a HOT-BIRD with cutoff wavelength shorter than 4 microns, a GaInAsSb quaternary alloy was used as the absorber, and a matching GaAlSbAs quaternary alloy as the barrier. By changing the alloy composition, the band gap of the quaternary alloy absorber can be continuously adjusted with cutoff wavelength ranging from 4 microns down to the short wavelength infrared (SWIR). By carefully choosing the alloy composition of the barrier, a HOT-BIRD structure can be formed. With this method, a HOT-BIRD can be made with continuously tailorable cutoff wavelengths from 4 microns down to the SWIR. The HOT-BIRD detector technology is suitable for making very-large-format MWIR/SWIR focal plane arrays that can be operated by passive cooling from low Earth orbit. High-operating temperature

  14. 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector Focal Plane Array for Long-Wave Infrared Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Jean; Rafol, Sir B.; Soibel, Alexander; Khoskhlagh, Arezou; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    A 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared (CBIRD) focal plane array for long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) imaging is reported. The arrays were grown by molecular beam expitaxy (MBE) with a 300 period 1.9 um thick absorber. The mean dark current density of 2.2 x 10-4 A/cm2 was measured at an operating bias of 128 mV with a long wavelength cutoff of 8.8 ?m observed at 50% of the peak. The maximum quantum efficiency was 54% measured at 5.6 ?m. Operating at T = 80K, the array yielded an 81% fill factor with 97% operability. Good imagery with a mean noise equivalent different temperature (NE?T) of 18.6 mK and a mean detectivity of D* = 1.3 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W was achieved. The substrate was thinned using mechanical lapping and neither an AR coating nor a passivation layer was applied. This article provides the details of the fabrication process for achieving low-dark current LWIR CBIRD arrays. Discussion for an effective hard mask for excellent pattern transfer is given and appropriate mounting techniques for good thermal contact during the dry etching process is described. The challenges and differences between etching large 200 ?m test diodes and small 28 ?m FPA pixels are given.

  15. 320 x 256 complementary barrier infrared detector focal plane array for long-wave infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Jean; Rafol, B., , Sir; Soibel, Alexander; Khoskhlagh, Arezou; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Liu, John K.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-06-01

    A 320 x 256 Complementary Barrier Infrared (CBIRD) focal plane array for long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) imaging is reported. The arrays were grown by molecular beam expitaxy (MBE) with a 300 period 1.9 um thick absorber. The mean dark current density of 2.2 x 10-4 A/cm2 was measured at an operating bias of 128 mV with a long wavelength cutoff of 8.8 μm observed at 50% of the peak. The maximum quantum efficiency was 54% measured at 5.6 μm. Operating at T = 80K, the array yielded an 81% fill factor with 97% operability. Good imagery with a mean noise equivalent different temperature (NE▵T) of 18.6 mK and a mean detectivity of D* = 1.3 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W was achieved. The substrate was thinned using mechanical lapping and neither an AR coating nor a passivation layer was applied. This article provides the details of the fabrication process for achieving low-dark current LWIR CBIRD arrays. Discussion for an effective hard mask for excellent pattern transfer is given and appropriate mounting techniques for good thermal contact during the dry etching process is described. The challenges and differences between etching large 200 μm test diodes and small 28 μm FPA pixels are given.

  16. Proton radiation effect on performance of InAs/GaSb complementary barrier infrared detector

    SciTech Connect

    Soibel, Alexander; Rafol, Sir B.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Nguyen, Jean; Hoglund, Linda; Fisher, Anita M.; Keo, Sam. A.; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2015-12-28

    In this work, we investigated the effect of proton irradiation on the performance of long wavelength infrared InAs/GaSb photodiodes (λ{sub c} = 10.2 μm), based on the complementary barrier infrared detector design. We found that irradiation with 68 MeV protons causes a significant increase of the dark current from j{sub d} = 5 × 10{sup −5} A/cm{sup 2} to j{sub d} = 6 × 10{sup −3} A/cm{sup 2}, at V{sub b} = 0.1 V, T = 80 K and fluence 19.2 × 10{sup 11 }H{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. Analysis of the dark current as a function of temperature and bias showed that the dominant contributor to the dark current in these devices changes from diffusion current to tunneling current after proton irradiation. This change in the dark current mechanism can be attributed to the onset of surface leakage current, generated by trap-assisted tunneling processes in proton displacement damage areas located near the device sidewalls.

  17. Proton radiation effect on performance of InAs/GaSb complementary barrier infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Rafol, B., Sir; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Nguyen, Jean; Hoglund, Linda; Fisher, Anita M.; Keo, Sam. A.; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we investigated the effect of proton irradiation on the performance of long wavelength infrared InAs/GaSb photodiodes (λc = 10.2 μm), based on the complementary barrier infrared detector design. We found that irradiation with 68 MeV protons causes a significant increase of the dark current from jd = 5 × 10-5 A/cm2 to jd = 6 × 10-3 A/cm2, at Vb = 0.1 V, T = 80 K and fluence 19.2 × 1011 H+/cm2. Analysis of the dark current as a function of temperature and bias showed that the dominant contributor to the dark current in these devices changes from diffusion current to tunneling current after proton irradiation. This change in the dark current mechanism can be attributed to the onset of surface leakage current, generated by trap-assisted tunneling processes in proton displacement damage areas located near the device sidewalls.

  18. Status of HgCdTe Barrier Infrared Detectors Grown by MOCVD in Military University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytko, M.; Jóźwikowski, K.; Martyniuk, P.; Gawron, W.; Madejczyk, P.; Kowalewski, A.; Markowska, O.; Rogalski, A.; Rutkowski, J.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present the status of HgCdTe barrier detectors with an emphasis on technological progress in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology. It is shown that MOCVD technology is an excellent tool for HgCdTe barrier architecture growth with a wide range of composition, donor /acceptor doping, and without post-grown annealing. The device concept of a specific barrier bandgap architecture integrated with Auger-suppression is as a good solution for high-operating temperature infrared detectors. Analyzed devices show a high performance comparable with the state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. Dark current densities are close to the values given by "Rule 07" and detectivities of non-immersed detectors are close to the value marked for HgCdTe photodiodes. Experimental data of long-wavelength infrared detector structures were confirmed by numerical simulations obtained by a commercially available software APSYS platform. A detailed analysis applied to explain dark current plots was made, taking into account Shockley-Read-Hall, Auger, and tunneling currents.

  19. Status of HgCdTe Barrier Infrared Detectors Grown by MOCVD in Military University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytko, M.; Jóźwikowski, K.; Martyniuk, P.; Gawron, W.; Madejczyk, P.; Kowalewski, A.; Markowska, O.; Rogalski, A.; Rutkowski, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present the status of HgCdTe barrier detectors with an emphasis on technological progress in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology. It is shown that MOCVD technology is an excellent tool for HgCdTe barrier architecture growth with a wide range of composition, donor/acceptor doping, and without post-grown annealing. The device concept of a specific barrier bandgap architecture integrated with Auger-suppression is as a good solution for high-operating temperature infrared detectors. Analyzed devices show a high performance comparable with the state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. Dark current densities are close to the values given by "Rule 07" and detectivities of non-immersed detectors are close to the value marked for HgCdTe photodiodes. Experimental data of long-wavelength infrared detector structures were confirmed by numerical simulations obtained by a commercially available software APSYS platform. A detailed analysis applied to explain dark current plots was made, taking into account Shockley-Read-Hall, Auger, and tunneling currents.

  20. Long wavelength infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Long wavelength infrared detection is achieved by a detector made with layers of quantum well material bounded on each side by barrier material to form paired quantum wells, each quantum well having a single energy level. The width and depth of the paired quantum wells, and the spacing therebetween, are selected to split the single energy level with an upper energy level near the top of the energy wells. The spacing is selected for splitting the single energy level into two energy levels with a difference between levels sufficiently small for detection of infrared radiation of a desired wavelength.

  1. History of infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalski, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper overviews the history of infrared detector materials starting with Herschel's experiment with thermometer on February 11th, 1800. Infrared detectors are in general used to detect, image, and measure patterns of the thermal heat radiation which all objects emit. At the beginning, their development was connected with thermal detectors, such as thermocouples and bolometers, which are still used today and which are generally sensitive to all infrared wavelengths and operate at room temperature. The second kind of detectors, called the photon detectors, was mainly developed during the 20th Century to improve sensitivity and response time. These detectors have been extensively developed since the 1940's. Lead sulphide (PbS) was the first practical IR detector with sensitivity to infrared wavelengths up to ˜3 μm. After World War II infrared detector technology development was and continues to be primarily driven by military applications. Discovery of variable band gap HgCdTe ternary alloy by Lawson and co-workers in 1959 opened a new area in IR detector technology and has provided an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Many of these advances were transferred to IR astronomy from Departments of Defence research. Later on civilian applications of infrared technology are frequently called "dual-use technology applications." One should point out the growing utilisation of IR technologies in the civilian sphere based on the use of new materials and technologies, as well as the noticeable price decrease in these high cost technologies. In the last four decades different types of detectors are combined with electronic readouts to make detector focal plane arrays (FPAs). Development in FPA technology has revolutionized infrared imaging. Progress in integrated circuit design and fabrication techniques has resulted in continued rapid growth in the size and performance of these solid state arrays.

  2. Tunable quantum well infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A novel infrared detector (20, 20', 20), is provided, which is characterized by photon-assisted resonant tunneling between adjacent quantum wells (22a, 22b) separated by barrier layers (28) in an intrinsic semiconductor layer (24) formed on an n.sup.+ substrate (26), wherein the resonance is electrically tunable over a wide band of wavelengths in the near to long infrared region. An n.sup.+ contacting layer (34) is formed over the intrinsic layer and the substrate is n.sup.+ doped to provide contact to the quantum wells. The detector permits fabrication of arrays (30) (one-dimensional and two-dimensional) for use in imaging and spectroscopy applications.

  3. Compact infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Hong, S.; Moacanin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Broadband IR detector integrated into compact package for pollution monitoring and weather prediction is small, highly responsive, and immune to high noise. Sensing material is transparent sheet metalized with reflecting coating and overcoated with black material on same side. Pulse produced by chopping of infrared source beam creates transient "thermal lens" that temporarily defocuses laser beam probe. Detector monitoring beam measures defocusing which parallels infrared intensity.

  4. Photocapacitive MIS infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Lu, S. S.-M.; Moriarty, J. A.; Crouch, R. K.; Miller, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    A new class of room-temperature infrared detectors has been developed through use of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) or metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal (MISIM) slabs. The detectors, which have been fabricated from Si, Ge and GaAs, rely for operation on the electrical capacitance variations induced by modulated incident radiation. The peak detectivity for a 1000-A Si MISIM detector is comparable to that of a conventional Si detector functioning in the photovoltaic mode. Optimization of the photocapacitive-mode detection sensitivity is discussed.

  5. Single-Band and Dual-Band Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Nguyen, Jean (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Bias-switchable dual-band infrared detectors and methods of manufacturing such detectors are provided. The infrared detectors are based on a back-to-back heterojunction diode design, where the detector structure consists of, sequentially, a top contact layer, a unipolar hole barrier layer, an absorber layer, a unipolar electron barrier, a second absorber, a second unipolar hole barrier, and a bottom contact layer. In addition, by substantially reducing the width of one of the absorber layers, a single-band infrared detector can also be formed.

  6. Active Pyroelectric Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Mina, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noncontact pyroelectric infrared detector is described. A pyroelectric film that also has piezoelectric properties is held in place so that it is free to vibrate. It is electrically stimulated to vibrate at a resonance frequency. The vibrating film forms part of a balanced bridge circuit. As thermal radiation impinges on the film the pyroelectric effect causes the resonance frequency to change, thereby unbalancing the bridge circuit. A differential amplifier tracks the change in voltage across the bridge. The resulting voltage signal is further processed by a bandpass filter and a precision rectifier. The device allows for DC or static temperature measurements without the use of a mechanical chopping device.

  7. Stacked Metal Silicide/Silicon Far-Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    Selective doping of silicon in proposed metal silicide/silicon Schottky-barrier infrared photodetector increases maximum detectable wavelength. Stacking layers to form multiple Schottky barriers increases quantum efficiency of detector. Detectors of new type enhance capabilities of far-infrared imaging arrays. Grows by molecular-beam epitaxy on silicon waferscontaining very-large-scale integrated circuits. Imaging arrays of detectors made in monolithic units with image-preprocessing circuitry.

  8. Infrared detectors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardimona, D. A.; Huang, D. H.; Cowan, V.; Morath, C.

    2011-05-01

    Two of the main requirements for space situational awareness are to locate and identify dim and/or distant objects. At the Air Force Research Laboratory's Space Vehicles Directorate, we are investigating how nanostructured metal surfaces can produce plasmon-enhanced fields to address the first function. We are also investigating quantum interference effects in semiconductor quantum dots inside photonic crystal cavities to address the amplification of weak signals. To address the second function of identification of space objects, we are investigating a wavelength-tunable detector scheme that involves a coupled double quantum well structure with a thin middle barrier between the two wells. The photocurrent from this structure will be swept out with a lateral bias. In order to eliminate the diffraction loss of incident photons by a surface grating structure for the z-polarization required in normal quantum well infrared photodetector structures, we will grow an array of self-organized quantum dots buried in one of the quantum wells of a symmetric double quantum well structure. In this paper, we will first describe the requirements for detectors in space, then we will describe our work in the above topics, and finally we will briefly mention our forays into other areas of quantum-structured detectors for use in space.

  9. Detector Arrays For Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Paper describes status of program for developing integrated infrared detectors for astronomy. Program covers variety of detectors, including extrinsic silicon, extrinsic germanium, and indium antimonide devices with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Paper notes for arrays to reach background noise limit in cryogenic telescope, continued reductions in readout noise and dark current needed.

  10. Heterojunction-Internal-Photoemission Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    New type of photodetector adds options for design of imaging devices. Heterojunction-internal-photoemission (HIP) infrared photodetectors proposed for incorporation into planar arrays in imaging devices required to function well at wavelengths from 8 to 17 micrometers and at temperatures above 65 K. Photoexcited electrons cross energy barrier at heterojunction and swept toward collection layer. Array of such detectors made by etching mesa structures. HIP layers stacked to increase quantum efficiency. Also built into integrated circuits including silicon multiplexer/readout circuits.

  11. Advanced far infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in photoconductive and bolometric semiconductor detectors for wavelength 1 mm > {lambda} > 50 {mu}m are reviewed. Progress in detector performance in this photon energy range has been stimulated by new and stringent requirements for ground based, high altitude and space-borne telescopes for astronomical and astrophysical observations. The paper consists of chapters dealing with the various types of detectors: Be and Ga doped Ge photoconductors, stressed Ge:Ga devices and neutron transmutation doped Ge thermistors. Advances in the understanding of basic detector physics and the introduction of modern semiconductor device technology have led to predictable and reliable fabrication techniques. Integration of detectors into functional arrays has become feasible and is vigorously pursued by groups worldwide.

  12. Near infrared detectors for SNAP

    SciTech Connect

    Schubnell, M.; Barron, N.; Bebek, C.; Brown, M.G.; Borysow, M.; Cole, D.; Figer, D.; Lorenzon, W.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Seshadri, S.; Smith, R.; Tarle, G.

    2006-05-23

    Large format (1k x 1k and 2k x 2k) near infrared detectors manufactured by Rockwell Scientific Center and Raytheon Vision Systems are characterized as part of the near infrared R&D effort for SNAP (the Super-Nova/Acceleration Probe). These are hybridized HgCdTe focal plane arrays with a sharp high wavelength cut-off at 1.7 um. This cut-off provides a sufficiently deep reach in redshift while it allows at the same time low dark current operation of the passively cooled detectors at 140 K. Here the baseline SNAP near infrared system is briefly described and the science driven requirements for the near infrared detectors are summarized. A few results obtained during the testing of engineering grade near infrared devices procured for the SNAP project are highlighted. In particular some recent measurements that target correlated noise between adjacent detector pixels due to capacitive coupling and the response uniformity within individual detector pixels are discussed.

  13. Infrared detectors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fick, Wolfgang; Gassmann, Kai Uwe; Haas, Luis-Dieter; Haiml, Markus; Hanna, Stefan; Hübner, Dominique; Höhnemann, Holger; Nothaft, Hans-Peter; Thöt, Richard

    2013-12-01

    The motivation and intended benefits for the use of infrared (IR) detectors for space applications are highlighted. The actual status of state-of-the-art IR detectors for space applications is presented based on some of AIM's currently ongoing focal plane detector module developments covering the spectral range from the short-wavelength IR (SWIR) to the long-wavelength IR (LWIR) and very long-wavelength IR (VLWIR), where both imaging and spectroscopy applications will be addressed. In particular, the integrated detector cooler assemblies for a mid-wavelength IR (MWIR) push-broom imaging satellite mission, for the German hyperspectral satellite mission EnMAP and the IR detectors for the Sentinel 3 SLSTR will be elaborated. Additionally, dedicated detector modules for LWIR/VLWIR sounding, providing the possibility to have two different PVs driven by one ROIC, will be addressed.

  14. Subminiature infrared detector translation stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a precision subminiature three-axis translation stage used in the GOES Sounder to provide positional adjustment of 12 cooled infrared detectors. Four separate translation stages and detectors are packaged into a detector mechanism which has an overall size of 0.850 x 1.230 x 0.600 inches. Each translation stage is capable of + or - 0.015 inch motion in the X and Y axes and +0.050/-0.025 inch motion in the Z axis with a sensitivity of 0.0002 inches. The function of the detector translation stage allows real time detector signal peaking during Sounder alignment. The translation stage operates in a cryogenic environment under a 10 to the -6th torr vacuum.

  15. nBn and pBp infrared detectors with graded barrier layer, graded absorption layer, or chirped strained layer super lattice absorption layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An nBn detector is described where for some embodiments the barrier layer has a concentration gradient, for some embodiments the absorption layer has a concentration gradient, and for some embodiments the absorption layer is a chirped strained layer super lattice. The use of a graded barrier or absorption layer, or the use of a chirped strained layer super lattice for the absorption layer, allows for design of the energy bands so that the valence band may be aligned across the device. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  16. Two-color infrared detector

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F; Kim, Jin K

    2014-05-13

    A two-color detector includes a first absorber layer. The first absorber layer exhibits a first valence band energy characterized by a first valence band energy function. A barrier layer adjoins the first absorber layer at a first interface. The barrier layer exhibits a second valence band energy characterized by a second valence band energy function. The barrier layer also adjoins a second absorber layer at a second interface. The second absorber layer exhibits a third valence band energy characterized by a third valence band energy function. The first and second valence band energy functions are substantially functionally or physically continuous at the first interface and the second and third valence band energy functions are substantially functionally or physically continuous at the second interface.

  17. Stacked silicide/silicon mid- to long-wavelength infrared detector

    DOEpatents

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1990-03-13

    The use of stacked Schottky barriers (16) with epitaxially grown thin silicides (10) combined with selective doping (22) of the barriers provides high quantum efficiency infrared detectors (30) at longer wavelengths that is compatible with existing silicon VLSI technology.

  18. Infrared detectors for Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, K.; Davis, R. P.; Knowles, P.; Shorrocks, N.

    2016-05-01

    IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer), developed by CNES and launched since 2006 on the Metop satellites, is established as a major source of data for atmospheric science and weather prediction. The next generation - IASI NG - is a French national contribution to the Eumetsat Polar System Second Generation on board of the Metop second generation satellites and is under development by Airbus Defence and Space for CNES. The mission aim is to achieve twice the performance of the original IASI instrument in terms of sensitivity and spectral resolution. In turn, this places very demanding requirements on the infrared detectors for the new instrument. Selex ES in Southampton has been selected for the development of the infrared detector set for the IASI-NG instruments. The wide spectral range, 3.6 to 15.5 microns, is covered in four bands, each served by a dedicated detector design, with a common 4 x 4 array format of 1.3 mm square macropixels. Three of the bands up to 8.7 microns employ photovoltaic MCT (mercury cadmium telluride) technology and the very long wave band employs photoconductive MCT, in common with the approach taken between Airbus and Selex ES for the SEVIRI instrument on Second Generation Meteosat. For the photovoltaic detectors, the MCT crystal growth of heterojunction photodiodes is by the MOVPE technique (metal organic vapour phase epitaxy). Novel approaches have been taken to hardening the photovoltaic macropixels against localised crystal defects, and integrating transimpedance amplifiers for each macropixel into a full-custom silicon read out chip, which incorporates radiation hard design.

  19. Field induced gap infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, C. Thomas (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A tunable infrared detector which employs a vanishing band gap semimetal material provided with an induced band gap by a magnetic field to allow intrinsic semiconductor type infrared detection capabilities is disclosed. The semimetal material may thus operate as a semiconductor type detector with a wavelength sensitivity corresponding to the induced band gap in a preferred embodiment of a diode structure. Preferred semimetal materials include Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, x is less than 0.15, HgCdSe, BiSb, alpha-Sn, HgMgTe, HgMnTe, HgZnTe, HgMnSe, HgMgSe, and HgZnSe. The magnetic field induces a band gap in the semimetal material proportional to the strength of the magnetic field allowing tunable detection cutoff wavelengths. For an applied magnetic field from 5 to 10 tesla, the wavelength detection cutoff will be in the range of 20 to 50 micrometers for Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te alloys with x about 0.15. A similar approach may also be employed to generate infrared energy in a desired band gap and then operating the structure in a light emitting diode or semiconductor laser type of configuration.

  20. Reflections From Plasma Would Enhance Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Quantum efficiency of proposed photoemission semiconductor detector of long-wavelength infrared radiation enhanced by multiple passes of radiation. Device has features of back-to-back heterojunction internal-photoemission (HIP) detector, and Fabry-Perot interferometer. Arrays of devices of this type incorporated into integrated-circuit infrared imaging devices.

  1. Germanium blocked impurity band far infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rossington, C.S.

    1988-04-01

    The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been of interest to scientist since the eighteenth century when Sir William Herschel discovered the infrared as he measured temperatures in the sun's spectrum and found that there was energy beyond the red. In the late nineteenth century, Thomas Edison established himself as the first infrared astronomer to look beyond the solar system when he observed the star Arcturus in the infrared. Significant advances in infrared technology and physics, long since Edison's time, have resulted in many scientific developments, such as the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) which was launched in 1983, semiconductor infrared detectors for materials characterization, military equipment such as night-vision goggles and infrared surveillance equipment. It is now planned that cooled semiconductor infrared detectors will play a major role in the ''Star Wars'' nuclear defense scheme proposed by the Reagan administration.

  2. Proceedings of the Second Infrared Detector Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The workshop focused on infrared detector, detector array, and cryogenic electronic technologies relevant to low-background space astronomy. Papers are organized into the following categories: discrete infrared detectors and readout electronics; advanced bolometers; intrinsic integrated infrared arrays; and extrinsic integrated infrared arrays. Status reports on the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) and Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) programs are also included.

  3. SAPHIRA detector for infrared wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, Gert; Baker, Ian; Alvarez, Domingo; Ives, Derek; Mehrgan, Leander; Meyer, Manfred; Stegmeier, Jörg; Weller, Harald J.

    2014-08-01

    The only way to overcome the CMOS noise barrier of near infrared sensors used for wavefront sensing and fringe tracking is the amplification of the photoelectron signal inside the infrared pixel by means of the avalanche gain. In 2007 ESO started a program at Selex to develop near infrared electron avalanche photodiode arrays (eAPD) for wavefront sensing and fringe tracking. In a first step the cutoff wavelength was reduced from 4.5 micron to 2.5 micron in order to verify that the dark current scales with the bandgap and can be reduced to less than one electron/ms, the value required for wavefront sensing. The growth technology was liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) with annular diodes based on the loophole interconnect technology. The arrays required deep cooling to 40K to achieve acceptable cosmetic performance at high APD gain. The second step was to develop a multiplexer tailored to the specific application of the GRAVITY instrument wavefront sensors and the fringe tracker. The pixel format is 320x256 pixels. The array has 32 parallel video outputs which are arranged in such a way that the full multiplex advantage is available also for small subwindows. Nondestructive readout schemes with subpixel sampling are possible. This reduces the readout noise at high APD gain well below the subelectron level at frame rates of 1 KHz. The third step was the change of the growth technology from liquid phase epitaxy to metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). This growth technology allows the band structure and doping to be controlled on a 0.1μm scale and provides more flexibility for the design of diode structures. The bandgap can be varied for different layers of Hg(1-x)CdxTe. It is possible to make heterojunctions and apply solid state engineering techniques. The change to MOVPE resulted in a dramatic improvement in the cosmetic quality with 99.97 % operable pixels at an operating temperature of 85K. Currently this sensor is deployed in the 4 wavefront sensors and in the

  4. New infrared detectors and solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.

    1979-01-01

    The inventions and published papers related to the project are listed. The research with thin films of LaF3 deposited on GaAs substrates is reported along with improvements in photocapacitative MIS infrared detectors.

  5. Doping-Spike PtSi Schottky Infrared Detectors with Extended Cutoff Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; Park, J. S.; Gunapala, S. D.; Jones, E. W.; Castillo, H. M. Del

    1994-01-01

    A technique incorporating a p+ doping spike at the silicide/Si interface to reduce the effective Schottky barrier of the silicide infrared detectors and thus extend the cutoff wavelength has been developed.

  6. Anomalous Polarization May Improve Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Chan-Lon; Pan, Dee-Son

    1990-01-01

    New configurations proposed for quantum-well devices. Simplifies alignment, increases sensitivity, and opens up more possibilities in design of quantum-well detectors of infrared radiation. In detector made according to proposed concept, light incident broadside on front surface absorbed. No special waveguide structures required.

  7. n-B-pi-p Superlattice Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-01-01

    A specially designed barrier (B) is inserted at the n-pi junction [where most GR (generation-recombination) processes take place] in the standard n-pi-p structure to substantially reduce generation-recombination dark currents. The resulting n-Bpi- p structure also has reduced tunneling dark currents, thereby solving some of the limitations to which current type II strained layer superlattice infrared detectors are prone. This innovation is compatible with common read-out integrated circuits (ROICs).

  8. A novel electron tunneling infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, T. W.; Waltman, S. B.; Reynolds, J. K.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    The pneumatic infrared detector, originally developed by Golay in the late 1940s, uses the thermal expansion of one cm(exp 3) of xenon at room temperature to detect the heat deposited by infrared radiation. This detector was limited by thermal fluctuations within a 10 Hz bandwidth, but suffered from long thermal time constants and a fragile structure. Nevertheless, it represents the most sensitive room temperature detector currently available in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR). Fabrication of this type of detector on smaller scales has been limited by the lack of a suitably sensitive transducer. Researchers designed a detector based on this principle, but which is constructed entirely from micromachined silicon, and uses a vacuum tunneling transducer to detect the expansion of the trapped gas. Because this detector is fabricated using micromachining techniques, miniaturization and integration into one and two-dimensional arrays is feasible. The extreme sensitivity of vacuum tunneling to changes in electrode separation will allow a prototype of this detector to operate in the limit of thermal fluctuations over a 10 kHz bandwidth. A calculation of the predicted response and noise of the prototype is presented with the general formalism of thermal detectors. At present, most of the components of the prototype have been fabricated and tested independently. In particular, a characterization of the micromachined electron tunneling transducer has been carried out. The measured noise in the tunnel current is within a decade of the limit imposed by shot noise, and well below the requirements for the operation of an infrared detector with the predicted sensitivity. Assembly and characterization of the prototype infrared detector will be carried out promptly.

  9. MWIR InAsSb barrier detector data and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, A. I.; Robinson, E.; Ionescu, A. C.; Okerlund, D.; De Lyon, T. J.; Rajavel, R. D.; Sharifi, H.; Dhar, N. K.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Grein, C.

    2013-06-01

    Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) InAsSb alloy barrier detectors grown on GaAs substrates were characterized as a function of temperature to evaluate their performance. Detector arrays were fabricated in a 1024 × 1024 format on an 18 μm pitch. A fanout was utilized to directly acquire data from a set of selected detectors without an intervening read out integrating circuit (ROIC). The detectors have a cutoff wavelength equal to ~ 4.9 μm at 150 K. The peak internal quantum efficiency (QE) required a reverse bias voltage of 1 V. The detectors were diffusion-limited at the bias required to attain peak QE. Multiple 18 μm × 18 μm detectors were tied together in parallel by connecting the indium bump of each detector to a single large metal pad on the fanout. The dark current density at -1 V bias for a set of 64 × 64 and 6 × 6 array of detectors, each of which were tied together in parallel was ~ 10-3 A/cm2 at 200 K and 5 × 10-6 A/cm2 at 150 K. The 4096 (64 × 64) and 36 (6 × 6) detectors, both have similar Jdark vs Vd characteristics, demonstrating high operability and uniformity of the detectors in the array. The external QE measured using a narrow band filter centered at ~ 4 μm had values in the 65 - 70 % range. Since the detectors were illuminated through a GaAs substrate which has a reflectance of 29%, the internal QE is greater than 90 %. A 1024 × 1024 ROIC on an 18 μm pitch was also designed and fabricated to interface with the barrier detectors. QE at 150 K for a 1024 × 1024 detector array hybridized to a ROIC matched the QE measured on detectors that were measured directly through a fanout chip. Median D* at 150 K under a flux of 1.07 × 1015 ph/(cm2/s was 1.0 x 1011 cm Hz1/2 /W.

  10. Challenges of small-pixel infrared detectors: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalski, A.; Martyniuk, P.; Kopytko, M.

    2016-04-01

    In the last two decades, several new concepts for improving the performance of infrared detectors have been proposed. These new concepts particularly address the drive towards the so-called high operating temperature focal plane arrays (FPAs), aiming to increase detector operating temperatures, and as a consequence reduce the cost of infrared systems. In imaging systems with the above megapixel formats, pixel dimension plays a crucial role in determining critical system attributes such as system size, weight and power consumption (SWaP). The advent of smaller pixels has also resulted in the superior spatial and temperature resolution of these systems. Optimum pixel dimensions are limited by diffraction effects from the aperture, and are in turn wavelength-dependent. In this paper, the key challenges in realizing optimum pixel dimensions in FPA design including dark current, pixel hybridization, pixel delineation, and unit cell readout capacity are outlined to achieve a sufficiently adequate modulation transfer function for the ultra-small pitches involved. Both photon and thermal detectors have been considered. Concerning infrared photon detectors, the trade-offs between two types of competing technology—HgCdTe material systems and III-V materials (mainly barrier detectors)—have been investigated.

  11. Challenges of small-pixel infrared detectors: a review.

    PubMed

    Rogalski, A; Martyniuk, P; Kopytko, M

    2016-04-01

    In the last two decades, several new concepts for improving the performance of infrared detectors have been proposed. These new concepts particularly address the drive towards the so-called high operating temperature focal plane arrays (FPAs), aiming to increase detector operating temperatures, and as a consequence reduce the cost of infrared systems. In imaging systems with the above megapixel formats, pixel dimension plays a crucial role in determining critical system attributes such as system size, weight and power consumption (SWaP). The advent of smaller pixels has also resulted in the superior spatial and temperature resolution of these systems. Optimum pixel dimensions are limited by diffraction effects from the aperture, and are in turn wavelength-dependent. In this paper, the key challenges in realizing optimum pixel dimensions in FPA design including dark current, pixel hybridization, pixel delineation, and unit cell readout capacity are outlined to achieve a sufficiently adequate modulation transfer function for the ultra-small pitches involved. Both photon and thermal detectors have been considered. Concerning infrared photon detectors, the trade-offs between two types of competing technology-HgCdTe material systems and III-V materials (mainly barrier detectors)-have been investigated. PMID:27007242

  12. Infrared microcalorimetric spectroscopy using uncooled thermal detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G. |; Rajic, S.; Datskou, I.; Egert, C.M.

    1997-10-01

    The authors have investigated a novel infrared microcalorimetric spectroscopy technique that can be used to detect the presence of trace amounts of target molecules. The chemical detection is accomplished by obtaining the infrared photothermal spectra of molecules absorbed on the surface of an uncooled thermal detector. Traditional gravimetric based chemical detectors (surface acoustic waves, quartz crystal microbalances) require highly selective coatings to achieve chemical specificity. In contrast, infrared microcalorimetric based detection requires only moderately specific coatings since the specificity is a consequence of the photothermal spectrum. They have obtained infrared photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of chemical analytes including diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), 2-mercaptoethanol and trinitrotoluene (TNT) over the wavelength region2.5 to 14.5 {micro}m. They found that in the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 {micro}m DIMP exhibits two strong photothermal peaks. The photothermal spectra of 2-mercaptoethanol and TNT exhibit a number of peaks in the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 {micro}m and the photothermal peaks for 2-mercaptoethanol are in excellent agreement with infrared absorption peaks present in its IR spectrum. The photothermal response of chemical detectors based on microcalorimetric spectroscopy has been found to vary reproducibly and sensitively as a consequence of adsorption of small number of molecules on a detector surface followed by photon irradiation and can be used for improved chemical characterization.

  13. Micromachined Electron-Tunneling Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W.; Kaiser, William J.; Waltman, Stephen B.

    1993-01-01

    Pneumatic/thermal infrared detectors based partly on Golay-cell concept, but smaller and less fragile. Include containers filled with air or other gas trapped behind diaphragms. Infrared radiation heats sensors, causing gas to expand. Resulting deflections of diaphragms measured by displacement sensors based on principle of electron-tunneling transducers of scanning tunneling microscopes. Exceed sensitivity of all other miniature, uncooled infrared sensors presently available. Expected to include low consumption of power, broadband sensitivity, room-temperature operation, and invulnerability to ionizing radiation.

  14. Ferroelectric infrared detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Lashley, Jason Charles; Opeil, Cyril P.; Smith, James Lawrence

    2010-03-30

    An apparatus and method are provided for sensing infrared radiation. The apparatus includes a sensor element that is positioned in a magnetic field during operation to ensure a .lamda. shaped relationship between specific heat and temperature adjacent the Curie temperature of the ferroelectric material comprising the sensor element. The apparatus is operated by inducing a magnetic field on the ferroelectric material to reduce surface charge on the element during its operation.

  15. Infrared diagnosis using liquid crystal detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hugenschmidt, M.; Vollrath, K.

    1986-01-01

    The possible uses of pulsed carbon dioxide lasers for analysis of plasmas and flows need appropriate infrared image converters. Emphasis was placed on liquid crystal detectors and their operational modes. Performance characterstics and selection criteria, such as high sensitivity, short reaction time, and high spatial resolution are discussed.

  16. Ge photocapacitive MIS infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binari, S. C.; Miller, W. E.; Tsuo, Y. H.; Miller, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    An undoped Ge photocapacitive detector is reported which has peak normalized detectivities at wavelengh 1.4 microns and chopping frequencies 13-1000 Hz of 9 x 10 to the 12th, 4 x 10 to the 9th cm Hz to the 1/2th/W operating respectively at temperatures 77, 195, and 295 K. The observed temperature, spectral, and frequency response of the signal and noise are explained in terms of the measured space charge and interface state properties of the device.

  17. Nano-scale NiSi and n-type silicon based Schottky barrier diode as a near infra-red detector for room temperature operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Midya, K.; Duttagupta, S. P.; Ramakrishnan, D.

    2014-09-01

    The fabrication of nano-scale NiSi/n-Si Schottky barrier diode by rapid thermal annealing process is reported. The characterization of the nano-scale NiSi film was performed using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The thickness of the film (27 nm) has been measured by cross-sectional Secondary Electron Microscopy and XPS based depth profile method. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics show an excellent rectification ratio (ION/IOFF = 105) at a bias voltage of ±1 V. The diode ideality factor is 1.28. The barrier height was also determined independently based on I-V (0.62 eV) and high frequency capacitance-voltage technique (0.76 eV), and the correlation between them has explained. The diode photo-response was measured in the range of 1.35-2.5 μm under different reverse bias conditions (0.0-1.0 V). The response is observed to increase with increasing reverse bias. From the photo-responsivity study, the zero bias barrier height was determined to be 0.54 eV.

  18. Nano-scale NiSi and n-type silicon based Schottky barrier diode as a near infra-red detector for room temperature operation

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.; Midya, K.; Duttagupta, S. P.; Ramakrishnan, D.

    2014-09-28

    The fabrication of nano-scale NiSi/n-Si Schottky barrier diode by rapid thermal annealing process is reported. The characterization of the nano-scale NiSi film was performed using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The thickness of the film (27 nm) has been measured by cross-sectional Secondary Electron Microscopy and XPS based depth profile method. Current–voltage (I–V) characteristics show an excellent rectification ratio (I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF} = 10⁵) at a bias voltage of ±1 V. The diode ideality factor is 1.28. The barrier height was also determined independently based on I–V (0.62 eV) and high frequency capacitance–voltage technique (0.76 eV), and the correlation between them has explained. The diode photo-response was measured in the range of 1.35–2.5 μm under different reverse bias conditions (0.0–1.0 V). The response is observed to increase with increasing reverse bias. From the photo-responsivity study, the zero bias barrier height was determined to be 0.54 eV.

  19. Infrared Detector System with Controlled Thermal Conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal infrared detector system includes a heat sink, a support member, a connection support member connecting the support member to the heat sink and including a heater unit is reviewed. An infrared detector element is mounted on the support member and a temperature signal representative of the infrared energy contacting the support member can then be derived by comparing the temperature of the support member and the heat sink. The temperature signal from a support member and a temperature signal from the connection support member can then be used to drive a heater unit mounted on the connection support member to thereby control the thermal conductance of the support member. Thus, the thermal conductance can be controlled so that it can be actively increased or decreased as desired.

  20. Linear cryogenic coolers for HOT infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veprik, A.; Riabzev, S.; Avishay, N.; Oster, D.; Tuitto, A.

    2012-06-01

    In spite of a wide spreading the uncooled night vision technologies, the cooled systems are still known to be superior in terms of working ranges, resolution and ability to recognize/track fast moving objects in dynamic infrared scenes. Recent technological advances allowed development and fielding of high temperature infrared detectors working up to 200K while showing performances typical for their 77K predecessors. The direct benefits of using such detectors are the lowering of the optical, cooling and packaging constraints resulting in smaller and cost effective optics, electronics and mechanical cryocooler. The authors are formulating requirements and general vision of prospective ultra-compact, long life, lightweight, power efficient, acoustically and dynamically quiet linear cryogenic cooler towards forthcoming infrared imagers. In particular, the authors are revealing the outcomes of the feasibility study and discuss downscaling options.

  1. Monolithic short wave infrared (SWIR) detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A monolithic self-scanned linear detector array was developed for remote sensing in the 1.1- 2.4-micron spectral region. A high-density IRCCD test chip was fabricated to verify new design approaches required for the detector array. The driving factors in the Schottky barrier IRCCD (Pdsub2Si) process development are the attainment of detector yield, uniformity, adequate quantum efficiency, and lowest possible dark current consistent with radiometric accuracy. A dual-band module was designed that consists of two linear detector arrays. The sensor architecture places the floating diffusion output structure in the middle of the chip, away from the butt edges. A focal plane package was conceptualized and includes a polycrystalline silicon substrate carrying a two-layer, thick-film interconnecting conductor pattern and five epoxy-mounted modules. A polycrystalline silicon cover encloses the modules and bond wires, and serves as a radiation and EMI shield, thermal conductor, and contamination seal.

  2. Far-Infrared Detectors for CLARREO Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogue, H. H.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Muzilla, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic-doped Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors are a mature detector technology for the infrared spectral range of 5 to 28 micrometers for low-background astronomy [Spitzer, ISO, WISE, JWST, and other observatories] and for higher-background astronomy from terrestrial telescopes. These detectors operate below 10 K (typically using cryogenic cooling) and achieve detectivity, bandwidth, and linearity performance at least an order of magnitude over uncooled detectors such as pyroelectrics or bolometers. To address specific requirements for long-duration, full-spectrum Earth radiance studies, a joint development effort between DRS Technologies and NASA Langley Research Center has now extended BIB detector wavelength sensitivity to at least 50 micrometers and raised operating temperature above 10 K for long-duration orbital operation with existing space-capable cryocoolers. In parallel DRS has demonstrated a large-area BIB detector design with negligible internal losses and gains for use in a 99.9% QE, two-detector light trap for a Fourier Transform Spectrometer application. The application of BIB detectors with these improved features to CLARREO provides major benefits: 1) Light trapping combined with high internal QE detectors results in instrument spectral radiance results that are insensitive to operating environment variations or radiation induced drift in detector characteristics over orbital lifetime. 2) Order-of-magnitude improved detectivity allows order-of-magnitude reduction in the time to acquire an interferogram - significantly reducing scene smear associated with the time of flight over the Earth. These improvements in detector capability enable the most accurate and precise full Earth spectrum radiance measurements.

  3. Infrared detector performance in the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility /SIRTF/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, S. G.; Autio, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    The limitations imposed on infrared detectors for SIRTF are quite different from those imposed on ground-based, balloon-borne, or aircraft-borne systems. The paper examines the limitations and provides performance predictions corresponding to SIRTF conditions. Detector parameters typical of an infrared camera are used. The detector size is taken to be of the order of the diffraction-limited spot, frequency response is taken to correspond to a fraction of a second or less time constant, and spectral definition is provided by multilayer dielectric filters, inductive or capacitive grids, intrinsic absorption, or a combination of these. A nominal 10-micron bandwidth is assumed. The discussion covers atmospheric absorption and emission, zodiacal dust radiance, Shuttle contaminants, telescope self-emission, charged particle radiation, clear environment detector performance, and trapped radiation effects. It is concluded that the SIRTF design and operating conditions will allow current and near-term state-of-the-art detectors to reach their performance limits with SIRTF at a temperature of 10-12 K.

  4. Infrared detectors: Advances, challenges and new technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Amir; Andersson, Jan Y.

    2013-12-01

    Human knowledge of infrared (IR) radiation is about 200 years old. However it was in the late 20th century that we developed a wide range of smart technologies for detection and started to take advantage for our benefit. Today IR detector technology is in its 3rd generation and comes with challenging demands. Based on the propagation of IR radiation through free space it is divided into different transmission windows. The most interesting for thermal imaging are the mid-wave IR (MWIR) and the long-wave IR (LW IR). Infrared detectors for thermal imaging have a number of applications in industry, security, search & rescue, surveillance, medicine, research, meteorology, climatology and astronomy. Currently high-performance IR imaging technology is mainly based on epitaxially grown structures of the small-bandgap bulk alloy mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT), indium antimonide (InSb) and GaAs based quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs), depending on the application and wavelength range. However, they operate at low temperatures requiring costly and bulky cryogenic systems. In addition there is always a need for better performance, which generates possibilities for developing new technologies. Some emerging technologies are quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs), type-II strained layer super-lattice, and QDIPs with type-II band alignment. In this report a brief review of the current and new technologies for high performance IR detectors, will be presented.

  5. The SNAP near infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tarle, G.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bercovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, Anne; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.; Harvey, P.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Lampton, M.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; Miguel, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tomasch, A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will measure precisely the cosmological expansion history over both the acceleration and deceleration epochs and thereby constrain the nature of the dark energy that dominates our universe today. The SNAP focal plane contains equal areas of optical CCDs and NIR sensors and an integral field spectrograph. Having over 150 million pixels and a field-of-view of 0.34 square degrees, the SNAP NIR system will be the largest yet constructed. With sensitivity in the range 0.9-1.7 {micro}m, it will detect Type Ia supernovae between z = 1 and 1.7 and will provide follow-up precision photometry for all supernovae. HgCdTe technology, with a cut-off tuned to 1.7 {micro}m, will permit passive cooling at 140 K while maintaining noise below zodiacal levels. By dithering to remove the effects of intrapixel variations and by careful attention to other instrumental effects, we expect to control relative photometric accuracy below a few hundredths of a magnitude. Because SNAP continuously revisits the same fields we will be able to achieve outstanding statistical precision on the photometry of reference stars in these fields, allowing precise monitoring of our detectors. The capabilities of the NIR system for broadening the science reach of SNAP are discussed.

  6. Astronomical imaging with infrared array detectors.

    PubMed

    Gatley, I; Depoy, D L; Fowler, A M

    1988-12-01

    History shows that progress in astronomy often stems directly from technological innovation and that each portion of the electromagnetic spectrum offers unique insights into the nature of the universe. Most recently, the widespread availability of infrared-sensitive two-dimensional array detectors has led to dramatic improvements in the capabilities of conventional ground-based observatories. The impact of this new technology on our understanding of a wide variety of phenomena is illustrated here by infrared pictures of star-forming regions, of nebulae produced by the late stages of stellar evolution, of the nucleus of our own galaxy(the Milky Way), and of activity in other galaxies. PMID:17817072

  7. Advances in Detector Technology for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCreight, Craig; Cheng, P. L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Progress in semiconductor materials and processing technology has allowed the development of infrared detector arrays with unprecedented sensitivity, for imaging and spectroscopic applications in astronomy. The earlier discrete-detector approach has been replaced by large-element (up to 1024 x 1024 pixel), multiplexed devices. Progress has been made against a number of key limiting factors, such as quantum efficiency, noise, spectral response, linearity, and dark current. Future developments will focus on the need for even larger arrays, which operate at higher temperatures.

  8. [Study on photographing experiment of infrared detector].

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Jiang; Zhang, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Infrared detectors are widely used in multi spectral remote sensing systems, and in order to verify photographing principles of infrared time delay integration (TDI) detector, and make preparations for future research, a verification system for infrared TDI camera is proposed in the present paper. Experimental methods are explained thoroughly and two major factors which affect image quality are analyzed. First, the causes of image motion and their effects on the quality of image are studied, and a novel architecture using high precision DC-speed machine is presented, then the relationship between velocity of precision turntable and detectors line transfer frequency is determined by Kalman algorithm. Second, four focusing means are analyzed and compared, and video signal amplitude method is selected according to practical application. Finally, a genuine demo system is established in national supervision and test center for optics mechanics quality. 5.3, 6.4 and 9.2 mm drones are chosen for testing. Experimental results indicate that the obtained drone is vivid, and camera's resolution achieves 11.3 lines per mm, which satisfies preliminary aims. PMID:21428103

  9. Radiation response issues for infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalma, Arne H.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers describe the most important radiation response issues for infrared detectors. In general, the two key degradation mechanisms in infrared detectors are the noise produced by exposure to a flux of ionizing particles (e.g.; trapped electronics and protons, debris gammas and electrons, radioactive decay of neutron-activated materials) and permanent damage produced by exposure to total dose. Total-dose-induced damage is most often the result of charge trapping in insulators or at interfaces. Exposure to short pulses of ionization (e.g.; prompt x rays or gammas, delayed gammas) will cause detector upset. However, this upset is not important to a sensor unless the recovery time is too long. A few detector technologies are vulnerable to neutron-induced displacement damage, but fortunately most are not. Researchers compare the responses of the new technologies with those of the mainstream technologies of PV HgCdTe and IBC Si:As. One important reason for this comparison is to note where some of the newer technologies have the potential to provide significantly improved radiation hardness compared with that of the mainstream technologies, and thus to provide greater motivation for the pursuit of these technologies.

  10. Multilayered (Hg,Cd)Te infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rae, W. G.

    1977-01-01

    Multilayered mercury-cadmium telluride photoconductive detectors were developed which are capable of providing individual coverage of three separate spectral wavelength bands without the use of beam splitters. The multilayered "three-color" detector on a single dewar takes the place of three separate detector/filter/dewar units and enables simpler and more reliable mechanical and optical designs for multispectral scanners and radiometers. Wavelength channel design goals (in micrometers) were: 10.1 to 11.0, 11.0 to 12.0, and 13.0. Detectivity for all channels was 1 x 10 to the 10th power cm-Hz 1/2/Watt. A problem occurred in finding an epoxy layer which had good infrared transmission properties and which also was chemically and mechanically compatible with HgCdTe processing techniques. Data on 6 candidate bonding materials are surveyed and discussed.

  11. Radiation effects in IRAS extrinsic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, L.; Langford, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    During the calibration and testing of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) focal plane, it was observed that the extrinsic photoconductor detectors were affected by gamma radiation at dose levels of the order of one rad. Since the flight environment will subject the focal plane to dose levels of this order from protons in single pass through the South Atlantic Anomaly, an extensive program of radiation tests was carried out to measure the radiation effects and to devise a method to counteract these effects. The effects observed after irradiation are increased responsivity, noise, and rate of spiking of the detectors after gamma-ray doses of less than 0.1 rad. The detectors can be returned almost to pre-irradiation performance by increasing the detector bias to breakdown and allowing a large current to flow for several minutes. No adverse effects on the detectors have been observed from this bias boost, and this technique will be used for IRAS with frequent calibration to ensure the accuracy of observations made with the instrument.

  12. Infrared SWAP detectors: pushing the limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Yann; Taalat, R.; Brunner, A.; Rubaldo, L.; Augey, T.; Kerlain, A.; Péré-Laperne, N.; Manissadjian, A.; Gravrand, O.; Castelein, P.; Destéfanis, G.

    2015-06-01

    The growing demand for compact and low consumption infrared cooled detectors is driven by different products segments. Hand Held Thermal Imagers, UAV, small gimbals are some of them. End users are requiring devices easy to use with fast cool down time, excellent portability, low acoustic noise with no trade-offs in reliability and performance. These requirements are pushing the technology developments toward constant innovations on detectors, coolers, read out circuits and proximity electronic boards. In this paper we are discussing the different figures of merit and highlighting the challenges for the different components. An update on the developments of HOT technology for most advanced pixel pitch will be presented. Very compact products are driving the developments for innovative coolers and cryogenic solutions. A low power compact architecture is a must for electronic boards to optimize the overall system power consumption. Finally a look to the future requirements for further shrink will be addressed.

  13. Far-infrared kinetic-inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, E.N.; McDonald, D.G.; Sauvageau, J.E. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on extremely sensitive far-infrared detectors suitable for both direct detection and heterodyn applications based upon {mu}m-sized thin films with thickness less than a superconducting penetration depth. The penetration depth of such a film, and therefore its inductance, varies with temperature and with quasiparticle population (described by an effective temperature T*), resulting in both bolometric and non-equilibrium Photoinductive responses. Incident radiation is coupled into the small-area kinetic inductor by a lithographic antenna, and the resulting inductance changes are amplified and converted to a voltage signal by an integrated microstrip DC SQUID.

  14. Gerard Kuiper and the Infrared Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Derek

    2013-10-01

    The life and contributions of Gerard Kuiper have been documented by Dale Cruikshank in his National Academy of Sciences biography. I will argue that particularly important in this eventful life was Kuiper's war time experiences. Kuiper's wartime role evolved as the war unfolded, but towards the end he was charged by the US military with reporting German progress with war-related technologies and the activities of scientists under Nazi control. He interviewed a great many scientists, including his own PhD mentor (Ejnar Hertzsprung), and when Kuiper was the only person available, he interviewed concentration-camp victims. He carried briefing sheets that identified the technologies being sought by the allies and the major fraction of these involved infrared equipment. He sent back to the USA boxes of documents, and large amounts of equipment, and he stressed to the military his interest in these for his own research. It seems very likely that in this way an effective PbS infrared detector, so critical to Kuiper's career and the future of planetary science, came to the USA and to Robert Cashman's laboratory at Northwestern University. As the war was winding down, Cashman and Kuiper worked together to develop a practical infrared spectrometer for astronomical use. Within months, Kuiper discovered the C02 atmospheres on Mars and Venus.

  15. Resonant infrared detector with substantially unit quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam (Inventor); Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A resonant infrared detector includes an infrared-active layer which has first and second parallel faces and which absorbs radiation of a given wavelength. The detector also includes a first tuned reflective layer, disposed opposite the first face of the infrared-active layer, which reflects a specific portion of the radiation incident thereon and allows a specific portion of the incident radiation at the given wavelength to reach the infrared-active layer. A second reflective layer, disposed opposite the second face of the infrared-active layer, reflects back into the infrared-active layer substantially all of the radiation at the given wavelength which passes through the infrared-active layer. The reflective layers have the effect of increasing the quantum efficiency of the infrared detector relative to the quantum efficiency of the infrared-active layer alone.

  16. Proceedings of the Third Infrared Detector Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, Craig R. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    This volume consists of 37 papers which summarize results presented at the Third Infrared Detector Technology Workshop, held February 7-9, 1989, at Ames Research Center. The workshop focused on infrared (IR) detector, detector array, and cryogenic electronic technologies relevant to low-background space astronomy. Papers on discrete IR detectors, cryogenic readouts, extrinsic and intrinsic IR arrays, and recent results from ground-based observations with integrated arrays were given. Recent developments in the second-generation Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared spectrometer and in detectors and arrays for the European Space Agency's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) are also included, as are status reports on the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) and the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) projects.

  17. Innovative Long Wavelength Infrared Detector Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on innovative long wavelength (lambda less than 17 microns) infrared (LWIR) detectors with the potential of meeting future NASA and DoD long-duration space application needs. Requirements are for focal plane arrays which operate near 65K using active refrigeration with mission lifetimes of five to ten years. The workshop addressed innovative concepts, new material systems, novel device physics, and current progress in relation to benchmark technology. It also provided a forum for discussion of performance characterization, producibility, reliability, and fundamental limitations of device physics. It covered the status of the incumbent HgCdTe technology, which shows encouraging progress towards LWIR arrays, and provided a snapshot of research and development in several new contender technologies.

  18. Multiwavelength infrared focal plane array detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Inventor); Olsen, Gregory H. (Inventor); Kim, Dong-Su (Inventor); Lange, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A multiwavelength focal plane array infrared detector is included on a common substrate having formed on its top face a plurality of In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As (x.ltoreq.0.53) absorption layers, between each pair of which a plurality of InAs.sub.y P.sub.1-y (y<1) buffer layers are formed having substantially increasing lattice parameters, respectively, relative to said substrate, for preventing lattice mismatch dislocations from propagating through successive ones of the absorption layers of decreasing bandgap relative to said substrate, whereby a plurality of detectors for detecting different wavelengths of light for a given pixel are provided by removing material above given areas of successive ones of the absorption layers, which areas are doped to form a pn junction with the surrounding unexposed portions of associated absorption layers, respectively, with metal contacts being formed on a portion of each of the exposed areas, and on the bottom of the substrate for facilitating electrical connections thereto.

  19. Novel infrared detector based on a tunneling displacement transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, T. W.; Kaiser, W. J.; Waltman, S. B.; Reynolds, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the design, fabrication, and characteristics of a novel infrared detector based on the principle of Golay's (1947) pneumatic infrared detector, which uses the expansion of a gas to detect infrared radiation. The present detector is constructed entirely from micromachined silicon and uses an electron tunneling displacement transducer for the detection of gas expansion. The sensitivity of the new detector is competitive with the best commercial pyroelectric sensors and can be readily improved by an order of magnitude through the use of an optimized transducer.

  20. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  1. Barriers Keep Drops Of Water Out Of Infrared Gas Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Sean K.

    1996-01-01

    Infrared-sensor cells used for measuring partial pressures of CO(2) and other breathable gases modified to prevent entry of liquid water into sensory optical paths of cells. Hydrophobic membrane prevents drops of water entrained in flow from entering optical path from lamp to infrared detectors.

  2. Uncooled infrared photon detector and multicolor infrared detection using microoptomechanical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.; Rajic, Solobodan; Datskou, Irene C.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for infrared detection are described. An optomechanical photon detector includes a semiconductor material and is based on measurement of a photoinduced lattice strain. A multicolor infrared sensor includes a stack of frequency specific optomechanical detectors. The stack can include one, or more, of the optomechanical photon detectors that function based on the measurement of photoinduced lattice strain. The systems and methods provide advantages in that rapid, sensitive multicolor infrared imaging can be performed without the need for a cooling subsystem.

  3. Novel far-infrared detectors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, A. G. Unil; Shen, W. Z.; Liu, Hui C.; Buchanan, Margaret; Schaff, William J.

    1999-04-01

    The recent development of p-GaAs homojunction interfacial workfunction internal photoemission (HIWIP) far-infrared (> 40 micrometers ) detectors for space application is reported. The emphasis is placed on the detector performance, which includes responsivity, quantum efficiency, bias effects, cutoff wavelength, uniformity, crosstalk, and noise. The results are promising and show that p-GaAs HIWIP detectors have high potential to become a strong competitor in far- infrared space applications.

  4. nBn Infrared Detector Containing Graded Absorption Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D.; Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Bandara, Sumith V.

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed to modify the basic structure of an nBn infrared photodetector so that a plain electron-donor- type (n-type) semiconductor contact layer would be replaced by a graded n-type III V alloy semiconductor layer (i.e., ternary or quarternary) with appropriate doping gradient. The abbreviation nBn refers to one aspect of the unmodified basic device structure: There is an electron-barrier ("B" ) layer between two n-type ("n" ) layers, as shown in the upper part of the figure. One of the n-type layers is the aforementioned photon-absorption layer; the other n-type layer, denoted the contact layer, collects the photocurrent. The basic unmodified device structure utilizes minority-charge-carrier conduction, such that, for reasons too complex to explain within the space available for this article, the dark current at a given temperature can be orders of magnitude lower (and, consequently, signal-to-noise ratios can be greater) than in infrared detectors of other types. Thus, to obtain a given level of performance, less cooling (and, consequently, less cooling equipment and less cooling power) is needed. [In principle, one could obtain the same advantages by means of a structure that would be called pBp because it would include a barrier layer between two electron-acceptor- type (p-type) layers.] The proposed modifications could make it practical to utilize nBn photodetectors in conjunction with readily available, compact thermoelectric coolers in diverse infrared- imaging applications that could include planetary exploration, industrial quality control, monitoring pollution, firefighting, law enforcement, and medical diagnosis.

  5. Infrared Detectors Overview in the Short Wave Infrared to Far Infrared for CLARREO Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Refaat, Tamer F.

    2010-01-01

    There exists a considerable interest in the broadband detectors for CLARREO Mission, which can be used to detect CO2, O3, H2O, CH4, and other gases. Detection of these species is critical for understanding the Earth?s atmosphere, atmospheric chemistry, and systemic force driving climatic changes. Discussions are focused on current and the most recent detectors developed in SWIR-to-Far infrared range for CLARREO space-based instrument to measure the above-mentioned species. These detector components will make instruments designed for these critical detections more efficient while reducing complexity and associated electronics and weight. We will review the on-going detector technology efforts in the SWIR to Far-IR regions at different organizations in this study.

  6. Infrared Detector Activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Refaat, T. F.; Sulima, O. V.; Amzajerdian, F.

    2008-01-01

    Infrared detector development and characterization at NASA Langley Research Center will be reviewed. These detectors were intended for ground, airborne, and space borne remote sensing applications. Discussion will be focused on recently developed single-element infrared detector and future development of near-infrared focal plane arrays (FPA). The FPA will be applied to next generation space-based instruments. These activities are based on phototransistor and avalanche photodiode technologies, which offer high internal gain and relatively low noise-equivalent-power. These novel devices will improve the sensitivity of active remote sensing instruments while eliminating the need for a high power laser transmitter.

  7. Effect of space exposure on pyroelectric infrared detectors (A0135)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, J. B.; Clark, I. O.; Crouch, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of long-duration space exposure and launch environment on the performance of pyroelectric detectors which is important for the prediction of performance degradation, setting exposure limits, or determining shielding requirements was investigated. Air pollution monitoring and thermal mapping of the Earth, which includes the remote sensing of aerosols and limb scanning infrared radiometer projects, requires photodetection in the 6- to 20 micro m region of the spectrum. Pyroelectric detectors can detect radiation in the 1- to 100 micro m region while operating at room temperature. This makes tahe pyroelectric detector a prime candidate to fill the thermal infrared detector requirements.

  8. Far-Infrared Blocked Impurity Band Detector Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, H. H.; Guptill, M. T.; Monson, J. C.; Stewart, J. W.; Huffman, J. E.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Abedin, M. N.

    2007-01-01

    DRS Sensors & Targeting Systems, supported by detector materials supplier Lawrence Semiconductor Research Laboratory, is developing far-infrared detectors jointly with NASA Langley under the Far-IR Detector Technology Advancement Partnership (FIDTAP). The detectors are intended for spectral characterization of the Earth's energy budget from space. During the first year of this effort we have designed, fabricated, and evaluated pilot Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors in both silicon and germanium, utilizing pre-existing customized detector materials and photolithographic masks. A second-year effort has prepared improved silicon materials, fabricated custom photolithographic masks for detector process, and begun detector processing. We report the characterization results from the pilot detectors and other progress.

  9. Electron-beam studies of Schottky-barrier detector surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peckerar, M. C.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the surface anomalies occurring in Schottky-barrier particle detectors identifiable by means of an electron beam technique employed by Czaja (1965) for analyzing defects in diode structures. The technique is shown to make possible the detection and identification of the following anomalies: (1) chemical contamination of the detector surface; (2) mechanical damage of the wafer substrates; (3) damage introduced in semiconductor surface preparation; (4) radiation damage; and (5) defective surface metallization.

  10. LK39F1 S/N U-1 infrared detector. [performance tests, controllability, and equipment specifications of infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A multilayered (Hg,Cd)Te detector is described with three infrared bands. Nominal cut-off wavelengths for each band are as follows: (1) Channel 1 - 3 microns, (2) Channel 2 - 6 microns, and (3) Channel 3 - 11 microns. The multilayered detector is mounted in a Honeywell LK39 glass dewar. Accompanying the detector/dewar assembly is a three-channel preamplifier package capable of switching each detector to the single channel input of the HRB Singer Reconfax 4 Mark 4 Infrared Scanner.

  11. Predictive modeling of infrared detectors and material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkie, Benjamin

    Detectors sensitive to thermal and reflected infrared radiation are widely used for night-vision, communications, thermography, and object tracking among other military, industrial, and commercial applications. System requirements for the next generation of ultra-high-performance infrared detectors call for increased functionality such as large formats (> 4K HD) with wide field-of-view, multispectral sensitivity, and on-chip processing. Due to the low yield of infrared material processing, the development of these next-generation technologies has become prohibitively costly and time consuming. In this work, it will be shown that physics-based numerical models can be applied to predictively simulate infrared detector arrays of current technological interest. The models can be used to a priori estimate detector characteristics, intelligently design detector architectures, and assist in the analysis and interpretation of existing systems. This dissertation develops a multi-scale simulation model which evaluates the physics of infrared systems from the atomic (material properties and electronic structure) to systems level (modulation transfer function, dense array effects). The framework is used to determine the electronic structure of several infrared materials, optimize the design of a two-color back-to-back HgCdTe photodiode, investigate a predicted failure mechanism for next-generation arrays, and predict the systems-level measurables of a number of detector architectures.

  12. Field-Induced-Gap Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, C. Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Semimetals become semiconductors under applied magnetic fields. New detectors require less cooling equipment because they operate at temperatures higher than liquid-helium temperatures required by extrinsic-semiconductor detectors. Magnetic fields for detectors provided by electromagnets based on recently-discovered high-transition-temperature superconducting materials. Detector material has to be semiconductor, in which photon absorbed by exciting electron/hole pair across gap Eg of forbidden energies between valence and conduction energy bands. Magnetic- and compositional-tuning effects combined to obtain two-absorber detector having narrow passband. By variation of applied magnetic field, passband swept through spectrum of interest.

  13. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C.; Robertson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    New and highly sensitive method of detecting infrared irradiation makes possible solid state infrared detector which is more sensitive near room temperature than usual photoconductive low band gap semiconductor devices. Reconfiguration of high field domains in cadmium sulphide crystals provides basis for discovery.

  14. Detector Arrays for the James Webb Near Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is delivering the detector subsystem for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec). Of all JWST instruments, NIRSpec has the most stringent detector requirements. In this poster, we describe recent performance testing results and relate them to NIRSpec's science requirements.

  15. Detector arrays for low-background space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The status of development and characterization tests of integrated infrared detector array technology for astronomy applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Laboratary test results and successful astronomy imagery have established the usefulness of integrated arrays in low-background astronomy applications.

  16. Detector arrays for low-background space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Goebel, J. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Lee, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The status of development and characterization tests of integrated infrared detector array technology for astronomy applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, with hybrid silicon multiplexers. Laboratory test results and successful astronomy imagery have established the usefulness of integrated arrays in low-background astronomy applications.

  17. Infra-red signature neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane William [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-10-13

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material that includes a photoluminescent material that generates infrared radiation and generation a by-product of a nuclear reaction due to the activator impinging the receptor material. The method further includes generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect, wherein the light activates the photoluminescent material so as to generate the infrared radiation. Identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the infrared radiation.

  18. Heterojunction and superlattice detectors for infrared to ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, A. G. U.

    2016-07-01

    The interest in Infrared and Ultraviolet detectors has increased immensely due to the emergence of important applications over a wide range of activities. Detectors based on free carrier absorption known as Hetero-junction Interfacial Workfunction Internal Photoemission (HEIWIP) detectors and variations of these heterojunction structures to be used as intervalence band detectors for a wide wavelength region are presented. Although this internal photoemission concept is valid for all semiconductor materials systems, using a well-studied III-V system of GaAs/AlxGa1-x As to cover a wide wavelength range from UV to far-infrared (THz) is an important development in detector technology. Using the intervalence band (heavy hole, light hole and split off) transitions for high operating temperature detection of mid Infrared radiation is also discussed. A promising new way to extend the detection wavelength threshold beyond the standard threshold connected with the energy gap in a GaAs/AlxGa1-x As system is also presented. Superlattice detector technology, which is another promising detector architecture, can be optimized using both Type I and Type II heterostructures. Here the focus will be on Type II Strained Layer (T2SL) Superlattice detectors. T2SL Superlattices based on InAs/(In,GA)Sb have made significant improvements demonstrating focal plane arrays operating around 80 K and with multiple band detection capability. A novel spectroscopic method to evaluate the band offsets of both heterojunction and superlattice detectors is also discussed.

  19. Development of double-cantilever infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shusen

    Detection and imaging of infrared (IR) radiation are of great importance to a variety of military and civilian applications. Recent advances in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the development of uncooled cantilever IR focal plane arrays (FPAs), which function based on the bending of bimaterial cantilevers upon the absorption of IR energy. In this dissertation, capacitive-based double-cantilever IR FPAs, which have a potential of reaching a noise-equivalent temperature difference (NETD) approaching the theoretical limit, i.e., <10 mK, are developed. Each pixel in the proposed double-cantilever IR FPAs consists of two facing bimaterial cantilevers: one bends upward and the other downward upon IR radiation, resulting in an extremely high sensitivity of the device. It is predicted that the NETD of the double-cantilever IR FPAs is about 60% of the current single-cantilever IR FPAs, which is a significant improvement of device performance. A surface micromachining module with polyimide as a sacrificial material is developed for the fabrication of both simplified single- and double-cantilever FPAs. It is found the as-fabricated FPAs are curved because of the imbalanced residual stresses (strains) in thin films developed in the fabrication processes. In this dissertation, therefore, the general relationship between the residual strain and the resultant elastic bending deformation is modeled. A thorough investigation of residual stresses in cantilever IR materials and structures is then conducted using the theory developed in this dissertation. Furthermore, thermal-cycling experiments reveal that the residual stresses in IR materials, i.e., plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) SiNx and electron beam (Ebeam) AI, can be significantly modified by thermal annealing. Therefore, an engineering approach to flattening IR FPAs is developed by using rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Finally, this dissertation demonstrates the thermal detection of cantilever

  20. Multi-element double ring infrared detector based on InSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mo; Lv, Hui; Guo, Li; Liu, Zhu

    2015-10-01

    A multi-element double ring infrared detector based on InSb p-n photodiodes is presented. The presented detector includes an outer ring detector and an inner ring detector. Each ring consist 10 detector elements, five mid-wave infrared detector elements and five short wave infrared detector elements. Two wavebands of 3.5-5 μm and 1.5-3 μm in mid-wave infrared and short wave infrared are adopted. The mid-wave infrared and short wave infrared detector elements are arranged alternately and close to each other to form detection pair. Between the adjacent detector elements, there is an interval to avoid cross talk. Dual band filter thin films are directly coated on the photodiode surface to form a dual band infrared detector. The double ring detector which can perform dual band IR counter-countermeasures can track target effectively under infrared countermeasure conditions.

  1. Infrared focal plane detector modules for space applications at AIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Dominique; Hanna, Stefan; Thöt, Richard; Gassmann, Kai-Uwe; Haiml, Markus; Weber, Andreas; Haas, Luis-Dieter; Ziegler, Johann; Nothaft, Hans-Peter; Fick, W.

    2012-09-01

    In the framework of this paper, AIM presents the actual status of some of its currently ongoing focal plane detector module developments for space applications covering the spectral range from the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) to the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) and very-long-wavelength infrared (VLWIR), where both imaging and spectroscopy applications will be addressed. In particular, the integrated detector cooler assemblies for a mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) push-broom imaging satellite mission, for the German hyperspectral satellite mission EnMAP will be elaborated. Additionally dedicated detector modules for LWIR/VLWIR sounding, providing the possibility to have two different PVs driven by one ROIC will be addressed.

  2. Theoretical Study of Midwave Infrared HgCdTe nBn Detectors Operating at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, Nima Dehdashti; Jolley, Gregory; Umana-Membreno, Gilberto A.; Antoszewski, Jarek; Faraone, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    We report a theoretical study of mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) unipolar n-type/barrier/ n-type (nBn) detectors for midwave infrared (MWIR) applications at elevated temperatures. The results obtained indicate that the composition, doping, and thickness of the barrier layer in MWIR HgCdTe nBn detectors can be optimized to yield performance levels comparable with those of ideal HgCdTe p- n photodiodes. It is also shown that introduction of an additional barrier at the back contact layer of the detector structure (nBnn+) leads to substantial suppression of the Auger generation-recombination (GR) mechanism; this results in an order-of-magnitude reduction in the dark current level compared with conventional nBn or p- n junction-based detectors, thus enabling background-limited detector operation above 200 K.

  3. Development of infrared detector with slot antenna-coupled microbolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kosol; Kislov, Nikolai; Wang, Jing

    2010-04-01

    The current state-of-the-art infrared detection technology requires either exotic materials or cryogenic conditions to perform its duty. Implementing infrared detection by coupling infrared tuned antenna with a micro-bolometer offers a promising technological platform for mass production of un-cooled infrared detectors and imaging arrays. The design, fabrication, and characterization of a planar slotted antenna have been demonstrated on a thin silicon dioxide (SiO2) membrane for infrared detection. The planar slotted antenna was chosen due to its ease of fabrication and greater fabrication tolerance, higher gain and greater bandwidth coveted for the infrared applications. The employment of the SiO2 membrane technology mitigates the losses due to surface waves generated as the radiation coupling into the substrates. In addition, by retaining the membrane thickness to be less than a wavelength, the amount of interference is greatly reduced. A strategically designed planar slotted dipole antenna is implemented along with an integrated direct current (DC) block enabled by co-fabricated on-chip capacitors between the two DC patches to separate DC and high frequency signals without the need for sub-micron DC separation line. As a result of this revision, standard UV photolithography instead of e-beam lithography can be used to fabricate the infrared detectors for mass production. This research is considered as an important step toward our main goal, which is developing ultrafast infrared detector by coupling a planar slotted antenna with a metal insulator metal (MIM) tunneling diode.

  4. Effect of space exposure of pyroelectric infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, James B.

    1992-01-01

    Pyroelectric detectors are one of many different types of infrared radiation detectors. The pyroelectric detectors are of interest for long term space use because they do not require cooling during operation. Also, they can detect at very long wavelengths and they have a relatively flat spectral response. A disadvantage is that the radiation must be chopped in order to be detected by a pyroelectric detector. The objective was to determine the effects of launch and space exposure on the performance of commercially available pyroelectric detectors. The approach was to measure certain detector parameters before and after flight and try to determine the amount and cause of the degradation. The experiment was passive: no data was taken during flight. It is concluded that lithium-tantalate and strontium-barium-niobate are suitable materials for pyroelectric detectors for long term space applications.

  5. Plasmonic lens enhanced mid-infrared quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, Andreas Schwarz, Benedikt; Gansch, Roman; Reininger, Peter; Detz, Hermann; Zederbauer, Tobias; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2014-10-27

    We demonstrate monolithic integrated quantum cascade detectors enhanced by plasmonic lenses. Surface normal incident mid-infrared radiation is coupled to surface plasmon polaritons guided to and detected by the active region of the detector. The lens extends the optical effective active area of the device up to a 5 times larger area than for standard mesa detectors or pixel devices while the electrical active region stays the same. The extended optical area increases the absorption efficiency of the presented device as well as the room temperature performance while it offers a flexible platform for various detector geometries. A photocurrent response increase at room temperature up to a factor of 6 was observed.

  6. Detector requirements for space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, E. L.

    1986-01-01

    Requirements for background-limited (BLIP) detectors are discussed in terms of number of photons falling on each pixel, dark current, high detective quantum efficiencies, large numbers of pixels, and array size.

  7. Performance of mid-wave T2SL detectors with heterojunction barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, Carl; Marcks von Würtemberg, Rickard; Lantz, Dan; Malm, Hedda; Martijn, Henk; Plis, Elena; Gautam, Nutan; Krishna, Sanjay

    2013-07-01

    A heterojunction T2SL barrier detector which effectively blocks majority carrier leakage over the pn-junction was designed and fabricated for the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) atmospheric transmission window. The layers in the barrier region comprised AlSb, GaSb and InAs, and the thicknesses were selected by using k · P-based energy band modeling to achieve maximum valence band offset, while maintaining close to zero conduction band discontinuity in a way similar to the work of Abdollahi Pour et al. [1] The barrier-structure has a 50% cutoff at 4.75 μm and 40% quantum efficiency and shows a dark current density of 6 × 10-6 A/cm2 at -0.05 V bias and 120 K. This is one order of magnitude lower than for comparable T2SL-structures without the barrier. Further improvement of the (non-surface related) bulk dark current can be expected with optimized doping of the absorber and barrier, and by fine tuning of the barrier layer design. We discuss the effect of barrier doping on dark current based on simulations. A T2SL focal plane array with 320 × 256 pixels, 30 μm pitch and 90% fill factor was processed in house using a conventional homojunction p-i-n photodiode architecture and the ISC9705 readout circuit. High-quality imaging up to 110 K was demonstrated with the substrate fully removed.

  8. Development of an ultrahigh-performance infrared detector platform for advanced spectroscopic sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Manish; Wicks, Gary; Marshall, Andrew; Craig, Adam; Golding, Terry; Hossain, Khalid; McEwan, Ken; Howle, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Laser-based stand-off sensing of threat agents (e.g. explosives, toxic industrial chemicals or chemical warfare agents), by detection of distinct infrared spectral absorption signature of these materials, has made significant advances recently. This is due in part to the availability of infrared and terahertz laser sources with significantly improved power and tunability. However, there is a pressing need for a versatile, high performance infrared sensor that can complement and enhance the recent advances achieved in laser technology. This work presents new, high performance infrared detectors based on III-V barrier diodes. Unipolar barrier diodes, such as the nBn, have been very successful in the MWIR using InAs(Sb)-based materials, and in the MWIR and LWIR using type-II InAsSb/InAs superlattice-based materials. This work addresses the extension of the barrier diode architecture into the SWIR region, using GaSb-based and InAs-based materials. The program has resulted in detectors with unmatched performance in the 2-3 μm spectral range. Temperature dependent characterization has shown dark currents to be diffusion limited and equal to, or within a factor of 5, of the Rule 07 expression for Auger-limited HgCdTe detectors. Furthermore, D* values are superior to those of existing detectors in the 2-3 μm band. Of particular significance to spectroscopic sensing systems is the ability to have near-background limited performance at operation temperatures compatible with robust and reliable solid state thermoelectric coolers.

  9. Infrared imaging using carbon nanotube-based detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongzhi; Xi, Ning; Song, Bo; Chen, Liangliang; Lai, King W. C.; Lou, Jianyong

    2011-06-01

    Using carbon nanotubes (CNT), high performance infrared detectors have been developed. Since the CNTs have extraordinary optoelectronics properties due to its unique one dimensional geometry and structure, the CNT based infrared detectors have extremely low dark current, low noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD), short response time, and high dynamic range. Most importantly, it can detect 3-5 um middle-wave infrared (MWIR) at room temperature. This unique feature can significantly reduce the size and weight of a MWIR imaging system by eliminating a cryogenic cooling system. However, there are two major difficulties that impede the application of CNT based IR detectors for imaging systems. First, the small diameter of the CNTs results in low fill factor. Secondly, it is difficult to fabricate large scale of detector array for high resolution focal plane due to the limitations on the efficiency and cost of the manufacturing. In this paper, a new CNT based IR imaging system will be presented. Integrating the CNT detectors with photonic crystal resonant cavity, the fill factor of the CNT based IR sensor can reach as high as 0.91. Furthermore, using the compressive sensing technology, a high resolution imaging can be achieved by CNT based IR detectors. The experimental testing results show that the new imaging system can achieve the superb performance enabled by CNT based IR detectors, and, at the same time, overcame its difficulties to achieve high resolution and efficient imaging.

  10. Adjustable responsivity for thermal infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Woo-Bin; Talghader, Joseph J.

    2002-07-01

    With the recent interest in adaptive IR imaging, focal plane arrays are desired that can operate linearly over an enormous dynamic range. Unfortunately, large signals can cause thermal detectors to operate at temperatures significantly above their ambient resulting in intensity dependent performance or even device damage. In this letter, the responsivity of microbolometer devices is controlled using the detector and substrate as a simple electrostatic actuator. Microbolometers are demonstrated to switch between states that are over a factor of 50 apart in responsivity. The limits of the switching are theoretically separated by four to five orders of magnitude. In addition, intermediate values of responsivity can be obtained by designing devices in which the support beams snap down at lower voltage than the detector plate. Combining this idea with the pressure dependence of the thermal contact conductance, continuous thermal conductance tuning over a factor of 3 is demonstrated.

  11. High performance infrared fast cooled detectors for missile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Yann; Espuno, Laurent; Taalat, Rachid; Sultan, Ahmad; Cassaigne, Pierre; Matallah, Noura

    2016-05-01

    SOFRADIR was selected in the late 90's for the production of 320×256 MW detectors for major European missile programs. This experience has established our company as a key player in the field of missile programs. SOFRADIR has since developed a vast portfolio of lightweight, compact and high performance JT-based solutions for missiles. ALTAN is a 384x288 Mid Wave infrared detector with 15μm pixel pitch, and is offered in a miniature ultra-fast Joule- Thomson cooled Dewar. Since Sofradir offers both Indium Antimonide (InSb) and Mercury Cadmium Telluride technologies (MCT), we are able to deliver the detectors best suited to customers' needs. In this paper we are discussing different figures of merit for very compact and innovative JT-cooled detectors and are highlighting the challenges for infrared detection technologies.

  12. Materials processing threshold report. 1: Semiconductor crystals for infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, E. V.; Thompson, T. R.; Nagler, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    An extensive search was performed of the open literature pertaining to infrared detectors to determine what constitutes a good detector and in what way performance is limited by specific material properties. Interviews were conducted with a number of experts in the field to assess their perceptions of the state of the art and of the utility of zero-gravity processing. Based on this information base and on a review of NASA programs in crystal growth and infrared sensors, NASA program goals were reassessed and suggestions are presented as to possible joint and divergent efforts between NASA and DOD.

  13. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  14. Effects Of Ionizing Radiation On Cryogenic Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Lakew, B.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1988-04-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. We report here on ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    1989-01-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  16. SDIO long wavelength infrared detector requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duston, Dwight

    1990-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) has a significant requirement for infrared sensors for surveillance, tracking and discrimination of objects in space. Projected SDIO needs cover the range from short wavelengths out to 30 microns. Large arrays are required, and producibility and cost are major factors. The SDIO is pursuing several approaches including innovative concepts based on semiconductors and superconductors.

  17. Infrared microcalorimetric spectroscopy using uncooled thermal detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datskos, Panos G.; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskou, Irene; Egert, Charles M.

    1997-10-01

    We have investigated a novel IR microcalorimetric spectroscopy technique that can be used to detect the presence of trace amounts of target molecules. The chemical detection is accomplished by obtaining the IR photothermal spectra of molecules absorbed on the surface of an uncooled thermal detector. Traditional gravimetric based chemical detectors require highly selective coatings to achieve chemical specificity. In contrast, IR microcalorimetric based detection requires only moderately specific coatings since the specificity is a consequence of the photothermal spectrum. We have obtained IR photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of chemical analytes including diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), 2-mercaptoethanol and trinitrotoluene (TNT) over the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 micrometers . We found that in the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 micrometers DIMP exhibits two strong photothermal peaks. The photothermal spectra of 2-mercaptoethanol and TNT exhibit a number of peaks in the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 micrometers and the photothermal peaks for 2-mercaptoethanol are in excellent agreement with IR absorption peaks present in its IR spectrum. The photothermal response of chemical detectors based on microcalorimetric spectroscopy has been found to vary reproducibly and sensitively as a consequence of adsorption of small number of molecules on a detector surface followed by photon irradiation and can be used for improved chemical characterization.

  18. Thermoelectric infrared detectors with improved mechanical stability for the composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) far-infrared focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fettig, Rainer; Lakew, Brook; Brasunas, John C.; Crooke, Julie A.; Hakun, Claef F.; Orloff, Jon

    1998-09-01

    The Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument aboard the Cassini spacecraft en route to Saturn is a cryogenic spectrometer with far-infrared (FIR) and mid-infrared channels. The CIRS FIR focal plane, which covers the spectral range of 10 - 600 cm-1, consists of focusing optics and an output polarizer/analyzer that splits the output radiation according to polarization. The reflected and transmitted components are focused by concentrating cones onto thermoelectric detectors. These thermoelectric detectors consist of a gold black absorber on top of a gold foil that is welded to a thermoelement consisting of two semiconductor pyramids. After the detectors were integrated into the focal plane assembly and the CIRS instrument, the detectors proved to be extremely susceptible to two environmental survivability conditions: acoustics and airflow. Several changes were investigated to improve the integrity of the detectors including detector airflow geometry, structural changes to the detectors, and more intensive screening methods. The geometry of the air paths near the sensing elements was modified. Two structural modifications were implemented to improve the stability of the sensing elements. These were changes in the geometry of the thermoelectric pyramids by ion milling, and a change in the gold foil thickness. New screening methods, centrifuge and modulated force testing, were developed to select the most rugged detectors. Although several methods gave significant improvements to the detector's stability, the modification that allowed the detectors to meet the environmental survivability requirements was the change in the geometry of the air paths near the sensing elements.

  19. Pyroelectric Materials for Uncooled Infrared Detectors: Processing, Properties, and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Batra, A. K.; Guggilla, P.; Edwards, M. E.; Penn, B. G.; Currie, J. R., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Uncooled pyroelectric detectors find applications in diverse and wide areas such as industrial production; automotive; aerospace applications for satellite-borne ozone sensors assembled with an infrared spectrometer; health care; space exploration; imaging systems for ships, cars, and aircraft; and military and security surveillance systems. These detectors are the prime candidates for NASA s thermal infrared detector requirements. In this Technical Memorandum, the physical phenomena underlying the operation and advantages of pyroelectric infrared detectors is introduced. A list and applications of important ferroelectrics is given, which is a subclass of pyroelectrics. The basic concepts of processing of important pyroelectrics in various forms are described: single crystal growth, ceramic processing, polymer-composites preparation, and thin- and thick-film fabrications. The present status of materials and their characteristics and detectors figures-of-merit are presented in detail. In the end, the unique techniques demonstrated for improving/enhancing the performance of pyroelectric detectors are illustrated. Emphasis is placed on recent advances and emerging technologies such as thin-film array devices and novel single crystal sensors.

  20. Practical design of infrared detector circuits.

    PubMed

    Berger, T; Brookner, E

    1967-07-01

    The practical design of the receiver circuitry for an ir surveillance system is considered. A design procedure for obtaining high signal detectability is presented and illustrated with an explicit example. Filtering circuitry is designed which takes into account the nonwhite noise of the detector cell and the first stage of amplification. The tradeoffs between signal detectability, accuracy, resolution, and background suppression are also discussed. PMID:20062160

  1. Photoresponse Model for Si_(1-x)Ge_x/Si Heterojunction Internal Photoemission Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T.; Park, J. S.; Gunapala, S. D.; Jones, E. W.; Castillo, H. M. Del

    1993-01-01

    A photoresponse model has been developed for the Si_(1-x)Ge_x/Si heterojunction internalphotoemission (HIP) infrared detector at wavelengths corresponding to photon energies less than theFermi energy. A Si_(0.7)Ge_(0.3)/Si HIP detector with a cutoff wavelength of 23 micrometers andan emission coefficient of 0.4 eV^(-1) has been demonstrated. The model agrees with the measureddetector response at lambda greater than 8 micrometers. The potential barrier determined by themodel is in close agreement (difference similar to 4 meV) with the potential barrier determined by theRichardson plot, compared to the discrepancies of 20-50 meV usually observed for PtSi Schottkydetectors.

  2. Status of LWIR HgCdTe infrared detector technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reine, M. B.

    1990-01-01

    The performance requirements that today's advanced Long Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) focal plane arrays place on the HgCdTe photovoltaic detector array are summarized. The theoretical performance limits for intrinsic LWIR HgCdTe detectors are reviewed as functions of cutoff wavelength and operating temperature. The status of LWIR HgCdTe photovoltaic detectors is reviewed and compared to the focal plane array (FPA) requirements and to the theoretical limits. Emphasis is placed on recent data for two-layer HgCdTe PLE heterojunction photodiodes grown at Loral with cutoff wavelengths ranging between 10 and 19 microns at temperatures of 70 to 80 K. Development trends in LWIR HgCdTe detector technology are outlined, and conclusions are drawn about the ability for photovoltaic HgCdTe detector arrays to satisfy a wide variety of advanced FPA array applications.

  3. Si:Bi switched photoconducttor infrared detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eakin, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A multiplexed infrared detector array is described. The small demonstration prototype consisted of two cryogenically cooled, bismuth doped silicon, extrinsic photoconductor pixels multiplexed onto a single output channel using an on focal plane switch integration sampling technique. Noise levels of the order of 400 to 600 rms electrons per sample were demonstrated for this chip and wire hybrid version.

  4. Development of Kinetic Inductance Detectors for Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlis, Alyssa; Aguirre, James E.; Stevenson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    An instrument with high sensitivity and spectral resolution at far-infrared wavelengths could contribute significantly to several currently unanswered questions in astrophysics. Here, we describe a detector system suitable for a spectroscopic experiment at far-infrared wavelengths using kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs). KIDs have the potential to achieve high sensitivity and low noise levels. Specifically, the approach we take uses lumped-element KIDs, which consist of separate capacitive and inductive elements combined to form a microresonator. The inductive element serves as a direct radiation absorber. We describe the design considerations, fabrication process, and readout scheme for a prototype LEKID array of 1600 pixels, along with results from a prototype detector array.

  5. A bandgap-engineered HgCdTe PBπn long-wavelength infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, W. C.; Jiang, T.; Cheng, X. A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the HgCdTe PBπn (π represents p-type absorption layer) long-wavelength infrared detector based on bandgap-engineering is designed and validated by the preliminary experiments. Numerical simulation was applied to calculate the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic and zero-bias resistance-area product (R0A) for PBπn detectors and traditional pn photodiodes. The results show that the performance of PBπn detector was significantly improved compared with that of conventional pn photodiodes. The design of PBπn barrier structure can essentially reduce the dark current, while significantly improving the responsivity. In addition, when reverse biased, optimized PBπn device can also suppress Auger processes in the absorption layer under the high temperature up to 215 K. The proposed HgCdTe long wavelength infrared detectors based on vertical PBπn structure pave the way for development of high performance and high operation temperature infrared sensor applications.

  6. Schottky Barrier CdTe(Cl) Detectors for Planetary Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisen, Yosef; Floyd, Samuel

    2002-10-01

    Schottky barrier cadmium telluride (CdTe) radiation detectors of dimensions 2mm × 2mm × 1mm and segmented monolithic 3cm × 3 cm × 1mm are under study at GSFC for future NASA planetary instruments. These instruments will perform x-ray fluorescence spectrometry of the surface and monitor the solar x-ray flux spectrum, the excitation source for the characteristic x-rays emitted from the planetary body. The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission is the most recent example of such a remote sensing technique. Its x-ray fluorescence detectors were gas proportional counters with a back up Si PIN solar monitor. Analysis of NEAR data has shown the necessity to develop a solar x-ray detector with efficiency extending to 30keV. Proportional counters and Si diodes have low sensitivity above 9keV. Our 2mm × 2mm × 1mm CdTe operating at -30°C possesses an energy resolution of 250eV FWHM for 55Fe with unit efficiency to up to 30keV. This is an excellent candidate for a solar monitor. Another ramification of the NEAR data is a need to develop a large area detector system, 20-30 cm2, with cosmic ray charged particle rejection, for measuring the characteristic radiation. A 3cm × 3cm × 1mm Schottky CdTe segmented monolithic detector is under investigation for this purpose. A tiling of 2-3 such detectors will result in the desired area. The favorable characteristics of Schottky CdTe detectors, the system design complexities when using CdTe and its adaptation to future missions will be discussed.

  7. Novel Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si heterojunction internal photoemission long wavelength infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. L.; Maserjian, Joseph; Ksendzov, A.; Huberman, Mark L.; Terhune, R.; Krabach, T. N.

    1990-01-01

    There is a major need for long-wavelength-infrared (LWIR) detector arrays in the range of 8 to 16 microns which operate with close-cycle cryocoolers above 65 K. In addition, it would be very attractive to have Si-based infrared (IR) detectors that can be easily integrated with Si readout circuitry and have good pixel-to-pixel uniformity, which is critical for focal plane array (FPA) applications. Here, researchers report a novel Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) detector approach with a tailorable long wavelength infrared cutoff wavelength, based on internal photoemission over the Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si heterojunction. The HIP detectors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), which allows one to optimize the device structure with precise control of doping profiles, layer thickness and composition. The feasibility of a novel Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si HIP detector has been demonstrated with tailorable cutoff wavelength in the LWIR region. Photoresponse at wavelengths 2 to 10 microns are obtained with quantum efficiency (QE) above approx. 1 percent in these non-optimized device structures. It should be possible to significantly improve the QE of the HIP detectors by optimizing the thickness, composition, and doping concentration of the Si(1-x)Ge(x) layers and by configuring the detector for maximum absorption such as the use of a cavity structure. With optimization of the QE and by matching the barrier energy to the desired wavelength cutoff to minimize the thermionic current, researchers predict near background limited performance in the LWIR region with operating temperatures above 65K. Finally, with mature Si processing, the relatively simple device structure offers potential for low-cost producible arrays with excellent uniformity.

  8. JWST Near-Infrared Detectors: Latest Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Erin C.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Alexander, David; Brambora, Clifford K.; Chiao, Meng; Clemons, Brian L.; Derro, Rebecca; Engler, Chuck; Fox, Ori; Garrison, Matthew B.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Henegar, Greg; Hill, Robert J.; Johnson, Thomas; Lavaque, Dodolfo J.; Lindler, Don J.; Manthripragada, Sridhar S.; Marshall, Cheryl; Mott, Brent; Parr, Thomas M.; Roher, Wayne D.; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin B.; Schnurr, Richard; Smith, Miles; Waczynski, Augustyn

    2009-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope, an infrared-optimized space telescope being developed by NASA for launch in 2013, will utilize cutting-edge detector technology in its investigation of fundamental questions in astrophysics. JWST's near infrared spectrograph, NIRSpec utilizes two 2048 x 2048 HdCdTe arrays with Sidecar ASIC readout electronics developed by Teledyne to provide spectral coverage from 0.6 microns to 5 microns. We present recent test and calibration results for the NIRSpec flight arrays as well as data processing routines for noise reduction and cosmic ray rejection.

  9. Superconducting infrared detector arrays with integrated processing circuitry

    SciTech Connect

    Osterman, D.P.; Marr, P.; Dang, H.; Yao, C.T.; Radparvar, M. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on thin film Josephson junctions used as infrared detectors' which function by a thermal sensing mechanism. In addition to the potential for high sensitivity to a broad range of optical wavelengths, they are ideally suited for integration with superconducting electronics on a single wafer. A project at HYPRES to develop these arrays is directed along two avenues: maximizing the sensitivity of individual Josephson junction detector/SQUID amplifier units and development of superconducting on-chip processing circuitry - multiplexers and A to D converters.

  10. Construction of prototypes of a new class of infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.

    1976-01-01

    A class of infrared detectors is proposed and experimental results are presented for a prototype device. The material used is LaF3, an ionic conductor with a capacitance that varies exponentially with temperature. The detectivity of a prototype detector is estimated from measured signal voltages and incident power, and a Johnson noise voltage calculated from the measured resistance. For the parameters characterizing this device the estimated detectivity is consistent with a theoretical prediction. The theory further predicts an optimum detectivity for much thinner devices than the prototypes.

  11. Computer-aided design of optimal infrared detector preamplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frodsham, D. G.; Baker, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model for a frequency-compensated detector-preamplifier suitable for cryogenically cooled IR sensors operating under low background conditions. By the use of a digital computer, this model can rapidly select the optimal combination of design values. These parameters include load resistance, compensation resistance, compensation capacitance, chopping frequency, and detector area to meet desired specifications of noise equivalent power, frequency response, dynamic range, and level of output noise. This computer-assisted optimal design approach is demonstrated using a contemporary spaceborne infrared sensor application, i.e., a cryogenically cooled dual-channel radiometer.

  12. Low-background detector arrays for infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Estrada, J. A.; Goebel, J. H.; Mckelvey, M. E.; Mckibbin, D. D.; Mcmurray, R. E., Jr.; Weber, T. T.

    1989-01-01

    The status of a program which develops and characterizes integrated infrared (IR) detector array technology for space astronomical applications is described. The devices under development include intrinsic, extrinsic silicon, and extrinsic germanium detectors, coupled to silicon readout electronics. Low-background laboratory test results include measurements of responsivity, noise, dark current, temporal response, and the effects of gamma-radiation. In addition, successful astronomical imagery has been obtained on some arrays from this program. These two aspects of the development combine to demonstrate the strong potential for integrated array technology for IR space astronomy.

  13. Kinetic inductance detectors for far-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlis, A.; Aguirre, J.; Stevenson, T.

    2016-07-01

    The star formation mechanisms at work in the early universe remain one of the major unsolved problems of modern astrophysics. Many of the luminous galaxies present during the period of peak star formation (at redshift of about 2.5) were heavily enshrouded in dust, which makes observing their properties difficult at optical wavelengths. However, many spectral lines exist at far-infrared wavelengths that serve as tracers of star formation. Here, we describe a detector system suitable for a balloon-borne spectroscopic intensity mapping experiment at far-infrared wavelengths. The system uses lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs), which have the potential to achieve high sensitivity and low noise levels. KIDs consist of separate capacitive and inductive elements, and use the inductive element as the radiation absorber. We describe the design considerations, fabrication process, and readout scheme for a prototype LEKID array of 1600 pixels.

  14. Space applications of superconductivity - Microwave and infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    This is the fifth of a seven part series on the potential applications of superconductivity in space. The potential of superconducting microwave and infrared detectors for space applications is reviewed. The devices considered include bolometers, super-Schottky diodes and Josephson junctions operating as oscillators, mixers, and parametric amplifiers. In each case the description includes the physical mechanism, theoretical limits and the current state of the art for the superconducting device as well as its nonsuperconducting competitors.

  15. Infrared negative luminescent devices and higher operating temperature detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, G. R.; Gordon, N. T.; Hall, D. J.; Ashby, M. K.; Little, J. C.; Masterton, G.; Hails, J. E.; Giess, J.; Haworth, L.; Emeny, M. T.; Ashley, T.

    2004-01-01

    Infrared LEDs and negative luminescent devices, where less light is emitted than in equilibrium, have been attracting an increasing amount of interest recently. They have a variety of applications, including as a ‘source’ of IR radiation for gas sensing; radiation shielding for, and non-uniformity correction of, high sensitivity staring infrared detectors; and dynamic infrared scene projection. Similarly, infrared (IR) detectors are used in arrays for thermal imaging and, discretely, in applications such as gas sensing. Multi-layer heterostructure epitaxy enables the growth of both types of device using designs in which the electronic processes can be precisely controlled and techniques such as carrier exclusion and extraction can be implemented. This enables detectors to be made which offer good performance at higher than normal operating temperatures, and efficient negative luminescent devices to be made which simulate a range of effective temperatures whilst operating uncooled. In both cases, however, additional performance benefits can be achieved by integrating optical concentrators around the diodes to reduce the volume of semiconductor material, and so minimise the thermally activated generation-recombination processes which compete with radiative mechanisms. The integrated concentrators are in the form of Winston cones, which can be formed using an iterative dry etch process involving methane/hydrogen and oxygen. We present results on negative luminescence in the mid- and long-IR wavebands, from devices made from indium antimonide and mercury cadmium telluride, where the aim is sizes greater than 1 cm×1 cm. We also discuss progress on, and the potential for, operating temperature and/or sensitivity improvement of detectors, where very high-performance imaging is anticipated from systems which require no mechanical cooling.

  16. Research of thermal cycles of long wavelength MCT infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li-gang; Liu, Da-fu; Zhu, San-gen; Gong, Hai-mei

    2009-07-01

    The conflict of longevity of satellite's service and limited life of Sterling cooler decides that coolers should work on the intermittent mode in space. As a result, The HgCdTe (MCT) infrared (IR) detectors in satellite are commonly subjected to thousands of repeated thermal cycles from below -173°C to room temperature (20°C), which brings some new reliability problems. Especially the mismatch of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of different materials may lead to some unfamiliar failure modes with such low temperature and nearly 200°C span of thermal cycles. In order to study the characteristics of MCT detectors under the stress of thermal cycles, this paper introduced a special automatic system. The system is mainly composed of a sub-container of liquid nitrogen, a heater controlled by the PID hardware, and an object stage on which the MCT detectors to be tested are mounted. Furthermore, the sub-container, the heater and the stage are positioned in a large vacuum tank. In the course of thermal cycles, the object stage moved up and down with MCT detectors is driven by a step motor. When it rises to the bottom of liquid nitrogen sub-container, the stage is to be cooled with detectors, and when declines to the heater, the stage to be heated with detectors, too. At last, two long wavelength MCT detector samples are tested with this equipment, and the resistance, the signal and the noise are measured. It shows that all the pixels' resistance didn't change beyond 5% after 5000 cycles. However, the tested signal of the last pixel of both detectors increased sharply after 1000 cycles, and fell to normal level after 5000 cycles, with its noise altering a little from beginning to end. A deduction is given in this paper for this phenomenon. In accordance, the thermal cycle equipment and the experimental data, would supply some references to the design and fabrication of MCT IR detectors.

  17. Cooled and uncooled infrared detectors for missile seekers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraenkel, Rami; Haski, Jacob; Mizrahi, Udi; Shkedy, Lior; Shtrichman, Itay; Pinsky, Ephi

    2014-06-01

    Electro-optical missile seekers pose exceptional requirements for infrared (IR) detectors. These requirements include: very short mission readiness (time-to-image), one-time and relatively short mission duration, extreme ambient conditions, high sensitivity, fast frame rate, and in some cases small size and cost. SCD is engaged in the development and production of IR detectors for missile seeker applications for many years. 0D, 1D and 2D InSb focal plane arrays (FPAs) are packaged in specially designed fast cool-down Dewars and integrated with Joule-Thomson (JT) coolers. These cooled MWIR detectors were integrated in numerous seekers of various missile types, for short and long range applications, and are combat proven. New technologies for the MWIR, such as epi-InSb and XBn-InAsSb, enable faster cool-down time and higher sensitivity for the next generation seekers. The uncooled micro-bolometer technology for IR detectors has advanced significantly over the last decade, and high resolution - high sensitivity FPAs are now available for different applications. Their much smaller size and cost with regard to the cooled detectors makes these uncooled LWIR detectors natural candidates for short and mid-range missile seekers. In this work we will present SCD's cooled and uncooled solutions for advanced electro-optical missile seekers.

  18. Si and GaAs photocapacitive MIS infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Tsuo, Y. H.; Moriarty, J. A.; Miller, W. E.; Crouch, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    Improvement of the previously reported photocapacitive MIS infrared detectors has led to the development of exceptional room-temperature devices. Unoptimized peak detectivities on the order of 10 to the 13th cm sq rt Hz/W, a value which exceeds the best obtainable from existing solid-state detectors, have now been consistently obtained in Si and GaAs devices using high-capacitance LaF3 or composite LaF3/native-oxide insulating layers. The measured spectral response of representative samples is presented and discussed in detail together with a simple theory which accounts for the observed behavior. The response of an ideal MIS photocapacitor is also contrasted with that of both a conventional photoconductor and a p-i-n photodiode, and reasons for the superior performance of the MIS detectors are given. Finally, fundamental studies on the electrical, optical, and noise characteristics of the MIS structures are analyzed and discussed in the context of infrared-detector applications.

  19. Photoacoustic-based detector for infrared laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, L.; Palzer, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we present an alternative detector technology for use in direct absorption spectroscopy setups. Instead of a semiconductor based detector, we use the photoacoustic effect to gauge the light intensity. To this end, the target gas species is hermetically sealed under excess pressure inside a miniature cell along with a MEMS microphone. Optical access to the cell is provided by a quartz window. The approach is particularly suitable for tunable diode laser spectroscopy in the mid-infrared range, where numerous molecules exhibit large absorption cross sections. Moreover, a frequency standard is integrated into the method since the number density and pressure inside the cell are constant. We demonstrate that the information extracted by our method is at least equivalent to that achieved using a semiconductor-based photon detector. As exemplary and highly relevant target gas, we have performed direct spectroscopy of methane at the R3-line of the 2v3 band at 6046.95 cm-1 using both detector technologies in parallel. The results may be transferred to other infrared-active transitions without loss of generality.

  20. Optical Studies on Antimonide Superlattice Infrared Detector Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoglund, Linda; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Ting, David Z.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Liao, Anna; Keo, Sam; Lee, Michael C.; Nguyen, Jean; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2010-01-01

    In this study the material quality and optical properties of type II InAs/GaSb superlattices are investigated using transmission and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The influence of the material quality on the intensity of the luminescence and on the electrical properties of the detectors is studied and a good correlation between the photodetector current-voltage (IV) characteristics and the PL intensity is observed. Studies of the temperature dependence of the PL reveal that Shockley-Read-Hall processes are limiting the minority carrier lifetime in both the mid-IR wavelength and the long-IR wavelength detector material studied. These results demonstrate that PL spectroscopy is a valuable tool for optimization of infrared detectors.

  1. Mid-Infrared Reflectance Imaging of Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edlridge, Jeffrey I.; Martin, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for mid-infrared reflectance imaging has been developed as means of inspecting for subsurface damage in thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). The apparatus is designed, more specifically, for imaging the progression of buried delamination cracks in plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings on turbine-engine components. Progression of TBC delamination occurs by the formation of buried cracks that grow and then link together to produce eventual TBC spallation. The mid-infrared reflectance imaging system described here makes it possible to see delamination progression that is invisible to the unaided eye, and therefore give sufficiently advanced warning before delamination progression adversely affects engine performance and safety. The apparatus (see figure) includes a commercial mid-infrared camera that contains a liquid-nitrogen-cooled focal plane indium antimonide photodetector array, and imaging is restricted by a narrow bandpass centered at wavelength of 4 microns. This narrow wavelength range centered at 4 microns was chosen because (1) it enables avoidance of interfering absorptions by atmospheric OH and CO2 at 3 and 4.25 microns, respectively; and (2) the coating material exhibits maximum transparency in this wavelength range. Delamination contrast is produced in the midinfrared reflectance images because the introduction of cracks into the TBC creates an internal TBC/air-gap interface with a high diffuse reflectivity of 0.81, resulting in substantially higher reflectance of mid-infrared radiation in regions that contain buried delamination cracks. The camera is positioned a short distance (.12 cm) from the specimen. The mid-infrared illumination is generated by a 50-watt silicon carbide source positioned to the side of the mid-infrared camera, and the illumination is collimated and reflected onto the specimen by a 6.35-cm-diameter off-axis paraboloidal mirror. Because the collected images are of a steady-state reflected intensity (in

  2. Infrared negative luminescent devices and higher operating temperature detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, Geoff R.; Gordon, Neil T.; Hall, David J.; Little, J. Chris; Masterton, G.; Hails, J. E.; Giess, J.; Haworth, L.; Emeny, Martin T.; Ashley, Tim

    2004-02-01

    Infrared LEDs and negative luminescent devices, where less light is emitted than in equilibrium, have been attracting an increasing amount of interest recently. They have a variety of applications, including as a ‘source" of IR radiation for gas sensing; radiation shielding for and non-uniformity correction of high sensitivity starring infrared detectors; and dynamic infrared scene projection. Similarly, IR detectors are used in arrays for thermal imaging and, discretely, in applications such as gas sensing. Multi-layer heterostructure epitaxy enables the growth of both types of device using designs in which the electronic processes can be precisely controlled and techniques such as carrier exclusion and extraction can be implemented. This enables detectors to be made which offer good performance at higher than normal operating temperatures, and efficient negative luminescent devices to be made which simulate a range of effective temperatures whilst operating uncooled. In both cases, however, additional performance benefits can be achieved by integrating optical concentrators around the diodes to reduce the volume of semiconductor material, and so minimise the thermally activated generation-recombination processes which compete with radiative mechanisms. The integrated concentrators are in the form of Winston cones, which can be formed using an iterative dry etch process involving methane/hydrogen and oxygen. We will present results on negative luminescence in the mid and long IR wavebands, from devices made from indium antimonide and mercury cadmium telluride, where the aim is sizes greater than 1cm x 1cm. We will also discuss progress on, and the potential for, operating temperature and/or sensitivity improvement of detectors, where very higher performance imaging is anticipated from systems which require no mechanical cooling.

  3. Infrared Negative Luminescent Devices and Higher Operating Temperature Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Tim

    2003-03-01

    Infrared LEDs and negative luminescent devices, where less light is emitted than in equilibrium, have been attracting an increasing amount of interest recently. They have a variety of applications, including as a source' of IR radiation for gas sensing; radiation shielding for and non-uniformity correction of high sensitivity starring infrared detectors; and dynamic infrared scene projection. Similarly, IR detectors are used in arrays for thermal imaging and, discretely, in applications such as gas sensing. Multi-layer heterostructure epitaxy enables the growth of both types of device using designs in which the electronic processes can be precisely controlled and techniques such as carrier exclusion and extraction can be implemented. This enables detectors to be made which offer good performance at higher than normal operating temperatures, and efficient negative luminescent devices to be made which simulate a range of effective temperatures whilst operating uncooled. In both cases, however, additional performance benefits can be achieved by integrating optical concentrators around the diodes to reduce the volume of semiconductor material, and so minimise the thermally activated generation-recombination processes which compete with radiative mechanisms. The integrated concentrators are in the form of Winston cones, which can be formed using an iterative dry etch process involving methane/hydrogen and oxygen. We will present results on negative luminescence in the mid and long IR wavebands, from devices made from indium antimonide and mercury cadmium telluride, where the aim is sizes greater than 1cm x 1cm. We will also discuss progress on, and the potential for, operating temperature and/or sensitivity improvement of detectors, where very high performance imaging is anticipated from systems which require no mechanical cooling.

  4. Bi-material resonant infrared thermal detector and array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Dacheng

    2014-10-01

    A resonant infrared thermal sensor with high sensitivity, whose sensing element is a bi-material structure with thermal expansion mismatch effect, is presented in this paper. The sensor detects infrared radiation by means of tracking the change in resonance frequency of the bi-material structure with temperature change attributed to the infrared radiation from targets. The bi-material structure can amplify the change in resonance frequency compared to a single material sensing structure. In accordance with the theory of vibration mechanics and design principle of infrared thermal detector, the bi-material resonant sensor by means of which an array can be achieved is designed. The simulation results, by ANSYS software analysis based on multi-layer shell finite element, demonstrate that the dependence of resonance frequency on temperature of the designed sensing structure achieves 1Hz/0.01°C. A microarray with 6×6 resonant infrared sensors is fabricated based on microelectronics processes being compatible with integrated circuit fabrication technology. The frequency variation corresponding to the temperature shift can be obtained by electrical measurement.

  5. Cooling and shielding systems for infrared detectors - requirements and limits.

    PubMed

    Wiecek, B

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents three main cooling systems used for infrared detectors. At first thermoelectric devices are discussed. They allow cooling down the detector with low efficiency and not to the very low temperature. They do not generate any vibrations and therefore are suitable for thermal detectors, where the microphone effect can decrease their performance. Photon detectors need to be cooled down even to 77K or better. The only way to have such deep cooling is to use the cooler based on thermodynamic cycle such as Stirling one. With the high efficiency one can easily obtain cryogenic temperature for a detector. The electromagnetic noise and vibration generation are the main disadvantages of using such devices. Joule-Thomson effect during gas expansion is 3rdcooling system discussed in the paper. It is highly effective process, used for gas liquefaction too. The working gas is being removed during cooling into the atmosphere, so the need of continuous supplying with compressed one, what makes this system very difficult for remote applications. In the paper, simple calculations are presented to illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of the different cooling systems. PMID:17282258

  6. The development of infrared detectors and mechanisms for use in future infrared space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, James R.

    1995-01-01

    The environment above earth's atmosphere offers significant advantages in sensitivity and wavelength coverage in infrared astronomy over ground-based observatories. In support of future infrared space missions, technology development efforts were undertaken to develop detectors sensitive to radiation between 2.5 micron and 200 micron. Additionally, work was undertaken to develop mechanisms supporting the imaging and spectroscopy requirements of infrared space missions. Arsenic-doped-Silicon and Antimony-doped-Silicon Blocked Impurity Band detectors, responsive to radiation between 4 micron and 45 micron, were produced in 128x128 picture element arrays with the low noise, high sensitivity performance needed for space environments. Technology development continued on Gallium-doped-Germanium detectors (for use between 80 micron and 200 micron), but were hampered by contamination during manufacture. Antimony-doped-Indium detectors (for use between 2.5 micron and 5 micron) were developed in a 256x256 pixel format with high responsive quantum efficiency and low dark current. Work began on adapting an existing cryogenic mechanism design for space-based missions; then was redirected towards an all-fixed optical design to improve reliability and lower projected mission costs.

  7. Quantum Well and Quantum Dot Modeling for Advanced Infrared Detectors and Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David; Gunapala, S. D.; Bandara, S. V.; Hill, C. J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the modeling of Quantum Well Infrared Detectors (QWIP) and Quantum Dot Infrared Detectors (QDIP) in the development of Focal Plane Arrays (FPA). The QWIP Detector being developed is a dual band detector. It is capable of running on two bands Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) and Medium Wavelength Infrared (MWIR). The same large-format dual-band FPA technology can be applied to Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (QDIP) with no modification, once QDIP exceeds QWIP in single device performance. Details of the devices are reviewed.

  8. Modeling the optical response of grating-profiled PtSi/Si infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, Chris J. T.; Cairns, Gerald F.; Dawson, Paul

    1997-10-01

    Modeling the optical response of grating profiled PtSi/Si structures is examined to demonstrate the potential of microstructuring in optimizing the absorption of infrared detectors. Coupling to angularly broad surface plasmon polariton resonances near normal incidence is, in fact, achieved at both Si/PtSi and SiO2/PtSi interfaces for the same grating parameters in the wavelength ranges 3.0 - 4.4 micrometer and 1.3 - 1.9 micrometer respectively. These ranges correspond to two infrared, atmospheric transmission windows, and demonstrate the potential for a single device geometry to operate optimally in two different spectral bands. It is also shown that, throughout these spectral bands, it is possible to attain reflectance significantly lower than that of the planar structure counterparts in the angle range 0 degrees to plus or minus 20 degrees (corresponding to the use of F1.4 optics), along with containment of low reflectance to that angle range. Absorption mediated by the PtSi/Si surface plasmon polariton mode may be of particular interest in these Schottky barrier structures, since there would be considerable enhancement in the generation of hot carriers in the near barrier region where they have a better chance of direct or indirect (via elastic scattering) promotion over the barrier to give rise to a detectable charge.

  9. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882.1935 Section 882.1935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma...

  10. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882.1935 Section 882.1935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma...

  11. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882.1935 Section 882.1935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma...

  12. Progress in MOCVD growth of HgCdTe epilayers for HOT infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebłowski, A.; Gawron, W.; Martyniuk, P.; Stepień, D.; Kolwas, K.; Piotrowski, J.; Madejczyk, P.; Kopytko, M.; Piotrowski, A.; Rogalski, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present progress in MOCVD growth of (100) HgCdTe epilayers achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology and Vigo System S.A. It is shown that MOCVD technology is an excellent tool in fabrication of different HgCdTe detector structures with a wide range of composition, donor/acceptor doping and without post grown annealing. Particular progress has been achieved in the growth of (100) HgCdTe epilayers for long wavelength infrared photoconductors operated in HOT conditions. The (100) HgCdTe photoconductor optimized for 13-μm attain detectivity equal to 6.5x109 Jones and therefore outperform its (111) counterpart. The paper also presents technological progress in fabrication of MOCVD-grown (111) HgCdTe barrier detectors. The barrier device performance is comparable with state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. The detectivity of HgCdTe detectors is close to the value marked HgCdTe photodiodes. Dark current densities are close to the values given by "Rule 07".

  13. Study of PZT thick-film infrared detectors prepared by MEMS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Xiang-Peng; Chuan, Gui-Wu; Wen, Bo-Luo; Wan, Li-Zhang; Jia, Qiang-Cao

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a single element integrated infrared detector using screen printed lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thick films on Pt/Ti/Al2O3/SiO2 coated silicon cup has been developed. The thermal insulating micro-bridge of the detector was prepared by Micro-electro-mechanical System (MEMS) technology. To increase the density of PZT ceramic thick films, cool isostatic pressing experiments had been conducted under 300MPa and 30s dwell time. The XRD pattern shows that PZT thick films possess good perovskite structure. The SEM cross section image demonstrate that the PZT film was dense and the thickness is about 25μm. The dielectric constant, loss and pyroelectric coefficient of PZT thick films prepared at optimized conditions is 1100, 1% and 1×10-8C/Kcm 2, respectively. The results indicated that the PZT thermal sensitive layer fabricated by screen printing on the Pt/Ti coated silicon cup with micro-bridge thermal insulation structure, and Al2O3/SiO2 barrier layer show potential application in infrared detectors.

  14. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Robertson, J. B.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An infrared radiation detector including a cadmium sulfide platelet having a cathode formed on one of its ends and an anode formed on its other end is presented. The platelet is suitably doped such that stationary high-field domains are formed adjacent the cathode when based in the negative differential conductivity region. A negative potential is applied to the cathode such that a high-field domain is formed adjacent to the cathode. A potential measuring probe is located between the cathode and the anode at the edge of the high-field domain and means are provided for measuring the potential at the probe whereby this measurement is indicative of the infrared radiation striking the platelet.

  15. InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, Robert; Masur, Michael; Schmitz, Johannes; Daumer, Volker; Niemasz, Jasmin; Vandervelde, Thomas; DeMeo, Dante; Luppold, Wolfgang; Wauro, Matthias; Wörl, Andreas; Rutz, Frank; Scheibner, Ralf; Ziegler, Johann; Walther, Martin

    2013-07-01

    Future heterojunction InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL) detector devices in the long-wavelength infrared regime (LWIR, 8-12 μm) require an accurate bandstructure model and a successful surface passivation. In this study, we have validated the superlattice empirical pseudopotential method developed by Dente and Tilton over a wide range of bandgap energies. Furthermore, dark current data for a novel dielectric surface passivation for LWIR devices is presented. Next, we present a technique for high-resolution, full-wafer mapping of etch pit densities on commercial (1 0 0) GaSb substrates, which allows to study the local correlation between threading dislocations in the substrate and the electro-optical pixel performance. Finally, recent performance data for 384 × 288 dual-color InAs/GaSb superlattice imagers for the mid-wavelength infrared (MWR, 3-5 μm) is given.

  16. Reflow flip-chip bonding technology for infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yue; Lin, Chun; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Ding, Rui-Jun

    2015-08-01

    Based on the self-alignment principle, a new reflow flip-chip bonding technology for infrared detectors is proposed. By optimizing the dimensions between the under bump metallization (UBM) and the indium bump, 10 µm tall spherical indium balls are achieved firstly. Then the technical parameters of heating temperature and surface pre-treatment are discussed. Thereafter, a new reflow flip-chip bonding technology is applied to the infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) and it results in a 6.7% of the total bad pixel percentage which is dramatically decreased compared with the thermo-compression one of 41.9%. The deduced fatigue life of the IRFPA bonded by the new reflow flip-chip bonding technology is four times longer than that of the thermo-compression one.

  17. Low dark current photovoltaic multiquantum well long wavelength infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Wen, Cheng P.; Sato, R. N.; Hu, M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have, for the first time, demonstrated photovoltaic detection for an multiple quantum well (MQW) detector. With a blocking layer, the MQW detector exhibits Schottky I-V characteristics with extremely low dark current and excellent ideality factor. The dark current is 5 times 10(exp -14) A for an 100x100 square micron 10 micron detector at 40 K, 8 to 9 orders of magnitude lower than that of a similar 10 micron MQW detector without blocking layer. The ideality factor is about 1.01 to 1.05 at T = 40 to 80 K. The measured barrier height is consistent with the energy difference between first excited states and ground states, or the peak of spectral response. The authors also, for the first time, report the measured effective Richardson constant (A asterisk asterisk) for the GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction using this blocking layer structure. The A asterisk asterisk is low approx. 2.3 A/sq cm/K(exp 2).

  18. Infrared reflectometry with a cavity-shaped pyroelectric detector.

    PubMed

    Blevin, W R; Geist, J

    1974-10-01

    A new type of reflectometer has been developed for measuring directional-hemispherical spectral reflectances in the infrared region. The instrument is based upon a cavity-shaped pyroelectric detector that itself collects the radiation reflected by the test sample, thereby obviating the need for an intermediate collector such as an integrating sphere or concave mirror. This detector is made from an electrically polarized plastic film of polyvinyl fluoride, coated with gold-black on its inner surface and backed with brass him on its outer surface in order to provide mechanical strength. The reflectometer has been used with Fourier spectrometer to measure spectral reflectances over the wavelength range 5-30 microm. PMID:20134663

  19. InGaAs Detectors for Miniature Infrared Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabach, T. N.; Staller, C.; Dejewski, S.; Cunningham, T.; Herring, M.; Fossum, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    In the past year, there has been substantial impetus for NASA to consider missions that are of relatively low cost as a trade off for a higher new mission launch rate. To maintain low mission cost, these missions will be of short duration and will use smaller launch vehicles (e.g. Pegasus). Consequently, very low volume, very low mass instrument (a.k.a. miniature instrument) payloads will be required. Furthermore, it is anticipated that the number of instruments flown on a particular mission will also be highly constrained; consequently increased instrument capability will also be desired. In the case of infrared instruments, focal planes typically require cooling to ensure high performance of the detectors, especially in the case of spectrometers where high D* is necessary. In this paper, we discuss the InGaAs detector technology and its potential.

  20. Megapixel digital InSb detector for midwave infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkedy, Lior; Markovitz, Tuvy; Calahorra, Zipi; Hirsh, Itay; Shtrichman, Itay

    2011-06-01

    Since the late 1990s Semiconductor devices (SCDs) has developed and manufactured a variety of InSb two-dimensional (2D) focal plane arrays (FPAs) that were implemented in many infrared (IR) systems and applications. SCD routinely manufactures both analog and digital InSb FPAs with array formats of 320×256, 480×384, and 640×512 elements, and pitch size in the range 15 to 30 μm. These FPAs are available in many packaging configurations, including fully integrated detector-Dewar-cooler-assembly, with either closed-cycle Stirling or open-loop Joule-Thomson coolers. In response to a need for very high resolution midwave IR (MWIR) detectors and systems, SCD has developed a large format 2D InSb detector with 1280×1024 elements and pixel size of 15 μm. A digital readout integrated circuit (ROIC) is coupled by flip-chip bonding to the megapixel InSb array. The ROIC is fabricated in CMOS 0.18-μm technology, that enables the small pixel circuitry and relatively low power generation at the focal plane. The digital ROIC has an analog to digital (A/D) converter per-channel and allows for full frame readout at a rate of 100 Hz. Such on-chip A/D conversion eliminates the need for several A/D converters with fairly high power consumption at the system level. The digital readout, together with the InSb detector technology, lead to a wide linear dynamic range and low residual nonuniformity, which is stable over a long period of time following a nonuniformity correction procedure. A special Dewar was designed to withstand harsh environmental conditions while minimizing the contribution to the heat load of the detector. The Dewar together with the low power ROIC, enable a megapixel detector with overall low size, weight, and power with respect to comparable large format detectors. A variety of applications with this detector make use of different cold shields with different f-number and spectral filters. In this paper we present actual performance characteristics of the

  1. Crosstalk study of near infrared InGaAs detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue; Tang, Hengjing; Li, Tao; Fan, Cui; Shao, Xiumei; Li, Jianwei; Wei, Jun; Gong, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Crosstalk characteristics of high density FPA detectors attract widespread attention in the application of electro-optical systems. Crosstalk characteristics of near-infrared (NIR) InGaAs photodiodes and focal plane arrays (FPAs) were studied in this paper. The mesa type detector was investigated by using laser beam induced current technique (LBIC) to measure the absorption outside the designed photosensitive area, and the results show that the excess absorption enlarges the crosstalk of the adjacent pixels. The structure optimization using the effective absorption layer between the pixels can effectively reduce the crosstalk to 2.5%. The major crosstalk components of the optimization photodiode come from the electronic signal caused by carrier lateral diffusion. For the planar type detectors, test structures were used to compare the crosstalk of different structures, and the guard ring structure shows good suppression of the crosstalk. Then the back-illuminated 32x32 InGaAs photodiodes with 30μm pitch were designed, and LBIC was used to measure its lateral diffusion of the effective carriers and fill factor of photosensitive area. The results indicate that the fill factor of detectors can reach up to 98% when the diffusion region is optimized, and the minimum response exists between two neighborhood pixels. Based on these crosstalk measurement results and optimizing structure designs, the linear InGaAs photodiodes were designed and thus the InGaAs FPA assembly was fabricated. The assembly shows higher electro-optical performance and good improvement on crosstalk. The assembly was applied in infrared imaging system and modulation transfer function (MTF) of FPA assembly was calculated to be above 0.50. The clear image based on FPA assembly was obtained.

  2. Advanced numerical modeling and hybridization techniques for third-generation infrared detector pixel arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Jonathan

    Infrared (IR) detectors are well established as a vital sensor technology for military, defense and commercial applications. Due to the expense and effort required to fabricate pixel arrays, it is imperative to develop numerical simulation models to perform predictive device simulations which assess device characteristics and design considerations. Towards this end, we have developed a robust three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation model for IR detector pixel arrays. We used the finite-difference time-domain technique to compute the optical characteristics including the reflectance and the carrier generation rate in the device. Subsequently, we employ the finite element method to solve the drift-diffusion equations to compute the electrical characteristics including the I(V) characteristics, quantum efficiency, crosstalk and modulation transfer function. We use our 3D numerical model to study a new class of detector based on the nBn-architecture. This detector is a unipolar unity-gain barrier device consisting of a narrow-gap absorber layer, a wide-gap barrier layer, and a narrow-gap collector layer. We use our model to study the underlying physics of these devices and to explain the anomalously long lateral collection lengths for photocarriers measured experimentally. Next, we investigate the crosstalk in HgCdTe photovoltaic pixel arrays employing a photon-trapping (PT) structure realized with a periodic array of pillars intended to provide broadband operation. The PT region drastically reduces the crosstalk; making the use of the PT structures not only useful to obtain broadband operation, but also desirable for reducing crosstalk, especially in small pitch detector arrays. Then, the power and flexibility of the nBn architecture is coupled with a PT structure to engineer spectrally filtering detectors. Last, we developed a technique to reduce the cost of large-format, high performance HgCdTe detectors by nondestructively screen-testing detector arrays prior

  3. Type-II superlattice infrared detector technology at Fraunhofer IAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, Robert; Daumer, Volker; Hugger, Tsvetelina; Kohn, Norbert; Luppold, Wolfgang; Müller, Raphael; Niemasz, Jasmin; Schmidt, Johannes; Rutz, Frank; Stadelmann, Tim; Wauro, Matthias; Wörl, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    For more than two decades, Antimony-based type-II superlattice photodetectors for the infrared spectral range between 3-15 μm are under development at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (IAF). Today, Fraunhofer IAF is Germany's only national foundry for InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice detectors and we cover a wide range of aspects from basic materials research to small series production in this field. We develop single-element photodetectors for sensing systems as well as two-dimensional detector arrays for high-performance imaging and threat warning systems in the mid-wavelength and long-wavelength region of the thermal infrared. We continuously enhance our production capabilities by extending our in-line process control facilities. As a recent example, we present a semiautomatic wafer probe station that has developed into an important tool for electrooptical characterization. A large amount of the basic materials research focuses on the reduction of the dark current by the development of bandgap engineered device designs on the basis of heterojunction concepts. Recently, we have successfully demonstrated Europe's first LWIR InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice imager with 640x512 pixels with 15 μm pitch. The demonstrator camera already delivers a good image quality and achieves a thermal resolution better than 30 mK.

  4. Infrared dual-band detectors for next generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Yann; Chabuel, Fabien; Vaz, Cedric; Billon-Lanfrey, David; Baylet, Jacques; Gravrand, Olivier; Ballet, Philippe; Destefanis, Gérard

    2011-06-01

    The development of DB (Dual-Band) infrared detectors has been the core of research and technological improvements for the last ten years at CEA-LETI and Sofradir: the semi planar structure uses a proven standard process with robust reproducibility, leading to low-risk and a facilitated ramp-up to production. This makes it the natural choice for the third generation detectors proposed by Sofradir. The fabrication of DB MCT detectors is reaching maturity: ALTAIR with 24μm-pixel pitch arrays in TV format are available, showing median NETD around 18mK with operability over 99.5%. A second structure, based on two back to back diodes, with a single contact per pixel translates the DB pixel into smaller cell therefore being more efficient in terms of pitch reduction. These new technologies widen perspectives and open new horizons of applications such as large DB FPA, dual mode capability providing both SAL (Semi Active Laser) and IR operations for more robust target engagement or compact dual color detection with wide-angle integrated optics for missile warning system.

  5. Detector Arrays for an Airborne Infrared Echelle Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, E. F.; Haas, M. R.; Baltz, J. A.; McKelvey, M. E.; Colgan, S. W. J.; Lynch, D. H.; Wolf, J.; Witteborn, Fred (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The design of a long-slit echelle spectrograph covering the 16 - 210 micron range for use on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is under study at NASA-Ames. This wavelength range is selected for its content of important astrophysical spectral lines accessible from an airborne platform, and availability of suitable detectors. Two dimensional arrays will be used to simultaneously provide spectral coverage in the dispersion direction and imaging in the cross-dispersion direction. Major goals are: (1) to reach sensitivities limited primarily by the background from the residual atmosphere and the telescope; (2) to provide imaging not far from the diffraction limit of the 2.5 meter (effective) aperture of the telescope; and (3) to obtain diffraction-limited spectral resolution from the large echelle grating, which means that the resolving power increases with decreasing wavelength. To meet these requirements, three detector types are forseen: a commercially available monolithic Si:Sb IBC array to cover the wavelength range from 16 to 40 microns, a Ge:Sb photoconductor array to cover the range from 40 to 125 microns, and a stressed Ge:Ga photoconductor array covering the range from 125 to 210 microns. The paper discusses details of the studies and plans for the field optics, detectors, and readouts.

  6. Optimization of (100)-Si TMAH etching for uncooled infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Y.; Wu, C. G.; Zhang, W. L.; Li, Y. R.; Liu, X. Z.; Zhu, J.

    2009-07-01

    The influences of concentration of the Tetra-methyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution together with oxidizer additions were studied in order to optimize the anisotropic silicon etching in the development of a fabrication process for Ba0.65Sr0.35TiO3 (BST) pyroelectric thin film infrared detectors. The detector active element was consisted of capacitance NiCr/BST/Pt and the thin silicon suspending membrane. The later one was formed by bulk anisotropically etching of the (100)-Si wafer. Both solution concentration and oxidizing agent were tuned in order to obtain an optimum etching process. Some improvements such as higher etch rate and lower surface roughness have been obtained by the addition of ammonium peroxide sulfate ((NH4)S2O8) as oxidizing agent under different conditions. The examination of etching speed and surface topography were performed by step surface profiler and scanned electronic microscopy. Furthermore, a simple approach was developed to fabric BST pyroelectric thin film detector based on the optimized TMAH etching parameters. A BST thin film capacitance was formed on a thin silicon membrane, where high sensitivity D* of 9.4×107cm•Hz1/2/W was measured.

  7. Compact dewar and electronics for large-format infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manissadjian, A.; Magli, S.; Mallet, E.; Cassaigne, P.

    2011-06-01

    Infrared systems cameras trend is to require higher performance (thanks to higher resolution) and in parallel higher compactness for easier integration in systems. The latest developments at SOFRADIR / France on HgCdTe (Mercury Cadmium Telluride / MCT) cooled IR staring detectors do show constant improvements regarding detector performances and compactness, by reducing the pixel pitch and optimizing their encapsulation. Among the latest introduced detectors, the 15μm pixel pitch JUPITER HD-TV format (1280×1024) has to deal with challenging specifications regarding dewar compactness, low power consumption and reliability. Initially introduced four years ago in a large dewar with a more than 2kg split Stirling cooler compressor, it is now available in a new versatile compact dewar that is vacuum-maintenance-free over typical 18 years mission profiles, and that can be integrated with the different available Stirling coolers: K548 microcooler for light solution (less than 0.7 kg), K549 or LSF9548 for split cooler and/or higher reliability solution. The IDDCAs are also required with simplified electrical interface enabling to shorten the system development time and to standardize the electronic boards definition with smaller volumes. Sofradir is therefore introducing MEGALINK, the new compact Command & Control Electronics compatible with most of the Sofradir IDDCAs. MEGALINK provides all necessary input biases and clocks to the FPAs, and digitizes and multiplexes the video outputs to provide a 14 bit output signal through a cameralink interface, in a surface smaller than a business card.

  8. SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission long-wavelength infrared detectors fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon; Ksendzov, A.; Dejewski, Suzan M.; Jones, Eric W.; Fathauer, Robert W.; Krabach, Timothy N.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    A new SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) detector has been fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The detection mechanism of the SiGe/Si HIP detector is infrared absorption in the degenerately doped p+-SiGe layer followed by internal photoemission of photoexcited holes over a heterojunction barrier. By adjusting the Ge concentration in the SiGe layer, and, consequently, the valence band offset between SiGe and Si, the cutoff wavelength of SiGe HIP detectors can be extended into the LWIR (8-17-micron) regime. Detectors were fabricated by growing p+-SiGe layers using MBE on patterned p-type Si substrates. The SiGe layers were boron-doped, with concentrations ranging from 10 to the 19th/cu cm to 4 x 10 to the 20th/cu cm. Infrared absorption of 5-25 percent in a 30-nm-thick p+-SiGe layer was measured in the 3-20-micron range using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Quantum efficiencies of 3-5 percent have been obtained from test devices in the 8-12-micron range.

  9. Ultrafast superconducting single-photon detectors for infrared wavelength quantum communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verevkin, Aleksandr A.; Pearlman, Aaron; Slysz, Wojtek; Zhang, Jin; Sobolewski, Roman; Chulkova, Galina; Okunev, Oleg; Kouminov, Pavel; Drakinskij, Vladimir; Smirnov, Konstantin; Kaurova, Natalia; Voronov, Boris; Gol'tsman, Gregory; Currie, Marc

    2003-08-01

    We have developed a new class of superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) for ultrafast counting of infrared (IR) photons for secure quantum communications. The devices are operated on the quantum detection mechanism, based on the photon-induced hotspot formation and subsequent appearance of a transient resistive barrier across an ultrathin and submicron-wide superconducting stripe. The detectors are fabricated from 3.5-nm-thick NbN films and they operate at 4.2 K inside a closed-cycle refrigerator or liquid helium cryostat. Various continuous and pulsed laser sources have been used in our experiments, enabling us to determine the detector experimental quantum efficiency (QE) in the photon-counting mode, response time, time jitter, and dark counts. Our 3.5-nm-thick SSPDs reached QE above 15% for visible light photons and 5% at 1.3 - 1.5 μm infrared range. The measured real-time counting rate was above 2 GHz and was limited by the read-out electronics (intrinsic response time is <30 ps). The measured jitter was <18 ps, and the dark counting rate was <0.01 per second. The measured noise equivalent power (NEP) is 2 x 10-18 W/Hz1/2 at λ = 1.3 μm. In near-infrared range, in terms of the counting rate, jitter, dark counts, and overall sensitivity, the NbN SSPDs significantly outperform their semiconductor counterparts. An ultrafast quantum cryptography communication technology based on SSPDs is proposed and discussed.

  10. Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy and Energy-Resolving Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhauer, Frank; Raab, Walfried

    2015-08-01

    Imaging spectroscopy has seen rapid progress over the past 25 years, leading to breakthroughs in many fields of astronomy that would not have been otherwise possible. This review overviews the visible/infrared imaging spectroscopy techniques as well as energy-resolving detectors. We introduce the working principle of scanning Fabry-Perot and Fourier transform spectrometers and explain the most common integral field concepts based on mirror slicers, lenslet arrays, and fibers. The main advantage of integral field spectrographs is the simultaneous measurement of spatial and spectral information. Although Fabry-Perot and Fourier transform spectrometers can provide a larger field of view, it is ultimately the higher sensitivity of integral field units that make them the technique of choice. This is arguably the case for image slicers, which make the most efficient use of the available detector pixels and have equal or higher transmission than lenslet arrays and fiber integral field units, respectively. We also address the more specific issues of large étendue operation, focal ratio degradation, anamorphic magnification, and diffraction-limited operation. This review also covers the emerging technology of energy-resolving detectors, which promise very simple and efficient instrument designs. These energy-resolving detectors are based on superconducting thin film technology and exploit either the very small superconducting energy to count the number of quasi-particles excited in the absorption of the photon or the extremely steep phase transition between the normal- and superconducting phase to measure a temperature increase. We have put special emphasis on an overview of the underlying physical phenomena as well as on the recent technological progress and astronomical path finder experiments.

  11. Ultrafast superconducting single-photon detectors for near-infrared-wavelength quantum communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verevkin, A.; Pearlman, A.; Słysz, W.; Zhang, J.; Currie, M.; Korneev, A.; Chulkova, G.; Okunev, O.; Kouminov, P.; Smirnov, K.; Voronov, B.; Gol'Tsman, G. N.; Sobolewski, Roman

    2004-09-01

    The paper reports progress on the design and development of niobium-nitride, superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) for ultrafast counting of near-infrared photons for secure quantum communications. The SSPDs operate in the quantum detection mode, based on photon-induced hotspot formation and subsequent appearance of a transient resistive barrier across an ultrathin and submicron-width superconducting stripe. The devices are fabricated from 3.5 nm thick NbN films and kept at cryogenic (liquid helium) temperatures inside a cryostat. The detector experimental quantum efficiency in the photon-counting mode reaches above 20% in the visible radiation range and up to 10% at the 1.3-1.55 µm infrared range. The dark counts are below 0.01 per second. The measured real-time counting rate is above 2 GHz and is limited by readout electronics (the intrinsic response time is below 30 ps). The SSPD jitter is below 18 ps, and the best-measured value of the noise-equivalent power (NEP) is 2 × 10-18 W/Hz1/2 at 1.3 µm. In terms of photon-counting efficiency and speed, these NbN SSPDs significantly outperform semiconductor avalanche photodiodes and photomultipliers.

  12. Application of fast infrared detectors to detonation science

    SciTech Connect

    Von Holle, W.G.; McWilliams, R.A.

    1982-07-28

    Infrared radiometers have been used to make time-resolved emission measurements of shocked explosives. Instruments of moderate time resolution were used to estimate temperatures in shocked but not detonated explosives. The heterogeneity of the shock-induced heating was discovered in pressed explosives by two-band techniques, and the time-resolved emittance or extent of hot spot coverage indicated a great dependence on shock pressures. Temperatures in moderately shocked organic liquids were also measured. Faster response radiometers with 5 ns rise times based on InSb and HgCdTe photovoltaic detectors were constructed and tested. Preliminary data on reactive shocks and detonations reveal a resolution of the heating in the shock wave and the following reaction.

  13. Advances in detector technologies for visible and infrared wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-Luc; Downing, Mark; Jorden, Paul; Kolb, Johann; Rothman, Johan; Fusco, Thierry; Balard, Philippe; Stadler, Eric; Guillaume, Christian; Boutolleau, David; Destefanis, Gérard; Lhermet, Nicolas; Pacaud, Olivier; Vuillermet, Michel; Kerlain, Alexandre; Hubin, Norbert; Reyes, Javier; Kasper, Markus; Ivert, Olaf; Suske, Wolfgang; Walker, Andrew; Skegg, Michael; Derelle, Sophie; Deschamps, Joel; Robert, Clélia; Vedrenne, Nicolas; Chazalet, Frédéric; Tanchon, Julien; Trollier, Thierry; Ravex, Alain; Zins, Gérard; Kern, Pierre; Moulin, Thibaut; Preis, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    detector with a readout noise of 3 e (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate. The LGSD is a scaling of the NGSD with 1760x1680 pixels and 3 e readout noise (goal 1e) at 700 Hz (goal 1000 Hz) frame rate. New technologies will be developed for that purpose: advanced CMOS pixel architecture, CMOS back thinned and back illuminated device for very high QE, full digital outputs with signal digital conversion on chip. In addition, the CMOS technology is extremely robust in a telescope environment. Both detectors will be used on the European ELT but also interest potentially all giant telescopes under development. Additional developments also started for wavefront sensing in the infrared based on a new technological breakthrough using ultra low noise Avalanche Photodiode (APD) arrays within the RAPID project. Developed by the SOFRADIR and CEA/LETI manufacturers, the latter will offer a 320x240 8 outputs 30 microns IR array, sensitive from 0.4 to 3.2 microns, with 2 e readout noise at 1500 Hz frame rate. The high QE response is almost flat over this wavelength range. Advanced packaging with miniature cryostat using liquid nitrogen free pulse tube cryocoolers is currently developed for this programme in order to allow use on this detector in any type of environment. First results of this project are detailed here. These programs are held with several partners, among them are the French astronomical laboratories (LAM, OHP, IPAG), the detector manufacturers (e2v technologies, Sofradir, CEA/LETI) and other partners (ESO, ONERA, IAC, GTC). Funding is: Opticon FP6 and FP7 from European Commission, ESO, CNRS and Université de Provence, Sofradir, ONERA, CEA/LETI and the French FUI (DGCIS).

  14. Design of catadioptric middle infrared continuous zoom lens for uncooled infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kai; Zhou, Si-zhong; Duan, Jing; Wang, Yan-bin; Zhang, Heng-jin

    2011-08-01

    For uncooled 320×240 infrared detector, a catadioptric middle infrared continuous zoom lens is presented. The optical system is divided into three segments. First of all, a reflective system is designed as the front system. Then the continuous zoom lens which matches with the reflective system as the back system is designed. The conversed back system is assembled at the first imaging of the optical system with the reflective system. A continuous variable magnification catadiootric telescope is obtained. Projection objective is designed based on the telescope lastly. To ensure the imaging quality of the system, the whole system is optimized with the CODE V software. The system can realize 200mm~800mm continuous zoom. The designed result shows the system has the advantages of simple structure, short zoom path and smooth zoom locus, high image quality and approached or reached to the diffraction limit.

  15. Chemical imaging of cotton fibers using an infrared microscope and a focal-plane array detector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this presentation, the chemical imaging of cotton fibers with an infrared microscope and a Focal-Plane Array (FPA) detector will be discussed. Infrared spectroscopy can provide us with information on the structure and quality of cotton fibers. In addition, FPA detectors allow for simultaneous spe...

  16. An infrared motion detector system for lossless real-time monitoring of animal preference tests.

    PubMed

    Pogány, A; Heszberger, J; Szurovecz, Zita; Vincze, E; Székely, T

    2014-12-01

    Automated behavioural observations are routinely used in many fields of biology, including ethology, behavioural ecology and physiology. When preferences for certain resources are investigated, the focus is often on simple response variables, such as duration and frequency of visits to choice chambers. Here we present an automated motion detector system that use passive infrared sensors to eliminate many drawbacks of currently existing methods. Signals from the sensors are processed by a custom-built interface, and after unnecessary data is filtered by a computer software, the total time and frequency of the subject's visits to each of the choice chambers are calculated. We validate the detector system by monitoring (using the system) and in the same time video recording mating preferences of zebra finches in a four-way choice apparatus. Manual scoring of the video recordings showed very high consistency with data from the detector system both for time and for frequency of visits. Furthermore, the validation revealed that if we used micro-switches or light barriers, the most commonly applied automatic detection techniques, this would have resulted in approximately 22% less information compared to our lossless system. The system provides a low-cost alternative for monitoring animal movements, and we discuss its further applicability. PMID:25475978

  17. Detection mechanisms in microstrip dipole antenna-coupled infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codreanu, Iulian; Gonzalez, Francisco J.; Boreman, Glenn D.

    2003-06-01

    We compare the detection mechanisms employed in microstrip dipole antenna-coupled infrared detectors. The electrical currents induced along the antenna arms are detected by a rectangular niobium (Nb) microsensor placed at the center of the antenna. The ohmic nature of the Au-Nb contact determines the detection mechanism. Devices with linear contacts between the Au antenna arms and the Nb microsensor exhibit bolometric response. A nonlinear Au-insulator-Nb junction rectifies the induced antenna currents. Devices with nonlinear contacts also exhibit a bolometric response. The devices with nonlinear contacts are 1/ f noise limited while the devices with linear contacts are Johnson noise limited. The rectification mechanism is 5.3 times faster than the thermal detection. The current-voltage ( I- V) characteristic of the devices exhibiting bolometric response is linear, while that of the rectifying devices is cubic. For devices with nonlinear contacts excellent agreement is obtained between the measured detector response and the ratio between the second and the first derivative of the I- V characteristic.

  18. Method of fabricating multiwavelength infrared focal plane array detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Inventor); Olsen, Gregory H. (Inventor); Kim, Dong-Su (Inventor); Lange, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A multiwavelength local plane array infrared detector is included on a common substrate having formed on its top face a plurality of In.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x As (x.ltoreq.0.53) absorption layers, between each pair of which a plurality of InAs.sub.y P.sub.1-y (y.ltoreq.1) buffer layers are formed having substantially increasing lattice parameters, respectively, relative to said substrate, for preventing lattice mismatch dislocations from propagating through successive ones of the absorption layers of decreasing bandgap relative to said substrate, whereby a plurality of detectors for detecting different wavelengths of light for a given pixel are provided by removing material above given areas of successive ones of the absorption layers, which areas are doped to form a pn junction with the surrounding unexposed portions of associated absorption layers, respectively, with metal contacts being formed on a portion of each of the exposed areas, and on the bottom of the substrate for facilitating electrical connections thereto.

  19. Characterization of an infrared detector for high frame rate thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruehmann, R. K.; Crump, D. A.; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    The use of a commercially available photodetector based infrared thermography system, operating in the 2-5 µm range, for high frame rate imaging of temperature evolutions in solid materials is investigated. Infrared photodetectors provide a very fast and precise means of obtaining temperature evolutions over a wide range of science and engineering applications. A typical indium antimonide detector will have a thermal resolution of around 4 mK for room temperature measurements, with a noise threshold around 15 to 20 mK. However the precision of the measurement is dependent on the integration time (akin to exposure time in conventional photography). For temperature evolutions that occur at a moderate rate the integration time can be relatively long, enabling a large signal to noise ratio. A matter of increasing importance in engineering is the behaviour of materials at high strain rates, such as those experienced in impact, shock and ballistic loading. The rapid strain evolution in the material is usually accompanied by a temperature change. The temperature change will affect the material constitutive properties and hence it is important to capture both the temperature and the strain evolutions to provide a proper constitutive law for the material behaviour. The present paper concentrates on the capture of the temperature evolutions, which occur at such rates that rule out the use of contact sensors such as thermocouples and electrical resistance thermometers, as their response times are too slow. Furthermore it is desirable to have an indication of the temperature distribution over a test specimen, hence the full-field approach of IRT is investigated. The paper explores the many hitherto unaddressed challenges of IRT when employed at high speed. Firstly the images must be captured at high speeds, which means reduced integration times and hence a reduction in the signal to noise ratio. Furthermore, to achieve the high image capture rates the detector array must be

  20. Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetectors: Photoresponse Enhancement Due to Potential Barriers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Potential barriers around quantum dots (QDs) play a key role in kinetics of photoelectrons. These barriers are always created, when electrons from dopants outside QDs fill the dots. Potential barriers suppress the capture processes of photoelectrons and increase the photoresponse. To directly investigate the effect of potential barriers on photoelectron kinetics, we fabricated several QD structures with different positions of dopants and various levels of doping. The potential barriers as a function of doping and dopant positions have been determined using nextnano3 software. We experimentally investigated the photoresponse to IR radiation as a function of the radiation frequency and voltage bias. We also measured the dark current in these QD structures. Our investigations show that the photoresponse increases ~30 times as the height of potential barriers changes from 30 to 130 meV.

  1. Spectral matching factors between low-light-level and infrared fusion optoelectronic detector and objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Fan, Yinghao; Chang, Benkang

    2009-09-01

    According to the response of photoelectric device to a light source, the formula of spectral matching factor of low-lightlevel and infrared fusion optoelectronic detector-object combination is deduced. The spectral matching factors of photo cathode and infrared detector for green vegetation are calculated and compared. Through the analysis of results it shows that spectral matching factor has influence on the performance of low light level and infrared fusion night vision system.

  2. On-orbit performance of the Compact Infrared Camera (CIRC) with uncooled infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Haruyoshi; Sakai, Michito; Kato, Eri.; Nakajima, Yasuhoiro; Nakau, Koji.; Kimura, Toshiyoshi

    2015-06-01

    We have developed the Compact Infrared Camera (CIRC) with an uncooled infrared array detector (microbolometer) for space application. Microbolometers have an advantage of not requiring cooling system such as a mechanical cooler, and is suitable for resource-limited sensor system. Another characteristic of the CIRC is its use of athermal optics. The athermal optics system compensates for defocus owing to temperature changes. We also employ a shutter-less system which is a method to correct non-uniformity of the detector without a mechanical shutter. The CIRC achieves a small size (approximately 200 mm), light mass (approximately 3 kg), and low electrical power consumption (<20 W) by employing athermal optics and a shutterless system. The CIRC is launched in May 2014 as a technology-demonstration payload of Advanced Land Observation Satellite-2 (ALOS-2). Since the initial functional verification phase (July 4-14, 2014), the CIRC was demonstrated a function according to its intended design. We also confirmed the temperature accuracy of the CIRC observation data is within +/-4K in the calibration validation phase after the initial functional verification phase. The CIRC also detected wildfires in various areas and observed the volcano activities in the operational phase. In this paper, we present the on-orbit performance of the CIRC onboard ALOS-2.

  3. New and Better H2RG Detectors for the JWST Near Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2014-01-01

    Remanufacturing of the near-infrared H2RG detectors for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is nearing completion. The first of the Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) flight candidates were delivered on-schedule this summer. We tested the detectors at Teledyne and characterized them in the Goddard Detector Characterization Laboratory (DCL), with excellent agreement between the two labs. Here we describe the DCL results which show the new detectors to be even better than the previous flight detectors. Highlights include improvements in the transimpedance gain that will reduce read noise and generally excellent QE over the full bandpass.

  4. Infra-red detector and method of making and using same

    DOEpatents

    Craig, Richard A.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.

    2007-02-20

    A low-cost infra-red detector is disclosed including a method of making and using the same. The detector employs a substrate, a filtering layer, a converting layer, and a diverter to be responsive to wavelengths up to about 1600 nm. The detector is useful for a variety of applications including spectroscopy, imaging, and defect detection.

  5. Design philosophy of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory infrared detector test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R.; Blessinger, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    To support the development of advanced infrared remote sensing instrumentation using line and area arrays, a test facility has been developed to characterize the detectors. The necessary performance characteristics of the facility were defined by considering current and projected requirements for detector testing. The completed facility provides the desired level of detector testing capability as well as providing ease of human interaction.

  6. Calibration of diffusion barrier charcoal detectors using a semi-empirical expression.

    PubMed

    Montero Cabrera, M E; Sujo, L Colmenero; Villalba, L; Peinado, J Sáenz; Jiménez, A Cano; Miranda, A López; Peraza, E F Herrera

    2003-10-01

    Several calibration settings of diffusion barrier charcoal canister (DBCC) detectors for measuring radon concentration in air were studied. A set of functions and graphs were developed for relations between radon concentration in air and adsorbed activity in DBCC, when calibrated in small chambers. Both the integration time for 10% of DBCC of a batch, and the radon adsorption coefficient for the activated charcoal used in these detectors, were determined. Thus, a semi-empirical expression for detector calibration was applied. PMID:14522237

  7. Two-color detector: Mercury-cadmium-telluride as a terahertz and infrared detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sizov, F.; Zabudsky, V.; Petryakov, V.; Golenkov, A.; Andreyeva, K.; Tsybrii, Z.; Dvoretskii, S.

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, issues associated with the development of infrared (IR) and terahertz (THz) radiation detectors based on HgCdTe are discussed. Two-color un-cooled and cooled to 78 K narrow-gap mercury-cadmium-telluride semiconductor thin layers with antennas were considered both as sub-THz (sub-THz) direct detection bolometers and 3–10 μm IR photoconductors. The noise equivalent power (NEP) for one of the detectors studied at ν ≈ 140 GHz reaches NEP{sub 300 K} ≈ 4.5 × 10{sup −10} W/Hz{sup 1/2} and NEP{sub 78 K} ≈ 5 × 10{sup −9} W/Hz{sup 1/2}. The same detector used as an IR photoconductor showed the responsivity at temperatures T = 78 K and 300 K with signal-to-noise ratio S/N ≈ 750 and 50, respectively, under illumination by using IR monochromator and globar as a thermal source.

  8. The improved pyroelectric detectors for far-infrared laser interferometer measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Gao

    1990-05-01

    In this paper, the application of the pyroelectric detectors for Far-Infrared laser diagnostics on TOKAMAK plasma is described. We discovered experimentally that the Fabry-Perot interference could affect the performance of the pyroelectric detectors (PED). The improved pyroelectric detector (IPD) was developed for FIR laser coheront measuring. Some designing considerations about the pyroelectric detectors used in high temperature plasma conditions are mentioned.

  9. Infrared Detectors Containing Stacked Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jin S.; Lin, True-Lon; Jones, Eric; Del Castillo, Hector; Gunapala, Sarath

    1996-01-01

    Long-wavelength-infrared detectors containing multiple layers of high-quality crystalline p(+) Si(1-x)Ge(x) alternating with layers of Si undergoing development. Each detector comprises stack of Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) photodetectors. In comparison with older HIP detectors containing single Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si heterojunctions, developmental detectors feature greater quantum efficiencies and stronger photoresponses.

  10. MEMS-based infrared detector for body thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Kum-Pyo; Kim, Yun-Ho; Min, Nam-Ki

    2005-12-01

    Infrared detectors have many application fields. One of those, MEMS based thermopile is attractive for many low-cost commercial and industrial applications, mainly because it does not require cooling for operation and the process technologies are relatively simple. The MEMS thermopile fabricated on a silicon nitride microbridge structure was proposed. Using microbridge rather conventional membrane makes it possible to fabricate much smaller micro thermopile and to reduce heat loss because of small contact area at silicon rim. The bridge material is only composed of Si3N4. The thermocouple was used a poly-Si and an aluminum. The characteristic of electromotive force (EMF) generation was evaluated for various patterns at hot junction. Aluminum thermocouple shape on bridge structure was designed two patterns. One was a square shape and the other shape was a hollow square. The output voltage of hollow square-type electrode was increased in compared with square-type electrode from 3.03uV/°C to 4.609uV/°C at body temperature (37°C). With the same membrane dimensions and the same overall thickness of the chip a thermopile on microbridge is almost 53% smaller a conventional thermopile chip.

  11. Defects and noise in Type-II superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Martin; Wörl, Andreas; Daumer, Volker; Rehm, Robert; Kirste, Lutz; Rutz, Frank; Schmitz, Johannes

    2013-06-01

    To examine defects in InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices we investigated GaSb substrates and epitaxial InAs/GaSb layers by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography to characterize the distribution of threading dislocations. Those measurements are compared with wet chemical etch pit density measurements on GaSb substrates and InAs/GaSb type-II superlattices epitaxial layer structures. The technique uses a wet chemical etch process to decorate threading dislocations and an automated optical analyzing system for mapping the defect distribution. Dark current and noise measurements on processed InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice single element photo diodes reveal a generation-recombination limited dark current behavior without contributions by surface leakage currents for midwavelength infrared detectors. In the white noise part of the noise spectrum, the extracted diode noise closely matches the theoretically expected shot noise behavior. For diodes with an increased dark current in comparison to the dark current of generation-recombination limited material, the standard shot-noise model fails to describe the noise experimentally observed in the white part of the spectrum. Instead, we find that McIntyre's noise model for avalanche multiplication processes fits the data quite well. We suggest that within high electric field domains localized around crystallographic defects, electrons initiate avalanche multiplication processes leading to increased dark current and excess noise.

  12. InAs/GaSb superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, Robert; Lemke, Florian; Masur, Michael; Schmitz, Johannes; Stadelmann, Tim; Wauro, Matthias; Wörl, Andreas; Walther, Martin

    2015-05-01

    We report on the development of high-performance InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL) infrared (IR) detectors for the mid-wavelength (MWIR, 3-5 μm) and long-wavelength (LWIR, 8-12 μm) transmission window of the atmosphere. With a refined process technology, we are now able to fabricate dual-color focal plane arrays for the MWIR that excel at a very low number of noisy pixels. In an effort to correlate dark current and noise data of a larger number of devices, we found that for the description of the behavior in the white noise part of the spectrum, both, in InAs/GaSb SL photodiodes for the MWIR and the LWIR McIntyre's well-known model for excess noise of avalanche photodiodes is, in general, much more suited than the commonly used shot noise model. The analysis of dark current contributions is a convenient method to identify limiting mechanisms and extract material parameters such as the minority carrier lifetime. We show that even in large area devices the contribution of the sidewall leakage path should not be ignored for this kind of investigation. Finally, we present our Al-free heterojunction device concept for reduced dark current.

  13. Low-cost uncooled infrared detector arrays in standard CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eminoglu, Selim; Tanrikulu, M. Y.; Akin, Tayfun

    2003-09-01

    This paper reports the development of a low-cost 128 x 128 uncooled infrared focal plane array (FPA) based on suspended and thermally isolated CMOS p+-active/n-well diodes. The FPA is fabricated using a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process followed by simple post-CMOS bulk micromachining that does not require any critical lithography or complicated deposition steps; and therefore, the cost of the uncooled FPA is almost equal to the cost of the CMOS chip. The post-CMOS fabrication steps include an RIE etching to reach the bulk silicon and an anisotropic silicon etching to obtain thermally isolated pixels. During the RIE etching, CMOS metal layers are used as masking layers, and therefore, narrow openings such as 2 μm can be defined between the support arms. This approach allows achieving small pixel size of 40 μm x 40 μm with a fill factor of 44%. The FPA is scanned at 30 fps by monolithically integrated multi-channel parallel readout circuitry which is composed of low-noise differential transconductance amplifiers, switched capacitor (SC) integrators, sample-and-hold circuits, and various other circuit blocks for reducing the effects of variations in detector voltage and operating temperature. The fabricated detector has a temperature coefficient of -2 mV/K, a thermal conductance value of 1.8 x 10-7 W/K, and a thermal time constant value of 36 msec, providing a measured DC responsivity (R) of 4970 V/W under continuous bias. Measured detector noise is 0.69 μV in 8 kHz bandwidth at 30 fps scanning rate, resulting a measured detectivity (D*) of 9.7 x 108 cm√HzW. Contribution of the 1/f noise component is found to be negligible due to the single crystal nature of the silicon n-well and its low value at low bias levels. The noise of the readout circuit is measured as 0.76 μV, resulting in an expected NETD value of 1 K when scanned at 30 fps using f=1 optics. This NETD value can be decreased below 350 mK by decreasing the electrical bandwidth with the help of increased

  14. New and Better Near-Infrared Detectors for JWST Near Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Mott, D. Brent; Wen, Yiting; Linder, Don; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Hill, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    ESA and NASA recently selected two 5 m cutoff Teledyne H2RG sensor chip assemblies (SCA) for flight on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec). These HgCdTe SCAs incorporate Teledynes improved barrier layer design that eliminates the degradation that affected earlier JWST H2RGs(Rauscher et al. 2012a). The better indium barrier, together with other design changes, has improved the performance and reliability of JWSTs SCAs. In this article, we describe the measured performance characteristics that most directly affect scientific observations including read noise, total noise, dark current, quantum efficiency (QE), and image persistence. As part of measuring QE, we measured the quantum yield as a function of photon energy,, and found that it exceeds unity for photon energies E (2.65.2) Eg, where Eg is the HgCdTe bandgap energy. This corresponds to. 2 m for NIRSpecs 5 m cutoff HgCdTe. Our measurements agree well with a previous measurement by McCullough et al. (2008) for. 1.3. For 1.3, we find a slower increase in with photon energy than McCullough et al. did. However, and as McCullough et al. note, their two state model of the yield process is not valid for large 1.

  15. Generation and performance of automated jarosite mineral detectors for visible/near-infrared spectrometers at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Martha S.; Bornstein, Benjamin; Merrill, Matthew D.; Castaño, Rebecca; Greenwood, James P.

    2008-05-01

    We have developed two automated detectors that can recognize the sulfate mineral jarosite in unknown visible to near-infrared spectra (350-2500 nm). The two detectors are optimized for use within the terrestrial and martian atmospheres. The detectors are built from Support Vector Machines trained using a generative model to create linear mixtures of library mineral spectra. Both detectors performed with an average ˜90% accuracy on laboratory spectra of single minerals and the laboratory and field spectra of rocks collected in a hydrothermal environment. This type of algorithm will contribute to the efficiency of onboard data analysis of landed and orbital visible/near-infrared spectrometers at Mars.

  16. Flexible infrared detectors based on p-n junctions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenlong; Gao, Min; Yan, Zhuocheng; Pan, Taisong; Liao, Feiyi; Lin, Yuan

    2016-05-14

    Different types of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, are used to fabricate infrared (IR) detectors on flexible substrates based on CNT p-n junctions. It is found that this kind of detector is sensitive to infrared signals with a power density as low as 90 μW mm(-2) even at room temperature. Besides, unlike other devices, the detector with this unique structure can be bent for 100 cycles without any damage and its functionality does not degenerate once it recovers to the initial state. The results give a good reference for developing efficient, low-cost, and flexible IR detectors. PMID:27101973

  17. Absolute linearity measurements on a PV HgCdTe detector in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theocharous, Evangelos

    2012-04-01

    The linearity-of-response characteristics of a photovoltaic (PV) HgCdTe detector were investigated at a number of wavelengths in the infrared, using the NPL linearity of detector response characterization facility. The measurements were performed with the test detector operating under conditions identical to those in which the detectors will be used in typical infrared radiometric applications. The deviation from linearity in the generated photocurrent was shown to be strongly dependent on the area of the detector being illuminated. Plots of the linearity factor versus generated photocurrent for different illuminated wavelengths were shown to overlap. The linearity factor was shown to be a function of the photon irradiance of the illuminating beam. This behaviour was similar to that exhibited by photoconductive (PC) HgCdTe detectors, indicating that Auger recombination was the dominant source of the deviation from linearity observed in the test detector.

  18. Progress, challenges, and opportunities for HgCdTe infrared materials and detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wen; Antoszewski, Jarek; Faraone, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a review on the current status, challenges, and potential future development opportunities for HgCdTe infrared materials and detector technology. A brief history of HgCdTe infrared technology is firstly summarized and discussed, leading to the conclusion that HgCdTe-based infrared detectors will continue to be a core infrared technology with expanded capabilities in the future due to a unique combination of its favourable properties. Recent progress and the current status of HgCdTe infrared technology are reviewed, including material growth, device architecture, device processing, surface passivation, and focal plane array applications. The further development of infrared applications requires that future infrared detectors have the features of lower cost, smaller pixel size, larger array format size, higher operating temperature, and multi-band detection, which presents a number of serious challenges to current HgCdTe-based infrared technology. The primary challenges include well controlled p-type doping, lower cost, larger array format size, higher operating temperature, multi-band detection, and advanced plasma dry etching. Various new concepts and technologies are proposed and discussed that have the potential to overcome the existing primary challenges that are inhibiting the development of next generation HgCdTe infrared detector technology.

  19. Quantum structure based infrared detector research and development within Acreo’s centre of excellence IMAGIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, J. Y.; Höglund, L.; Noharet, B.; Wang, Q.; Ericsson, P.; Wissmar, S.; Asplund, C.; Malm, H.; Martijn, H.; Hammar, M.; Gustafsson, O.; Hellström, S.; Radamson, H.; Holtz, P. O.

    2010-07-01

    Acreo has a long tradition of working with quantum structure based infrared (IR) detectors and arrays. This includes QWIP (quantum well infrared photodetector), QDIP (quantum dot infrared photodetector), and InAs/GaInSb based photon detectors of different structure and composition. It also covers R&D on uncooled microbolometers. The integrated thermistor material of such detectors is advantageously based on quantum structures that are optimised for high temperature coefficient and low noise. Especially the SiGe material system is preferred due to the compatibility with silicon technology. The R&D work on IR detectors is a prominent part of Acreo's centre of excellence "IMAGIC" on imaging detectors and systems for non-visible wavelengths. IMAGIC is a collaboration between Acreo, several industry partners and universities like the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) and Linköping University.

  20. 77 FR 16925 - Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 882 Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the Near Infrared (NIR)...

  1. Flexible infrared detectors based on p-n junctions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhenlong; Gao, Min; Yan, Zhuocheng; Pan, Taisong; Liao, Feiyi; Lin, Yuan

    2016-05-01

    Different types of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, are used to fabricate infrared (IR) detectors on flexible substrates based on CNT p-n junctions. It is found that this kind of detector is sensitive to infrared signals with a power density as low as 90 μW mm-2 even at room temperature. Besides, unlike other devices, the detector with this unique structure can be bent for 100 cycles without any damage and its functionality does not degenerate once it recovers to the initial state. The results give a good reference for developing efficient, low-cost, and flexible IR detectors.Different types of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, are used to fabricate infrared (IR) detectors on flexible substrates based on CNT p-n junctions. It is found that this kind of detector is sensitive to infrared signals with a power density as low as 90 μW mm-2 even at room temperature. Besides, unlike other devices, the detector with this unique structure can be bent for 100 cycles without any damage and its functionality does not degenerate once it recovers to the initial state. The results give a good reference for developing efficient, low-cost, and flexible IR detectors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08791k

  2. Laboratory characterization of direct readout Si:Sb and Si:Ga infrared detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckelvey, Mark E.; Moss, Nicolas N.; Mcmurray, R. E., Jr.; Estrada, John A.; Goebel, John H.; Mccreight, Craig R.; Savage, Maureen L.; Junga, Frank; Whittemore, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    Highlights of recent results obtained at Ames Research Center in performance evaluations of infrared detector arrays are presented. Antimony- and gallium-doped silicon direct readout 58x62 element hybrid devices from Ames' ongoing detector technology development program are described. The observed characteristics meet most of the performance goals specified by the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) instrument teams and compare favorably with the best performance reported for discrete non-integrating extrinsic silicon detectors. Initial results of radiation environment testing are reported, and non-ideal behavior demonstrated by these test devices is discussed.

  3. Field funneling and range straggling in partially depleted silicon surface-barrier detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Malone, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of field funneling and range straggling have been quantitatively observed in the measurement of charge collected from alpha-particle tracks in silicon surface-barrier charged-particle detectors. The method described may be used for the straight-forward measurement of charge collection from heavy ions in these and other semiconductor devices.

  4. Overview of DRS uncooled VOx infrared detector development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Han, C. J.; Skidmore, George

    2011-06-01

    Significant progress has been made over the past decade on uncooled focal plane array technologies and production capabilities. The detector pixel dimensions have continually decreased with an increase in pixel performance making large format, high-density array products affordable. In turn, this has resulted in the proliferation of uncooled IR detectors in commercial and military markets. Presently, uncooled detectors are widely used in firefighting, surveillance, industrial process monitoring, machine vision, and medical applications. Within the military arena, uncooled detectors are ubiquitous in Army soldier systems such as weapon sights, driver's viewers, and helmet-mounted sights. Uncooled detectors are also employed in airborne and ground surveillance sensors including unmanned aerial vehicles and robot vehicles.

  5. PtSi Schottky-barrier focal plane arrays for multispectral imaging in ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaur, Bor-Yeu; Chen, C. K.; Mattia, John-Paul

    1990-04-01

    PtSi Schottky-barrier detectors, which are conventionally used in the back-illumination mode for thermal imaging in the 3-5 micron infrared (IR) spectral band, are shown to exhibit excellent photoresponse in the near-ultraviolet and visible regions when operated in the front-illumination mode. For devices without antireflection coatings, external quantum efficiency in excess of 60 percent has been obtained for wavelengths between 400 and 800 nm. The efficiency decreases below 400 nm but is still about 35 percent at 290 nm. High-quality imaging has been demonstrated in both the visible and 3-5 micron spectral bands for front-illuminated 160- x 244-element PtSi focal plane arrays integrated with monolithic CCD readout circuitry.

  6. Absolute Linearity Measurements on HgCdTe Detectors in the Infrared Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theocharous, Evangelos; Ishii, Juntaro; Fox, Nigel P.

    2004-07-01

    The nonlinearity characteristics of photoconductive and photovoltaic HgCdTe detectors were experimentally investigated in the infrared wavelength region by use of the National Physical Laboratory detector linearity measurement facility. The nonlinearity of photoconductive HgCdTe detectors was shown to be a function of irradiance rather than the total radiant power incident on the detector. Photoconductive HgCdTe detectors supplied by different vendors were shown to have similar linearity characteristics for wavelengths around 10 µm. However, the nonlinearity of response of a photovoltaic HgCdTe detector was shown to be significantly lower than the corresponding value for photoconductive HgCdTe detectors at the same wavelength.

  7. Charge distribution and response time for a modulation-doped extrinsic infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadek, Victor

    1987-01-01

    The electric charge distribution and response time of a modulation-doped extrinsic infrared detector are determined. First, it is demonstrated theoretically that the photoconductive layer is effectively depleted of ionized majority-impurity charges so that scattering is small and mobility is high for photogenerated carriers. Then, using parameters appropriate to an actual detector, the predicted response time is 10 to the -8th to about 10 to the -9th s, which is much faster than comparable conventional detectors. Thus, the modulation-doped detector design would be valuable for heterodyne applications.

  8. An automatic measuring system for the lifetime testing of infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lan; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhu, Xianliang; Gong, Haimei

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, an automatic measuring system based on LABVIEW and PLC is introduced; it uses the mutual controls of Single-Chip computer (MCU) and LABVIEW to accomplish the electrical parameter measurements of infrared detectors. This system can realize the multiple parameter measurements of no less than 160 IR detectors, it can realize the collection and storage of results by the LABVIEW; and it can avoid the damage of the IR detector during the measurement. After thousands times of test, the results show that the system runs stably and it can meet the accurate parameter measurement of detector.

  9. Measurement of thermal radiation using regular glass optics and short-wave infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, H W; Eppeldauer, G P

    2008-01-21

    The measurement of thermal radiation from ambient-temperature objects using short-wave infrared detectors and regular glass optics is described. The detectors are chosen to operate in the 2.0 microm to 2.5 microm atmospheric window. Selection of detectors with high shunt resistance along with the 4-stage thermo-electric cooling of the detectors to -85 degrees C results in detectivity, D*, of 4 x 10(13) cm Hz(1/2)/W which is near the background limited performance at 295 K. Furthermore, the use of regular-glass commercial optics to collect the thermal radiation results in diffraction-limited imaging. The use of a radiation thermometer constructed with these elements for the measurement of a blackbody from 20 degrees C to 50 degrees C results in noise-equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of < 3 mK at 50 degrees C. The operation at shorter wavelengths than traditional thermal sensors also leads to lower sensitivity to the emissivity of the object in determining the temperature of the object. These elements are used to construct a calibrator for an infrared collimator, and such a system demonstrates noise-equivalent irradiances of < 5 fW/cm(2). These results indicate that radiometers using short-wave infrared sensors could be constructed utilizing commercial glass optics with possible better performance and lower NETD than existing radiometers using cryogenically-cooled mid-infrared or thermal infrared detectors. PMID:18542168

  10. Heated Surface Temperatures Measured by Infrared Detector in a Cascade Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Investigators have used infrared devices to accurately measure heated surface temperatures. Several of these applications have been for turbine heat transfer studies involving film cooling and surface roughness, typically, these measurements use an infrared camera positioned externally to the test section. In cascade studies, where several blades are used to ensure periodic flow, adjacent blades block the externally positioned camera's views of the test blade. To obtain a more complete mapping of the surface temperatures, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center fabricated a probe with an infrared detector to sense the blade temperatures. The probe size was kept small to minimize the flow disturbance. By traversing and rotating the probe, using the same approach as for total pressure surveys, one can find the blade surface temperatures. Probe mounted infrared detectors are appropriate for measuring surface temperatures where an externally positioned infrared camera is unable to completely view the test object. This probe consists of a 8-mm gallium arsenide (GaAs) lens mounted in front of a mercury-cadmium-zinc-tellurium (HgCdZnTe) detector. This type of photovoltaic detector was chosen because of its high sensitivity to temperature when the detector is uncooled. The particular application is for relatively low surface temperatures, typically ambient to 100 C. This requires a detector sensitive at long wavelengths. The detector is a commercial product enclosed in a 9-mm-diameter package. The GaAs lens material was chosen because of its glass-like hardness and its good long-wavelength transmission characteristics. When assembled, the 6.4-mm probe stem is held in the traversing actuator. Since the entire probe is above the measurement plane, the flow field disturbance in the measurement plane is minimized. This particular probe body is somewhat wider than necessary, because it was designed to have replaceable detectors and lenses. The signal for the detector is

  11. Infrared detector circuits using monolithic CMOS Op-Amps with InSb detectors in a transimpedance configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David S.

    1992-09-01

    As the emphasis in infrared detector research shifts toward larger and more complicated arrays the amount of time spent on simple single-element and small arrays is decreasing. One set of applications where discrete detectors and arrays are still finding use is in satellites. In addition, scanned imaging arrays based on single element detectors and small arrays are still being manufactured. Discussion here is for small arrays and single element detectors. One of the aspects of detector operation that always needs to be addressed is amplification. Often detectors are attached to amplifiers through rather long leads. Such systems are subject to unwanted microphonic response as a result of the motion of the leads relative to each other or to the ground plane. This sort of microphonic response can many times be eliminated through careful wiring and routing techniques, however, in some severe environments it is not possible to eliminate all microphonic response. A commonly used solution to this problem is to hybridize the detector with a JFET front end to reduce the effective output resistance of the detector circuit relative to the amplifier input. The TIA in such configurations is completed off the focal plane at room temperature. This means that half the circuit is operating at cryogenic temperatures while the other part is operating at room temperature some distance away. Ideally it would be more convenient, if not better, to include the amplifier on the focal plane with the detector. (Of course this hybridization is necessary for large two-dimensional arrays.) Data have been acquired to show some of the limitations and opportunities for such an approach. Typical bipolar operational amplifiers (OP-27, OP-37, LM108) will not operate well at cryogenic temperatures. CMOS operational amplifiers generally will operate at cryogenic temperatures but suffer from high front-end voltage noise. The TLC2201 from Texas Instruments is a CMOS op-amp manufactured for low voltage

  12. Calibration of diffusion barrier charcoal detectors and application to radon sampling in dwellings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, M. E. M.; Sujo, L. C.; Villalba, L.; Peinado, J. S.; Jimenez, A. C.; Baca, A. M.; Gandara, S. D.; Villalobos, M. R.; Miranda, A. L.; Peraza, E. F. H.

    2003-10-01

    Some calibration conditions of diffusion barrier charcoal canister (DBCC) detectors for measuring radon concentration in air were studied. A series of functional expressions and graphs were developed to describe relationship between radon concentration in air and the activity adsorbed in DBCC, when placed in small chambers. A semi-empirical expression for the DBCC calibration was obtained, based on the detector integration time and the adsorption coefficient of radon on activated charcoal. Both, the integration time for 10% of DBCC of the same batch, and the adsorption coefficient of radon for the activated charcoal used in these detectors, were experimentally determined. Using these values as the calibration parameters, a semi-empirical calibration function was used for the interpretation of the radon activities in the detectors used for sampling more than 200 dwellings in the major cities of the state of Chihuahua, Mexico.

  13. Extension of long wavelength response by modulation doping in extrinsic germanium infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadek, V.; Farhoomand, J.; Beichman, C. A.; Watson, D. M.; Jack, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    A new concept for infrared detectors based on multilayer epitaxy and modulation doping has been investigated. This permits a high doping concentration and lower excitation energy in the photodetecting layer as is necessary for longer wavelength response, without incurring the detrimental effects of increased dark current and noise as would be the case with conventional detector designs. Germanium photodetectors using conventional materials and designs have a long wavelength cutoff in the infrared at 138 microns, which can only be extended through the inconvenient application of mechanical stress or magnetic fields. As a result of this approach which was arrived at from theoretical considerations and subsequently demonstrated experimentally, the long wavelength cutoff for germanium extrinsic detectors was extended beyond 200 microns, as determined by direct infrared optical measurements.

  14. De-polarization of a CdZnTe radiation detector by pulsed infrared light

    SciTech Connect

    Dědič, V. Franc, J.; Rejhon, M.; Grill, R.; Zázvorka, J.; Sellin, P. J.

    2015-07-20

    This work is focused on a detailed study of pulsed mode infrared light induced depolarization of CdZnTe detectors operating at high photon fluxes. This depolarizing effect is a result of the decrease of positive space charge that is caused by the trapping of photogenerated holes at a deep level. The reduction in positive space charge is due to the optical transition of electrons from a valence band to the deep level due to additional infrared illumination. In this paper, we present the results of pulse mode infrared depolarization, by which it is possible to keep the detector in the depolarized state during its operation. The demonstrated mechanism represents a promising way to increase the charge collection efficiency of CdZnTe X-ray detectors operating at high photon fluxes.

  15. Stress induced long wavelength photoconductivity in doped silicon infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The long wavelength cutoff of a Si:P detector was extended to 34 microns by the application of a uniaxial stress. An unstressed Si:P photoconductive detector responds to photons of up to 28 microns wavelength. By applying a uniaxial stress to a detector along the /100/ crystal axis, the response was extended to approximately 34 microns. The /100/ axis was chosen as the stress direction because theoretical calculations predicted that such a stress extends the wavelength response more than one along the /110/ axis. These theoretical calculations were based upon fits to experimental data obtained at stresses of up to approximately kbar, and indicated that the extension in wavelength response continues to increase at much larger stresses.

  16. DRS uncooled VOx infrared detector development and production status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Han, C. J.; Skidmore, George D.; Hess, Cory

    2010-04-01

    Significant progress has been made over the past decade on uncooled focal plane array (UFPA) technology development and production capacity at DRS as well as other domestic and overseas suppliers. This resulted in the proliferation of uncooled IR detectors in commercial and military markets. The uncooled detectors are widely used in firefighting, surveillance, industrial process monitoring, machine vision, and medical applications. In the military arena, uncooled detectors are fielded among diverse systems such as weapon sights, driver enhancement viewers, helmet-mounted sights, airborne and ground surveillance sensors including UAVs and robot vehicles. Pixel dimensions have continually decreased with an increase in pixel performance. This paper presents an overview of the DRS 25- and 17-micron pixel pitch uncooled VOx detector technology development and production status. The DRS uncooled FPA products include 320x240 and 640x480 arrays while the larger 1024x768 17-micron pitch array is at engineering prototype quantities. Current production of the 25-micron pitch 320x240 and 640x480 arrays exceeds 5,000 units per month, supporting U.S. military systems such as Army thermal weapon sights (TWS) and driver vision enhancers (DVE). Next generation systems are moving towards the 17-micron pixel pitch detectors. Advancement in small pixel technology has enabled the 17-micron pitch detectors performance to surpass their 25-micron pitch counterparts. To meet future production demand of the 17-micron pitch UFPAs, DRS has made significant investment in production infrastructure to upgrade its tools. These investments include a new DUV stepper, coater, and plasma etcher plus improvements in its manufacturing techniques to enhance yield. These advanced tools reduce the minimum line width in production below 0.35μm and are now being used to manufacture the 17-micron 320x240 and 640x480 arrays. To further technology development, DRS continues to engage in R&D activities

  17. Detectors for the James Webb Space Telescope near-infrared spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Figer, Donald F.; Regan, Michael W.; Boeker, Torsten; Garnett, James; Hill, Robert J.; Bagnasco, Giorgio; Balleza, Jesus; Barney, Richard; Bergeron, Louis E.; Brambora, Clifford; Connelly, Joe; Derro, Rebecca; DiPirro, Michael J.; Doria-Warner, Christina; Ericsson, Aprille; Glazer, Stuart D.; Greene, Charles; Hall, Donald N.; Jacobson, Shane; Jakobsen, Peter; Johnson, Eric; Johnson, Scott D.; Krebs, Carolyn; Krebs, Danny J.; Lambros, Scott D.; Likins, Blake; Manthripragada, Sridhar; Martineau, Robert J.; Morse, Ernie C.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Mott, D. Brent; Muench, Theo; Park, Hongwoo; Parker, Susan; Polidan, Elizabeth J.; Rashford, Robert; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin; Sharma, Rajeev; Strada, Paolo; Waczynski, Augustyn; Wen, Yiting; Wong, Selmer; Yagelowich, John; Zuray, Monica

    2004-10-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is the James Webb Space Telescope"s primary near-infrared spectrograph. NASA is providing the NIRSpec detector subsystem, which consists of the focal plane array, focal plane electronics, cable harnesses, and software. The focal plane array comprises two closely-butted λco ~ 5 μm Rockwell HAWAII-2RG sensor chip assemblies. After briefly describing the NIRSpec instrument, we summarize some of the driving requirements for the detector subsystem, discuss the baseline architecture (and alternatives), and presents some recent detector test results including a description of a newly identified noise component that we have found in some archival JWST test data. We dub this new noise component, which appears to be similar to classical two-state popcorn noise in many aspects, "popcorn mesa noise." We close with the current status of the detector subsystem development effort.

  18. Calibration method for spectral responsivity of infrared detector based on blackbody at multiple temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. F.; Shao, Z. F.; Wu, Y. Q.

    2015-08-01

    The spectral responsivity is one of the most important technical indicators of infrared detector which has an important significance for radiation thermometry and emissivity measurement. Using a blackbody radiation at multiple temperatures, the calibration for spectral responsivity of the infrared detector is proposed. With the Planck's law, the spectral radiance of blackbody at the different temperature is calculated. The detector captures the radiation and generates output values each of those is the function of spectral responsivity, spectral radiance and environmental radiation. Calibration equation is established by means of the calculated radiance and output values. By solving the equations based on principle of least squares, the calibration of spectral responsivity is implemented. From the comparison experiment of measuring the radiance of blackbody at 850K, radiance value measured by the MCT detector has a good consistency with the theoretical data.

  19. Detectors for the James Webb Space Telescope Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Figer, Donald F.; Regan, Michael W.; Boeker, Torsten; Garnett, James; Hill, Robert J.; Bagnasco, Georgio; Balleza, Jesus; Barney, Richard; Bergeron, Louis E.

    2004-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is the James Webb Space Telescope's primary near-infrared spectrograph. NASA is providing the NIRSpec detector subsystem, which consists of the focal plane array, focal plane electronics, cable harnesses, and software. The focal plane array comprises two closely-butted lambda (sub co) approximately 5 micrometer Rockwell HAWAII- 2RG sensor chip assemblies. After briefly describing the NIRSpec instrument, we summarize some of the driving requirements for the detector subsystem, discuss the baseline architecture (and alternatives), and presents some recent detector test results including a description of a newly identified noise component that we have found in some archival JWST test data. We dub this new noise component, which appears to be similar to classical two-state popcorn noise in many aspects, "popcorn mesa noise." We close with the current status of the detector subsystem development effort.

  20. The suppression of charged-particle-induced noise in infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.; Briotta, D. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A d.c.-coupled transimpedance amplifier/pulse suppression circuit designed to remove charged-particle-induced noise from infrared detectors is described. Noise spikes produced by single particle events are large and have short rise times, and can degrade the performance of an infrared detector in moderate radiation environments. The use of the suppression circuit improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 1.6:1, which corresponds to a reduction in required observing time by a factor of about 2.6.

  1. Magnetotransport in very long wave infrared quantum cascade detectors: Analyzing the current with and without illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Jasnot, François-Régis; Maëro, Simon; Vaulchier, Louis-Anne de; Guldner, Yves; Carosella, Francesca; Ferreira, Robson; Delga, Alexandre; Doyennette, Laetitia; Berger, Vincent; Carras, Mathieu

    2013-12-04

    Current measurements of current have been performed on a very long wave infrared quantum cascade detector under magnetic field under both dark and light conditions. The analysis of dark current as a function of temperature highlights three regimes of transport. Under illumination, the model developed is in agreement with the oscillatory component of the experimental magnetophotocurrent. It allows to identify the key points controlling the electronic transport: crucial role of extraction, location of ionized impurities and scattering mechanisms involved in the structure. This work is valuable for the future conception of high-performance quantum cascade detectors in the infrared range.

  2. Development of One-Dimensional Pyroelectric Infrared Array Detector with High Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Tsuruta, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Koji; Morinaka, Katsuya; Yoshiike, Nobuyuki

    1999-10-01

    A one-dimensional pyroelectric array detector for use as a multielement infrared sensor has been developed by using PbTiO3 bulk ceramics fabricated by a sheet-forming method. This one-dimensional infrared sensor consists of 16 elements. A pyroelectric detector responsivity of 3×104 V/W can be obtained at a 10 Hz chopping frequency, and a specific detectivity D* of 1.2×108 cm·Hz1/2/W has been achieved. The time constant of this pyroelectric detector is about 5.2 ms, so the detector has a shorter response time compared with a commercially available conventional pyroelectric detector. The crosstalk, which influences the output for the adjacent elements, is less than 10%. The output voltage for the detector gradually decreased as the atmospheric temperature increased. Pyroelectric detector responsivity increases with decreasing electrode size. By using this high-performance pyroelectric array detector, the thermal sources at lower temperatures than that of the environment can be detected with high sensitivity, as much as in the case of the thermal sources at higher temperatures.

  3. Design and analysis of the flexible support structure of a space infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dewei; Zhang, Guangyu; Guo, Ning

    2009-07-01

    A flexible support structure of space infrared detector is presented so as to reduce the impacts of mechanical vibration, electromagnetic interference and temperature shift from outside environment. According to technical requirements of the infrared detector, the flexible support structure is designed, which mainly consists of two components: one component is planted in the outside of the infrared detector to shield electromagnetic wave called shield cover; the other component is a soft rubber ring, which can connect the shield cover to bracket forming a flexible support. In order to demonstrate its effectiveness on reducing vibration, parameter identification and dynamic analysis of this structure are carried out to calculate the acceleration of detector under sine vibration with different frequency. Then a new type composite material is used to produce the shield cover, which has some advantages such as lighter weight, higher stiffness and function of electromagnetic shielding. Besides, the soft rubber ring is made of a special rubber called XM-31. Not only can this rubber isolate the vibration, but insulate the heat, which will further improve the performance of detector. The flexible support structure has an important application value in the field of infrared detection and imaging.

  4. Assessment study of infrared detector arrays for low-background astronomical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ando, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art of infrared detector arrays employing charge coupled devices (CCD) or charge injection devices (CID) readout are assessed. The applicability, limitations and potentials of such arrays under the low-background astronomical observing conditions of interest for SIRFT (Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility) are determined. The following are reviewed: (1) monolithic extrinsic arrays; (2) monolithic intrinsic arrays; (3) charge injection devices; and (4) hybrid arrays.

  5. Miniature Uncooled Infrared Sensitive Detectors for in Vivo Biomedical Imaging Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P. G.; Demos, S. G.; Rajic, S.

    1998-06-01

    Broadband infrared (OR) radiation detectors have been developed using miniature, inexpensive, mass produced microcantilevers capable of detecting temperature differences as small as lea(-6) K. Microcantilevers made out of semiconductor materials can be used either as uncurled photon or thermal detectors. Mounted on a probe mm in diameter a number of microcantilevers can be accommodated in the working channel of existing endoscopes for in vivo proximity focus measurements inside the human body.

  6. Beta ray spectroscopy based on a plastic scintillation detector/silicon surface barrier detector coincidence telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Y. S.; Hirning, C. R.; Yuen, P.; Aikens, M.

    1994-01-01

    Beta radiation is now recognized as a significant radiation safety problem and several international conferences have recently been devoted to the problems of mixed field beta/photon dosimetry. Conventional dosimetry applies algorithms to thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) multi-element badges which attempt to extract dose information based on the comparison of TL signals from ``thick/thin'' and/or ``bare/filtered'' elements. These may be grossly innacurate due to inadequate or non-existant knowledge of the energy spectrum of both the beta radiation and the accompanying photon field, as well as other factors. In this paper, we discuss the operation of a beta-ray energy spectrometer based on a two element, E × dE detector telescope intended to support dose algorithms with beta spectral information. Beta energies are measured via a 5 cm diameter × 2 cm thick BC-404 plastic scintillator preceded by a single, 100 μm thick, totally depleted, silicon dE detector. Photon events in the E detector are rejected by requiring a coincidence between the E and dE detectors. Photon rejection ratios vary from 225:1 at 1.25 MeV (60Co) to 360:1 at 0.36 MeV (133Ba). The spectrometer is capable of measuring electron energies from a lower energy coincidence threshold of approximately 125 keV to an upper limit of 3.5 MeV. This energy range spans the great majority of beta-emitting radionuclides in nuclear facilities.

  7. Infrared speckle interferometer with a linear array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataza, Hirokazu; Maihara, Toshinori

    1993-04-01

    We have developed a 1D near-IR speckle interferometer with a linear-array detector which can produce speckle images by means of a cylindrical lens. The detector with a Reticon multiplexer is operated at the kTC noise limit (approximately 2500 e-, rms). Using this instrument, we have obtained systematic data of the exposure time dependence of the modulation transfer function along with astronomical observations. The result indicates that the best exposure time of the speckle interferometry is longer than the exposure time chosen so that the fluctuations in the atmosphere are approximately frozen within an exposure. In the actual observations at the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope at Mauna Kea, the optimum exposure time is proved to be about 0.3 s.

  8. Detector Arrays for the James Webb Space Telescope Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Alexander, David; Brambora, Clifford K.; Derro, Rebecca; Engler, Chuck; Fox, Ori; Garrison, Matthew B.; Henegar, Greg; Hill, robert J.; Johnson, Thomas; Lindler, Don J.; Manthripragada, Sridhar S.; Marshall, Ceryl; Mott, Brent; Parr, Thomas M.; Roher, Wayne D.; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin B.; Smith, Miles; Waczynski, Augustyn; Wen, Yiting; Wilson, Donna; Xia-Serafino, Wei

    2007-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) incorporates two 5 micron cutoff (lambda(sub co) = 5 microns) 2048x2048 pixel Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG sensor chip assemblies. These detector arrays, and the two Teledyne SIDECAR application specific integrated circuits that control them, are operated in space at T approx. 37 K. In this article, we provide a brief introduction to NIRSpec, its detector subsystem (DS), detector readout in the space radiation environment, and present a snapshot of the developmental status of the NIRSpec DS as integration and testing of the engineering test unit begins.

  9. Multiplexed dispersive spectrometers using reduced background infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, C L; Esplin, R W

    1974-11-01

    The application of multiplex spectrometry to cryogenically cooled LWIR extrinsic photodetectors is limited by system noise. This noise limitation results in a detector NEP that is directly proportional to bandwidth. Therefore, multiplex schemes that require increased bandwidth are not productive of real advantage. However, doubly encoded systems that are based on 2n - 1 or n + N - 1 measurements have the potential to provide a real throughput gain proportional to the number of elements used on the throughput matrix. PMID:20134749

  10. Infrared detectors: State of art; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 23, 24, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makky, Wagih H.

    1992-12-01

    The present conference discusses innovative IR detection devices and technologies, HgCdTe-based IR detectors, and quantum-well (QW) devices. Attention is given to uncooled thermal imaging, intersubband transitions and IR hot-electron transistors, the consideration of a novel two-color IR detector on the basis of the 'two-peak' effect, recent developments in MOCVD of Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te photodiode arrays, and the growth of HgCdTe by MBE on CdZnTe substrates. Also discussed are Si-based QW intersubband detectors, increased responsivity and detectivity in asymmetric QW IR detectors, IR internal emission detectors, an InSb monolithic focal-plane cell, and surface plasmons on PtSi for visible and Si Schottky-barrier-enhanced detection. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  11. Far-infrared detector development for space-based Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogue, H. H.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Abedin, M. N.; Masterjohn, S. A.; Huffman, J. E.

    2008-08-01

    DRS Sensors & Targeting Systems with silicon materials partner Lawrence Semiconductor Research Laboratory and development partner NASA Langley Research Center Earth Science Directorate are developing improved far-infrared detectors for Earth energy balance observations from orbit. Our team has succeeded in demonstrating the feasibility of extending the wavelength range of conventional arsenic-doped-silicon Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors (cut-off ~28 μm) into the far infrared. The new far-IR member of the BIB detector family operates at temperatures accessible to existing space-qualified cryocoolers, while retaining the very high values of sensitivity, stability, linearity, and bandwidth typical of the broader class of silicon BIB detectors. The new detector should merit serious consideration for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission defined by the recent National Research Council's Decadal Survey for Earth Science. Proposed further development of this detector technology includes wavelength extension to a goal of at least 100 μm, improvements in detector design, and implementation of light-trapping packaging. These are developments that will enable increased radiometric accuracy, reduced spatial smearing, and simpler calibration approaches for CLARREO.

  12. JWST Near-Infrared Detector Degradation: Finding the Problem, Fixing the Problem, and Moving Forward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Stahle, Carl; Hill, Bob; Greenhouse, Matt; Beletic, James; Babu, Sachidananda; Blake, Peter; Cleveland, Keith; Cofie, Emmanuel; Eegholm, Bente; Engelbracht, Chad; Hall, Don; Hoffman, Alan; Jeffers, Basil; Jhabvala, Christine; Kimble, Randy; Kopp, Robert; Lee, Don; Leidecker, Henning; Lindler, Don; McMurray, Bob; Mott, D. Brent; Ohl, Ray; Polis, Don; Pontius, Jim

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. JWST will be an infrared optimized telescope, with an approximately 6.5 m diameter primary mirror, that is located at the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Three of JWST's four science instruments use Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG (H2RG) near infrared detector arrays. During 2010, the JWST Project noticed that a few of its 5 micron cutoff H2RG detectors were degrading during room temperature storage, and NASA chartered a "Detector Degradation Failure Review Board" (DD-FRB) to investigate. The DD-FRB determined that the root cause was a design flaw that allowed indium to interdiffuse with the gold contacts and migrate into the HgCdTe detector layer. Fortunately, Teledyne already had an improved design that eliminated this degradation mechanism. During early 2012, the improved H2RG design was qualified for flight and JWST began making additional H2RGs. In this article we present the two public DD-FRB "Executiye Summaries" that: (1) determined the root cause of the detector degradation and (2) defined tests to determine whether the existing detectors are qualified for flight. We supplement these with a brief introduction to H2RG detector arrays, and a discussion of how the JWST Project is using cryogenic storage to retard the degradation rate of the existing flight spare H2RGs.

  13. Infrared receivers for low background astronomy: Incoherent detectors and coherent devices from one micrometer to one millimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggess, N. W.; Greenberg, L. T.; Hauser, M. G.; Houck, J. R.; Low, F. J.; Mccreight, C. R.; Rank, D. M.; Richards, P. L.; Weiss, R.

    1979-01-01

    The status of incoherent detectors and coherent receivers over the infrared wavelength range from one micrometer to one millimeter is described. General principles of infrared receivers are included, and photon detectors, bolometers, coherent receivers, and important supporting technologies are discussed, with emphasis on their suitability for low background astronomical applications. Broad recommendations are presented and specific opportunities are identified for development of improved devices.

  14. The Case for Moderately-Cooled, Far-Infrared Thermal Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, John C.; Lakew, Brook

    2004-01-01

    There are moderately-cooled (around 77K) infrared detectors, for instance InSb (around 5 microns wavelength) and HgCdTe (around 15 to 20 microns wavelength). However for longer wavelengths there are either uncooled thermal-type detectors or highly cooled (about 4K and lower) quantum and thermal detectors, with the notable exception of high Tc superconductor detectors. We will describe certain long-wavelength applications in space where only moderate cooling is feasible, and where better sensitivity is required than possible with uncooled detectors. These requirements could be met with high Tc bolometers, but it may also be prudent to develop other technologies. Additionally, over the past 16 years a marketplace has not developed for the commercial production of high Tc bolometers, indicating their production may be a natural endeavor for government laboratories.

  15. Multi-element double ring detector for dual band infrared counter-countermeasure.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Sun, Weiguo; Zhang, Liang; Zhu, Xubo

    2014-06-10

    A multi-element double ring detector which can track a target effectively under infrared (IR) countermeasure conditions is presented. Dual band IR counter-countermeasures can be performed by the detector to distinguish the target from target-flare mixed signals. Middle and short IR wavelengths are used for target and IR countermeasure detection, respectively. With a special design, unique dual band signals will be outputted by the detector when a target spot is located on the center of the detector. By comparison, the typical single element ring detector has a "dead spot" in this case, which is undesirable for target identification. Relatively high tracking accuracy and low cost indicate that the presented method has a potential application. PMID:24921141

  16. Near-infrared Single-photon-counting Detectors for Free-space Laser Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William; Wu, Stewart; Waczynski, Augustyn; Miko, Laddawan

    2007-01-01

    We compare several photon-counting detector technologies for use as near-infrared timeresolved laser receivers in science instrument, communication and navigation systems. The key technologies are InGaAs(P) photocathode hybrid photomultiplier tubes and InGaAs(P) and HgCdTe avalanche photodiodes. We discuss recent experimental results and application.

  17. A near-infrared 64-pixel superconducting nanowire single photon detector array with integrated multiplexed readout

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, M. S. Verma, V. B.; Stevens, M.; Gerrits, T.; Horansky, R. D.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R.; Nam, S. W.; Marsili, F.; Beyer, A.; Shaw, M. D.; Kumor, D.

    2015-05-11

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  18. Long-Wavelength Stacked Si(sub 1-x)/Si Heterojunction Internal Photoemission Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. S.; Lin, T. L.; Jones, E. W.; Castillo, H. M. Del; George, T.; Gunapala, S. D.

    1993-01-01

    Utilizing the low temperature silicon molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of degenerately doped SiGe layers on Si, long wavelength stacked SiGe/Si heterojunction internal photoemission (HIP) infrared detectors with multiple SiGe/Se layers have been fabricated and demonstrated.

  19. Influence of infrared illumination on the characteristics of CdZnTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.; Dorogov, P.; Loutchanski, A.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared (IR) radiation of proper wavelength deep penetrating inside the CdZnTe detector may interact with trapping centers and has a significant influence on the trapping-detrapping processes of charge carriers from traps, thereby influencing charge collection efficiency in the detector. We studied the effect of infrared (IR) illumination on the characteristics of planar and quasi-hemispherical CdZnTe detectors. These results show that the near bandgap IR illumination significantly affects the detectors characteristics. By selecting a wavelength and intensity of illumination, detectors spectrometric characteristics can be significantly improved. Improvement of spectrometric characteristics is due to better uniformity of charge collection on the detector volume, as evidenced by the improvement in the total absorption peak symmetry and shape of the output pulses. The degree of improvement is different for various detectors depending on the characteristics of source material used for detector fabrication and theirs dimensions. For example, a detector of sizes 10 x 10 x 5 mm{sup 3} with an initial energy resolution (FWHM) of 20.6 keV at 662 keV under IR illumination was improved up to 9.1 keV, but a detector of sizes 5 x 5 x 2.5 mm{sup 3} with an initial energy resolution (FWHM) of 7.1 keV can be improved up to 4.8 keV. The IR illumination with a properly chosen intensity improves spectrometric characteristic in a wide range of energies without any losses of registration effectiveness. IR Illumination was practically performed using conventional GaAlAs IR LEDs with different peak wavelengths of emitted radiation. (authors)

  20. Infrared and visible detector electronics for the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, D. L.; Simmonds, J. J.; Ozawa, T.; Long, E. C.; Paris, R.

    1984-01-01

    The paper describes the detectors, preamplifiers, and processing electronics; the system characterization test methods and results; and the performance of the detectors and electronics during the first month of on-orbit operation of the IRAS telescope. The Focal Plane Array (FPA) consists of 62 IR channels and 8 visible channels operating at 2.5 K. The IR detectors are grouped in eight 7 or 8 channel staggered linear subarrays with shared bias voltage; the visible detectors are grouped in two 4 channel skewed arrays, also with shared bias. Each channel detector is dc coupled to a TIA preamplifier through a very low power thermally isolated JFET source follower operating at about 65 K within the FPA housing. The visible channel detectors are ac coupled to TIA preamplifiers and signal chain electronics using MOSFET source followers operating at about 2.5 K within the FPA housing. The detectors, preamplifiers, analog electronics, and grounding are discussed as they evolved and were implemented during FPA retrofit, telescope integration, and preparation for launch.

  1. Photoluminescence Study of Long Wavelength Superlattice Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoglund, Linda; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Soibel, Alexander; Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Keo, Sam; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the relation between the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and the PL peak wavelength was studied. A linear decrease of the PL intensity with increasing cut-off wavelength of long wavelength infrared CBIRDs was observed at 77 K and the trend remained unchanged in the temperature range 10 - 77 K. This relation between the PL intensity and the peak wavelength can be favorably used for comparison of the optical quality of samples with different PL peak wavelengths. A strong increase of the width of the PL spectrum in the studied temperature interval was observed, which was attributed to thermal broadening.

  2. Polymer-Ceramic Composite Materials for Pyroelectric Infrared Detectors: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, M. D; Currie, J. R.; Penn, B. G.; Batra, A. K.; Lal, R. B.

    2007-01-01

    Ferroelectrics:Polymer composites can be considered an established substitute for conventional electroceramics and ferroelectric polymers. The composites have a unique blend of polymeric properties such as mechanical flexibility, high strength, formability, and low cost, with the high electro-active properties of ceramic materials. They have attracted considerable interest because of their potential use in pyroelectric infrared detecting devices and piezoelectric transducers. These flexible sensors and transducers may eventually be useful for their health monitoring applications for NASA crew launch vehicles and crew exploration vehicles being developed. In the light of many technologically important applications in this field, it is worthwhile to present an overview of the pyroelectric infrared detector theory, models to predict dielectric behavior and pyroelectric coefficient, and the concept of connectivity and fabrication techniques of biphasic composites. An elaborate review of Pyroelectric-Polymer composite materials investigated to date for their potential use in pyroelectric infrared detectors is presented.

  3. Large-scale numerical simulation of reduced-pitch HgCdTe infrared detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkie, Benjamin; Bellotti, Enrico

    2013-06-01

    Numerical simulations play an important role in the development of large-format infrared detector array tech- nologies, especially when considering devices whose sizes are comparable to the wavelength of the radiation they are detecting. Computational models can be used to predict the optical and electrical response of such devices and evaluate designs prior to fabrication. We have developed a simulation framework which solves Maxwell's equations to determine the electromagnetic properties of a detector and subsequently uses a drift-diffusion ap- proach to asses the electrical response. We apply these techniques to gauge the effects of cathode placement on the inter- and intra-pixel attributes of compositionally graded and constant Hg1-xCdxTe mid-wavelength infrared detectors. In particular, the quantum efficiency, nearest-neighbor crosstalk, and modulation transfer function are evaluated for several device architectures.

  4. Advanced sensor technologies for high performance infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, J.; Bruder, M.; Finck, M.; Krüger, R.; Menger, P.; Simon, Th.; Wollrab, R.

    2002-06-01

    For high performance IR imaging and seeker systems AIM has established a high yield and reproducible HgCdTe detector technology. For continuous improvement of detector performance, yield and reliability, key processes have been optimized and new approaches have been developed. By a superior CdZnTe Bridgman growth process, dislocation densities < 1×10 5 cm-2 in substrate and epitaxial layer are achieved for all substrates, ensuring high performance focal-plane-arrays, particularly for λ CO=11.5 μm arrays. A new guard ring approach for planar diodes, created by a n +-region in pixel spacing area reduces pixel crosstalk and improves modulation transfer function. For long linear arrays, a multichip-module-technique has been developed, which meets the demands for high temperature-cycle-reliability. In addition, a cycle-to-failure model has been established by cooldown tests on AIM-FPA's to predict cycle-to-failure at existing FPA approach or maximum allowable strain at demanded cycles-to-failure specification.

  5. Design and implementation of a high-performance readout circuit for uncooled infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Honghui; Chen, Shijun; Zhai, Houming; Chen, Yongping

    2015-10-01

    At present, most uncooled infrared detectors circuits consist of the corresponding blind pixel detector, which increases the complexity of uncooled infrared detector, and the performance of the readout circuits is not ideal in practical applications. In order to achieve high performance of the readout circuit for uncooled infrared detectors, a kind of readout circuit based on current mirror has been designed in this paper. The readout circuit is composed of current mirror input part, capacitor feedback transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) and correlated double sampling (CDS) output circuit. Transconductance amplifier CTIA with capacitance negative feedback is used in the circuit and it consists of three integral capacitors, thus the circuit can realize different magnifications. The CDS N SF (source follow) and P SF are adopted as the circuit's output, the output swing can easily be greater than 2V. In average, the CDS N SF and P SF's power consumption is very low. So the total power consumption of 160 line circuit is about 100 mW. The non-uniformity of circuit has been obviously improved by reasonable parameter settings. In the test, the non-uniformity of the readout circuit has reached 1%. The other test results of total power consumption and the output amplitude also agree with simulation results. When the readout circuit and uncooled infrared detector are connected, the infrared signal can be well read out. the device has good noise characteristics and the NETD(noise equivalent temperature difference) is near 80mK. When the integration time is 20μs, the whole device's response is about 15mV/K.

  6. Thermophysics modeling of an infrared detector cryochamber for transient operational scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Mayank; Singhal, Gaurav; Verma, Avinash C.; Kumar, Sushil; Singh, Manmohan

    2016-05-01

    An infrared detector (IR) is essentially a transducer capable of converting radiant energy in the infrared regime into a measurable form. The benefit of infrared radiation is that it facilitates viewing objects in dark or through obscured conditions by detecting the infrared energy emitted by them. One of the most significant applications of IR detector systems is for target acquisition and tracking of projectile systems. IR detectors also find widespread applications in the industry and commercial market. The performance of infrared detector is sensitive to temperatures and performs best when cooled to cryogenic temperatures in the range of nearly 120 K. However, the necessity to operate in such cryogenic regimes increases the complexity in the application of IR detectors. This entails a need for detailed thermophysics analysis to be able to determine the actual cooling load specific to the application and also due to its interaction with the environment. This will enable design of most appropriate cooling methodologies suitable for specific scenarios. The focus of the present work is to develop a robust thermo-physical numerical methodology for predicting IR cryochamber behavior under transient conditions, which is the most critical scenario, taking into account all relevant heat loads including radiation in its original form. The advantage of the developed code against existing commercial software (COMSOL, ANSYS, etc.), is that it is capable of handling gas conduction together with radiation terms effectively, employing a ubiquitous software such as MATLAB. Also, it requires much smaller computational resources and is significantly less time intensive. It provides physically correct results enabling thermal characterization of cryochamber geometry in conjunction with appropriate cooling methodology. The code has been subsequently validated experimentally as the observed cooling characteristics are found to be in close agreement with the results predicted using

  7. Improving detector spatial resolution using pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Langechuan; Lu, Minghui; Cao, Wanqing; Peng, Luke; Chen, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    Indirect conversion flat panel detectors (FPDs) based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) technology are widely used in digital X-ray imaging. In such FPDs a scintillator layer is used for converting X-rays into visible light photons. However, the lateral spread of these photons inside the scintillator layer reduces spatial resolution of the FPD. In this study, FPDs incorporating pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure were developed to limit lateral spread of light photons thereby improving spatial resolution. For the pixelated scintillator, a two-dimensional barrier rib structure was first manufactured on a substrate layer, coated with reflective materials, and filled to the rim with the scintillating material of gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS). Several scintillator samples were fabricated, with pitch size varying from 160 to 280 μm and rib height from 200 to 280 μm. The samples were directly coupled to an a-Si flat panel photodiode array with a pitch of 200 μm to convert optical photons to electronic signals. With the pixelated scintillator, the detector modulation transfer function was shown to improve significantly (by 94% at 2 cycle/mm) compared to a detector using an unstructured GOS layer. However, the prototype does show lower sensitivity due to the decrease in scintillator fill factor. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility of using the barrier-rib structure to improve the spatial resolution of FPDs. Such an improvement would greatly benefit nondestructive testing applications where the spatial resolution is the most important parameter. Further investigation will focus on improving the detector sensitivity and exploring its medical applications.

  8. Design of MWIR Type-II Superlattices for Infrared Photon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grein, Christoph

    The Type II InAs/GaInSb and InAs/InAsSb superlattices are material systems for implementation as photodetector absorbers in infrared imaging applications. In addition to cutoff wavelengths spanning the infrared spectrum, they offer degrees of freedom in their materials design (e.g. layer thicknesses, alloy compositions, number of layers in one superlattice period) that permit the optimization of an infrared photon detector's figures of merit such as detectivity through the tuning of material properties like generation/recombination lifetimes and optical absorption. We describe efforts to obtain accurate electronic band structures of superlattice semiconductors with infrared energy gaps, and employing them to evaluate nonradiative minority carrier lifetimes. Simple device models are utilized to suggest potential performance enhancements that arise from employing superlattices as infrared absorber. We also discuss current efforts to simulate the molecular beam epitaxial growth of InAs/InAsSb superlattices to predict dominant native point defects and other growth nonidealities. Design of MWIR Type-II Superlattices for Infrared Photon Detectors.

  9. Thermal cycling reliability of indirect hybrid HgCdTe infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing; He, Kai; Wang, Jian-xin; Zhang, Qin-yao

    2013-09-01

    Thermal cycling reliability is one of the most important issues whether the HgCdTe infrared focal plane array detectors can be applied to both military and civil fields. In this paper, a 3D finite element model for indirect hybrid HgCdTe infrared detectors is established. The thermal stress distribution and thermally induced warpage of the detector assembly as a function of the distance between the detector chip and Si-ROIC, the thickness and the materials properties of electrical lead board in cryogenic temperature are analyzed. The results show that all these parameters have influences on the thermal stress distribution and warpage of the detector assembly, especially the coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE) of electrical lead board. The thermal stress and warpage in the assembly can be avoided or minimized by choosing the appropriate electrical lead board. Additionally, the warpage of some indirect hybrid detectors assembly samples is measured in experiment. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation results, which verifies that the results are calculated by finite element method are reasonable.

  10. Adaptive non-uniformity correction method based on temperature for infrared detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhijie; Yue, Song; Hong, Pu; Jia, Guowei; Lei, Bo

    2013-09-01

    The existence of non-uniformities in the responsitivity of the element array is a severe problem typical to common infrared detector. These non-uniformities result in a "curtain'' like fixed pattern noises (FPN) that appear in the image. Some random noise can be restrained by the method kind of equalization method. But the fixed pattern noise can only be removed by .non uniformity correction method. The produce of non uniformities of detector array is the combined action of infrared detector array, readout circuit, semiconductor device performance, the amplifier circuit and optical system. Conventional linear correction techniques require costly recalibration due to the drift of the detector or changes in temperature. Therefore, an adaptive non-uniformity method is needed to solve this problem. A lot factors including detectors and environment conditions variety are considered to analyze and conduct the cause of detector drift. Several experiments are designed to verify the guess. Based on the experiments, an adaptive non-uniformity correction method is put forward in this paper. The strength of this method lies in its simplicity and low computational complexity. Extensive experimental results demonstrate the disadvantage of traditional non-uniformity correct method is conquered by the proposed scheme.