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Sample records for barrier oxidation dependence

  1. Alloy-grain-size dependence of the effectiveness of silica coatings as oxidation barriers on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, C.S.; Basu, S.N.

    1995-04-01

    In order to determine the effect of alloy grain size on the oxidation properties of silica-coated austenitic Fe-18Cr-20Ni stainless steel, both coarse-grain (100-{mu}m grain size) forms of the alloy were produced. A 1-{mu}m-thick vitreous silica coating was deposited by chemical-vapor deposition on the alloys, which were subjected to isothermal and cyclic oxidation in air at 900{degrees}C. The coarse-grain alloys underwent widespread oxidation below the silica coating, leading to extensive coating spallation. This was attributed to the inability of the alloy to supply a sufficient outward flux of chromium to prevent oxygen penetration through microcracks in the silica coating. Due to an abundance of chromium available at the surface of the fine-grain alloy, chromia formed in the microcracks within the silica layer. As a result, the silica-coated, fine-grain alloy demonstrated superior oxidation resistance and excellent adhesion of the coating.

  2. The formation mechanism of aluminum oxide tunnel barriers.

    SciTech Connect

    Cerezo, A.; Petford-Long, A. K.; Larson, D. J.; Pinitsoontorn, S.; Singleton, E. W.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Oxford; Seagate Tech.

    2006-01-01

    The functional properties of magnetic tunnel junctions are critically dependant on the nanoscale morphology of the insulating barrier (usually only a few atomic layers thick) that separates the two ferromagnetic layers. Three-dimensional atom probe analysis has been used to study the chemistry of a magnetic tunnel junction structure comprising an aluminium oxide barrier formed by in situ oxidation, both in the under-oxidized and fully oxidized states and before and after annealing. Low oxidation times result in discrete oxide islands. Further oxidation leads to a more continuous, but still non-stoichiometric, barrier with evidence that oxidation proceeds along the top of grain boundaries in the underlying CoFe layer. Post-deposition annealing leads to an increase in the barrier area, but only in the case of the fully oxidized and annealed structure is a continuous planar layer formed, which is close to the stoichiometric Al:O ratio of 2:3. These results are surprising, in that the planar layers are usually considered unstable with respect to breaking up into separate islands. Analysis of the various driving forces suggests that the formation of a continuous layer requires a combination of factors, including the strain energy resulting from the expansion of the oxide during internal oxidation on annealing.

  3. Moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation results in blood-brain barrier breakdown via oxidative stress-dependent tight-junction protein disruption.

    PubMed

    Zehendner, Christoph M; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M; Angamo, Eskedar A; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in this

  4. Moderate Hypoxia Followed by Reoxygenation Results in Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown via Oxidative Stress-Dependent Tight-Junction Protein Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Zehendner, Christoph M.; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M.; Angamo, Eskedar A.; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in

  5. Oxidative methane conversion in dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Krzysztof; Młotek, Michał; Ulejczyk, Bogdan; Pryciak, Krzysztof; Schmidt-Szałowski, Krzysztof

    2013-02-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge was used for the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) with oxygen at the pressure of 1.2 bar. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor was powered at the frequency of about 6 kHz. Molar ratio CH4/O2 in the inlet gas containing 50% or 25% of argon was 3, 6 and 12. The effects of temperature (110, 150 and 340 ◦C), gas flow rate, molar ratio of methane to oxygen on the overall methane and oxygen conversion and methane conversion to methanol, ethanol, hydrocarbons, carbon oxides and water were studied. In the studied system the increase of the temperature decreases the conversion of methane to methanol. The increase of the molar ratio of methane to oxygen increased the methane conversion to hydrocarbons and strongly decreased the methane conversion to alcohols. The conversion of methane to hydrocarbons increased and the conversion of methane to methanol decreased with the decrease of the gas flow rate from 2 to 1 NL/h. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  6. Polyelectrolyte/Graphene Oxide Barrier Film for Flexible OLED.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung-Yeol; Park, Jongwhan; Kim, Yong-Seog

    2015-10-01

    Ultra-thin flexible nano-composite barrier layer consists of graphene oxide and polyelectrolyte was prepared using the layer-by-layer processing method. Microstructures of the barrier layer was optimized via modifying coating conditions and inducing chemical reactions. Although the barrier layer consists of hydrophilic polyelectrolyte was not effective in blocking the water vapor permeation, the chemical reduction of graphene oxide as well as conversion of polyelectrolyte to hydrophobic nature were very effective in reducing the permeation. PMID:26726415

  7. Signalling of DNA damage and cytokines across cell barriers exposed to nanoparticles depends on barrier thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, A.; Salih, S.; Roh, D.; Lacharme-Lora, L.; Parry, M.; Hardiman, B.; Keehan, R.; Grummer, R.; Winterhager, E.; Gokhale, P. J.; Andrews, P. W.; Abbott, C.; Forbes, K.; Westwood, M.; Aplin, J. D.; Ingham, E.; Papageorgiou, I.; Berry, M.; Liu, J.; Dick, A. D.; Garland, R. J.; Williams, N.; Singh, R.; Simon, A. K.; Lewis, M.; Ham, J.; Roger, L.; Baird, D. M.; Crompton, L. A.; Caldwell, M. A.; Swalwell, H.; Birch-Machin, M.; Lopez-Castejon, G.; Randall, A.; Lin, H.; Suleiman, M.-S.; Evans, W. H.; Newson, R.; Case, C. P.

    2011-12-01

    The use of nanoparticles in medicine is ever increasing, and it is important to understand their targeted and non-targeted effects. We have previously shown that nanoparticles can cause DNA damage to cells cultured below a cellular barrier without crossing this barrier. Here, we show that this indirect DNA damage depends on the thickness of the cellular barrier, and it is mediated by signalling through gap junction proteins following the generation of mitochondrial free radicals. Indirect damage was seen across both trophoblast and corneal barriers. Signalling, including cytokine release, occurred only across bilayer and multilayer barriers, but not across monolayer barriers. Indirect toxicity was also observed in mice and using ex vivo explants of the human placenta. If the importance of barrier thickness in signalling is a general feature for all types of barriers, our results may offer a principle with which to limit the adverse effects of nanoparticle exposure and offer new therapeutic approaches.

  8. Oxidation behavior of a thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings, consisting of a plasma sprayed calcium silicate ceramic layer and a CoCrAlY or NiCrAlY bond coat, were applied on B-1900 coupons and cycled hourly in air in a rapid-response furnace to maximum temperatures of 1030, 1100, or 1160 C. Eight specimens were tested for each of the six conditions of bond-coat composition and temperature. Specimens were removed from test at the onset of failure, which was taken to be the formation of a fine surface crack visible at 10X magnification. Specimens were weighed periodically, and plots of weight gain vs time indicate that weight is gained at a parabolic rate after an initial period where weight was gained at a much greater rate. The high initial oxidation rate is thought to arise from the initially high surface area in the porous bond coat. Specimen life (time to first crack) was found to be a strong function of temperature. However, while test lives varied greatly with time, the weight gain at the time of specimen failure was quite insensitive to temperature. This indicates that there is a critical weight gain at which the coating fails when subjected to this test.

  9. Temperature dependent resistance of magnetic tunnel junctions as a quality proof of the barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Rudiger, U.; Calarco, R.; May, U.; Samm, K.; Hauch, J.; Kittur, H.; Sperlich, M.; Guntherodt, G.

    2001-06-01

    Tunnel junctions of Co(10 nm)/AlO{sub x} (nominally 2 nm)/Co(20 nm) have been prepared by molecular beam epitaxy applying a shadow mask technique in conjunction with an UV light-assisted oxidation process of the AlO{sub x} barrier. The quality of the AlO{sub x} barrier has been proven by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature dependent tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) measurements. Optimum-oxidized tunnel junctions show a TMR of 20% at 285 K and up to 36% at 100 K. At 285 K the TMR values as a function of oxidation time are not symmetric about the optimum time. For underoxidized junctions the TMR is reduced more strongly than for overoxidized junctions. The temperature dependence of the junction{close_quote}s resistance is a clear and reliable indicator whether pinholes (or imperfections) contribute to the conduction across the barrier. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Diffusion Barriers to Increase the Oxidative Life of Overlay Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Lei, Jih-Fen

    1999-01-01

    Currently, most blades and vanes in the hottest section of aero gas turbine engines require some type of coating for oxidation protection. Newly developed single crystal superalloys have the mechanical potential to operate at increasingly higher component temperatures. However, at these elevated temperatures, coating/substrate interdiffusion can shorten the protective life of the coating. Diffusion barriers between overlay coatings and substrates are being examined to extend the protective life of the coating. A previously- developed finite-difference diffusion model has been modified to predict the oxidative life enhancement due to use of a diffusion barrier. The original diffusion model, designated COSIM, simulates Al diffusion in the coating to the growing oxide scale as well as Al diffusion into the substrate. The COSIM model incorporates an oxide growth and spalling model to provide the rate of Al consumption during cyclic oxidation. Coating failure is predicted when the Al concentration at the coating surface drops to a defined critical level. The modified COSIM model predicts the oxidative life of an overlay coating when a diffusion barrier is present eliminating diffusion of Al from the coating into the substrate. Both the original and the modified diffusion models have been used to predict the effectiveness of a diffusion barrier in extending the protective life of a NiCrAl overlay coating undergoing cyclic oxidation at 1100 C.

  11. Mechanisms of lung endothelial barrier disruption induced by cigarette smoke: role of oxidative stress and ceramides.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Kelly S; Hatoum, Hadi; Brown, Mary Beth; Gupta, Mehak; Justice, Matthew J; Beteck, Besem; Van Demark, Mary; Gu, Yuan; Presson, Robert G; Hubbard, Walter C; Petrache, Irina

    2011-12-01

    The epithelial and endothelial cells lining the alveolus form a barrier essential for the preservation of the lung respiratory function, which is, however, vulnerable to excessive oxidative, inflammatory, and apoptotic insults. Whereas profound breaches in this barrier function cause pulmonary edema, more subtle changes may contribute to inflammation. The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke (CS) exposure induce lung inflammation are not fully understood, but an early alteration in the epithelial barrier function has been documented. We sought to investigate the occurrence and mechanisms by which soluble components of mainstream CS disrupt the lung endothelial cell barrier function. Using cultured primary rat microvascular cell monolayers, we report that CS induces endothelial cell barrier disruption in a dose- and time-dependent manner of similar magnitude to that of the epithelial cell barrier. CS exposure triggered a mechanism of neutral sphingomyelinase-mediated ceramide upregulation and p38 MAPK and JNK activation that were oxidative stress dependent and that, along with Rho kinase activation, mediated the endothelial barrier dysfunction. The morphological changes in endothelial cell monolayers induced by CS included actin cytoskeletal rearrangement, junctional protein zonula occludens-1 loss, and intercellular gap formation, which were abolished by the glutathione modulator N-acetylcysteine and ameliorated by neutral sphingomyelinase inhibition. The direct application of ceramide recapitulated the effects of CS, by disrupting both endothelial and epithelial cells barrier, by a mechanism that was redox and apoptosis independent and required Rho kinase activation. Furthermore, ceramide induced dose-dependent alterations of alveolar microcirculatory barrier in vivo, measured by two-photon excitation microscopy in the intact rat. In conclusion, soluble components of CS have direct endothelial barrier-disruptive effects that could be ameliorated by glutathione

  12. Oxidation and degradation of thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, James Allen

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), which consist of an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating overlaid with a thermally-insulating Ysb2Osb3-stabilized ZrOsb2 (YSZ) top coating, are used to protect superalloy hardware in gas turbine engines. Spallation of the YSZ is accelerated by growth of an interfacial Alsb2Osb3 scale at high temperatures. The mechanisms of oxidation-related degradation are not well understood for air plasma-sprayed (APS) TBCs, whereas Alsb2Osb3 thermomechanical failure is the dominant degradation mode in electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) TBCs. This work investigated the isothermal oxidation and thermocyclic degradation of various TBC systems; with particular emphasis on the growth kinetics, microstructures, flaw content, fracture behavior and micro-mechanical properties of the Alsb2Osb3 interfacial scales. The isothermal oxidation kinetics of plasma-sprayed NiCrAlY were not influenced by the presence of an APS YSZ top coating (at 1150sp°C). However, the isothermal oxidation rate constants of NiCoCrAlY bond coatings were accelerated by a factor of 2 (at 950, 1050 and 1150sp°C) when overlaid with a commercial EB-PVD TBC. Thermocyclic failure of APS TBCs occurred by progressive YSZ fracture and crack link-up. Severe fracture and buckling of the interfacial Alsb2Osb3 during thermal cycling did not induce rapid failure of APS TBCs. Evaluation of the interfacial Alsb2Osb3 scale microstructures (on APS TBCs) after thermal cycling revealed the following: thermocyclic damage occurred by both oxide-metal delamination and by internal fracture; Alsb2Osb3 scale crack healing by sintering occurred at 1150sp°C; surfaces with a sharp radius of curvature induced less Alsb2Osb3 damage than gradually convex surfaces; scale grain boundary void growth was accelerated by thermal cycling; and higher void contents were observed in scales which formed on convex surfaces. There were no significant changes in the hardness or Young's modulus of the Alsb2

  13. GUCY2C opposes systemic genotoxic tumorigenesis by regulating AKT-dependent intestinal barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jieru Egeria; Snook, Adam Eugene; Li, Peng; Stoecker, Brian Arthur; Kim, Gilbert Won; Magee, Michael Sullivan; Garcia, Alex Vladimir Mejia; Valentino, Michael Anthony; Hyslop, Terry; Schulz, Stephanie; Waldman, Scott Arthur

    2012-01-01

    The barrier separating mucosal and systemic compartments comprises epithelial cells, annealed by tight junctions, limiting permeability. GUCY2C recently emerged as an intestinal tumor suppressor coordinating AKT1-dependent crypt-villus homeostasis. Here, the contribution of GUCY2C to barrier integrity opposing colitis and systemic tumorigenesis is defined. Mice deficient in GUCY2C (Gucy2c(-/-)) exhibited barrier hyperpermeability associated with reduced junctional proteins. Conversely, activation of GUCY2C in mice reduced barrier permeability associated with increased junctional proteins. Further, silencing GUCY2C exacerbated, while activation reduced, chemical barrier disruption and colitis. Moreover, eliminating GUCY2C amplified, while activation reduced, systemic oxidative DNA damage. This genotoxicity was associated with increased spontaneous and carcinogen-induced systemic tumorigenesis in Gucy2c(-/-) mice. GUCY2C regulated barrier integrity by repressing AKT1, associated with increased junction proteins occludin and claudin 4 in mice and Caco2 cells in vitro. Thus, GUCY2C defends the intestinal barrier, opposing colitis and systemic genotoxicity and tumorigenesis. The therapeutic potential of this observation is underscored by the emerging clinical development of oral GUCY2C ligands, which can be used for chemoprophylaxis in inflammatory bowel disease and cancer. PMID:22384056

  14. Potential Dependence of Electrochemical Barriers from ab Initio Calculations.

    PubMed

    Chan, Karen; Nørskov, Jens K

    2016-05-01

    We present a simple and computationally efficient method to determine the potential dependence of the activation energies for proton-electron transfer from a single ab initio barrier calculation. We show that the potential dependence of the activation energy is given by the partial charge transferred at the transition state. The method is evaluated against the potential dependence determined explicitly through multiple calculations at varying potential. We show that the transfer coefficient is given by the charge transferred from the initial to transition state, which has significant implications for electrochemical kinetics. PMID:27088442

  15. Thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, G. C.; Phucharoen, W.; Miller, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) for advanced gas turbine blades have been under intensive development during the last several years. This investigation is intended to achieve a clearer understanding of the mechanical behavior of plasma sprayed zirconia-yttria TBCs, involving a nickle-chromium-aluminum bond coat. The near term objectives are to study the stress states in a relatively simple model TBC subjected to steady state thermal loading. The resulting thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation have been primary targets for the study. The finite element approach and the effects of thermal mismatch and oxidation are described. A proposed mechanism for oxidation induced coating failure is also presented.

  16. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  17. Nitric Oxide Mediates Tightening of the Endothelial Barrier by Ascorbic Acid

    PubMed Central

    May, James M.; Qu, Zhi-chao

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, decreases paracellular endothelial permeability in a process that requires rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. To define the proximal mechanism of this effect, we tested whether it might involve enhanced generation and/or sparing of nitric oxide (NO) by the vitamin. EA.hy926 endothelial cells cultured on semi-porous filter supports showed decreased endothelial barrier permeability to radiolabeled inulin in response to exogenous NO provided by the NO donor spermine NONOATE, as well as to activation of the downstream NO pathway by 8-bromo-cyclic GMP, a cell-penetrant cyclic GMP analog. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) with Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester increased endothelial permeability, indicating a role constitutive NO generation by eNOS in maintaining the permeability barrier. Inhibition of guanylate cyclase by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one also increased endothelial permeability and blocked barrier tightening by spermine NONOATE. Loading cells with what are likely physiologic concentrations of ascorbate decreased endothelial permeability. This effect was blocked by inhibition of either eNOS or guanylate cyclase, suggesting that it involved generation of NO by eNOS and subsequent NO-dependent activation of guanylate cyclase. These results show that endothelial permeability barrier function depends on constitutive generation of NO and that ascorbate-dependent tightening of this barrier involves maintaining NO through the eNOS/guanylate cyclase pathway. PMID:21156160

  18. Silicon oxide permeation barrier coating of PET bottles and foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steves, Simon; Deilmann, Michael; Awakowicz, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Modern packaging materials such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) have displaced established materials in many areas of food and beverage packaging. Plastic packing materials offer are various advantages concerning production and handling. PET bottles for instance are non-breakable and lightweight compared to glass and metal containers. However, PET offers poor barrier properties against gas permeation. Therefore, the shelf live of packaged food is reduced. Permeation of gases can be reduced by depositing transparent plasma polymerized silicon oxide (SiOx) barrier coatings. A microwave (2.45 GHz) driven low pressure plasma reactor is developed based on a modified Plasmaline antenna to treat PET foils or bottles. To increase the barrier properties of the coatings furthermore a RF substrate bias (13.56 MHz) is applied. The composition of the coatings is analyzed by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy regarding carbon and hydrogen content. Influence of gas phase composition and substrate bias on chemical composition of the coatings is discussed. A strong relation between barrier properties and film composition is found: good oxygen barriers are observed as carbon content is reduced and films become quartz-like. Regarding oxygen permeation a barrier improvement factor (BIF) of 70 is achieved.

  19. Scalability of Schottky barrier metal-oxide-semiconductor transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Moongyu

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the general characteristics and the scalability of Schottky barrier metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (SB-MOSFETs) are introduced and reviewed. The most important factors, i.e., interface-trap density, lifetime and Schottky barrier height of erbium-silicided Schottky diode are estimated using equivalent circuit method. The extracted interface trap density, lifetime and Schottky barrier height for hole are estimated as 1.5 × 1013 traps/cm2, 3.75 ms and 0.76 eV, respectively. The interface traps are efficiently cured by N2 annealing. Based on the diode characteristics, various sizes of erbium-silicided/platinum-silicided n/p-type SB-MOSFETs are manufactured and analyzed. The manufactured SB-MOSFETs show enhanced drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) characteristics due to the existence of Schottky barrier between source and channel. DIBL and subthreshold swing characteristics are comparable with the ultimate scaling limit of double gate MOSFETs which shows the possible application of SB-MOSFETs in nanoscale regime.

  20. Evaluation of Oxidation Damage in Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    A method based on the technique of dilatometry has been established to quantitatively evaluate the interfacial damage due to the oxidation in a thermal barrier coating system. Strain isolation and adhesion coefficients have been proposed to characterize the thermal barrier coating (TBC) performance based on its thermal expansion behavior. It has been found that, for a thermal barrier coating system consisting of ZrO2-8%Y2O3/FeCrAlY/4140 steel substrate, the oxidation of the bond coat and substrate significantly reduced the ceramic coating adherence, as inferred from the dilatometry measurements. The in-situ thermal expansion measurements under 30 deg C to 700 deg C thermal cycling in air showed that the adhesion coefficient, A(sub i) decreased by 25% during the first 35 oxidation cycles. Metallography showed that delamination occurred at both the ceramic/bond coat and bond coat/substrate interfaces. In addition, the strain isolation effect has been improved by increasing the FeCrAlY bond coat thickness. The strain isolation coefficient, Si, increased from about 0.04 to 0.25, as the bond coat thickness changed from 0.1 mm to 1.0 mm. It may be possible to design optimum values of strain isolation and interface adhesion coefficients to achieve the best TBC performance.

  1. Modeling Oxidation Induced Stresses in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, B. L.; Freborg, A. M.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, William J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) in gas turbines has increased dramatically in recent years, due mainly to the need for component protection from ever increasing service temperatures. Oxidation of the bond coat has been identified as an important contributing factor to spallation of the ceramic top coat during service. Additional variables found to influence TBC thermal cycle life include bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers, and modulus of elasticity. The purpose of this work was to characterize the effects of oxidation on the stress states within the TBC system, as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with other factors affecting TBC life.

  2. All magnesium diboride Josephson junctions with MgO and native oxide barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costache, M. V.; Moodera, J. S.

    2010-02-01

    We present results on all-MgB2 tunnel junctions, where the tunnel barrier is deposited MgO or native-oxide of base electrode. For the junctions with MgO, the hysteretic I-V curve resembles a conventional underdamped Josephson junction characteristic with critical current-resistance product nearly independent of the junction area. The dependence of the critical current with temperature up to 20 K agrees with the [Ambegaokar and Baratoff, Phys. Rev. Lett. 10, 486 (1963)] expression. For the junctions with native-oxide, conductance at low bias exhibits subgap features while at high bias reveals thick barriers. As a result no supercurrent was observed in the latter, despite the presence of superconducting-gaps to over 30 K.

  3. Opportunities for functional oxides in yttrium oxide-titanium oxide-zirconium oxide system: Applications for novel thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francillon, Wesley

    This dissertation is an investigation of materials and processed under consideration for next generation thermal structural oxides with potential applications as thermal barrier coatings; wherein, high temperature stability and mechanical properties affect durability. Two notable next generation materials systems under investigation are pyrochlore and co-doped zirconia oxides. The motivation for this work is based on current limitations of the currently used thermal barrier material of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) deposited by the plasma spray processes. The rapid quenching associated with the plasma spray process, results in a metastable structure that is a non-transformable tetragonal structure in the yttria partially stabilized zirconia system rather than the equilibrium anticipated two phase mixture of cubic and monoclinic phases. It has been shown that this metastable structure offers enhanced toughness and thus durability during thermomechanical cycling from the operating temperatures in excess of 1000C to ambient. However, the metastable oxides are susceptible to partitioning at temperatures greater than 1200C, thus resulting in a transformation of the tetragonal phase oxides. Transformations of the tetragonal prime phase into the parent cubic and tetragonal prime phase result in coating degradation. Several of the emerging oxides are based on rare earth additions to zirconia. However, there is limited information of the high temperature stability of these oxide coatings and more notably these compositions exhibit limited toughness for durable performance. A potential ternary composition based on the YSZ system that offers the ability to tailor the phase structure is based YO1.5-TiO2 -ZrO2. The ternary of YO1.5-TiO2-ZrO 2 has the current TBC composition of seven molar percent yttria stabilized zirconia, pyrochlore phase oxide and zirconia doped with yttria and titania additions (Ti-YSZ). The Ti-YSZ phase field is of interest because at equilibrium it is

  4. Temperature-Dependent Photoluminescence of Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, S. T.; Rajoba, S. J.; Patil, S. A.; Han, S. H.; Jadhav, L. D.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide thin films have been deposited by spray pyrolysis using graphene oxide powder prepared by modified Hummers method. These thin films were characterized by different physico-chemical techniques. The x-ray diffraction studies revealed the structural properties of GO (graphene oxide) while the Raman spectrum showed the presence of D and G and two-dimensional bands. The D/G intensity ratio for spray-deposited GO film is 1.10. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed 67% and 33% atomic percentages of carbon and oxygen, respectively. The ratio of O1s/C1s was found to be 0.49. The temperature-dependent photoluminescence of GO thin film and GO solution showed a blue emission.

  5. MERCURY OXIDIZATION IN NON-THERMAL PLASMA BARRIER DISCHARGE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    V.K. Mathur

    2003-02-01

    In the past decade, the emission of toxic elements from human activities has become a matter of great public concern. Hg, As, Se and Cd typically volatilize during a combustion process and are not easily caught with conventional air pollution control techniques. In addition, there is no pollution prevention technique available now or likely be available in the foreseeable future that can prevent the emission of these trace elements. These trace elements pose additional scientific challenge as they are present at only ppb levels in large gas streams. Mercury, in particular, has attracted significant attention due to its high volatility, toxicity and potential threat to human health. In the present research work, a non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge technique has been used to oxidize Hg{sup 0}(g) to HgO. The basic premise of this approach is that Hg{sup 0} in vapor form cannot be easily removed in an absorption tower whereas HgO as a particulate is amiable to water scrubbing. The work presented in this report consists of three steps: (1) setting-up of an experimental apparatus to generate mercury vapors at a constant rate and modifying the existing non-thermal plasma reactor system, (2) solving the analytical challenge for measuring mercury vapor concentration at ppb level, and (3) conducting experiments on mercury oxidation under plasma conditions to establish proof of concept.

  6. Role of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide as oxidation barrier for silicon based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe Morana, Bruno; Forte, Salvatore; Sarro, Pasqualina Maria

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, the authors study the protective effect against oxidation of a thin layer of atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Nitrogen doped silicon carbide (poly-SiC:N) based microheaters coated with ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are used as test structure to investigate the barrier effect of the alumina layers to oxygen and water vapor at very high temperature (up to 1000 °C). Different device sets have been fabricated changing the doping levels, to evaluate possible interaction between the dopants and the alumina layer. The as-deposited alumina layer morphology has been evaluated by means of AFM analysis and compared to an annealed sample (8 h at 1000 °C) to estimate the change in the grain structure and the film density. The coated microheaters are subjected to very long oxidation time in dry and wet environment (up to 8 h at 900 and 1000 °C). By evaluating the electrical resistance variation between uncoated reference devices and the ALD coated devices, the oxide growth on the SiC is estimated. The results show that the ALD alumina coating completely prevents the oxidation of the SiC up to 900 °C in wet environment, while an oxide thickness reduction of 50% is observed at 1000 °C compared to uncoated devices.

  7. Intracellular mediators of JAM-A–dependent epithelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana C.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    JAM-A is a critical signaling component of the apical junctional complex, a structure composed of several transmembrane and scaffold molecules that controls the passage of nutrients and solutes across epithelial surfaces. Observations from JAM-A–deficient epithelial cells and JAM-A knockout animals indicate that JAM-A is an important regulator of epithelial paracellular permeability, however the mechanism(s) linking JAM-A to barrier function are not understood. This review highlights recent findings relevant to JAM-A–mediated regulation of epithelial permeability, focusing on the role of upstream and downstream signaling candidates. We draw on what is known about proteins reported to associate with JAM-A in other pathways and on known modulators of barrier function to propose candidate effectors that may mediate JAM-A regulation of epithelial paracellular permeability. Further investigation of pathways highlighted in this review may provide ideas for novel therapeutics that target debilitating conditions associated with barrier dysfunction, such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:22671597

  8. Comparison between two models of absorption of matter waves by a thin time-dependent barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Maximilien; Beau, Mathieu; Goussev, Arseni

    2015-11-01

    We report a quantitative, analytical, and numerical comparison between two models of the interaction of a nonrelativistic quantum particle with a thin time-dependent absorbing barrier. The first model represents the barrier by a set of time-dependent discontinuous matching conditions, which are closely related to Kottler boundary conditions used in stationary-wave optics as a mathematical basis for Kirchhoff diffraction theory. The second model mimics the absorbing barrier with an off-diagonal δ potential with a time-dependent amplitude. We show that the two models of absorption agree in their predictions in a semiclassical regime, the regime readily accessible in modern experiments with ultracold atoms.

  9. Variable products in dielectric-barrier discharge assisted benzene oxidation.

    PubMed

    Dey, G R; Sharma, Asmita; Pushpa, K K; Das, Tomi Nath

    2010-06-15

    Atmospheric-pressure dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) assisted control of benzene((g)) oxidation into different classes of products is presented in this study. The gas-phase products were directly analyzed online by GC-FID and GC-MS. In addition, a solid yellowish surface deposit also formed, which was dissolved in 10 mL ethanol after each 10 min DBD cycle for GC analyses. One of the gas-phase products, phenol was also separately collected and estimated by Folin-Ciocalteu's wet-colorimetric method. In the gas phase only phenol and biphenyl were detected at maximum total conversion of approximately 3%, while in the ethanolic solution furthermore 1,2- and 1,4-dihydroxybenzene, 2,2'-biphenol, 2- and 4-phenylphenol and 4-phenoxyphenol were estimated at microM to mM level, and reveal approximately 30% total conversion. Products' types hint at the phenyl radical as the primary precursor. However, with the use of mesoporous molecular sieve 10X packing in unison with DBD, while the concentrations of such phenolic products decreased drastically, a number of open chain and non-aromatic ethers, aldehydes and esters, and also naphthalene and biphenylene were formed. In addition to high DBD process efficiency, the latter results suggest modification of discharge characteristics, and also strong physicochemical effects of cavity size and surface property on the intermediate reactions therein. Thus, use of such packing highlights a novel and practical methodology for control of chemical reactions towards useful product types, vis-à-vis pollutant mitigation. PMID:20188466

  10. Non-thermal dielectric-barrier discharge plasma damages human keratinocytes by inducing oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    KIM, KI CHEON; PIAO, MEI JING; HEWAGE, SUSARA RUWAN KUMARA MADDUMA; HAN, XIA; KANG, KYOUNG AH; JO, JIN OH; MOK, YOUNG SUN; SHIN, JENNIFER H.; PARK, YEUNSOO; YOO, SUK JAE; HYUN, JIN WON

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms through which dielectric-barrier discharge plasma damages human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) through the induction of oxidative stress. For this purpose, the cells were exposed to surface dielectric-barrier discharge plasma in 70% oxygen and 30% argon. We noted that cell viability was decreased following exposure of the cells to plasma in a time-dependent manner, as shown by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined using 2′,7′-dichlorodihydro-fluorescein diacetate and dihydroethidium was used to monitor superoxide anion production. Plasma induced the generation of ROS, including superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. N-acetyl cysteine, which is an antioxidant, prevented the decrease in cell viability caused by exposure to plasma. ROS generated by exposure to plasma resulted in damage to various cellular components, including lipid membrane peroxidation, DNA breaks and protein carbonylation, which was detected by measuring the levels of 8-isoprostane and diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine assay, comet assay and protein carbonyl formation. These results suggest that plasma exerts cytotoxic effects by causing oxidative stress-induced damage to cellular components. PMID:26573561

  11. Non-thermal dielectric-barrier discharge plasma damages human keratinocytes by inducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Cheon; Piao, Mei Jing; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Han, Xia; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Jo, Jin Oh; Mok, Young Sun; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeunsoo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms through which dielectric-barrier discharge plasma damages human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) through the induction of oxidative stress. For this purpose, the cells were exposed to surface dielectric-barrier discharge plasma in 70% oxygen and 30% argon. We noted that cell viability was decreased following exposure of the cells to plasma in a time-dependent manner, as shown by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and dihydroethidium was used to monitor superoxide anion production. Plasma induced the generation of ROS, including superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. N-acetyl cysteine, which is an antioxidant, prevented the decrease in cell viability caused by exposure to plasma. ROS generated by exposure to plasma resulted in damage to various cellular components, including lipid membrane peroxidation, DNA breaks and protein carbonylation, which was detected by measuring the levels of 8-isoprostane and diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine assay, comet assay and protein carbonyl formation. These results suggest that plasma exerts cytotoxic effects by causing oxidative stress-induced damage to cellular components. PMID:26573561

  12. Angular confinement and direction-dependent transmission in graphene nanostructures with magnetic barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masir, M. Ramezani; Vasilopoulos, P.; Matulis, A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the transmission through magnetic barriers in graphene-based nanostructures. Several particular cases are considered: a magnetic step, single and double barriers, δ -function barriers as well as barrier structures with inhomogeneous magnetic field profiles but with average magnetic field equal to zero. The transmission exhibits a strong dependence on the direction of the incident wave vector. In general the resonant structure of the transmission is significantly more pronounced for (Dirac) electrons with linear spectrum compared to that for electrons with a parabolic one.

  13. Temperature dependent barrier height and ideality factor of electrodeposited n-CdSe/Cu Schottky barrier diode

    SciTech Connect

    Mahato, S. Shiwakoti, N.; Kar, A. K.

    2015-06-24

    This article reports the measurement of temperature-dependent barrier height and ideality factor of n-CdSe/Cu Schottky barrier diode. The Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) thin films have been deposited by simple electrodeposition technique. The XRD measurements ravels the deposited single phase CdSe films are highly oriented on (002) plane and the average particle size has been calculated to be ~18 nm. From SEM characterization, it is clear that the surface of CdSe thin films are continuous, homogeneous and the film is well adhered to the substrate and consists of fine grains which are irregular in shape and size. Current-Voltage characteristics have been measured at different temperatures in the range (298 K – 353 K). The barrier height and ideality factor are found to be strongly temperature dependent. The inhomogenious barrier height increases and ideality factor decreases with increase in temperature. The expectation value has been calculated and its value is 0.30 eV.

  14. Dependence of Andreev reflection and Schottky barriers on GaMnAs/Nb interface treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Eid, K. F. Dahliah, D. F.; Abujeib, H. A.; Liu, X.; Furdyna, J. K.

    2015-05-07

    We studied the interfacial contact between GaMnAs and superconducting Nb micro-structures both with and without removing the native GaMnAs surface oxide. Our results show that a strong Schottky barrier forms at the interface when the oxide layer is left between Nb and GaMnAs. This barrier can be confused for Andreev Reflection and erroneously used to extract spin polarization. A simple acid etch is shown to remove the oxide film, thus decreasing the interface resistance, removing the Schottky barrier, and causing a clear Andreev reflection effect. One key recommendation for point contact Andreev reflection studies is to push the tip hard enough into contact and verify that the total resistance is not too high.

  15. In situ lifetimes and kinetics of a reductive whey barrier and an oxidative ORC barrier in the subsurface.

    PubMed

    Barcelona, M J; Xie, G

    2001-08-15

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are being used to engineer favorable field conditions for in-situ remediation efforts. Two redox adjustment barriers were installed to facilitate a 10-month research effort on the fate and transport of MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether) at a site called the Michigan Integrated Remediation Technology Laboratory (MIRTL). Thirty kilograms of whey were injected as a slurry into an unconfined aquifer to establish an upgradient reductive zone to reduce O2 concentration in the vicinity of a contaminant injection source. To minimize the impact of contaminant release, 363 kg of oxygen release compound (ORC) were placed in the aquifer as a downgradient oxidative barrier. Dissolved oxygen and other chemical species were monitored in the field to evaluate the effectiveness of this technology. A transient one-dimensional advective-dispersive-reaction (ADR) model was proposed to simulate the dissolved oxygen transport. The equations were solved with commonly encountered PRB initial and constant/variable boundary conditions. No similar previous solution was found in the literature. The in-situ lifetimes, based on variable source loading, were estimated to be 1,661 and 514 days for the whey barrier and ORC barrier, respectively. Estimates based on either maximum O2 consumption/production or measured O2 curves were found to under- or overestimate the lifetime of the barriers. The pseudo-first-order rate constant of whey depletion was estimated to be 0.303/d with a dissolution rate of 0.04/d. The oxygen release rate constant in the ORC barrier was estimated to be 0.03/d. This paper provides a means to design and predict the performance of reactive redox barriers, especially when only limited field data are available. PMID:11529581

  16. Nitric oxide synthase stimulates prostaglandin synthesis and barrier function in C. parvum-infected porcine ileum.

    PubMed

    Gookin, Jody L; Duckett, Laurel L; Armstrong, Martha U; Stauffer, Stephen H; Finnegan, Colleen P; Murtaugh, Michael P; Argenzio, Robert A

    2004-09-01

    Cell culture models implicate increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis as a cause of mucosal hyperpermeability in intestinal epithelial infection. NO may also mediate a multitude of subepithelial events, including activation of cyclooxygenases. We examined whether NO promotes barrier function via prostaglandin synthesis using Cryptosporidium parvum-infected ileal epithelium in residence with an intact submucosa. Expression of NO synthase (NOS) isoforms was examined by real-time RT-PCR of ileal mucosa from control and C. parvum-infected piglets. The isoforms mediating and mechanism of NO action on barrier function were assessed by measuring transepithelial resistance (TER) and eicosanoid synthesis by ileal mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers in the presence of selective and nonselective NOS inhibitors and after rescue with exogenous prostaglandins. C. parvum infection results in induction of mucosal inducible NOS (iNOS), increased synthesis of NO and PGE2, and increased mucosal permeability. Nonselective inhibition of NOS (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) inhibited prostaglandin synthesis, resulting in further increases in paracellular permeability. Baseline permeability was restored in the absence of NO by exogenous PGE2. Selective inhibition of iNOS [L-N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine] accounted for approximately 50% of NOS-dependent PGE2 synthesis and TER. Using an entire intestinal mucosa, we have demonstrated for the first time that NO serves as a proximal mediator of PGE2 synthesis and barrier function in C. parvum infection. Expression of iNOS by infected mucosa was without detriment to overall barrier function and may serve to promote clearance of infected enterocytes. PMID:15155179

  17. A Septin-Dependent Diffusion Barrier at Dendritic Spine Necks

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Jennifer D.; Racz, Bence; Sheng, Morgan; Choquet, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory glutamatergic synapses at dendritic spines exchange and modulate their receptor content via lateral membrane diffusion. Several studies have shown that the thin spine neck impedes the access of membrane and solute molecules to the spine head. However, it is unclear whether the spine neck geometry alone restricts access to dendritic spines or if a physical barrier to the diffusion of molecules exists. Here, we investigated whether a complex of septin cytoskeletal GTPases localized at the base of the spine neck regulates diffusion across the spine neck. We found that, during development, a marker of the septin complex, Septin7 (Sept7), becomes localized to the spine neck where it forms a stable structure underneath the plasma membrane. We show that diffusion of receptors and bulk membrane, but not cytoplasmic proteins, is slower in spines bearing Sept7 at their neck. Finally, when Sept7 expression was suppressed by RNA interference, membrane molecules explored larger membrane areas. Our findings indicate that Sept7 regulates membrane protein access to spines. PMID:25494357

  18. COMPARISON OF OXYGEN TRANSFER TEST METHODS IN A TOTAL BARRIER OXIDATION DITCH CONFIGURATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Total Barrier Oxidation Ditch (TBOD), a recent development in oxidation ditch technology is described. The study was carried out in 1986 and 1987 for the purposes of: (1) evaluating the applicability of selected test procedures developed by the American Society of Civil Engin...

  19. Barriers to Quitting Smoking Among Substance Dependent Patients Predict Smoking Cessation Treatment Outcome.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rosemarie A; Cassidy, Rachel N; Murphy, Cara M; Rohsenow, Damaris J

    2016-05-01

    For smokers with substance use disorders (SUD), perceived barriers to quitting smoking include concerns unique to effects on sobriety as well as usual concerns. We expanded our Barriers to Quitting Smoking in Substance Abuse Treatment (BQS-SAT) scale, added importance ratings, validated it, and then used the importance scores to predict smoking treatment response in smokers with substance use disorders (SUD) undergoing smoking treatment in residential treatment programs in two studies (n=184 and 340). Both components (general barriers, weight concerns) were replicated with excellent internal consistency reliability. Construct validity was supported by significant correlations with pretreatment nicotine dependence, smoking variables, smoking self-efficacy, and expected effects of smoking. General barriers significantly predicted 1-month smoking abstinence, frequency and heaviness, and 3-month smoking frequency; weight concerns predicted 1-month smoking frequency. Implications involve addressing barriers with corrective information in smoking treatment for smokers with SUD. PMID:26979552

  20. Lie-algebraic approach for pricing moving barrier options with time-dependent parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. F.; Hui, C. H.

    2006-11-01

    In this paper we apply the Lie-algebraic technique for the valuation of moving barrier options with time-dependent parameters. The value of the underlying asset is assumed to follow the constant elasticity of variance (CEV) process. By exploiting the dynamical symmetry of the pricing partial differential equations, the new approach enables us to derive the analytical kernels of the pricing formulae straightforwardly, and thus provides an efficient way for computing the prices of the moving barrier options. The method is also able to provide tight upper and lower bounds for the exact prices of CEV barrier options with fixed barriers. In view of the CEV model being empirically considered to be a better candidate in equity option pricing than the traditional Black-Scholes model, our new approach could facilitate more efficient comparative pricing and precise risk management in equity derivatives with barriers by incorporating term-structures of interest rates, volatility and dividend into the CEV option valuation model.

  1. Temperature-dependent characteristics of 4H—SiC junction barrier Schottky diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng-Ping; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Yi-Men; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Yue-Hu; Chen, Wen-Hao

    2012-03-01

    The current—voltage characteristics of 4H—SiC junction barrier Schottky (JBS) diodes terminated by an offset field plate have been measured in the temperature range of 25-300 °C. An experimental barrier height value of about 0.5 eV is obtained for the Ti/4H—SiC JBS diodes at room temperature. A decrease in the experimental barrier height and an increase in the ideality factor with decreasing temperature are shown. Reverse recovery testing also shows the temperature dependence of the peak recovery current density and the reverse recovery time. Finally, a discussion of reducing the reverse recovery time is presented.

  2. Advanced Multi-Component Defect Cluster Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The advantages of using ceramic thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engine hot sections include increased fuel efficiency and improved engine reliability. However, current thermal barrier coatings will not have the low thermal conductivity and necessary sintering resistance under higher operating temperatures and thermal gradients required by future advanced ultra-efficient and low-emission aircraft engines. In this paper, a novel oxide defect cluster design approach is described for achieving low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability of the thermal barrier coating systems. This approach utilizes multi-component rare earth and other metal cluster oxide dopants that are incorporated in the zirconia-yttria based systems, thus significantly reducing coating thermal conductivity and sintering resistance by effectively promoting the formation of thermodynamically stable, essentially immobile defect clusters and/or nanoscale phases. The performance of selected plasma-sprayed cluster oxide thermal barrier coating systems has been evaluated. The advanced multi-component thermal barrier coating systems were found to have significantly lower initial and long-term thermal conductivities, and better high temperature stability. The effect of oxide cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, sintering resistance, oxide grain growth behavior and durability will be discussed.

  3. Advanced Multi-Component Defect Cluster Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The advantages of using ceramic thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engine hot sections include increased fuel efficiency and improved engine reliability. However, current thermal barrier coatings will not have the low thermal conductivity and necessary sintering resistance under higher operating temperatures and thermal gradients required by future advanced ultra efficient and low emission aircraft engines. In this paper, a novel oxide defect cluster design approach is described for achieving low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability of the thermal barrier coating systems. This approach utilizes multi-component rare earth and other metal cluster oxide dopants that are incorporated in the zirconia-yttna based systems, thus significantly reducing coating thermal conductivity and sintering resistance by effectively promoting the formation of thermodynamically stable, essentially immobile defect clusters and/or nanoscale phases. The performance of selected plasma-sprayed cluster oxide thermal barrier coating systems has been evaluated. The advanced multi-component thermal barrier coating systems were found to have significantly lower initial and long-term thermal conductivities, and better high temperature stability. The effect of oxide cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, sintering resistance, oxide grain growth behavior and durability will be discussed.

  4. Healthcare Preferences among Nursing Home Residents: Perceived Barriers and Situational Dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Bangerter, Lauren R.; Abbott, Katherine; Heid, Allison R.; Klumpp, Rachel E.; Van Haitsma, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    While much research has examined end of life care preferences of nursing home (NH) residents, little work has examined resident preferences for everyday healthcare. The present study conducted interviews with 255 residents recruited from 35 NHs. Content analysis identified barriers (hindrances to the fulfillment of resident preferences) and situational dependencies (what would make residents change their mind about the importance of these preferences) associated with preferences for utilizing mental health services, choosing a medical care provider, and choosing individuals involved in care discussions. Barriers and situational dependencies were embedded within the person, facility environment, and social environment. Nearly half of residents identified barriers to their preferences of choosing others involved in care and choosing a medical care provider. In contrast, the importance of mental health services was situationally dependent on needs of residents. Results highlight opportunities for improvement in practice and facility policies that promote person-centered care. PMID:26716460

  5. Strain-dependent disruption of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier by Streptoccocus suis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Tobias; Adam, Rüdiger; Eggelnpöhler, Ingo; Matalon, David; Seibt, Annette; K Novotny, Gerd E; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Schroten, Horst

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus suis capsular type 2 is an important agent of diseases including meningitis among pigs worldwide, and is also a zoonotic agent. The barrier function of the choroid plexus epithelium that constitutes the structural basis for the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier has not been elucidated yet in bacterial meningitis. We investigated the influence of various S. suis isolates on the barrier function of cultured porcine choroid plexus epithelial cells with respect to the transepithelial resistance and paracellular [(3)H]-mannitol flux. Preferentially apical application of S. suis isolates significantly decreased transepithelial resistance and significantly increased paracellular [(3)H]-mannitol flux in a time-, dose- and strain-dependent manner. Viable S. suis isolates caused cytotoxicity determined by lactate dehydrogenase assay and electron microscopy, whereas S. suis sonicates and UV-inactivated S. suis did not cause cytotoxicity. The observed effects on porcine choroid plexus epithelial cells barrier function could not exclusively be ascribed to known virulence factors of S. suis such as suilysin. In conclusion, S. suis isolates induce loss of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function in an in vitro model. Thus, S. suis may facilitate trafficking of bacteria and leucocytes across the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. The underlying mechanisms for the barrier breakdown have yet to be determined. PMID:15780575

  6. Human skin penetration and local effects of topical nano zinc oxide after occlusion and barrier impairment.

    PubMed

    Leite-Silva, V R; Sanchez, W Y; Studier, H; Liu, D C; Mohammed, Y H; Holmes, A M; Ryan, E M; Haridass, I N; Chandrasekaran, N C; Becker, W; Grice, J E; Benson, H A E; Roberts, M S

    2016-07-01

    Public health concerns continue to exist over the safety of zinc oxide nanoparticles that are commonly used in sunscreen formulations. In this work, we assessed the effects of two conditions which may be encountered in everyday sunscreen use, occlusion and a compromised skin barrier, on the penetration and local toxicity of two topically applied zinc oxide nanoparticle products. Caprylic/capric triglyceride (CCT) suspensions of commercially used zinc oxide nanoparticles, either uncoated or with a silane coating, were applied to intact and barrier impaired skin of volunteers, without and with occlusion for a period of six hours. The exposure time was chosen to simulate normal in-use conditions. Multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging was used to noninvasively assess zinc oxide penetration and cellular metabolic changes that could be indicative of toxicity. We found that zinc oxide nanoparticles did not penetrate into the viable epidermis of intact or barrier impaired skin of volunteers, without or with occlusion. We also observed no apparent toxicity in the viable epidermis below the application sites. These findings were validated by ex vivo human skin studies in which zinc penetration was assessed by multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging as well as Zinpyr-1 staining and toxicity was assessed by MTS assays in zinc oxide treated skin cryosections. In conclusion, applications of zinc oxide nanoparticles under occlusive in-use conditions to volunteers are not associated with any measurable zinc oxide penetration into, or local toxicity in the viable epidermis below the application site. PMID:27131753

  7. Nox2-dependent glutathionylation of endothelial NOS leads to uncoupled superoxide production and endothelial barrier dysfunction in acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Feng; Szczepaniak, William S.; Shiva, Sruti; Liu, Huanbo; Wang, Yinna; Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Kelley, Eric E.; Chen, Alex F.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular barrier integrity is dependent on bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) produced locally by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Under conditions of limited substrate or cofactor availability or by enzymatic modification, eNOS may become uncoupled, producing superoxide in lieu of NO. This study was designed to investigate how eNOS-dependent superoxide production contributes to endothelial barrier dysfunction in inflammatory lung injury and its regulation. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with intratracheal LPS. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for protein accumulation, and lung tissue homogenate was assayed for endothelial NOS content and function. Human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HLMVEC) monolayers were exposed to LPS in vitro, and barrier integrity and superoxide production were measured. Biopterin species were quantified, and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays were performed to identify protein interactions with eNOS that putatively drive uncoupling. Mice exposed to LPS demonstrated eNOS-dependent increased alveolar permeability without evidence for altered canonical NO signaling. LPS-induced superoxide production and permeability in HLMVEC were inhibited by the NOS inhibitor nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, eNOS-targeted siRNA, the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin, and superoxide dismutase. Co-IP indicated that LPS stimulated the association of eNOS with NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2), which correlated with augmented eNOS S-glutathionylation both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, Nox2-specific inhibition prevented LPS-induced eNOS modification and increases in both superoxide production and permeability. These data indicate that eNOS uncoupling contributes to superoxide production and barrier dysfunction in the lung microvasculature after exposure to LPS. Furthermore, the results implicate Nox2-mediated eNOS-S-glutathionylation as a mechanism underlying LPS-induced eNOS uncoupling in the lung microvasculature. PMID:25326583

  8. Amorphous alumina thin films deposited on titanium: Interfacial chemistry and thermal oxidation barrier properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baggetto, Loic; Charvillat, Cedric; Thebault, Yannick; Esvan, Jerome; Lafont, Marie-Christine; Scheid, Emmanuel; Veith, Gabriel M.; Vahlas, Constantin

    2015-12-02

    Ti/Al2O3 bilayer stacks are used as model systems to investigate the role of atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to prepare 30-180 nm thick amorphous alumina films as protective barriers for the medium temperature oxidation (500-600⁰C) of titanium, which is employed in aeronautic applications. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that the films produced from the direct liquid injection (DLI) CVD of aluminum tri-isopropoxide (ATI) are poor oxygen barriers. The films processed using the ALD of trimethylaluminum (TMA) show good barrier properties butmore » an extensive intermixing with Ti which subsequently oxidizes. In contrast, the films prepared from dimethyl aluminum isopropoxide (DMAI) by CVD are excellent oxygen barriers and show little intermixing with Ti. Overall, these measurements correlate the effect of the alumina coating thickness, morphology, and stoichiometry resulting from the preparation method to the oxidation barrier properties, and show that compact and stoichiometric amorphous alumina films offer superior barrier properties.« less

  9. Amorphous alumina thin films deposited on titanium: Interfacial chemistry and thermal oxidation barrier properties

    SciTech Connect

    Baggetto, Loic; Charvillat, Cedric; Thebault, Yannick; Esvan, Jerome; Lafont, Marie-Christine; Scheid, Emmanuel; Veith, Gabriel M.; Vahlas, Constantin

    2015-12-02

    Ti/Al2O3 bilayer stacks are used as model systems to investigate the role of atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to prepare 30-180 nm thick amorphous alumina films as protective barriers for the medium temperature oxidation (500-600⁰C) of titanium, which is employed in aeronautic applications. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that the films produced from the direct liquid injection (DLI) CVD of aluminum tri-isopropoxide (ATI) are poor oxygen barriers. The films processed using the ALD of trimethylaluminum (TMA) show good barrier properties but an extensive intermixing with Ti which subsequently oxidizes. In contrast, the films prepared from dimethyl aluminum isopropoxide (DMAI) by CVD are excellent oxygen barriers and show little intermixing with Ti. Overall, these measurements correlate the effect of the alumina coating thickness, morphology, and stoichiometry resulting from the preparation method to the oxidation barrier properties, and show that compact and stoichiometric amorphous alumina films offer superior barrier properties.

  10. Thin Oxides as a Cu Diffusion Barrier for NIF Be Ablator Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Kelly P.; Huang, H.; Xu, H. W.; Hayes, J.; Moreno, K. A.; Wu, J. J.; Nikroo, A.; Alford, C. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Wang, Y. M.; Wu, K. J.

    2013-03-01

    The NIF point design uses a five-layer capsule to modify the X-ray absorption in order to achieve optimized shock timing. A stepped copper dopant design defines the layer structure. The production of the capsule involves pyrolysis to remove the inner plastic mandrel. Copper atoms diffuse radially and azimuthally throughout the capsule during pyrolysis. This diffusion significantly diminishes the capsule performance during implosion. Thermal and coated oxide barrier layers employed between layers mitigate the diffusion of copper during the mandrel removal process. The copper atoms do not diffuse through this barrier during pyrolysis. A capsule fabrication method that produces a capsule with a thin oxide layer will be discussed.

  11. Highly defective oxides as sinter resistant thermal barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2005-08-16

    A thermal barrier coating material formed of a highly defective cubic matrix structure having a concentration of a stabilizer sufficiently high that the oxygen vacancies created by the stabilizer interact within the matrix to form multi-vacancies, thereby improving the sintering resistance of the material. The concentration of stabilizer within the cubic matrix structure is greater than that concentration of stabilizer necessary to give the matrix a peak ionic conductivity value. The concentration of stabilizer may be at least 30 wt. %. Embodiments include a cubic matrix of zirconia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % yttria, and a cubic matrix of hafnia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % gadolinia.

  12. Application of diffusion barriers to the refractory fibers of tungsten, columbium, carbon and aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, F. C.; Paradis, E. L.; Veltri, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    A radio frequency powered ion-plating system was used to plate protective layers of refractory oxides and carbide onto high strength fiber substrates. Subsequent overplating of these combinations with nickel and titanium was made to determine the effectiveness of such barrier layers in preventing diffusion of the overcoat metal into the fibers with consequent loss of fiber strength. Four substrates, five coatings, and two metal matrix materials were employed for a total of forty material combinations. The substrates were tungsten, niobium, NASA-Hough carbon, and Tyco sapphire. The diffusion-barrier coatings were aluminum oxide, yttrium oxide, titanium carbide, tungsten carbide with 14% cobalt addition, and zirconium carbide. The metal matrix materials were IN 600 nickel and Ti 6/4 titanium. Adhesion of the coatings to all substrates was good except for the NASA-Hough carbon, where flaking off of the oxide coatings in particular was observed.

  13. Effects of angular dependence of surface diffuseness in deformed nuclei on Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Malov, L. A.; Scamps, G.; Lacroix, D.

    2014-09-01

    The angular dependence of surface diffuseness is further discussed. The results of self-consistent calculations are compared with those obtained with the phenomenological mean-field potential. The rather simple parametrizations are suggested. The effects of surface polarization and hexadecapole deformation on the height of the Coulomb barrier are revealed.

  14. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3-dependent microvascular endothelial cell barrier function is disrupted under septic conditions.

    PubMed

    Arpino, Valerie; Mehta, Sanjay; Wang, Lefeng; Bird, Ryan; Rohan, Marta; Pape, Cynthia; Gill, Sean E

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is associated with dysfunction of microvascular endothelial cells (MVEC) leading to tissue edema and multiple organ dysfunction. Metalloproteinases can regulate MVEC function through processing of cell surface proteins, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 (TIMP3) regulates metalloproteinase activity in the lung following injury. We hypothesize that TIMP3 promotes normal pulmonary MVEC barrier function through inhibition of metalloproteinase activity. Naive Timp3(-/-) mice had significantly higher basal pulmonary microvascular Evans blue (EB) dye-labeled albumin leak vs. wild-type (WT) mice. Additionally, cecal-ligation/perforation (CLP)-induced sepsis significantly increased pulmonary microvascular EB-labeled albumin leak in WT but not Timp3(-/-) mice. Similarly, PBS-treated isolated MVEC monolayers from Timp3(-/-) mice displayed permeability barrier dysfunction vs. WT MVEC, evidenced by lower transendothelial electrical resistance and greater trans-MVEC flux of fluorescein-dextran and EB-albumin. Cytomix (equimolar interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 1β) treatment of WT MVEC induced significant barrier dysfunction (by all three methods), and was associated with a time-dependent decrease in TIMP3 mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, basal Timp3(-/-) MVEC barrier dysfunction was associated with disrupted MVEC surface VE-cadherin localization, and both barrier dysfunction and VE-cadherin localization were rescued by treatment with GM6001, a synthetic metalloproteinase inhibitor. TIMP3 promotes normal MVEC barrier function, at least partially, through inhibition of metalloproteinase-dependent disruption of adherens junctions, and septic downregulation of TIMP3 may contribute to septic MVEC barrier dysfunction. PMID:26993226

  15. Comparison study of ferrofluid and powder iron oxide nanoparticle permeability across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Dan; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the permeability of 11 different iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP) samples (eight fluids and three powders) was determined using an in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Importantly, the results showed that the ferrofluid formulations were statistically more permeable than the IONP powder formulations at the blood-brain barrier, suggesting a role for the presently studied in situ synthesized ferrofluid formulations using poly(vinyl) alcohol, bovine serum albumin, collagen, glutamic acid, graphene, and their combinations as materials which can cross the blood-brain barrier to deliver drugs or have other neurological therapeutic efficacy. Conversely, the results showed the least permeability across the blood-brain barrier for the IONP with collagen formulation, suggesting a role as a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent but limiting IONP passage across the blood-brain barrier. Further analysis of the data yielded several trends of note, with little correlation between permeability and fluid zeta potential, but a larger correlation between permeability and fluid particle size (with the smaller particle sizes having larger permeability). Such results lay the foundation for simple modification of iron oxide nanoparticle formulations to either promote or inhibit passage across the blood-brain barrier, and deserve further investigation for a wide range of applications. PMID:23426527

  16. Use of aluminum as an oxidation barrier for titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnam, J.; Shenoy, R. N.; Wiedemann, K. E.; Clark, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    A study is conducted of the use of aluminum coatings as oxidation retardants for Ti alloys, using room temperature normal emittance and spectral emittance as bases for the characterization of oxidation properties with and without the coatings. Thermal exposures were conducted in a thermogravimetric analysis apparatus in which specimen weight was continuously monitored. The results obtained indicate that the weight gains are proportional to the square root of the time for uncoated alloys and for 649 C-exposed aluminum-coated alloys. For the 704 C-exposed aluminum-coated alloys, weight gain exhibits a low rate for short and a high rate for long exposure times, implying that the 0.5-micron coating's protection decreases for long exposures at this temperature.

  17. Strong, self-standing oxygen barrier films from nanocelluloses modified with regioselective oxidative treatments.

    PubMed

    Sirviö, Juho Antti; Kolehmainen, Aleksi; Visanko, Miikka; Liimatainen, Henrikki; Niinimäki, Jouko; Hormi, Osmo E O

    2014-08-27

    In this work, three self-standing nanocellulose films were produced from birch pulp using regioselective oxidation and further derivatization treatments. The modified celluloses were synthesized using periodate oxidation, followed by chlorite oxidation, bisulfite addition, or reductive amination with amino acid taurine, which resulted in dicarboxylic acid cellulose (DCC), α-hydroxy sulfonic acid cellulose (HSAC), and taurine-modified cellulose (TC), respectively. The nanocelluloses were fabricated by mechanical disintegration using high-pressure homogenization. Mechanical and barrier properties of the nanocellulose films were characterized. Two (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) oxidation-based nanocellulose films were also produced, and their properties were compared to the periodate-based nanocellulose films. All of the periodate-based nanocellulose films showed high tensile strength (130-163 MPa) and modulus (19-22 GPa). Oxygen barrier properties of the films were superior to many synthetic and composite materials; in particular, the nanofibrillated DCC films had oxygen permeability as low as 0.12 cm(3) μm/(m(2) d kPa) at 50% relative humidity. Compared to films of TEMPO-oxidized nanocelluloses, all of the periodate-based nanocellulose films had similar or even better mechanical and barrier properties, demonstrating versatility of periodate oxidation to obtain nanocellulose films with adjustable properties. Also, for the first time, amino-acid-based cellulose modification was used in the production of nanocellulose. PMID:25089516

  18. Asymmetric spin absorption across a low-resistance oxide barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shuhan; Qin, Chuan; Ji, Yi

    2015-07-21

    An unconventional method of nonlocal spin detection is demonstrated in mesoscopic lateral spin valves at room temperature. Clear nonlocal spin signals are detected between the two ends of an extended ferromagnetic spin detector. This is different from the conventional method in which the nonlocal voltage is measured between the spin detector and the nonmagnetic channel. The results can be understood as spatially non-uniform absorption of a pure spin current into the spin detector across a low-resistance oxide interface.

  19. Impermeable barrier films and protective coatings based on reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Kravets, V. G.; Wong, S. L.; Waters, J.; Geim, A. K.; Nair, R. R.

    2014-09-01

    Flexible barrier films preventing permeation of gases and moistures are important for many industries ranging from food to medical and from chemical to electronic. From this perspective, graphene has recently attracted particular interest because its defect-free monolayers are impermeable to all atoms and molecules. However, it has been proved to be challenging to develop large-area defectless graphene films suitable for industrial use. Here we report barrier properties of multilayer graphitic films made by gentle chemical reduction of graphene oxide laminates with hydroiodic and ascorbic acids. They are found to be highly impermeable to all gases, liquids and aggressive chemicals including, for example, hydrofluoric acid. The exceptional barrier properties are attributed to a high degree of graphitization of the laminates and little structural damage during reduction. This work indicates a close prospect of graphene-based flexible and inert barriers and protective coatings, which can be of interest for numerous applications.

  20. Vasoinhibins regulate the inner and outer blood-retinal barrier and limit retinal oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo Zamarripa, David; Díaz-Lezama, Nundehui; Meléndez García, Rodrigo; Chávez Balderas, Jesús; Adán, Norma; Ledesma-Colunga, Maria G.; Arnold, Edith; Clapp, Carmen; Thebault, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    Vasoinhibins are prolactin fragments present in the retina, where they have been shown to prevent the hypervasopermeability associated with diabetes. Enhanced bradykinin (BK) production contributes to the increased transport through the blood-retina barrier (BRB) in diabetes. Here, we studied if vasoinhibins regulate BRB permeability by targeting the vascular endothelium and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) components of this barrier. Intravitreal injection of BK in male rats increased BRB permeability. Vasoinhibins prevented this effect, as did the B2 receptor antagonist Hoe-140. BK induced a transient decrease in mouse retinal and brain capillary endothelial monolayer resistance that was blocked by vasoinhibins. Both vasoinhibins and the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor L-NAME, but not the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), blocked the transient decrease in bovine umbilical vein endothelial cell (BUVEC) monolayer resistance induced by BK; this block was reversed by the NO donor DETANONOate. Vasoinhibins also prevented the BK-induced actin cytoskeleton redistribution, as did L-NAME. BK transiently decreased human RPE (ARPE-19) cell monolayer resistance, and this effect was blocked by vasoinhibins, L-NAME, and NAC. DETANONOate reverted the blocking effect of vasoinhibins. Similar to BK, the radical initiator Luperox induced a reduction in ARPE-19 cell monolayer resistance, which was prevented by vasoinhibins. These effects on RPE resistance coincided with actin cytoskeleton redistribution. Intravitreal injection of vasoinhibins reduced the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in retinas of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, particularly in the RPE and capillary-containing layers. Thus, vasoinhibins reduce BRB permeability by targeting both its main inner and outer components through NO- and ROS-dependent pathways, offering potential treatment strategies against diabetic retinopathies. PMID:25368550

  1. Polymer-Derived Ceramics as Innovative Oxidation Barrier Coatings for Mo-Si-B Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasemann, Georg; Baumann, Torben; Dieck, Sebastian; Rannabauer, Stefan; Krüger, Manja

    2015-04-01

    A preceramic polymer precursor, perhydropolysilazane, is used to investigate its function as a new type of oxidation barrier coating on Mo-Si-B alloys. After dip-coating and pyrolysis at 1073 K (800 °C), dense and well-adhering SiON ceramic coatings could be achieved, which were investigated by SEM and cyclic oxidation tests at 1073 K and 1373 K (800 °C and 1100 °C). The coating is promising in reducing the mass loss during the initial stage of oxidation exposure at 1373 K (1100 °C) significantly.

  2. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation of an air plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.; Rigney, E.D.

    1996-08-01

    Thermogravimetric methods for evaluating bond coat oxidation in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems were assessed by high-temperature testing of TBC systems with air plasma-sprayed (APS) Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and yttria-stabilized zirconia top coatings. High-mass thermogravimetric analysis (at 1150{sup degrees}C) was used to measure bond coat oxidation kinetics. Furnace cycling was used to evaluate APS TBC durability. This paper describes the experimental methods and relative oxidation kinetics of the various specimen types. Characterization of the APS TBCs and their reaction products is discussed.

  3. Investigation of humidity-dependent size control of local anodic oxidation on graphene by using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seoknam; Lee, Seong jun; Son, Maengho; Ahn, Doyeol; Lee, Seung-Woong

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate nanoscale local anodic oxidation (LAO) patterning on few-layer graphene by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) at room temperature under a normal atmosphere. We focus on the humidity dependency of nanoscale oxidation of graphene. The relations between the oxidation size and the setting values of the AFM, such as the set point, tip speed, and the humidity, are observed. By changing these values, proper parameters were found to produce features with on-demand size. This technique provides an easy way for graphene oxide lithography without any chemical resists. We obtained oxidation sizes down to 50 nm with a 6-nm-high oxide barrier line by using a 0.1- μm/s tip scanning speed. We also obtained micrometer-sized symbols on a graphene flake. We attribute the bumps of oxidized graphene in the graphene layer to local anodic oxidation on graphenes surface and to an incorporation of oxygen ions into the graphene lattice.

  4. Field-dependent energy barriers in Co/CoO core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, P.; Kechrakos, D.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.

    2016-02-01

    We perform atomistic modeling of Co/CoO nanoparticles with a diameter of a few nanometers and realistic values of the exchange and anisotropy parameters in order to study the field-dependent energy barriers under forward and backward reversal of the magnetization. The barriers are extracted from the constrained energy minimization using the integration of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations and the Lagrange multiplier method. We show that the applied field and the interface exchange strength have opposite effects on the values of the energy barriers. In particular, while the backward (forward) energy barrier increases (decreases) linearly with the strength of the interface exchange coupling, it decreases (increases) almost quadratically with the applied magnetic field. Our results are in good agreement with the well-known Meiklejohn-Bean model of exchange bias, and allow us to analyze the limits of applicability of the macrospin approach to the study of energy barriers in core-shell Co/CoO nanoparticles.

  5. Anaerobic Nitrate-Dependent Metal Bio-Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K.; Knox, T.; Achenbach, L. A.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Direct biological oxidation of reduced metals (Fe(II) and U(IV)) coupled to nitrate reduction at circumneutral pH under anaerobic conditions has been recognized in several environments as well as pure culture. Several phylogentically diverse mesophilic bacteria have been described as capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation (NFOx). Our recent identification of a freshwater mesophilic, lithoautotroph, Ferrutens nitratireducens strain 2002, capable of growth through NFOx presents an opportunity to further study metal bio- oxidation. Continuing physiological studies revealed that in addition to Fe(II) oxidation, strain 2002 is capable of oxidizing U(IV) (4 μM) in washed cell suspensions with nitrate serving as the electron acceptor. Pasteurized cultures exhibited abiotic oxidation of 2 μM U(IV). Under growth conditions, strain 2002 catalyzed the oxidation of 12 μM U(IV) within a two week period. Cultures amended with sodium azide, an electron transport inhibitor, demonstrated limited oxidation (7 μM) similar to pasteurized cultures, supporting the direct role of electron transport in U(IV) bio-oxidation. The oxidation of U(IV) coupled denitrification at circumneutral pH would yield enough energy to support anaerobic microbial growth (ΔG°'= -460.36 kJ/mole). It is currently unknown whether or not strain 2002 can couple this metabolism to growth. The growth of F. nitratireducens strain 2002 utilizing Fe(II) as the sole electron donor was previously demonstrated. The amount of U(IV) (~12 μM) that strain 2002 oxidized under similar autotrophic growth conditions yields 0.0019 kJ, enough energy for the generation of ATP (5.3 x 10-20 kJ ATP-1), but not enough energy for cell replication as calculated for nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizing conditions (0.096 kJ) assuming a similar metabolism. In addition to F. nitratireducens strain 2002, a nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizing bacterium isolated from U contaminated groundwater, Diaphorobacter sp. strain

  6. Mechanism of the development of a weakly alkaline barrier slurry without BTA and oxidizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaodong, Luan; Yuling, Liu; Xinhuan, Niu; Juan, Wang

    2015-07-01

    Controllable removal rate selectivity with various films (Cu, Ta, SiO2) is a challenging job in barrier CMP. H2O2 as an oxidizer and benzotriazole (BTA) as an inhibitor is considered to be an effective method in barrier CMP. Slurries that contain hydrogen peroxide have a very short shelf life because H2O2 is unstable and easily decomposed. BTA can cause post-CMP challenges, such as organic residue, toxicity and particle adhesion. We have been engaged in studying a weakly alkaline barrier slurry without oxidizer and benzotriazole. Based on these works, the objective of this paper is to discuss the mechanism of the development of the barrier slurry without oxidizer and benzotriazole by studying the effects of the different components (containing colloidal silica, FA/O complexing agent, pH of polishing solution and guanidine nitrate) on removal rate selectivity. The possible related polishing mechanism has also been proposed. Project supported by the Major National Science and Technology Special Projects (No. 2009ZX02308), the National Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (No. E2013202247), and the Department of Education-Funded Research Projects of Hebei Province, China (No. QN2014208).

  7. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits. PMID:27403611

  8. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-07-01

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits.

  9. Atomic structure and oxygen deficiency of the ultrathin aluminium oxide barrier in Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lunjie; Tran, Dung Trung; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Svensson, Gunnar; Olsson, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions are the building blocks of a wide range of superconducting quantum devices that are key elements for quantum computers, extremely sensitive magnetometers and radiation detectors. The properties of the junctions and the superconducting quantum devices are determined by the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. The nanoscale dimension and disordered nature of the barrier oxide have been challenges for the direct experimental investigation of the atomic structure of the tunnel barrier. Here we show that the miniaturized dimension of the barrier and the interfacial interaction between crystalline Al and amorphous AlOx give rise to oxygen deficiency at the metal/oxide interfaces. In the interior of the barrier, the oxide resembles the atomic structure of bulk aluminium oxide. Atomic defects such as oxygen vacancies at the interfaces can be the origin of the two-level systems and contribute to decoherence and noise in superconducting quantum circuits. PMID:27403611

  10. [Inhalation of nitric oxide - dependence: case report

    PubMed

    Carvalho, W B; Matsumoto, T; Horita, S M; Almeida, N M; Martins, F R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Describe the hemodynamic response with rebound of pulmonary hypertension after withdrawal of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in a pediatric patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS: Case report of a child with ARDS and pulmonary hypertension evaluated through ecocardiografic with dopller, receiving inhaled NO for a period of 21 days. RESULTS: There was a decrease of the pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) from 52 mmHg to 44 mmHg after the initial titulation of NO inhalation dose. After the withdrawal of inhaled NO an elevation of PAP was observed (55 mmHg). It was necessary to reinstall the inhaled NO to obtain a more appropriate value (34 mmHg). A new attempt of interruption of the inhaled NO after prolonged inhalation (20 days) resulted in a new clinic worsening and increase of PAP, with the indication to reinstall the inhaled NO. In the 24th day of permanence in the intensive care unit the patient died due to multiple organ dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: The possibility of pulmonary hypertension rebound after withdrawal of inhaled NO is a complication that may have important clinical implications for patients who need a prolonged treatment with NO. This case report emphasizes these implications. PMID:14647690

  11. Coefficient of thermal expansion dependent thermal stress analysis of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) using finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, Omotola

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are highly sophisticated micro scale ceramic insulation applied on high temperature components such as gas turbine blades. TBCs create a large temperature drop between the gas turbine environment and the underlying metal blades. TBC lifetime is finite and influenced by several factors such as: Bond Coat (BC) oxidation, BC roughness, Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between the layers, and creep properties of the TBC system. However, there is a lack of reliable methods of TBC life prediction which result in under utilization of these coatings. This research study focuses on modeling the steady state thermal stresses in TBC systems of various oxide thicknesses, and BC roughness, using Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The model factors into it the temperature dependent thermo mechanical properties of each layer, as well as the creep properties. The steady state model results show similar results to the existing transient models: an increase in tensile stresses as the oxide thickness increases, an increase in tensile stresses with BC roughness and stress relaxation in the ceramic BC interface due to creep. It also shows in each model, initially compressive stresses in the BC - Top Coat (TC) interface, and its evolution into higher tensile stresses which lead to crack formation and ultimately failure of the TBC by spallation.

  12. RF-sputter-deposited magnesium oxide films as high-quality adjustable tunnel barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Villegier, J.C.; Radparvar, M.; Yu, L.S.; Faris, S.M.

    1989-03-01

    High quality RF-sputtered MgO films are used as tunnel barriers to fabricate small area, niobium nitride Josephson tunnel junctions. A magnesium oxide barrier deposited as a single layer, or as a multilayer film, results in devices with similar characteristics. Annealing trilayers at temperatures in excess of 250/sup 0/C for several hours decrease junction current density and improve device quality presumably by increasing barrier heights through reducing resonant tunneling states. A self-aligned process utilizing only two mask levels is used to produce junctions as small as 0.5 ..mu..m/sup 2/ with excellent critical current uniformity. These junctions exhibit energy gaps of 5.1 mV and low subgap currents at current densities in excess of 1000 A/cm/sup 2/ which make them suitable for a variety of applications such as SIS mixers and logic circuits.

  13. Zirconia and Pyrochlore Oxides for Thermal Barrier Coatings in Gas Turbine Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Fergus, Jeffrey W.

    2014-04-12

    One of the important applications of yttria stabilized zirconia is as a thermal barrier coating for gas turbine engines. While yttria stabilized zirconia performs well in this function, the need for increased operating temperatures to achieve higher energy conversion efficiencies, requires the development of improved materials. To meet this challenge, some rare-earth zirconates that form the cubic fluorite derived pyrochlore structure are being developed for use in thermal barrier coatings due to their low thermal conductivity, excellent chemical stability and other suitable properties. In this paper, the thermal conductivities of current and prospective oxides for use in thermal barrier coatings are reviewed. The factors affecting the variations and differences in the thermal conductivities and the degradation behaviors of these materials are discussed.

  14. Zirconia and Pyrochlore Oxides for Thermal Barrier Coatings in Gas Turbine Engines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fergus, Jeffrey W.

    2014-04-12

    One of the important applications of yttria stabilized zirconia is as a thermal barrier coating for gas turbine engines. While yttria stabilized zirconia performs well in this function, the need for increased operating temperatures to achieve higher energy conversion efficiencies, requires the development of improved materials. To meet this challenge, some rare-earth zirconates that form the cubic fluorite derived pyrochlore structure are being developed for use in thermal barrier coatings due to their low thermal conductivity, excellent chemical stability and other suitable properties. In this paper, the thermal conductivities of current and prospective oxides for use in thermal barrier coatingsmore » are reviewed. The factors affecting the variations and differences in the thermal conductivities and the degradation behaviors of these materials are discussed.« less

  15. Oxidation of trichloroethylene, toluene, and ethanol vapors by a partially saturated permeable reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba G.; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid; Hartog, Niels; Raoof, Amir

    2014-08-01

    The mitigation of volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors in the unsaturated zone largely relies on the active removal of vapor by ventilation. In this study we considered an alternative method involving the use of solid potassium permanganate to create a horizontal permeable reactive barrier for oxidizing VOC vapors. Column experiments were carried out to investigate the oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE), toluene, and ethanol vapors using a partially saturated mixture of potassium permanganate and sand grains. Results showed a significant removal of VOC vapors due to the oxidation. We found that water saturation has a major effect on the removal capacity of the permeable reactive layer. We observed a high removal efficiency and reactivity of potassium permanganate for all target compounds at the highest water saturation (Sw = 0.6). A change in pH within the reactive layer reduced oxidation rate of VOCs. The use of carbonate minerals increased the reactivity of potassium permanganate during the oxidation of TCE vapor by buffering the pH. Reactive transport of VOC vapors diffusing through the permeable reactive layer was modeled, including the pH effect on the oxidation rates. The model accurately described the observed breakthrough curve of TCE and toluene vapors in the headspace of the column. However, miscibility of ethanol in water in combination with produced water during oxidation made the modeling results less accurate for ethanol. A linear relationship was found between total oxidized mass of VOC vapors per unit volume of permeable reactive layer and initial water saturation. This behavior indicates that pH changes control the overall reactivity and longevity of the permeable reactive layer during oxidation of VOCs. The results suggest that field application of a horizontal permeable reactive barrier can be a viable technology against upward migration of VOC vapors through the unsaturated zone.

  16. Thin Oxides as a Cu Diffusion Barrier for NIF Be Ablator Capsules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Youngblood, Kelly P.; Huang, H.; Xu, H. W.; Hayes, J.; Moreno, K. A.; Wu, J. J.; Nikroo, A.; Alford, C. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Kucheyev, S. O.; et al

    2013-03-01

    The NIF point design uses a five-layer capsule to modify the X-ray absorption in order to achieve optimized shock timing. A stepped copper dopant design defines the layer structure. The production of the capsule involves pyrolysis to remove the inner plastic mandrel. Copper atoms diffuse radially and azimuthally throughout the capsule during pyrolysis. This diffusion significantly diminishes the capsule performance during implosion. Thermal and coated oxide barrier layers employed between layers mitigate the diffusion of copper during the mandrel removal process. The copper atoms do not diffuse through this barrier during pyrolysis. A capsule fabrication method that produces a capsulemore » with a thin oxide layer will be discussed.« less

  17. GRP78 is a novel receptor initiating a vascular barrier protective response to oxidized phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Birukova, Anna A; Singleton, Patrick A; Gawlak, Grzegorz; Tian, Xinyong; Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Mambetsariev, Bolot; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Oskolkova, Olga V; Bochkov, Valery N; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2014-07-01

    Vascular integrity and the maintenance of blood vessel continuity are fundamental features of the circulatory system maintained through endothelial cell-cell junctions. Defects in the endothelial barrier become an initiating factor in several pathologies, including ischemia/reperfusion, tumor angiogenesis, pulmonary edema, sepsis, and acute lung injury. Better understanding of mechanisms stimulating endothelial barrier enhancement may provide novel therapeutic strategies. We previously reported that oxidized phospholipids (oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine [OxPAPC]) promote endothelial cell (EC) barrier enhancement both in vitro and in vivo. This study examines the initiating mechanistic events triggered by OxPAPC to increase vascular integrity. Our data demonstrate that OxPAPC directly binds the cell membrane-localized chaperone protein, GRP78, associated with its cofactor, HTJ-1. OxPAPC binding to plasma membrane-localized GRP78 leads to GRP78 trafficking to caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEMs) on the cell surface and consequent activation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1, Src and Fyn tyrosine kinases, and Rac1 GTPase, processes essential for cytoskeletal reorganization and EC barrier enhancement. Using animal models of acute lung injury with vascular hyperpermeability, we observed that HTJ-1 knockdown blocked OxPAPC protection from interleukin-6 and ventilator-induced lung injury. Our data indicate for the first time an essential role of GRP78 and HTJ-1 in OxPAPC-mediated CEM dynamics and enhancement of vascular integrity. PMID:24829380

  18. Physicochemical Factors that Affect Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Passage Across Epithelial Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Alison; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan; DeLouise, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of nanomaterials in terms of size, shape, and surface chemistry poses a challenge to those who are trying to characterize the human health and environmental risks associated with incidental and unintentional exposures. There are numerous products that are already commercially available that contain solid metal and metal oxide nanoparticles, either embedded in a matrix or in solution. Exposure assessments for these products are often incomplete or difficult due to technological challenges associated with detection and quantitation of nanoparticles in gaseous or liquid carriers. The main focus of recent research has been on hazard identification. However, risk is a product of hazard and exposure, and one significant knowledge gap is that of the target organ dose following in vivo exposures. In order to reach target organs, nanoparticles must first breech the protective barriers of the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, or skin. The fate of those nanoparticles that reach physiological barriers is in large part determined by the properties of the particles and the barriers themselves. This article reviews the physiological properties of the lung, gut, and skin epithelia, the physicochemical properties of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles that are likely to affect their ability to breech epithelial barriers, and what is known about their fate following in vivo exposures. PMID:20049809

  19. GRP78 is a novel receptor initiating a vascular barrier protective response to oxidized phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Birukova, Anna A.; Singleton, Patrick A.; Gawlak, Grzegorz; Tian, Xinyong; Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Mambetsariev, Bolot; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Oskolkova, Olga V.; Bochkov, Valery N.; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular integrity and the maintenance of blood vessel continuity are fundamental features of the circulatory system maintained through endothelial cell–cell junctions. Defects in the endothelial barrier become an initiating factor in several pathologies, including ischemia/reperfusion, tumor angiogenesis, pulmonary edema, sepsis, and acute lung injury. Better understanding of mechanisms stimulating endothelial barrier enhancement may provide novel therapeutic strategies. We previously reported that oxidized phospholipids (oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine [OxPAPC]) promote endothelial cell (EC) barrier enhancement both in vitro and in vivo. This study examines the initiating mechanistic events triggered by OxPAPC to increase vascular integrity. Our data demonstrate that OxPAPC directly binds the cell membrane–localized chaperone protein, GRP78, associated with its cofactor, HTJ-1. OxPAPC binding to plasma membrane–localized GRP78 leads to GRP78 trafficking to caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEMs) on the cell surface and consequent activation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1, Src and Fyn tyrosine kinases, and Rac1 GTPase, processes essential for cytoskeletal reorganization and EC barrier enhancement. Using animal models of acute lung injury with vascular hyperpermeability, we observed that HTJ-1 knockdown blocked OxPAPC protection from interleukin-6 and ventilator-induced lung injury. Our data indicate for the first time an essential role of GRP78 and HTJ-1 in OxPAPC-mediated CEM dynamics and enhancement of vascular integrity. PMID:24829380

  20. Ultrasonic characterization of thermally grown oxide in thermal barrier coating by reflection coefficient amplitude spectrum.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Zhao, Yang; Luo, Zhongbing; Lin, Li

    2014-04-01

    The thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth at the interface of ceramic coating/bond coating in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was evaluated by ultrasonic reflection coefficient amplitude spectrum (URCAS). A theoretical analysis was performed about the influence of acoustic impedance match relationship between the ceramic coating and its adjacent media on URCAS. The immersion ultrasonic narrow pulse echo method was carried out on the TBC specimen before and after oxidation under 1050°C×1h for 15cycles. The resonant peaks of URCAS obtained before and after oxidation showed that TGO which generated between the ceramic coating and bond coating due to the oxidation, changed the acoustic impedance match between the ceramic coating and its adjacent media. This method is able to nondestructively characterize the generation of TGO in TBCs, and is important to practical engineering application. PMID:24359869

  1. Modeling of Schottky Barrier Modulation due to Oxidation at Metallic Electrode and Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A model is proposed for the previously reported lower Schottky barrier for holes PHI (sub bH) in air than in vacuum at a metallic electrode - semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) junction. We assume that there is a transition region between the electrode and the CNT, and an appreciable potential can drop there. The role of the oxidation is to increase this potential drop with negatively charged oxygen molecules on the CNT, leading to lower PHI(sub Bh) after oxidation. The mechanism prevails in both p- and n-CNTs, and the model consistently explains the key experimental findings.

  2. Sub-barrier fusion excitation function data and energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh

    2016-07-01

    This paper analyzed the role of intrinsic degrees of freedom of colliding nuclei in the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion cross-section data of various heavy ion fusion reactions. The influences of inelastic surface vibrations of colliding pairs are found to be dominant and their couplings result in the significantly larger fusion enhancement over the predictions of the one dimensional barrier penetration model at sub-barrier energies. The theoretical calculations are performed by using energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with the one dimensional Wong formula. The effects of dominant intrinsic channels are entertained within framework of the coupled channel calculations obtained by using the code CCFULL. It is quite interesting to note that the energy dependence in Woods-Saxon potential simulates the effects of inelastic surface vibrational states of reactants wherein significantly larger value of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.95 fm is required to address the observed fusion excitation function data of the various heavy ion fusion reactions.

  3. The burnup dependence of light water reactor spent fuel oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, B.D.

    1998-07-01

    Over the temperature range of interest for dry storage or for placement of spent fuel in a permanent repository under the conditions now being considered, UO{sub 2} is thermodynamically unstable with respect to oxidation to higher oxides. The multiple valence states of uranium allow for the accommodation of interstitial oxygen atoms in the fuel matrix. A variety of stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric phases is therefore possible as the fuel oxidizers from UO{sub 2} to higher oxides. The oxidation of UO{sub 2} has been studied extensively for over 40 years. It has been shown that spent fuel and unirradiated UO{sub 2} oxidize via different mechanisms and at different rates. The oxidation of LWR spent fuel from UO{sub 2} to UO{sub 2.4} was studied previously and is reasonably well understood. The study presented here was initiated to determine the mechanism and rate of oxidation from UO{sub 2.4} to higher oxides. During the early stages of this work, a large variability in the oxidation behavior of samples oxidized under nearly identical conditions was found. Based on previous work on the effect of dopants on UO{sub 2} oxidation and this initial variability, it was hypothesized that the substitution of fission product and actinide impurities for uranium atoms in the spent fuel matrix was the cause of the variable oxidation behavior. Since the impurity concentration is roughly proportional to the burnup of a specimen, the oxidation behavior of spent fuel was expected to be a function of both temperature and burnup. This report (1) summarizes the previous oxidation work for both unirradiated UO{sub 2} and spent fuel (Section 2.2) and presents the theoretical basis for the burnup (i.e., impurity concentration) dependence of the rate of oxidation (Sections 2.3, 2.4, and 2.5), (2) describes the experimental approach (Section 3) and results (Section 4) for the current oxidation tests on spent fuel, and (3) establishes a simple model to determine the activation energies

  4. Furnace Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Multi-Component Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Nesbitt, James A.; Barrett, Charles A.; McCue, Terry R.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in advanced gas turbine engines because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling, thus helping achieve future engine low emission, high efficiency and improved reliability goals. Advanced multi-component zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings are being developed using an oxide defect clustering design approach to achieve the required coating low thermal conductivity and high temperature stability. Although the new composition coatings were not yet optimized for cyclic durability, an initial durability screening of the candidate coating materials was conducted using conventional furnace cyclic oxidation tests. In this paper, furnace cyclic oxidation behavior of plasma-sprayed zirconia-based defect cluster thermal barrier coatings was investigated at 1163 C using 45 min hot cycles. The ceramic coating failure mechanisms were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) phase analysis after the furnace tests. The coating cyclic lifetime is also discussed in relation to coating processing, phase structures, dopant concentration, and other thermo-physical properties.

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease Induced Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage Associated with Intestinal Oxidative Stress Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao; Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Chunyu; Kang, Xin; Zhao, Shuang; Liu, Shuai; Fu, Huijun; Yu, Zhen; Peng, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate whether intestinal mucosal barrier was damaged or not in chronic kidney disease progression and the status of oxidative stress. Methods. Rats were randomized into two groups: a control group and a uremia group. The uremia rat model was induced by 5/6 kidney resection. In postoperative weeks (POW) 4, 6, 8, and 10, eight rats were randomly selected from each group to prepare samples for assessing systemic inflammation, intestinal mucosal barrier changes, and the status of intestinal oxidative stress. Results. The uremia group presented an increase trend over time in the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10, serum D-lactate and diamine oxidase, and intestinal permeability, and these biomarkers were significantly higher than those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Chiu's scores in uremia group were also increased over time, especially in POW 8 and 10. Furthermore, the intestinal malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase levels were significantly higher in uremia group when compared with those in control group in POW 8 and/or 10. Conclusions. The advanced chronic kidney disease could induce intestinal mucosal barrier damage and further lead to systemic inflammation. The underlying mechanism may be associated with the intestinal oxidative stress injury. PMID:27493661

  6. Spin-dependent shot noise in diluted magnetic semiconductor/semiconductor heterostructures with a nonmagnetic barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuang; Guo, Yong

    2014-05-01

    We investigate quantum size effect on the spin-dependent shot noise in the diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS)/semiconductor heterostructure with a nonmagnetic semiconductor (NMS) barrier in the presence of external magnetic and electric fields. The results demonstrate that the NMS barrier plays a quite different role from the DMS layer in the electron transport process. It is found that spin-down shot noise shows relatively regular oscillations as the width of DMS layer increases, while the spin-up shot noise deceases monotonically. However, as the width of NMS layer increases, the spin-down shot noise displays irregular oscillations at first and then decreases while the spin-up shot noise decreases at a quite different rate. The results indicate that the shot noise can be used as a sensitive probe in detecting material type and its size.

  7. Analytical energy-barrier-dependent Voc model for amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Carranza, A.; Nolasco, J. C.; Reininghaus, N.; Geißendörfer, S.; Vehse, M.; Parisi, J.; Gutowski, J.; Voss, T.

    2016-07-01

    We show that the open circuit voltage (Voc) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells can be described by an analytical energy-barrier-dependent equation, considering thermionic emission as the physical mechanism determining the recombination current. For this purpose, the current-voltage characteristics of two device structures, i.e., a-Si:H(n)/a-Si:H(i)/a-Si:H(p)/AZO p-i-n solar cells with different p-doping concentrations and a-Si:H(n)/a-Si:H(i)/AZO Schottky structures with different intrinsic layer thicknesses, were analyzed in dark and under illumination, respectively. The calculated barrier in the p-i-n devices is consistent with the difference between the work function of the p-layer and the conduction band edge of the i-layer at the interface in thermal equilibrium.

  8. Understanding the Barriers to Use of Free, Proactive Telephone Counseling for Tobacco Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Sheffer, Christine E.; Brackman, Sharon L.; Cottoms, Naomi; Olsen, Mary

    2012-01-01

    We sought to gain an empirical and practical understanding of the barriers experienced by Arkansas Mississippi Delta residents to using the free telephone counseling (quitline) for tobacco dependence. Barriers included lack of knowledge about the quitline, lack of trust in the providers, as well as multiple root causes to seeking and achieving abstinence from tobacco including issues related to the poor socio-economic context and concerns about negative health effects of quitting. A strong belief in the role of faith in the process of quitting was expressed. Participants suggested strategies for increasing knowledge and trust levels, but were not hopeful about addressing root causes. Given the considerable resources being allocated to quitlines and the burden of tobacco use and disease in lower socioeconomic and minority groups, understanding utilization of quitlines by these groups has implications for policy development, the promotion of quitlines, and the provision of alternate tobacco treatment services. PMID:21464470

  9. Environmental degradation of oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings for fuel-flexible gas turbine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Prabhakar

    The development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been undoubtedly the most critical advancement in materials technology for modern gas turbine engines. TBCs are widely used in gas turbine engines for both power-generation and propulsion applications. Metallic oxidation-resistant coatings (ORCs) are also widely employed as a stand-alone protective coating or bond coat for TBCs in many high-temperature applications. Among the widely studied durability issues in these high-temperature protective coatings, one critical challenge that received greater attention in recent years is their resistance to high-temperature degradation due to corrosive deposits arising from fuel impurities and CMAS (calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate) sand deposits from air ingestion. The presence of vanadium, sulfur, phosphorus, sodium and calcium impurities in alternative fuels warrants a clear understanding of high-temperature materials degradation for the development of fuel-flexible gas turbine engines. Degradation due to CMAS is a critical problem for gas turbine components operating in a dust-laden environment. In this study, high-temperature degradation due to aggressive deposits such as V2O5, P2O 5, Na2SO4, NaVO3, CaSO4 and a laboratory-synthesized CMAS sand for free-standing air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the topcoat of the TBC system, and APS CoNiCrAlY, the bond coat of the TBC system or a stand-alone ORC, is examined. Phase transformations and microstructural development were examined by using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. This study demonstrated that the V2O5 melt degrades the APS YSZ through the formation of ZrV2O7 and YVO 4 at temperatures below 747°C and above 747°C, respectively. Formation of YVO4 leads to the depletion of the Y2O 3 stabilizer and the deleterious transformation of the YSZ to the monoclinic ZrO2 phase. The investigation on the YSZ degradation by Na 2SO4 and a Na2SO4 + V2

  10. Size dependent reduction-oxidation-reduction behaviour of cobalt oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Sadasivan, Sajanikumari; Bellabarba, Ronan M; Tooze, Robert P

    2013-11-21

    Morphologically similar cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4) of four different sizes (3 nm, 6 nm, 11 nm and 29 nm) with narrow size distribution were prepared by subtle variation of synthesis conditions. These nanoparticles were used as model materials to understand the structural and morphological changes that occur to cobalt oxide during sequential reduction, oxidation and further re-reduction process as a function of the initial size of cobalt oxide. On reduction, spherical cobalt nanoparticles were obtained independent of the original size of cobalt oxide. In contrast, subsequent oxidation of the metal particles led to solid spheres, hollow spheres or core-shell structures depending on the size of the initial metal particle. Further re-reduction of the oxidized structures was also observed to be size dependent. The hollow oxide shells formed by the large particles (29 nm) fragmented into smaller particles on reduction, while the hollow shells of the medium sized particles (11 nm) did not re-disperse on further reduction. Similarly, no re-dispersion was observed in the case of the small particles (6 nm). This model study provides useful insights into the size dependent behavior of metal/metal oxide particles during oxidation/reduction. This has important implications in petrochemical industry where cobalt is used as a catalyst in the Fischer-Tropsch process. PMID:24065040

  11. Magnitude-dependent regulation of pulmonary endothelial cell barrier function by cyclic stretch.

    PubMed

    Birukov, Konstantin G; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Flores, Alejandro A; Ye, Shui Q; Birukova, Anna A; Verin, Alexander D; Garcia, Joe G N

    2003-10-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury syndromes are characterized by profound increases in vascular leakiness and activation of inflammatory processes. To explore whether excessive cyclic stretch (CS) directly causes vascular barrier disruption or enhances endothelial cell sensitivity to edemagenic agents, human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAEC) were exposed to physiologically (5% elongation) or pathologically (18% elongation) relevant levels of strain. CS produced rapid (10 min) increases in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, activation of p38 and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 MAP kinases, and actomyosin remodeling. Acute (15 min) and chronic (48 h) CS markedly enhanced thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation (2.1-fold and 3.2-fold for 15-min CS at 5 and 18% elongation and 2.1-fold and 3.1-fold for 48-h CS at 5 and 18% elongation, respectively). HPAEC preconditioned at 18% CS, but not at 5% CS, exhibited significantly enhanced thrombin-induced reduction in transendothelial electrical resistance but did not affect barrier protective effect of sphingosine-1-phosphate (0.5 microM). Finally, expression profiling analysis revealed a number of genes, including small GTPase rho, apoptosis mediator ZIP kinase, and proteinase activated receptor-2, to be regulated by CS in an amplitude-dependent manner. Thus our study demonstrates a critical role for the magnitude of CS in regulation of agonist-mediated pulmonary endothelial cell permeability and strongly suggests phenotypic regulation of HPAEC barrier properties by CS. PMID:12639843

  12. Graphene-graphene oxide-graphene hybrid nanopapers with superior mechanical, gas barrier and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xilian; Huang, Wenyi; Cabrera, Eusebio; Castro, Jose; Lee, L. James

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid nanopaper-like thin films with a graphene oxide (GO) layer sandwiched by two functionalized graphene (GP-SO3H) layers were successfully prepared from oxidized graphene and benzene sulfonic modified graphene. The hybrid graphene-graphene oxide-graphene (GP-GO-GP) nanopapers showed combination of high mechanic strength and good electrical conductivity, leading to desirable electromagnetic interference shielding performance, from the GP-SO3H layers, and superior gas diffusion barrier provided by the GO layer. These GP-GO-GP nanopapers can be readily coated onto plastic and composite substrates by thermal lamination and injection molding for various industrial applications such as fuel cell and natural gas containers.

  13. Voltage-controlled oxide barriers in organic/hybrid spin valves based on tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünewald, M.; Homonnay, N.; Kleinlein, J.; Schmidt, G.

    2014-11-01

    Resistive switching, i.e., the remanent (reversible) change of a device's resistance, is a widely investigated phenomenon as it holds the prospect for realizing high density memory devices. Resistive switching has also been observed in organic semiconductors; however, a clear understanding of the underlying physics could not yet be obtained. Possible options are for example interface effects at the electrodes or the formation and destruction of filaments. Here we present resistive switching in an organic spin valve based on tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance. Similar to experiments in conventional spin-valve devices with two ferromagnetic electrodes we observe a modulation of the magnetoresistance by the electrical switching. However, as the magnetoresistance effect's origin is unambiguously clear, which is not always the case for effects in conventional structures, it can be exploited to prove that a tunnel barrier exists at the interface between the ferromagnetic oxide electrode and the organic semiconductor. Furthermore our experiments reveal that this barrier is reversibly modified during the switching, which causes both the change in magnetoresistance and total device resistance. Quantitative analysis indicates that the barrier is situated in the oxide layer. A phenomenological model provides a full description of the microscopic processes involved in the resistive switching.

  14. Oxidation resistance of tantalum-ruthenium dioxide diffusion barrier for memory capacitor bottom electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dong-Soo; Baik, Hong Koo; Lee, Sung-Man; Park, Chang-Soo; Lee, Sang-In

    1998-07-01

    The effect of the RuO2 addition into a Ta film on the oxidation resistance of a diffusion barrier for the Ta+RuO2/Si system was investigated. The Ta+RuO2/Si system was sustained up to 800 °C without an increase in resistivity, while the Ta/Si structure completely degraded after annealing at 450 °C. The Ta+RuO2 diffusion barrier showed an amorphous microstructure for an as-deposited state and formed a conductive RuO2 phase after annealing. Ta was sufficiently bound to oxygen of RuO2 for an as-deposited state, but RuO2 was divided into Ru and Ru-O binding states. Ta-O bonds showed a little change compared to the as-deposited state with increasing annealing temperature, whereas Ru-O bonds significantly increased. Therefore, the Ta layer deposited by the RuO2 addition effectively prevented the indiffusion of oxygen up to 800 °C and its oxidation resistance was superior to those of polycrystalline nitride (TiN, TaN) and ternary amorphous (TaSiN) barriers reported by others.

  15. Gas Barrier and Separation Behavior of Graphene Oxide Nanobrick Wall Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunlan, Jaime

    2015-03-01

    In many cases, electronics packaging requires electrical conductivity and barrier to oxygen, even under humid conditions. These two properties have simultaneously been realized through the use of surfactant-free aqueous layer-by-layer (LbL) processing, in the form of a polymer composite nanocoating. By layering graphene oxide (GO) with polyethyleneimine (PEI), a ``nano brick wall'' structure has been created, imparting gas barrier properties to the film. Reducing the graphene oxide with a thermal treatment further produces high oxygen barrier in humid conditions and imparts high electrical conductivity (σ ~ 1750 S/m). These thin films (<400 nm) are flexible relative traditional conductive thin films (e.g. ITO), and processing occurs under ambient conditions with water as the only solvent. Additionally, these PEI/GO thin films exhibit H2/CO2 selectivity (>300), making them interesting for gas purification membranes. The flexible nature of the aforementioned thin films, along with their excellent combination of transport properties, make them ideal candidates for use in a broad range of electronics and other packaging applications.

  16. Nitric Oxide and Airway Epithelial Barrier Function: Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins and Epithelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nels; Greul, Anne-Katrin; Hristova, Milena; Bove, Peter F.; Kasahara, David I.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Acute airway inflammation is associated with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO•) and altered airway epithelial barrier function, suggesting a role of NO• or its metabolites in epithelial permeability. While high concentrations of S-nitrosothiols disrupted transepithelial resistance (TER) and increased permeability in 16HBE14o- cells, no significant barrier disruption was observed by NONOates, in spite of altered distribution and expression of some TJ proteins. Barrier disruption of mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE) cell monolayers in response to inflammatory cytokines was independent of NOS2, based on similar effects in MTE cells from NOS2-/- mice and a lack of effect of the NOS2-inhibitor 1400W. Cell pre-incubation with LPS protected MTE cells from TER loss and increased permeability by H2O2, which was independent of NOS2. However, NOS2 was found to contribute to epithelial wound repair and TER recovery after mechanical injury. Overall, our results demonstrate that epithelial NOS2 is not responsible for epithelial barrier dysfunction during inflammation, but may contribute to restoration of epithelial integrity. PMID:19100237

  17. Adhesion Issues with Polymer/Oxide Barrier Coatings on Organic Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Matson, Dean W.; Martin, Peter M.; Graff, Gordon L.; Gross, Mark E.; Burrows, Paul E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Hall, Michael G.; Mast, Eric S.; Bonham, Charles C.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Rutherford, Nicole M.; Moro, Lorenza; Rosenblum, Martin; Praino, Robert F.; Visser, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Multilayer polymer/oxide coatings are being developed to protect sensitive organic display devices, such as OLEDs, from oxygen and water vapor permeation. The coatings have permeation levels ~ 10-6 g/m2/d for water vapor and ~10-6 cc/m2/d for oxygen, and are deposited by vacuum polymer technology. The coatings consist of either a base Al2O3 or acrylate polymer adhesion layer followed by alternating Al2O3/polymer layers. The polymer is used to decouple the 30 nm-thick Al2O3 barrier layers. Adhesion of the barrier coating to the substrate and display device is critical for the operating lifetime of the device. The substrate material could be any transparent flexible plastic. The coating technology can also be used to encapsulate organic-based electronic devices to protect them from atmospheric degradation. Plasma pretreatment is also needed for good adhesion to the substrate, but if it is too aggressive, it will damage the organic display device. We report on the effects of plasma treatment on the adhesion of barrier coatings to plastic substrates and the performance of OLED devices after plasma treatment and barrier coating deposition. We find that initial OLED performance is not significantly affected by the deposition process and plasma treatment, as demonstrated by luminosity and I-V curves.

  18. Fluence dependence of deuterium retention in oxidized SS-316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Sachiko; Matsuyama, Masao; Hayashi, Takumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Asakura, Yamato; Okuno, Kenji

    2011-10-01

    The ion fluence dependence of deuterium retention in SS-316 during oxidation at a temperature of 673 K was studied to evaluate the dynamics of deuterium retention in the oxide layer of SS-316. The correlation between the chemical state of stainless steel and deuterium retention was evaluated using XPS and TDS. It was found that the major deuterium desorption temperatures were located at around 660 K and 935 K, which correspond to the desorption of deuterium trapped as hydroxide. The deuterium retention increased with increasing deuterium ion fluence, since the deuterium retention as hydroxide increased significantly. However, retention saturated at an ion fluence of ˜2.5 × 10 21 D + m -2. The XPS result showed that FeOOD was formed on the surface, although pure Fe also remained in the oxide layer. These facts indicate the nature of the oxide layer have a key role in deuterium trapping behavior.

  19. Ga0.5In0.5P Barrier Layer for Wet Oxidation of AlAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Wei-I

    2000-05-01

    We study the stability of Ga0.5In0.5P and Al0.4Ga0.6As barrier layers for wet thermal oxidation of AlAs on GaAs. Samples with a Ga0.5In0.5P or Al0.4Ga0.6As barrier layer are oxidized in a water vapor environment under various oxidation conditions. The results of photoluminescence and secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profile measurements indicate that the Ga0.5In0.5P barrier layer is more stable than the Al0.4Ga0.6As layer at higher oxidation temperatures and longer periods of oxidation time.

  20. Superoxide-dependent oxidation of melatonin by myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Valdecir F; Silva, Sueli de O; Rodrigues, Maria R; Catalani, Luiz H; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Kettle, Anthony J; Campa, Ana

    2005-11-18

    Myeloperoxidase uses hydrogen peroxide to oxidize numerous substrates to hypohalous acids or reactive free radicals. Here we show that neutrophils oxidize melatonin to N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) in a reaction that is catalyzed by myeloperoxidase. Production of AFMK was highly dependent on superoxide but not hydrogen peroxide. It did not require hypochlorous acid, singlet oxygen, or hydroxyl radical. Purified myeloperoxidase and a superoxide-generating system oxidized melatonin to AFMK and a dimer. The dimer would result from coupling of melatonin radicals. Oxidation of melatonin was partially inhibited by catalase or superoxide dismutase. Formation of AFMK was almost completely eliminated by superoxide dismutase but weakly inhibited by catalase. In contrast, production of melatonin dimer was enhanced by superoxide dismutase and blocked by catalase. We propose that myeloperoxidase uses superoxide to oxidize melatonin by two distinct pathways. One pathway involves the classical peroxidation mechanism in which hydrogen peroxide is used to oxidize melatonin to radicals. Superoxide adds to these radicals to form an unstable peroxide that decays to AFMK. In the other pathway, myeloperoxidase uses superoxide to insert dioxygen into melatonin to form AFMK. This novel activity expands the types of oxidative reactions myeloperoxidase can catalyze. It should be relevant to the way neutrophils use superoxide to kill bacteria and how they metabolize xenobiotics. PMID:16148002

  1. Effect of shot peening on the oxidation behavior of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaoglanli, Abdullah Cahit; Doleker, Kadir Mert; Demirel, Bilal; Turk, Ahmet; Varol, Remzi

    2015-11-01

    A conventional thermal barrier coating (TBC) system is made up of a multilayered coating system that comprises a metallic bond coat including oxidation-resistant MCrAlY and a thermally insulating ceramic top coat including yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ). In this study, in order to improve the oxidation behavior in conventionally produced TBC systems, shot peening process is applied for modification of surface layer structure of atmospheric plasma spray (APS) bond coats. The oxidation behavior of TBCs, produced by the APS process and subjected to shot peening, was investigated. Oxidation tests were performed under isothermal conditions at 1000 °C for different time periods. The coatings produced by the APS process include high porosity and oxide content due to atmospheric production conditions as well as exposure to very high temperature. In this study, the coatings, produced by the APS process, subsequently subjected to shot-peening, were compared with the ones which were not shot peened. Following the application of the shot peening process, a dense structure is obtained due to the plastic deformation effect in the metallic bond coating structure at a certain distance from the surface. To this end, the effects of the shot-peening on the high temperature oxidation behavior of the coatings are investigated and evaluated.

  2. Oxidative stress and blood-brain barrier dysfunction under particular consideration of matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Christine; Gehwolf, Renate; Tempfer, Herbert; Krizbai, Istvan; Hennig, Bernhard; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Bauer, Hannelore

    2011-09-01

    A cell's "redox" (oxidation and reduction) state is determined by the sum of all redox processes yielding reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS), and other reactive intermediates. Low amounts of ROS/RNS are generated by different mechanisms in every cell and are important regulatory mediators in many signaling processes (redox signaling). When the physiological balance between the generation and elimination of ROS/RNS is disrupted, oxidative/nitrosative stress with persistent oxidative damage of the organism occurs. Oxidative stress has been suggested to act as initiator and/or mediator of many human diseases. The cerebral vasculature is particularly susceptible to oxidative stress, which is critical since cerebral endothelial cells play a major role in the creation and maintenance of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This article will only contain a focused introduction on the biochemical background of redox signaling, since this has been reported already in a series of excellent recent reviews. The goal of this work is to increase the understanding of basic mechanisms underlying ROS/RNS-induced BBB disruption, with a focus on the role of matrix metalloproteinases, which, after all, appear to be a key mediator in the initiation and progression of BBB damage elicited by oxidative stress. PMID:21294658

  3. Size dependent reduction-oxidation-reduction behaviour of cobalt oxide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadasivan, Sajanikumari; Bellabarba, Ronan M.; Tooze, Robert P.

    2013-10-01

    Morphologically similar cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4) of four different sizes (3 nm, 6 nm, 11 nm and 29 nm) with narrow size distribution were prepared by subtle variation of synthesis conditions. These nanoparticles were used as model materials to understand the structural and morphological changes that occur to cobalt oxide during sequential reduction, oxidation and further re-reduction process as a function of the initial size of cobalt oxide. On reduction, spherical cobalt nanoparticles were obtained independent of the original size of cobalt oxide. In contrast, subsequent oxidation of the metal particles led to solid spheres, hollow spheres or core-shell structures depending on the size of the initial metal particle. Further re-reduction of the oxidized structures was also observed to be size dependent. The hollow oxide shells formed by the large particles (29 nm) fragmented into smaller particles on reduction, while the hollow shells of the medium sized particles (11 nm) did not re-disperse on further reduction. Similarly, no re-dispersion was observed in the case of the small particles (6 nm). This model study provides useful insights into the size dependent behavior of metal/metal oxide particles during oxidation/reduction. This has important implications in petrochemical industry where cobalt is used as a catalyst in the Fischer-Tropsch process.Morphologically similar cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4) of four different sizes (3 nm, 6 nm, 11 nm and 29 nm) with narrow size distribution were prepared by subtle variation of synthesis conditions. These nanoparticles were used as model materials to understand the structural and morphological changes that occur to cobalt oxide during sequential reduction, oxidation and further re-reduction process as a function of the initial size of cobalt oxide. On reduction, spherical cobalt nanoparticles were obtained independent of the original size of cobalt oxide. In contrast, subsequent oxidation of the metal

  4. Removal Of Nitric Oxide From Different Mixtures Of Gases Using Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Hashim, Siti Aiasah; San, Wong Chiow; Abas, Radzi

    2009-07-07

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is employed in this project as the processing medium to remove nitric oxide in gas stream. Gas stream containing different components was released continuously into a series of dielectric barrier discharge cells and the output gas was analyzed using a chemiluminescence's type NO analyzer. Almost complete removal (more than 99%) of NO was observed when the gas stream contained only NO and nitrogen. In the presence of SO{sub 2}, the removal rate was decreased to as low as 70%. Adding air into the stream gave a more erratic results. The removal rate was also affected by the number of DBD cell used and the flow rate of the input gas. However, In this paper, only results using 2 cells whilst varying the flow rate are presented.

  5. Time dependent semiclassical tunneling through one dimensional barriers using only real valued trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Michael F.

    2015-10-28

    The time independent semiclassical treatment of barrier tunneling has been understood for a very long time. Several semiclassical approaches to time dependent tunneling through barriers have also been presented. These typically involve trajectories for which the position variable is a complex function of time. In this paper, a method is presented that uses only real valued trajectories, thus avoiding the complications that can arise when complex trajectories are employed. This is accomplished by expressing the time dependent wave packet as an integration over momentum. The action function in the exponent in this expression is expanded to second order in the momentum. The expansion is around the momentum, p{sub 0{sup *}}, at which the derivative of the real part of the action is zero. The resulting Gaussian integral is then taken. The stationary phase approximation requires that the derivative of the full action is zero at the expansion point, and this leads to a complex initial momentum and complex tunneling trajectories. The “pseudo-stationary phase” approximation employed in this work results in real values for the initial momentum and real valued trajectories. The transmission probabilities obtained are found to be in good agreement with exact quantum results.

  6. Myeloperoxidase-Derived Oxidants Induce Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Üllen, Andreas; Singewald, Evelin; Konya, Viktoria; Fauler, Günter; Reicher, Helga; Nusshold, Christoph; Hammer, Astrid; Kratky, Dagmar; Heinemann, Akos; Holzer, Peter; Malle, Ernst; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral leukocytes can exacerbate brain damage by release of cytotoxic mediators that disrupt blood-brain barrier (BBB) function. One of the oxidants released by activated leukocytes is hypochlorous acid (HOCl) formed via the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2O2-Cl− system. In the present study we examined the role of leukocyte activation, leukocyte-derived MPO and MPO-generated oxidants on BBB function in vitro and in vivo. In a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammation, neutrophils that had become adherent released MPO into the cerebrovasculature. In vivo, LPS-induced BBB dysfunction was significantly lower in MPO-deficient mice as compared to wild-type littermates. Both, fMLP-activated leukocytes and the MPO-H2O2-Cl− system inflicted barrier dysfunction of primary brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) that was partially rescued with the MPO inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. BMVEC treatment with the MPO-H2O2-Cl− system or activated neutrophils resulted in the formation of plasmalogen-derived chlorinated fatty aldehydes. 2-chlorohexadecanal (2-ClHDA) severely compromised BMVEC barrier function and induced morphological alterations in tight and adherens junctions. In situ perfusion of rat brain with 2-ClHDA increased BBB permeability in vivo. 2-ClHDA potently activated the MAPK cascade at physiological concentrations. An ERK1/2 and JNK antagonist (PD098059 and SP600125, respectively) protected against 2-ClHDA-induced barrier dysfunction in vitro. The current data provide evidence that interference with the MPO pathway could protect against BBB dysfunction under (neuro)inflammatory conditions. PMID:23691142

  7. Borate cross-linked graphene oxide-chitosan as robust and high gas barrier films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ning; Capezzuto, Filomena; Lavorgna, Marino; Buonocore, Giovanna G.; Tescione, Fabiana; Xia, Hesheng; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    Chitosan (CS) is one of the most promising polymers due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and natural abundance. However, its poor mechanical and barrier properties make it difficult to satisfy a wide range of applications. Herein, borate ions, originating from the hydrolysis of sodium tetraborate decahydrate (borax), have been used to crosslink chitosan and graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites. Chitosan films consisting of 1.0 wt% boron and 1.0 wt% GO exhibit a significant improvement in both the toughness and oxygen barrier properties compared to pristine chitosan. In particular the tensile strength of the samples after thermal treatment increases by ~160% compared to pristine chitosan, whereas their oxygen permeability reduces by ~90%. This is ascribed to the chemical crosslinking between chitosan and GO nanoplatelets through borate ions, as well as the formation of a layered morphology with graphene nanoplatelets oriented parallel to the sample surface. The exceptional robust and high gas barrier film has promising application in the packaging industry. The borate-crosslinking chemistry represents the potential strategy for improving properties of other polymer nanocomposites.Chitosan (CS) is one of the most promising polymers due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and natural abundance. However, its poor mechanical and barrier properties make it difficult to satisfy a wide range of applications. Herein, borate ions, originating from the hydrolysis of sodium tetraborate decahydrate (borax), have been used to crosslink chitosan and graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites. Chitosan films consisting of 1.0 wt% boron and 1.0 wt% GO exhibit a significant improvement in both the toughness and oxygen barrier properties compared to pristine chitosan. In particular the tensile strength of the samples after thermal treatment increases by ~160% compared to pristine chitosan, whereas their oxygen permeability reduces by ~90%. This is ascribed to the chemical

  8. Atomic and electronic structure of ultrathin fluoride barrier layers at the oxide/Si interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquali, L.; Montecchi, M.; Nannarone, S.; Boscherini, F.

    2011-09-01

    A SrF2 ultrathin barrier layer on Si(001) is used to form a sharp interface and block reactivity and intermixing between the semiconductor and a Yb2O3 overlayer. Yb2O3/Si(001) and Yb2O3/SrF2/Si(001) interfaces grown in ultra high vacuum by molecular beam epitaxy are studied by photoemission and x-ray absorption fine structure. Without the fluoride interlayer, Yb2O3/Si(001) presents an interface reacted region formed by SiOx and/or silicate compounds, which is about 9 Å thick and increases up to 14-15 Å after annealing at 500-700 °C. A uniform single layer of SrF2 molecules blocks intermixing and reduces the oxidized Si region to 2.4 Å after deposition and to 3.5 Å after annealing at 500 °C. In both cases we estimate a conduction band offset and a valence band offset of ~ 1.7 eV and 2.4 eV between the oxide and Si, respectively. X-ray absorption fine structure measurements at the Yb LIII edge suggest that the Yb oxide films exhibit a significant degree of static disorder with and without the fluoride barrier. Sr K edge measurements indicate that the ultrathin fluoride films are reacted, with the formation of bonds between Si and Sr; the Sr-Sr and Sr-F interatomic distances in the ultrathin fluoride barrier film are relaxed to the bulk value.

  9. Drugs of abuse and blood-brain barrier endothelial dysfunction: A focus on the role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sajja, Ravi K; Rahman, Shafiqur; Cucullo, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Psychostimulants and nicotine are the most widely abused drugs with a detrimental impact on public health globally. While the long-term neurobehavioral deficits and synaptic perturbations are well documented with chronic use of methamphetamine, cocaine, and nicotine, emerging human and experimental studies also suggest an increasing incidence of neurovascular complications associated with drug abuse. Short- or long-term administration of psychostimulants or nicotine is known to disrupt blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity/function, thus leading to an increased risk of brain edema and neuroinflammation. Various pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed to underlie drug abuse-induced BBB dysfunction suggesting a central and unifying role for oxidative stress in BBB endothelium and perivascular cells. This review discusses drug-specific effects of methamphetamine, cocaine, and tobacco smoking on brain microvascular crisis and provides critical assessment of oxidative stress-dependent molecular pathways focal to the global compromise of BBB. Additionally, given the increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalitis in drug abusers, we have summarized the synergistic pathological impact of psychostimulants and HIV infection on BBB integrity with an emphasis on unifying role of endothelial oxidative stress. This mechanistic framework would guide further investigations on specific molecular pathways to accelerate therapeutic approaches for the prevention of neurovascular deficits by drugs of abuse. PMID:26661236

  10. Oxidation and degradation of a plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.

    1996-04-01

    The isothermal oxidation behavior of thermal barrier coating (TBC) specimens consisting of single-crystal superalloy substrates, vacuum plasma-sprayed Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and air plasma-sprayed 7.5 wt.% yttria stabilized zirconia top coatings was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis at 1150{degrees}C for up to 200 hours. Coating durability was assessed by furnace cycling at 1150{degrees}C. Coatings and reaction products were identified by x-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  11. Highly robust transparent and conductive gas diffusion barriers based on tin oxide.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Andreas; Friedenberger, Christian; Gahlmann, Tobias; Trost, Sara; Becker, Tim; Zilberberg, Kirill; Polywka, Andreas; Görrn, Patrick; Riedl, Thomas

    2015-10-21

    Transparent and electrically conductive gas diffusion barriers are reported. Tin oxide (SnOx ) thin films grown by atomic layer deposition afford extremely low water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) on the order of 10(-6) g (m(2) day)(-1) , six orders of magnitude better than that established with ITO layers. The electrical conductivity of SnOx remains high under damp heat conditions (85 °C/85% relative humidity (RH)), while that of ZnO quickly degrades by more than five orders of magnitude. PMID:26310881

  12. Influence of thermally-oxidized vegetable oils and animal fats on intestinal barrier function and immune variables in young pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the effect of feeding thermally-oxidized lipids on metabolic oxidative status, gut barrier function, and immune response of young pigs, 108 barrows (6.67 ± 0.03 kg BW) were assigned to 12 dietary treatments in a 4 × 3 factorial design in addition to a corn-soybean meal control diet. Main...

  13. Characterization of Aluminum Oxide Tunnel Barrier for use in a Non-Local Spin Detection Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Joseph; Garramone, John; Sitnitsky, Ilona; Labella, Vincent

    2010-03-01

    Aluminum oxide can be utilized as an interface layer between ferromagnetic metals and silicon to achieve spin injection into silicon. The goal of our research is to inject and readout spins using a non-local measurement device that utilizes 1-2 nm aluminum oxide interface layers as tunnel barriers. An important step of fabricating a non-local measurement device out of silicon is the growth of an aluminum oxide tunnel barrierfootnotetextO. van't Erve, A. Hanbicki, M. Holub, C. Li, C. Awo-Affouda, P. Thompson and B. Jonker, Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 212109 (2007).. Aluminum Oxide thin films where grown using a Knudsen cell to deposit 1 nm, 2 nm, and 3 nm of aluminum. The films were then oxidized in O2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was performed to characterize the film stoichiometry, and the band gap. We will also report on current voltage measurements of these films after they have been capped with metal and compare the resistance area product to those calculated for spin injection into siliconfootnotetextB.-C. Min, K. Motohashi, C. Lodder, and R. Jansen, Nat. Mater. 5, 817 (2006). .

  14. Tunneling Characteristics Depending on Schottky Barriers and Diffusion Current in SiOC.

    PubMed

    Oh, Teresa; Kim, Chy Hyung

    2016-02-01

    To obtain a diffusion current in SiOC, the aluminum doped zinc oxide films were deposited on SiOC/Si wafer by a RF magnetron sputtering. All the X-ray patterns of the SiOC films showed amorphous phases. The level of binding energy of Si atoms will lead to an additional potential modulation by long range Coulombic and covalent interactions with oxygen ions. The growth of the AZO film was affected by the characteristics of SiOC, resulting in similar trends in XPS spectra and a shift to higher AZO lattice d values than the original AZO d values in XRD analyses. The charges trapped by the defects at the interlayer between AZO and SiOC films induced the decreased mobility of carriers. In the absence of trap charges, AZO grown on SiOC film such as the sample prepared at O2 = 25 or 30 sccm, which has low charge carrier concentration and high mobility, showed high mobility in an ambipolar characteristic of oxide semiconductor due to the tunneling effect and diffusion current. The structural matching of an interface between AZO and amorphous SiOC enhanced the height of Schottky Barrier (SB), and then the mobility was increased by the tunneling effect from band to band through the high SB. PMID:27433737

  15. The advantages and barriers in the implementation of a substance dependence treatment information system (SDTIS).

    PubMed

    Ajami, Sima; Mellat-Karkevandi, Zahra

    2015-11-01

    Addiction is a phenomenon that causes structural changes in different systems of society. Studies show for planning of addiction prevention and treatment, it is necessary to create an information management system. Substance dependence information systems refer to systems which collect, analyse and report data related to substance dependence information. The aim of this study was to identify advantages and barriers to implement Substance Dependence Treatment Information System (SDTIS). This study was a narrative review. Our review divided into three phases: literature collection, assessing, and selection. We employed the following keywords and their combinations in different areas of articles. In this study, 22 of collected articles and reports were selected based on their relevancy. We found many advantages for a substance dependence treatment information system such as recording sufficient, complete and accurate information and easy and timely access to them and monitoring and enhancing the quality of care received by patients. But we may face some concerns for implementing this information system like taking time and funds from client services, being expensive or even problems regarding the quality of data contained in these information systems. There are some important problems in the way of implementing. In order to overcome these issues, we need to raise community awareness. PMID:26941816

  16. The advantages and barriers in the implementation of a substance dependence treatment information system (SDTIS)

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Mellat-Karkevandi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Addiction is a phenomenon that causes structural changes in different systems of society. Studies show for planning of addiction prevention and treatment, it is necessary to create an information management system. Substance dependence information systems refer to systems which collect, analyse and report data related to substance dependence information. The aim of this study was to identify advantages and barriers to implement Substance Dependence Treatment Information System (SDTIS). This study was a narrative review. Our review divided into three phases: literature collection, assessing, and selection. We employed the following keywords and their combinations in different areas of articles. In this study, 22 of collected articles and reports were selected based on their relevancy. We found many advantages for a substance dependence treatment information system such as recording sufficient, complete and accurate information and easy and timely access to them and monitoring and enhancing the quality of care received by patients. But we may face some concerns for implementing this information system like taking time and funds from client services, being expensive or even problems regarding the quality of data contained in these information systems. There are some important problems in the way of implementing. In order to overcome these issues, we need to raise community awareness. PMID:26941816

  17. Temperature dependence of the Tafel slope and electrochemical barrier symmetry factor,. beta. , in electrode kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, B.E. ); Tessier, D.F. ); Wilkinson, D.P. )

    1989-09-01

    The significance of the new-established situation that the Tafel slopes, b, ( = d{eta}/d In i) for simple charge-transfer processes at electrodes are usually not represented with respect to variation with temperature, T, by the conventional relation b = RT/{beta} cpF, where {beta} is a constant-valued electrochemical charge-transfer barrier-symmetry coefficient, is examined in the light of recent comments on the problem. Clear evidence is given that b has the form b = RT({beta}sub H + T{beta}{sub s})F for proton transfer at Hg in water and various other solvents, where {beta}{sub H} and T{beta}{sub s} are enthalpic components of the overall {beta}, corresponding to experimentally observable potential-dependence of both the enthalpy and the entropy of activation, respectively. The frequent deviation from conventional behavior thus arises because the entropy of activation, as well as the energy of activation, can be potential-dependent, a situation that, until recently, has been neglected in inter-pretations of electrode-kinetic experiments. The origin of the conventional effect of potential on electrode reaction rates, through the change of electrode work function,{Phi}, with overpotential or electrode potential, V, ({Phi}{sub v} = {Phi}{sub v = O}{plus minus} eV), is examined critically in relation to the potential-dependent surface-potential component, {chi}{sub d}, in {Phi}, which can also be T-dependent.

  18. The application of the barrier-type anodic oxidation method to thickness testing of aluminum films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianwen; Yao, Manwen; Xiao, Ruihua; Yang, Pengfei; Hu, Baofu; Yao, Xi

    2014-09-01

    The thickness of the active metal oxide film formed from a barrier-type anodizing process is directly proportional to its formation voltage. The thickness of the consumed portion of the metal film is also corresponding to the formation voltage. This principle can be applied to the thickness test of the metal films. If the metal film is growing on a dielectric substrate, when the metal film is exhausted in an anodizing process, because of the high electrical resistance of the formed oxide film, a sudden increase of the recorded voltage during the anodizing process would occur. Then, the thickness of the metal film can be determined from this voltage. As an example, aluminum films are tested and discussed in this work. This method is quite simple and is easy to perform with high precision. PMID:25273741

  19. The application of the barrier-type anodic oxidation method to thickness testing of aluminum films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianwen; Yao, Manwen; Xiao, Ruihua; Yang, Pengfei; Hu, Baofu; Yao, Xi

    2014-09-01

    The thickness of the active metal oxide film formed from a barrier-type anodizing process is directly proportional to its formation voltage. The thickness of the consumed portion of the metal film is also corresponding to the formation voltage. This principle can be applied to the thickness test of the metal films. If the metal film is growing on a dielectric substrate, when the metal film is exhausted in an anodizing process, because of the high electrical resistance of the formed oxide film, a sudden increase of the recorded voltage during the anodizing process would occur. Then, the thickness of the metal film can be determined from this voltage. As an example, aluminum films are tested and discussed in this work. This method is quite simple and is easy to perform with high precision.

  20. Processing Methods Established To Fabricate Porous Oxide Ceramic Spheres for Thermal Barrier Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.

    2003-01-01

    As gas turbine technology advances, the demand for efficient engines and emission reduction requires a further increase in operating temperatures, but combustion temperatures are currently limited by the temperature capability of the engine components. The existing thermal barrier coating (TBC) technology does not provide sufficient thermal load reduction at a 3000 F (1649 C) operating condition. Advancement in thermal barrier coating technology is needed to meet this aggressive goal. One concept for improving thermal barrier coating effectiveness is to design coating systems that incorporate a layer that reflects or scatters photon radiation. This can be achieved by using porous structures. The refractive index mismatch between the solid and pore, the pore size, and the pore density can be engineered to efficiently scatter photon radiation. Under NASA s Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program, processing methods to fabricate porous ceramic spheres suitable for scattering photon radiation at elevated temperatures have been established. A straightforward templating process was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center that requires no special processing equipment. The template was used to define particle shape, particle size, and pore size. Spherical organic cation exchange resins were used as a structure-directing template. The cation exchange resins have dual template capabilities that can produce different pore architectures. This process can be used to fabricate both metal oxide and metal carbide spheres.

  1. Borate cross-linked graphene oxide-chitosan as robust and high gas barrier films.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ning; Capezzuto, Filomena; Lavorgna, Marino; Buonocore, Giovanna G; Tescione, Fabiana; Xia, Hesheng; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2016-05-19

    Chitosan (CS) is one of the most promising polymers due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and natural abundance. However, its poor mechanical and barrier properties make it difficult to satisfy a wide range of applications. Herein, borate ions, originating from the hydrolysis of sodium tetraborate decahydrate (borax), have been used to crosslink chitosan and graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites. Chitosan films consisting of 1.0 wt% boron and 1.0 wt% GO exhibit a significant improvement in both the toughness and oxygen barrier properties compared to pristine chitosan. In particular the tensile strength of the samples after thermal treatment increases by ∼160% compared to pristine chitosan, whereas their oxygen permeability reduces by ∼90%. This is ascribed to the chemical crosslinking between chitosan and GO nanoplatelets through borate ions, as well as the formation of a layered morphology with graphene nanoplatelets oriented parallel to the sample surface. The exceptional robust and high gas barrier film has promising application in the packaging industry. The borate-crosslinking chemistry represents the potential strategy for improving properties of other polymer nanocomposites. PMID:27168418

  2. Barrier dependent electron tunneling lifetime in one-dimensional device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Gong, Jian; Hu, Xing; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2010-11-01

    The tunneling times of electrons in one-dimensional potential structures were studied using a projected Green function (PGF) method. The approach was applied to cases with potentials with one barrier, two barriers, and three barriers at the right side of a quantum well where the electron is located at the initial time. Our results include the effects of well width and barrier thickness on the tunneling time, and also show the impact on the tunneling time of splitting a single barrier into more barriers. This study confirms not only the validity of the PGF method but also reveals the impact of the potential structure on the operation speed of resonant tunneling devices.

  3. Role of interfacial oxide in high-efficiency graphene-silicon Schottky barrier solar cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Yi; Li, Xinming; Mackin, Charles; Zhang, Xu; Fang, Wenjing; Palacios, Tomás; Zhu, Hongwei; Kong, Jing

    2015-03-11

    The advent of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene has allowed researchers to investigate large area graphene/n-silicon Schottky barrier solar cells. Using chemically doped graphene, efficiencies of nearly 10% can be achieved for devices without antireflective coatings. However, many devices reported in past literature often exhibit a distinctive s-shaped kink in the measured I/V curves under illumination resulting in poor fill factor. This behavior is especially prevalent for devices with pristine (not chemically doped) graphene but can be seen in some cases for doped graphene as well. In this work, we show that the native oxide on the silicon presents a transport barrier for photogenerated holes and causes recombination current, which is responsible for causing the kink. We experimentally verify our hypothesis and propose a simple semiconductor physics model that qualitatively captures the effect. Furthermore, we offer an additional optimization to graphene/n-silicon devices: by choosing the optimal oxide thickness, we can increase the efficiency of our devices to 12.4% after chemical doping and to a new record of 15.6% after applying an antireflective coating. PMID:25685934

  4. Spin-dependent tunneling time in periodic diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/nonmagnetic-barrier superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping-Fan; Guo, Yong

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the tunneling time (dwell time) in periodic diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/nonmagnetic-barrier (DMS/NB) superlattices subjected to an external magnetic field. It is found that spin-dependent resonant bands form in the spectra of dwell time, which can be effectively manipulated by not only the external magnetic field but also the geometric parameters of the system. Moreover, an intuitive semiclassical delay is defined to illustrate the behavior of the dwell time, and the former one is shown to be the result of "smoothing out" the latter one. We also find that the dwell time in diluted-magnetic-semiconductor/semiconductor superlattices behaves surprisingly different from the DMS/NB case, especially for spin-down electrons.

  5. Simultaneous Remediation of NOx and Oxidation of Soot Using Dielectric Barrier Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorai, Rajesh; Kushner, Mark J.; Hassouni, Khaled

    2000-10-01

    Plasma remediation of atmospheric pressure gases is being investigated as a means to remove nitrogen oxides (NO_x) from automobilie exhaust. In actual exhausts, unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs) and soot are unavoidably present which impacts the plasma chemistry of NOx removal. In this regard, the feasibility of using a dielectric barrier discharge to simultaneously oxidize soot particles and remove NOx from simulated exhausts has been computationally investigated. The model system is a mixture of N_2/O_2/CO_2/H_2O with ppm levels of CO, H_2, NO, C_3H_6, C_3H8 and soot particles. The model is a global kinetics simulation modified to account for diffusive transport to and from the soot and reactions on the soot surface. Charging of soot due to electrons and ions is also included. Significant changes in gas-phase NOx chemistry occur when including surface reactions due to reduction of NO2 and deactivation of oxidizing radicals generated from the UHCs. Oxidation of the soot particles produces significant increases in CO.

  6. Effects of Doping on Thermal Conductivity of Pyrochlore Oxides for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides of general composition, A2B2O7, where A is a 3(+) cation (La to Lu) and B is a 4(+) cation (Zr, Hf, Ti, etc.) have high melting point, relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity which make them suitable for applications as high-temperature thermal barrier coatings. The effect of doping at the A site on the thermal conductivity of a pyrochlore oxide La2Zr2O7, has been investigated. Oxide powders of various compositions La2Zr2O7, La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 were synthesized by the citric acid sol-gel method. These powders were hot pressed into discs and used for thermal conductivity measurements using a steady-state laser heat flux test technique. The rare earth oxide doped pyrochlores La(1.7)Gd(0.3)Zr2O7, La(1.7)Yb(0.3)Zr2O7 and La(1.7)Gd(0.15)Yb(0.15)Zr2O7 had lower thermal conductivity than the un-doped La2Zr2O7. The Gd2O3 and Yb2O3 co-doped composition showed the lowest thermal conductivity.

  7. Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of Supersonic Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yu; Ding, Chunhua; Li, Hongqiang; Han, Zhihai; Ding, Bingjun; Wang, Tiejun; Yu, Lie

    2013-10-01

    In this work, Y2O3 stabilized zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were deposited by conventional atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) and high efficiency supersonic atmospheric plasma spraying (SAPS), respectively. The effect of Al2O3 layer stability on the isothermal growth behavior of thermally grown oxides (TGOs) was studied. The results revealed that the Al2O3 layer experienced a three-stage change process, i.e., (1) instantaneous growth stage, (2) steady-state growth stage, and (3) depletion stage. The thickness of Al2O3 scale was proved to be an important factor for the growth rate of TGOs. The SAPS-TBCs exhibited a higher Al2O3 stability and better oxidation resistance as compared with the APS-TBCs. Additionally, it was found that inner oxides, especially nucleated on the top of the crest, continually grew and swallowed the previously formed Al2O3 layer, leading to the granulation and disappearance of continuous Al2O3 scale, which was finally replaced by the mixed oxides and spinel.

  8. Thermal Properties of Oxides With Magnetoplumbite Structure for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    2007-01-01

    Oxides having magnetoplumbite structure are promising candidate materials for applications as high temperature thermal barrier coatings because of their high thermal stability, high thermal expansion, and low thermal conductivity. In this study, powders of LaMgAl11O19, GdMgAl11O19, SmMgAl11O19, and Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxides were synthesized by citric acid sol-gel method and hot pressed into disk specimens. The thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) of these oxide materials were measured from room temperature to 1500 C. The average CTE value was found to be approx.9.6x10(exp -6)/C. Thermal conductivity of these magnetoplumbite-based oxide materials was also evaluated using steady-state laser heat flux test method. The effects of doping on thermal properties were also examined. Thermal conductivity of the doped Gd0.7Yb0.3MgAl11O19 composition was found to be lower than that of the undoped GdMgAl11O19. In contrast, thermal expansion coefficient was found to be independent of the oxide composition and appears to be controlled by the magnetoplumbite crystal structure. Thermal conductivity testing of LaMgAl11O19 and LaMnAl11O19 magnetoplumbite oxide coatings plasma sprayed on NiCrAlY/Rene N5 superalloy substrates indicated resistance of these coatings to sintering even at temperatures as high as 1600 C.

  9. In Situ XPS Chemical Analysis of MnSiO3 Copper Diffusion Barrier Layer Formation and Simultaneous Fabrication of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Electrical Test MOS Structures.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Conor; Brennan, Barry; McCoy, Anthony P; Bogan, Justin; Brady, Anita; Hughes, Greg

    2016-02-01

    Copper/SiO2/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices both with and without a MnSiO3 barrier layer at the Cu/SiO2 interface have been fabricated in an ultrahigh vacuum X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) system, which allows interface chemical characterization of the barrier formation process to be directly correlated with electrical testing of barrier layer effectiveness. Capacitance voltage (CV) analysis, before and after tube furnace anneals of the fabricated MOS structures showed that the presence of the MnSiO3 barrier layer significantly improved electric stability of the device structures. Evidence of improved adhesion of the deposited copper layer to the MnSiO3 surface compared to the clean SiO2 surface was apparent both from tape tests and while probing the samples during electrical testing. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profiling measurements of the MOS test structures reveal distinct differences of copper diffusion into the SiO2 dielectric layers following the thermal anneal depending on the presence of the MnSiO3 barrier layer. PMID:26732185

  10. Tirandamycin biosynthesis is mediated by co-dependent oxidative enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Jacob C.; Li, Shengying; Gunatilleke, Shamila S.; Anzai, Yojiro; Burr, Douglas A.; Podust, Larissa M.; Sherman, David H.

    2011-08-01

    Elucidation of natural product biosynthetic pathways provides important insights into the assembly of potent bioactive molecules, and expands access to unique enzymes able to selectively modify complex substrates. Here, we show full reconstitution, in vitro, of an unusual multi-step oxidative cascade for post-assembly-line tailoring of tirandamycin antibiotics. This pathway involves a remarkably versatile and iterative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (TamI) and a flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent oxidase (TamL), which act co-dependently through the repeated exchange of substrates. TamI hydroxylates tirandamycin C (TirC) to generate tirandamycin E (TirE), a previously unidentified tirandamycin intermediate. TirE is subsequently oxidized by TamL, giving rise to the ketone of tirandamycin D (TirD), after which a unique exchange back to TamI enables successive epoxidation and hydroxylation to afford, respectively, the final products tirandamycin A (TirA) and tirandamycin B (TirB). Ligand-free, substrate- and product-bound crystal structures of bicovalently flavinylated TamL oxidase reveal a likely mechanism for the C10 oxidation of TirE.

  11. The tunneling solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for a square-potential barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Elci, A.; Hjalmarson, H. P.

    2009-10-15

    The exact tunneling solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation with a square-potential barrier are derived using the continuous symmetry group G{sub S} for the partial differential equation. The infinitesimal generators and the elements for G{sub S} are represented and derived in the jet space. There exist six classes of wave functions. The representative (canonical) wave functions for the classes are labeled by the eigenvalue sets, whose elements arise partially from the reducibility of a Lie subgroup G{sub LS} of G{sub S} and partially from the separation of variables. Each eigenvalue set provides two or more time scales for the wave function. The ratio of two time scales can act as the duration of an intrinsic clock for the particle motion. The exact solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation presented here can produce tunneling currents that are orders of magnitude larger than those produced by the energy eigenfunctions. The exact solutions show that tunneling current can be quantized under appropriate boundary conditions and tunneling probability can be affected by a transverse acceleration.

  12. Scale dependent behavior the foredune: Implications for barrier island response to storms and sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, C.; Wernette, P. A.; Weymer, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The impact of elevated storm surge on a barrier island tends to be considered from a single cross-shore dimension and dependent only on the relative elevations of the storm surge and dune. However, the foredune line is rarely uniform and can exhibit considerable variation in height and width alongshore at a range of length scales ranging from tens of meters to several kilometers. LiDAR data from Santa Rosa Island in northwest Florida, Padre Island, Texas and Assateague Island, Maryland are used to explore how the dune morphology varies alongshore and how this variability is altered by storms and post-storm recovery. While the alongshore variation in dune height can be approximated by a power law, there are scale-dependent variations in the dune that exhibit different responses to storm erosion and post-storm recovery. This suggests that the alongshore variation in dune morphology reflects the history of storm impact and recovery, and that changes in the variance magnitude through time may provide insight into whether the island will be resilient as it transgresses with rising sea level. The difference in variance magnitude at large spatial scales is associated with the framework geology unique to each island and a dominant control on island response to sea level rise.

  13. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1–Dependent Induction of Intestinal Trefoil Factor Protects Barrier Function during Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Glenn T.; Turner, Jerrold R.; Taylor, Cormac T.; Hershberg, Robert M.; Comerford, Katrina; Narravula, Sailaja; Podolsky, Daniel K.; Colgan, Sean P.

    2001-01-01

    Mucosal organs such as the intestine are supported by a rich and complex underlying vasculature. For this reason, the intestine, and particularly barrier-protective epithelial cells, are susceptible to damage related to diminished blood flow and concomitant tissue hypoxia. We sought to identify compensatory mechanisms that protect epithelial barrier during episodes of intestinal hypoxia. Initial studies examining T84 colonic epithelial cells revealed that barrier function is uniquely resistant to changes elicited by hypoxia. A search for intestinal-specific, barrier-protective factors revealed that the human intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) gene promoter bears a previously unappreciated binding site for hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1. Hypoxia resulted in parallel induction of ITF mRNA and protein. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay analysis using ITF-specific, HIF-1 consensus motifs resulted in a hypoxia-inducible DNA binding activity, and loading cells with antisense oligonucleotides directed against the α chain of HIF-1 resulted in a loss of ITF hypoxia inducibility. Moreover, addition of anti-ITF antibody resulted in a loss of barrier function in epithelial cells exposed to hypoxia, and the addition of recombinant human ITF to vascular endothelial cells partially protected endothelial cells from hypoxia-elicited barrier disruption. Extensions of these studies in vivo revealed prominent hypoxia-elicited increases in intestinal permeability in ITF null mice. HIF-1–dependent induction of ITF may provide an adaptive link for maintenance of barrier function during hypoxia. PMID:11342587

  14. Permeability of the blood-brain barrier depends on brain temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A.; Sharma, Hari S.

    2009-01-01

    Increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been reported in different conditions accompanied by hyperthermia, but the role of brain temperature per se in modulating brain barrier functions has not been directly examined. To delineate the contribution of this factor, we examined albumin immunoreactivity in several brain structures (cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and hypothalamus) of pentobarbital-anesthetized rats (50 mg/kg, ip), which were passively warmed to different levels of brain temperature (32–42°C). Similar brain structures were also examined for the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), an index of astrocytic activation, water and ion content, and morphological cell abnormalities. Data were compared with those obtained from drug-free awake rats with normal brain temperatures (36–37°C). The numbers of albumin- and GFAP-positive cells strongly correlates with brain temperature, gradually increasing from ~38.5°C and plateauing at 41–42°C. Brains maintained at hyperthermia also showed larger content of brain water and Na+, K+ and Cl− as well as structural abnormalities of brain cells, all suggesting acute brain edema. The latter alterations were seen at ~39°C, gradually progressed with temperature increase, and peaked at maximum hyperthermia. Temperature-dependent changes in albumin immunoreactivity tightly correlated with GFAP immunoreactivity, brain water, and numbers of abnormal cells; they were found in each tested area, but showed some structural specificity. Notably, a mild BBB leakage, selective glial activation, and specific cellular abnormalities were also found in the hypothalamus and piriform cortex during extreme hypothermia (32–33°C); in contrast to hyperthermia these changes were associated with decreased levels of brain water, Na+ and K+, suggesting acute brain dehydration. Therefore, brain temperature per se is an important factor in regulating BBB permeability, alterations in brain water

  15. Graphene Oxide as an Effective Barrier on a Porous Nanofibrous Membrane for Water Treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianqiang; Zhang, Pan; Liang, Bin; Liu, Yuxuan; Xu, Tao; Wang, Lifang; Cao, Bing; Pan, Kai

    2016-03-01

    A novel graphene oxide (GO)-based nanofiltration membrane on a highly porous polyacrylonitrile nanofibrous mat (GO@PAN) is prepared for water treatment applications. GO with large lateral size (more than 200 μm) is first synthesized through an improved Hummers method and then assembled on a highly porous nanofibrous mat by vacuum suction method. The prepared GO@PAN membrane is characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectrum, X-ray diffraction, and so forth. The results show that graphene oxide can form a barrier on the top of a PAN nanofibrous mat with controllable thickness. The obtained graphene oxide layer exhibits "ideal" pathways (hydrophobic nanochannel) for water molecules between the well-stacked GO nanosheets. Water flux under an extremely low external pressure (1.0 bar) significantly increased due to the unique structure of the GO layer and nanofibrous support. Furthermore, the GO@PAN membrane shows high rejection performance (nearly 100% rejection of Congo red and 56.7% for Na2SO4). A hydrophilic-hydrophobic "gate"-nanochannel model is presented for explaining the water diffusion mechanism through the GO layer. This method for fabrication of the GO membrane on a highly porous support may provide many new opportunities for high performance nanofiltration applications. PMID:26849085

  16. Nitrate-Dependent Ferrous Iron Oxidation by Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Oshiki, M.; Ishii, S.; Yoshida, K.; Fujii, N.; Ishiguro, M.; Satoh, H.

    2013-01-01

    We examined nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation mediated by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria. Enrichment cultures of “Candidatus Brocadia sinica” anaerobically oxidized Fe2+ and reduced NO3− to nitrogen gas at rates of 3.7 ± 0.2 and 1.3 ± 0.1 (mean ± standard deviation [SD]) nmol mg protein−1 min−1, respectively (37°C and pH 7.3). This nitrate reduction rate is an order of magnitude lower than the anammox activity of “Ca. Brocadia sinica” (10 to 75 nmol NH4+ mg protein−1 min−1). A 15N tracer experiment demonstrated that coupling of nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation and the anammox reaction was responsible for producing nitrogen gas from NO3− by “Ca. Brocadia sinica.” The activities of nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation were dependent on temperature and pH, and the highest activities were seen at temperatures of 30 to 45°C and pHs ranging from 5.9 to 9.8. The mean half-saturation constant for NO3− ± SD of “Ca. Brocadia sinica” was determined to be 51 ± 21 μM. Nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation was further demonstrated by another anammox bacterium, “Candidatus Scalindua sp.,” whose rates of Fe2+ oxidation and NO3− reduction were 4.7 ± 0.59 and 1.45 ± 0.05 nmol mg protein−1 min−1, respectively (20°C and pH 7.3). Co-occurrence of nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation and the anammox reaction decreased the molar ratios of consumed NO2− to consumed NH4+ (ΔNO2−/ΔNH4+) and produced NO3− to consumed NH4+ (ΔNO3−/ΔNH4+). These reactions are preferable to the application of anammox processes for wastewater treatment. PMID:23624480

  17. Oxidation Resistant Ti-Al-Fe Diffusion Barrier for FeCrAlY Coatings on Titanium Aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialke, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A diffusion barrier to help protect titanium aluminide alloys, including the coated alloys of the TiAl gamma + Ti3Al (alpha2) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C is disclosed. The coating may comprise FeCrAlX alloys. The diffusion barrier comprises titanium, aluminum, and iron in the following approximate atomic percent: Ti-(50-55)Al-(9-20)Fe. This alloy is also suitable as an oxidative or structural coating for such substrates.

  18. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth’s evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in “functional weightlessness” were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and

  19. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity.

    PubMed

    Adrian, Astrid; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Sromicki, Juri; Brungs, Sonja; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Hock, Bertold; Kolanus, Waldemar; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Ullrich, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth's evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in "functional weightlessness" were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and function

  20. Exceptional oxygen barrier performance of pullulan nanocomposites with ultra-low loading of graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Unalan, Ilke Uysal; Wan, Chaoying; Figiel, Łukasz; Olsson, Richard T; Trabattoni, Silvia; Farris, Stefano

    2015-07-10

    Polymer nanocomposites are increasingly important in food packaging sectors. Biopolymer pullulan is promising in manufacturing packaging films or coatings due to its excellent optical clarity, mechanical strength, and high water-solubility as compared to other biopolymers. This work aims to enhance its oxygen barrier properties and overcome its intrinsic brittleness by utilizing two-dimensional planar graphene oxide (GO) nanoplatelets. It has been found that the addition of only 0.2 wt% of GO enhanced the tensile strength, Young's modulus, and elongation at break of pullulan films by about 40, 44 and 52%, respectively. The light transmittance at 550 nm of the pullulan/GO films was 92.3% and haze values were within 3.0% threshold, which meets the general requirement for food packaging materials. In particular, the oxygen permeability coefficient of pullulan was reduced from 6337 to 2614 mL μm m(-2) (24 h(-1)) atm(-1) with as low as 0.05 wt% of GO loading and further to 1357 mL μm m(-2) (24 h(-1)) atm(-1) when GO concentration reached 0.3 wt%. The simultaneous improvement of the mechanical and oxygen barrier properties of pullulan was ascribed to the homogeneous distribution and prevalent unidirectional alignment of GO nanosheets, as determined from the characterization and theoretical modelling results. The exceptional oxygen barrier properties of pullulan/GO nanocomposites with enhanced mechanical flexibility and good optical clarity will add new values to high performance food packaging materials. PMID:26080998

  1. Exceptional oxygen barrier performance of pullulan nanocomposites with ultra-low loading of graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal Unalan, Ilke; Wan, Chaoying; Figiel, Łukasz; Olsson, Richard T.; Trabattoni, Silvia; Farris, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Polymer nanocomposites are increasingly important in food packaging sectors. Biopolymer pullulan is promising in manufacturing packaging films or coatings due to its excellent optical clarity, mechanical strength, and high water-solubility as compared to other biopolymers. This work aims to enhance its oxygen barrier properties and overcome its intrinsic brittleness by utilizing two-dimensional planar graphene oxide (GO) nanoplatelets. It has been found that the addition of only 0.2 wt% of GO enhanced the tensile strength, Young’s modulus, and elongation at break of pullulan films by about 40, 44 and 52%, respectively. The light transmittance at 550 nm of the pullulan/GO films was 92.3% and haze values were within 3.0% threshold, which meets the general requirement for food packaging materials. In particular, the oxygen permeability coefficient of pullulan was reduced from 6337 to 2614 mL μm m-2 (24 h-1) atm-1 with as low as 0.05 wt% of GO loading and further to 1357 mL μm m-2 (24 h-1) atm-1 when GO concentration reached 0.3 wt%. The simultaneous improvement of the mechanical and oxygen barrier properties of pullulan was ascribed to the homogeneous distribution and prevalent unidirectional alignment of GO nanosheets, as determined from the characterization and theoretical modelling results. The exceptional oxygen barrier properties of pullulan/GO nanocomposites with enhanced mechanical flexibility and good optical clarity will add new values to high performance food packaging materials.

  2. Advanced Oxide Material Systems for 1650 C Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) are being developed for low-emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor and vane applications to extend the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water-vapor-containing combustion environments. The advanced 1650 C TEBC system is required to have a better high-temperature stability, lower thermal conductivity, and more resistance to sintering and thermal stress than current coating systems under engine high-heat-flux and severe thermal cycling conditions. In this report, the thermal conductivity and water vapor stability of selected candidate hafnia-, pyrochlore- and magnetoplumbite-based TEBC materials are evaluated. The effects of dopants on the materials properties are also discussed. The test results have been used to downselect the TEBC materials and help demonstrate the feasibility of advanced 1650 C coatings with long-term thermal cycling durability.

  3. Advanced Oxide Material Systems For 1650 C Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Advanced thermal/environmental barrier coatings (T/EBCs) are being developed for low emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor and vane applications to extend the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water-vapor containing combustion environments. The 1650 C T/EBC system is required to have better thermal stability, lower thermal conductivity, and improved sintering and thermal stress resistance than current coating systems. In this paper, the thermal conductivity, water vapor stability and cyclic durability of selected candidate zirconia-/hafnia-, pyrochlore- and magnetoplumbite-based T/EBC materials are evaluated. The test results have been used to downselect the T/EBC coating materials, and help demonstrate advanced 1650OC coatings feasibility with long-term cyclic durability.

  4. Electromechanical Breakdown of Barrier-Type Anodized Aluminum Oxide Thin Films Under High Electric Field Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianwen; Yao, Manwen; Yao, Xi

    2016-02-01

    Barrier-type anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) thin films were formed on a polished aluminum substrate via electrochemical anodization in 0.1 mol/L aqueous solution of ammonium pentaborate. Electromechanical breakdown occurred under high electric field conditions as a result of the accumulation of mechanical stress in the film-substrate system by subjecting it to rapid thermal treatment. Before the breakdown event, the electricity of the films was transported in a highly nonlinear way. Immediately after the breakdown event, dramatic cracking of the films occurred, and the cracks expanded quickly to form a mesh-like dendrite network. The breakdown strength was significantly reduced because of the electromechanical coupling effect, and was only 34% of the self-healing breakdown strength of the AAO film.

  5. Spinel oxides: 1 spin-filter barrier for a class of magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2012-01-01

    The orbital composition of the electrode wave functions and the complex bands within the barrier band gap are two important factors in deciding the spin-filter effect. This is illustrated in a class of spinel oxides, including MgAl2O4, ZnAl2O4, SiMg2O4, and SiZn2O4. Through first-principles calculations of the complex bands and electron transmission along the [001] direction, they are shown to have the same D1 spin-filter effect as MgO due to the combination of both factors. Due to better lattice match with typical bcc magnetic electrodes than MgO, these materials provide a broad spectrum of candidate materials for magnetic tunnel junctions.

  6. Study of the water barrier properties of polyester paints after photo-oxidative degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Deflorian, F.; Fedrizzi, L.; Bonora, P.L.

    1996-10-01

    The capacitance of an organic coating, applied on a metal substrate for protection against corrosion, can undergo a decrease following some deterioration processes due to the interaction with the environment. In particular, the barrier properties of a paint are strongly influenced, for example, by the presence of defects, by photo-oxidative phenomena and by the adhesive properties of the polymer-metal interface. Impedance spectroscopy is a flexible and efficacious instrument for assessing all these phenomena and is useful in supplying information on the mechanisms of deterioration as well as in assessing the physical parameters associated with it. The scope of this work is to study in detail the photosensitive effects of UV radiation on the water barrier properties of industrially produced polyester organic coating. The coefficients of diffusion and the values of permeability and saturation for different UV radiation intervals, have been calculated, starting from the impedance data and using appropriate models. So the relationship between these values and the effective long term properties of protection from corrosion of the paints was evaluated.

  7. A study on thermal barrier coatings including thermal expansion mismatch and bond coat oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, George C.; Phucharoen, Woraphat; Miller, Robert A.

    1986-01-01

    The present investigation deals with a plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) intended for high temperature applications to advanced gas turbine blades. Typically, this type of coating system consists of a zirconia-yttria ceramic layer with a nickel-chromium-aluminum bond coat on a superalloy substrate. The problem on hand is a complex one due to the fact that bond coat oxidation and thermal mismatch occur in the TBC. Cracking in the TBC has also been experimentally illustrated. A clearer understanding of the mechanical behavior of the TBC is investigated. The stress states in a model thermal barrier coating as it cools down in air is studied. The powerful finite element method was utilized to model a coating cylindrical specimen. Four successively refined finite element models were developed. Some results obtained using the first two models have been reported previously. The major accomplishment is the successful development of an elastic TBC finite element model known as TBCG with interface geometry between the ceramic layer and the bond coat. An equally important milestone is the near-completion of the new elastic-plastic TBC finite element model called TBCGEP which yielded initial results. Representative results are presented.

  8. Characteristics of titanium oxide memristor with coexistence of dopant drift and a tunnel barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiao-Bo; Xu, Hui

    2014-06-01

    The recent published experimental data of titanium oxide memristor devices which are tested under the same experimental conditions exhibit the strange instability and complexity of these devices. Such undesired characteristics preclude the understanding of the device conductive processes and the memristor-based practical applications. The possibility of the coexistence of dopant drift and tunnel barrier conduction in a memristor provides preliminary explanations for the undesired characteristics. However, current research lacks detailed discussion about the coexistence case. In this paper, dopant drift and tunnel barrier-based theories are first analyzed for studying the relations between parameters and physical variables which affect characteristics of memristors, and then the influences of each parameter change on the conductive behaviors in the single and coexistence cases of the two mechanisms are simulated and discussed respectively. The simulation results provide further explanations of the complex device conduction. Theoretical methods of eliminating or reducing the coexistence of the two mechanisms are proposed, in order to increase the stability of the device conduction. This work also provides the support for optimizing the fabrications of memristor devices with excellent performance.

  9. Polymer-graphene oxide quadlayer thin-film assemblies with improved gas barrier.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Ping; Stevens, Bart; Devlaming, Ian; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2015-06-01

    Layer-by-layer assembly was used to create quadlayers (QLs) of chitosan (CH), poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), CH, and graphene oxide (GO). Electron microscopy confirmed GO coverage over the film and a highly ordered nanobrick wall structure. By varying pH deviation between CH and PAA, a thick and interdiffused polymer matrix was created because of the altered chain conformation. A 5 CH (pH 5.5)/PAA (pH 3)/CH (pH 5.5)/GO QL assembly (48 nm) exhibits very low oxygen permeability (3.9 × 10(-20) cm(3) cm cm(-2) Pa(-1) s(-1)) that matches SiOx barrier coatings. In an effort to maintain barrier performance under high humidity, GO was thermally reduced to increase hydrophobicity of the film. This reduction step increased H2/CO2 selectivity of a 5 QL film from 5 to 215, exceeding Robeson's upper bound limit. This unique water-based multilayer nanocoating is very promising for a variety of gas purification and packaging applications. PMID:25970136

  10. Temperature dependent electrical transport of disordered reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchharla, Baleeswaraiah; Narayanan, T. N.; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Talapatra, Saikat

    2014-06-01

    We report on the simple route for the synthesis of chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO) using ascorbic acid (a green chemical) as a reducing agent. Temperature-dependent electrical transport properties of rGO thin films have been studied in a wide range (50 K T 400 K) of temperature. Electrical conduction in rGO thin films was displayed in two different temperature regimes. At higher temperatures, Arrhenius-like temperature dependence of resistance was observed indicating a band gap dominating transport behavior. At lower temperatures, the rGO sample showed a conduction mechanism consistent with Mott's two-dimensional variable range hopping (2D-VRH). An unsaturated negative magnetoresistance (MR) was observed up to 3 T field. A decrease in negative MR at high temperatures is attributed to the phonon scattering of charge carriers.

  11. Nitric oxide attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced barrier disruption and protein tyrosine phosphorylation in monolayers of intestinal epithelial cell.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Takanori; Tsuji, Hideo; Onoda, Makoto

    2007-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium provides a barrier to the transport of harmful luminal molecules into the systemic circulation. A dysfunctional epithelial barrier is closely associated with the pathogenesis of a variety of intestinal and systemic disorders. We investigated here the effects of nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on the barrier function of a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2. When treated with H(2)O(2), Caco-2 cell monolayers grown on permeable supports exhibited several remarkable features of barrier dysfunction as follows: a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance, an increase in paracellular permeability to dextran, and a disruption of the intercellular junctional localization of the scaffolding protein ZO-1. In addition, an induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous cellular proteins including ZO-1, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin, components of tight and adherens junctions, was observed. On the other hand, combined treatment of Caco-2 monolayers with H(2)O(2) and an NO donor (NOC5 or NOC12) relieved the damage to the barrier function and suppressed the protein tyrosine phosphorylation induced by H(2)O(2) alone. These results suggest that NO protects the barrier function of intestinal epithelia from oxidative stress by modulating some intracellular signaling pathways of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in epithelial cells. PMID:17451824

  12. Investigation on edge fringing effect and oxide thickness dependence of inversion current in metal-oxide-semiconductor tunneling diodes with comb-shaped electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chien-Chih; Hsu, Pei-Lun; Lin, Li; Hwu, Jenn-Gwo

    2014-03-28

    A particular edge-dependent inversion current behavior of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) tunneling diodes was investigated utilizing square and comb-shaped electrodes. The inversion tunneling current exhibits the strong dependence on the tooth size of comb-shaped electrodes and oxide thickness. Detailed illustrations of current conduction mechanism are developed by simulation and experimental measurement results. It is found that the electron diffusion current and Schottky barrier height lowering for hole tunneling current both contribute on inversion current conduction. In MOS tunneling photodiode applications, the photoresponse can be improved by decreasing SiO{sub 2} thickness and using comb-shaped electrodes with smaller tooth spacing. Meantime, the high and steady photosensitivity can also be approached by introducing HfO{sub 2} into dielectric stacks.

  13. Anomalous Fano resonance of massive Dirac particle through a time-dependent barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cunxi; Liu, Jie; Fu, Libin

    2015-06-01

    As is well known Fano resonance arises from the interference between a localized state and a continuum state. Using the standard Floquet theory and the scattering matrix method, we study theoretically the massive Dirac particle transmission over a quantum barrier with an oscillating field. It is found that the massive relativistic particles can generate not only normal Fano resonance in the transmission due to the interference between a localized state (bound state) and the continuum state, but also anomalous Fano resonance due to the interference between a delocalized state (extended state) and the continuum state. The dependence of line shapes on driving parameters for these two kinds of Fano resonances is quite different. For normal Fano resonance the asymmetry parameter is approximately proportional to a power law of the amplitude of the oscillating field, while for the anomalous Fano resonance the asymmetry parameters change slightly with different oscillation amplitudes. In practice, the anomalous Fano resonance can be identified by observing asymmetry parameters in experiment.

  14. AIDS and chemical dependency: special issues and treatment barriers for gay and bisexual men.

    PubMed

    Cabaj, R P

    1989-01-01

    Because gay and bisexual men continue to be the largest at-risk group for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) related conditions, the special role of substance abuse, and not just intravenous drug abuse, must be understood in order to provide adequate services and prevention. Gay men and women appear to have a higher incidence of substance abuse than the general population. Genetic, biochemical, societal, and cultural factors may all contribute to this increase, especially the overwhelming impact of societal homophobia. To address the treatment barriers to gay and bisexual men seeking or needing treatment for HIV-related conditions, chemical dependence or both, the gay community should be seen like any other minority community. The social and cultural norms of this widely varied community should be studied: the socialization of being gay in mainstream society, including the awareness of being different; the coming-out process; and dealing with internalized homophobia need to be understood. In addition, the resistance or anxiety health care providers may feel in working with gay or bisexual men or with HIV-related conditions should be addressed. PMID:2621509

  15. Buprenorphine Maintenance for Opioid Dependence in Public Sector Healthcare: Benefits and Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Laura G.; Mendoza, Sonia; Hansen, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Background Since its U.S. FDA approval in 2002, buprenorphine has been available for maintenance treatment of opiate dependence in primary care physicians’ offices. Though buprenorphine was intended to facilitate access to treatment, disparities in utilization have emerged; while buprenorphine treatment is widely used in private care setting, public healthcare integration of buprenorphine lags behind. Results Through a review of the literature, we found that U.S. disparities are partly due to a shortage of certified prescribers, concern of patient diversion, as well as economic and institutional barriers. Disparity of buprenorphine treatment dissemination is concerning since buprenorphine treatment has specific characteristics that are especially suited for low-income patient population in public sector healthcare such as flexible dosing schedules, ease of concurrently treating co-morbidities such as HIV and hepatitis C, positive patient attitudes towards treatment, and the potential of reducing addiction treatment stigma. Conclusion As the gap between buprenorphine treatment in public sector settings and private sector settings persists in the U.S., current research suggests ways to facilitate its dissemination. PMID:27088135

  16. TLR4 induces CCR7-dependent monocytes transmigration through the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Alexandre; Bernier, Stéphane; Dumais, Nancy

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we examined whether bacterial pathogen-associated molecular patterns recognized by toll-like receptors (TLRs) can modify the CCR7-dependent migration of human monocytes. MonoMac-1 (MM-1) cells and freshly isolated human monocytes were cultivated in the presence of agonists for TLR4 (which senses lipopolysaccharides from gram-negative bacteria), TLR1/2 (which senses peptidoglycan from gram-positive bacteria), and TLR9 (which recognizes bacterial DNA rich in unmethylated CpG DNA). CCR7 mRNA transcription was measured using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and protein expression was examined using flow cytometry. CCR7 function was monitored using migration and transmigration assays in response to CCL19/CCL21, which are natural ligands for CCR7. Our results show that TLR4 strongly increases monocyte migratory capacity in response to CCL19 in chemotaxis and transmigration assays in a model that mimics the human blood-brain barrier, whereas TLR1/2 and 9 have no effect. Examination of monocyte migration in response to TLRs that are activated by bacterial components would contribute to understanding the excessive monocyte migration that characterizes the pathogenesis of bacterial infections and/or neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:27235343

  17. The oxidative activities of membrane vesicles from Bacillus caldolyticus. Energy-dependence of succinate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Dawson, A G; Chappell, J B

    1978-02-15

    1. The properties of membrane vesicles from the extreme thermophile Bacillus caldolyticus were investigated. 2. Vesicles prepared by exposure of spheroplasts to ultrasound contained cytochromes a, b and c, and at 50 degrees C they rapidly oxidized NADH and ascorbate in the presence of tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine. Succinate and l-malate were oxidized more slowly, and dl-lactate, l-alanine and glycerol 1-phosphate were not oxidized. 3. In the absence of proton-conducting uncouplers the oxidation of NADH was accompanied by a net translocation of H(+) into the vesicles. Hydrolysis of ATP by a dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide-sensitive adenosine triphosphatase was accompanied by a similarly directed net translocation of H(+). 4. Uncouplers (carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone or valinomycin plus NH(4) (+)) prevented net H(+) translocation but stimulated ATP hydrolysis, NADH oxidation and ascorbate oxidation. The last result suggested an energy-conserving site in the respiratory chain between cytochrome c and oxygen. 5. Under anaerobic conditions the reduction of cytochrome b by ascorbate (with tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine) was stimulated by ATP hydrolysis, indicating an energy-conserving site between cytochrome b and cytochrome c. However, no reduction of NAD(+) supported by oxidation of succinate, malate or ascorbate occurred, neither did it with these substrates in the presence of ATP under anaerobic conditions, suggesting that there was no energy-conserving site between NADH and cytochrome b. 6. Succinate oxidation, in contrast with that of NADH and ascorbate, was strongly inhibited by uncouplers and stimulated by ATP hydrolysis. These effects were not observed when phenazine methosulphate, which transfers electrons from succinate dehydrogenase directly to oxygen, was present. It was concluded that in these vesicles the oxidation of succinate was energy-dependent and that the reoxidation of reduced succinate dehydrogenase was dependent on the outward

  18. Correlation between nicotine dependence and barriers to cessation between exclusive cigarette smokers and dual (water pipe) smokers among Arab Americans

    PubMed Central

    El-Shahawy, Omar; Haddad, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that dual cigarette and water pipe use is growing among minority groups, particularly among Arab Americans. Differences in nicotine dependence and barriers to smoking cessation among such dual smokers have not been previously examined in this population. We examined potential differences that might exist between exclusive cigarette smokers and dual smokers (cigarette and water pipe) pertaining to nicotine dependence and barriers to cessation among Arab Americans. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study using a convenience sample of self-identified Arab immigrant smokers (n=131) living in the Richmond, VA metropolitan area. Data were collected using four questionnaires: Demographic and Cultural Information questionnaire, Tobacco Use questionnaire, Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) questionnaire, and Barriers to Cessation questionnaire. We examined differences in nicotine dependence and barriers to cessation between exclusive cigarette smokers and dual smokers of cigarettes and water pipe. Furthermore, we explored the correlations of these measures with select variables. Results There was a significant difference in the FTND scores between the exclusive cigarette smokers (mean M=2.55, standard deviation [SD] =2.10) and dual smokers (M=3.71, SD =2.42); t(129) = (2.51), P=0.0066. There was also a significant difference in the Barriers to Cessation scores between exclusive cigarette smokers (M=38.47, SD =13.07) and dual smokers (M=45.21, SD =9.27); t(129) = (2.56), P=0.0058. Furthermore, there was a highly significant correlation among FTND scores, Barriers to Cessation scores, and past quit attempts among dual smokers. Conclusion Water pipe tobacco smoking seems to be both adding to the dependence potential of cigarette smoking and enhancing barriers to cessation in our study sample. However, the high correlation between quit attempts, FTND, and barriers to cessation needs further investigation to ascertain the possible

  19. Anandamide rescues retinal barrier properties in Müller glia through nitric oxide regulation.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, G; Chatterjee, N

    2015-01-22

    The blood retinal barrier (BRB) can mitigate deleterious immune response. Dysfunction at the BRB can affect disease progression. Under inflammatory conditions Müller glia produce increased pro-inflammatory factors, like nitric oxide (NO). In this study we describe molecular events at the Müller glia during inflammation which could affect inner BRB properties. Griess assay and 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA) time-lapse fluorescence were used to measure NO production. Western blot was used to analyze the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) components. Lucifer Yellow was used to measure permeability. Griess assay and DAF-2DA time-lapse fluorescence images revealed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammation and increased NO production. In parallel, changes were observed in tight junction proteins, zona occludens 1 (ZO-1), connexin 43 (Cx43), and permeability. This was mediated through activation of iNOS and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), implicated in immune response. Endocannabinoids can exert a protective and anti-inflammatory effect. Exogenous arachidonoyl ethanolamide (AEA) inhibited NO generation and also abolished LPS-induced increase in permeability. Our work suggests that subtle changes in Müller glia function, which act as part of the BRB, could contribute to retinal health. AEA which can reduce inflammatory cytotoxicity has potential as treatment in several ocular manifestations where the integrity of the BRB is crucial. PMID:25453774

  20. Tritium permeation barrier-aluminized coating prepared by Al-plating and subsequent oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guikai, Zhang; Ju, Li; Chang'an, Chen; Sanping, Dou; Guoping, Ling

    2011-10-01

    Aluminum rich coatings forming Al 2O 3 on surface are widely applied as tritium permeation barrier (TPB) on structural materials in fusion reactor. In this work, we proposed a new three-step method for preparing such aluminum rich coating on HR-2 steel: ambient temperature melts salt electroplating followed by heat treating and artificial oxidation at 700 °C. Al deposition from AlCl 3/EMIC was performed with a deposition rate of 15 μm/h. After heat treated for 2 h, the aluminized coating appeared homogeneous, with thickness of 11-13 μm and free of visible porosity, and exhibited a three-layer structure. After oxidized in 10 -2 Pa O 2 for 80 h, the finally fabricated coating showed a double-layered structure consisting of an outer γ-A1 2O 3 layer with thickness of 0.1 μm and inner (Fe,Cr,Mn,Ni)Al/(Fe,Cr,Mn,Ni) 3Al layer of 32 μm thickness, without any visible defects. The deuterium permeation rate through the coated HR-2 steel was reduced by 2-3 orders of magnitude at 600-727 °C.

  1. Oxidation Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings with a TiAl3 Bond Coat on γ-TiAl Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiqiang; Kong, Lingyan; Li, Tiefan; Xiong, Tianying

    2015-02-01

    The thermal barrier coatings investigated in this paper included a TiAl3 bond coat and a yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) layer. The TiAl3 bond coat was prepared by deposition of aluminum by cold spray, followed by a heat-treatment. The YSZ layer was prepared by air plasma spray. The isothermal and cyclic oxidation tests were conducted at 900 °C for 1000 h and 500 cycles to test the oxidation resistance of the thermal barrier coatings. The microstructure and composition of the γ-TiAl alloy with and without the thermal barrier coatings after oxidation were investigated. The results showed that a dense TGO layer about 5 μm had grown between the YSZ layer and the TiAl3 bond coat. The TGO had good adhesion to both the YSZ layer and the bond coat even after the TiAl3 bond coat entirely degraded into the TiAl2 phase, which decreased the inward oxygen diffusion. Thus, the thermal barrier coatings improved the oxidation resistance of γ-TiAl alloy effectively.

  2. Nitronyl nitroxides, a novel group of protective agents against oxidative stress in endothelial cells forming the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Blasig, I E; Mertsch, K; Haseloff, R F

    2002-11-01

    Nitronyl nitroxides (NN) effectively decompose free radicals (. As brain endothelium, forming the blood-brain barrier (BBB), is both the main source and the target of reactive species during cerebral oxidative stress, we studied the effect of NN on brain endothelial cells injured by the mediator of oxidative stress H(2)O(2) (. H(2)O(2) caused hydroxyl radical generation, lipid peroxidation, membrane dysfunction, membrane leak and cell death, concentration dependently. Due to 0.5 mM H(2)O(2), oxy-radical-induced membrane phospholipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde) increased to 0.61+/-0.04 nmol/mg protein vs control (0.32+/-0.03, p<0.05), cells lost cytosolic proteins into the medium and viability decreased to 28+/-2% of control (p<0.05). Permeability through the endothelial monolayer (measure for the tightness of the BBB) rose to 250+/-40% after 0.15 mM H(2)O(2) (p<0.001). Addition of 10 microM of the NN 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-diphenyl-4-methoxy-2-imidazoline-3-oxide-1-oxyl (NN-2), 1 mM phenylbutyl nitrone (PBN), or 10 microM of the lazaroid U83836E improved cell viability during incubation with 0.5 mM H(2)O(2) to 57+/-1%, 49+/-2%, and 42+/-3% (p<0.05, vs drug-free H(2)O(2) group). The permeability enhancement by 0.15 mM H(2)O(2) was reduced to 171+/-21%, 170+/-25%, and 118+/-32% (p<0.05 vs drug-free H(2)O(2) group). Generally, the assumption is supported that during cerebral oxidative stress the protection should also be directed to the cells of the BBB, which can be provided by antioxidative approaches. NN represent a new group of antioxdatively acting cytoprotectiva improving the survival and function of the endothelium against oxidative stress. PMID:12423670

  3. Improved Oxidation Life of Segmented Plasma Sprayed 8YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2004-03-01

    Unconventional plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems were produced and evaluated by interrupted or cyclic furnace oxidation life testing. First, approximately 250 µm thick 8YSZ coatings were directly sprayed onto grit blasted surfaces of PWA 1484, without a bond coat, to take advantage of the excellent oxidation resistance of this superalloy. For nominal sulfur (S) contents of 1 ppmw, total coating separation took place at relatively short times (200 h at 1100°C). Reductions in the S content, by melt desulfurization commercially (0.3 ppmw) or by hydrogen (H2) annealing in the laboratory (0.01 ppmw), improved scale adhesion and extended life appreciably, by factors of 5-10. However, edge-initiated failure persisted, producing massive delamination as one sheet of coating. Secondly, surfaces of melt desulfurized PWA 1484 were machined with a grid of grooves or ribs (˜250 µm wide and high), resulting in a segmented TBC surface macrostructure, for the purpose of subverting this failure mechanism. In this case, failure occurred only as independent, single-segment events. For grooved samples, 1100 °C segment life was extended to ˜1000h for 5 mm wide segments, with no failure observed out to 2000 h for segments ≤2.5 mm wide. Ribbed samples were even more durable, and segments ≤6 mm remained intact for 2000 h. Larger segments failed by buckling at times inversely related to the segment width and decreased by oxidation effects at higher temperatures. This critical buckling size was consistent with that predicted for elastic buckling of a TBC plate subject to thermal expansion mismatch stresses. Thus, low S substrates demonstrate appreciable coating lives without a bond coat, while rib segmenting extends life considerably.

  4. Microbubble Type and Distribution Dependence of Focused Ultrasound Induced Blood Brain Barrier Opening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shutao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Olumolade, Oluyemi; Feshitan, Jameel A.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Focused Ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles has been used to non-invasively induce reversible blood brain barrier (BBB) opening in both rodents and non-human primates. This study aims at identifying the dependence of the BBB opening properties on the polydisperse microbubble (since all clinically approved microbubbles are polydisperse) type and distribution by using clinically approved UCA (Definity®) and in-house made polydisperse microbubbles (IHP) in mice. A total of 18 C57BL/6 mice (n = 3) were used in this study, and each mouse received either Definity® or IHP microbubbles via tail vein injection. The concentration and size distribution of both the activated Definity® and IHP microbubbles were measured and diluted to 6×108/ml prior to injection. Immediately after the microbubble administration, FUS sonications were carried out with the following parameters: frequency of 1.5 MHz, pulse repetition frequency of 10 Hz, 1000 cycles, in situ peak rarefactional acoustic pressures of 0.3 MPa, 0.45 MPa, and 0.6 MPa for a sonication duration of 60 s. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to confirm the BBB opening and allowed for image-based analysis. The permeability of the treated region and volumes of BBB opening using the two types of microbubbles did not show significant difference (P > 0.05) for PRPs of 0.45 MPa and 0.6 MPa, while IHP microbubbles showed significantly higher permeability and volume of opening (P < 0.05) at the relatively lower pressure of 0.3 MPa. The results from this study indicate that the microbubble type and distribution could have significant effects on the FUS-induced BBB opening at lower, but less important at higher, pressure levels, possibly due to the stable cavitation that governs the former. This difference may have become less significant at higher FUS pressure levels where inertial cavitation typically occurs. PMID:24239362

  5. Barriers to community-based drug dependence treatment: implications for police roles, collaborations and performance indicators

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Du, Chunhua; Cai, Thomas; Han, Qingfeng; Yuan, Huanhuan; Luo, Tingyan; Ren, Guoliang; Mburu, Gitau; Wang, Bangyuan; Golichenko, Olga; Zhang, Chaoxiong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Worldwide, people who use drugs (PWUD) are among the populations at highest risk for HIV infection. In China, PWUD are primarily sentenced to compulsory detainment centres, in which access to healthcare, including HIV treatment and prevention services, is limited or non-existent. In 2008, China's 2008 Anti-Drug Law encouraged the development and use of community-based drug dependence rehabilitation, yet there is limited evidence evaluating the efficacy and challenges of this model in China. In this study, we explore these challenges and describe how cooperation between law enforcement and health departments can meet the needs of PWUD. Methods In 2015, we conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with all four staff members and 16 clients of the Ping An Centre No. 1 for community-based drug treatment, three local police officers and three officials from the local Centre for Disease Control. Interviews explored obstacles in implementing community-based drug dependence treatment and efforts to resolve these difficulties. Transcripts were coded and analyzed with qualitative data analysis software (MAXQDA 11). Results We identified three challenges to community-based drug treatment at the Ping An Centre No. 1: (1) suboptimal coordination among parties involved, (2) a divergence in attitudes towards PWUD and harm reduction between law enforcement and health officials and (3) conflicting performance targets for police and health officials that undermine the shared goal of treatment. We also identified the take-home methadone maintenance treatment model at the Ping An Centre No. 1 as an example of an early successful collaboration between the police, the health department and PWUD. Conclusions To overcome barriers to effective community-based drug treatment, we recommend aligning the goals of law enforcement and public health agencies towards health-based performance indicators. Furthermore, tensions between PWUD and police need to be addressed and trust

  6. Ursodeoxycholic acid ameliorates experimental ileitis counteracting intestinal barrier dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bernardes-Silva, Carlos Felipe; Damião, Adérson O M C; Sipahi, Aytan M; Laurindo, Francisco R M; Iriya, Kiyoshi; Lopasso, Fabio P; Buchpiguel, Carlos A; Lordello, Maria Laura L; Agostinho, Carmem L O; Laudanna, Antonio A

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on intestinal permeability (IP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in indomethacin-induced enteropathy, a well-known experimental model of Crohn's disease. Seventy-eight male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to receive indomethacin, indomethacin + UDCA, or vehicles. Indomethacin induced a significant increase in the fraction of urinary excretion of 51Cr-EDTA following oral administration (7.9 +/- 1.3 vs 2.3 +/- 0.2%; P < 0.05) and lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence in intestinal fragments ex vivo (10.1 +/- 1.9 vs 2.6 +/- 0.4 cpm x 10(3)/mg; P < 0.05) compared to controls. UDCA significantly reversed these effects (P < 0.05), without being incorporated in biliary bile acid composition (HPLC analysis). These findings support a local protective effect of UDCA in experimental ileitis by the modulation of intestinal barrier dysfunction and oxidative stress. In short, they provide insights into mechanisms of action of UDCA in intestinal inflammation and a new perspective on the treatment of Crohn's disease. PMID:15573906

  7. Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Oxidation of U(IV) Oxide Minerals by the Chemolithoautotrophic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, H R

    2004-06-25

    Under anaerobic conditions and at circumneutral pH, cells of the widely-distributed, obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans oxidatively dissolved synthetic and biogenic U(IV) oxides (uraninite) in nitrate-dependent fashion: U(IV) oxidation required the presence of nitrate and was strongly correlated to nitrate consumption. This is the first report of anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by an autotrophic bacterium.

  8. Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Oxidation of U(IV) Oxide Minerals by the Chemolithoautotrophic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    PubMed Central

    Beller, Harry R.

    2005-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions and at circumneutral pH, cells of the widely distributed, obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans oxidatively dissolved synthetic and biogenic U(IV) oxides (uraninite) in nitrate-dependent fashion: U(IV) oxidation required the presence of nitrate and was strongly correlated with nitrate consumption. This is the first report of anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by an autotrophic bacterium. PMID:15812053

  9. Blood-brain barrier properties in vitro depend on composition and assembly of endogenous extracellular matrices.

    PubMed

    Zobel, Kathrin; Hansen, Uwe; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells, which constitute the blood-brain barrier (BBB), are enveloped by the extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes. The contribution of matrix components secreted by the various cell types at the neurovascular unit, however, remains unclear with respect to their effect on endothelial barrier function. In this study, a new in vitro model was established by growing endothelial cells on an ECM produced by pericytes, astrocytes or a serial combination of both. The last-mentioned was found to be more in vivo-like. We investigated the role of the composition and morphology of ECM supra-structures in maintaining BBB function. The composition was analysed by protein analysis (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and the ultrastructure of generated matrices was analysed by transmission electron microscopy including immunogold labelling. We could show by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing measurements that pericytes and combined matrices significantly improved the barrier tightness of porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (PBCEC). The increase of the resistance was verified by enhanced expression of tight junction proteins. Thus, for the first time, we have shown that barrier integrity is strictly controlled by the ECM, which is a product of all cells involved in the secretion of ECM components and their modification by corresponding cells. Moreover, we have demonstrated that complex matrices by the various cells of the BBB induce barrier marker enzymes in PBCEC, such as alkaline phosphatase. PMID:27053246

  10. Pentylentetrazole-induced loss of blood-brain barrier integrity involves excess nitric oxide generation by neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Danjo, Sonoko; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Masatomo; Nakamura, Yu; Itoh, Kouichi

    2013-09-12

    Dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major pathophysiological consequences of epilepsy. The increase in the permeability caused by BBB failure is thought to contribute to the development of epileptic outcomes. We developed a method by which the BBB permeability can be demonstrated by gadolinium-enhanced T1 weighted imaging (GdET1WI). The present study examined the changes in the BBB permeability in mice with generalized convulsive seizures (GCS) induced by acute pentylentetrazole (PTZ) injection. At 15min after PTZ-induced GCS, the BBB temporarily leaks BBB-impermeable contrast agent into the parenchyma of the diencephalon, hippocampus and cerebral cortex in mice, and the loss of BBB integrity was gradually recovered by 24h. The temporary BBB failure is a critical link to the glutamatergic activities that occur following the injection of PTZ. PTZ activates the glutamatergic pathway via the NMDA receptor, then nitric oxide (NO) is generated by NMDA receptor-coupled neuronal NO synthase (nNOS). To examine the influence of nNOS-derived NO induced by PTZ on the increases of the BBB permeability, GdET1WI was performed using conventional nNOS gene-deficient mice with or without PTZ injection. The failure of the BBB induced by PTZ was completely protected by nNOS deficiency in the brain. These results suggest that nNOS-derived excess NO in the glutamatergic pathway plays a key role in the failure of the BBB during PTZ-induced GCS. The levels of NO synthetized by nNOS in the brain may represent an important target for the future development of drugs to protect the BBB. PMID:23831997

  11. Electrical spin injection and detection in silicon nanowires through oxide tunnel barriers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shixiong; Dayeh, Shadi A; Li, Yan; Crooker, Scott A; Smith, Darryl L; Picraux, S T

    2013-02-13

    We demonstrate all-electrical spin injection, transport, and detection in heavily n-type-doped Si nanowires using ferromagnetic Co/Al(2)O(3) tunnel barrier contacts. Analysis of both local and nonlocal spin valve signals at 4 K on the same nanowire device using a standard spin-transport model suggests that high spin injection efficiency (up to ~30%) and long spin diffusion lengths (up to ~6 μm) are achieved. These values exceed those reported for spin transport devices based on comparably doped bulk Si. The spin valve signals are found to be strongly bias and temperature dependent and can invert sign with changes in the dc bias current. The influence of the nanowire morphology on field-dependent switching of the contacts is also discussed. Owing to their nanoscale geometry, ~5 orders of magnitude less current is required to achieve nonlocal spin valve voltages comparable to those attained in planar microscale spin transport devices, suggesting lower power consumption and the potential for applications of Si nanowires in nanospintronics. PMID:23324028

  12. Size-dependent selectivity and activity of silver nanoclusters in the partial oxidation of propylene to propylene oxide and acrolein : A joint experimental and theoretical study.

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, L M.; Lee, S.; Sell, K.; Barcaro, G.; Fortunelli, A.; Lee, B.; Seifert, S.; Winans, R. E.; Elam, J. W.; Pellin, M. J.; Barke, I.; von Oeynhausen, V.; Lei, Y.; Meyer, R. J.; Alonso, J. A.; Fraile-Rodriguez, A.; Kleibert, A.; Giorgio, S.; Henry, C. R.; Heinz Meiwes-Broer, K.; Vadja, S.; Univ. de Valladolid; Univ. Rostock; IPCF-CNR; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Swiss Light Source; CINaM-CNRS and Aix-Marseille Univ.; Yale Univ.

    2011-02-02

    Model silver nanocatalysts between 9 and 23 nm in size were prepared by size-selected cluster deposition from a free cluster beam on amorphous alumina films and their size-dependent catalytic performance studied in the partial oxidation of propylene under realistic reaction conditions. Smaller clusters preferentially produced acrolein, while the 23 nm particles were considerably more selective towards the formation of propylene oxide, at reaction rates far exceeding those previously reported for larger silver particles. The activity of clusters dropped significantly with increasing particle size. First-principle calculations, of the activation energies for oxygen adsorption and its dissociation, at variable surface coverage yielded surface energies which resulted in particle shapes resembling the experimentally observed shapes of partially oxidized silver clusters. The calculated activation barriers for propylene oxide and acrolein formation on various facets and on the edges of the nanoparticles provided detailed information about the energetics of the competing reaction pathways. The size- and corresponding morphology dependent theoretical activity and selectivity are in good accord with experimental observations.

  13. Spin injection and detection in a graphene lateral spin valve using an yttrium-oxide tunneling barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Katsuyoshi; Kasai, Shinya; Li, Song-Lin; Nakaharai, Shu; Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Yamamoto, Mahito; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate charge and spin current transport in a graphene-based lateral spin valve using yttrium oxide (Y-O) as a tunneling barrier between graphene and a ferromagnetic electrode. A Y-O layer grown on graphene is flat, with a root-mean-square roughness of 0.17 nm, which is much lower than that of conventional barrier materials. This flatness allows the utilization of a very thin but well-defined tunneling barrier, leading to a large spin signal of ˜20 Ω and a high spin injection efficiency of 15% with a low contact resistance of ˜1 kΩ. These findings represent important progress toward the realization of graphene-based spintronics applications.

  14. Gold-thickness-dependent Schottky barrier height for charge transfer in metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Large-area, vertically aligned silicon nanowires with a uniform diameter along the height direction were fabricated by combining in situ-formed anodic aluminum oxide template and metal-assisted chemical etching. The etching rate of the Si catalyzed using a thick Au mesh is much faster than that catalyzed using a thin one, which is suggested to be induced by the charge transport process. The thick Au mesh in contact with the Si produces a low Au/Si Schottky barrier height, facilitating the injection of electronic holes from the Au to the Si, thus resulting in a high etching rate. PMID:23618313

  15. The Development of HfO2-Rare Earth Based Oxide Materials and Barrier Coatings for Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan James

    2014-01-01

    Advanced hafnia-rare earth oxides, rare earth aluminates and silicates have been developed for thermal environmental barrier systems for aerospace propulsion engine and thermal protection applications. The high temperature stability, low thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of these oxide material systems make them attractive and potentially viable for thermal protection systems. This paper will focus on the development of the high performance and high temperature capable ZrO2HfO2-rare earth based alloy and compound oxide materials, processed as protective coating systems using state-or-the-art processing techniques. The emphasis has been in particular placed on assessing their temperature capability, stability and suitability for advanced space vehicle entry thermal protection systems. Fundamental thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of the material systems have been investigated at high temperatures. Laser high-heat-flux testing has also been developed to validate the material systems, and demonstrating durability under space entry high heat flux conditions.

  16. Stress influence on high temperature oxide scale growth: Modeling and investigation on a thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saillard, A.; Cherkaoui, M.; Capolungo, L.; Busso, E. P.

    2010-07-01

    In thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems, an oxide layer develops at high temperature below the ceramic coating, leading in the long term to the mechanical failure of the structure upon cooling. The mechanism of stress-affected oxidation likely to induce the growth of a non-uniform oxide scale detrimental to the TBC lifetime was investigated. A continuum thermodynamics formulation is derived accounting for the influence of the stress and strain situation at the sharp metal/oxide phase boundary on the local oxidation kinetics. It specially includes the contributions of the large volumetric strain and the mass consumption associated with metal oxidation. A continuum mechanics/mass diffusion framework is used along with the developed formulation for the interface evolution to study the growth of an oxide layer coupled with local stress development. The implementation of the model has required the development of a specific simulation tool, based on a finite element method completed with an external routine for the phase boundary propagation. Results on an electron-beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) TBC case are presented. The processes resulting in a non-uniform oxide scale growth are analyzed and the main influences are discussed.

  17. Nitric oxide isoenzymes regulate lipopolysaccharide-enhanced insulin transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A; Dohgu, Shinya; Lynch, Jessica L; Fleegal-DeMotta, Melissa A; Erickson, Michelle A; Nakaoke, Ryota; Vo, Than Q

    2008-04-01

    Insulin transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has many effects within the central nervous system. Insulin transport is not static but altered by obesity and inflammation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), derived from the cell walls of Gram-negative bacteria, enhances insulin transport across the BBB but also releases nitric oxide (NO), which opposes LPS-enhanced insulin transport. Here we determined the role of NO synthase (NOS) in mediating the effects of LPS on insulin BBB transport. The activity of all three NOS isoenzymes was stimulated in vivo by LPS. Endothelial NOS and inducible NOS together mediated the LPS-enhanced transport of insulin, whereas neuronal NOS (nNOS) opposed LPS-enhanced insulin transport. This dual pattern of NOS action was found in most brain regions with the exception of the striatum, which did not respond to LPS, and the parietal cortex, hippocampus, and pons medulla, which did not respond to nNOS inhibition. In vitro studies of a brain endothelial cell (BEC) monolayer BBB model showed that LPS did not directly affect insulin transport, whereas NO inhibited insulin transport. This suggests that the stimulatory effect of LPS and NOS on insulin transport is mediated through cells of the neurovascular unit other than BECs. Protein and mRNA levels of the isoenzymes indicated that the effects of LPS are mainly posttranslational. In conclusion, LPS affects insulin transport across the BBB by modulating NOS isoenzyme activity. NO released by endothelial NOS and inducible NOS acts indirectly to stimulate insulin transport, whereas NO released by nNOS acts directly on BECs to inhibit insulin transport. PMID:18187549

  18. The Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier on an oxide surface: a combined Monte-Carlo and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Gianfrancesco, Anthony G; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V; Vasudevan, Rama K

    2015-11-13

    The controlled growth of epitaxial films of complex oxides requires an atomistic understanding of key parameters determining final film morphology, such as termination dependence on adatom diffusion, and height of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barrier. Here, through an in situ scanning tunneling microscopy study of mixed-terminated La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 (LCMO) films, we image adatoms and observe pile-up at island edges. Image analysis allows determination of the population of adatoms at the edge of islands and fractions on A-site and B-site terminations. A simple Monte-Carlo model, simulating the random walk of adatoms on a sinusoidal potential landscape using Boltzmann statistics is used to reproduce the experimental data, and provides an estimate of the ES barrier as ∼0.18 ± 0.04 eV at T = 1023 K, similar to those of metal adatoms on metallic surfaces. These studies highlight the utility of in situ imaging, in combination with basic Monte-Carlo methods, in elucidating the factors which control the final film growth in complex oxides. PMID:26489518

  19. The Ehrlich–Schwoebel barrier on an oxide surface: a combined Monte-Carlo and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy approach

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfrancesco, Anthony G.; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Vasudevan, Rama K.

    2015-10-22

    The controlled growth of epitaxial films of complex oxides requires an atomistic understanding of key parameters determining final film morphology, such as termination dependence on adatom diffusion, and height of the Ehrlich–Schwoebel (ES) barrier. In this study, through an in situ scanning tunneling microscopy study of mixed-terminated La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 (LCMO) films, we image adatoms and observe pile-up at island edges. Image analysis allows determination of the population of adatoms at the edge of islands and fractions on A-site and B-site terminations. A simple Monte-Carlo model, simulating the random walk of adatoms on a sinusoidal potential landscape using Boltzmann statistics is used to reproduce the experimental data, and provides an estimate of the ES barrier as ~0.18 ± 0.04 eV at T = 1023 K, similar to those of metal adatoms on metallic surfaces. In conclusion, these studies highlight the utility of in situ imaging, in combination with basic Monte-Carlo methods, in elucidating the factors which control the final film growth in complex oxides.

  20. The Ehrlich–Schwoebel barrier on an oxide surface: a combined Monte-Carlo and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy approach

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gianfrancesco, Anthony G.; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Vasudevan, Rama K.

    2015-10-22

    The controlled growth of epitaxial films of complex oxides requires an atomistic understanding of key parameters determining final film morphology, such as termination dependence on adatom diffusion, and height of the Ehrlich–Schwoebel (ES) barrier. In this study, through an in situ scanning tunneling microscopy study of mixed-terminated La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 (LCMO) films, we image adatoms and observe pile-up at island edges. Image analysis allows determination of the population of adatoms at the edge of islands and fractions on A-site and B-site terminations. A simple Monte-Carlo model, simulating the random walk of adatoms on a sinusoidal potential landscape using Boltzmann statistics is usedmore » to reproduce the experimental data, and provides an estimate of the ES barrier as ~0.18 ± 0.04 eV at T = 1023 K, similar to those of metal adatoms on metallic surfaces. In conclusion, these studies highlight the utility of in situ imaging, in combination with basic Monte-Carlo methods, in elucidating the factors which control the final film growth in complex oxides.« less

  1. The Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier on an oxide surface: a combined Monte-Carlo and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianfrancesco, Anthony G.; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Vasudevan, Rama K.

    2015-11-01

    The controlled growth of epitaxial films of complex oxides requires an atomistic understanding of key parameters determining final film morphology, such as termination dependence on adatom diffusion, and height of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barrier. Here, through an in situ scanning tunneling microscopy study of mixed-terminated La5/8Ca3/8MnO3 (LCMO) films, we image adatoms and observe pile-up at island edges. Image analysis allows determination of the population of adatoms at the edge of islands and fractions on A-site and B-site terminations. A simple Monte-Carlo model, simulating the random walk of adatoms on a sinusoidal potential landscape using Boltzmann statistics is used to reproduce the experimental data, and provides an estimate of the ES barrier as ˜0.18 ± 0.04 eV at T = 1023 K, similar to those of metal adatoms on metallic surfaces. These studies highlight the utility of in situ imaging, in combination with basic Monte-Carlo methods, in elucidating the factors which control the final film growth in complex oxides.

  2. Scale-dependent bias from an inflationary bispectrum: the effect of a stochastic moving barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagetti, Matteo; Desjacques, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    With the advent of large-scale galaxy surveys, constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity (PNG) are expected to reach O(f_NL) ˜ 1. In order to fully exploit the potential of these future surveys, a deep theoretical understanding of the signatures imprinted by PNG on the large-scale structure of the Universe is necessary. In this paper, we explore the effect of a stochastic moving barrier on the amplitude of the non-Gaussian bias induced by local quadratic PNG. We show that, in the peak approach to halo clustering, the amplitude of the non-Gaussian bias will generally differ from the peak-background split prediction unless the barrier is flat and deterministic. For excursion set peaks with a square-root barrier, which reproduce reasonably well the linear bias b1 and mass function bar{n}_h of SO haloes, the non-Gaussian bias amplitude is ˜40 per cent larger than the peak-background split expectation partial lnbar{n}_h/partial lnσ _8 for haloes of mass ˜1013 M⊙ h-1 at z = 0. Furthermore, we argue that the effect of PNG on squeezed configurations of the halo bispectrum differs significantly from that predicted by standard local bias approaches. Our predictions can be easily confirmed, or invalidated, with N-body simulations.

  3. The toxicity of graphene oxides: dependence on the oxidative methods used.

    PubMed

    Chng, Elaine Lay Khim; Pumera, Martin

    2013-06-17

    Graphene, a class of two-dimensional carbon nanomaterial, has attracted extensive interest in recent years, with a significant amount of research focusing on graphene oxides (GOs). They have been primed as potential candidates for biomedical applications such as cell labeling and drug delivery, thus the toxicity and behavior of graphene oxides in biological systems are fundamental issues that need urgent attention. The production of GO is generally achieved through a top-down route, which includes the usage of concentrated H₂SO₄ along with: 1) concentrated nitric acid and KClO₃ oxidant (Hoffmann); 2) fuming nitric acid and KClO₃ oxidant (Staudenmaier); 3) concentrated phosphoric acid with KMnO₄ (Tour); or 4) sodium nitrate for in-situ production of nitric acid in the presence of KMnO₄ (Hummers). It has been widely assumed that the properties of these four GOs produced by using the above different methods are roughly similar, so the methods have been used interchangeably. However, several studies have reported that the toxicity of graphene-related nanomaterials in biological systems may be influenced by their physiochemical properties, such as surface functional groups and structural defects. In addition, considering how GOs are increasingly used in the field of biomedicine, we are interested to see how the oxygen content/functional groups of GOs can impact their toxicological profiles. Since in-vitro testing is a common first step in assessing the health risks related with engineered nanomaterials, the cytotoxicity of the GOs prepared by the four different oxidative treatments was investigated by measuring the mitochondrial activity in adherent lung epithelial cells (A549) by using commercially available viability assays. The dose-response data was generated by using two assays, the methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and the water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-8). From the viability data, it is evident that there is a strong dose-dependent

  4. Stress dependent oxidation of sputtered niobium and effects on superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David Henry, M.; Wolfley, Steve; Monson, Todd; Clark, Blythe G.; Shaner, Eric; Jarecki, Robert

    2014-02-01

    We report on the suppression of room temperature oxidation of DC sputtered niobium films and the effects upon the superconductive transition temperature, Tc. Niobium was sputter-deposited on silicon dioxide coated 150 mm wafers and permitted to oxidize at room temperature and pressure for up to two years. Resistivity and stress measurements indicate that tensile films greater than 400 MPa resist bulk oxidation with measurements using transmission electron microscope, electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry confirming this result. Although a surface oxide, Nb2O5, consumed the top 6-10 nm, we measure less than 1 at. % oxygen and nitrogen in the bulk of the films after the oxidation period. Tc measurements using a SQUID magnetometer indicate that the tensile films maintained a Tc approaching the dirty superconductive limit of 8.4 K after two years of oxidation while maintaining room temperature sheet resistance. This work demonstrates that control over niobium film stress during deposition can prevent bulk oxidation by limiting the vertical grain boundaries ability to oxidize, prolonging the superconductive properties of sputtered niobium when exposed to atmosphere.

  5. Stress dependent oxidation of sputtered niobium and effects on superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    David Henry, M. Wolfley, Steve; Monson, Todd; Clark, Blythe G.; Shaner, Eric; Jarecki, Robert

    2014-02-28

    We report on the suppression of room temperature oxidation of DC sputtered niobium films and the effects upon the superconductive transition temperature, T{sub c}. Niobium was sputter-deposited on silicon dioxide coated 150 mm wafers and permitted to oxidize at room temperature and pressure for up to two years. Resistivity and stress measurements indicate that tensile films greater than 400 MPa resist bulk oxidation with measurements using transmission electron microscope, electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry confirming this result. Although a surface oxide, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, consumed the top 6–10 nm, we measure less than 1 at. % oxygen and nitrogen in the bulk of the films after the oxidation period. T{sub c} measurements using a SQUID magnetometer indicate that the tensile films maintained a T{sub c} approaching the dirty superconductive limit of 8.4 K after two years of oxidation while maintaining room temperature sheet resistance. This work demonstrates that control over niobium film stress during deposition can prevent bulk oxidation by limiting the vertical grain boundaries ability to oxidize, prolonging the superconductive properties of sputtered niobium when exposed to atmosphere.

  6. Effect of Layer-Graded Bond Coats on Edge Stress Concentration and Oxidation Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) durability is closely related to design, processing and microstructure of the coating Z, tn systems. Two important issues that must be considered during the design of a thermal barrier coating are thermal expansion and modulus mismatch between the substrate and the ceramic layer, and substrate oxidation. In many cases, both of these issues may be best addressed through the selection of an appropriate bond coat system. In this study, a low thermal expansion and layer-graded bond coat system, that consists of plasma-sprayed FeCoNiCrAl and FeCrAlY coatings, and a high velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed FeCrAlY coating, is developed to minimize the thermal stresses and provide oxidation resistance. The thermal expansion and oxidation behavior of the coating system are also characterized, and the strain isolation effect of the bond coat system is analyzed using the finite element method (FEM). Experiments and finite element results show that the layer-graded bond coat system possesses lower interfacial stresses. better strain isolation and excellent oxidation resistance. thus significantly improving the coating performance and durability.

  7. Oral administration of Bifidobacterium breve attenuates UV-induced barrier perturbation and oxidative stress in hairless mice skin.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yuki; Sugimoto, Saho; Izawa, Naoki; Sone, Toshiro; Chiba, Katsuyoshi; Miyazaki, Kouji

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that some probiotics affect not only the gut but also the skin. However, the effects of probiotics on ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin damage are poorly understood. In this study, we aim to examine whether oral administration of live Bifidobacterium breve strain Yakult (BBY), a typical probiotic, can attenuate skin barrier perturbation caused by UV and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hairless mice. The mice were orally supplemented with a vehicle only or BBY once a day for nine successive days. Mouse dorsal skin was irradiated with UV from days 6 to 9. The day after the final irradiation, the transepidermal water loss (TEWL), stratum corneum hydration, and oxidation-related factors of the skin were evaluated. We elucidated that BBY prevented the UV-induced increase in TEWL and decrease in stratum corneum hydration. In addition, BBY significantly suppressed the UV-induced increase in hydrogen peroxide levels, oxidation of proteins and lipids, and xanthine oxidase activity in the skin. Conversely, antioxidant capacity did not change regardless of whether BBY was administered or not. In parameters we evaluated, there was a positive correlation between the increase in TEWL and the oxidation levels of proteins and lipids. Our results suggest that oral administration of BBY attenuates UV-induced barrier perturbation and oxidative stress of the skin, and this antioxidative effect is not attributed to enhancement of antioxidant capacity but to the prevention of ROS generation. PMID:24414333

  8. Effect of Coating Process Condition on High-Temperature Oxidation and Mechanical Failure Behavior for Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Satoru; Yoshiba, Masayuki; Harada, Yoshio

    In order to clarify the thermal and/or mechanical failure behavior of the plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) system in connection with their coating characteristics depending on the coating process condition, two kinds of the failure analytical tests were conducted for TBC systems processed under different conditions. One was the high-temperature oxidation test, which was conducted at 1100°C under both the isothermal and thermal cycle conditions. The other was the in-situ observation of mechanical failure behavior, which was conducted under the static loadings at ambient temperature; as the most fundamental aspect, by means of an optical microscopy. It was found that the thermal and mechanical failure behavior of TBC system depends strongly on the top-coat (TC)/bond-coat (BC) interfacial condition, the reheat-treatment (RHT) after spraying and so on. For the TBC system with vacuum plasma sprayed (VPS) BC as well as for that with atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) BC, in particular, the RHT at an appropriate temperature in Ar atmosphere was found to be effective for improving the oxidation property. For the TBC system with APS-BC, however, it was impossible to prevent the crack growth into the BC interior under the tensile loading in spite of conducting the RHT, since the microdefects such as oxides within the APS-BC tend to provide an easy crack propagation path. Furthermore, it was clarified that the smoothening process on the BC surface is able to prevent perfectly the occurrence of the wart-like oxide during oxidation, but at the same time increases also the risk of the TC spalling under the mechanical loading.

  9. Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of VC and Columnar Structured Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolong; Yang, Qi; Huang, Xiao; Tang, Zhaolin

    2015-08-01

    The effects of different thermal barrier coating (TBC) top coat structures and substrate alloys on the isothermal oxidation behaviors of TBC systems were investigated at 1080 °C in lab air. The tested TBC systems consisted of two nickel-based superalloy substrates (CMSX-4 and IN738LC), a platinum aluminide bond coat and two 8YSZ top coats (vertical cracked and columnar structured). Samples with IN738LC substrate demonstrated longer isothermal oxidation lives than the counterparts with CMSX-4 substrate. Outward refractory elemental diffusion in coating systems with CMSX-4 substrate and void formation at the interface between thermally grown oxide and bond coat was found to be responsible for the early failure of TBCs. Columnar structured YSZ top coat seemed to provide better protection of the bond coating and substrate, marginally delaying the failure of the both coating systems with IN738LC and CMSX-4.

  10. Site-dependent catalytic activity of graphene oxides towards oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaobin; Cao, Zexing

    2012-12-28

    Graphene oxides (GOs) may offer extraordinary potential in the design of novel catalytic systems due to the presence of various oxygen functional groups and their unique electronic and structural properties. Using first-principles calculations, we explore the plausible mechanisms for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane to propene by GOs and the diffusion of the surface oxygen-containing groups under an external electric field. The present results show that GOs with modified oxygen-containing groups may afford high catalytic activity for the ODH of propane to propene. The presence of hydroxyl groups around the active sites provided by epoxides can remarkably enhance the C-H bond activation of propane and the activity enhancement exhibits strong site dependence. The sites of oxygen functional groups on the GO surface can be easily tuned by the diffusion of these groups under an external electric field, which increases the reactivity of GOs towards ODH of propane. The chemically modified GOs are thus quite promising in the design of metal-free catalysis. PMID:22801590

  11. Temperature dependence of photoemission from quantum-well states in Ag/V(100): Moving surface-vacuum barrier effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kralj, M.; Siber, A.; Pervan, P.; Milun, M.; Valla, T.; Johnson, P. D.; Woodruff, D. P.

    2001-08-15

    The temperature dependence of angle-resolved photoemission from quantum-well states in ultrathin films of Ag on V(100) has been examined for films from 1--8 ML thickness within the temperature range 45--600 K. Contrary to bulk solids, the photoemission peaks shift to higher binding energy as the temperature is increased. The temperature dependence of the peak widths is linear, consistent with the expected behavior for electron-phonon coupling, but the coupling parameter {lambda} is found to show a strong oscillatory dependence on film thickness, with some values many times larger than those found for bulk silver. The observations are explained in terms of the influence on both the initial and final states in the photoemission process of the static and dynamic movements of the surface-vacuum interface barrier induced by temperature changes.

  12. DNA damage signalling barrier, oxidative stress and treatment-relevant DNA repair factor alterations during progression of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kurfurstova, Daniela; Bartkova, Jirina; Vrtel, Radek; Mickova, Alena; Burdova, Alena; Majera, Dusana; Mistrik, Martin; Kral, Milan; Santer, Frederic R; Bouchal, Jan; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-06-01

    The DNA damage checkpoints provide an anti-cancer barrier in diverse tumour types, however this concept has remained unexplored in prostate cancer (CaP). Furthermore, targeting DNA repair defects by PARP1 inhibitors (PARPi) as a cancer treatment strategy is emerging yet requires suitable predictive biomarkers. To address these issues, we performed immunohistochemical analysis of multiple markers of DNA damage signalling, oxidative stress, DNA repair and cell cycle control pathways during progression of human prostate disease from benign hyperplasia, through intraepithelial neoplasia to CaP, complemented by genetic analyses of TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangement and NQO1, an anti-oxidant factor and p53 protector. The DNA damage checkpoint barrier (γH2AX, pATM, p53) mechanism was activated during CaP tumorigenesis, albeit less and with delayed culmination compared to other cancers, possibly reflecting lower replication stress (slow proliferation despite cases of Rb loss and cyclin D1 overexpression) and progressive loss of ATM activator NKX3.1. Oxidative stress (8-oxoguanine lesions) and NQO1 increased during disease progression. NQO1 genotypes of 390 men did not indicate predisposition to CaP, yet loss of NQO1 in CaP suggested potential progression-opposing tumour suppressor role. TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangement and PTEN loss, events sensitizing to PARPi, occurred frequently along with heterogeneous loss of DNA repair factors 53BP1, JMJD1C and Rev7 (all studied here for the first time in CaP) whose defects may cause resistance to PARPi. Overall, our results reveal an unorthodox DNA damage checkpoint barrier scenario in CaP tumorigenesis, and provide novel insights into oxidative stress and DNA repair, with implications for biomarker guidance of future targeted therapy of CaP. PMID:26987799

  13. Insulin increases glomerular filtration barrier permeability through PKGIα-dependent mobilization of BKCa channels in cultured rat podocytes.

    PubMed

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rogacka, Dorota; Audzeyenka, Irena; Kasztan, Małgorzata; Angielski, Stefan; Jankowski, Maciej

    2015-08-01

    Podocytes are highly specialized cells that wrap around glomerular capillaries and comprise a key component of the glomerular filtration barrier. They are uniquely sensitive to insulin; like skeletal muscle and fat cells, they exhibit insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and express glucose transporters. Podocyte insulin signaling is mediated by protein kinase G type I (PKGI), and it leads to changes in glomerular permeability to albumin. Here, we investigated whether large-conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channels (BKCa) were involved in insulin-mediated, PKGIα-dependent filtration barrier permeability. Insulin-induced glomerular permeability was measured in glomeruli isolated from Wistar rats. Transepithelial albumin flux was measured in cultured rat podocyte monolayers. Expression of BKCa subunits was detected by RT-PCR. BKCa, PKGIα, and upstream protein expression were examined in podocytes with Western blotting and immunofluorescence. The BKCa-PKGIα interaction was assessed with co-immunoprecipitation. RT-PCR showed that primary cultured rat podocytes expressed mRNAs that encoded the pore-forming α subunit and four accessory β subunits of BKCa. The BKCa inhibitor, iberiotoxin (ibTX), abolished insulin-dependent glomerular albumin permeability and PKGI-dependent transepithelial albumin flux. Insulin-evoked albumin permeability across podocyte monolayers was also blocked with BKCa siRNA. Moreover, ibTX blocked insulin-induced disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and changes in the phosphorylation of PKG target proteins, MYPT1 and RhoA. These results indicated that insulin increased filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BKCa channels via PKGI in cultured rat podocytes. This molecular mechanism may explain podocyte injury and proteinuria in diabetes. PMID:25952906

  14. The Effect of Interface Roughness and Oxide Film Thickness on the Inelastic Response of Thermal Barrier Coatings to Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of interfacial roughness and oxide film thickness on thermally-induced stresses in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings subjected to thermal cycling are investigated using the recently developed higher-order theory for functionally graded materials. The higher-order theory is shown to be a viable alternative to the finite-element approach, capable of modeling different interfacial roughness architectures in the presence of an aluminum oxide layer and capturing the high stress gradients that occur at the top coat/bond coat interface. The oxide layer thickness is demonstrated to have a substantially greater effect on the evolution of residual stresses than local variations in interfacial roughness. Further, the location of delamination initiation in the top coat is predicted to change with increasing oxide layer thickness. This result can be used to optimize the thickness of a pre-oxidized layer introduced at the top coat/bond coat interface in order to enhance TBC durability as suggested by some researchers. The results of our investigation also support a recently proposed hypothesis regarding delamination initiation and propagation in the presence of an evolving bond coat oxidation, while pointing to the importance of interfacial roughness details and specimen geometry in modeling this phenomenon.

  15. Probiotic-derived polyphosphate improves the intestinal barrier function through the caveolin-dependent endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Konishi, Hiroaki; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Kashima, Shin; Sasajima, Junpei; Moriichi, Kentaro; Ikuta, Katsuya; Tanabe, Hiroki; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2015-11-20

    Probiotics exhibit beneficial functions for host homeostasis maintenance. We herein investigated the mechanism by which Lactobacillus brevis-derived poly P exhibited a beneficial function. Immunostaining indicated that poly P was captured in the plasma membrane via integrin β1 in Caco2/bbe cells. The uptake of poly P was reduced by the inhibition of integrin β1 as well as caveolin-1, a major component of lipid rafts. The function of poly P, including the induction of HSP27 and enhancement of the intestinal barrier function, was suppressed by the inhibition of caveolin-1, illustrating that the function of poly P was mediated by the endocytic pathway. High-throughput sequencing revealed that poly P induced tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 3, which contributes to cytoprotection, including upregulation of the intestinal barrier function. The present study demonstrates a novel host-probiotic interaction through the uptake of bacterial substance into host cells, which is distinct from pattern recognition receptor pathways. PMID:26459590

  16. Temperature-dependent bias-stress-induced electrical instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hui-Min; Yu, Guang; Lu, Hai; Wu, Chen-Fei; Tang, Lan-Feng; Zhou, Dong; Ren, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, You-Liao; Huang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-07-01

    The time and temperature dependence of threshold voltage shift under positive-bias stress (PBS) and the following recovery process are investigated in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. It is found that the time dependence of threshold voltage shift can be well described by a stretched exponential equation in which the time constant τ is found to be temperature dependent. Based on Arrhenius plots, an average effective energy barrier Eτstress = 0.72 eV for the PBS process and an average effective energy barrier Eτrecovery = 0.58 eV for the recovery process are extracted respectively. A charge trapping/detrapping model is used to explain the threshold voltage shift in both the PBS and the recovery process. The influence of gate bias stress on transistor performance is one of the most critical issues for practical device development. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB301900 and 2011CB922100) and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China

  17. Schottky barrier height reduction for holes by Fermi level depinning using metal/nickel oxide/silicon contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Raisul Shine, Gautam; Saraswat, Krishna C.

    2014-11-03

    We report the experimental demonstration of Fermi level depinning using nickel oxide (NiO) as the insulator material in metal-insulator-semiconductor (M-I-S) contacts. Using this contact, we show less than 0.1 eV barrier height for holes in platinum/NiO/silicon (Pt/NiO/p-Si) contact. Overall, the pinning factor was improved from 0.08 (metal/Si) to 0.26 (metal/NiO/Si). The experimental results show good agreement with that obtained from theoretical calculation. NiO offers high conduction band offset and low valence band offset with Si. By reducing Schottky barrier height, this contact can be used as a carrier selective contact allowing hole transport but blocking electron transport, which is important for high efficiency in photonic applications such as photovoltaics and optical detectors.

  18. Solution phase synthesis and intense pulsed light sintering and reduction of a copper oxide ink with an encapsulating nickel oxide barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, M.; Dharmadasa, R.; Draper, G. L.; Sherehiy, A.; Sumanasekera, G.; Amos, D.; Druffel, T.

    2015-05-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticle inks sintered and reduced by intense pulsed light (IPL) are an inexpensive means to produce conductive patterns on a number of substrates. However, the oxidation and diffusion characteristics of copper are issues that must be resolved before it can be considered as a viable solution. Nickel can provide a degree of oxidation protection and act as a barrier for the diffusion of copper. In the present study we have for the first time synthesized copper oxide with an encapsulating nickel oxide nanostructure using a solution phase synthesis process in the presence of a surfactant at room temperature. The room temperature process enables us to easily prevent the formation of alloys at the copper-nickel interface. The synthesis results in a simple technique (easily commercializable, tested at a 10 g scale) with highly controllable layer thicknesses on a 20 nm copper oxide nanoparticle. These Cu2O@NiO dispersions were then directly deposited onto substrates and sintered/reduced using an IPL source. The sintering technique produces a highly conductive film with very short processing times. Films have been deposited onto silicon, and the copper-nickel structure has shown a lower copper diffusion. The nanostructures and resulting films were characterized using electron and x-ray spectroscopy, and the films’ resistivity was measured.

  19. Barriers to intramolecular rotation determined from the temperature dependence of the Henry constant in the region of adsorbed molecule rigidity failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgonosov, A. M.; Prudkovskii, A. G.

    2008-05-01

    A distribution for the rigid and nonrigid adsorbed molecule forms was found. Adsorbed molecule rigidity failure was shown to be accompanied by a weak nonlinear effect, which manifested itself as a temperature dependence of the Henry constant. A method for the determination of the barrier to intramolecular rotation from the temperature dependence of the molecule adsorption constant was suggested. Barriers to rotation about the C-C and C-O bonds were determined for several molecules.

  20. Size-dependent magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsula, Vitalii; Moskvin, Maksym; Dutz, Silvio; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Uniform iron oxide nanoparticles in the size range from 10 to 24 nm and polydisperse 14 nm iron oxide particles were prepared by thermal decomposition of Fe(III) carboxylates in the presence of oleic acid and co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides by ammonium hydroxide followed by oxidation, respectively. While the first method produced hydrophobic oleic acid coated particles, the second one formed hydrophilic, but uncoated, nanoparticles. To make the iron oxide particles water dispersible and colloidally stable, their surface was modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and sucrose, respectively. Size and size distribution of the nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and X-ray diffraction. Surface of the PEG-functionalized and sucrose-modified iron oxide particles was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Magnetic properties were measured by means of vibration sample magnetometry and specific absorption rate in alternating magnetic fields was determined calorimetrically. It was found, that larger ferrimagnetic particles showed higher heating performance than smaller superparamagnetic ones. In the transition range between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism, samples with a broader size distribution provided higher heating power than narrow size distributed particles of comparable mean size. Here presented particles showed promising properties for a possible application in magnetic hyperthermia.

  1. Size dependence of inter- and intra-cluster interactions in core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; McCloy, John S.; Jiang, Weilin; Yao, Qi; Qiang, You

    2012-06-15

    The room temperature magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters (NCs) synthesized by a cluster deposition system have been investigated, and their dependence on mean cluster size has been discussed. In this study, the surface/boundary spins of clusters were not frozen and were thermally activated during the measurements. The inter-cluster interactions between clusters and intra-cluster interactions between the iron core (ferromagnetic) and iron oxide shell (ferrimagnetic) have been investigated by field dependent isothermal remanent magnetization and dc demagnetization measurements at room temperature. The Henkel plot and delta M plot support the existence of dipolar inter-cluster interactions which become stronger with the growth of cluster size. The derivative of the initial magnetization curve implies that smaller clusters require less field and time than the bigger ones to overcome various energy barriers before aligning along the field direction. Coercive field and magnetization are also correlated with the interaction parameters. To compare the room temperature magnetic results, one system was studied at low temperature, where exchange coupling at the interface between the oxide and metallic phases was observed through bias effect and anisotropy enhancement.

  2. Propionate Ameliorates Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colitis by Improving Intestinal Barrier Function and Reducing Inflammation and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ling-Chang; Wang, Yue; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Liu, Wei-Ye; Sun, Sheng; Li, Ling; Su, Ding-Feng; Zhang, Li-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Propionate is a short chain fatty acid that is abundant as butyrate in the gut and blood. However, propionate has not been studied as extensively as butyrate in the treatment of colitis. The present study was to investigate the effects of sodium propionate on intestinal barrier function, inflammation and oxidative stress in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mice. Animals in DSS group received drinking water from 1 to 6 days and DSS [3% (w/v) dissolved in double distilled water] instead of drinking water from 7 to 14 days. Animals in DSS+propionate (DSS+Prop) group were given 1% sodium propionate for 14 consecutive days and supplemented with 3% DSS solution on day 7-14. Intestinal barrier function, proinflammatory factors, oxidative stress, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in the colon were determined. It was found that sodium propionate ameliorated body weight loss, colon-length shortening and colonic damage in colitis mice. Sodium propionate significantly inhibited the increase of FITC-dextran in serum and the decrease of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin, and E-cadherin expression in the colonic tissue. It also inhibited the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA and phosphorylation of STAT3 in colitis mice markedly, reduced the myeloperoxidase (MPO) level, and increased the superoxide dismutase and catalase level in colon and serum compared with DSS group. Sodium propionate inhibited macrophages with CD68 marker infiltration into the colonic mucosa of colitis mice. These results suggest that oral administration of sodium propionate could ameliorate DSS-induced colitis mainly by improving intestinal barrier function and reducing inflammation and oxidative stress via the STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:27574508

  3. Propionate Ameliorates Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colitis by Improving Intestinal Barrier Function and Reducing Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ling-chang; Wang, Yue; Wang, Zhi-bin; Liu, Wei-ye; Sun, Sheng; Li, Ling; Su, Ding-feng; Zhang, Li-chao

    2016-01-01

    Propionate is a short chain fatty acid that is abundant as butyrate in the gut and blood. However, propionate has not been studied as extensively as butyrate in the treatment of colitis. The present study was to investigate the effects of sodium propionate on intestinal barrier function, inflammation and oxidative stress in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mice. Animals in DSS group received drinking water from 1 to 6 days and DSS [3% (w/v) dissolved in double distilled water] instead of drinking water from 7 to 14 days. Animals in DSS+propionate (DSS+Prop) group were given 1% sodium propionate for 14 consecutive days and supplemented with 3% DSS solution on day 7–14. Intestinal barrier function, proinflammatory factors, oxidative stress, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway in the colon were determined. It was found that sodium propionate ameliorated body weight loss, colon-length shortening and colonic damage in colitis mice. Sodium propionate significantly inhibited the increase of FITC-dextran in serum and the decrease of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin, and E-cadherin expression in the colonic tissue. It also inhibited the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA and phosphorylation of STAT3 in colitis mice markedly, reduced the myeloperoxidase (MPO) level, and increased the superoxide dismutase and catalase level in colon and serum compared with DSS group. Sodium propionate inhibited macrophages with CD68 marker infiltration into the colonic mucosa of colitis mice. These results suggest that oral administration of sodium propionate could ameliorate DSS-induced colitis mainly by improving intestinal barrier function and reducing inflammation and oxidative stress via the STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:27574508

  4. Quantum state-resolved CH4 dissociation on Pt(111): coverage dependent barrier heights from experiment and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Hirokazu; Chen, Li; Beck, Rainer D; Colón-Dìaz, Inara; Jackson, Bret

    2013-12-21

    The dissociative chemisorption of CH4 on Pt(111) was studied using quantum state-resolved methods at a surface temperature (T(s)) of 150 K where the nascent reaction products CH3(ads) and H(ads) are stable and accumulate on the surface. Most previous experimental studies of methane chemisorption on transition metal surfaces report only the initial sticking coefficients S0 on a clean surface. Reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), used here for state resolved reactivity measurements, enables us to monitor the CH3(ads) uptake during molecular beam deposition as a function of incident translational energy (E(t)) and vibrational state (ν3 anti-symmetric C-H stretch of CH4) to obtain the initial sticking probability S0, the coverage dependence of the sticking probability S(θ) and the CH3(ads) saturation coverage θ(sat). We observe that both S0 and θ(sat) increase with increasing E(t) as well as upon ν3 excitation of the incident CH4 which indicates a coverage dependent dissociation barrier height for the dissociation of CH4 on Pt(111) at low surface temperature. This interpretation is supported by density functional calculations of barrier heights for dissociation, using large supercells containing one or more H and/or methyl adsorbates. We find a significant increase in the activation energies with coverage. These energies are used to construct simple models that reasonably reproduce the uptake data and the observed saturation coverages. PMID:24177276

  5. Partial oxidation of methane to methanol with nitrogen dioxide in dielectric barrier discharge plasma: experimental and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indarto, Antonius

    2016-04-01

    Non-catalytic conversion of methane (CH4) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) into methanol (CH3OH) has been conducted and presented in this paper. Experiments were carried out using dielectric barrier discharge as the reaction medium in atmospheric pressure and temperature conditions. High yield production of methanol was achieved (18-20% mol) by single-stage plasma reaction with maximum selectivity of 32% mol. Compared to other oxidants, such as O2, the presence of NO2 in the plasma reaction resulted in higher methanol selectivity. For better understanding of the reactions, density functional theory calculations were also performed and discussed.

  6. Effect of barrier properties of zein colloidal particles and oil-in-water emulsions on oxidative stability of encapsulated bioactive compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidation of encapsulated bioactive compounds is a key challenge that limits shelf-life of bioactive containing products. The objectives of this study were to compare differences between the oxidative barrier properties of biopolymer particle based encapsulation system (zein colloidal particles) and...

  7. Thermal barrier coating life and isothermal oxidation of low-pressure plasma-sprayed bond coat alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J.; Miller, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper investigates the isothermal oxidation kinetics of Ni-35Cr-6Al-0.95Y, Ni-18Cr-12Al-0.3Y, and Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.3Y low-pressure plasma-sprayed bond coat alloys and examines the effect of these alloys on the thermal barrier coating (TBC) cyclic life. TBC life was examined by cycling substrates coated with the different bond coats and a ZrO2-7 wt pct Y2O3 TBC in an air-rich burner rig flame between 1150 C and room temperature. The oxidation kinetics of the three bond coat alloys was examined by isothermal oxidation of monolithic NJiCrAlY coupons at 1083 C. The Ni-35Cr-6Al-0.95Y alloy exhibits comparatively high isothermal oxidation weight gains and provides the longest TBC life, whereas the Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.3Y alloy had the lowest weight gains and provided the shortest TBC life. The results show that, although bond coat oxidation is known to have a strong detrimental effect on TBC life, it is not the only bond coat factor that determines TBC life.

  8. Compositionally Graded Thermal Barrier Coating by Hybrid Thermal Spraying Route and its Non-isothermal Oxidation Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Subhasisa; Manna, Indranil; Dutta Majumdar, Jyotsna

    2013-08-01

    The present study concerns a detailed investigation of the characteristics and oxidation resistance property of a duplex and compositionally graded thermal barrier coating on Inconel 718. The duplex coating consists of a CoNiCrAlY bond coat layer sprayed on to sand-blasted Inconel 718 substrate (by high velocity oxy-fuel spraying) followed by deposition of a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coat by plasma spraying. The compositionally graded coating consists of several layers deposited by plasma spraying of pre-mixed CoNiCrAlY and YSZ powders in the weight ratios of 70:30, 50:50, 30:70, and 0:100 varying from the bond coat to the top surface, respectively. A detailed investigation of the microstructure, composition, and phases in the coating and its non-isothermal oxidation behavior from room temperature to 1250°C was performed. Oxidation proceeds by three stages in the as-received Inconel 718 and the compositionally graded coating, but by two stages in the duplex coating with a maximum activation energy for oxidation in the compositionally graded coating at high temperature (stage III). The kinetics and mechanism of oxidation were established.

  9. Oxidative Stress-Dependent Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gamez-Mendez, Ana María; Vargas-Robles, Hilda; Ríos, Amelia; Escalante, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is involved in several cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery disease and endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial Endothelium vasodilator and vasoconstrictor agonists play a key role in regulation of vascular tone. In this study, we evaluated coronary vascular response in an 8 weeks diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice model. Coronary perfusion pressure in response to acetylcholine in isolated hearts from obese mice showed increased vasoconstriction and reduced vasodilation responses compared with control mice. Vascular nitric oxide assessed in situ with DAF-2 DA showed diminished levels in coronary arteries from obese mice in both basal and acetylcholine-stimulated conditions. Also, released prostacyclin was decreased in heart perfusates from obese mice, along with plasma tetrahydrobiopterin level and endothelium nitric oxide synthase dimer/monomer ratio. Obesity increased thromboxane A2 synthesis and oxidative stress evaluated by superoxide and peroxynitrite levels, compared with control mice. Obese mice treated with apocynin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, reversed all parameters to normal levels. These results suggest that after 8 weeks on a high-fat diet, the increase in oxidative stress lead to imbalance in vasoactive substances and consequently to endothelial dysfunction in coronary arteries. PMID:26381906

  10. Schottky barrier height of Au on the transparent semiconducting oxide β-Ga2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, M.; Irmscher, K.; Janowitz, C.; Galazka, Z.; Manzke, R.; Fornari, R.

    2012-09-01

    The Schottky barrier height of Au deposited on (100) surfaces of n-type β-Ga2O3 single crystals was determined by current-voltage characteristics and high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy resulting in a common effective value of 1.04 ± 0.08 eV. Furthermore, the electron affinity of β-Ga2O3 and the work function of Au were determined to be 4.00 ± 0.05 eV and 5.23 ± 0.05 eV, respectively, yielding a barrier height of 1.23 eV according to the Schottky-Mott rule. The reduction of the Schottky-Mott barrier to the effective value was ascribed to the image-force effect and the action of metal-induced gap states, whereas extrinsic influences could be avoided.

  11. Selenium and vitamin E together improve intestinal epithelial barrier function and alleviate oxidative stress in heat-stressed pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; Cottrell, Jeremy J; Furness, John B; Rivera, Leni R; Kelly, Fletcher W; Wijesiriwardana, Udani; Pustovit, Ruslan V; Fothergill, Linda J; Bravo, David M; Celi, Pietro; Leury, Brian J; Gabler, Nicholas K; Dunshea, Frank R

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Oxidative stress may play a role in compromising intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in pigs subjected to heat stress, but it is unknown whether an increase of dietary antioxidants (selenium and vitamin E) could alleviate gut leakiness in heat-stressed pigs. What is the main finding and its importance? Levels of dietary selenium (1.0 p.p.m.) and vitamin E (200 IU kg(-1) ) greater than those usually recommended for pigs reduced intestinal leakiness caused by heat stress. This finding suggests that oxidative stress plays a role in compromising intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in heat-stressed pigs and also provides a nutritional strategy for mitigating these effects. Heat stress compromises the intestinal epithelial barrier integrity of mammals through mechanisms that may include oxidative stress. Our objective was to test whether dietary supplementation with antioxidants, selenium (Se) and vitamin E (VE), protects intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in heat-stressed pigs. Female growing pigs (n = 48) were randomly assigned to four diets containing from 0.2 p.p.m. Se and 17 IU kg(-1) VE (control, National Research Council recommended) to 1.0 p.p.m. Se and 200 IU kg(-1) VE for 14 days. Six pigs from each dietary treatment were then exposed to either thermoneutral (20°C) or heat-stress conditions (35°C 09.00-17.00 h and 28°C overnight) for 2 days. Transepithelial electrical resistance and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (4 kDa; FD4) permeability were measured in isolated jejunum and ileum using Ussing chambers. Rectal temperature, respiratory rate and intestinal HSP70 mRNA abundance increased (all P < 0.001), and respiratory alkalosis occurred, suggesting that pigs were heat stressed. Heat stress also increased FD4 permeability and decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (both P < 0.01). These changes were associated with changes indicative of oxidative stress, a decreased

  12. Haptoglobin Genotype-dependent Differences in Macrophage Lysosomal Oxidative Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Asleh, Rabea; Ward, John; Levy, Nina S.; Safuri, Shady; Aronson, Doron; Levy, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    The major function of the Haptoglobin (Hp) protein is to control trafficking of extracorpuscular hemoglobin (Hb) thru the macrophage CD163 receptor with degradation of the Hb in the lysosome. There is a common copy number polymorphism in the Hp gene (Hp 2 allele) that has been associated with a severalfold increased incidence of atherothrombosis in multiple longitudinal studies. Increased plaque oxidation and apoptotic markers have been observed in Hp 2-2 atherosclerotic plaques, but the mechanism responsible for this finding has not been determined. We proposed that the increased oxidative injury in Hp 2-2 plaques is due to an impaired processing of Hp 2-2-Hb complexes within macrophage lysosomes, thereby resulting in redox active iron accumulation, lysosomal membrane oxidative injury, and macrophage apoptosis. We sought to test this hypothesis in vitro using purified Hp-Hb complex and cells genetically manipulated to express CD163. CD163-mediated endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of Hp-Hb were decreased for Hp 2-2-Hb complexes. Confocal microscopy using lysotropic pH indicator dyes demonstrated that uptake of Hp 2-2-Hb complexes disrupted the lysosomal pH gradient. Cellular fractionation studies of lysosomes isolated from macrophages incubated with Hp 2-2-Hb complexes demonstrated increased lysosomal membrane oxidation and a loss of lysosomal membrane integrity leading to lysosomal enzyme leakage into the cytoplasm. Additionally, markers of apoptosis, DNA fragmentation, and active caspase 3 were increased in macrophages that had endocytosed Hp 2-2-Hb complexes. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into how the Hp genotype regulates lysosomal oxidative stress within macrophages after receptor-mediated endocytosis of Hb. PMID:24778180

  13. Characterization of aluminum oxide tunnel barriers by combining transport measurements and transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Aref, T.; Averin, A.; Nguyend, H. Q.; Pekola, J. P.; Dijken, S. van; Yao, L. D.; Ferring, A.; Koberidze, M.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2014-08-21

    We present two approaches for studying the uniformity of a tunnel barrier. The first approach is based on measuring single-electron and two-electron tunneling in a hybrid single-electron transistor. Our measurements indicate that the effective area of a conduction channel is about one order of magnitude larger than predicted by theoretical calculations. With the second method, transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate that variations in the barrier thickness are a plausible explanation for the larger effective area and an enhancement of higher order tunneling processes.

  14. Tumor Necrosis Factor Disrupts Claudin-5 Endothelial Tight Junction Barriers in Two Distinct NF-κB-Dependent Phases

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Paul R.; Kim, Richard K.; Pober, Jordan S.; Kluger, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Capillary leak in severe sepsis involves disruption of endothelial cell tight junctions. We modeled this process by TNF treatment of cultured human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (HDMEC) monolayers, which unlike human umbilical vein endothelial cells form claudin-5-dependent tight junctions and a high-resistance permeability barrier. Continuous monitoring with electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing revealed that TNF disrupts tight junction-dependent HDMEC barriers in discrete steps: an ~5% increase in transendothelial electrical resistance over 40 minutes; a decrease to ~10% below basal levels over 2 hours (phase 1 leak); an interphase plateau of 1 hour; and a major fall in transendothelial electrical resistance to < 70% of basal levels by 8–10 hours (phase 2 leak), with EC50 values of TNF for phase 1 and 2 leak of ~30 and ~150 pg/ml, respectively. TNF leak is reversible and independent of cell death. Leak correlates with disruption of continuous claudin-5 immunofluorescence staining, myosin light chain phosphorylation and loss of claudin-5 co-localization with cortical actin. All these responses require NF-κB signaling, shown by inhibition with Bay 11 or overexpression of IκB super-repressor, and are blocked by H-1152 or Y-27632, selective inhibitors of Rho-associated kinase that do not block other NF-κB-dependent responses. siRNA combined knockdown of Rho-associated kinase-1 and -2 also prevents myosin light chain phosphorylation, loss of claudin-5/actin co-localization, claudin-5 reorganization and reduces phase 1 leak. However, unlike H-1152 and Y-27632, combined Rho-associated kinase-1/2 siRNA knockdown does not reduce the magnitude of phase 2 leak, suggesting that H-1152 and Y-27632 have targets beyond Rho-associated kinases that regulate endothelial barrier function. We conclude that TNF disrupts TJs in HDMECs in two distinct NF-κB-dependent steps, the first involving Rho-associated kinase and the second likely to involve an as yet

  15. In Situ Chemical Oxidation of Contaminated Ground Water: Permanganate Reactive Barrier Systems for the Long-Term Treatment of Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. David; Schwartz, Frank W.

    2004-03-31

    Oxidation of chlorinated solvents by permanganate has proven to be effective in destroying these compounds in the aqueous phase. A semi-passive, well-based permanganate reactive barrier system (PRBS) was designed in order for the long-term treatment of dissolved contaminant in the ground water. Results from laboratory experiments indicate the PRBS could deliver permanganate at a stable, constant and controllable rate. In this paper, different field designs of the PRBS are discussed. Numerical simulation was conducted to elucidate the parameters that will influence the field implementation of a PRBS. We investigated issues such as permanganate consumption by aquifer materials, variable density flow effect, as well as lateral spreading under different geological settings. Results from this study continue to point to the promise of an in situ chemical oxidation scheme. PRBS provides a potential treatment of the contaminated ground water at relatively low management cost as compared with other alternatives.

  16. Temperature-Dependent Current-Voltage (I-V) and Capacitance-Voltage (C-V) Characteristics of Ni/Cu/n-InP Schottky Barrier Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munikrishana Reddy, Y.; Nagaraj, M. K.; Siva Pratap Reddy, M.; Lee, Jung-Hee; Rajagopal Reddy, V.

    2013-04-01

    The current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics of Ni/Cu/n-InP Schottky barrier diodes are studied over a wide temperature range, from 210 K to 420 K. The I-V characteristics display anomalous thermal behavior. The apparent barrier height decays, and the ideality factor grows at low temperatures, and the series resistances resulting from Cheung's and Norde's procedures are markedly temperature dependent. The nonlinearity of the Richardson plot and the strong temperature dependence of the Schottky-barrier parameters indicate that the interface is spatially inhomogeneous. Plots of the zero-bias barrier height as a function of 1/(2kT) points to a Gaussian distribution of barrier heights with 0.90 eV mean height and 0.014 eV standard deviation. When this distribution is accounted for, a Richardson of 6.5 A/(cm K)2 results, relatively close to the 9.4/(cm K)2 predicted by theory. We conclude that, combined with a Gaussian distribution of barrier heights, the thermionic-emission mechanism explains the temperature-dependent I-V and C-V characteristics of the studied Schottky-barrier diodes.

  17. Purinergic receptor P2RY12-dependent microglial closure of the injured blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Lou, Nanhong; Takano, Takahiro; Pei, Yong; Xavier, Anna L; Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2016-01-26

    Microglia are integral functional elements of the central nervous system, but the contribution of these cells to the structural integrity of the neurovascular unit has not hitherto been assessed. We show here that following blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, P2RY12 (purinergic receptor P2Y, G-protein coupled, 12)-mediated chemotaxis of microglia processes is required for the rapid closure of the BBB. Mice treated with the P2RY12 inhibitor clopidogrel, as well as those in which P2RY12 was genetically ablated, exhibited significantly diminished movement of juxtavascular microglial processes and failed to close laser-induced openings of the BBB. Thus, microglial cells play a previously unrecognized protective role in the maintenance of BBB integrity following cerebrovascular damage. Because clopidogrel antagonizes the platelet P2Y12 receptor, it is widely prescribed for patients with coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease. As such, these observations suggest the need for caution in the postincident continuation of P2RY12-targeted platelet inhibition. PMID:26755608

  18. Racial Differences in Nitric Oxide-Dependent Vasorelaxation

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Greenwood, Eugenia; Chen, Dong-Bao

    2008-01-01

    Along with the growing heterogeneity of the American population, ethnic/racial disparity is becoming a clear health issue in the United States. The awareness of ethnic/racial disparities has been growing because of considerable data gathered from recent clinical and epidemiological studies. These studies have highlighted the importance of addressing these differences in the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases potentially according to race. It is becoming particularly clear that there is a 2- to 3-fold racial difference in certain cardiovascular diseases (eg, preeclampsia) associated with dysfunctional nitric oxide–mediated vasodilation. In this review, the authors summarize the current literature on racial disparities in nitric oxide–mediated vasodilation in relation to cardiovascular health with an emphasis on vascular nitric oxide bioavailability as a balance between production via endothelial nitric oxide synthase and degradation through reactive oxygen species. The major hypotheses postulated on the biological basis of these differences are also highlighted. PMID:18212350

  19. Borate cross-linking chitosan/graphene oxide films: Toward the simultaneous enhancement of gases barrier and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ning; Capezzuto, Filomena; Buonocore, Giovanna G.; Tescione, Fabiana; Lavorgna, Marino; Xia, Hesheng; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Borate adducts, originated from hydrolysis of sodium tetraborate decahydrate (borax), have been used to crosslink chitosan (CS) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets for the production of innovative composite sustainable materials. CS/GO film consisting of 10wt% borax and 1wt% GO exhibits a significant improvement of both toughness and oxygen barrier properties in comparison to pristine chitosan. In particular the tensile strength increases by about 100% and 150% after thermal annealing of samples at 90°C for 50min whereas the oxygen permeability reduces of about 90% compared to pristine chitosan. The enhancement of both mechanical and barrier properties is ascribed to the formation of a resistant network due to the chemical crosslinking, including borate orthoester bonds and hydroxyl moieties complexes, formed among borate ions, chitosan, and GO nanoplatelets. The crosslinked graphene-based chitosan material with its enhanced mechanical and barrier properties may significantly broad the range of applications of chitosan based-materials which presently are very limited and addressed only to packaging.

  20. Texture-dependent anaerobic microsites constrain soil carbon oxidation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Fendorf, Scott

    2016-04-01

    Soil texture, which is a product of parent material, climate and other soil forming factors, is a predictor for long-term storage of soil organic carbon (SOC) storage in many soil ecosystems. Positive correlation between texture (particularly clay content) and SOC storage have long been attributed to protective associations between clay minerals and organic compounds that prevent microbial and enzymatic access - a mechanism commonly referred to as 'mineral protection'. Texture therefore acts as the primary proxy for mineral protection in terrestrial ecosystem models used to assess SOC storage and its sensitivity to global change impacts. Here we show that this protective effect of texture is not only due to mineral protection, but also to the formation of anaerobic microsites. Combining micro-scale laboratory experiments with field-scale observations, we find that oxygen diffusion limitations within clay-rich domains create anaerobic microsites within seemingly well-aerated soils, shifting microbial metabolism to less efficient anaerobic SOC oxidation pathways. Kinetic and thermodynamic constraints reduce SOC oxidation rates within these anaerobic microsites by an order of magnitude relative to aerobic rates, and caused the preservation of bioavailable, polymeric and reduced organic compounds. Lifting these metabolic constraints through increased soil aeration (e.g., through changes in precipitation patterns or land use) may stimulate microbial oxidation of this inherently bioavailable SOC pool. Models that attribute the effects of texture merely to 'mineral protection' may therefore underestimate the vulnerability of soil C to global change impacts.

  1. Neuropsychiatric disease relevance of circulating anti-NMDA receptor autoantibodies depends on blood-brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Hammer, C; Stepniak, B; Schneider, A; Papiol, S; Tantra, M; Begemann, M; Sirén, A-L; Pardo, L A; Sperling, S; Mohd Jofrry, S; Gurvich, A; Jensen, N; Ostmeier, K; Lühder, F; Probst, C; Martens, H; Gillis, M; Saher, G; Assogna, F; Spalletta, G; Stöcker, W; Schulz, T F; Nave, K-A; Ehrenreich, H

    2014-10-01

    In 2007, a multifaceted syndrome, associated with anti-NMDA receptor autoantibodies (NMDAR-AB) of immunoglobulin-G isotype, has been described, which variably consists of psychosis, epilepsy, cognitive decline and extrapyramidal symptoms. Prevalence and significance of NMDAR-AB in complex neuropsychiatric disease versus health, however, have remained unclear. We tested sera of 2817 subjects (1325 healthy, 1081 schizophrenic, 263 Parkinson and 148 affective-disorder subjects) for presence of NMDAR-AB, conducted a genome-wide genetic association study, comparing AB carriers versus non-carriers, and assessed their influenza AB status. For mechanistic insight and documentation of AB functionality, in vivo experiments involving mice with deficient blood-brain barrier (ApoE(-/-)) and in vitro endocytosis assays in primary cortical neurons were performed. In 10.5% of subjects, NMDAR-AB (NR1 subunit) of any immunoglobulin isotype were detected, with no difference in seroprevalence, titer or in vitro functionality between patients and healthy controls. Administration of extracted human serum to mice influenced basal and MK-801-induced activity in the open field only in ApoE(-/-) mice injected with NMDAR-AB-positive serum but not in respective controls. Seropositive schizophrenic patients with a history of neurotrauma or birth complications, indicating an at least temporarily compromised blood-brain barrier, had more neurological abnormalities than seronegative patients with comparable history. A common genetic variant (rs524991, P=6.15E-08) as well as past influenza A (P=0.024) or B (P=0.006) infection were identified as predisposing factors for NMDAR-AB seropositivity. The >10% overall seroprevalence of NMDAR-AB of both healthy individuals and patients is unexpectedly high. Clinical significance, however, apparently depends on association with past or present perturbations of blood-brain barrier function. PMID:23999527

  2. Contributions of altered permeability of intestinal barrier and defecation behavior to toxicity formation from graphene oxide in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiuli; Yin, Li; Li, Xing; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Dayong

    2013-09-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively studied for potential biomedical applications. Meanwhile, potential GO toxicity arises in both biomedical applications and non-biomedical products where environmental exposures may occur. In the present study, we examined the potential adverse effects of GO and the underlying mechanism using nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as the assay system. We compared the in vivo effects of GO between acute exposure and prolonged exposure, and found that prolonged exposure to 0.5-100 mg L-1 of GO caused damage on functions of both primary (intestine) and secondary (neuron and reproductive organ) targeted organs. In the intestine, ROS production was significantly correlated with the formation of adverse effects on functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs. GO could be translocated into intestinal cells with loss of microvilli, and distributed to be adjacent to or surrounding mitochondria. Prolonged exposure to GO resulted in a hyper-permeable state of the intestinal barrier, an increase in mean defecation cycle length, and alteration of genes required for intestinal development and defecation behavior. Thus, our data suggest that prolonged exposure to GO may cause potential risk to environmental organisms after release into the environment. GO toxicity may be due to the combinational effects of oxidative stress in the intestinal barrier, enhanced permeability of the biological barrier, and suppressed defecation behavior in C. elegans.Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively studied for potential biomedical applications. Meanwhile, potential GO toxicity arises in both biomedical applications and non-biomedical products where environmental exposures may occur. In the present study, we examined the potential adverse effects of GO and the underlying mechanism using nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as the assay system. We compared the in vivo effects of GO between acute exposure and prolonged exposure, and found that prolonged

  3. Size- and composition-dependent radio frequency magnetic permeability of iron oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hongseok; Liu, Xiyu; Paik, Taejong; Palanisamy, Duraivelan; Kim, Jungkwun; Vogel, William D; Viescas, Arthur J; Chen, Jun; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C; Kikkawa, James M; Allen, Mark G; Murray, Christopher B

    2014-12-23

    We investigate the size- and composition-dependent ac magnetic permeability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals for radio frequency (RF) applications. The nanocrystals are obtained through high-temperature decomposition synthesis, and their stoichiometry is determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Two sets of oxides are studied: (a) as-synthesized magnetite-rich and (b) aged maghemite nanocrystals. All nanocrystalline samples are confirmed to be in the superparamagnetic state at room temperature by SQUID magnetometry. Through the one-turn inductor method, the ac magnetic properties of the nanocrystalline oxides are characterized. In magnetite-rich iron oxide nanocrystals, size-dependent magnetic permeability is not observed, while maghemite iron oxide nanocrystals show clear size dependence. The inductance, resistance, and quality factor of hand-wound inductors with a superparamagnetic composite core are measured. The superparamagnetic nanocrystals are successfully embedded into hand-wound inductors to function as inductor cores. PMID:25390073

  4. Size- and Composition-Dependent Radio Frequency Magnetic Permeability of Iron Oxide Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, H; Liu, XY; Paik, T; Palanisamy, D; Kim, J; Vogel, WD; Viescas, AJ; Chen, J; Papaefthymiou, GC; Kikkawa, JM; Allen, MG; Murray, CB

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the size- and composition-dependent ac magnetic permeability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals for radio frequency (RF) applications. The nanocrystals are obtained through high-temperature decomposition synthesis, and their stoichiometry is determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy. Two sets of oxides are studied: (a) as-synthesized magnetite-rich and (b) aged maghemite nanocrystals. All nanocrystalline samples are confirmed to be in the superparamagnetic state at room temperature by SQUID magnetometry. Through the one-turn inductor method, the ac magnetic properties of the nanocrystalline oxides are characterized. In magnetite-rich iron oxide nanocrystals, size-dependent magnetic permeability is not observed, while maghemite iron oxide nanocrystals show clear size dependence. The inductance, resistance, and quality factor of hand-wound inductors with a superparamagnetic composite core are measured. The superparamagnetic nanocrystals are successfully embedded into hand-wound inductors to function as inductor cores.

  5. A dielectric barrier discharge terminally inactivates RNase A by oxidizing sulfur-containing amino acids and breaking structural disulfide bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackmann, J.-W.; Baldus, S.; Steinborn, E.; Edengeiser, E.; Kogelheide, F.; Langklotz, S.; Schneider, S.; Leichert, L. I. O.; Benedikt, J.; Awakowicz, P.; Bandow, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    RNases are among the most stable proteins in nature. They even refold spontaneously after heat inactivation, regaining full activity. Due to their stability and universal presence, they often pose a problem when experimenting with RNA. We investigated the capabilities of nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas to inactivate RNase A and studied the inactivation mechanism on a molecular level. While prolonged heating above 90 °C is required for heat inactivating RNase A, direct plasma treatment with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) source caused permanent inactivation within minutes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that DBD-treated RNase A unfolds rapidly. Raman spectroscopy indicated methionine modifications and formation of sulfonic acid. A mass spectrometry-based analysis of the protein modifications that occur during plasma treatment over time revealed that methionine sulfoxide formation coincides with protein inactivation. Chemical reduction of methionine sulfoxides partially restored RNase A activity confirming that sulfoxidation is causal and sufficient for RNase A inactivation. Continued plasma exposure led to over-oxidation of structural disulfide bonds. Using antibodies, disulfide bond over-oxidation was shown to be a general protein inactivation mechanism of the DBD. The antibody’s heavy and light chains linked by disulfide bonds dissociated after plasma exposure. Based on their ability to inactivate proteins by oxidation of sulfur-containing amino acids and over-oxidation of disulfide bonds, DBD devices present a viable option for inactivating undesired or hazardous proteins on heat or solvent-sensitive surfaces.

  6. Size-dependent thermal oxidation of copper: single-step synthesis of hierarchical nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Christopher J.; Smith, J. David; Cui, Yuehua; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2011-12-01

    Thermal oxidation of copper is a simple and scalable method to produce copper oxide nanowires. We report for the first time the formation of nanowires on copper powder during thermal oxidation and the resulting nanowire coverage that is dependent on the initial particle size. Systematic thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of thermal oxidation of particles of different sizes provide insights into the size-dependent process and evolution of the various phases of copper and copper oxide with time. Furthermore, we find that a large void is formed within these particles after oxidation and propose a mechanism based on the Kirkendall effect. The unique tunability of hierarchical features and hollow interior can be used to create new scalable structures for applications in a variety of areas including thermal management and catalysis.Thermal oxidation of copper is a simple and scalable method to produce copper oxide nanowires. We report for the first time the formation of nanowires on copper powder during thermal oxidation and the resulting nanowire coverage that is dependent on the initial particle size. Systematic thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of thermal oxidation of particles of different sizes provide insights into the size-dependent process and evolution of the various phases of copper and copper oxide with time. Furthermore, we find that a large void is formed within these particles after oxidation and propose a mechanism based on the Kirkendall effect. The unique tunability of hierarchical features and hollow interior can be used to create new scalable structures for applications in a variety of areas including thermal management and catalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM images, XRD spectra, and calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10993f

  7. Size Dependence of [n]Cycloparaphenylenes (n=5-12) in Electrochemical Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kayahara, Eiichi; Fukayama, Kei; Nishinaga, Tohru; Yamago, Shigeru

    2016-06-21

    The oxidation processes of [n]cycloparaphenylenes ([n]CPPs) (n=5-12) were systematically investigated by cyclic and rotating disk electrode voltammetry. All CPPs underwent pseudo-reversible two-electron oxidation irrespective of ring size, forming the corresponding radical cations and then dications. The results were in sharp contrast to those observed for linear oligoparaphenylenes, which only undergo one-electron oxidation. The difference in the first and second oxidation potentials in the CPP oxidation was affected by the ring size and became more significant as the decrease of CPP size. In other words, while the first oxidation from neutral CPP to the radical cation occurred faster as the size of CPP becomes smaller, the second oxidation from the radical cation to dication exhibited opposite size dependence. PMID:27137132

  8. Improved free energy profile for reduction of NO in cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR).

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Margareta R A; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2016-07-15

    Quantum chemical calculations play an essential role in the elucidation of reaction mechanisms for redox-active metalloenzymes. For example, the cleavage and the formation of covalent bonds can usually not be described only on the basis of experimental information, but can be followed by the calculations. Conversely, there are properties, like reduction potentials, which cannot be accurately calculated. Therefore, computational and experimental data has to be carefully combined to obtain reliable descriptions of entire catalytic cycles involving electron and proton uptake from donors outside the enzyme. Such a procedure is illustrated here, for the reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide and water in the membrane enzyme, cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR). A surprising experimental observation is that this reaction is nonelectrogenic, which means that no energy is conserved. On the basis of hybrid density functional calculations a free energy profile for the entire catalytic cycle is obtained, which agrees much better with experimental information on the active site reduction potentials than previous ones. Most importantly the energy profile shows that the reduction steps are endergonic and that the entire process is rate-limited by high proton uptake barriers during the reduction steps. This result implies that, if the reaction were electrogenic, it would become too slow when the gradient is present across the membrane. This explains why this enzyme does not conserve any of the free energy released. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27130561

  9. Removal of nitric oxide in flue gases by multipoint to plane dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Takaki, Koichi; Jani, M.A.; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    1999-08-01

    An experimental study on the removal of NO{sub x} in flue gas has been carried out using plasma chemical reactions in a dielectric barrier discharge. A multipoint-to-plane geometry is used for electrode to lower the operating voltage. The effect of the multipoint electrode configuration on the characteristics of a discharge and NO{sub x} removal has been investigated. Plasma is produced in a narrow gap by a dielectric barrier discharge at low applied voltage with sinusoidal waveform of 2--3 kV rms Specific energy to reduce NO is 63 eV. Electric energy consumed in the discharge increases linearly with area of multipoint electrode, and is approximately 1 {micro}J/point at 2.7 kV. In regard to the multipoint electrode configuration, the consumed energy can be increased by making angle of the point small. However, the energy efficiency of NO removal becomes small if the point angle is small. It also decreases with reducing the number of points per unit area. In regard to treatment of exhaust gas from a diesel engine generator (20 kVA), NO can be almost completely depleted by the multipoint-to-plane barrier discharge for electrical load below 35% of the rated output.

  10. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Caused by Ultrasound Bursts Combined with Microbubbles Depends on Anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia

    2011-09-01

    Prior works on BBB disruption via inter-arterial infusions of osmotic agents have shown a strong dependence on anesthesia. Here, we investigated whether different anesthesia agents can affect ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. A piston transducer fired through a rubber aperture (frequency: 532 kHz, diameter: 4 cm, aperture diameter: 16 mm) was used to generate the ultrasound fields, and sonications combined with an ultrasound contrast agent were performed at 5 power levels. BBB disruption was quantified by measuring the MRI contrast enhancement in T1-weighted MRI, and erythrocyte extravasation characterized in light microscopy. For each exposure level tested, experiments performed with ketamine/xylazine resulted in significantly greater (P<0.05) enhancement than with isoflurane/oxygen. The onset of severe red blood cell extravasation occurred at lower power levels with ketamine/xylazine. These results suggest ultrasound-induced BBB disruption can depend on anesthesia agent, possibly due effects on the vasculature. These results suggest that care is needed in comparing experiments with different anesthesia agents and physiological factors need to be considered with ultrasound-induced BBB disruption.

  11. Entrance Channel Mass Asymmetry Effects in Sub-Barrier Fusion Dynamics by Using Energy Dependent Woods-Saxon Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjeet Singh, Gautam

    2015-12-01

    The present article highlights the inconsistency of static Woods-Saxon potential and the applicability of energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential to explore the fusion dynamics of {}4822Ti+58,60,6428Ni, {}4622Ti+{}6428Ni,{}5022Ti+{}6028Ni, and {}199F+9341Nb reactions leading to formation of different Sn-isotopes via different entrance channels. Theoretical calculations based upon one-dimensional Wong formula obtained by using static Woods-Saxon potential unable to provide proper explanation for sub-barrier fusion enhancement of these projectile-target combinations. However, the predictions of one-dimensional Wong formula based upon energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) accurately describe the observed fusion dynamics of these systems wherein the significantly larger value of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.97 fm is required to address the experimental data in whole range of energy. Therefore, the energy dependence in nucleus-nucleus potential simulates the influence of the nuclear structure degrees of freedom of the colliding pairs. Supported by Dr. D.S. Kothari Post-Doctoral Fellowship Scheme sponsored by University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi, India

  12. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Oxidative Stress in Guinea Pig after Systemic Exposure to Modified Cell-Free Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Omer I.; Buehler, Paul W.; D'Agnillo, Felice

    2011-01-01

    Systemic exposure to cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) or its breakdown products after hemolysis or with the use of Hb-based oxygen therapeutics may alter the function and integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Using a guinea pig exchange transfusion model, we investigated the effect of a polymerized cell-free Hb (HbG) on the expression of endothelial tight junction proteins (zonula occludens 1, claudin-5, and occludin), astrocyte activation, IgG extravasation, heme oxygenase (HO), iron deposition, oxidative end products (4-hydroxynonenal adducts and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine), and apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3). Reduced zonula occludens 1 expression was observed after HbG transfusion as evidenced by Western blot and confocal microscopy. Claudin-5 distribution was altered in small- to medium-sized vessels. However, total expression of claudin-5 and occludin remained unchanged except for a notable increase in occludin 72 hours after HbG transfusion. HbG-transfused animals also showed increased astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein expression and IgG extravasation after 72 hours. Increased HO activity and HO-1 expression with prominent enhancement of HO-1 immunoreactivity in CD163-expressing perivascular cells and infiltrating monocytes/macrophages were also observed. Consistent with oxidative stress, HbG increased iron deposition, 4-hydroxynonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine immunoreactivity, and cleaved caspase-3 expression. Systemic exposure to an extracellular Hb triggers blood-brain barrier disruption and oxidative stress, which may have important implications for the use of Hb-based therapeutics and may provide indirect insight on the central nervous system vasculopathies associated with excessive hemolysis. PMID:21356382

  13. Novel thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that are resistant to high temperature attack by calcium oxide-magnesium oxide-silicon oxide-aluminum oxide (CMAS) glassy deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygun, Aysegul

    2008-10-01

    Higher performance and durability requirements of gas-turbine engines will require a new generation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). This is particularly true of engines operated at higher temperatures, where TBCs are subjected to attack by CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO 2 (CMAS) glassy deposits. In this work, a new approach for mitigating CMAS attack on TBCs is introduced, where up to 20 mol% Al2O 3 and 5 mol% TiO2 in the form of a solid solution is incorporated into Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) TBCs. The fabrication of such TBCs with engineered chemistries is made possible by the solution-precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process, which is uniquely suited for depositing coatings of metastable ceramics with extended solid-solubilities. In the current work, the TBC serves as a reservoir of Al and Ti solutes, which are incorporated into the molten CMAS glass that is in contact with the TBC. An accumulation of Al concentration in the CMAS glass as it penetrates the TBC shifts the glass composition from the difficult-to-crystallize psuedowollastonite field to the easy-to-crystallize anorthite field. The incorporation of Ti in the glass promotes crystallization of the CMAS glass by serving as a nucleating agent. This combined effect results in the near-complete crystallization of the leading edge of the CMAS front into anorthite, essentially arresting the front. Both of these phenomena will help crystallize the CMAS glass, making it immobile and ineffective in penetrating the TBC. It is shown that incorporation of both Al and Ti in the CMAS glass is essential for this approach to be effective. Additionally, incorporation of Al and Ti as solutes is expected to alleviate thermal-expansion and thermal-conductivity issues associated with crystalline second phases used before. Moreover, the metastable nature of the Al and Ti solutes will make them more readily available for incorporation in the molten CMAS glass. CMAS interactions with SPPS TBCs of various metastable compositions are

  14. Nitrate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation in a freshwater sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norði, Katrin á.; Thamdrup, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to denitrification (DAOM) is a novel process of potential importance to the regulation of methane emissions from freshwater environments. We established nitrate-enriched microcosms of sediment from a freshwater pond in order to quantify the role of this process in a simulated natural redox zonation. The microcosms were allowed to acclimate to nitrate levels of 1-2 mmol L-1 in the overlying water for 16 months leading to a nitrate penetration of 4 cm. The nitrate enrichment significantly stimulated AOM relative to controls, and based on the similar concentrations of sulfate and reactive Fe(III) in the control sediment we conclude that the observed AOM was coupled to denitrification. DAOM occurred at rates that were two orders of magnitude lower than aerobic methane oxidation rates reported in freshwater sediments, and the process appeared to be limited by nitrate or nitrite even at millimolar nitrate concentrations. By contrast, ammonium was efficiently consumed at the base of the nitrate zone, presumably by the anammox process. Although DAOM was stimulated by nitrate enrichment, there were no significant differences between the methane emission from the control and nitrate-enriched microcosms. Our results provide the first experimental evaluation of the kinetics of DAOM in whole sediment cores and indicate that AOM coupled to denitrification can consume a substantial part of the methane flux in nitrate-rich environments. Because it is much less efficient in scavenging methane than its aerobic counterpart, the anaerobic process will, however, mainly be of significance in the regulation of methane emission from oxygen-depleted systems.

  15. Size-dependent electrical conductivity of indium zinc oxide deposited by RF magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Heo, Young-Woo; Pearton, S J; Norton, D P

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the size-dependent electrical conductivities of indium zinc oxide stripes with different widths from 50 nm to 4 microm and with the same thickness of 50 nm deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. The size of the indium zinc oxide stripes was controlled by e-beam lithography. The distance of the two Ti/Au Ohmic electrodes along the indium zinc oxide stripes was kept constant at 25 microm. The electrical conductivity decreased as the size of the indium zinc oxide stripes decreased below a critical width (80 nm). The activation energy, derived from the electric conductivity versus temperature measurement, was dependent on the dimensions of indium zinc oxide stripes. These results can be understood as stemming from surface charge trapping from the absorption of oxygen and/or water vapor, which leads to an increase in the energy difference between the conduction energy band and the Fermi energy. PMID:22849102

  16. Boswellia serrata Preserves Intestinal Epithelial Barrier from Oxidative and Inflammatory Damage.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Daniela; Rancan, Serena; Orso, Genny; Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Brun, Paola; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Carrara, Maria; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Caparrotta, Laura; Montopoli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Aminosalicylates, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants are currently the therapeutic choices in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), however, with limited remission and often serious side effects. Meanwhile complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is increasing, particularly herbal medicine. Boswellia serrata is a traditional Ayurvedic remedy with anti-inflammatory properties, of interest for its usefulness in IBDs. The mechanism of this pharmacological potential of Boswellia serrata was investigated in colonic epithelial cell monolayers exposed to H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α, chosen as in vitro experimental model of intestinal inflammation. The barrier function was evaluated by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular permeability assay, and by the tight junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, ZO-1 and occludin) immunofluorescence. The expression of phosphorylated NF-κB and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were determined by immunoblot and cytofluorimetric assay, respectively. Boswellia serrata oleo-gum extract (BSE) and its pure derivative acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA), were tested at 0.1-10 μg/ml and 0.027 μg/ml, respectively. BSE and AKBA safety was demonstrated by no alteration of intestinal cell viability and barrier function and integrity biomarkers. H2O2 or INF-γ+TNF-α treatment of Caco-2 cell monolayers significantly reduced TEER, increased paracellular permeability and caused the disassembly of tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1. BSE and AKBA pretreatment significantly prevented functional and morphological alterations and also the NF-κB phosphorylation induced by the inflammatory stimuli. At the same concentrations BSE and AKBA counteracted the increase of ROS caused by H2O2 exposure. Data showed the positive correlation of the antioxidant activity with the mechanism involved in the physiologic maintenance of the integrity and function of the intestinal epithelium. This study elucidates the

  17. Nitric Oxide-Dependent Posttranslational Modification in Plants: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Astier, Jeremy; Lindermayr, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been demonstrated as an essential regulator of several physiological processes in plants. The understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying its critical role constitutes a major field of research. NO can exert its biological function through different ways, such as the modulation of gene expression, the mobilization of second messengers, or interplays with protein kinases. Besides this signaling events, NO can be responsible of the posttranslational modifications (PTM) of target proteins. Several modifications have been identified so far, whereas metal nitrosylation, the tyrosine nitration and the S-nitrosylation can be considered as the main ones. Recent data demonstrate that these PTM are involved in the control of a wide range of physiological processes in plants, such as the plant immune system. However, a great deal of effort is still necessary to pinpoint the role of each PTM in plant physiology. Taken together, these new advances in proteomic research provide a better comprehension of the role of NO in plant signaling. PMID:23203119

  18. Kinetic-dependent Killing of Oral Pathogens with Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, C.J.; Worley, B.V.; Sergesketter, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)–releasing silica nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-condensation of tetramethyl orthosilicate with aminosilanes and subsequent conversion of secondary amines to N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors. A series of ~150 nm NO-releasing particles with different NO totals and release kinetics (i.e., half-lives) were achieved by altering both the identity and mol% composition of the aminosilane precursors. Independent of identical 2 h NO-release totals, enhanced antibacterial action was observed against the periodontopathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis with extended NO-release kinetics at pH 7.4. Negligible bactericidal effect was observed against cariogenic Streptococcus mutans at pH 7.4, even when using NO-releasing silica particles with greater NO-release totals. However, antibacterial activity was observed against S. mutans at lower pH (6.4). This result was attributed to more rapid proton-initiated decomposition of the N-diazeniumdiolate NO donors and greater NO-release payloads. The data suggest a differential sensitivity to NO between cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria with implications for the future development of NO-releasing oral care therapeutics. PMID:26078424

  19. Field-induced macroscopic barrier model for persistent photoconductivity in nanocrystalline oxide thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyun-Sik; Jeon, Sanghun

    2014-03-01

    Persistent photoconductivity (PPC) in nanocrystalline InZnO thin-film transistors (TFTs) was studied using carrier fluctuation measurements and transient analysis. Low-frequency noise measurements and decay kinetics indicate that the band bending by the external field together with the ionized oxygen vacancy (Vo++) generated during the light exposure is the main cause of the PPC phenomenon. Based on these observations, a field-induced macroscopic barrier model is proposed as the origin of PPC for InZnO TFTs. In particular, this model explains that the carrier separation between e and Vo++ is induced by the external field applied to the three electrodes inside the transistor.

  20. DEPENDENCE OF NITRIC OXIDE EMISSIONS ON VEHICLE LOAD: RESULTS FROM THE GTRP INSTRUMENTED VEHICLE PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation discussed the dependence of nitric oxide (NO) emissions on vehicle load, bases on results from an instrumented-vehicle program. The accuracy and feasibility of modal emissions models depend on algorithms to allocate vehicle emissions based on a vehicle operation...

  1. Communication: Transition state trajectory stability determines barrier crossing rates in chemical reactions induced by time-dependent oscillating fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, Galen T.; Bartsch, Thomas; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2014-07-01

    When a chemical reaction is driven by an external field, the transition state that the system must pass through as it changes from reactant to product—for example, an energy barrier—becomes time-dependent. We show that for periodic forcing the rate of barrier crossing can be determined through stability analysis of the non-autonomous transition state. Specifically, strong agreement is observed between the difference in the Floquet exponents describing stability of the transition state trajectory, which defines a recrossing-free dividing surface [G. T. Craven, T. Bartsch, and R. Hernandez, "Persistence of transition state structure in chemical reactions driven by fields oscillating in time," Phys. Rev. E 89, 040801(R) (2014)], and the rates calculated by simulation of ensembles of trajectories. This result opens the possibility to extract rates directly from the intrinsic stability of the transition state, even when it is time-dependent, without requiring a numerically expensive simulation of the long-time dynamics of a large ensemble of trajectories.

  2. The Endothelium-Dependent Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mónica, F Z; Bian, K; Murad, F

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic 3'-5' guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling plays a critical role on smooth muscle tone, platelet activity, cardiac contractility, renal function and fluid balance, and cell growth. Studies of the 1990s established endothelium dysfunction as one of the major causes of cardiovascular diseases. Therapeutic strategies that benefit NO bioavailability have been applied in clinical medicine extensively. Basic and clinical studies of cGMP regulation through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) or inhibition of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) have resulted in effective therapies for pulmonary hypertension, erectile dysfunction, and more recently benign prostatic hyperplasia. This section reviews (1) how endothelial dysfunction and NO deficiency lead to cardiovascular diseases, (2) how soluble cGMP regulation leads to beneficial effects on disorders of the circulation system, and (3) the epigenetic regulation of NO-sGC pathway components in the cardiovascular system. In conclusion, the discovery of the NO-cGMP pathway revolutionized the comprehension of pathophysiological mechanisms involved in cardiovascular and other diseases. However, considering the expression "from bench to bedside" the therapeutic alternatives targeting NO-cGMP did not immediately follow the marked biochemical and pathophysiological revolution. Some therapeutic options have been effective and released on the market for pulmonary hypertension and erectile dysfunction such as inhaled NO, PDE5 inhibitors, and recently sGC stimulators. The therapeutic armamentarium for many other disorders is expected in the near future. There are currently numerous active basic and clinical research programs in universities and industries attempting to develop novel therapies for many diseases and medical applications. PMID:27451093

  3. Electrophoretic deposition of diffusion barrier titanium oxide coatings for nuclear reactor cladding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzdor, Vahid; Brechtl, Jamieson; Hauch, Benjamin; Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd R.

    2013-10-01

    Development of TiO2 diffusion barrier coating by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) has been studied to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI). Important EPD deposition parameters, including solvent, additives, particle size and crystal structure, current, and voltage were optimized for coating deposition on flat T91 ferritic steel substrates. Post-deposition sintering in the range of 850-1050 °C was investigated. Diffusion characteristics of the coatings were evaluated by diffusion couple experiments at 575 °C for 100 h using cerium as one of the fission products responsible for FCCI. Results showed that the coated steel exhibited up to 83% reduction in solid state inter-diffusion with cerium. Heat transfer calculations showed that the fuel center-line temperature would increase slightly due to the addition of the TiO2 diffusion barrier coating; however, the maximum temperature still remains well below the melting point of uranium and is even lower than eutectic temperature between Fe2U and Fe2U6 at cladding centerline and cladding/fuel interface, respectively.

  4. On determining the height of the potential barrier at grain boundaries in ion-conducting oxides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangtae; Kim, Seong K; Khodorov, Sergey; Maier, Joachim; Lubomirsky, Igor

    2016-01-28

    The validity and limitations of two quantitative approaches for estimating the height of the potential barrier at grain boundaries, Ψgb, in polycrystalline ionic conductors are examined both theoretically and experimentally. The linear diffusion model recently proposed by Kim and Lubomirsky determines Ψgb from the value of the power exponent of the current (Igb)-voltage (Ugb) relationship at the grain boundary, dln(Igb)/dln(Ugb), while the conventional approach calculates Ψgb from the ratio of the grain boundary resistivity to the grain core resistivity. The results of our theoretical analysis demonstrate that both approaches should yield consistent values for Ψgb if the ionic current through the grain boundary is limited exclusively by space charge. While the value of Ψgb obtained by the power law procedure is relatively insensitive to other causes of current obstruction, e.g. current constriction and/or local structural disorder, the resistivity ratio method, if not explicitly corrected for these additional limitations, results in a considerable overestimate of the grain boundary potential barrier. Hence, it is possible to distinguish between grain boundary resistance due to the presence of space charge and that due to additional sources by comparing the values of Ψgb determined using each of the two methods. Our theoretical analysis is confirmed experimentally with 3 mol% Gd-doped ceria with and without an additional source of current constriction across the grain boundary. PMID:26738808

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of post-ischemic blood-brain barrier damage with PEGylated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong-Fang; Qian, Cheng; An, Yan-Li; Chang, Di; Ju, Sheng-Hong; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage during ischemia may induce devastating consequences like cerebral edema and hemorrhagic transformation. This study presents a novel strategy for dynamically imaging of BBB damage with PEGylated supermagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as contrast agents. The employment of SPIONs as contrast agents made it possible to dynamically image the BBB permeability alterations and ischemic lesions simultaneously with T2-weighted MRI, and the monitoring could last up to 24 h with a single administration of PEGylated SPIONs in vivo. The ability of the PEGylated SPIONs to highlight BBB damage by MRI was demonstrated by the colocalization of PEGylated SPIONs with Gd-DTPA after intravenous injection of SPION-PEG/Gd-DTPA into a mouse. The immunohistochemical staining also confirmed the leakage of SPION-PEG from cerebral vessels into parenchyma. This study provides a novel and convenient route for imaging BBB alteration in the experimental ischemic stroke model.

  6. Application of Iron Oxide as a pH-dependent Indicator for Improving the Nutritional Quality

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acid food indicators can be used as pH indicators for evaluating the quality and freshness of fermented products during the full course of distribution. Iron oxide particles are hardly suspended in water, but partially or completely agglomerated. The agglomeration degree of the iron oxide particles depends on the pH. The pH-dependent particle agglomeration or dispersion can be useful for monitoring the acidity of food. The zeta potential of iron oxide showed a decreasing trend as the pH increased from 2 to 8, while the point of zero charge (PZC) was observed around at pH 6.0-7.0. These results suggested that the size of the iron oxide particles was affected by the change in pH levels. As a result, the particle sizes of iron oxide were smaller at lower pH than at neutral pH. In addition, agglomeration of the iron oxide particles increased as the pH increased from 2 to 7. In the time-dependent aggregation test, the average particle size was 730.4 nm and 1,340.3 nm at pH 2 and 7, respectively. These properties of iron oxide particles can be used to develop an ideal acid indicator for food pH and to monitor food quality, besides a colorant or nutrient for nutrition enhancement and sensory promotion in food industry. PMID:27482521

  7. Application of Iron Oxide as a pH-dependent Indicator for Improving the Nutritional Quality.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangpeng; Ryu, Jina; Kim, Bumsik; Ko, Sanghoon

    2016-07-01

    Acid food indicators can be used as pH indicators for evaluating the quality and freshness of fermented products during the full course of distribution. Iron oxide particles are hardly suspended in water, but partially or completely agglomerated. The agglomeration degree of the iron oxide particles depends on the pH. The pH-dependent particle agglomeration or dispersion can be useful for monitoring the acidity of food. The zeta potential of iron oxide showed a decreasing trend as the pH increased from 2 to 8, while the point of zero charge (PZC) was observed around at pH 6.0-7.0. These results suggested that the size of the iron oxide particles was affected by the change in pH levels. As a result, the particle sizes of iron oxide were smaller at lower pH than at neutral pH. In addition, agglomeration of the iron oxide particles increased as the pH increased from 2 to 7. In the time-dependent aggregation test, the average particle size was 730.4 nm and 1,340.3 nm at pH 2 and 7, respectively. These properties of iron oxide particles can be used to develop an ideal acid indicator for food pH and to monitor food quality, besides a colorant or nutrient for nutrition enhancement and sensory promotion in food industry. PMID:27482521

  8. Trichloroethylene oxidation by purified toluene 2-monooxygenase: products, kinetics, and turnover-dependent inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, L M; Wackett, L P

    1997-01-01

    Trichloroethylene is oxidized by several types of nonspecific bacterial oxygenases. Toluene 2-monooxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia G4 is implicated in trichloroethylene oxidation and is uniquely suggested to be resistant to turnover-dependent inactivation in vivo. In this work, the oxidation of trichloroethylene was studied with purified toluene 2-monooxygenase. All three purified toluene 2-monooxygenase protein components and NADH were required to reconstitute full trichloroethylene oxidation activity in vitro. The apparent Km and Vmax were 12 microM and 37 nmol per min per mg of hydroxylase component, respectively. Ten percent of the full activity was obtained when the small-molecular-weight enzyme component was omitted. The stable oxidation products, accounting for 84% of the trichloroethylene oxidized, were carbon monoxide, formic acid, glyoxylic acid, and covalently modified oxygenase proteins that constituted 12% of the reacted [14C]trichloroethylene. The stable oxidation products may all derive from the unstable intermediate trichloroethylene epoxide that was trapped by reaction with 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine. Chloral hydrate and dichloroacetic acid were not detected. This finding differs from that with soluble methane monooxygenase and cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase, which produce chloral hydrate. Trichloroethylene-dependent inactivation of toluene 2-monooxygenase activity was observed. All of the protein components were covalently modified during the oxidation of trichloroethylene. The addition of cysteine to reaction mixtures partially protected the enzyme system against inactivation, most notably protecting the NADH-oxidoreductase component. This suggested the participation of diffusible intermediates in the inactivation of the oxidoreductase. PMID:8981984

  9. Temperature dependent optical properties of pentacene films on zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Helzel, J.; Jankowski, S.; El Helou, M.; Witte, G.; Heimbrodt, W.

    2011-11-21

    The optical transitions of pentacene films deposited on ZnO have been studied by absorption spectroscopy as a function of temperature in the range of room temperature down to 10 K. The pentacene films were prepared with thicknesses of 10 nm, 20 nm, and 100 nm on the ZnO-O(000-1) surface by molecular beam deposition. A unique temperature dependence has been observed for the two Davydov components of the excitons for different film thicknesses. At room temperature, the energetic positions of the respective absorption bands are the same for all films, whereas the positions differ more than 20 meV at 10 K caused by the very different expansion coefficients of pentacene and ZnO. Although the pentacene is just bonded via van der Waals interaction to the ZnO substrate, the very first pentacene monolayer (adlayer) is forced to keep the initial position on the ZnO surface and suffering, therefore, a substantial tensile strain. For all the subsequent pentacene monolayers, the strain is reduced step by step resulting electronically in a strong potential gradient at the interface.

  10. Chemolithotrophic nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing nature of actinobacterial subdivision lineage TM3

    PubMed Central

    Kanaparthi, Dheeraj; Pommerenke, Bianca; Casper, Peter; Dumont, Marc G

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation is widespread in various environments and is known to be performed by both heterotrophic and autotrophic microorganisms. Although Fe(II) oxidation is predominantly biological under acidic conditions, to date most of the studies on nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation were from environments of circumneutral pH. The present study was conducted in Lake Grosse Fuchskuhle, a moderately acidic ecosystem receiving humic acids from an adjacent bog, with the objective of identifying, characterizing and enumerating the microorganisms responsible for this process. The incubations of sediment under chemolithotrophic nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing conditions have shown the enrichment of TM3 group of uncultured Actinobacteria. A time-course experiment done on these Actinobacteria showed a consumption of Fe(II) and nitrate in accordance with the expected stoichiometry (1:0.2) required for nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. Quantifications done by most probable number showed the presence of 1 × 104 autotrophic and 1 × 107 heterotrophic nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizers per gram fresh weight of sediment. The analysis of microbial community by 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing showed that these actinobacterial sequences correspond to ∼0.6% of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Stable isotope probing using 13CO2 was performed with the lake sediment and showed labeling of these Actinobacteria. This indicated that they might be important autotrophs in this environment. Although these Actinobacteria are not dominant members of the sediment microbial community, they could be of functional significance due to their contribution to the regeneration of Fe(III), which has a critical role as an electron acceptor for anaerobic microorganisms mineralizing sediment organic matter. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study to show the autotrophic nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing nature of TM3 group of uncultured Actinobacteria