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Sample records for barrier shape symmetries

  1. A Low-Symmetry Dysprosium Metallocene Single-Molecule Magnet with a High Anisotropy Barrier.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Thomas; Chilton, Nicholas F; Layfield, Richard A

    2016-09-01

    The single-molecule magnet (SMM) properties of the isocarbonyl-ligated dysprosium metallocene [Cp*2 Dy{μ-(OC)2 FeCp}]2 (1Dy ), which contains a rhombus-shaped Dy2 Fe2 core, are described. Combining a strong axial [Cp*](-) ligand field with a weak equatorial field consisting of the isocarbonyl ligands leads to an anisotropy barrier of 662 cm(-1) in zero applied field. The dominant thermal relaxation pathways in 1Dy involves at least the fourth-excited Kramers doublet, thus demonstrating that prominent SMM behavior can be observed for dysprosium in low-symmetry environments. PMID:27460170

  2. Actin filaments growing against a barrier with fluctuating shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhu, Raj Kumar; Chatterjee, Sakuntala

    2016-06-01

    We study force generation by a set of parallel actin filaments growing against a nonrigid obstacle, in the presence of an external load. The filaments polymerize by either moving the whole obstacle, with a large energy cost, or by causing local distortion in its shape which costs much less energy. The nonrigid obstacle also has local thermal fluctuations due to which its shape can change with time and we describe this using fluctuations in the height profile of a one-dimensional interface with Kardar-Parisi-Zhang dynamics. We find the shape fluctuations of the barrier strongly affect the force generation mechanism. The qualitative nature of the force-velocity curve is crucially determined by the relative time scale of filament and barrier dynamics. The height profile of the barrier also shows interesting variation with the external load. Our analytical calculations within mean-field theory show reasonable agreement with our simulation results.

  3. Enhancement and suppression of tunneling by controlling symmetries of a potential barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, Denys I.; Liu, Wing-Ki; Ivanov, Misha Yu.

    2010-11-15

    We present a class of two-dimensional (2D) systems which shows a counterintuitive property that contradicts a semiclassical intuition: A 2D quantum particle 'prefers' tunneling through a barrier rather than traveling above it. Viewing the one-particle 2D system as a system of two 1D particles, it is demonstrated that this effect occurs due to a specific symmetry of the barrier that forces excitations of the interparticle degree of freedom that, in turn, lead to the appearance of an effective potential barrier even though there is no 'real' barrier. This phenomenon cannot exist in 1D.

  4. Constitutive modelling of magnetic shape memory alloys with discrete and continuous symmetries

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, K.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2014-01-01

    A free energy-based constitutive formulation is considered for magnetic shape memory alloys. Internal state variables are introduced whose evolution describes the transition from reference state to the deformed and transformed one. We impose material symmetry restrictions on the Gibbs free energy and on the evolution equations of the internal state variables. Discrete symmetry is considered for single crystals, whereas continuous symmetry is considered for polycrystalline materials. PMID:25197247

  5. Constitutive modelling of magnetic shape memory alloys with discrete and continuous symmetries.

    PubMed

    Haldar, K; Lagoudas, D C

    2014-09-01

    A free energy-based constitutive formulation is considered for magnetic shape memory alloys. Internal state variables are introduced whose evolution describes the transition from reference state to the deformed and transformed one. We impose material symmetry restrictions on the Gibbs free energy and on the evolution equations of the internal state variables. Discrete symmetry is considered for single crystals, whereas continuous symmetry is considered for polycrystalline materials. PMID:25197247

  6. Higher-rank discrete symmetries in the IBM I. Octahedral shapes: General Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Isacker, P.; Bouldjedri, A.; Zerguine, S.

    2015-06-01

    In the context of the interacting boson model with s, d and g bosons, the conditions for obtaining an intrinsic shape with octahedral symmetry are derived for a general Hamiltonian with up to two-body interactions.

  7. Controlling active self-assembly through broken particle-shape symmetry.

    PubMed

    Wensink, H H; Kantsler, V; Goldstein, R E; Dunkel, J

    2014-01-01

    Many structural properties of conventional passive materials are known to arise from the symmetries of their microscopic constituents. By contrast, it is largely unclear how the interplay between particle shape and self-propulsion controls the meso- and macroscale behavior of active matter. Here we use large-scale simulations of homo- and heterogeneous self-propelled particle systems to identify generic effects of broken particle-shape symmetry on collective motion. We find that even small violations of fore-aft symmetry lead to fundamentally different collective behaviors, which may facilitate demixing of differently shaped species as well as the spontaneous formation of stable microrotors. These results suggest that variation of particle shape yields robust physical mechanisms to control self-assembly of active matter, with possibly profound implications for biology and materials design. PMID:24580155

  8. Evidence for Triclinic Symmetry in Smectic Liquid Crystals of Bent-Shape Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Jakli, A.; Kruerke, D.; Sawade, H.; Heppke, G.

    2001-06-18

    The first experimental evidence for triclinic symmetry of bulk smectic liquid-crystal samples of achiral banana-shaped molecules is presented. This phase corresponds to the so-called Sm-C{sub G} phase consisting of biaxial molecules and characterized by two tilt directions with respect to the layer normal: tilt of the molecular plane (clinic) and tilt of the molecular kink direction (leaning). Each smectic layer has a polarization component normal to the smectic layers (C{sub 1} symmetry). The observations suggest that the phase tentatively labeled as B{sub 7} is identical with the Sm-C{sub G} phase.

  9. Emergence of Euclidean dynamical symmetry as a consequence of shape phase mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaca, R.; Budaca, A. I.

    2016-08-01

    A hybrid model which combines γ-stable and γ-rigid collective conditions through a rigidity parameter, is used to study the critical point of the phase transition between spherical and axially symmetric shapes. The model in the equally mixed case, called X (4), exhibits properties of the Euclidean symmetry in four dimensions. The spectral properties of the new model are investigated in connection to the exact symmetry. Experimental realisation of the X (4) model is found in two N = 90 nuclei and two Pt isotopes in vicinity of experimentally observed critical point.

  10. Poloidal tilting symmetry of high order tokamak flux surface shaping in gyrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Justin; Parra, Felix I.; Barnes, Michael

    2016-04-01

    A poloidal tilting symmetry of the local nonlinear δ f gyrokinetic model is demonstrated analytically and verified numerically. This symmetry shows that poloidally rotating all the flux surface shaping effects with large poloidal mode number by a single tilt angle has an exponentially small effect on the transport properties of a tokamak. This is shown using a generalization of the Miller local equilibrium model to specify an arbitrary flux surface geometry. With this geometry specification we find that, when performing an expansion in large flux surface shaping mode number, the governing equations of gyrokinetics are symmetric in the poloidal tilt of the high order shaping effects. This allows us to take the fluxes from a single configuration and calculate the fluxes in any configuration that can be produced by tilting the large mode number shaping effects. This creates a distinction between tokamaks with mirror symmetric flux surfaces and tokamaks without mirror symmetry, which is expected to have important consequences for generating toroidal rotation using up-down asymmetry.

  11. Pseudospin symmetry for a new oscillatory ring-shaped noncentral potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Mincang; Huangfu Guoqing

    2011-05-15

    A new oscillatory ring-shaped noncentral potential is proposed and the pseudospin symmetry for this potential is investigated by solving the Dirac equation with equally mixed scalar and vector potentials with opposite signs. The spinor wave functions and the energy spectrum for the bound states are obtained by using the Nikiforov-Uvarov method. The effect of angle-dependent part on the radial solutions and the algebraic property of the energy equation are discussed.

  12. Symmetry-controlled colloidal nanocrystals: nonhydrolytic chemical synthesis and shape determining parameters.

    PubMed

    Jun, Young-wook; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Choi, Jin-sil; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2005-08-11

    Since inorganic nanocrystals exhibit unique shape-dependent nanoscale properties and can be utilized as basic building blocks for futuristic nanodevices, a systematic study on the shape control of these nanocrystals remains an important subject in materials and physical chemistry. In this feature article, we overview the recent progress on the synthetic development of symmetry-controlled colloidal nanocrystals of semiconductor and metal oxide, which are prepared through nonhydrolytic chemical routes. We describe their shape-guiding processes and illustrate the detailed key factors controlling their growth by examining various case studies of zero-dimensional spheres and cubes, one-dimensional rods, and quasi multidimensional structures such as disks, multipods, and stars. Specifically, the crystalline phase of nucleating seeds, surface energy, kinetic vs thermodynamic growth, and selective adhesion processes of capping ligands are found to be most crucial for the determination of the nanocrystal shape. PMID:16852873

  13. New approach to the perception of 3D shape based on veridicality, complexity, symmetry and volume.

    PubMed

    Pizlo, Zygmunt; Sawada, Tadamasa; Li, Yunfeng; Kropatsch, Walter G; Steinman, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress towards understanding 3D shape perception made possible by appreciating the significant role that veridicality and complexity play in the natural visual environment. The ability to see objects as they really are "out there" is derived from the complexity inherent in the 3D object's shape. The importance of both veridicality and complexity was ignored in most prior research. Appreciating their importance made it possible to devise a computational model that recovers the 3D shape of an object from only one of its 2D images. This model uses a simplicity principle consisting of only four a priori constraints representing properties of 3D shapes, primarily their symmetry and volume. The model recovers 3D shapes from a single 2D image as well, and sometimes even better, than a human being. In the rare recoveries in which errors are observed, the errors made by the model and human subjects are very similar. The model makes no use of depth, surfaces or learning. Recent elaborations of this model include: (i) the recovery of the shapes of natural objects, including human and animal bodies with limbs in varying positions (ii) providing the model with two input images that allowed it to achieve virtually perfect shape constancy from almost all viewing directions. The review concludes with a comparison of some of the highlights of our novel, successful approach to the recovery of 3D shape from a 2D image with prior, less successful approaches. PMID:19800910

  14. Shape Transitions and Chiral Symmetry Breaking in the Energy Landscape of the Mitotic Chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2016-06-01

    We derive an unbiased information theoretic energy landscape for chromosomes at metaphase using a maximum entropy approach that accurately reproduces the details of the experimentally measured pairwise contact probabilities between genomic loci. Dynamical simulations using this landscape lead to cylindrical, helically twisted structures reflecting liquid crystalline order. These structures are similar to those arising from a generic ideal homogenized chromosome energy landscape. The helical twist can be either right or left handed so chiral symmetry is broken spontaneously. The ideal chromosome landscape when augmented by interactions like those leading to topologically associating domain formation in the interphase chromosome reproduces these behaviors. The phase diagram of this landscape shows that the helical fiber order and the cylindrical shape persist at temperatures above the onset of chiral symmetry breaking, which is limited by the topologically associating domain interaction strength.

  15. Symmetry and scale orient Min protein patterns in shaped bacterial sculptures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fabai; van Schie, Bas G.C.; Keymer, Juan E.; Dekker, Cees

    2016-01-01

    The boundary of a cell defines the shape and scale for its subcellular organisation. However, the effects of the cell’s spatial boundaries as well as the geometry sensing and scale adaptation of intracellular molecular networks remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that living bacterial cells can be ‘sculpted’ into defined shapes, such as squares and rectangles, which are used to explore the spatial adaptation of Min proteins that oscillate pole-to-pole in rod-shape Escherichia coli to assist cell division. In a wide geometric parameter space, ranging from 2x1x1 to 11x6x1 μm3, Min proteins exhibit versatile oscillation patterns, sustaining rotational, longitudinal, diagonal, stripe, and even transversal modes. These patterns are found to directly capture the symmetry and scale of the cell boundary, and the Min concentration gradients scale in adaptation to the cell size within a characteristic length range of 3–6 μm. Numerical simulations reveal that local microscopic Turing kinetics of Min proteins can yield global symmetry selection, gradient scaling, and an adaptive range, when and only when facilitated by the three-dimensional confinement of cell boundary. These findings cannot be explained by previous geometry-sensing models based on the longest distance, membrane area or curvature, and reveal that spatial boundaries can facilitate simple molecular interactions to result in far more versatile functions than previously understood. PMID:26098227

  16. Symmetry and scale orient Min protein patterns in shaped bacterial sculptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fabai; van Schie, Bas G. C.; Keymer, Juan E.; Dekker, Cees

    2015-08-01

    The boundary of a cell defines the shape and scale of its subcellular organization. However, the effects of the cell's spatial boundaries as well as the geometry sensing and scale adaptation of intracellular molecular networks remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that living bacterial cells can be ‘sculpted’ into defined shapes, such as squares and rectangles, which are used to explore the spatial adaptation of Min proteins that oscillate pole-to-pole in rod-shaped Escherichia coli to assist cell division. In a wide geometric parameter space, ranging from 2 × 1 × 1 to 11 × 6 × 1 μm3, Min proteins exhibit versatile oscillation patterns, sustaining rotational, longitudinal, diagonal, stripe and even transversal modes. These patterns are found to directly capture the symmetry and scale of the cell boundary, and the Min concentration gradients scale with the cell size within a characteristic length range of 3-6 μm. Numerical simulations reveal that local microscopic Turing kinetics of Min proteins can yield global symmetry selection, gradient scaling and an adaptive range, when and only when facilitated by the three-dimensional confinement of the cell boundary. These findings cannot be explained by previous geometry-sensing models based on the longest distance, membrane area or curvature, and reveal that spatial boundaries can facilitate simple molecular interactions to result in far more versatile functions than previously understood.

  17. Galilean symmetry in the effective theory of inflation: new shapes of non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Musso, Marcello; D'Amico, Guido; Noreña, Jorge; Trincherini, Enrico E-mail: gda2@nyu.edu E-mail: jorge.norena@gmail.com

    2011-02-01

    We study the consequences of imposing an approximate Galilean symmetry on the Effective Theory of Inflation, the theory of small perturbations around the inflationary background. This approach allows us to study the effect of operators with two derivatives on each field, which can be the leading interactions due to non-renormalization properties of the Galilean Lagrangian. In this case cubic non-Gaussianities are given by three independent operators, containing up to six derivatives, two with a shape close to equilateral and one peaking on flattened isosceles triangles. The four-point function is larger than in models with small speed of sound and potentially observable with the Planck satellite.

  18. Conformal barrier and hidden local symmetry constraints: Walking technirhos in LHC diboson channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukano, Hidenori S.; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Terashi, Koji; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2016-03-01

    We expand the previous analyses of the conformal barrier on the walking technirho for the 2 TeV diboson excesses reported by the ATLAS Collaboration, with a special emphasis on the hidden local symmetry (HLS) constraints. We first show that the Standard Model (SM) Higgs Lagrangian is equivalent to the scale-invariant nonlinear chiral Lagrangian, which is further gauge equivalent to the scale-invariant HLS model, with the scale symmetry realized nonlinearly via SM Higgs as a (pseudo-)dilaton. The scale symmetry forbids the new vector boson decay to the 125 GeV Higgs plus W / Z boson, in sharp contrast to the conventional "equivalence theorem" which is invalidated by the conformality. The HLS forbids mixing between the iso-triplet technirho's, ρΠ and ρP, of the one-family walking technicolor (with four doublets ND =NF / 2 = 4), which, without the HLS, would be generated when switching on the standard model gauging. We also present updated analyses of the walking technirho's for the diboson excesses by fully incorporating the constraints from the conformal barrier and the HLS as well as possible higher order effects: still characteristic of the one-family walking technirho is its smallness of the decay width, roughly of order Γ /Mρ ∼ [ 3 /NC × 1 /ND ] ×[ Γ /Mρ ] QCD ≃ 70 GeV / 2 TeV (ND =NC = 4), in perfect agreement with the expected diboson resonance with Γ < 100 GeV. The model is so sharply distinguishable from other massive spin 1 models without the conformality and HLS that it is clearly testable at the LHC Run II. If the 2 TeV boson decay to WH / ZH is not observed in the ongoing Run II, then the conformality is operative on the 125 GeV Higgs, strongly suggesting that the 2 TeV excess events are responsible for the walking technirhos and the 125 GeV Higgs is the technidilaton.

  19. Measured symmetry of facial 3D shape and perceived facial symmetry and attractiveness before and after orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ostwald, Julia; Berssenbrügge, Philipp; Dirksen, Dieter; Runte, Christoph; Wermker, Kai; Kleinheinz, Johannes; Jung, Susanne

    2015-05-01

    One aim of cranio-maxillo-facial surgery is to strive for an esthetical appearance. Do facial symmetry and attractiveness correlate? How are they affected by surgery? Within this study faces of patients with orthognathic surgery were captured and analyzed regarding their symmetry. A total of 25 faces of patients were measured three-dimensionally by an optical sensor using the fringe projection technique before and after orthognathic surgery. Based upon this data an asymmetry index was calculated for each case. In order to gather subjective ratings each face was presented to 100 independent test subjects in a 3D rotation sequence. Those were asked to rate the symmetry and the attractiveness of the faces. It was analyzed to what extend the ratings correlate with the measured asymmetry indices and whether pre- and post-surgical data differ. The measured asymmetry indices correlate significantly with the subjective ratings of both items. The measured symmetry as well as the rated symmetry and attractiveness increased on average after surgery. The increase of the ratings was even statistically significant. A larger enhancement of symmetry is achieved in pre-surgical strongly asymmetric faces than in rather symmetric faces. PMID:25841308

  20. Temperature dependence of the Tafel slope and electrochemical barrier symmetry factor,. beta. , in electrode kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, B.E. ); Tessier, D.F. ); Wilkinson, D.P. )

    1989-09-01

    The significance of the new-established situation that the Tafel slopes, b, ( = d{eta}/d In i) for simple charge-transfer processes at electrodes are usually not represented with respect to variation with temperature, T, by the conventional relation b = RT/{beta} cpF, where {beta} is a constant-valued electrochemical charge-transfer barrier-symmetry coefficient, is examined in the light of recent comments on the problem. Clear evidence is given that b has the form b = RT({beta}sub H + T{beta}{sub s})F for proton transfer at Hg in water and various other solvents, where {beta}{sub H} and T{beta}{sub s} are enthalpic components of the overall {beta}, corresponding to experimentally observable potential-dependence of both the enthalpy and the entropy of activation, respectively. The frequent deviation from conventional behavior thus arises because the entropy of activation, as well as the energy of activation, can be potential-dependent, a situation that, until recently, has been neglected in inter-pretations of electrode-kinetic experiments. The origin of the conventional effect of potential on electrode reaction rates, through the change of electrode work function,{Phi}, with overpotential or electrode potential, V, ({Phi}{sub v} = {Phi}{sub v = O}{plus minus} eV), is examined critically in relation to the potential-dependent surface-potential component, {chi}{sub d}, in {Phi}, which can also be T-dependent.

  1. Theory of the Shape of the Heliospheric Termination Shock: Axial Symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Aaron; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The heliospheric termination shock must exhibit asymmetry in its shape, due in part to internal latitude variations in the solar wind, and in part to the special directions defined by the external interstellar flow and/or the galactic magnetic field. This asymmetry shows up naturally in numerical simulations of the interaction between the heliosphere and local interstellar medium. However, to date only one analytical treatment of the theory has appeared, which discussed the modification of the shock shape due to solar wind latitude variations in the presence of spherically symmetric outer boundary conditions. In the present report, we discuss an extension and generalization of this theory to an axially symmetric gasdynamic system, in which departure from spherical symmetry may be due either to internal solar wind variations or to the directional properties of the external interstellar medium. It is shown that for steady flow the post-shock region is characterized by an infinite set of quantities that are conserved along streamlines; among these invariants are the stagnation pressure and a quantity closely related to vorticity. Moreover, for a given latitude profile of the (supersonic) solar wind, the geometry of the termination shock uniquely determines the valued of these invariants at the points where the streamlines emerge from the shock. A self-consistent solution of the problem thus requires a match between the shock geometry and distant boundary conditions. The theory is applied to give estimates of termination-shock asymmetry for various internal and external conditions.

  2. Cell shape, spreading symmetry, and the polarization of stress-fibers in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemel, A.; Rehfeldt, F.; Brown, A. E. X.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-05-01

    The active regulation of cellular forces during cell adhesion plays an important role in the determination of cell size, shape, and internal structure. While on flat, homogeneous and isotropic substrates some cells spread isotropically, others spread anisotropically and assume elongated structures. In addition, in their native environment as well as in vitro experiments, the cell shape and spreading asymmetry can be modulated by the local distribution of adhesive molecules and topography of the environment. We present a simple elastic model and experiments on stem cells to explain the variation of cell size with the matrix rigidity. In addition, we predict the experimental consequences of two mechanisms of acto-myosin polarization and focus here on the effect of the cell spreading asymmetry on the regulation of the stress-fiber alignment in the cytoskeleton. We show that when cell spreading is sufficiently asymmetric the alignment of acto-myosin forces in the cell increases monotonically with the matrix rigidity; however, in general this alignment is non-monotonic, as shown previously. These results highlight the importance of the symmetry characteristics of cell spreading in the regulation of cytoskeleton structure and suggest a mechanism by which different cell types may acquire different morphologies and internal structures in different mechanical environments.

  3. DNA-linked NanoParticle Lattices with Diamond Symmetry: Stability and Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emamy, Hamed; Tkachenko, Alexei; Gang, Oleg; Starr, Francis

    The linking of nanoparticles (NP) by DNA has been proven to be an effective means to create NP lattices with specific order. Lattices with diamond symmetry are predicted to offer novel photonic properties, but self-assembly of such lattices has proven to be challenging due to the low packing fraction, sensitivity to bond orientation, and local heterogeneity. Recently, we reported an approach to create diamond NP lattices based on the association between anisotropic particles with well-defined tetravalent DNA binding topology and isotropically functionalized NP. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate the Gibbs free energy of these lattices, and thereby determine the stability of these lattices as a function of NP size. The lattice free energy has a minimum for NP size near 50 nm, and rapid increases for larger NP, destabilizing the lattice. We also predict the equilibrium shape for the cubic diamond crystallite using the Wulff construction method. Specifically, we predict the equilibrium shape using the surface energy for different crystallographic planes. We evaluate surface energy directly form molecular dynamics simulation, which we correlate with theoretical estimates from the expected number of broken DNA bonds along a facet.

  4. The sweetest thing: the influence of angularity, symmetry, and the number of elements on shape-valence and shape-taste matches

    PubMed Central

    Salgado-Montejo, Alejandro; Alvarado, Jorge A.; Velasco, Carlos; Salgado, Carlos J.; Hasse, Kendra; Spence, Charles

    2015-01-01

    A within-participants experiment was conducted in two countries (the UK and Colombia) in order to investigate the matching of shapes to taste words. Comparing the two countries allowed us to explore some of the cultural differences that have been reported thus far solely in terms of people's visual preferences. In particular, we addressed the question of whether properties other than angularity influence shape-valence and shape-taste matching (crossmodal correspondences). The participants in the present study repeatedly matched eight shapes, varying in terms of their angularity, symmetry, and number of elements to one of two words—pleasant or unpleasant and sweet or sour. Participants' choices, as well as the latency of their responses, and their hand movements, were evaluated. The participants were more likely to judge those shapes that were rounder, symmetrical, and those shapes that had fewer elements as both pleasant and sweet. Those shapes that were more angular, asymmetrical, and that had a greater number of elements, were more likely to be judged as both unpleasant and sour instead. The evidence presented here therefore suggests that aside from angularity and roundness, both symmetry/asymmetry and the number of elements present in a shape also influence valence and taste categorizations. PMID:26441757

  5. Dune Detective, Using Ecological Studies to Reconstruct Events Which Shaped a Barrier Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Paul J.; Hon, Will

    This publication is designed for use as part of a curriculum series developed by the Regional Marine Science Project. Students in grades 11 and 12 are exposed to research methods through a series of field exercises guiding investigators in reconstructing the events which have shaped the natural communities of a barrier beach. Background…

  6. Numerical evaluation of tree canopy shape near noise barriers to improve downwind shielding.

    PubMed

    Van Renterghem, T; Botteldooren, D

    2008-02-01

    The screen-induced refraction of sound by wind results in a reduced noise shielding for downwind receivers. Placing a row of trees behind a highway noise barrier modifies the wind field, and this was proven to be an important curing measure in previous studies. In this paper, the wind field modification by the canopy of trees near noise barriers is numerically predicted by using common quantitative tree properties. A realistic range of pressure resistance coefficients are modeled, for two wind speed profiles. As canopy shape influences vertical gradients in the horizontal component of the wind velocity, three typical shapes are simulated. A triangular crown shape, where the pressure resistance coefficient is at maximum at the bottom of the canopy and decreases linearly toward the top, is the most interesting configuration. A canopy with uniform aerodynamic properties with height behaves similarly at low wind speeds. The third crown shape that was modeled is the ellipse form, which has a worse performance than the first two types, but still gives a significant improvement compared to barriers without trees. With increasing wind speed, the optimum pressure resistance coefficient increases. Coniferous trees are more suited than deciduous trees to increase the downwind noise barrier efficiency. PMID:18247869

  7. Improvement of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor for Ozone Generation by Electrode Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Masaki; Sato, Tohru; Kato, Shoji; Mukaigawa, Seiji; Takaki, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    An effect of electrode shape on ozone generation in dielectric barrier discharge reactor is described in this article. Three different shape electrodes were employed as ground electrodes. A plane electrode is 6 cm in width, and 20 cm in length. A trench electrode has large number of knife-edge rails. A multipoint electrode has large number of four-sided pyramid projections on the plane. A high voltage plane electrode is covered with 0.5 mm thickness alumina layer worked as dielectric barrier. The experimental results show that the breakdown for the multipoint electrode occurs at 7.0 kVpp. This value is lower than 8.4 kVpp that is the breakdown voltage of the plane electrode. The ozone yield increases from 80 g/kWh to 130 g/kWh by changing the electrode shape from the plane to the multipoint. The ozone generation efficiency decreased with increase of the ozone concentration.

  8. Symmetry analysis of a model for the exercise of a barrier option

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, J. G.; Sophocleous, C.; Leach, P. G. L.

    2013-09-01

    A barrier option takes into account the possibility of an unacceptable change in the price of the underlying stock. Such a change could carry considerable financial loss. We examine one model based upon the Black-Scholes-Merton Equation and determine the functional forms of the barrier function and rebate function which are consistent with a solution of the underlying evolution partial differential equation using the Lie Theory of Extended Groups. The solution is consistent with the possibility of no rebate and the barrier function is very similar to one adopted on an heuristic basis.

  9. Theory of damped quantum rotation in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. III. Nuclear permutation symmetry of the line shape equation.

    PubMed

    Szymański, S

    2009-12-28

    The damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory describes manifestations in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the coherent and stochastic dynamics of N-fold molecular rotors composed of indistinguishable particles. The standard jump model is only a limiting case of the DQR approach; outside this limit, the stochastic motions of such rotors have no kinematic description. In this paper, completing the previous two of this series, consequences of nuclear permutation symmetry for the properties of the DQR line shape equation are considered. The systems addressed are planar rotors, such as aromatic hydrocarbons' rings, occurring inside of molecular crystals oriented in the magnetic field. Under such conditions, oddfold rotors can have nontrivial permutation symmetries only for peculiar orientations while evenfold ones always retain their intrinsic symmetry element, which is rotation by 180 degrees about the N-fold axis; in specific orientations the latter can gain two additional symmetry elements. It is shown that the symmetry selection rules applicable to the classical rate processes in fluids, once recognized as having two diverse aspects, macroscopic and microscopic, are also rigorously valid for the DQR processes in the solid state. However, formal justification of these rules is different because the DQR equation is based on the Pauli principle, which is ignored in the jump model. For objects like the benzene ring, exploitation of these rules in simulations of spectra using the DQR equation can be of critical significance for the feasibility of the calculations. Examples of such calculations for the proton system of the benzene ring in a general orientation are provided. It is also shown that, because of the intrinsic symmetries of the evenfold rotors, many of the DQR processes, which such rotors can undergo, are unobservable in NMR spectra. PMID:20059076

  10. Constraining the Symmetry Energy:. a Journey in the Isospin Physics from Coulomb Barrier to Deconfinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, M.; Colonna, M.; Greco, V.; Ferini, G.; Rizzo, C.; Rizzo, J.; Baran, V.; Gaitanos, T.; Prassa, V.; Wolter, H. H.; Zielinska-Pfabe, M.

    Heavy Ion Collisions (HIC) represent a unique tool to probe the in-medium nuclear interaction in regions away from saturation. In this work we present a selection of reaction observables in dissipative collisions particularly sensitive to the isovector part of the interaction, i.e.to the symmetry term of the nuclear Equation of State (EoS). At low energies the behavior of the symmetry energy around saturation influences dissipation and fragment production mechanisms. We will first discuss the recently observed Dynamical Dipole Radiation, due to a collective neutron-proton oscillation during the charge equilibration in fusion and deep-inelastic collisions. Important Iso - EOS are stressed. Reactions induced by unstable 132Sn beams appear to be very promising tools to test the sub-saturation Isovector EoS. New Isospin sensitive observables are also presented for deep-inelastic, fragmentation collisions and Isospin equilibration measurements (Imbalance Ratios). The high density symmetry term can be derived from isospin effects on heavy ion reactions at relativistic energies (few AGeV range), that can even allow a "direct" study of the covariant structure of the isovector interaction in the hadron medium. Rather sensitive observables are proposed from collective flows and from pion/kaon production. The possibility of the transition to a mixed hadron-quark phase, at high baryon and isospin density, is finally suggested. Some signatures could come from an expected "neutron trapping" effect. The importance of studying violent collisions with radioactive beams from low to relativistic energies is finally stressed.

  11. Control of barrier island shape by inlet sediment bypassing: East Frisian Islands, West Germany

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    FitzGerald, D.M.; Penland, S.; Nummedal, D.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the East Frisian Islands has shown that the plan form of these islands can be explained by processes of inlet sediment bypassing. This island chain is located on a high wave energy, high tide range shoreline where the average deep-water significant wave height exceeds 1.0 m and the spring tidal range varies from 2.7 m at Juist to 2.9 m at Wangerooge. An abundant sediment supply and a strong eastward component of wave power (4.4 ?? 103 W m-1) have caused a persistent eastward growth of the barrier islands. The eastward extension of the barriers has been accommodated more by inlet narrowing, than by inlet migration. It is estimated from morphological evidence that a minimum of 2.7 ?? 105 m3 of sand is delivered to the inlets each year via the easterly longshore transport system. Much of this sand ultimately bypasses the inlets in the form of large, migrating swash bars. The location where the swash bars attach to the beach is controlled by the amount of overlap of the ebb-tidal delta along the downdrift inlet shoreline. The configuration of the ebbtidal delta, in turn, is a function of inlet size and position of the main ebb channel. The swash bar welding process has caused preferential beach nourishment and historical shoreline progradation. Along the East Frisian Islands this process has produced barrier islands with humpbacked, bulbous updrift and bulbous downdrift shapes. The model of barrier island development presented in this paper not only explains well the configuration of the German barriers but also the morphology of barriers along many other mixed energy coasts. ?? 1984.

  12. Measurement of the electron density in a subatmospheric dielectric barrier discharge by spectral line shape

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Lifang; Qi Yuyan; Liu Weiyuan; Fan Weili

    2009-07-01

    The electron density in a subatmospheric dielectric barrier discharge by using argon spectral line shape is measured for the first time. With the gas pressure increasing in the range of 1x10{sup 4} Pa-6x10{sup 4} Pa, the line profiles of argon 696.54 nm are measured. An asymmetrical deconvolution procedure is applied to separate the Gaussian and Lorentzian profile from the measured spectral line. The gas temperature is estimated by using rotational temperature of N{sub 2}{sup +}. By subtracting the van der Waals broadening and partial Lorentzian instrumental broadening from the Lorentzian broadening, the Stark broadening is obtained and used to estimate the electron density. It is found that the electron density in dielectric barrier discharge increases with the increase in gas pressure.

  13. Fission barriers and half-lives of actinides in the quasimolecular shape valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, G.; Jaffré, M.; Moreau, D.

    2012-10-01

    The energy of actinide nuclei in the fusionlike deformation valley has been determined from a liquid-drop model, taking into account the proximity energy, the mass and charge asymmetries, and the shell and pairing energies. Double-humped potential barriers appear. The saddle point corresponds to the second maximum and to the transition from compact one-body shapes with a deep neck to two touching ellipsoids. The scission point, where the effects of the nuclear attractive forces between the fragments vanish, lies at the end of an energy plateau below the saddle point and corresponds to two well-separated fragments. The kinetic and excitation energies of the fragments come from the energy on this plateau. The shell and pairing effects play a main role to decide the most probable decay path. The heights of the potential barriers roughly agree with the experimental data and the calculated half-lives follow the trend of the experimental values. A shallow third minimum and a third peak appear in specific asymmetric exit channels where one fragment is close to a double magic quasispherical nucleus, while the other one evolves from oblate to prolate shapes.

  14. Experimental investigation of Lissajous figure shapes in planar and surface dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biganzoli, I.; Barni, R.; Gurioli, A.; Pertile, R.; Riccardi, C.

    2014-11-01

    Dielectric Barrier Discharges (DBDs) operating in air at atmospheric pressure are widely employed as cold plasma sources for plasma processing and applications, in both volume and surface configurations. Surface dielectric barrier discharges, however, are mainly known for the manipulation of the boundary layer of an airflow surrounding a body, and thus for aeronautical applications. Lissajous figures, obtained by means of a high-voltage and a capacitive probes, are usually adopted for both these types of DBDs as a method for measuring the power consumption by the discharge. In this work, we propose to integrate this diagnostic tool with the measurement of current pulses, which are associated to microdischarges that usually develop in these plasmas because of the presence of the dielectric barrier. We have studied both planar and surface DBDs in presence of a continuous sinusoidal voltage feeding, and we have demonstrated that this method is promising in order to gain additional information about the discharge characteristics from the shape of the Lissajous figures.

  15. Simulation of NMR powder line shapes of quadrupolar nuclei with half-integer spin at low-symmetry sites

    SciTech Connect

    Power, W.P.; Wasylishen, R.E. ); Mooibroek, S. Ltd., Milton, Ontario ); Pettitt, B.A.; Danchura, W. )

    1990-01-25

    At crystallographic sites of low symmetry it is possible for the interactions governing the NMR powder line shape of half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei to have different orientation dependences. In such cases, it is found that the NMR line shape is sensitive to the relative orientation of the quadrupolar (Q) and chemical shielding (CS) tensors. An analysis of the {sup 133}Cs NMR powder pattern of cesium chromate illustrates the importance of considering such orientation effects. For systems where second-order quadrupolar interactions influence the central (m{sub I} = 1/2 {leftrightarrow} 1/2) transition, the line shape arising from this transition also depends critically on the relative orientation of the Q and CS tensors. It is anticipated that such effects will be important for pin n/2 nuclei (n = 3,5,7, or 9) with large chemical shift ranges and quadrupole moments larger than that of {sup 133}Cs (e.g., {sup 17}O, {sup 51}V, {sup 59}Co, and {sup 63}Cu).

  16. Shape invariance symmetries for quantum states of the superpotentials Atanh ωy+ B/ A and - Acot ωθ+ Bcsc ωθ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, H.

    2004-04-01

    Using shape invariance symmetries with respect to two different parameters n and m, we derive the general forms of the partner Hamiltonians for the superpotentials Atanh ωy+ B/ A and - Acot ωθ+ Bcsc ωθ, respectively. For the first model in a special case and the second model in the general case, the parameters m and n play the role of the quantization numbers for the spectrum and quantum states as finite and infinite ones, respectively. We also get a type of the shape invariance symmetry which is realized by the operators shifting only m and only n, respectively, for two models. Furthermore, for the models, other shape invariance symmetries based on the operators shifting the indices n and m of quantum states simultaneously and inversely as well as simultaneously and agreeably are derived.

  17. Influence of cell shape, inhomogeneities and diffusion barriers in cell polarization models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Wolfgang; Eigel, Martin; Westerheide, Sebastian; Engwer, Christian; Klipp, Edda

    2015-12-01

    In silico experiments bear the potential for further understanding of biological transport processes by allowing a systematic modification of any spatial property and providing immediate simulation results. Cell polarization and spatial reorganization of membrane proteins are fundamental for cell division, chemotaxis and morphogenesis. We chose the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an exemplary model system which entails the shuttling of small Rho GTPases such as Cdc42 and Rho, between an active membrane-bound form and an inactive cytosolic form. We used partial differential equations to describe the membrane-cytosol shuttling of proteins. In this study, a consistent extension of a class of 1D reaction-diffusion systems into higher space dimensions is suggested. The membrane is modeled as a thin layer to allow for lateral diffusion and the cytosol is modeled as an enclosed volume. Two well-known polarization mechanisms were considered. One shows the classical Turing-instability patterns, the other exhibits wave-pinning dynamics. For both models, we investigated how cell shape and diffusion barriers like septin structures or bud scars influence the formation of signaling molecule clusters and subsequent polarization. An extensive set of in silico experiments with different modeling hypotheses illustrated the dependence of cell polarization models on local membrane curvature, cell size and inhomogeneities on the membrane and in the cytosol. In particular, the results of our computer simulations suggested that for both mechanisms, local diffusion barriers on the membrane facilitate Rho GTPase aggregation, while diffusion barriers in the cytosol and cell protrusions limit spontaneous molecule aggregations of active Rho GTPase locally.

  18. The experimental determination of the torsional barrier and shape for disilane.

    PubMed

    Moazzen-Ahmadi, N; Horneman, V-M

    2006-05-21

    The torsional spectrum of disilane was recorded for the first time under high-pressure-pathlength conditions and at a spectral resolution of 0.007 cm(-1) using a Bruker IFS-120 HR Fourier transform spectrometer. The spectrum shows six distinct Q branches. The most prominent Q branch is near 130 cm(-1) which is a blend of four components of the torsional fundamental. Of the remaining five, four were assigned to the first torsional hot band (v(4)=2<--1) and one to the second torsional hot band (v(4)=3<--2). Over 350 transitions were identified. An analysis of the torsional fundamental, the first torsional hot band, and the lower state combination differences from frequencies of the vibrational bands nu(9) and nu(9)+nu(4)-nu(4) was made to characterize the torsion-rotation Hamiltonian in the ground vibrational state. The barrier height, barrier shape, and the rotational constant about the Si-Si bond were determined to be 404.344(83) cm(-1), 2.255(65) cm(-1), and 43208(28) MHz, respectively. Comparison of simulated and the experimental spectra yielded (mu||-mu(perpendicular))/mu(perpendicular)= -4(1) for the torsional dipole moments. This ratio compares well with -3.39(6) for ethane. A comparison of molecular parameters obtained here is made with those for methyl silane and ethane. PMID:16729816

  19. The experimental determination of the torsional barrier and shape for disilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; Horneman, V.-M.

    2006-05-01

    The torsional spectrum of disilane was recorded for the first time under high-pressure-pathlength conditions and at a spectral resolution of 0.007cm-1 using a Bruker IFS-120 HR Fourier transform spectrometer. The spectrum shows six distinct Q branches. The most prominent Q branch is near 130cm-1 which is a blend of four components of the torsional fundamental. Of the remaining five, four were assigned to the first torsional hot band (v4=2←1) and one to the second torsional hot band (v4=3←2). Over 350 transitions were identified. An analysis of the torsional fundamental, the first torsional hot band, and the lower state combination differences from frequencies of the vibrational bands ν9 and ν9+ν4-ν4 was made to characterize the torsion-rotation Hamiltonian in the ground vibrational state. The barrier height, barrier shape, and the rotational constant about the Si-Si bond were determined to be 404.344(83)cm-1, 2.255(65)cm-1, and 43208(28)MHz, respectively. Comparison of simulated and the experimental spectra yielded (μ‖-μ⊥)/μ⊥=-4(1) for the torsional dipole moments. This ratio compares well with -3.39(6) for ethane. A comparison of molecular parameters obtained here is made with those for methyl silane and ethane.

  20. Ring-Shaped Microlanes and Chemical Barriers as a Platform for Probing Single-Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Christoph; Segerer, Felix J; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas; Rädler, Joachim O

    2016-01-01

    Quantification and discrimination of pharmaceutical and disease-related effects on cell migration requires detailed characterization of single-cell motility. In this context, micropatterned substrates that constrain cells within defined geometries facilitate quantitative readout of locomotion. Here, we study quasi-one-dimensional cell migration in ring-shaped microlanes. We observe bimodal behavior in form of alternating states of directional migration (run state) and reorientation (rest state). Both states show exponential lifetime distributions with characteristic persistence times, which, together with the cell velocity in the run state, provide a set of parameters that succinctly describe cell motion. By introducing PEGylated barriers of different widths into the lane, we extend this description by quantifying the effects of abrupt changes in substrate chemistry on migrating cells. The transit probability decreases exponentially as a function of barrier width, thus specifying a characteristic penetration depth of the leading lamellipodia. Applying this fingerprint-like characterization of cell motion, we compare different cell lines, and demonstrate that the cancer drug candidate salinomycin affects transit probability and resting time, but not run time or run velocity. Hence, the presented assay allows to assess multiple migration-related parameters, permits detailed characterization of cell motility, and has potential applications in cell biology and advanced drug screening. PMID:27242099

  1. Ring-Shaped Microlanes and Chemical Barriers as a Platform for Probing Single-Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Christoph; Segerer, Felix J.; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2016-01-01

    Quantification and discrimination of pharmaceutical and disease-related effects on cell migration requires detailed characterization of single-cell motility. In this context, micropatterned substrates that constrain cells within defined geometries facilitate quantitative readout of locomotion. Here, we study quasi-one-dimensional cell migration in ring-shaped microlanes. We observe bimodal behavior in form of alternating states of directional migration (run state) and reorientation (rest state). Both states show exponential lifetime distributions with characteristic persistence times, which, together with the cell velocity in the run state, provide a set of parameters that succinctly describe cell motion. By introducing PEGylated barriers of different widths into the lane, we extend this description by quantifying the effects of abrupt changes in substrate chemistry on migrating cells. The transit probability decreases exponentially as a function of barrier width, thus specifying a characteristic penetration depth of the leading lamellipodia. Applying this fingerprint-like characterization of cell motion, we compare different cell lines, and demonstrate that the cancer drug candidate salinomycin affects transit probability and resting time, but not run time or run velocity. Hence, the presented assay allows to assess multiple migration-related parameters, permits detailed characterization of cell motility, and has potential applications in cell biology and advanced drug screening. PMID:27242099

  2. Dendritic Domains with Hexagonal Symmetry Formed by X-Shaped Bolapolyphiles in Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Stefan; Ebert, Helgard; Lechner, Bob-Dan; Lange, Frank; Achilles, Anja; Bärenwald, Ruth; Poppe, Silvio; Blume, Alfred; Saalwächter, Kay; Tschierske, Carsten; Bacia, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    A novel class of bolapolyphile (BP) molecules are shown to integrate into phospholipid bilayers and self-assemble into unique sixfold symmetric domains of snowflake-like dendritic shapes. The BPs comprise three philicities: a lipophilic, rigid, π–π stacking core; two flexible lipophilic side chains; and two hydrophilic, hydrogen-bonding head groups. Confocal microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, XRD, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy confirm BP-rich domains with transmembrane-oriented BPs and three to four lipid molecules per BP. Both species remain well organized even above the main 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine transition. The BP molecules only dissolve in the fluid membrane above 70 °C. Structural variations of the BP demonstrate that head-group hydrogen bonding is a prerequisite for domain formation. Independent of the head group, the BPs reduce membrane corrugation. In conclusion, the BPs form nanofilaments by π stacking of aromatic cores, which reduce membrane corrugation and possibly fuse into a hexagonal network in the dendritic domains. PMID:25940233

  3. PT -symmetry-induced evolution of sharp asymmetric line shapes and high-sensitivity refractive index sensors in a three-cavity array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Ding, Chunling; Wu, Ying

    2016-02-01

    It is important to control and tune the Fano-resonance spectra to achieve a large slope with, in addition, a relatively high extinction ratio for low-power optical switching and high-sensitivity sensing. Here, we explore the evolution of sharp asymmetric Fano-like line shapes in a three-cavity array with local parity-time (PT ) symmetry. In this three-cavity configuration, a single cavity is coupled to a PT -symmetric combination of two cavities via a common waveguide. The influences of local PT symmetry on the asymmetric Fano-like line shapes are investigated by monitoring the output transmission spectra at various system parameters. It is found that both the slope and the extinction ratio within the sharp asymmetric line shapes can be significantly enhanced by introducing the PT -symmetric unit, compared with the configuration of two indirectly coupled cavities. Subsequently we discuss the application of such a PT -assisted configuration as a family of high-sensitivity refractive index sensors by numerical analysis. For practical parameters based on microring resonators, the best sensitivity of refractive index sensors is more than five orders of magnitude larger than two indirectly coupled lossy cavities. The proposed scheme can be implemented in current state-of-the-art experiments. This investigation can help us to understand the interplay between the Fano resonance and PT symmetry.

  4. Six-fold-symmetry internal rotation in toluenes: the low barrier challenge of 2,6- and 3,5-difluorotoluene.

    PubMed

    Nair, K P Rajappan; Jahn, Michaela K; Lesarri, Alberto; Ilyushin, Vadim V; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2015-10-21

    Pure six-fold symmetry (V6) internal rotation poses significant challenges to experimental and theoretical determination, as the very low torsional barriers result in huge tunneling splittings difficult to identify and to model. Here we resolved the methyl group internal rotation dynamics of 2,6- and 3,5-difluorotoluene using a newly developed computer code especially adapted to V6 problems. The jet-cooled rotational spectra of the title molecules in the 5-25 GHz region revealed internal rotation tunneling doublings of up to 3.6 GHz, which translated in methyl group potential barriers of V6 = 0.14872(24) and 0.0856(10) kJ mol(-1), respectively, in the vibrational ground-state. Additional information on Stark effects and carbon isotopic species in natural abundance provided structural data and the electric dipole moments for both molecules. Ab initio calculations at the MP2 level do not reproduce the tiny torsional barriers, calling for experiments on other systems and additional theoretical models. PMID:26393883

  5. Dragging Maintaining Symmetry: Can It Generate the Concept of Inclusivity as well as a Family of Shapes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsythe, Susan K.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a project using Design Based Research methodology to ascertain whether a pedagogical task based on a dynamic figure designed in a Dynamic Geometry Software (DGS) program could be instrumental in developing students' geometrical reasoning. A dragging strategy which I have named "Dragging Maintaining Symmetry" (DMS)…

  6. Dynamics of finite-symmetry and general-shaped objects under shear and shear alignment of uniaxial objects at finite temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peilong

    2013-12-01

    We prove that, for an object with a finitefold rotational symmetry (except for a twofold one) around an axis and mirror symmetries (such as a square rod or pentagonal slab, etc.), dynamics of the symmetry axis in low Reynolds number shear flow exactly follows the same form as that of a uniaxial object (e.g., a circular rod or symmetric ellipsoid) as the so-called Jeffery orbits. We use the formulation in which the dynamics of the rigid body follows first-order ordinary differential equations in time [Phys. Rev. E 84, 056309 (2011)]. Interaction between the object and the shear flow enters through a set of scalar coefficients, and the flow field does not need to be solved dynamically. Results of numerical simulations for general-shaped objects also are discussed. In the second part, Brownian dynamics of a uniaxial object is studied numerically. With D as the rotational diffusion constant, α as a parameter characterizing the aspect ratio, and γ as the shear rate, the object starts to align with the flow when the value of D/(γα) decreases near 1. At large α (the long object limit), the results suggest much lower flow alignment when D/(γα)>1. PMID:24483556

  7. Symmetry-Breaking in Cationic Polymethine Dyes: Part 2. Shape of Electronic Absorption Bands Explained by the Thermal Fluctuations of the Solvent Reaction Field.

    PubMed

    Masunov, Artëm E; Anderson, Dane; Freidzon, Alexandra Ya; Bagaturyants, Alexander A

    2015-07-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of the symmetric cyanines exhibit dramatic dependence on the conjugated chain length: whereas short-chain homologues are characterized by the narrow and sharp absorption bands of high intensity, the long-chain homologues demonstrate very broad, structureless bands of low intensity. Spectra of the intermediate homologues combine both features. These broad bands are often explained using spontaneous symmetry-breaking and charge localization at one of the termini, and the combination of broad and sharp features was interpreted as coexistence of symmetric and asymmetric species in solution. These explanations were not supported by the first principle simulations until now. Here, we employ a combination of time-dependent density functional theory, a polarizable continuum model, and Franck-Condon (FC) approximation to predict the absorption line shapes for the series of 2-azaazulene and 1-methylpyridine-4-substituted polymethine dyes. To simulate inhomogeneous broadening by the solvent, the molecular structures are optimized in the presence of a finite electric field of various strengths. The calculated FC line shapes, averaged with the Boltzmann weights of different field strengths, reproduce the experimentally observed spectra closely. Although the polarizable continuum model accounts for the equilibrium solvent reaction field at absolute zero, the finite field accounts for the thermal fluctuations in the solvent, which break the symmetry of the solute molecule. This model of inhomogeneous broadening opens the possibility for computational studies of thermochromism. The choice of the global hybrid exchange-correlation functional SOGGA11-X, including 40% of the exact exchange, plays the critical role in the success of our model. PMID:26087319

  8. Spontaneous versus induced hydrogen and deuterium helical shaped plasmas with electron internal transport barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbin, M.; Franz, P.; Auriemma, F.; Lorenzini, R.; Marrelli, L.

    2015-09-01

    Electron internal transport barriers (eITBs) in high current plasmas with helical equilibria of the reversed field pinch experiment RFX-mod are analyzed and characterized in detail thanks to a high time resolution double filter diagnostic for the electron temperature spatial profile determination. The large amount of data provided by this diagnostic has required the development of dedicated algorithms and the identification of suitable parameters, reported and described in this paper, in order to perform automatic statistical studies. These numerical tools have been used to examine the effect of three dimensional (3D) magnetic fields applied by the RFX-mod 192 active coils in deuterium and hydrogen discharges with the aim to improve the sustainment and control of helical equilibria with eITBs. It is shown that 3D fields partially increase the occurring of helical states but with only a moderate effect on the eITBs duration; moreover, they have a different impact on the confinement properties in hydrogen and deuterium discharges. Numerical simulations, by the Hamiltonian guiding center code ORBIT, investigate the effect of magnetic topology in plasmas with and without the application of 3D fields on deuterium and hydrogen test ions transport. Results from numerical studies are in agreement with estimates of the particle confinement times showing that particle transport is reduced in deuterium plasmas but not significantly affected by the application of helical boundary conditions.

  9. Geometry Shapes Propagation: Assessing the Presence and Absence of Cortical Symmetries through a Computational Model of Cortical Spreading Depression

    PubMed Central

    Kroos, Julia M.; Diez, Ibai; Cortes, Jesus M.; Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Gerardo-Giorda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD), a depolarization wave which originates in the visual cortex and travels toward the frontal lobe, has been suggested to be one neural correlate of aura migraine. To the date, little is known about the mechanisms which can trigger or stop aura migraine. Here, to shed some light on this problem and, under the hypothesis that CSD might mediate aura migraine, we aim to study different aspects favoring or disfavoring the propagation of CSD. In particular, by using a computational neuronal model distributed throughout a realistic cortical mesh, we study the role that the geometry has in shaping CSD. Our results are two-fold: first, we found significant differences in the propagation traveling patterns of CSD, both intra and inter-hemispherically, revealing important asymmetries in the propagation profile. Second, we developed methods able to identify brain regions featuring a peculiar behavior during CSD propagation. Our study reveals dynamical aspects of CSD, which, if applied to subject-specific cortical geometry, might shed some light on how to differentiate between healthy subjects and those suffering migraine. PMID:26869913

  10. Geometry Shapes Propagation: Assessing the Presence and Absence of Cortical Symmetries through a Computational Model of Cortical Spreading Depression.

    PubMed

    Kroos, Julia M; Diez, Ibai; Cortes, Jesus M; Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Gerardo-Giorda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD), a depolarization wave which originates in the visual cortex and travels toward the frontal lobe, has been suggested to be one neural correlate of aura migraine. To the date, little is known about the mechanisms which can trigger or stop aura migraine. Here, to shed some light on this problem and, under the hypothesis that CSD might mediate aura migraine, we aim to study different aspects favoring or disfavoring the propagation of CSD. In particular, by using a computational neuronal model distributed throughout a realistic cortical mesh, we study the role that the geometry has in shaping CSD. Our results are two-fold: first, we found significant differences in the propagation traveling patterns of CSD, both intra and inter-hemispherically, revealing important asymmetries in the propagation profile. Second, we developed methods able to identify brain regions featuring a peculiar behavior during CSD propagation. Our study reveals dynamical aspects of CSD, which, if applied to subject-specific cortical geometry, might shed some light on how to differentiate between healthy subjects and those suffering migraine. PMID:26869913

  11. [The morphological features of stab-and-slash skin wounds inflicted by the blades with differently shaped tips through the multilayer barrier].

    PubMed

    Sarkisian, B A; Fedorov, S Iu

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the shape, size, and morphological features of stab-and-slash skin wounds inflicted by the blades with differently shaped tips taking into consideration the direction of stab through multiple garments (1, 2, and 3 layers). The injuries were inflicted by kitchen knives having the blades of practically identical length and width but differently shaped tips. A total of 480 skin wounds and 720 damaged cloth specimens were available for the examination. The analysis of the data obtained revealed differences between morphological features of the skin wounds. Injuries to the skin unprotected by the cloths had different shape and length of the edge and end portions depending on the shape of the blade tip and the direction of the stab. The length of all wound inflicted through the barrier decreased as the number of layers increased. The wounds had the linear shape, their contusion collar and flattened area became narrower; the shape of the back edges of the wounds inflicted through a three-layer barrier altered. It is concluded that the result of the present study may be useful for the improvement of diagnostics of stab-and-slash skin wounds. PMID:25269167

  12. Understanding and Shaping the Morphology of the Barrier Layer of Supported Porous Anodized Alumina on Gold Underlayers.

    PubMed

    Berger, Nele; Es-Souni, Mohammed

    2016-07-12

    Large-area ordered nanorod (NR) arrays of various functional materials can be easily and cost-effectively processed using on-substrate anodized porous aluminum oxide (PAO) films as templates. However, reproducibility in the processing of PAO films is still an issue because they are prone to delamination, and control of fabrication parameters such as electrolyte type and concentration and anodizing time is critical for making robust templates and subsequently mechanically reliable NR arrays. In the present work, we systematically investigate the effects of the fabrication parameters on pore base morphology, devise a method to avoid delamination, and control void formation under the barrier layer of PAO films on gold underlayers. Via systematic control of the anodization parameters, particularly the anodization current density and time, we follow the different stages of void development and discuss their formation mechanisms. The practical aspect of this work demonstrates how void size can be controlled and how void formation can be utilized to control the shape of NR bases for improving the mechanical stability of the NRs. PMID:27315420

  13. Bulk Crystallization in a SiO2/Al2O3/Y2O3/AlF3/B2O3/Na2O Glass: Fivefold Pseudo Symmetry due to Monoclinic Growth in a Glassy Matrix Containing Growth Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Seyring, Martin; Patzig, Christian; Höche, Thomas; Keshavarzi, Ashkan; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A glass with the mol% composition 17 Y2O3·33 Al2O3·40 SiO2·2 AlF3·3 Na2O·2 CeF3·3 B2O3 is heat treated at 1000 °C for 6–24 h. This results in the surface nucleation and growth of YAG. Nucleation and growth of star-shaped alumina and later of monoclinic β-Y2Si2O7 and orthorhombic δ-Y2Si2O7 are additionally observed in the bulk. Phase identification and localization are performed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) as well as TEM analysis. The monoclinic β-Y2Si2O7 observed in the bulk occurs in the form of large, crystal agglomerates which range from 50 to 120 μm in size. The individual crystals are aligned along the c-axis which is the fastest growing axis. Ten probability maxima are observed in the pole-figures illustrating the rotation of orientations around the c-axes indicating a fivefold symmetry. This symmetry is caused by multiple twinning which results in a high probability of specific orientation relationships with rotation angles of ~36°, ~108° (also referred to as the pentagon angle) and ~144° around the c-axis. All these rotation angles are close to the multiples of 36° which are required for an ideal fivefold symmetry. This is the first report of a fivefold symmetry triggered by the presence of barriers hindering crystal growth. PMID:26813152

  14. Bulk Crystallization in a SiO2/Al2O3/Y2O3/AlF3/B2O3/Na2O Glass: Fivefold Pseudo Symmetry due to Monoclinic Growth in a Glassy Matrix Containing Growth Barriers.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Seyring, Martin; Patzig, Christian; Höche, Thomas; Keshavarzi, Ashkan; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A glass with the mol% composition 17 Y2O3·33 Al2O3·40 SiO2·2 AlF3·3 Na2O·2 CeF3·3 B2O3 is heat treated at 1000 °C for 6-24 h. This results in the surface nucleation and growth of YAG. Nucleation and growth of star-shaped alumina and later of monoclinic β-Y2Si2O7 and orthorhombic δ-Y2Si2O7 are additionally observed in the bulk. Phase identification and localization are performed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) as well as TEM analysis. The monoclinic β-Y2Si2O7 observed in the bulk occurs in the form of large, crystal agglomerates which range from 50 to 120 μm in size. The individual crystals are aligned along the c-axis which is the fastest growing axis. Ten probability maxima are observed in the pole-figures illustrating the rotation of orientations around the c-axes indicating a fivefold symmetry. This symmetry is caused by multiple twinning which results in a high probability of specific orientation relationships with rotation angles of ~36°, ~108° (also referred to as the pentagon angle) and ~144° around the c-axis. All these rotation angles are close to the multiples of 36° which are required for an ideal fivefold symmetry. This is the first report of a fivefold symmetry triggered by the presence of barriers hindering crystal growth. PMID:26813152

  15. Bulk Crystallization in a SiO2/Al2O3/Y2O3/AlF3/B2O3/Na2O Glass: Fivefold Pseudo Symmetry due to Monoclinic Growth in a Glassy Matrix Containing Growth Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Seyring, Martin; Patzig, Christian; Höche, Thomas; Keshavarzi, Ashkan; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A glass with the mol% composition 17 Y2O3·33 Al2O3·40 SiO2·2 AlF3·3 Na2O·2 CeF3·3 B2O3 is heat treated at 1000 °C for 6-24 h. This results in the surface nucleation and growth of YAG. Nucleation and growth of star-shaped alumina and later of monoclinic β-Y2Si2O7 and orthorhombic δ-Y2Si2O7 are additionally observed in the bulk. Phase identification and localization are performed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) as well as TEM analysis. The monoclinic β-Y2Si2O7 observed in the bulk occurs in the form of large, crystal agglomerates which range from 50 to 120 μm in size. The individual crystals are aligned along the c-axis which is the fastest growing axis. Ten probability maxima are observed in the pole-figures illustrating the rotation of orientations around the c-axes indicating a fivefold symmetry. This symmetry is caused by multiple twinning which results in a high probability of specific orientation relationships with rotation angles of ~36°, ~108° (also referred to as the pentagon angle) and ~144° around the c-axis. All these rotation angles are close to the multiples of 36° which are required for an ideal fivefold symmetry. This is the first report of a fivefold symmetry triggered by the presence of barriers hindering crystal growth.

  16. Saddle-shaped macrocycle distortion and symmetry decrease in cobalt (II) meso-tetraphenylporphyrin: Structure of a dichloromethane solvate and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, Cristiane Cabral; Moreira, Wania da Conceição; Martins, Tássia Joi; Cordeiro, Márcia Regina; Ellena, Javier; Guimarães, Freddy Fernandes; Martins, Felipe Terra

    2014-11-01

    Many studies about porphyrins have emerged in recent years, including studies using porphyrins as building blocks for supramolecular assemblies. Understanding new solid state forms of porphyrins and the elucidation of their structures can have remarkable benefits for nanoscience and synthetic biology. In this study, a new pseudopolymorph of cobalt (II) meso-tetraphenylporphyrin, (CoTPP), was synthesized in a known one-pot reaction, rather than using many-step conventional methods, was isolated and was characterized for the first time by low-temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction. It is a nonstoichiometric solvate assembled into dichloromethane channels. The most striking feature of this structure is the conformation adopted by the porphyrin macrocycle. In contrast to the non-solvated form of CoTPP that exhibits a ruffled core distortion and crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I-42d, this solvated form has been crystallized in the triclinic space group Pī and shows a distinct saddle-shaped macrocycle distortion. In the triclinic form, the conformation of one of the four phenyl rings is remarkably different from the others. A potential energy surface scan of the torsional angles around the bonds between this phenyl moiety and the macrocycle of CoTPP in both the non-solvated and the solvate forms demonstrates that the saddle-shaped macrocycle distortion depends on the unusual phenyl conformation. The distortion is responsible for the symmetry decrease in the channel solvate form, causing a loss of the 4-fold rotoinversion axis observed in the non-solvated tetragonal phase, which has identical phenyl conformations.

  17. Host-Specific Interactions with Environmental Factors Shape the Distribution of Symbiodinium across the Great Barrier Reef

    PubMed Central

    Tonk, Linda; Sampayo, Eugenia M.; Weeks, Scarla; Magno-Canto, Marites; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2013-01-01

    Background The endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium) within coral reef invertebrates are critical to the survival of the holobiont. The genetic variability of Symbiodinium may contribute to the tolerance of the symbiotic association to elevated sea surface temperatures (SST). To assess the importance of factors such as the local environment, host identity and biogeography in driving Symbiodinium distributions on reef-wide scales, data from studies on reef invertebrate-Symbiodinium associations from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) were compiled. Methodology/Principal Findings The resulting database consisted of 3717 entries from 26 studies. It was used to explore ecological patterns such as host-specificity and environmental drivers structuring community complexity using a multi-scalar approach. The data was analyzed in several ways: (i) frequently sampled host species were analyzed independently to investigate the influence of the environment on symbiont distributions, thereby excluding the influence of host specificity, (ii) host species distributions across sites were added as an environmental variable to determine the contribution of host identity on symbiont distribution, and (iii) data were pooled based on clade (broad genetic groups dividing the genus Symbiodinium) to investigate factors driving Symbiodinium distributions using lower taxonomic resolution. The results indicated that host species identity plays a dominant role in determining the distribution of Symbiodinium and environmental variables shape distributions on a host species-specific level. SST derived variables (especially SSTstdev) most often contributed to the selection of the best model. Clade level comparisons decreased the power of the predictive model indicating that it fails to incorporate the main drivers behind Symbiodinium distributions. Conclusions/Significance Including the influence of different host species on Symbiodinium distributional patterns improves our understanding

  18. Chiral symmetry in rotating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Sham S.

    2015-08-01

    The triaxial rotating system at critical angular momentum I ≥Iband exhibits two enatiomeric (the left- and right-handed) forms. These enatiomers are related to each other through dynamical chiral symmetry. The chiral symmetry in rotating system is defined by an operator χ ˆ =Rˆy (π) T ˆ, which involves the product of two distinct symmetries, namely, continuous and discrete. Therefore, new guidelines are required for testing its commutation with the system Hamiltonian. One of the primary objectives of this study is to lay down these guidelines. Further, the possible impact of chiral symmetry on the geometrical arrangement of angular momentum vectors and investigation of observables unique to nuclear chiral-twins is carried out. In our model, the angular momentum components (J1, J2, J3) occupy three mutually perpendicular axes of triaxial shape and represent a non-planar configuration. At certain threshold energy, the equation of motion in angular momentum develops a second order phase transition and as a result two distinct frames (i.e., the left- and right-handed) are formed. These left- and right-handed states correspond to a double well system and are related to each other through chiral operator. At this critical angular momentum, the centrifugal and Coriolis interactions lower the barrier in the double well system. The tunneling through the double well starts, which subsequently lifts the degeneracy among the rotational states. A detailed analysis of the behavior of rotational energies, spin-staggering, and the electromagnetic transition probabilities of the resulting twin-rotational bands is presented. The ensuing model results exhibit similarities with many observed features of the chiral-twins. An advantage of our formalism is that it is quite simple and it allows us to pinpoint the understanding of physical phenomenon which lead to chiral-twins in rotating systems.

  19. Effect of annealing and applied bias on barrier shape in CoFe/MgO/CoFe tunnel junctions.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Chiaramonti, A. N.; Schreiber, D. K.; Yang, H.; Parkin, S. S. P.; Heinonen, O. G.; Petford-Long, A. K.

    2011-04-12

    Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron holography were used to study changes in the MgO tunnel barrier of CoFe/MgO/CoFe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) as a function of annealing and in situ applied electrical bias. Annealing was found to increase the homogeneity and crystallinity of the MgO tunnel barrier. Cobalt, oxygen, and trace amounts of iron diffused into the MgO upon annealing. Annealing also resulted in a reduction of the tunneling barrier height, and decreased the resistance of the annealed MTJ relative to that of the as-grown sample. In situ off-axis electron holography was employed to image the barrier potential profile of a MTJ directly, with the specimen under electrical bias. Varying the bias voltage from -1.5 to +1.5 V was found to change the asymmetry of the barrier potential and decrease the effective barrier width as a result of charge accumulation at the MgO-CoFe interface.

  20. Improvement of carrier injection symmetry and quantum efficiency in InGaN light-emitting diodes with Mg delta-doped barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Can, N.; Hafiz, S.; Monavarian, M.; Das, S.; Avrutin, V.; Özgür, Ü. Morkoç, H.

    2015-05-04

    The effect of δ-doping of In{sub 0.06}Ga{sub 0.94}N barriers with Mg on the quantum efficiency of blue light-emitting-diodes (LEDs) with active regions composed of 6 (hex) 3-nm In{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}N is investigated. Compared to the reference sample, δ-doping of the first barrier on the n-side of the LED structure improves the peak external quantum efficiency (EQE) by 20%, owing to the increased hole concentration in the wells adjacent to the n-side, as confirmed by numerical simulations of carrier distributions across the active region. Doping the second barrier, in addition to the first one, did not further enhance the EQE, which likely indicates compensation of improved hole injection by degradation of the active region quality due to Mg doping. Both LEDs with Mg δ-doped barriers effectively suppress the drop of efficiency at high injection when compared to the reference sample, and the onset of EQE peak roll-off shifts from ∼80 A/cm{sup 2} in the reference LED to ∼120 A/cm{sup 2} in the LEDs with Mg δ-doped barriers.

  1. Symmetry matters.

    PubMed

    Moubayidin, Laila; Østergaard, Lars

    2015-09-01

    985 I. 985 II. 986 III. 987 IV. 988 V. 989 989 References 989 SUMMARY: The development of multicellular organisms depends on correct establishment of symmetry both at the whole-body scale and within individual tissues and organs. Setting up planes of symmetry must rely on communication between cells that are located at a distance from each other within the organism, presumably via mobile morphogenic signals. Although symmetry in nature has fascinated scientists for centuries, it is only now that molecular data to unravel mechanisms of symmetry establishment are beginning to emerge. As an example we describe the genetic and hormonal interactions leading to an unusual bilateral-to-radial symmetry transition of an organ in order to promote reproduction. PMID:26086581

  2. Transient change in the shape of premixed burner flame with the superposition of pulsed dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaima, Kazunori; Sasaki, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the transient phenomena in a premixed burner flame with the superposition of a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The length of the flame was shortened by the superposition of DBD, indicating the activation of combustion chemical reactions with the help of the plasma. In addition, we observed the modulation of the top position of the unburned gas region and the formations of local minimums in the axial distribution of the optical emission intensity of OH. These experimental results reveal the oscillation of the rates of combustion chemical reactions as a response to the activation by pulsed DBD. The cycle of the oscillation was 0.18–0.2 ms, which could be understood as the eigenfrequency of the plasma-assisted combustion reaction system.

  3. Latitudinal Environmental Niches and Riverine Barriers Shaped the Phylogeography of the Central Chilean Endemic Dioscorea humilis (Dioscoreaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Viruel, Juan; Catalán, Pilar; Segarra-Moragues, José Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Pleistocene glaciations and geographical barriers on the phylogeographic patterns of lowland plant species in Mediterranean-climate areas of Central Chile are poorly understood. We used Dioscorea humilis (Dioscoreaceae), a dioecious geophyte extending 530 km from the Valparaíso to the Bío-Bío Regions, as a case study to disentangle the spatio-temporal evolution of populations in conjunction with latitudinal environmental changes since the Last Inter-Glacial (LIG) to the present. We used nuclear microsatellite loci, chloroplast (cpDNA) sequences and environmental niche modelling (ENM) to construct current and past scenarios from bioclimatic and geographical variables and to infer the evolutionary history of the taxa. We found strong genetic differentiation at nuclear microsatellite loci between the two subspecies of D. humilis, probably predating the LIG. Bayesian analyses of population structure revealed strong genetic differentiation of the widespread D. humilis subsp. humilis into northern and southern population groups, separated by the Maipo river. ENM revealed that the ecological niche differentiation of both groups have been maintained up to present times although their respective geographical distributions apparently fluctuated in concert with the climatic oscillations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the Holocene. Genetic data revealed signatures of eastern and western postglacial expansion of the northern populations from the central Chilean depression, whereas the southern ones experienced a rapid southward expansion after the LGM. This study describes the complex evolutionary histories of lowland Mediterranean Chilean plants mediated by the summed effects of spatial isolation caused by riverine geographical barriers and the climatic changes of the Quaternary. PMID:25295517

  4. Multidimensionally constrained covariant density functional theories—nuclear shapes and potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2016-06-01

    The intrinsic nuclear shapes deviating from a sphere not only manifest themselves in nuclear collective states but also play important roles in determining nuclear potential energy surfaces (PES’s) and fission barriers. In order to describe microscopically and self-consistently nuclear shapes and PES’s with as many shape degrees of freedom as possible included, we developed multidimensionally constrained covariant density functional theories (MDC-CDFTs). In MDC-CDFTs, the axial symmetry and the reflection symmetry are both broken and all deformations characterized by {β }λ μ with even μ are considered. We have used the MDC-CDFTs to study PES’s and fission barriers of actinides, the non-axial octupole Y 32 correlations in N = 150 isotones and shapes of hypernuclei. In this Review we will give briefly the formalism of MDC-CDFTs and present the applications to normal nuclei.

  5. Numerical investigation of the effect of driving voltage pulse shapes on the characteristics of low-pressure argon dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Eslami, E. Barjasteh, A.; Morshedian, N.

    2015-06-15

    In this work, we numerically compare the effect of a sinusoidal, triangular, and rectangular pulsed voltage profile on the calculated particle production, electric current, and gas voltage in a dielectric barrier discharge. The total argon gas pressure of 400 Pa, the distance between dielectrics of 5 mm, the dielectric thickness of 0.7 mm, and the temperature of T = 300 K were considered as input parameters. The different driving voltage pulse shapes (triangular, rectangular, and sinusoidal) are considered as applied voltage with a frequency of 7 kHz and an amplitude of 700 V peak to peak. It is shown that applying a rectangular voltage, as compared with a sinusoidal or triangle voltage, increases the current peak, while the peak width is decreased. Higher current density is related to high production of charged particles, which leads to the generation of some highly active species, such as Ar* (4s level), and Ar** (4p level) in the gap.

  6. Uranium and manganese assembled in a wheel-shaped nanoscale single-molecule magnet with high spin-reversal barrier.

    PubMed

    Mougel, Victor; Chatelain, Lucile; Pécaut, Jacques; Caciuffo, Roberto; Colineau, Eric; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2012-12-01

    Discrete molecular compounds that exhibit both magnetization hysteresis and slow magnetic relaxation below a characteristic 'blocking' temperature are known as single-molecule magnets. These are promising for applications including memory devices and quantum computing, but require higher spin-inversion barriers and hysteresis temperatures than currently achieved. After twenty years of research confined to the d-block transition metals, scientists are moving to the f-block to generate these properties. We have now prepared, by cation-promoted self-assembly, a large 5f-3d U(12)Mn(6) cluster that adopts a wheel topology and exhibits single-molecule magnet behaviour. This uranium-based molecular wheel shows an open magnetic hysteresis loop at low temperature, with a non-zero coercive field (below 4 K) and quantum tunnelling steps (below 2.5 K), which suggests that uranium might indeed provide a route to magnetic storage devices. This molecule also represents an interesting model for actinide nanoparticles occurring in the environment and in spent fuel separation cycles. PMID:23174981

  7. Uranium and manganese assembled in a wheel-shaped nanoscale single-molecule magnet with high spin-reversal barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougel, Victor; Chatelain, Lucile; Pécaut, Jacques; Caciuffo, Roberto; Colineau, Eric; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2012-12-01

    Discrete molecular compounds that exhibit both magnetization hysteresis and slow magnetic relaxation below a characteristic ‘blocking’ temperature are known as single-molecule magnets. These are promising for applications including memory devices and quantum computing, but require higher spin-inversion barriers and hysteresis temperatures than currently achieved. After twenty years of research confined to the d- block transition metals, scientists are moving to the f-block to generate these properties. We have now prepared, by cation-promoted self-assembly, a large 5f-3d U12Mn6 cluster that adopts a wheel topology and exhibits single-molecule magnet behaviour. This uranium-based molecular wheel shows an open magnetic hysteresis loop at low temperature, with a non-zero coercive field (below 4 K) and quantum tunnelling steps (below 2.5 K), which suggests that uranium might indeed provide a route to magnetic storage devices. This molecule also represents an interesting model for actinide nanoparticles occurring in the environment and in spent fuel separation cycles.

  8. Geographic variation in skull shape of the water rat Scapteromys tumidus (Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae): isolation-by-distance plus environmental and geographic barrier effects?

    PubMed

    Quintela, Fernando M; Fornel, Rodrigo; Freitas, Thales R O

    2016-01-01

    The geographic variation in skull size and shape of the swamp rat Scapteromys tumidus was examined in samples from eight geographic clusters in almost of its distribution in southern Brazil and Uruguay. For analysis we used two-dimensional geometric morphometric methods for dorsal, ventral and lateral views of the skull. The geometric descriptors showed no significant differences in skull size between geographic clusters, while differences in shape were highly significant. We found a significant and moderate correlation between geographic and morphological distances, corroborating the isolation-by-distance model. Samples from the Rio Grande do Sul central coastal plain were the most differentiated, segregating completely from all other samples in canonical variate analysis for the dorsal view. The most visible variable regions in skull were the zygomatic arch (mainly the squamosal root of zygomatic) and the lateral braincase borders. Once correlation between geographic and morphological distances were not strong, it is possible that other factors (environmental heterogeneity and/or geographic barriers) may are acting in S. tumidus skull differentiation. PMID:27142549

  9. Perception of Mirror Symmetry in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falter, Christine M.; Bailey, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Gestalt grouping in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is selectively impaired for certain organization principles but for not others. Symmetry is a fundamental Gestalt principle characterizing many biological shapes. Sensitivity to symmetry was tested using the Picture Symmetry Test, which requires finding symmetry lines on pictures. Individuals…

  10. Calculation of the gas temperature in a throughflow atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge torch by spectral line shape analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ionascut-Nedelcescu, A.; Carlone, C.; Kogelschatz, U.; Gravelle, D. V.; Boulos, M. I

    2008-03-15

    An analysis of spectral line profiles is used to calculate the gas temperature and to estimate the upper limit of the electron density in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge torch. Two transitions are studied, that of helium (He) at 587.5 nm and that of hydrogen (H{sub {beta}}) at 486.1 nm, both observed in the spectra of the light emitted from the gap-space region. Relevant broadening mechanisms including the Doppler and Stark effects, as well as the collision processes between an emitter and a neutral particle, are reviewed. It is deduced that the main contribution to the broadened profiles is due to collisions. Through knowledge of the van der Waals interaction potential, a general expression for determining the gas temperature is derived and applied to each transition. The results obtained from both lines are in agreement; i.e., the gas temperature is found to be 460{+-}60 K at the highest voltage applied. This value is consistent with the experimental observation that at these conditions the afterglow plasma cannot ignite paper, whose ignition temperature is 507 K. Since no signature of the Stark effect can be detected either in He or H{sub {beta}} transition, the upper limit of the electron density, estimated from the uncertainty on the H{sub {beta}} linewidth, is 4x10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}. The generality of the method allows one to determine the temperature as a function of other parameters, such as voltage and flow rate. Concerning the applied voltage, the gas temperature increases linearly from 315{+-}30 to 460{+-}60 K, as derived from both lines. Over the same voltage range, a similar behavior is found for the rotational temperature, as deduced from the first negative B({sup 2}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +},v=0){yields}X({sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +},v=0) transition of the molecular nitrogen ion. However, the temperature varies between 325{+-}30 and 533{+-}15 K, indicating an overestimation of the gas temperature. On the other hand, the gas

  11. Inherited Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attanucci, Frank J.; Losse, John

    2008-01-01

    In a first calculus course, it is not unusual for students to encounter the theorems which state: If f is an even (odd) differentiable function, then its derivative is odd (even). In our paper, we prove some theorems which show how the symmetry of a continuous function f with respect to (i) the vertical line: x = a or (ii) with respect to the…

  12. Optomechanical shape analysis using group theory.

    PubMed

    Magnes, Jenny; Kinneberg, Margo; Khakurel, Rahul; Melikechi, Noureddine

    2010-08-01

    We describe an optomechanical technique using a knife-edge, which is scanned spatially across a beam of light to identify shape-based irradiance. Symmetry groups are identified through linear and rotational scanning signatures of illuminated shapes. The scanning signature is used to classify the shape into a symmetry group. To demonstrate the shape analysis technique, we have classified basic geometric shapes, which belong to the orthogonal and dihedral symmetry groups O(2), D(2), D(3), and D(6). PMID:20676172

  13. Broken Symmetry

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    - Physics, as we know it, attempts to interpret the diverse natural phenomena as particular manifestations of general laws. This vision of a world ruled by general testable laws is relatively recent in the history of mankind. Basically it was initiated by the Galilean inertial principle. The subsequent rapid development of large-scale physics is certainly tributary to the fact that gravitational and electromagnetic forces are long-range and hence can be perceived directly without the mediation of highly sophisticated technical devices. - The discovery of subatomic structures and of the concomitant weak and strong short-range forces raised the question of how to cope with short-range forces in relativistic quantum field theory. The Fermi theory of weak interactions, formulated in terms of point-like current-current interaction, was well-defined in lowest order perturbation theory and accounted for existing experimental data.However, it was inconsistent in higher orders because of uncontrollable divergent quantum fluctuations. In technical terms, in contradistinction to quantum electrodynamics, the Fermi theorywas not ?renormalizable?. This difficulty could not be solved by smoothing the point-like interaction by a massive, and therefore short-range, charged ?vector? particle exchange: theories with massive charged vector bosons were not renormalizable either. In the early nineteen sixties, there seemed to be insuperable obstacles to formulating a consistent theory with short-range forces mediated by massive vectors. - The breakthrough came from the notion of spontaneous symmetry breaking which arose in the study of phase transitions and was introduced in field theory by Nambu in 1960. - Ferromagnets illustrate the notion in phase transitions. Although no direction is dynamically preferred, the magnetization selects a global orientation. This is a spontaneous broken symmetry(SBS)of rotational invariance. Such continuous SBS imply the existence of ?massless? modes

  14. Effect of symmetry on electronic properties of nano devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamba, Vijay Kr; Garg, O. P.; Anju, Aditi

    2015-06-01

    Nano devices are a promising candidate for new technology nowadays. Great effort has been devoted recently to understand the charge transport at the interfaces in nano junctions and the role of the symmetry in the transport properties of molecular junctions. However, these studies have been largely based on the analysis of the low-bias conductance, which does not allow elucidating the exact influence of the symmetry in both the electronic structure and transport characteristics of the interfaces. In this work we present a theoretical study of the transport properties, and how conductance changes with symmetry. Herein, we investigate a di-thiol benzene (DTB) single-molecule system in which sulphur group from the molecule are anchored to two facing gold electrodes. We have performed first principles calculations of the transport properties of these molecules using a combination of density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function techniques. Our computational results show that for the asymmetric models, the onset of the larger current occurs at current and conductance in the negative bias regime than that in the positive bias regime, and with ΔL increasing the conductance peak shifts towards the lower negative bias so that the I(G)-V curves behave more asymmetric. Further with variation of electrode surface we found that coupling constant for coned shaped electrode is less as compared to 2X2, and 3X3 atom electrodes, so there will be lower potential barrier for canonical electrode in comparison to that of others.

  15. Effect of symmetry on electronic properties of nano devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lamba, Vijay Kr Anju,; Aditi; Garg, O. P.

    2015-06-24

    Nano devices are a promising candidate for new technology nowadays. Great effort has been devoted recently to understand the charge transport at the interfaces in nano junctions and the role of the symmetry in the transport properties of molecular junctions. However, these studies have been largely based on the analysis of the low-bias conductance, which does not allow elucidating the exact influence of the symmetry in both the electronic structure and transport characteristics of the interfaces. In this work we present a theoretical study of the transport properties, and how conductance changes with symmetry. Herein, we investigate a di-thiol benzene (DTB) single-molecule system in which sulphur group from the molecule are anchored to two facing gold electrodes. We have performed first principles calculations of the transport properties of these molecules using a combination of density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green’s function techniques. Our computational results show that for the asymmetric models, the onset of the larger current occurs at current and conductance in the negative bias regime than that in the positive bias regime, and with ΔL increasing the conductance peak shifts towards the lower negative bias so that the I(G)-V curves behave more asymmetric. Further with variation of electrode surface we found that coupling constant for coned shaped electrode is less as compared to 2X2, and 3X3 atom electrodes, so there will be lower potential barrier for canonical electrode in comparison to that of others.

  16. Some symmetries in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.

    1981-09-01

    Internal and space-time symmetries are discussed in this group of lectures. The first of the lectures deals with an internal symmetry, or rather two related symmetries called charge independence and charge symmetry. The next two discuss space-time symmetries which also hold approximately, but are broken only by the weak forces; that is, these symmetries hold for both the hadronic and electromagnetic forces. (GHT)

  17. First-order quantum phase transitions: Test ground for emergent chaoticity, regularity and persisting symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, M. Leviatan, A.

    2014-12-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the emerging order and chaos and enduring symmetries, accompanying a generic (high-barrier) first-order quantum phase transition (QPT). The interacting boson model Hamiltonian employed, describes a QPT between spherical and deformed shapes, associated with its U(5) and SU(3) dynamical symmetry limits. A classical analysis of the intrinsic dynamics reveals a rich but simply-divided phase space structure with a Hénon–Heiles type of chaotic dynamics ascribed to the spherical minimum and a robustly regular dynamics ascribed to the deformed minimum. The simple pattern of mixed but well-separated dynamics persists in the coexistence region and traces the crossing of the two minima in the Landau potential. A quantum analysis discloses a number of regular low-energy U(5)-like multiplets in the spherical region, and regular SU(3)-like rotational bands extending to high energies and angular momenta, in the deformed region. These two kinds of regular subsets of states retain their identity amidst a complicated environment of other states and both occur in the coexistence region. A symmetry analysis of their wave functions shows that they are associated with partial U(5) dynamical symmetry (PDS) and SU(3) quasi-dynamical symmetry (QDS), respectively. The pattern of mixed but well-separated dynamics and the PDS or QDS characterization of the remaining regularity, appear to be robust throughout the QPT. Effects of kinetic collective rotational terms, which may disrupt this simple pattern, are considered.

  18. Symmetry analysis of talus bone

    PubMed Central

    Islam, K.; Dobbe, A.; Komeili, A.; Duke, K.; El-Rich, M.; Dhillon, S.; Adeeb, S.; Jomha, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The main object of this study was to use a geometric morphometric approach to quantify the left-right symmetry of talus bones. Methods Analysis was carried out using CT scan images of 11 pairs of intact tali. Two important geometric parameters, volume and surface area, were quantified for left and right talus bones. The geometric shape variations between the right and left talus bones were also measured using deviation analysis. Furthermore, location of asymmetry in the geometric shapes were identified. Results Numerical results showed that talus bones are bilaterally symmetrical in nature, and the difference between the surface area of the left and right talus bones was less than 7.5%. Similarly, the difference in the volume of both bones was less than 7.5%. Results of the three-dimensional (3D) deviation analyses demonstrated the mean deviation between left and right talus bones were in the range of -0.74 mm to 0.62 mm. It was observed that in eight of 11 subjects, the deviation in symmetry occurred in regions that are clinically less important during talus surgery. Conclusions We conclude that left and right talus bones of intact human ankle joints show a strong degree of symmetry. The results of this study may have significance with respect to talus surgery, and in investigating traumatic talus injury where the geometric shape of the contralateral talus can be used as control. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:139–45. PMID:24802391

  19. Energy levels in self-assembled quantum arbitrarily shaped dots.

    PubMed

    Tablero, C

    2005-02-01

    A model to determine the electronic structure of self-assembled quantum arbitrarily shaped dots is applied. This model is based principally on constant effective mass and constant potentials of the barrier and quantum dot material. An analysis of the different parameters of this model is done and compared with those which take into account the variation of confining potentials, bands, and effective masses due to strain. The results are compared with several spectra reported in literature. By considering the symmetry, the computational cost is reduced with respect to other methods in literature. In addition, this model is not limited by the geometry of the quantum dot. PMID:15740390

  20. Critical Symmetry and Supersymmetry in Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Iachello, Francesco

    2006-04-26

    The role of dynamic symmetries and supersymmetries in nuclei is reviewed. The concept of critical symmetry, appropriate to describe bosonic systems (even-even nuclei) at the critical point of a phase transition, is introduced, and the symmetry, E(5), at the critical point of spherical to {gamma}-unstable shape phase transition, is discussed. The recently introduced concept of critical supersymmetry, appropriate to describe mixed systems of bosons and fermions (odd-even nuclei) at the critical point of a phase transition is presented. The case of a j=3/2 particle at the critical point of spherical to {gamma}-unstable transition, called E(5/4), is discussed.

  1. Symmetries in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brading, Katherine; Castellani, Elena

    2003-12-01

    Preface; Copyright acknowledgements; List of contributors; 1. Introduction; Part I. Continuous Symmetries: 2. Classic texts: extracts from Weyl and Wigner; 3. Review paper: On the significance of continuous symmetry to the foundations of physics C. Martin; 4. The philosophical roots of the gauge principle: Weyl and transcendental phenomenological idealism T. Ryckman; 5. Symmetries and Noether's theorems K. A. Brading and H. R. Brown; 6. General covariance, gauge theories, and the Kretschmann objection J. Norton; 7. The interpretation of gauge symmetry M. Redhead; 8. Tracking down gauge: an ode to the constrained Hamiltonian formalism J. Earman; 9. Time-dependent symmetries: the link between gauge symmetries and indeterminism D. Wallace; 10. A fourth way to the Aharanov-Bohm effect A. Nounou; Part II. Discrete Symmetries: 11. Classic texts: extracts from Lebniz, Kant and Black; 12. Review paper: Understanding permutation symmetry S. French and D. Rickles; 13. Quarticles and the identity of discernibles N. Hugget; 14. Review paper: Handedness, parity violation, and the reality of space O. Pooley; 15. Mirror symmetry: what is it for a relational space to be orientable? N. Huggett; 16. Physics and Leibniz's principles S. Saunders; Part III. Symmetry Breaking: 17: Classic texts: extracts from Curie and Weyl; 18. Extract from G. Jona-Lasinio: Cross-fertilization in theoretical physics: the case of condensed matter and particle physics G. Jona-Lasinio; 19. Review paper: On the meaning of symmetry breaking E. Castellani; 20. Rough guide to spontaneous symmetry breaking J. Earman; 21. Spontaneous symmetry breaking: theoretical arguments and philosophical problems M. Morrison; Part IV. General Interpretative Issues: 22. Classic texts: extracts from Wigner; 23. Symmetry as a guide to superfluous theoretical structure J. Ismael and B. van Fraassen; 24. Notes on symmetries G. Belot; 25. Symmetry, objectivity, and design P. Kosso; 26. Symmetry and equivalence E. Castellani.

  2. Symmetries in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brading, Katherine; Castellani, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Preface; Copyright acknowledgements; List of contributors; 1. Introduction; Part I. Continuous Symmetries: 2. Classic texts: extracts from Weyl and Wigner; 3. Review paper: On the significance of continuous symmetry to the foundations of physics C. Martin; 4. The philosophical roots of the gauge principle: Weyl and transcendental phenomenological idealism T. Ryckman; 5. Symmetries and Noether's theorems K. A. Brading and H. R. Brown; 6. General covariance, gauge theories, and the Kretschmann objection J. Norton; 7. The interpretation of gauge symmetry M. Redhead; 8. Tracking down gauge: an ode to the constrained Hamiltonian formalism J. Earman; 9. Time-dependent symmetries: the link between gauge symmetries and indeterminism D. Wallace; 10. A fourth way to the Aharanov-Bohm effect A. Nounou; Part II. Discrete Symmetries: 11. Classic texts: extracts from Lebniz, Kant and Black; 12. Review paper: Understanding permutation symmetry S. French and D. Rickles; 13. Quarticles and the identity of discernibles N. Hugget; 14. Review paper: Handedness, parity violation, and the reality of space O. Pooley; 15. Mirror symmetry: what is it for a relational space to be orientable? N. Huggett; 16. Physics and Leibniz's principles S. Saunders; Part III. Symmetry Breaking: 17: Classic texts: extracts from Curie and Weyl; 18. Extract from G. Jona-Lasinio: Cross-fertilization in theoretical physics: the case of condensed matter and particle physics G. Jona-Lasinio; 19. Review paper: On the meaning of symmetry breaking E. Castellani; 20. Rough guide to spontaneous symmetry breaking J. Earman; 21. Spontaneous symmetry breaking: theoretical arguments and philosophical problems M. Morrison; Part IV. General Interpretative Issues: 22. Classic texts: extracts from Wigner; 23. Symmetry as a guide to superfluous theoretical structure J. Ismael and B. van Fraassen; 24. Notes on symmetries G. Belot; 25. Symmetry, objectivity, and design P. Kosso; 26. Symmetry and equivalence E. Castellani.

  3. Lorentz invariance in shape dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlip, S.; Gomes, Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Shape dynamics is a reframing of canonical general relativity in which time reparametrization invariance is ‘traded’ for a local conformal invariance. We explore the emergence of Lorentz invariance in this model in three contexts: as a maximal symmetry, an asymptotic symmetry and a local invariance.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Face Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Abraham

    2015-06-01

    The major objective of this article was to report quantitatively the degree of human face symmetry for reported images taken from the Internet. From the original image of a certain person that appears in the center of each triplet, 2 symmetric combinations were constructed that are based on the left part of the image and its mirror image (left-left) and on the right part of the image and its mirror image (right-right). By applying a computer software that enables to determine length, surface area, and perimeter of any geometric shape, the following measurements were obtained for each triplet: face perimeter and area; distance between the pupils; mouth length; its perimeter and area; nose length and face length, usually below the ears; as well as the area and perimeter of the pupils. Then, for each of the above measurements, the value C, which characterizes the degree of symmetry of the real image with respect to the combinations right-right and left-left, was calculated. C appears on the right-hand side below each image. A high value of C indicates a low symmetry, and as the value is decreasing, the symmetry is increasing. The magnitude on the left relates to the pupils and compares the difference between the area and perimeter of the 2 pupils. The major conclusion arrived at here is that the human face is asymmetric to some degree; the degree of asymmetry is reported quantitatively under each portrait. PMID:26080172

  5. Geometric intrinsic symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, A. Szulerecka, A.; Pedrak, A.

    2013-08-15

    The problem of geometric symmetries in the intrinsic frame of a many-body system (nucleus) is considered. An importance of symmetrization group notion is discussed. Ageneral structure of the intrinsic symmetry group structure is determined.

  6. Approximate flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Rasin, A.

    1994-04-01

    We discuss the idea of approximate flavor symmetries. Relations between approximate flavor symmetries and natural flavor conservation and democracy models is explored. Implications for neutrino physics are also discussed.

  7. Neutrinos and flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, Morimitsu

    2015-07-15

    We discuss the recent progress of flavor models with the non-Abelian discrete symmetry in the lepton sector focusing on the θ{sub 13} and CP violating phase. In both direct approach and indirect approach of the flavor symmetry, the non-vanishing θ{sub 13} is predictable. The flavor symmetry with the generalised CP symmetry can also predicts the CP violating phase. We show the phenomenological analyses of neutrino mixing for the typical flavor models.

  8. Polynomial Graphs and Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehle, Geoff; Kobayashi, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    Most quadratic functions are not even, but every parabola has symmetry with respect to some vertical line. Similarly, every cubic has rotational symmetry with respect to some point, though most cubics are not odd. We show that every polynomial has at most one point of symmetry and give conditions under which the polynomial has rotational or…

  9. Chiral symmetry and chiral-symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, M.E.

    1982-12-01

    These lectures concern the dynamics of fermions in strong interaction with gauge fields. Systems of fermions coupled by gauge forces have a very rich structure of global symmetries, which are called chiral symmetries. These lectures will focus on the realization of chiral symmetries and the causes and consequences of thier spontaneous breaking. A brief introduction to the basic formalism and concepts of chiral symmetry breaking is given, then some explicit calculations of chiral symmetry breaking in gauge theories are given, treating first parity-invariant and then chiral models. These calculations are meant to be illustrative rather than accurate; they make use of unjustified mathematical approximations which serve to make the physics more clear. Some formal constraints on chiral symmetry breaking are discussed which illuminate and extend the results of our more explicit analysis. Finally, a brief review of the phenomenological theory of chiral symmetry breaking is presented, and some applications of this theory to problems in weak-interaction physics are discussed. (WHK)

  10. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  11. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  12. Equilibria with incompressible flows from symmetry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiroukidis, Ap E-mail: gthroum@cc.uoi.gr; Throumoulopoulos, G. N. E-mail: gthroum@cc.uoi.gr

    2015-08-15

    We identify and study new nonlinear axisymmetric equilibria with incompressible flow of arbitrary direction satisfying a generalized Grad Shafranov equation by extending the symmetry analysis presented by Cicogna and Pegoraro [Phys. Plasmas 22, 022520 (2015)]. In particular, we construct a typical tokamak D-shaped equilibrium with peaked toroidal current density, monotonically varying safety factor, and sheared electric field.

  13. Symmetry remnants in the face of competing interactions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Leviatan, A.; Macek, M.

    2015-10-15

    Detailed description of nuclei necessitates model Hamiltonians which break most dynamical symmetries. Nevertheless, generalized notions of partial and quasi dynamical symmetries may still be applicable to selected subsets of states, amidst a complicated environment of other states. We examine such scenarios in the context of nuclear shape-phase transitions.

  14. Controlling potential barrier height by changing V-shaped pit size and the effect on optical and electrical properties for InGaN/GaN based light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Narihito Kashihara, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Kohei; Yamada, Yoichi; Tadatomo, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-14

    The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with blue light emission was improved by inserting an InGaN/GaN superlattice (SL) beneath the MQWs. While the SL technique is useful for improving the light-emitting diode (LED) performance, its effectiveness from a multilateral point of view requires investigation. V-shaped pits (V-pits), which generate a potential barrier and screen the effect of the threading dislocation, are one of the candidates for increasing the light emission efficiency of LEDs exceptionally. In this research, we investigated the relationship between the V-pit and SL and revealed that the V-pit diameter is strongly correlated with the IQE by changing the number of SL periods. Using scanning near-field optical microscopy and photoluminescence measurements, we demonstrated the distinct presence of the potential barrier formed by the V-pits around the dislocations. The relationship between the V-pit and the number of SL periods resulted in changing the potential barrier height, which is related to the V-pit diameter determined by the number of SL periods. In addition, we made an attempt to insert pit expansion layers (PELs) composed of combination of SL and middle temperature grown GaN layer instead of only SL structure. As a result of the evaluation of LEDs using SL or PEL, the EL intensity was strongly related to pit diameter regardless of the structures to form the V-pits. In addition, it was clear that larger V-pits reduce the efficiency droop, which is considered to be suppression of the carrier loss at high injection current.

  15. The Symmetries of QCD

    ScienceCinema

    Sekhar Chivukula

    2010-01-08

    The symmetries of a quantum field theory can be realized in a variety of ways. Symmetries can be realized explicitly, approximately, through spontaneous symmetry breaking or, via an anomaly, quantum effects can dynamically eliminate a symmetry of the theory that was present at the classical level.  Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the modern theory of the strong interactions, exemplify each of these possibilities. The interplay of these effects determine the spectrum of particles that we observe and, ultimately, account for 99% of the mass of ordinary matter. 

  16. Is symmetry informative?

    PubMed

    Gray, J E; Vogt, A

    1997-01-01

    Is symmetry informative? The answer is both yes and no. We examine what information and symmetry are and how they are related. Our approach is primarily mathematical, not because mathematics provides the final word, but because it provides an insightful and relatively precise starting point. Information theory treats transformations that messages undergo from source to destination. Symmetries are information that leave some property of interest unchanged. In this respect the studies of information and symmetry can both be regarded as a Quest for the identity transformation. PMID:9224554

  17. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  18. Weyl-gauge symmetry of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Iorio, Alfredo

    2011-05-15

    Research Highlights: > Graphene action's Weyl symmetry identifies shapes for which the DOS is invariant. > Electrons on graphene might experience a general-relativistic-like spacetime. > Rich mathematical structures, such as the Liouville's equation, naturally arise. - Abstract: The conformal invariance of the low energy limit theory governing the electronic properties of graphene is explored. In particular, it is noted that the massless Dirac theory in point enjoys local Weyl symmetry, a very large symmetry. Exploiting this symmetry in the two spatial dimensions and in the associated three dimensional spacetime, we find the geometric constraints that correspond to specific shapes of the graphene sheet for which the electronic density of states is the same as that for planar graphene, provided the measurements are made in accordance to the inner reference frame of the electronic system. These results rely on the (surprising) general relativistic-like behavior of the graphene system arising from the combination of its well known special relativistic-like behavior with the less explored Weyl symmetry. Mathematical structures, such as the Virasoro algebra and the Liouville equation, naturally arise in this three-dimensional context and can be related to specific profiles of the graphene sheet. Speculations on possible applications of three-dimensional gravity are also proposed.

  19. Symmetry and Interculturality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchis, Iuliana

    2009-01-01

    Symmetry is one of the fundamental concepts in Geometry. It is a Mathematical concept, which can be very well connected with Art and Ethnography. The aim of the article is to show how to link the geometrical concept symmetry with interculturality. For this mosaics from different countries are used.

  20. Symmetries in Lagrangian Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrario, Carlo; Passerini, Arianna

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of Noether's theorem, a distinction between Lagrangian and dynamical symmetries is made, in order to clarify some aspects neglected by textbooks. An intuitive setting of the concept of invariance of differential equations is presented. The analysis is completed by deriving the symmetry properties in the motion of a charged…

  1. Symmetries of Spectral Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabat, A.

    Deriving abelian KdV and NLS hierarchies, we describe non-abelian symmetries and "pre-Lax" elementary approach to Lax pairs. Discrete symmetries of spectral problems are considered in Sect. 4.2. Here we prove Darboux classical theorem and discuss a modern theory of dressing chains.

  2. Superheavy nuclei and fission barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Nan; Zhao, Jie; Zhao, En-Guang; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    In this chapter, we will present relativistic mean field (RMF) description of heavy and superheavy nuclei (SHN). We will discuss the shell structure and magic numbers in the mass region of SHN, binding energies and α decay Q values, shapes of ground states and potential energy surfaces and fission barriers. We particularly focus on the multidimensionally-constrained covariant density functional theories (CDFT) and the applications of CDFT to the study of exotic nuclear shapes and fission barriers.

  3. Symmetry Effects in Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Andrew Chi-Chih

    2008-12-01

    The concept of symmetry has played a key role in the development of modern physics. For example, using symmetry, C.N. Yang and other physicists have greatly advanced our understanding of the fundamental laws of physics. Meanwhile, computer scientists have been pondering why some computational problems seem intractable, while others are easy. Just as in physics, the laws of computation sometimes can only be inferred indirectly by considerations of general principles such as symmetry. The symmetry properties of a function can indeed have a profound effect on how fast the function can be computed. In this talk, we present several elegant and surprising discoveries along this line, made by computer scientists using symmetry as their primary tool. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  4. Exploring symmetry in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, L.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; MacKinnon, A.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O.; Khan, S.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C.; Turnbull, D.; Amendt, P.; Wilks, S.; Zylstra, A.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sio, H.; Petrasso, R.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with near-vacuum hohlraums, which utilize a minimal but non-zero helium fill, have demonstrated performance improvements relative to conventional gas-filled (0.96 - 1.6 mg/cc helium) hohlraums: minimal backscatter, reduced capsule drive degradation, and minimal suprathermal electron generation. Because this is a low laser-plasma interaction platform, implosion symmetry is controlled via pulse-shaping adjustments to laser power balance. Extending this platform to high-yield designs with high-density carbon capsules requires achieving adequate symmetry control throughout the pulse. In simulations, laser propagation is degraded suddenly by hohlraum wall expansion interacting with ablated capsule material. Nominal radiation-hydrodynamics simulations have not yet proven predictive on symmetry of the final hotspot, and experiments show more prolate symmetry than preshot calculations. Recent efforts have focused on understanding the discrepancy between simulated and measured symmetry and on alternate designs for symmetry control through varying cone fraction, trade-offs between laser power and energy, and modifications to case-to-capsule ratio. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Information barriers and authentication.

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, D. W.; Wolford, J. K.

    2001-01-01

    Acceptance of nuclear materials into a monitoring regime is complicated if the materials are in classified shapes or have classified composition. An attribute measurement system with an information barrier can be emplo,yed to generate an unclassified display from classified measurements. This information barrier must meet two criteria: (1) classified information cannot be released to the monitoring party, and (2) the monitoring party must be convinced that the unclassified output accurately represents the classified input. Criterion 1 is critical to the host country to protect the classified information. Criterion 2 is critical to the monitoring party and is often termed the 'authentication problem.' Thus, the necessity for authentication of a measurement system with an information barrier stems directly from the description of a useful information barrier. Authentication issues must be continually addressed during the entire development lifecycle of the measurement system as opposed to being applied only after the system is built.

  6. Aspects of emergent symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Pedro R. S.

    2016-03-01

    These are intended to be review notes on emergent symmetries, i.e. symmetries which manifest themselves in specific sectors of energy in many systems. The emphasis is on the physical aspects rather than computation methods. We include some background material and go through more recent problems in field theory, statistical mechanics and condensed matter. These problems illustrate how some important symmetries, such as Lorentz invariance and supersymmetry, usually believed to be fundamental, can arise naturally in low-energy regimes of systems involving a large number of degrees of freedom. The aim is to discuss how these examples could help us to face other complex and fundamental problems.

  7. Sequential flavor symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, Thorsten; Jung, Martin; Mannel, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    The gauge sector of the standard model exhibits a flavor symmetry that allows for independent unitary transformations of the fermion multiplets. In the standard model the flavor symmetry is broken by the Yukawa couplings to the Higgs boson, and the resulting fermion masses and mixing angles show a pronounced hierarchy. In this work we connect the observed hierarchy to a sequence of intermediate effective theories, where the flavor symmetries are broken in a stepwise fashion by vacuum expectation values of suitably constructed spurion fields. We identify the possible scenarios in the quark sector and discuss some implications of this approach.

  8. Geometric symmetries in superfluid vortex dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kozik, Evgeny; Svistunov, Boris

    2010-10-01

    Dynamics of quantized vortex lines in a superfluid feature symmetries associated with the geometric character of the complex-valued field, w(z)=x(z)+iy(z), describing the instant shape of the line. Along with a natural set of Noether's constants of motion, which - apart from their rather specific expressions in terms of w(z) - are nothing but components of the total linear and angular momenta of the fluid, the geometric symmetry brings about crucial consequences for kinetics of distortion waves on the vortex lines, the Kelvin waves. It is the geometric symmetry that renders Kelvin-wave cascade local in the wave-number space. Similar considerations apply to other systems with purely geometric degrees of freedom.

  9. Animal Gaits and Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubitsky, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Many gaits of four-legged animals are described by symmetry. For example, when a horse paces it moves both left legs in unison and then both right legs and so on. The motion is described by two symmetries: Interchange front and back legs, and swap left and right legs with a half-period phase shift. Biologists postulate the existence of a central pattern generator (CPG) in the neuronal system that sends periodic signals to the legs. CPGs can be thought of as electrical circuits that produce periodic signals and can be modeled by systems with symmetry. In this lecture we discuss animal gaits; use gait symmetries to construct a simplest CPG architecture that naturally produces quadrupedal gait rhythms; and make several testable predictions about gaits.

  10. Dynamical spacetime symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelady, Benjamin C.; Wheeler, James T.

    2016-04-01

    According to the Coleman-Mandula theorem, any gauge theory of gravity combined with an internal symmetry based on a Lie group must take the form of a direct product in order to be consistent with basic assumptions of quantum field theory. However, we show that an alternative gauging of a simple group can lead dynamically to a spacetime with compact internal symmetry. The biconformal gauging of the conformal symmetry of n-dimensional Euclidean space doubles the dimension to give a symplectic manifold. Examining one of the Lagrangian submanifolds in the flat case, we find that in addition to the expected S O (n ) connection and curvature, the solder form necessarily becomes Lorentzian. General coordinate invariance gives rise to an S O (n -1 ,1 ) connection on the spacetime. The principal fiber bundle character of the original S O (n ) guarantees that the two symmetries enter as a direct product, in agreement with the Coleman-Mandula theorem.

  11. Molecular symmetry with quaternions.

    PubMed

    Fritzer, H P

    2001-09-01

    A new and relatively simple version of the quaternion calculus is offered which is especially suitable for applications in molecular symmetry and structure. After introducing the real quaternion algebra and its classical matrix representation in the group SO(4) the relations with vectors in 3-space and the connection with the rotation group SO(3) through automorphism properties of the algebra are discussed. The correlation of the unit quaternions with both the Cayley-Klein and the Euler parameters through the group SU(2) is presented. Besides rotations the extension of quaternions to other important symmetry operations, reflections and the spatial inversion, is given. Finally, the power of the quaternion calculus for molecular symmetry problems is revealed by treating some examples applied to icosahedral symmetry. PMID:11666072

  12. Another Broken Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Resistance destroys symmetry. In this note, a graphical exploration serves as a guide to a rigorous elementary proof of a specific asymmetry in the trajectory of a point projectile in a medium offering linear resistance.

  13. Symmetries in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaños, Octavio

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this course is to study the evolution of the symmetry concept and establish its influence in the knowledge of the fundamental laws of nature. Physicist have been using the symmetry concept in two ways: to solve problems and to search for new understanding of the world around us. In quantum physics symmetry plays a key role in gaining an understanding of the physical laws governing the behavior of matter and field systems. It provides, generally, a shortcut based on geometry for discovering the secrets of the Universe. Because it is believed that the laws of physics are invariant under discrete and continuous transformation operations of the space and time, there are continuous symmetries, for example, energy and momentum together with discrete ones corresponding to charge, parity and time reversal operations.

  14. Dynamical symmetries for fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, M.

    1989-01-01

    An introduction is given to the Fermion Dynamical Symmetry Model (FDSM). The analytical symmetry limits of the model are then applied to the calculation of physical quantities such as ground-state masses and B(E{sub 2}) values in heavy nuclei. These comparisons with data provide strong support for a new principle of collective motion, the Dynamical Pauli Effect, and suggest that dynamical symmetries which properly account for the pauli principle are much more persistent in nuclear structure than the corresponding boson symmetries. Finally, we present an assessment of criticisms which have been voiced concerning the FDSM, and a discussion of new phenomena and exotic spectroscopy'' which may be suggested by the model. 14 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Ice barrier construction

    SciTech Connect

    Finucane, R. G.; Jahns, H. O.

    1985-06-18

    A method is provided for constructing spray ice barriers to protect offshore structures in a frigid body of water from mobile ice, waves and currents. Water is withdrawn from the body of water and is sprayed through ambient air which is below the freezing temperature of the water so that a substantial amount of the water freezes as it passes through the air. The sprayed water is directed to build up a mass of ice having a size and shape adapted to protect the offshore structure. Spray ice barriers can also be constructed for the containment of pollutant spills.

  16. Mechanochemical Symmetry Breaking in Hydra Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Mercker, Moritz; Köthe, Alexandra; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis comprises the self-organized creation of various patterns and shapes. Although detailed underlying mechanisms are still elusive in many cases, an increasing amount of experimental data suggests that chemical morphogen and mechanical processes are strongly coupled. Here, we develop and test a minimal model of the axis-defining step (i.e., symmetry breaking) in aggregates of the Hydra polyp. Based on previous findings, we combine osmotically driven shape oscillations with tissue mechanics and morphogen dynamics. We show that the model incorporating a simple feedback loop between morphogen patterning and tissue stretch reproduces a wide range of experimental data. Finally, we compare different hypothetical morphogen patterning mechanisms (Turing, tissue-curvature, and self-organized criticality). Our results suggest the experimental investigation of bigger (i.e., multiple head) aggregates as a key step for a deeper understanding of mechanochemical symmetry breaking in Hydra. PMID:25954896

  17. Mechanochemical symmetry breaking in Hydra aggregates.

    PubMed

    Mercker, Moritz; Köthe, Alexandra; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna

    2015-05-01

    Tissue morphogenesis comprises the self-organized creation of various patterns and shapes. Although detailed underlying mechanisms are still elusive in many cases, an increasing amount of experimental data suggests that chemical morphogen and mechanical processes are strongly coupled. Here, we develop and test a minimal model of the axis-defining step (i.e., symmetry breaking) in aggregates of the Hydra polyp. Based on previous findings, we combine osmotically driven shape oscillations with tissue mechanics and morphogen dynamics. We show that the model incorporating a simple feedback loop between morphogen patterning and tissue stretch reproduces a wide range of experimental data. Finally, we compare different hypothetical morphogen patterning mechanisms (Turing, tissue-curvature, and self-organized criticality). Our results suggest the experimental investigation of bigger (i.e., multiple head) aggregates as a key step for a deeper understanding of mechanochemical symmetry breaking in Hydra. PMID:25954896

  18. Vehicle barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hirsh, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  19. Lectures on Yangian symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-08-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfel’d's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang–Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang–Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dilatation operator and tree-level scattering amplitudes. These lectures are illustrated by several examples, in particular the two-dimensional chiral Gross–Neveu model, the Heisenberg spin chain and { N }=4 superconformal Yang–Mills theory in four dimensions.

  20. Relativistic pseudospin symmetry and shell model Hamiltonians that conserve pseudospin symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ginocchio, Joseph N

    2010-09-21

    Professor Akito Arima and his colleagues discovered 'pseudospin' doublets forty-one years ago in spherical nuclei. These doublets were subsequently discovered in deformed nuclei. We show that pseudospin symmetry is an SU(2) symmetry of the Dirac Hamiltonian which occurs when the scalar and vector potentials are opposite in sign but equal in magnitude. This symmetry occurs independent of the shape of the nucleus: spherical, axial deformed, triaxial, and gamma unstable. We survey some of the evidence that pseudospin symmetry is approximately conserved for a Dirac Hamiltonian with realistic scalar and vector potentials by examining the energy spectra, the lower components of the Dirac eigenfunctions, the magnetic dipole and Gamow-Teller transitions in nuclei, the upper components of the Dirac eigenfunctions, and nucleon-nucleus scattering. We shall also suggest that pseudospin symmetry may have a fundamental origin in chiral symmetry breaking by examining QCD sum rules. Finally we derive the shell model Hamiltonians which conserve pseudospin and show that they involve tensor interactions.

  1. Quantification of Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yi-Nan; Dong, Guo-Hui; Zhou, Duan-Lu; Sun, Chang-Pu

    2016-04-01

    Symmetry is conventionally described in a polarized manner that the system is either completely symmetric or completely asymmetric. Using group theoretical approach to overcome this dichotomous problem, we introduce the degree of symmetry (DoS) as a non-negative continuous number ranging from zero to unity. DoS is defined through an average of the fidelity deviations of Hamiltonian or quantum state over its transformation group G, and thus is computable by making use of the completeness relations of the irreducible representations of G. The monotonicity of DoS can effectively probe the extended group for accidental degeneracy while its multi-valued natures characterize some (spontaneous) symmetry breaking. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11421063, 11534002, 11475254 and the National 973 Program under Grant Nos. 2014CB921403, 2012CB922104, and 2014CB921202

  2. Electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1990-09-01

    The Higgs mechanism is reviewed in its most general form, requiring the existence of a new symmetry-breaking force and associated particles, which need not however be Higgs bosons. The first lecture reviews the essential elements of the Higgs mechanism, which suffice to establish low energy theorems for the scattering of longitudinally polarized W and Z gauge bosons. An upper bound on the scale of the symmetry-breaking physics then follows from the low energy theorems and partial wave unitarity. The second lecture reviews particular models, with and without Higgs bosons, paying special attention to how the general features discussed in lecture 1 are realized in each model. The third lecture focuses on the experimental signals of strong WW scattering that can be observed at the SSC above 1 TeV in the WW subenergy, which will allow direct measurement of the strength of the symmetry-breaking force. 52 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Search for Tetrahedral Symmetry in 70Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Khanh; Haring-Kaye, R. A.; Elder, R. M.; Jones, K. D.; Morrow, S. I.; Tabor, S. L.; Tripathi, V.; Bender, P. C.; Allegro, P. R. P.; Medina, N. H.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Doring, J.

    2014-09-01

    The even-even Ge isotopes have recently become an active testing ground for a variety of exotic structural characteristics, including the existence of tetrahedral symmetry (pyramid-like shapes). Although theoretical shape calculations predict the onset of tetrahedral symmetry near 72Ge, the experimental signatures (including vanishing quadrupole moments within high-spin bands) remain elusive. This study searched for possible experimental evidence of tetrahedral symmetry in 70Ge. Excited states in 70Ge were populated at Florida State University using the 55Mn(18O,p2n) fusion-evaporation reaction at 50 MeV. Prompt γ- γ coincidences were measured with a Compton-suppressed Ge array consisting of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. The existing level scheme was enhanced through the addition of 20 new transitions and the rearrangement of five others based on the measured coincidence relations and relative intensities. Lifetimes of 24 states were measured using the Doppler-shift attenuation method, from which transition quadrupole moments were inferred. These results will be compared with those obtained from cranked Woods-Saxon calculations. The even-even Ge isotopes have recently become an active testing ground for a variety of exotic structural characteristics, including the existence of tetrahedral symmetry (pyramid-like shapes). Although theoretical shape calculations predict the onset of tetrahedral symmetry near 72Ge, the experimental signatures (including vanishing quadrupole moments within high-spin bands) remain elusive. This study searched for possible experimental evidence of tetrahedral symmetry in 70Ge. Excited states in 70Ge were populated at Florida State University using the 55Mn(18O,p2n) fusion-evaporation reaction at 50 MeV. Prompt γ- γ coincidences were measured with a Compton-suppressed Ge array consisting of three Clover detectors and seven single-crystal detectors. The existing level scheme was enhanced through the addition

  4. Essays on symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismael, Jenann Tareq

    1997-04-01

    Structures of many different sorts arise in physics, e.g., the concrete structures of material bodies, the structure exemplified by the spatiotemporal configuration of a set of bodies, the structures of more abstract objects like states, state-spaces, laws, and so on. To each structure of any of these types there corresponds a set of transformations which map it onto itself. These are its symmetries. Increasingly ubiquitous in theoretical discussions in physics, the notion of symmetry is also at the root of some time-worn philosophical debates. This dissertation consists of a set of essays on topics drawn from places where the two fields overlap. The first essay is an informal introduction to the mathematical study of symmetry. The second essay defends a famous principle of Pierre Curie which states that the symmetries of a cause are always symmetries of its effect. The third essay takes up the case of reflection in space in the context of a controversy stemming from one of Kant's early arguments for the substantivality of space. The fourth essay is a discussion of the general conditions under which an asymmetry in a phenomenon suggests an asymmetry in the laws which govern it. The case of reflection in time-specifically, the theoretical strategy used in statistical mechanics to subsume the time-asymmetric phenomena of Thermodynamics under the time-symmetric classical dynamical laws-is used to illustrate the general points. The philosophical heart of the thesis lies in its fifth essay. Here a somewhat novel way of conceiving scientific theorizing is articulated, one suggested by the abstract mathematical perspective of symmetry.

  5. Deformed discrete symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzano, Michele; Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    We construct discrete symmetry transformations for deformed relativistic kinematics based on group valued momenta. We focus on the specific example of κ-deformations of the Poincaré algebra with associated momenta living on (a sub-manifold of) de Sitter space. Our approach relies on the description of quantum states constructed from deformed kinematics and the observable charges associated with them. The results we present provide the first step towards the analysis of experimental bounds on the deformation parameter κ to be derived via precision measurements of discrete symmetries and CPT.

  6. Weakly broken galileon symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Pirtskhalava, David; Santoni, Luca; Trincherini, Enrico; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2015-09-01

    Effective theories of a scalar ϕ invariant under the internal galileon symmetryϕ→ϕ+b{sub μ}x{sup μ} have been extensively studied due to their special theoretical and phenomenological properties. In this paper, we introduce the notion of weakly broken galileon invariance, which characterizes the unique class of couplings of such theories to gravity that maximally retain their defining symmetry. The curved-space remnant of the galileon’s quantum properties allows to construct (quasi) de Sitter backgrounds largely insensitive to loop corrections. We exploit this fact to build novel cosmological models with interesting phenomenology, relevant for both inflation and late-time acceleration of the universe.

  7. Atkin-Lehner symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory

    The vanishing of the one-loop string cosmological constant in nontrivial non supersymmetric backgrounds can be understood by viewing the path integral as an inner product of orthogonal wave functions. For special backgrounds the string theory has an extra symmetry, expressed as a transformation on moduli space. When left- and right-moving wave functions transform in different representations of this symmetry the cosmological constant must vanish. Specific examples of the mechanism are given at one loop for theories in two and four dimensions. Various suggestions are made for the higher loop extension of this idea.

  8. PT -symmetry Wave Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Carl T.; Kottos, Tsampikos; Prosen, Tomaz

    2010-03-01

    We study a new class of chaotic systems with dynamical localization, where gain/loss processes break the hermiticity, while allowing for parity-time PT symmetry. For a value γPT of the gain/loss parameter the spectrum undergoes a spontaneous phase transition from real (exact phase) to complex values (broken phase). We develop a one parameter scaling theory for γPT, and show that chaos assists the exact PT-phase. Our results will have applications to the design of optical elements with PT-symmetry.

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, L. H.

    2005-11-01

    One of the most fruitful and enduring advances in theoretical physics during the last half century has been the development of the role played by symmetries. One needs only to consider SU(3) and the classification of elementary particles, the Yang Mills enlargement of Maxwell's electrodynamics to the symmetry group SU(2), and indeed the tremendous activity surrounding the discovery of parity violation in the weak interactions in the late 1950s. This last example is one of a broken symmetry, though the symmetry in question is a discrete one. It was clear to Gell-Mann, who first clarified the role of SU(3) in particle physics, that this symmetry was not exact. If it had been, it would have been much easier to discover; for example, the proton, neutron, Σ, Λ and Ξ particles would all have had the same mass. For many years the SU(3) symmetry breaking was assigned a mathematical form, but the importance of this formulation fell away when the quark model began to be taken seriously; the reason the SU(3) symmetry was not exact was simply that the (three, in those days) quarks had different masses. At the same time, and in a different context, symmetry breaking of a different type was being investigated. This went by the name of `spontaneous symmetry breaking' and its characteristic was that the ground state of a given system was not invariant under the symmetry transformation, though the interactions (the Hamiltonian, in effect) was. A classic example is ferromagnetism. In a ferromagnet the atomic spins are aligned in one direction only—this is the ground state of the system. It is clearly not invariant under a rotation, for that would change the ground state into a (similar but) different one, with the spins aligned in a different direction; this is the phenomenon of a degenerate vacuum. The contribution of the spin interaction, s1.s2, to the Hamiltonian, however, is actually invariant under rotations. As Coleman remarked, a little man living in a ferromagnet would

  10. Bilateral flower symmetry--how, when and why?

    PubMed

    Hileman, Lena C

    2014-02-01

    Bilateral flower symmetry has evolved multiple times during flowering plant diversification, is associated with specialized pollination, and is hypothesized to have contributed to flowering plant species richness. The genes and genetic interactions that control bilateral symmetry are well understood in the model species Snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus). I review recent insights into the genetic control of symmetry in Snapdragon. I summarize how this foundational genetic work has been integrated with mathematical modeling approaches, which together provided new insights into the control of quantitative aspects of petal shape. Lastly, I review how evolutionary studies, stemming from knowledge of the genetic control of symmetry in Snapdragon flowers, have revealed extensive parallel recruitment of a similar genetic program during repeated evolution of bilateral symmetry. PMID:24507506

  11. Micro heat barrier

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2003-08-12

    A highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  12. Symmetries in heavy nuclei and the proton-neutron interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) nuclear structure model can be expressed in terms of the U(6) group, and thereby leads to three dynamical symmetries (or group chains) corresponding to different nuclear coupling schemes and geometrical shapes. The status of the empirical evidence for these three symmetries is reviewed, along with brief comments on the possible existence of supersymmetries in nuclei. The relationships between these symmetries, the nuclear phase transitional regions linking them, and the residual proton-neutron interaction are discussed in terms of a particularly simple scheme for parameterizing the effects of that interaction. 34 refs., 15 figs.

  13. Horror Vacui Symmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumpecker, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art lesson used with children in the third grade to help them learn about symmetry, as well as encouraging them to draw larger than usual. Explains that students learn about the belief called "Horror Vacui" of the Northwest American Indian tribes and create their interpretation of this belief. (CMK)

  14. Introduction to chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, V.

    1996-01-08

    These lectures are an attempt to a pedagogical introduction into the elementary concepts of chiral symmetry in nuclear physics. Effective chiral models such as the linear and nonlinear sigma model will be discussed as well as the essential ideas of chiral perturbation theory. Some applications to the physics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions will be presented.

  15. Exploring Metric Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zwart, P.H.; Grosse-Kunstleve, R.W.; Adams, P.D.

    2006-07-31

    Relatively minor perturbations to a crystal structure can in some cases result in apparently large changes in symmetry. Changes in space group or even lattice can be induced by heavy metal or halide soaking (Dauter et al, 2001), flash freezing (Skrzypczak-Jankun et al, 1996), and Se-Met substitution (Poulsen et al, 2001). Relations between various space groups and lattices can provide insight in the underlying structural causes for the symmetry or lattice transformations. Furthermore, these relations can be useful in understanding twinning and how to efficiently solve two different but related crystal structures. Although (pseudo) symmetric properties of a certain combination of unit cell parameters and a space group are immediately obvious (such as a pseudo four-fold axis if a is approximately equal to b in an orthorhombic space group), other relations (e.g. Lehtio, et al, 2005) that are less obvious might be crucial to the understanding and detection of certain idiosyncrasies of experimental data. We have developed a set of tools that allows straightforward exploration of possible metric symmetry relations given unit cell parameters and a space group. The new iotbx.explore{_}metric{_}symmetry command produces an overview of the various relations between several possible point groups for a given lattice. Methods for finding relations between a pair of unit cells are also available. The tools described in this newsletter are part of the CCTBX libraries, which are included in the latest (versions July 2006 and up) PHENIX and CCI Apps distributions.

  16. Falling for Symmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGehe, Carol

    1991-01-01

    Presents math activities, problems, and games for teaching elementary students to recognize the world's natural symmetry and understand the mathematical qualities it represents; suggests activities with construction paper, blocks, and calculators. Instructions for using the calculator to create palindromes are included. (SM)

  17. Active fluctuation symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christian; Salazar, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with the understanding of fluctuation symmetries for entropy production, similar ideas applied to the time-symmetric fluctuation sector have been less explored. Here we give detailed derivations of time-symmetric fluctuation symmetries in boundary-driven particle systems such as the open Kawasaki lattice gas and the zero-range model. As a measure of time-symmetric dynamical activity over time T we count the difference (Nℓ - Nr)/T between the number of particle jumps in or out at the left edge and those at the right edge of the system. We show that this quantity satisfies a fluctuation symmetry from which we derive a new Green-Kubo-type relation. It will follow then that the system is more active at the edge connected to the particle reservoir with the largest chemical potential. We also apply these exact relations derived for stochastic particle models to a deterministic case, the spinning Lorentz gas, where the symmetry relation for the activity is checked numerically.

  18. Gauging without initial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Alexei; Strobl, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The gauge principle is at the heart of a good part of fundamental physics: Starting with a group G of so-called rigid symmetries of a functional defined over space-time Σ, the original functional is extended appropriately by additional Lie(G) -valued 1-form gauge fields so as to lift the symmetry to Maps(Σ , G) . Physically relevant quantities are then to be obtained as the quotient of the solutions to the Euler-Lagrange equations by these gauge symmetries. In this article we show that one can construct a gauge theory for a standard sigma model in arbitrary space-time dimensions where the target metric is not invariant with respect to any rigid symmetry group, but satisfies a much weaker condition: It is sufficient to find a collection of vector fields va on the target M satisfying the extended Killing equationv a(i ; j) = 0 for some connection acting on the index a. For regular foliations this is equivalent to requiring the conormal bundle to the leaves with its induced metric to be invariant under leaf-preserving diffeomorphisms of M, which in turn generalizes Riemannian submersions to which the notion reduces for smooth leaf spaces M / ∼. The resulting gauge theory has the usual quotient effect with respect to the original ungauged theory: in this way, much more general orbits can be factored out than usually considered. In some cases these are orbits that do not correspond to an initial symmetry, but still can be generated by a finite-dimensional Lie group G. Then the presented gauging procedure leads to an ordinary gauge theory with Lie algebra valued 1-form gauge fields, but showing an unconventional transformation law. In general, however, one finds that the notion of an ordinary structural Lie group is too restrictive and should be replaced by the much more general notion of a structural Lie groupoid.

  19. Origin of translocation barriers for polyelectrolyte chains.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Muthukumar, M

    2009-11-21

    For single-file translocations of a charged macromolecule through a narrow pore, the crucial step of arrival of an end at the pore suffers from free energy barriers, arising from changes in intrachain electrostatic interaction, distribution of ionic clouds and solvent molecules, and conformational entropy of the chain. All contributing factors to the barrier in the initial stage of translocation are evaluated by using the self-consistent field theory for the polyelectrolyte and the coupled Poisson-Boltzmann description for ions without radial symmetry. The barrier is found to be essentially entropic due to conformational changes. For moderate and high salt concentrations, the barriers for the polyelectrolyte chain are quantitatively equivalent to that of uncharged self-avoiding walks. Electrostatic effects are shown to increase the free energy barriers, but only slightly. The degree of ionization, electrostatic interaction strength, decreasing salt concentration, and the solvent quality all result in increases in the barrier. PMID:19929072

  20. Gravity from Lorentz Symmetry Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Potting, Robertus

    2006-06-19

    In general relativity, the masslessness of gravitons can be traced to symmetry under diffeomorphisms. In this talk, we consider another possibility, whereby the masslessness arises from spontaneous violation of Lorentz symmetry.

  1. Limits of custodial symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; Di Chiara, Stefano; Foadi, Roshan

    2009-11-01

    We introduce a toy model implementing the proposal of using a custodial symmetry to protect the Zb{sub L}b{sub L} coupling from large corrections. This 'doublet-extended standard model' adds a weak doublet of fermions (including a heavy partner of the top quark) to the particle content of the standard model in order to implement an O(4)xU(1){sub X}{approx}SU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R}xP{sub LR}xU(1){sub X} symmetry in the top-quark mass generating sector. This symmetry is softly broken to the gauged SU(2){sub L}xU(1){sub Y} electroweak symmetry by a Dirac mass M for the new doublet; adjusting the value of M allows us to explore the range of possibilities between the O(4)-symmetric (M{yields}0) and standard-model-like (M{yields}{infinity}) limits. In this simple model, we find that the experimental limits on the Zb{sub L}b{sub L} coupling favor smaller M while the presence of a potentially sizable negative contribution to {alpha}T strongly favors large M. Comparison with precision electroweak data shows that the heavy partner of the top quark must be heavier than about 3.4 TeV, making it difficult to search for at LHC. This result demonstrates that electroweak data strongly limit the amount by which the custodial symmetry of the top-quark mass generating sector can be enhanced relative to the standard model. Using an effective field theory calculation, we illustrate how the leading contributions to {alpha}T, {alpha}S, and the Zb{sub L}b{sub L} coupling in this model arise from an effective operator coupling right-handed top quarks to the Z boson, and how the effects on these observables are correlated. We contrast this toy model with extradimensional models in which the extended custodial symmetry is invoked to control the size of additional contributions to {alpha}T and the Zb{sub L}b{sub L} coupling, while leaving the standard model contributions essentially unchanged.

  2. Reflections on Symmetry and Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrotsy, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The concept of symmetry is fundamental to mathematics. Arguments and proofs based on symmetry are often aesthetically pleasing because they are subtle and succinct and non-standard. This article uses notions of symmetry to approach the solutions to a broad range of mathematical problems. It responds to Krutetskii's criteria for mathematical…

  3. Dynamical Symmetries in Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    We show how symmetries of a classical dynamical system can be described in terms of operators that act on the state space for the system. We illustrate our results by considering a number of possible symmetries that a classical dynamical system might have, and for each symmetry we give examples of dynamical systems that do and do not possess that…

  4. A broken symmetry ontology: Quantum mechanics as a broken symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Buschmann, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The author proposes a new broken symmetry ontology to be used to analyze the quantum domain. This ontology is motivated and grounded in a critical epistemological analysis, and an analysis of the basic role of symmetry in physics. Concurrently, he is led to consider nonheterogeneous systems, whose logical state space contains equivalence relations not associated with the causal relation. This allows him to find a generalized principle of symmetry and a generalized symmetry-conservation formalisms. In particular, he clarifies the role of Noether's theorem in field theory. He shows how a broken symmetry ontology already operates in a description of the weak interactions. Finally, by showing how a broken symmetry ontology operates in the quantum domain, he accounts for the interpretational problem and the essential incompleteness of quantum mechanics. He proposes that the broken symmetry underlying this ontological domain is broken dilation invariance.

  5. PSEUDOSPIN SYMMETRY IN NUCLEI, SPIN SYMMETRY IN HADRONS

    SciTech Connect

    P. PAGE; T. GOLDMAN; J. GINOCCHIO

    2000-08-01

    Ginocchio argued that chiral symmetry breaking in QCD is responsible for the relativistic pseudospin symmetry in the Dirac equation, explaining the observed approximate pseudospin symmetry in sizable nuclei. On a much smaller scale, it is known that spin-orbit splittings in hadrons are small. Specifically, new experimental data from CLEO indicate small splittings in D-mesons. For heavy-light mesons we identify a cousin of pseudospin symmetry that suppresses these splittings in the Dirac equation, known as spin symmetry. We suggest an experimental test of the implications of spin symmetry for wave functions in electron-positron annihilation. We investigate how QCD can give rise to two different dynamical symmetries on nuclear and hadronic scales.

  6. Chiral symmetry and pentaquarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Diakonov

    2004-07-01

    Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, mesons and baryons are illustrated in the language of the Dirac theory. Various forces acting between quarks inside baryons are discussed. I explain why the naive quark models typically overestimate pentaquark masses by some 500 MeV and why in the fully relativistic approach to baryons pentaquarks turn out to be light. I discuss briefly why it can be easier to produce pentaquarks at low than at high energies.

  7. Binary-Symmetry Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Hiram

    1987-01-01

    Transmission errors for zeros and ones tabulated separately. Binary-symmetry detector employs psuedo-random data pattern used as test message coming through channel. Message then modulo-2 added to locally generated and synchronized version of test data pattern in same manner found in manufactured test sets of today. Binary symmetrical channel shows nearly 50-percent ones to 50-percent zeroes correspondence. Degree of asymmetry represents imbalances due to either modulation, transmission, or demodulation processes of system when perturbed by noise.

  8. PT symmetry in optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulides, Demetrios

    2015-03-01

    Interest in complex Hamiltonians has been rekindled after the realization that a wide class of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians can have entirely real spectra as long as they simultaneously respect parity and time reversal operators. In non-relativistic quantum mechanics, governed by the Schrödinger equation, a necessary but not sufficient condition for PT symmetry to hold is that the complex potential should involve real and imaginary parts which are even and odd functions of position respectively. As recently indicated, optics provides a fertile ground to observe and utilize notions of PT symmetry. In optics, the refractive index and gain/loss profiles play the role of the real and imaginary parts of the aforementioned complex potentials. As it has been demonstrated in several studies, PT-symmetric optical structures can exhibit peculiar properties that are otherwise unattainable in traditional Hermitian (conservative) optical settings. Among them, is the possibility for breaking this symmetry through an abrupt phase transition, band merging effects and unidirectional invisibility. Here we review recent developments in the field of -symmetric optics.

  9. Viscoelasticity Breaks the Symmetry of Impacting Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, H.; Néel, B.; Limat, L.

    2014-11-01

    A jet of a Newtonian liquid impacting on a wall at right angle spreads as a thin liquid sheet which preserves the radial symmetry of the jet. We report that for a viscoelastic jet (solution of polyethylene glycol in water) this symmetry can break; close to the wall, the jet cross section becomes faceted and radial steady liquid films (wings) form, which connect the cross-section vertices to the sheet. The number of wings increases with increasing the viscoelastic relaxation time of the solution, but also with increasing jet velocity and decreasing distance from the jet nozzle to the wall. We propose a mechanism for this surprising destabilization of the jet shape, which develops perpendicularly to the direction expected for a buckling mechanism, and explain these dependencies. We also discuss the large-scale consequences of the jet destabilization on the sheet spreading and fragmentation, which show through the faceting of hydraulic jumps and of suspended (Savart) sheets.

  10. Shaped gold and silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yugang; An, Changhua

    2011-03-01

    Advance in the synthesis of shaped nanoparticles made of gold and silver is reviewed in this article. This review starts with a new angle by analyzing the relationship between the geometrical symmetry of a nanoparticle shape and its internal crystalline structures. According to the relationship, the nanoparticles with well-defined shapes are classified into three categories: nanoparticles with single crystallinity, nanoparticles with angular twins, and nanoparticles with parallel twins. Discussion and analysis on the classical methods for the synthesis of shaped nanoparticles in each category are also included and personal perspectives on the future research directions in the synthesis of shaped metal nanoparticles are briefly summarized. This review is expected to provide a guideline in designing the strategy for the synthesis of shaped nanoparticles and analyzing the corresponding growth mechanism.

  11. Symmetries in laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1976-01-01

    The different types of symmetry exhibited by laminated anisotropic fibrous composite plates are identified and contrasted with the symmetries of isotropic and homogeneous orthotropic plates. The effects of variations in the fiber orientation and the stacking sequence of the layers on the symmetries exhibited by composite plates are discussed. Both the linear and geometrically nonlinear responses of the plates are considered. A simple procedure is presented for exploiting the symmetries in the finite element analysis. Examples are given of square, skew and polygonal plates where use of symmetry concepts can significantly reduce the scope and cost of analysis.

  12. What Shapes Supernova Remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has mounted that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) supernovae (SNe) can have substantial deviations from spherical symmetry; one such piece of evidence is the complex morphologies of supernova remnants (SNRs). However, the relative role of the explosion geometry and the environment in shaping SNRs remains an outstanding question. Recently, we have developed techniques to quantify the morphologies of SNRs, and we have applied these methods to the extensive X-ray and infrared archival images available of Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud SNRs. In this proceeding, we highlight some results from these studies, with particular emphasis on SNR asymmetries and whether they arise from ``nature'' or ``nurture''.

  13. Size-dependent symmetry breaking in models for morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio, R. A.; Maini, P. K.; Aragón, J. L.; Torres, M.

    2002-08-01

    A general property of dynamical systems is the appearance of spatial and temporal patterns due to a change of stability of a homogeneous steady state. Such spontaneous symmetry breaking is observed very frequently in all kinds of real systems, including the development of shape in living organisms. Many nonlinear dynamical systems present a wide variety of patterns with different shapes and symmetries. This fact restricts the applicability of these models to morphogenesis, since one often finds a surprisingly small variation in the shapes of living organisms. For instance, all individuals in the Phylum Echinodermata share a persistent radial fivefold symmetry. In this paper, we investigate in detail the symmetry-breaking properties of a Turing reaction-diffusion system confined in a small disk in two dimensions. It is shown that the symmetry of the resulting pattern depends only on the size of the disk, regardless of the boundary conditions and of the differences in the parameters that differentiate the interior of the domain from the outer space. This study suggests that additional regulatory mechanisms to control the size of the system are of crucial importance in morphogenesis.

  14. Transforming Articulation Barriers in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Verle

    Barriers to educational mobility for nurses have existed since the mid-1960s. In 1963, the National League for Nursing (NLN) adopted a position that ruled out articulation of any kind between associate degree in nursing (ADN) and bachelors in science in nursing (BSN) programs. In the mid-1970s, a countermovement took shape, supporting open…

  15. Efficiency of single noise barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hothersall, D. C.; Chandler-Wilde, S. N.; Hajmirzae, M. N.

    1991-04-01

    A numerical model is described which enables the sound field in the region of outdoor noise barriers to be calculated by using the boundary element method. The non-uniqueness of solution of the method, producing unreliable results in some conditions, is discussed. The model can be applied to barriers of arbitrary cross-sectional shape and arbitrary distribution of surface cover. The model is two-dimensional, but results are shown to agree well with those obtained for the three-dimensional problem of propagation from a point source over a noise barrier of infinite length. The model is used to compare the efficiency of a wide range of constructions of single noise barriers of different height, cross-sectional shape and surface cover. The effects of the ground cover are also considered. Comparison is made by examining spectra of the insertion loss of the barriers, and also broadband insertion losses for a source with a characteristic A-weighted road traffic noise spectrum. Single-figure estimates are presented of the relative efficiency, in terms of insertion loss, in the deep shadow zone, of a wide range of barrier configurations.

  16. Crystalline structure and symmetry dependence of acoustic nonlinearity parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    1994-01-01

    A quantitative measure of elastic wave nonlinearity in crystals is provided by the acoustic nonlinearity parameters. The nonlinearity parameters are defined for arbitrary propagation modes for solids of arbitrary crystalline symmetry and are determined along the pure mode propagation directions for 33 crystals of cubic symmetry from data reported in the literature. The magnitudes of the nonlinearity parameters are found to exhibit a strong dependence on the crystalline structure and symmetries associated with the modal direction in the solid. Calculations based on the Born-Mayer potential for crystals having a dominant repulsive contribution to the elastic constants from the interatomic pair potential suggest that the origin of the structure dependence is associated with the shape rather than the strength of the potential. Considerations based on variations in crystal symmetry during loading along pure mode propagation directions of face-centered-cubic solids provide a qualitative explanation for the dependence of the acoustic nonlinearity parameters on modal direction.

  17. Symmetry in halo displays and symmetry in halo-making crystals.

    PubMed

    Können, Gunther P

    2003-01-20

    The relation between the symmetry in halo displays and crystal symmetry is investigated for halo displays that are generated by ensembles of crystals. It is found that, regardless of the symmetry of the constituent crystals, such displays are always left-right (L-R) symmetric if the crystals are formed from the surrounding vapor. L-R symmetry of a halo display implies here that the cross sections for formation of a halo arc on the left-hand side of the solar vertical and its right-hand side mirror image are equal. This property leaves room for two types of halo display only: a full symmetric one (mmm-symmetric), and a partial symmetric one (mm2-symmetric) in which halo constituents lack their counterparts on the other side of the parhelic circle. A partial symmetric display can occur only for point halos. Its occurrence implies that a number of symmetry elements are not present in the shape of the halo-making crystals. These elements are a center of inversion, any rotatory-inversion axis that is parallel to the crystal spin axis P, a mirror plane perpendicular to the P axis, and a twofold rotation axis perpendicular to the P axis. A simple conceptual method is presented to reconstruct possible shapes of the halo-generating crystals from the halos in the display. The method is illustrated in two examples. Halos that may occur on the Saturnian satellite Titan are discussed. The possibilities for the Huygens probe to detect these halos during its descent through the Titan clouds in 2005 are detailed. PMID:12570252

  18. Thermal symmetry in isoscaling

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero, C. R.; Lopez, J. A.; Dorso, C. O.

    2007-02-12

    It is determined that isoscaling data, if produced by two isotopic reactions under similar thermodynamic conditions, should satisfy a simple numerical relationship. This, which helps to explore the symmetry of thermodynamic conditions of isotopic reactions, is studied using molecular dynamics simulations of 40Ca+40Ca, 48Ca+48Ca, and 52Ca+52Ca, at beam energies from 35 MeV / A to 85 MeV / A, and as a function of time. Strong deviations from the rule are detected in the beginning of the collision, with an excellent convergence at long times for some energies. A comparison with experimental data and other calculations is also included.

  19. Language barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ngwakongnwi, Emmanuel; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Musto, Richard; King-Shier, Kathryn M.; Quan, Hude

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of regular medical doctors (RMDs), as well as awareness and use of telephone health lines or telehealth services, by official language minorities (OLMs) in Canada. Design Analysis of data from the 2006 postcensal survey on the vitality of OLMs. Setting Canada. Participants In total, 7691 English speakers in Quebec and 12 376 French speakers outside Quebec, grouped into those who experienced language barriers and those with no language barriers. Main outcome measures Health services utilization (HSU) by the presence of language barriers; HSU measures included having an RMD, use of an RMD’s services, and awareness of and use of telephone health lines or telehealth services. Multivariable models examined the associations between HSU and language barriers. Results After adjusting for age and sex, English speakers residing in Quebec with limited proficiency in French were less likely to have RMDs (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.66, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.87) and to use the services of their RMDs (AOR 0.65, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.86), but were more likely to be aware of the existence of (AOR 1.50, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.93) and to use (AOR 1.43, 95% CI 0.97 to 2.11) telephone health lines or telehealth services. This pattern of having and using RMDs and telehealth services was not observed for French speakers residing outside of Quebec. Conclusion Overall we found variation in HSU among the language barrier populations, with lower use observed in Quebec. Age older than 45 years, male sex, being married or in common-law relationships, and higher income were associated with having RMDs for OLMs. PMID:23242902

  20. Reusable Thermal Barrier for Insulation Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saladee, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Filler composed of resilient, heat-resistant materials. Thermal barrier nestles snugly in gap between two tiles with minimal protrusion beyond faces of surrounding tiles. When removed from gap, barrier springs back to nearly original shape. Developed for filling spaces between tiles on Space Shuttle, also used in furnaces and kilns.

  1. Probing symmetry and symmetry breaking in resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.; Guo, J.

    1997-04-01

    Conventional non-resonant soft X-ray emission brings about information about electronic structure through its symmetry and polarization selectivity, the character of which is governed by simple dipole rules. For centro-symmetric molecules with the emitting atom at the inversion center these rules lead to selective emission through the required parity change. For the more common classes of molecules which have lower symmetry or for systems with degenerate core orbitals (delocalized over identical sites), it is merely the local symmetry selectivity that provides a probe of the local atomic orbital contribution to the molecular orbital. For instance, in X-ray spectra of first row species the intensities essentially map the p-density at each particular atomic site, and, in a molecular orbital picture, the contribution of the local p-type atomic orbitals in the LCAO description of the molecular orbitals. The situation is different for resonant X-ray fluorescence spectra. Here strict parity and symmetry selectivity gives rise to a strong frequency dependence for all molecules with an element of symmetry. In addition to symmetry selectivity the strong frequency dependence of resonant X-ray emission is caused by the interplay between the shape of a narrow X-ray excitation energy function and the lifetime and vibrational broadenings of the resonantly excited core states. This interplay leads to various observable effects, such as linear dispersion, resonance narrowing and emission line (Stokes) doubling. Also from the point of view of polarization selectivity, the resonantly excited X-ray spectra are much more informative than the corresponding non-resonant spectra. Examples are presented for nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide molecules.

  2. Midpoint Shapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welchman, Rosamond; Urso, Josephine

    2000-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of children exploring hands-on and minds-on mathematics. Presents a midpoint shape activity for students to explore the midpoint shape of familiar quadrilaterals, such as squares and rectangles. (KHR)

  3. Galactic oscillator symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosensteel, George

    1995-01-01

    Riemann ellipsoids model rotating galaxies when the galactic velocity field is a linear function of the Cartesian coordinates of the galactic masses. In nuclear physics, the kinetic energy in the linear velocity field approximation is known as the collective kinetic energy. But, the linear approximation neglects intrinsic degrees of freedom associated with nonlinear velocity fields. To remove this limitation, the theory of symplectic dynamical symmetry is developed for classical systems. A classical phase space for a self-gravitating symplectic system is a co-adjoint orbit of the noncompact group SP(3,R). The degenerate co-adjoint orbit is the 12 dimensional homogeneous space Sp(3,R)/U(3), where the maximal compact subgroup U(3) is the symmetry group of the harmonic oscillator. The Hamiltonian equations of motion on each orbit form a Lax system X = (X,F), where X and F are elements of the symplectic Lie algebra. The elements of the matrix X are the generators of the symplectic Lie algebra, viz., the one-body collective quadratic functions of the positions and momenta of the galactic masses. The matrix F is composed from the self-gravitating potential energy, the angular velocity, and the hydostatic pressure. Solutions to the hamiltonian dynamical system on Sp(3,R)/U(3) are given by symplectic isospectral deformations. The Casimirs of Sp(3,R), equal to the traces of powers of X, are conserved quantities.

  4. Applications of chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarski, R.D.

    1995-03-01

    The author discusses several topics in the applications of chiral symmetry at nonzero temperature. First, where does the rho go? The answer: up. The restoration of chiral symmetry at a temperature T{sub {chi}} implies that the {rho} and a{sub 1} vector mesons are degenerate in mass. In a gauged linear sigma model the {rho} mass increases with temperature, m{sub {rho}}(T{sub {chi}}) > m{sub {rho}}(0). The author conjectures that at T{sub {chi}} the thermal {rho} - a{sub 1}, peak is relatively high, at about {approximately}1 GeV, with a width approximately that at zero temperature (up to standard kinematic factors). The {omega} meson also increases in mass, nearly degenerate with the {rho}, but its width grows dramatically with temperature, increasing to at least {approximately}100 MeV by T{sub {chi}}. The author also stresses how utterly remarkable the principle of vector meson dominance is, when viewed from the modern perspective of the renormalization group. Secondly, he discusses the possible appearance of disoriented chiral condensates from {open_quotes}quenched{close_quotes} heavy ion collisions. It appears difficult to obtain large domains of disoriented chiral condensates in the standard two flavor model. This leads to the last topic, which is the phase diagram for QCD with three flavors, and its proximity to the chiral critical point. QCD may be very near this chiral critical point, and one might thereby generated large domains of disoriented chiral condensates.

  5. Symmetry of Magnetically Ordered Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifshitz, Ron

    1998-03-01

    The notion of magnetic symmetry is reexamined in light of the recent observation of long-range magnetic order in icosahedral quasicrystals [Charrier et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 4637 (1997)]. The relation between the symmetry of a magnetically ordered (periodic or quasiperiodic) crystal, given in terms of a ``spin space group,'' and its neutron diffraction diagram is established. In doing so, an outline of a symmetry classification scheme for magnetically ordered quasiperiodic crystals, is provided. Predictions are given for the expected diffraction patterns of magnetically ordered icosahedral crystals, provided their symmetry is well described by icosahedral spin space groups.

  6. Leptogenesis and residual CP symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Ding, Gui-Jun; King, Stephen F.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss flavour dependent leptogenesis in the framework of lepton flavour models based on discrete flavour and CP symmetries applied to the type-I seesaw model. Working in the flavour basis, we analyse the case of two general residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, which corresponds to all possible semi-direct models based on a preserved Z 2 in the neutrino sector, together with a CP symmetry, which constrains the PMNS matrix up to a single free parameter which may be fixed by the reactor angle. We systematically study and classify this case for all possible residual CP symmetries, and show that the R-matrix is tightly constrained up to a single free parameter, with only certain forms being consistent with successful leptogenesis, leading to possible connections between leptogenesis and PMNS parameters. The formalism is completely general in the sense that the two residual CP symmetries could result from any high energy discrete flavour theory which respects any CP symmetry. As a simple example, we apply the formalism to a high energy S 4 flavour symmetry with a generalized CP symmetry, broken to two residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, recovering familiar results for PMNS predictions, together with new results for flavour dependent leptogenesis.

  7. Symmetry fractionalization and twist defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarantino, Nicolas; Lindner, Netanel H.; Fidkowski, Lukasz

    2016-03-01

    Topological order in two-dimensions can be described in terms of deconfined quasiparticle excitations—anyons—and their braiding statistics. However, it has recently been realized that this data does not completely describe the situation in the presence of an unbroken global symmetry. In this case, there can be multiple distinct quantum phases with the same anyons and statistics, but with different patterns of symmetry fractionalization—termed symmetry enriched topological order. When the global symmetry group G, which we take to be discrete, does not change topological superselection sectors—i.e. does not change one type of anyon into a different type of anyon—one can imagine a local version of the action of G around each anyon. This leads to projective representations and a group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, with the second cohomology group {H}2(G,{{ A }}{{abelian}}) being the relevant group. In this paper, we treat the general case of a symmetry group G possibly permuting anyon types. We show that despite the lack of a local action of G, one can still make sense of a so-called twisted group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, and show how this data is encoded in the associativity of fusion rules of the extrinsic ‘twist’ defects of the symmetry. Furthermore, building on work of Hermele (2014 Phys. Rev. B 90 184418), we construct a wide class of exactly-solvable models which exhibit this twisted symmetry fractionalization, and connect them to our formal framework.

  8. NIF symmetry capsule modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Pino, J. E.; Rowley, D. P.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Spears, B. K.; Tipton, R. E.

    2013-10-01

    NIF CH ablator symmetry capsules are filled with hydrogen or helium gas. SymCaps have more moderate convergence ratios ~ 15 as opposed to ~ 35 for ignition capsules with DT ice layers, and better agreement has been achieved between simulations and experimental data. We will present modeling of capsules with CD layers and tritium fill, for which we are able to match the dependence of DT yield on recession distance of the CD layer from the gas. We can also match the performance of CH capsules with D3 He fill. The simulations include surface roughness, drive asymmetry, a mock-up of modulation introduced by the tent holding the capsule, and an empirical prescription for ablator-gas atomic mix. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Spontaneous Planar Chiral Symmetry Breaking in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadidjojo, Jeremy; Lubensky, David

    Recent progress in animal development has highlighted the central role played by planar cell polarity (PCP) in epithelial tissue morphogenesis. Through PCP, cells have the ability to collectively polarize in the plane of the epithelium by localizing morphogenetic proteins along a certain axis. This allows direction-dependent modulation of tissue mechanical properties that can translate into the formation of complex, non-rotationally invariant shapes. Recent experimental observations[1] show that cells, in addition to being planar-polarized, can also spontaneously develop planar chirality, perhaps in the effort of making yet more complex shapes that are reflection non-invariant. In this talk we will present our work in characterizing general mechanisms that can lead to spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in cells. We decompose interfacial concentration of polarity proteins in a hexagonal cell packing into irreducible representations. We find that in the case of polar concentration distributions, a chiral state can only be reached from a secondary instability after the cells are polarized. However in the case of nematic distributions, we show that a finite-amplitude (subcritical, or ``first-order'') nematic transition can send the system from disorder directly to a chiral state. In addition, we find that perturbing the system by stretching the hexagonal packing enables direct (supercritical, or ``second-order'') chiral transition in the nematic case. Finally, we do a Landau expansion to study competition between stretch-induced chirality and the tendency towards a non-chiral state in packings that have retained the full 6-fold symmetry.

  10. Arabidopsis root growth movements and their symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Fortunati, Alessio; Tassone, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Over the last fifteen years, an increasing number of plant scientists have become interested in the Arabidopsis root growth pattern, that is produced on the surface of an agar plate, inclined from the vertical. In this situation, the roots wave intensely and slant preferentially towards one side, showing torsions in the epidermal cell files alternately right-and left handed. In addition, the pattern switches to the formation of large or strict coils when the plate is set horizontally. After this finding, different hypotheses were advanced attempting to explain the forces that shape these patterns. These basically appear to be gravitropism, circumnutation and negative thigmotropism. With regard to the symmetry, the coils and the slanting in the wild-type are essentially right-handed, but mutants were also reported which show a left-handed symmetry, while some do not show a regular growth pattern at all. This review article discusses the earlier as well as the most recent findings on the topic, and investigates the possibility of describing the different mechanisms shaping the root growth patterns via unifying hypothesis. PMID:19721745

  11. A vault ribonucleoprotein particle exhibiting 39-fold dihedral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Koji; Tanaka, Hideaki; Sumizawa, Tomoyuki; Yoshimura, Masato; Yamashita, Eiki; Iwasaki, Kenji; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2008-05-01

    A vault from rat liver was crystallized in space group C2. Rotational symmetry searches indicated that the particle has 39-fold dihedral symmetry. Vault is a 12.9 MDa ribonucleoprotein particle with a barrel-like shape, two protruding caps and an invaginated waist structure that is highly conserved in a wide variety of eukaryotes. Multimerization of the major vault protein (MVP) is sufficient to assemble the entire exterior shell of the barrel-shaped vault particle. Multiple copies of two additional proteins, vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (VPARP) and telomerase-associated protein 1 (TEP1), as well as a small vault RNA (vRNA), are also associated with vault. Here, the crystallization of vault particles is reported. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 708.0, b = 385.0, c = 602.9 Å, β = 124.8°. Rotational symmetry searches based on the R factor and correlation coefficient from noncrystallographic symmetry (NCS) averaging indicated that the particle has 39-fold dihedral symmetry.

  12. Crystallographic and Spectroscopic Symmetry Notations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    Compares Schoenflies and Hermann-Mauguin notations of symmetry. Although the former (used by spectroscopists) and latter (used by crystallographers) both describe the same symmetry, there are distinct differences in the manner of description which may lead to confusion in correlating the two notations. (Author/JN)

  13. Generalized Atkin-Lehner symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dienes, Keith R.

    1990-09-01

    Atkin-Lehner symmetry was proposed several years ago as a mechanism for obtaining a vanishing one-loop cosmological constant in nonsupersymmetric superstring models, but for models formulated in four-dimensional spacetime this symmetry cannot be realized. We therefore investigate various means of retaining the general Atkin-Lehner idea without having strict Atkin-Lehner symmetry. We first explicitly construct non-Atkin-Lehner-symmetric partition functions which not only lead to vanishing cosmological constants but which also avoid a recent proof that Atkin-Lehner-symmetric partition functions cannot arise from physically viable string models in greater than two dimensions. We then develop a systematic generalization of Atkin-Lehner symmetry, basing our considerations on the use of non-Hermitian operators as well as on a general class of possible congruence subgroups of the full modular group. We find that whereas in many instances our resulting symmetries reduce to either strict Atkin-Lehner symmetry or symmetries closely related to it, in other cases we obtain symmetries of a fundamentally new character. Our results therefore suggest possible new avenues for retaining the general Atkin-Lehner ``selection rule'' approach for obtaining a vanishing one-loop cosmological constant.

  14. Generalized Atkin-Lehner symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Dienes, K.R. )

    1990-09-15

    Atkin-Lehner symmetry was proposed several years ago as a mechanism for obtaining a vanishing one-loop cosmological constant in nonsupersymmetric superstring models, but for models formulated in four-dimensional spacetime this symmetry cannot be realized. We therefore investigate various means of retaining the general Atkin-Lehner idea without having strict Atkin-Lehner symmetry. We first explicitly construct non-Atkin-Lehner-symmetric partition functions which not only lead to vanishing cosmological constants but which also avoid a recent proof that Atkin-Lehner-symmetric partition functions cannot arise from physically viable string models in greater than two dimensions. We then develop a systematic generalization of Atkin-Lehner symmetry, basing our considerations on the use of non-Hermitian operators as well as on a general class of possible congruence subgroups of the full modular group. We find that whereas in many instances our resulting symmetries reduce to either strict Atkin-Lehner symmetry or symmetries closely related to it, in other cases we obtain symmetries of a fundamentally new character. Our results therefore suggest possible new avenues for retaining the general Atkin-Lehner selection rule'' approach for obtaining a vanishing one-loop cosmological constant.

  15. Symmetry in the Car Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Karen

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a lesson on rotational symmetry which she developed for her students. The aim of the lesson was "to identify objects with rotational symmetry in the staff car park" and the success criteria were "pictures or sketches of at least six objects with different orders of rotation". After finding examples of…

  16. Symmetry in Sign Language Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; Kaneko, Michiko

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the range of ways that sign languages use geometric symmetry temporally and spatially to create poetic effect. Poets use this symmetry in sign language art to highlight duality and thematic contrast, and to create symbolic representations of beauty, order and harmony. (Contains 8 tables, 14 figures and 6 notes.)

  17. Overcoming Barriers.

    PubMed

    Neal-Boylan, Leslie; Schmidt, Kari L

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Neal-Boylan's program of scholarship has always focused on nurse workforce issues. She recently published two books related to how nurses work. One (The Nurse's Reality Gap: Overcoming Barriers Between Academic Achievement and Clinical Success; Neal-Boylan, 2013) focused on the experience of new graduates from baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral programs. The second book, The Nurse's Reality Shift: Using Our History to Transform Our Future (Neal-Boylan, 2014), focuses on the problems nursing continues to face throughout our history and has failed to correct. PMID:26200309

  18. Ultraviolet completion without symmetry restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endlich, Solomon; Nicolis, Alberto; Penco, Riccardo

    2014-03-01

    We show that it is not possible to UV complete certain low-energy effective theories with spontaneously broken spacetime symmetries by embedding them into linear sigma models, that is, by adding "radial" modes and restoring the broken symmetries. When such a UV completion is not possible, one can still raise the cutoff up to arbitrarily higher energies by adding fields that transform nonlinearly under the broken symmetries, that is, new Goldstone bosons. However, this (partial) UV completion does not necessarily restore any of the broken symmetries. We illustrate this point by considering a concrete example in which a combination of spacetime and internal symmetries is broken down to a diagonal subgroup. Along the way, we clarify a recently proposed interpretation of inverse Higgs constraints as gauge-fixing conditions.

  19. Asymptotic symmetries from finite boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Tomás; Marolf, Donald

    2016-01-01

    It is natural to regulate an infinite-sized system by imposing a boundary condition at finite distance, placing the system in a 'box.' This breaks symmetries, though the breaking is small when the box is large. One should thus be able to obtain the asymptotic symmetries of the infinite system by studying regulated systems. We provide concrete examples in the context of Einstein-Hilbert gravity (with negative or zero cosmological constant) by showing in 4 or more dimensions how the anti-de Sitter and Poincaré asymptotic symmetries can be extracted from gravity in a spherical box with Dirichlet boundary conditions. In 2 + 1 dimensions we obtain the full double-Virasoro algebra of asymptotic symmetries for AdS3 and, correspondingly, the full Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) algebra for asymptotically flat space. In higher dimensions, a related approach may continue to be useful for constructing a good asymptotically flat phase space with BMS asymptotic symmetries.

  20. Symmetry inheritance of scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolić, Ivica

    2015-07-01

    Matter fields do not necessarily have to share the symmetries with the spacetime they live in. When this happens, we speak of the symmetry inheritance of fields. In this paper we classify the obstructions of symmetry inheritance by the scalar fields, both real and complex, and look more closely at the special cases of stationary and axially symmetric spacetimes. Since the symmetry noninheritance is present in the scalar fields of boson stars and may enable the existence of the black hole scalar hair, our results narrow the possible classes of such solutions. Finally, we define and analyse the symmetry noninheritance contributions to the Komar mass and angular momentum of the black hole scalar hair.

  1. Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Medina, J.F.; Sarvide, S.; Bervoets, T.J.M.; Everts, V.; DenBesten, P.; Smith, C.E.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl− for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b−/− mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b−/− mice and was strongly correlated with Cl−. Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl− levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  2. Using MT2 to distinguish dark matter stabilization symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Kim, Doojin; Walker, Devin G. E.; Zhu, Lijun

    2011-09-01

    We examine the potential of using colliders to distinguish models with parity (Z2) stabilized dark matter (DM) from models in which the DM is stabilized by other symmetries, taking the latter to be a Z3 symmetry for illustration. The key observation is that a heavier mother particle charged under a Z3 stabilization symmetry can decay into one or two DM particles along with standard model particles. This can be contrasted with the decay of a mother particle charged under a parity symmetry; typically, only one DM particle appears in the decay chain. The arXiv:1003.0899 studied the distributions of visible invariant mass from the decay of a single such mother particle in order to highlight the resulting distinctive signatures of Z3 symmetry versus parity symmetry stabilized dark matter candidates. We now describe a complementary study which focuses on decay chains of the two mother particles which are necessarily present in these events. We also include in our analysis the missing energy/momentum in the event. For the Z3 symmetry stabilized mothers, the resulting inclusive final state can have two, three or four DM particles. In contrast, models with Z2 symmetry can have only two. We show that the shapes and edges of the distribution of MT2-type variables, along with ratio of the visible momentum/energy on the two sides of the event, are powerful in distinguishing these different scenarios. Finally we conclude by outlining future work which focuses on reducing combinatoric ambiguities from reconstructing multijet events. Increasing the reconstruction efficiency can allow better reconstruction of events with two or three dark matter candidates in the final state.

  3. Schapiro Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Emily

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a lesson on Schapiro Shapes. Schapiro Shapes is based on the art of Miriam Schapiro, who created a number of works of figures in action. Using the basic concepts of this project, students learn to create their own figures and styles. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  4. Anomalous discrete symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z. )

    1992-12-01

    We examine an interesting scenario to solve the domain-wall problem recently suggested by Preskill, Trivedi, Wilczek, and Wise. The effective potential is calculated in the presence of the QCD axial anomaly. It is shown that some discrete symmetries such as {ital CP} and {ital Z}{sub 2} can be anomalous due to a so-called {ital K} term induced by instantons. We point out that the {ital Z}{sub 2} domain-wall problem in the two-doublet standard model can be resolved by two types of solutions: the {ital CP}-conserving one and the {ital CP}-breaking one. In the first case, there exist two {ital Z}{sub 2}-related local minima whose energy splitting is provided by the instanton effect. In the second case, there is only one unique vacuum so that the domain walls do not form at all. The consequences of this new source of {ital CP} violation are discussed and shown to be well within the experimental limits in weak interactions.

  5. Geometrical spin symmetry and spin

    SciTech Connect

    Pestov, I. B.

    2011-07-15

    Unification of General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics leads to General Quantum Mechanics which includes into itself spindynamics as a theory of spin phenomena. The key concepts of spindynamics are geometrical spin symmetry and the spin field (space of defining representation of spin symmetry). The essence of spin is the bipolar structure of geometrical spin symmetry induced by the gravitational potential. The bipolar structure provides a natural derivation of the equations of spindynamics. Spindynamics involves all phenomena connected with spin and provides new understanding of the strong interaction.

  6. Spectral theorem and partial symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, A.; Gozdz, M.

    2012-10-15

    A novel method of the decompositon of a quantum system's Hamiltonian is presented. In this approach the criterion of the decomposition is determined by the symmetries possessed by the sub-Hamiltonians. This procedure is rather generic and independent of the actual global symmetry, or the lack of it, of the full Hamilton operator. A detailed investigation of the time evolution of the various sub-Hamiltonians, therefore the change in time of the symmetry of the physical object, is presented for the case of a vibrator-plus-rotor model. Analytical results are illustrated by direct numerical calculations.

  7. Hidden symmetries and black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.

    2009-10-01

    The paper contains a brief review of recent results on hidden symmetries in higher dimensional black hole spacetimes. We show how the existence of a principal CKY tensor (that is a closed conformal Killing-Yano 2-form) allows one to generate a `tower' of Killing-Yano and Killing tensors responsible for hidden symmetries. These symmetries imply complete integrability of geodesic equations and the complete separation of variables in the Hamilton-Jacobi, Klein-Gordon, Dirac and gravitational perturbation equations in the general Kerr-NUT-(A)dS metrics. Equations of the parallel transport of frames along geodesics in these spacetimes are also integrable.

  8. Combining Flavour and CP Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio

    2013-07-01

    I shortly review the impact of the most recent neutrino oscillation data on our attempts to construct a realistic model for neutrino masses and mixing angles. Models based on anarchy and its variants remain an open possibility, reinforced by the latest experimental findings. Many models based on discrete symmetries no longer work in their simplest realizations. I illustrate several proposals that can rescue discrete symmetries. In particular I discuss the possibility of combining discrete flavour symmetries and CP, and I describe a recently proposed symmetry breaking pattern that allows to predict all mixing parameters, angles and phases, in terms of a single real unknown. I analyze several explicit examples of this construction, providing new realistic mixing patterns.

  9. A symmetry of massless fields

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Keller, J.

    1996-09-01

    It is proved that there exists an additional intrinsic symmetry in the left-handed and right-handed fermions (and other fields). The corresponding group of transformations is induced by the Poincar{acute e} translations in the space{endash}time manifold. This symmetry predicts an additional intrinsic energy-momentum for fermions. Considering this symmetry as local leads to introduction of a gauge field and of a nonintegrable phase angle, the corresponding Berry-type phase depends on the topology of the Riemannian space{endash}time manifold as determined by the vierbein. This additional symmetry provides us with the possibility of considering the fermions as gauge fields on the nonvector bundle. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Trace formula for broken symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Creagh, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    We derive a trace formula for systems that exhibit an approximate continuous symmetry. It interpolates between the sum over continuous families of periodic orbits that holds in the case of exact continuous symmetry, and the discrete sum over isolated orbits that holds when the symmetry is completely broken. It is based on a simple perturbation expansion of the classical dynamics, centered around the case of exact symmetry, and gives an approximation to the usual Gutzwiller formula when the perturbation is large. We illustrate the computation with some 2-dimensional examples: the deformation of the circular billiard into an ellipse, and anisotropic and anharmonic perturbations of a harmonic oscillator. Copyright {copyright} 1996 Academic Press, Inc.

  11. Symmetries from the solution manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaya, Víctor; Guerrero, Julio; Lopez-Ruiz, Francisco F.; Cossío, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    We face a revision of the role of symmetries of a physical system aiming at characterizing the corresponding Solution Manifold (SM) by means of Noether invariants as a preliminary step towards a proper, non-canonical, quantization. To this end, "point symmetries" of the Lagrangian are generally not enough, and we must resort to the more general concept of contact symmetries. They are defined in terms of the Poincaré-Cartan form, which allows us, in turn, to find the symplectic structure on the SM, through some sort of Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) transformation. These basic symmetries are realized as Hamiltonian vector fields, associated with (coordinate) functions on the SM, lifted back to the Evolution Manifold through the inverse of this HJ mapping, that constitutes an inverse of the Noether Theorem. The specific examples of a particle moving on S3, at the mechanical level, and nonlinear SU(2)-sigma model in field theory are sketched.

  12. Anomalies and Discrete Chiral Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    2009-09-07

    The quantum anomaly that breaks the U(1) axial symmetry of massless multi-flavored QCD leaves behind a discrete flavor-singlet chiral invariance. With massive quarks, this residual symmetry has a close connection with the strong CP-violating parameter theta. One result is that if the lightest quarks are degenerate, then a first order transition will occur when theta passes through pi. The resulting framework helps clarify when the rooting prescription for extrapolating in the number of flavors is valid.

  13. Momentum dependence of symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupland, Daniel D.; Youngs, Michael; Chajecki, Zbigniew; Lynch, William; Tsang, Betty; Zhang, Yingxun; Famiano, Michael; Ghosh, Tilak; Giacherio, B.; Kilburn, Micha; Lee, Jenny; Lu, Fei; Russotto, Paulo; Sanetullaev, Alisher; Showalter, Rachel; Verde, Giuseppe; Winkelbauer, Jack

    2014-09-01

    One of the main uncertainties in the Equation of State of neutron-rich nuclear matter concerns the density and momentum dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Some constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy at sub-saturation densities have been recently obtained. However questions remain, especially concerning the momentum dependence of the symmetry mean-field potential that can make the neutron and proton effective masses different. We probe the momentum dependence of this isovector mean-field potential by comparing the energy spectra of neutrons and protons emitted in 112Sn+112Sn and 124Sn +124Sn collisions at incident energies of E/A = 50 and 120 MeV. We achieve an experimental precision that can discriminate between transport model predictions for the n/p double ratio for different momentum dependencies of the symmetry mean-field potential. One of the main uncertainties in the Equation of State of neutron-rich nuclear matter concerns the density and momentum dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Some constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy at sub-saturation densities have been recently obtained. However questions remain, especially concerning the momentum dependence of the symmetry mean-field potential that can make the neutron and proton effective masses different. We probe the momentum dependence of this isovector mean-field potential by comparing the energy spectra of neutrons and protons emitted in 112Sn+112Sn and 124Sn+124Sn collisions at incident energies of E/A = 50 and 120 MeV. We achieve an experimental precision that can discriminate between transport model predictions for the n/p double ratio for different momentum dependencies of the symmetry mean-field potential. PHY-1102511.

  14. Broken Symmetries and Magnetic Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2007-01-01

    Phase space symmetries inherent in the statistical theory of ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are known to be broken dynamically to produce large-scale coherent magnetic structure. Here, results of a numerical study of decaying MHD turbulence are presented that show large-scale coherent structure also arises and persists in the presence of dissipation. Dynamically broken symmetries in MHD turbulence may thus play a fundamental role in the dynamo process.

  15. Dynamical symmetries in nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years the concept of dynamical symmetries in nuclei has witnessed a renaissance of interest and activity. Much of this work has been developed in the context of the Interacting Boson Approximation (or IBA) model. The appearance and properties of dynamical symmetries in nuclei will be reviewed, with emphasis on their characteristic signatures and on the role of the proton-neutron interaction in their formation, systematics and evolution. 36 refs., 20 figs.

  16. Symmetry and quaternionic integrable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaeta, G.; Rodríguez, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Given a hyperkahler manifold M, the hyperkahler structure defines a triple of symplectic structures on M; with these, a triple of Hamiltonians defines a so-called hyperHamiltonian dynamical system on M. These systems are integrable when can be mapped to a system of quaternionic oscillators. We discuss the symmetry of integrable hyperHamiltonian systems, i.e. quaternionic oscillators, and conversely how these symmetries characterize, at least in the Euclidean case, integrable hyperHamiltonian systems.

  17. Symmetry in polarimetric remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Yueh, S. H.; Kwok, R.

    1993-01-01

    Relationships among polarimetric backscattering coefficients are derived from the viewpoint of symmetry groups. For both reciprocal and non-reciprocal media, symmetry encountered in remote sensing due to reflection, rotation, azimuthal, and centrical symmetry groups is considered. The derived properties are general and valid to all scattering mechanisms, including volume and surface scatterings and their interactions, in a given symmetrical configuration. The scattering coefficients calculated from theoretical models for layer random media and rough surfaces are shown to obey the symmetry relations. Use of symmetry properties in remote sensing of structural and environmental responses of scattering media is also discussed. Orientations of spheroidal scatterers described by spherical, uniform, planophile, plagiothile, erectophile, and extremophile distributions are considered to derive their polarimetric backscattering characteristics. These distributions can be identified from the observed scattering coefficients by comparison with theoretical symmetry calculations. A new parameter is then defined to study scattering structures in geophysical media. Observations from polarimetric data acquired by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne synthetic aperture radar over forests, sea ice, and sea surface are presented. Experimental evidences of the symmetry relationships are shown and their use in polarimetric remote sensing is illustrated. For forests, the coniferous forest in Mt. Shasta area (California) and mixed forest near Presque Isle (Maine) exhibit characteristics of the centrical symmetry at C-band. For sea ice in the Beaufort Sea, multi-year sea ice has a cross-polarized ratio e close to e(sub 0), calculated from symmetry, due to the randomness in the scattering structure. First-year sea ice has e much smaller than e(sub 0) due to the preferential alignment of the columnar structure of the ice. From polarimetric data of a sea surface in the Bering Sea, it is

  18. Gedanken Worlds without Higgs: QCD-Induced Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; Shrock, Robert; /YITP, Stony Brook

    2009-01-01

    To illuminate how electroweak symmetry breaking shapes the physical world, we investigate toy models in which no Higgs fields or other constructs are introduced to induce spontaneous symmetry breaking. Two models incorporate the standard SU(3){sub c} {circle_times} SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} U(1){sub Y} gauge symmetry and fermion content similar to that of the standard model. The first class--like the standard electroweak theory--contains no bare mass terms, so the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry within quantum chromodynamics is the only source of electroweak symmetry breaking. The second class adds bare fermion masses sufficiently small that QCD remains the dominant source of electroweak symmetry breaking and the model can serve as a well-behaved low-energy effective field theory to energies somewhat above the hadronic scale. A third class of models is based on the left-right-symmetric SU(3){sub c} {circle_times} SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} SU(2){sub R} {circle_times} U(1)B?L gauge group. In a fourth class of models, built on SU(4){sub PS} {circle_times} SU(2){sub L} {circle_times} SU(2){sub R} gauge symmetry, lepton number is treated as a fourth color. Many interesting characteristics of the models stem from the fact that the effective strength of the weak interactions is much closer to that of the residual strong interactions than in the real world. The Higgs-free models not only provide informative contrasts to the real world, but also lead us to consider intriguing issues in the application of field theory to the real world.

  19. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A.

    2015-05-15

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  20. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breakinga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, Donald A.

    2015-05-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  1. Point interactions, metamaterials, and PT-symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2016-05-01

    We express the boundary conditions for TE and TM waves at the interfaces of an infinite planar slab of homogeneous metamaterial as certain point interactions and use them to compute the transfer matrix of the system. This allows us to demonstrate the omnidirectional reflectionlessness of Veselago's slab for waves of arbitrary wavelength, reveal the translational and reflection symmetry of this slab, explore the laser threshold condition and coherent perfect absorption for active negative-index metamaterials, introduce a point interaction modeling phase-conjugation, determine the corresponding antilinear transfer matrix, and offer a simple proof of the equivalence of Veselago's slab with a pair of parallel phase-conjugating plates. We also study the connection between certain optical setups involving metamaterials and a class of PT-symmetric quantum systems defined on wedge-shape contours in the complex plane. This provides a physical interpretation for the latter.

  2. Separability and dynamical symmetry of Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.-M.; Zou, L.-P.; Horvathy, P.A.; Gibbons, G.W.

    2014-02-15

    The separability and Runge–Lenz-type dynamical symmetry of the internal dynamics of certain two-electron Quantum Dots, found by Simonović et al. (2003), are traced back to that of the perturbed Kepler problem. A large class of axially symmetric perturbing potentials which allow for separation in parabolic coordinates can easily be found. Apart from the 2:1 anisotropic harmonic trapping potential considered in Simonović and Nazmitdinov (2013), they include a constant electric field parallel to the magnetic field (Stark effect), the ring-shaped Hartmann potential, etc. The harmonic case is studied in detail. -- Highlights: • The separability of Quantum Dots is derived from that of the perturbed Kepler problem. • Harmonic perturbation with 2:1 anisotropy is separable in parabolic coordinates. • The system has a conserved Runge–Lenz type quantity.

  3. Sprache als Barriere (Language as a Barrier)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattheier, Klaus

    1974-01-01

    The concept of language barrier has its derivations in the fields of dialectology, sociology and psychology. In contemporary usage however, the concept has two meanings i.e. regional-cultural barrier and socio-cultural barrier. (Text is in German.) (DS)

  4. Classical and quantum Kummer shape algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odzijewicz, A.; Wawreniuk, E.

    2016-07-01

    We study a family of integrable systems of nonlinearly coupled harmonic oscillators on the classical and quantum levels. We show that the integrability of these systems follows from their symmetry characterized by algebras, here called Kummer shape algebras. The resolution of identity for a wide class of reproducing kernels is found. A number of examples, illustrating this theory, are also presented.

  5. Heavy-element fission barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.; Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira; Bengtsson, Ragnar; Uhrenholt, Henrik; Angstromberg, Sven

    2009-06-15

    We present calculations of fission properties for heavy elements. The calculations are based on the macroscopic-microscopic finite-range liquid-drop model with a 2002 parameter set. For each nucleus we have calculated the potential energy in three different shape parametrizations: (1) for 5 009 325 different shapes in a five-dimensional deformation space given by the three-quadratic-surface parametrization, (2) for 10 850 different shapes in a three-dimensional deformation space spanned by {epsilon}{sub 2}, {epsilon}{sub 4}, and {gamma} in the Nilsson perturbed-spheroid parametrization, supplemented by a densely spaced grid in {epsilon}{sub 2}, {epsilon}{sub 3}, {epsilon}{sub 4}, and {epsilon}{sub 6} for axially symmetric deformations in the neighborhood of the ground state, and (3) an axially symmetric multipole expansion of the shape of the nuclear surface using {beta}{sub 2}, {beta}{sub 3}, {beta}{sub 4}, and {beta}{sub 6} for intermediate deformations. For a fissioning system, it is always possible to define uniquely one saddle or fission threshold on the optimum trajectory between the ground state and separated fission fragments. We present such calculated barrier heights for 1585 nuclei from Z=78 to Z=125. Traditionally, actinide barriers have been characterized in terms of a ''double-humped'' structure. Following this custom we present calculated energies of the first peak, second minimum, and second peak in the barrier for 135 actinide nuclei from Th to Es. However, for some of these nuclei which exhibit a more complex barrier structure, there is no unique way to extract a double-humped structure from the calculations. We give examples of such more complex structures, in particular the structure of the outer barrier region near {sup 232}Th and the occurrence of multiple fission modes. Because our complete results are too extensive to present in a paper of this type, our aim here is limited: (1) to fully present our model and the methods for determining the

  6. Parity-time symmetry broken by point-group symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández, Francisco M. Garcia, Javier

    2014-04-15

    We discuss a parity-time (PT) symmetric Hamiltonian with complex eigenvalues. It is based on the dimensionless Schrödinger equation for a particle in a square box with the PT-symmetric potential V(x, y) = iaxy. Perturbation theory clearly shows that some of the eigenvalues are complex for sufficiently small values of |a|. Point-group symmetry proves useful to guess if some of the eigenvalues may already be complex for all values of the coupling constant. We confirm those conclusions by means of an accurate numerical calculation based on the diagonalization method. On the other hand, the Schrödinger equation with the potential V(x, y) = iaxy{sup 2} exhibits real eigenvalues for sufficiently small values of |a|. Point group symmetry suggests that PT-symmetry may be broken in the former case and unbroken in the latter one.

  7. Physical symmetry and lattice symmetry in the lattice Boltzmann method

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N.; Chen, S.; Jin, S.; Martinez, D.

    1997-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is regarded as a specific finite difference discretization for the kinetic equation of the discrete velocity distribution function. We argue that for finite sets of discrete velocity models, such as LBM, the physical symmetry is necessary for obtaining the correct macroscopic Navier-Stokes equations. In contrast, the lattice symmetry and the Lagrangian nature of the scheme, which is often used in the lattice gas automaton method and the existing lattice Boltzmann methods and directly associated with the property of particle dynamics, is not necessary for recovering the correct macroscopic dynamics. By relaxing the lattice symmetry constraint and introducing other numerical discretization, one can also obtain correct hydrodynamics. In addition, numerical simulations for applications, such as nonuniform meshes and thermohydrodynamics can be easily carried out and numerical stability can be ensured by the Courant-Friedricks-Lewey condition and using the semi-implicit collision scheme. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Symmetry in finite phase plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, J.

    2010-03-01

    The known symmetries in one-dimensional systems are inversion and translations. These symmetries persist in finite phase plane, but a novel symmetry arises in view of the discrete nature of the coordinate xi and the momentum pi : xi and pi can undergo permutations. Thus, if xi assumes M discrete values, i = 0, 1,2,..., M - 1, a permutation will change the order of the set x0,x1,..., xM-1 into a new ordered set. Such a symmetry element does not exist for a continuous x-coordinate in an infinite phase plane. Thus, in a finite phase plane, translations can be replaced by permutations. This is also true for the inversion operator. The new permutation symmetry has been used for the construction of conjugate representations and for the splitting of the M-dimensional vector space into independent subspaces. This splitting is exhaustive in the sense that if M = iMi with Mi being prime numbers, the M-dimensional space splits into M1,M2,...Mn-dimensional independent subspaces. It is shown that following this splitting one can design new potentials with appropriate constants of motion. A related problem is the Weyl-Heisenberg group in the M-dimensional space which turns into a direct product of its subgroups in the Mi-dimensional subspaces. As an example we consider the case of M = 8.

  9. Symmetry Guide to Ferroaxial Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlinka, J.; Privratska, J.; Ondrejkovic, P.; Janovec, V.

    2016-04-01

    The 212 species of the structural phase transitions with a macroscopic symmetry breaking are inspected with respect to the occurrence of the ferroaxial order parameter, the electric toroidal moment. In total, 124 ferroaxial species are found, some of them being also fully ferroelectric (62) or fully ferroelastic ones (61). This ensures a possibility of electrical or mechanical switching of ferroaxial domains. Moreover, there are 12 ferroaxial species that are neither ferroelectric nor ferroelastic. For each species, we have also explicitly worked out a canonical form for a set of representative equilibrium property tensors of polar and axial nature in both high-symmetry and low-symmetry phases. This information was gathered into the set of 212 mutually different symbolic matrices, expressing graphically the presence of nonzero independent tensorial components and the symmetry-imposed links between them, for both phases simultaneously. Symmetry analysis reveals the ferroaxiality in several currently debated materials, such as VO2 , LuFe2 O4 , and URu2 Si2 .

  10. On the symmetries of integrability

    SciTech Connect

    Bellon, M.; Maillard, J.M.; Viallet, C. )

    1992-06-01

    In this paper the authors show that the Yang-Baxter equations for two-dimensional models admit as a group of symmetry the infinite discrete group A{sub 2}{sup (1)}. The existence of this symmetry explains the presence of a spectral parameter in the solutions of the equations. The authors show that similarly, for three-dimensional vertex models and the associated tetrahedron equations, there also exists an infinite discrete group of symmetry. Although generalizing naturally the previous one, it is a much bigger hyperbolic Coxeter group. The authors indicate how this symmetry can help to resolve the Yang-Baxter equations and their higher-dimensional generalizations and initiate the study of three-dimensional vertex models. These symmetries are naturally represented as birational projective transformations. They may preserve non-trivial algebraic varieties, and lead to proper parametrizations of the models, be they integrable or not. The authors mention the relation existing between spin models and the Bose-Messner algebras of algebraic combinatorics. The authors' results also yield the generalization of the condition q{sup n} = 1 so often mentioned in the theory of quantum groups, when no q parameter is available.

  11. CKM matrix and flavor symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Takeshi; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Ishimori, Hajime; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Ogasahara, Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    Following the way proposed recently by Hernandez and Smirnov, we seek possible residual symmetries in the quark sector with a focus on the von Dyck groups. We begin with two extreme cases in which both θ13 and θ23 or only θ13 are set to zero. Then, cases where all the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa parameters are allowed to take nonzero values are explored. The Z7 symmetry is favorable to realize only the Cabibbo angle. On the other hand, larger groups are necessary in order to be consistent with all the mixing parameters. Possibilities of embedding the obtained residual symmetries into the Δ(6N2) series are also briefly discussed.

  12. Symmetries in geometrical optics: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilagyi, M.; Mui, P. H.

    1995-12-01

    A study of light and charged-particle optical systems with inversion, reflection, rotation, translation, and/or glide symmetries is presented. The constraints imposed by the various symmetries on the first-order properties of a lens are investigated. In particular, the mathematical structures of the deflection vectors and the transfer matrices are described for various symmetrical systems. In the course of studying the translation and the glide symmetries, a simple technique for characterizing a general system of N identical components in series (or cascade) is also developed, based on the linear algebra theory of factoring matrices into Jordan canonical forms. Applications of these results are presented in a follow-up paper [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 12, XXXX (1995)]. Copyright (c) 1995 Optical Society of America

  13. Heisenberg symmetry and hypermultiplet manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Derendinger, Jean-Pierre; Marios Petropoulos, P.; Siampos, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    We study the emergence of Heisenberg (Bianchi II) algebra in hyper-Kähler and quaternionic spaces. This is motivated by the rôle these spaces with this symmetry play in N = 2 hypermultiplet scalar manifolds. We show how to construct related pairs of hyper-Kähler and quaternionic spaces under general symmetry assumptions, the former being a zooming-in limit of the latter at vanishing scalar curvature. We further apply this method for the two hyper-Kähler spaces with Heisenberg algebra, which is reduced to U (1) × U (1) at the quaternionic level. We also show that no quaternionic spaces exist with a strict Heisenberg symmetry - as opposed to Heisenberg ⋉ U (1). We finally discuss the realization of the latter by gauging appropriate Sp (2 , 4) generators in N = 2 conformal supergravity.

  14. Symmetry breaking in molecular ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ping-Ping; Tang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Peng-Fei; Liao, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Zhong-Xia; Ye, Qiong; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2016-07-11

    Ferroelectrics are inseparable from symmetry breaking. Accompanying the paraelectric-to-ferroelectric phase transition, the paraelectric phase adopting one of the 32 crystallographic point groups is broken into subgroups belonging to one of the 10 ferroelectric point groups, i.e. C1, C2, C1h, C2v, C4, C4v, C3, C3v, C6 and C6v. The symmetry breaking is captured by the order parameter known as spontaneous polarization, whose switching under an external electric field results in a typical ferroelectric hysteresis loop. In addition, the responses of spontaneous polarization to other external excitations are related to a number of physical effects such as second-harmonic generation, piezoelectricity, pyroelectricity and dielectric properties. Based on these, this review summarizes recent developments in molecular ferroelectrics since 2011 and focuses on the relationship between symmetry breaking and ferroelectricity, offering ideas for exploring high-performance molecular ferroelectrics. PMID:27051889

  15. Symmetry Relations in Chemical Kinetics Arising from Microscopic Reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adib, Artur B.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the kinetics of time-reversible chemical reactions having the same equilibrium constant but different initial conditions are closely related to one another by a directly measurable symmetry relation analogous to chemical detailed balance. In contrast to detailed balance, however, this relation does not require knowledge of the elementary steps that underlie the reaction, and remains valid in regimes where the concept of rate constants is ill defined, such as at very short times and in the presence of low activation barriers. Numerical simulations of a model of isomerization in solution are provided to illustrate the symmetry under such conditions, and potential applications in protein folding or unfolding are pointed out.

  16. Symmetry analysis of cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2013-01-01

    By means of B-calculus [V. García-Morales, Phys. Lett. A 376 (2012) 2645] a universal map for deterministic cellular automata (CAs) has been derived. The latter is shown here to be invariant upon certain transformations (global complementation, reflection and shift). When constructing CA rules in terms of rules of lower range a new symmetry, “invariance under construction” is uncovered. Modular arithmetic is also reformulated within B-calculus and a new symmetry of certain totalistic CA rules, which calculate the Pascal simplices modulo an integer number p, is then also uncovered.

  17. Unparticles and electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong-Phil

    2008-11-23

    We investigate a scalar potential inspired by the unparticle sector for the electroweak symmetry breaking. The scalar potential contains the interaction between the standard model fields and unparticle sector. It is described by the non-integral power of fields that originates from the nontrivial scaling dimension of the unparticle operator. It is found that the electroweak symmetry is broken at tree level when the interaction is turned on. The scale invariance of unparticle sector is also broken simultaneously, resulting in a physical Higgs and a new lighter scalar particle.

  18. The Broken Symmetry of Time

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, Ruth E.

    2011-11-29

    This paper seeks to clarify features of time asymmetry in terms of symmetry breaking. It is observed that, in general, a contingent situation or event requires the breaking of an underlying symmetry. The distinction between the universal anisotropy of temporal processes and the irreversibility of certain physical processes is clarified. It is also proposed that the Transactional Interpretation of quantum mechanics offers an effective way to explain general thermodynamic asymmetry in terms of the time asymmetry of radiation, where prior such efforts have fallen short.

  19. Iterates of maps with symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chossat, Pascal; Golubitsky, Martin

    1988-01-01

    Fixed-point bifurcation, period doubling, and Hopf bifurcation (HB) for iterates of equivariant mappings are investigated analytically, with a focus on HB in the presence of symmetry. An algebraic formulation for the hypotheses of the theorem of Ruelle (1973) is derived, and the case of standing waves in a system of ordinary differential equations with O(2) symmetry is considered in detail. In this case, it is shown that HB can lead directly to motion on an invariant 3-torus, with an unexpected third frequency due to drift of standing waves along the torus.

  20. Symmetries of coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators possesses many interesting symmetries. It is noted that the symmetry of a single oscillator is that of the three-parameter group Sp(2). Thus two uncoupled oscillator exhibits a direct product of two Sp(2) groups, with six parameters. The coupling can be achieved through a rotation in the two-dimensional space of two oscillator coordinates. The closure of the commutation relations for the generators leads to the ten-parameter group Sp(4) which is locally isomorphic to the deSitter group O(3,2).

  1. Thermal barrier research

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, K.G.

    1990-03-07

    The thermal barrier region in the TARA device is a complex arrangement combining ion-plugging by sloshing ions with an ECRH-generated thermal barrier plasma. An axisymmetric, high-mirror-ratio magnetic field, adjacent to the central cell, provides the confinement of the thermal barrier plasma and sloshing ions. This paper discusses research being done in this thermal barrier region.

  2. Electric Dipole Moments in Radioactive Nuclei, Tests of Time Reversal Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, N.

    2010-11-24

    The research of radioactive nuclei opens new possibilities to study fundamental symmetries, such as time reversal and reflection symmetry. Such nuclei often provide conditions to check in an optimal way certain symmetries and the violation of such symmetries. We will discuss the possibility of obtaining improved limits on violation of time reversal symmetry using pear shaped radioactive nuclei. An effective method to test time reversal invariance in the non-strange sector is to measure parity and time reversal violating (T-P-odd) electromagnetic moments, (such as the static electric dipole moment). Parity and time reversal violating components in the nuclear force may produce P-T-odd moments in nuclei which in turn induce such moments in atoms. We will discuss the possibility that in some reflection asymmetric, heavy nuclei (which are radioactive) these moments are enhanced by several orders of magnitude. Present and future experiments, which will test this idea, will be mentioned.

  3. New two-dimensional quantum models with shape invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Cannata, F.; Ioffe, M. V.; Nishnianidze, D. N.

    2011-02-15

    Two-dimensional quantum models which obey the property of shape invariance are built in the framework of polynomial two-dimensional supersymmetric quantum mechanics. They are obtained using the expressions for known one-dimensional shape invariant potentials. The constructed Hamiltonians are integrable with symmetry operators of fourth order in momenta, and they are not amenable to the conventional separation of variables.

  4. Use of electrical barriers to deter movement of round goby

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Jude, David J.; Kostich, Melissa J.

    2001-01-01

    An electrical barrier was chosen as a possible means to deter movement of round goby Neogobius melanostomus. Feasibility studies in a 2.1-m donut-shaped tank determined the electrical parameters necessary to inhibit round goby from crossing the 1-m stretch of the benthic, electrical barrier. Increasing electrical pulse duration and voltage increased effectiveness of the barrier in deterring round goby movement through the barrier. Differences in activity of round goby during daytime and nocturnal tests did not change the effectiveness of the barrier. In field verification studies, an electrical barrier was placed between two blocking nets in the Shiawassee River, Michigan. The barrier consisted of a 6-m wide canvas on which were laid four cables carrying the electrical current. Seven experiments were conducted, wherein 25 latex paint-marked round goby were introduced upstream of the electrical barrier and recovered 24 h later upstream, on, and downstream of the barrier. During control studies, round goby moved across the barrier within 20 min from release upstream. With the barrier on and using the prescribed electrical settings shown to inhibit passage in the laboratory, the only marked round goby found below the barrier were dead. At reduced pulse durations, a few round goby (mean one/test) were found alive, but debilitated, below the barrier. The electrical barrier could be incorporated as part of a program in reducing movement of adult round goby through artificial connections between the watersheds.

  5. Effect of barriers on propagation of construction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, H. S.

    1980-12-01

    Comparison of measurements with over 400 separate predictions for wedge-shaped barriers of bare compacted earth shows that Maekawa's thin barrier theory is adequate for predicting A weighted barrier attenuation for construction noise sources. The mean discrepancy between measured and predicted barrier attenuation was 0.5 dB (A). Kurze's wide barrier theory predicted A weighted barrier attenuation with reasonable accuracy. The mean deviation between measured and predicted barrier attenuation was 2.0 dB (A), theory generally overpredicting. Other studies with a controlled loudspeaker source show the thin barrier theory to be suitable for predictions with cuttings whose sides are covered very sparsely with grass. Attenuations afforded by real, full sized cuttings and embankments whose sides and edges are covered with densely grown grass or loose shingle are 5 dB greater than Maekawa predictions.

  6. The Configuration Space Symmetries in the Quantum Bouncer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerby, David

    We study a few-body particle system with contact interactions in a quantum bouncer potential well. In principle, the strength of the gravitational field can be extracted from the one-particle energy spectrum, but this is currently experimentally impractical. This project explores how varying the number of particles and tuning the particle interaction strength can improve measurement sensitivity. The analysis exploits the additional symmetries of configuration space that occur either in the unitary limit of contact interactions or when the bouncer potential is decorated with additional infinite delta-barriers.

  7. Charge symmetry at the partonic level

    SciTech Connect

    Londergan, J. T.; Peng, J. C.; Thomas, A. W.

    2010-07-01

    This review article discusses the experimental and theoretical status of partonic charge symmetry. It is shown how the partonic content of various structure functions gets redefined when the assumption of charge symmetry is relaxed. We review various theoretical and phenomenological models for charge symmetry violation in parton distribution functions. We summarize the current experimental upper limits on charge symmetry violation in parton distributions. A series of experiments are presented, which might reveal partonic charge symmetry violation, or alternatively might lower the current upper limits on parton charge symmetry violation.

  8. Spin symmetry in the antinucleon spectrum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shan-Gui; Meng, Jie; Ring, P

    2003-12-31

    We discuss spin and pseudospin symmetry in the spectrum of single nucleons and single antinucleons in a nucleus. As an example we use relativistic mean field theory to investigate single antinucleon spectra. We find a very well developed spin symmetry in single antineutron and single antiproton spectra. The dominant components of the wave functions of the spin doublet are almost identical. This spin symmetry in antiparticle spectra and the pseudospin symmetry in particle spectra have the same origin. However, it turns out that the spin symmetry in antinucleon spectra is much better developed than the pseudospin symmetry in normal nuclear single particle spectra. PMID:14754045

  9. Shape phase transitions and critical points

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2009-05-04

    We investigate different aspects connected with shape phase transitions in nuclei and the possible occurrence of dynamical symmetries at the critical points. We discuss in particular the behaviour of the neighbour odd nuclei at the vicinity of the critical points in the even nuclei. We consider both the case of the transition from the vibrational behaviour to the gamma-unstable deformation (characterized within the collective Bohr hamiltonian by the E(5) critical point symmetry) and the case of the transition from the vibrational behaviour to the stable axial deformation (characterized by the X(5) symmetry). The odd particle is assumed to be moving in the three single particle orbitals j = 1/2,3/2,5/2, a set of orbitals that is known to lead to possible supersymmetric cases. The coupling of the odd particle to the Bohr hamiltonian does lead in fact in the former case at the critical point to the E(5/12) boson-fermion dynamical symmetry. An alternative approach to the two shape transitions is based on the Interacting Boson Fermion Model. In this case suitably parametrized boson-fermion hamiltonians can describe the evolution of the odd system along the shape transitions. At the critical points both energy spectra and electromagnetic transitions were found to display characteristic patterns similar to those displayed by the even nuclei at the corresponding critical point. The behaviour of the odd nuclei can therefore be seen as necessary complementary signatures of the occurrence of the phase transitions.

  10. Strong coupling electroweak symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.L.; Burdman, G.; Chivukula, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    The authors review models of electroweak symmetry breaking due to new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale and discuss the prospects for their experimental tests. They emphasize the direct observation of the new interactions through high-energy scattering of vector bosons. They also discuss indirect probes of the new interactions and exotic particles predicted by specific theoretical models.

  11. Paper Models Illustrating Virus Symmetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Instructions are given for constructing two models, one to illustrate the general principles of symmetry in T=1, T=3, and T=4 viruses, and the other to illustrate the disposition of protein subunits in the T=3 plant viruses and the picornaviruses. (Author/CW)

  12. Entanglement renormalization and gauge symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Vidal, G.

    2011-03-15

    A lattice gauge theory is described by a redundantly large vector space that is subject to local constraints and can be regarded as the low-energy limit of an extended lattice model with a local symmetry. We propose a numerical coarse-graining scheme to produce low-energy, effective descriptions of lattice models with a local symmetry such that the local symmetry is exactly preserved during coarse-graining. Our approach results in a variational ansatz for the ground state(s) and low-energy excitations of such models and, by extension, of lattice gauge theories. This ansatz incorporates the local symmetry in its structure and exploits it to obtain a significant reduction of computational costs. We test the approach in the context of a Z{sub 2} lattice gauge theory formulated as the low-energy theory of a specific regime of the toric code with a magnetic field, for lattices with up to 16x16 sites (16{sup 2}x2=512 spins) on a torus. We reproduce the well-known ground-state phase diagram of the model, consisting of a deconfined and spin-polarized phases separated by a continuous quantum phase transition, and obtain accurate estimates of energy gaps, ground-state fidelities, Wilson loops, and several other quantities.

  13. Concomitant Ordering and Symmetry Lowering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boo, William O. J.; Mattern, Daniell L.

    2008-01-01

    Examples of concomitant ordering include magnetic ordering, Jahn-Teller cooperative ordering, electronic ordering, ionic ordering, and ordering of partially-filled sites. Concomitant ordering sets in when a crystal is cooled and always lowers the degree of symmetry of the crystal. Concomitant ordering concepts can also be productively applied to…

  14. Turning Students into Symmetry Detectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilders, Richard; VanOyen, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Exploring mathematical symmetry is one way of increasing students' understanding of art. By asking students to search designs and become pattern detectives, teachers can potentially increase their appreciation of art while reinforcing their perception of the use of math in their day-to-day lives. This article shows teachers how they can interest…

  15. From symmetries to number theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tempesta, P.

    2009-05-15

    It is shown that the finite-operator calculus provides a simple formalism useful for constructing symmetry-preserving discretizations of quantum-mechanical integrable models. A related algebraic approach can also be used to define a class of Appell polynomials and of L series.

  16. Superdeformations and fermion dynamical symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Cheng-Li . Dept. of Physics and Atmospheric Science Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge, TN )

    1990-01-01

    In this talk, I will present a link between nuclear collective motions and their underlying fermion dynamical symmetries. In particular, I will focus on the microscopic understanding of deformations. It is shown that the SU{sub 3} of the one major shell fermion dynamical symmetry model (FDSM) is responsible for the physics of low and high spins in normal deformation. For the recently observed phenomena of superdeformation, the physics of the problem dictates a generalization to a supershell structure (SFDSM), which also has an SU{sub 3} fermion dynamical symmetry. Many recently discovered feature of superdeformation are found to be inherent in such an SU{sub 3} symmetry. In both cases the dynamical Pauli effect plays a vital role. A particularly noteworthy discovery from this model is that the superdeformed ground band is not the usual unaligned band but the D-pair aligned (DPA) band, which sharply crosses the excited bands. The existence of such DPA band is a key point to understand many properties of superdeformation. Our studies also poses new experimental challenge. This is particularly interesting since there are now plans to build new and exciting {gamma}-ray detecting systems, like the GAMMASPHERE, which could provide answers to some of these challenges. 34 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. The Symmetry of Natural Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Laurie M.

    This document is a monograph intended for advanced undergraduate students, or beginning graduate students, who have some knowledge of modern physics as well as classical physics, including the elementary quantum mechanical treatment of the hydrogen atom and angular momentum. The first chapter introduces symmetry and relates it to the mathematical…

  18. Baryon and chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsky, A.; Krikun, A.

    2014-07-23

    We briefly review the generalized Skyrmion model for the baryon recently suggested by us. It takes into account the tower of vector and axial mesons as well as the chiral symmetry breaking. The generalized Skyrmion model provides the qualitative explanation of the Ioffe’s formula for the baryon mass.

  19. Platonic Symmetry and Geometric Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zsombor-Murray, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Cubic symmetry is used to build the other four Platonic solids and some formalism from classical geometry is introduced. Initially, the approach is via geometric construction, e.g., the "golden ratio" is necessary to construct an icosahedron with pentagonal faces. Then conventional elementary vector algebra is used to extract quantitative…

  20. Circular codes, symmetries and transformations.

    PubMed

    Fimmel, Elena; Giannerini, Simone; Gonzalez, Diego Luis; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2015-06-01

    Circular codes, putative remnants of primeval comma-free codes, have gained considerable attention in the last years. In fact they represent a second kind of genetic code potentially involved in detecting and maintaining the normal reading frame in protein coding sequences. The discovering of an universal code across species suggested many theoretical and experimental questions. However, there is a key aspect that relates circular codes to symmetries and transformations that remains to a large extent unexplored. In this article we aim at addressing the issue by studying the symmetries and transformations that connect different circular codes. The main result is that the class of 216 C3 maximal self-complementary codes can be partitioned into 27 equivalence classes defined by a particular set of transformations. We show that such transformations can be put in a group theoretic framework with an intuitive geometric interpretation. More general mathematical results about symmetry transformations which are valid for any kind of circular codes are also presented. Our results pave the way to the study of the biological consequences of the mathematical structure behind circular codes and contribute to shed light on the evolutionary steps that led to the observed symmetries of present codes. PMID:25008961

  1. Control of Be capsule low mode implosions symmetry at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrala, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Yi, S.; Simakov, A. N.; Olson, R. E.; Wilson, D. C.; Batha, S.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J. E.; MacPhee, A. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Izumi, N.; Nagel, S.; Rygg, J. R.

    2016-05-01

    We present results of the beryllium experimental campaign on the implosion symmetry properties of beryllium capsules at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [1]. These indirect drive experiments measure both the inflight and core self-emission implosion symmetry. The inflight symmetry of the ablator before stagnation is measured using a backlight imaging technique. A copper backlighter was used to measure the transmissions (or backlit absorption) of the copper doped beryllium shells. Images of the x-ray emission from the core around bang time provide a measure of the symmetry near peak compression. Both pieces of information about the 2D symmetry are used to infer the drive and velocity uniformity enabling us to predictably adjust the properties of the incident laser, mainly the time dependent ratio of the inner beam cone power to the outer laser beam powers, to achieve proper symmetry of the implosion. Results from these experiments show inner beam propagation is not degraded compared to similar implosions with CH ablators. Variations in the shape compared with implosions using CH ablators also provides information about the cross beam energy transfer used to adjust the equatorial shape and thus infer information about the differences in plasma conditions near the laser entrance holes. Experimental results of the implosion shape for beryllium capsules will be presented along with comparisons relative to CH ablators.

  2. Sulfur Dioxide-Pyridine Dimer. FTIR and Theoretical Evidence for a Low-Symmetry Structure.

    PubMed

    Keller, John W

    2015-10-15

    Sulfur dioxide-pyridine complex formation was reinvestigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and computational methods. The SO2-pyridine dimer has been proposed to have a v-shaped, Cs-symmetric structure based on the microwave spectrum; however, recent research showing the occurrence of X···H-C hydrogen bonds in noncovalent complexes suggested that the structure of the complex should be re-examined. The FTIR spectrum of the dimer was obtained by numerical analysis of the spectra of pyridine-SO2 mixtures in CCl4. The spectrum showed ortho C-H stretching modes consistent with a C1-symmetric structure containing a S-O bond oriented approximately coplanar with the pyridine ring and adjacent to an ortho C-H moiety. The C1 structure, which was identified as the global minimum by various density functional theory and correlated ab initio calculations, is also consistent with the out-of-plane second moment (Pbb) value previously determined by microwave spectroscopy. The complex is converted to its mirror image via three possible Cs-symmetric transition states: v-shaped, bisected, and flat. At the M06-2X/6-311++G(2d,p) level of theory, the rotational barriers (ΔG(o‡)) are 1.40, 1.87, and 3.63 kcal mol(-1), respectively. Natural bond order analysis indicated the asymmetric complex is stabilized both by N→S donation and back-donation from O to antibonding orbitals on pyridine. Atoms in molecules calculations identified a bond critical point within the O···H-C gap consistent with a normal, albeit weak, hydrogen bond. Theoretical studies also identified a high-energy sandwich-type dimer with Cs symmetry, and a C2-symmetric SO2-pyridine2 trimer. PMID:26401726

  3. PT Symmetry, Conformal Symmetry, and the Metrication of Electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Philip D.

    2016-05-01

    We present some interesting connections between PT symmetry and conformal symmetry. We use them to develop a metricated theory of electromagnetism in which the electromagnetic field is present in the geometric connection. However, unlike Weyl who first advanced this possibility, we do not take the connection to be real but to instead be PT symmetric, with it being iA_{μ } rather than A_{μ } itself that then appears in the connection. With this modification the standard minimal coupling of electromagnetism to fermions is obtained. Through the use of torsion we obtain a metricated theory of electromagnetism that treats its electric and magnetic sectors symmetrically, with a conformal invariant theory of gravity being found to emerge. An extension to the non-Abelian case is provided.

  4. Symmetry reduction in high dimensions, illustrated in a turbulent pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Ashley P.; Short, Kimberly Y.; Cvitanović, Predrag

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium solutions are believed to structure the pathways for ergodic trajectories in a dynamical system. However, equilibria are atypical for systems with continuous symmetries, i.e., for systems with homogeneous spatial dimensions, whereas relative equilibria (traveling waves) are generic. In order to visualize the unstable manifolds of such solutions, a practical symmetry reduction method is required that converts relative equilibria into equilibria, and relative periodic orbits into periodic orbits. In this article we extend the fixed Fourier mode slice approach, previously applied one-dimensional PDEs, to a spatially three-dimensional fluid flow, and show that it is substantially more effective than our previous approach to slicing. Application of this method to a minimal flow unit pipe leads to the discovery of many relative periodic orbits that appear to fill out the turbulent regions of state space. We further demonstrate the value of this approach to symmetry reduction through projections (projections only possible in the symmetry-reduced space) that reveal the interrelations between these relative periodic orbits and the ways in which they shape the geometry of the turbulent attractor.

  5. Universal Formulation For Symmetries In Computed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    1995-01-01

    Universal formulation for high-order symmetries in boundary conditions on flows devised. Eliminates need for special procedures to incorporate symmetries and corresponding boundary conditions into computer codes solving Navier-Stokes and Euler equations of flow.

  6. What symmetries can do for you

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucci, M. C.

    2015-04-01

    Several applications of Lie symmetries and its generalisation are presented: from turning butterflies into tornados, to its applications in epidemics, population dynamics, and ultimately converting classical problems into the quantum realm. Applications of nonclassical symmetries are also illustrated.

  7. Resonances for Symmetric Two-Barrier Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for the accurate calculation of bound-state and resonance energies for one-dimensional potentials. We calculate the shape resonances for symmetric two-barrier potentials and compare them with those coming from the Siegert approximation, the complex scaling method and the box-stabilization method. A comparison of the…

  8. Partial Dynamical Symmetry in Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E

    2003-06-02

    Partial dynamical symmetry (PDS) extends and complements the concepts of exact and dynamical symmetry. It allows one to remove undesired constraints from an algebraic theory, while preserving some of the useful aspects of a dynamical symmetry, and to study the effects of symmetry breaking in a controlled manner. An example of a PDS in an interacting fermion system is presented. The associated PDS Hamiltonians are closely related with a realistic quadrupole-quadrupole interaction and provide new insights into this important interaction.

  9. Yet another symmetry breaking to be discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, M.

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of spontaneous symmetry breaking in particle physics was the greatest contribution in Nambu's achievements. There is another class of symmetries that exist in low-energy nature, yet is doomed to be broken at high energy, due to a lack of protection of the gauge symmetry. I shall review our approach to searching for this class of symmetry breaking, the lepton number violation linked to the generation of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in our universe.

  10. Fission barriers in a macroscopic-microscopic model

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrowolski, A.; Pomorski, K.; Bartel, J.

    2007-02-15

    In the framework of the macroscopic-microscopic model, this study investigates fission barriers in the region of actinide nuclei. A very effective four-dimensional shape parametrization for fissioning nuclei is proposed. Taking, in particular, the left-right mass asymmetric and nonaxial shapes into account is demonstrated to have a substantial effect on fission barrier heights. The influence of proton versus neutron deformation differences on the potential energy landscape of fissioning nuclei is also discussed.