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Sample records for baryon resonance analysis

  1. Baryon Spectroscopy and Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards

    2011-12-01

    A short review of current efforts to determine the highly excited state spectrum of QCD, and in particular baryons, using lattice QCD techniques is presented. The determination of the highly excited spectrum of QCD is a major theoretical and experimental challenge. The experimental investigation of the excited baryon spectrum has been a long-standing element of the hadronic-physics program, an important component of which is the search for so-called 'missing resonances', baryonic states predicted by the quark model based on three constituent quarks but which have not yet been observed experimentally. Should such states not be found, it may indicate that the baryon spectrum can be modeled with fewer effective degrees of freedom, such as in quark-diquark models. In the past decade, there has been an extensive program to collect data on electromagnetic production of one and two mesons at Jefferson Lab, MIT-Bates, LEGS, MAMI, ELSA, and GRAAL. To analyze these data, and thereby refine our knowledge of the baryon spectrum, a variety of physics analysis models have been developed at Bonn, George Washington University, Jefferson Laboratory and Mainz. To provide a theoretical determination and interpretation of the spectrum, ab initio computations within lattice QCD have been used. Historically, the calculation of the masses of the lowest-lying states, for both baryons and mesons, has been a benchmark calculation of this discretized, finite-volume computational approach, where the aim is well-understood control over the various systematic errors that enter into a calculation; for a recent review. However, there is now increasing effort aimed at calculating the excited states of the theory, with several groups presenting investigations of the low-lying excited baryon spectrum, using a variety of discretizations, numbers of quark flavors, interpolating operators, and fitting methodologies. Some aspects of these calculations remain unresolved and are the subject of intense

  2. Progress towards understanding baryon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Crede, Volker; Roberts, Winston

    2013-07-01

    The composite nature of baryons manifests itself in the existence of a rich spectrum of excited states, in particular in the important mass region 1?2 GeV for the light-flavoured baryons. The properties of these resonances can be identified by systematic investigations using electromagnetic and strong probes, primarily with beams of electrons, photons, and pions. After decades of research, the fundamental degrees of freedom underlying the baryon excitation spectrum are still poorly understood. The search for hitherto undiscovered but predicted resonances continues at many laboratories around the world. Recent results from photo- and electroproduction experiments provide intriguing indications for new states and shed light on the structure of some of the known nucleon excitations. The continuing study of available data sets with consideration of new observables and improved analysis tools have also called into question some of the earlier findings in baryon spectroscopy. Other breakthrough measurements have been performed in the heavy-baryon sector, which has seen a fruitful period in recent years, in particular at the B factories and the Tevatron. First results from the large hadron collider indicate rapid progress in the field of bottom baryons. In this review, we discuss the recent experimental progress and give an overview of theoretical approaches.

  3. Baryon Resonance Analysis in Two-Pion Electroproduction at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Marco Ripani

    2004-02-01

    The cross section for the reaction ep {yields} e{prime}p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} was measured in the resonance region for 1.4 < W < 2.1 GeV and 0.5 < Q{sup 2} < 1.5 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory. The data show resonant structures not visible in previous experiments. The comparison of our data to a phenomenological prediction using available information on N* and {Delta} states shows an evident discrepancy. A better description of the data is obtained either by a sizeable change of the properties of the P{sub 13}(1720) resonance or by introducing a new baryon state, not reported in published analyses.

  4. Measurement of ep-->e' ppi+ pi- and baryon resonance analysis.

    PubMed

    Ripani, M; Burkert, V D; Mokeev, V; Battaglieri, M; De Vita, R; Golovach, E; Taiuti, M; Adams, G; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Audit, G; Auger, T; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Berman, B L; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Calarco, J R; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cazes, A; Cetina, C; Ciciani, L; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Dharmawardane, K V; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Eckhause, M; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feldman, G; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Gaff, S J; Gai, M; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilad, S; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girard, P; Griffioen, K; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Heimberg, P; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hicks, R S; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ishkhanov, B; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Kelley, J H; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kuang, Y; Kuhn, S E; Kuhn, J; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Lawrence, D; Li, Ji; Livingston, K; Longhi, A; Lukashin, K; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; McAleer, S; McCarthy, J; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Mozer, M U; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Murphy, L Y; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Nelson, S O; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Opper, A K; Osipenko, M; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Quinn, B; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Sabourov, K; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Shafi, A; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Spraker, M; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Todor, L; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weller, H; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, C S; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zhang, B; Zhao, J; Zhou, Z

    2003-07-11

    The cross section for the reaction ep-->e(')ppi(+)pi(-) was measured in the resonance region for 1.4resonant structures not visible in previous experiments. The comparison of our data to a phenomenological prediction using available information on N(*) and Delta states shows an evident discrepancy. A better description of the data is obtained either by a sizable change of the properties of the P13(1720) resonance or by introducing a new baryon state, not reported in published analyses. PMID:12906472

  5. An Alternative View of the Dynamical Origin of the P11 Nucleon Resonances: Results from the Excited Baryon Analysis Center

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroyuki Kamano

    2012-04-01

    We present an alternative interpretation for the dynamical origin of the P{sub 11} nucleon resonances, which results from the dynamical coupled-channels analysis at Excited Baryon Analysis Center of Jefferson Lab. The results indicate the crucial role of the multichannel reaction dynamics in determining the N* spectrum. An understanding of the spectrum and structure of the excited nucleon (N*) states is a fundamental challenge in the hadron physics. The N* states, however, couple strongly to the meson-baryon continuum states and appear only as resonance states in the {gamma}N and {pi}N reactions. One can expect from such strong couplings that the (multichannel) reaction dynamics will affect significantly the N* states and cannot be neglected in extracting the N* parameters from the data and giving physical interpretations. It is thus well recognized nowadays that a comprehensive study of all relevant meson production reactions with {pi}N,{eta}N,{pi}{pi}N,KY, {hor_ellipsis} final states is necessary for a reliable extraction of the N* parameters. To address this challenging issue, the Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) of Jefferson Lab has been conducting the comprehensive analysis of the world data of {gamma}N,{pi}N {yields} {pi}N,{eta}N,{pi}{pi}N,KY, {hor_ellipsis} reactions systematically, covering the wide energy and kinematic regions. The analysis is pursued with a dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) model, the EBAC-DCC model, within which the unitarity among relevant meson-baryon channels, including the three-body {pi}{pi}N channel, is fully taken into account.

  6. Meson Production and Baryon Resonances at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Volker Burkert

    2011-02-01

    I give a brief overview of the exploration of baryon properties in meson photo- and electroproduction. These processes provide ample information for the study of electromagnetic couplings of baryon resonances and to search for states, yet to be discovered. The CLAS detector, combined with the use of energy-tagged polarized photons and polarized electrons, as well as polarized targets and the measurement of recoil polarization, provide the tools for a comprehensive nucleon resonance program. I briefly present the status of this program, prospects for the next few years, and plans for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade.

  7. Photoproduction of exotic baryon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    We point out that the new exotic resonances recently reported by LHCb in the J / ψ p channel are excellent candidates for photoproduction off a proton target. This test is crucial to confirming the resonant nature of such states, as opposed to their being kinematical effects. We specialize to an interpretation of the heavier narrow state as a molecule composed of Σc and Dbar*, and estimate its production cross section using vector dominance. The relevant photon energies and fluxes are well within the capabilities of the GlueX and CLAS12 detectors at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB). A corresponding calculation is also performed for photoproduction of an analogous resonance which is predicted to exist in the ϒp channel.

  8. Chiral dynamics of S -wave baryon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Bingwei

    2016-07-01

    As the pion mass approaches a critical value mπ⋆ from below, an S -wave resonance crosses the pion-baryon threshold and becomes a bound state with arbitrarily small binding energy, thus driving the scattering length to diverge. I explore the consequences of chiral symmetry for the values of mπ close to mπ⋆. It turns out that chiral symmetry is crucial for an S -wave resonance to be able to stand very near the threshold and in the meantime to remain narrow, provided that the mass splitting is reasonably small. The effective range of pion-baryon scattering is unexpectedly large, proportional to 4 π fπ2/mπ3 when mπ is around mπ⋆. As a result, this unexpected large length scale causes universality relations to break down much sooner than naively expected.

  9. Baryon resonances in large Nc QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matagne, N.; Stancu, Fl.

    2015-01-01

    The current status and open challenges of large Nc QCD baryon spectroscopy are reviewed. After introducing the 1 /Nc expansion method, the latest achievements for the ground state properties are revisited. Next the applicability of this method to excited states is presented using two different approaches with their advantages and disadvantages. Selected results for the spectrum and strong and electromagnetic decays are described. Also further developments for the applicability of the method to excited states are presented, based on the qualitative compatibility between the quark excitation picture and the meson-nucleon scattering picture. A quantitative comparison between results obtained from the mass formula of the 1 /Nc expansion method and quark models brings convincing support to quark models and the implications of different large Nc limits are discussed. The SU(6) spin-flavor structure of the large Nc baryon allows a convenient classification of highly excited resonances into SU(3) multiplets and predicts mass ranges for the missing partners.

  10. Measurement of ep {yields} e{prime}p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and Baryon Resonance Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marco Ripani; et. Al.

    2003-07-01

    The cross section for the reaction ep {yields} e{prime}p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} was measured in the resonance region for 1.4 < W < 2.1 GeV and 0.5 < Q{sup 2} < 1.5 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory. The data shows resonant structures not visible in previous experiments. The comparison of our data to a phenomenological prediction using available information on N* and {Delta} states shows an evident discrepancy. A better description of the data is obtained either by a sizeable change of the properties of the P{sub 13}(1720) resonance or by introducing a new baryon state, not reported in published analyses.

  11. Measurement of ep {yields} e{prime} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}: experimental procedures and baryon resonance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ripani; V.D. Burkert; V. Mokeev; M. Battaglieri; R. De Vita; E. Golovach; M. Taiuti; et al

    2003-04-01

    The cross section for the reaction ep {yields} e{prime} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} was measured in the resonance region for 1.4 < W < 2.1 GeV and 0.5 < Q{sup 2} < 1.5 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory. The data show resonant structures not visible in previous experiments. The comparison of our data to a phenomenological prediction using available information on N* and {Delta} states shows an evident discrepancy. A better description of the data is obtained either by a sizeable change of the properties of the P{sub 13}(1720) resonance or by introducing a new baryon state, not reported in published analyses.

  12. Coupling vector and pseudoscalar mesons to study baryon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Khemchandani, K. P.; Kaneko, H.; Hosaka, A.; Martinez Torres, A.; Nagahiro, H.

    2011-11-01

    A study of meson-baryon systems with total strangeness -1 is made within a framework based on the chiral and hidden local symmetries. These systems consist of octet baryons, pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The pseudoscalar meson-baryon (PB) dynamics has been earlier found determinant for the existence of some strangeness -1 resonances, for example, {Lambda}(1405), {Lambda}(1670), etc. The motivation of the present work is to study the effect of coupling the closed vector meson-baryon (VB) channels to these resonances. To do this, we obtain the PB{yields}PB and VB{yields}VB amplitudes from the t-channel diagrams and the PB{r_reversible}VB amplitudes are calculated using the Kroll-Ruddermann term where, considering the vector meson dominance phenomena, the photon is replaced by a vector meson. The calculations done within this formalism reveal a very strong coupling of the VB channels to the {Lambda}(1405) and {Lambda}(1670). In the isospin 1 case, we find evidence for a double pole structure of the {Sigma}(1480) which, like the isospin 0 resonances, is also found to couple strongly to the VB channels. The strong coupling of these low-lying resonances to the VB channels can have important implications on certain reactions producing them.

  13. The status of the Excited Baryon Analysis Center

    SciTech Connect

    B. Julia-Diaz

    2010-08-01

    The Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC), which is associated with the Theory Group at Jefferson Laboratory, was initiated in 2006. Its main goal is to extract and interpret properties of nucleon resonances (N*) from the world data of meson production reactions induced by pions, photons and electrons. We review the main accomplishments of the center since then and sketch its near future perspectives.

  14. Relativistic Quark-Model Results for Baryon Ground and Resonant States

    SciTech Connect

    Plessas, W.; Melde, T.

    2008-10-13

    Latest results from a study of baryon ground and resonant states within relativistic constituent quark models are reported. After recalling some typical spectral properties, the description of ground states, especially with regard to the nucleon and hyperon electromagnetic structures, is addressed. In the following, recent covariant predictions for pion, eta, and kaon partial decay widths of light and strange baryon resonances below 2 GeV are summarized. These results exhibit a characteristic pattern that is distinct from nonrelativistic or relativized decay studies performed so far. Together with a detailed analysis of the spin, flavor, and spatial structures of the wave functions, it supports a new and extended classification scheme of baryon ground and resonant states into SU(3) flavor multiplets.

  15. Pion-nucleon scattering in covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory with explicit Delta resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, De-Liang; Siemens, D.; Bernard, V.; Epelbaum, E.; Gasparyan, A. M.; Gegelia, J.; Krebs, H.; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a third order calculation of the pion-nucleon scattering amplitude in a chiral effective field theory with pions, nucleons and delta resonances as explicit degrees of freedom. We work in a manifestly Lorentz invariant formulation of baryon chiral perturbation theory using dimensional regularization and the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme. In the delta resonance sector, the on mass-shell renormalization is realized as a complex-mass scheme. By fitting the low-energy constants of the effective Lagrangian to the S- and P -partial waves a satisfactory description of the phase shifts from the analysis of the Roy-Steiner equations is obtained. We predict the phase shifts for the D and F waves and compare them with the results of the analysis of the George Washington University group. The threshold parameters are calculated both in the delta-less and delta-full cases. Based on the determined low-energy constants, we discuss the pion-nucleon sigma term. Additionally, in order to determine the strangeness content of the nucleon, we calculate the octet baryon masses in the presence of decuplet resonances up to next-to-next-to-leading order in SU(3) baryon chiral perturbation theory. The octet baryon sigma terms are predicted as a byproduct of this calculation.

  16. Mixing of pseudoscalar-baryon and vector-baryon in the JP=1 /2- sector and the N* (1535) and N* (1650) resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzon, E. J.; Oset, E.

    2015-02-01

    We study the meson-baryon interaction with JP=1 /2- using the hidden-gauge Lagrangians and mixing pseudoscalar meson-baryon with the vector meson-baryon states in a coupled channels scheme with π N ,η N ,K Λ ,K Σ ,ρ N , and π Δ (d wave). We fit the subtraction constants of each channel to the S11 partial wave amplitude of the π N scattering data extracted from the partial wave analysis of the George Washington group. We find two poles that we associate to the N*(1535 ) and the N*(1650 ) resonances, with negative subtraction constants of natural size, and compare the results with empirical determinations of these pole positions. We calculate the branching ratios for the different channels of each resonance and we find a good agreement with the experimental data. The cross section for the π-p →η n scattering is also evaluated and compared with experiment.

  17. Baryon Resonances from a Novel Fat-Link Fermion Action

    SciTech Connect

    W. Melnitchouk; S. Bilson-Thompson; F. D. R. Bonnet; P. D. Coddington; F. X. Lee; D. B. Leinweber; A. G. Williams; J. M. Zanotti; J. B. Zhang

    2001-07-01

    We present first results for masses of positive and negative parity excited baryons in lattice QCD using an O(a{sup 2}) improved gluon action and a Fat Link Irrelevant Clover (FLIC) fermion action in which only the irrelevant operators are constructed with fat links. The results are in agreement with earlier calculations of N* resonances using improved actions and exhibit a clear mass splitting between the nucleon and its chiral partner, even for the Wilson fermion action. The results also indicate a splitting between the lowest J{sup P}=1/2{sup -} states for the standard nucleon interpolating fields.

  18. Baryon resonances without quarks: A chiral soliton perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Karliner, M.

    1987-03-01

    In many processes involving low momentum transfer it is fruitful to regard the nucleon as a soliton or ''monopole-like'' configuration of the pion field. In particular, within this framework it is possible to obtain detailed predictions for pion-nucleon scattering amplitudes and for properties of baryon resonances. One can also derive model-independent linear relations between scattering amplitudes, such as ..pi..N and anti KN. A short survey of some recent results is given, including comparison with experimental data.

  19. Observation of Two New Ξb- Baryon Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, RCM; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, JVVB; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; LHCb Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    Two structures are observed close to the kinematic threshold in the Ξb0π- mass spectrum in a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 , recorded by the LHCb experiment. In the quark model, two baryonic resonances with quark content b d s are expected in this mass region: the spin-parity JP=(1/2 ) + and JP=(3/2 ) + states, denoted Ξb'- and Ξb*-. Interpreting the structures as these resonances, we measure the mass differences and the width of the heavier state to be m (Ξb'-)-m (Ξb0)-m (π-)=3.653 ±0.018 ±0.006 MeV /c2 , m (Ξb*-)-m (Ξb0)-m (π-)=23.96 ±0.12 ±0.06 MeV /c2 , Γ (Ξb*-)=1.65 ±0.31 ±0.10 MeV , where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The width of the lighter state is consistent with zero, and we place an upper limit of Γ (Ξb'-)<0.08 MeV at 95% confidence level. Relative production rates of these states are also reported.

  20. Observation of two new Ξ(b)(-) baryon resonances.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; 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Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Domenico, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gastaldi, U; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Sterpka, F; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V V B; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voss, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2015-02-13

    Two structures are observed close to the kinematic threshold in the Ξ(b)(0)π(-) mass spectrum in a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb(-1), recorded by the LHCb experiment. In the quark model, two baryonic resonances with quark content bds are expected in this mass region: the spin-parity J(P)=(1/2)(+) and J(P)=(3/2)(+) states, denoted Ξ(b)('-) and Ξ(b)(*-). Interpreting the structures as these resonances, we measure the mass differences and the width of the heavier state to be m(Ξ(b)('-))-m(Ξ(b)(0))-m(π(-))=3.653±0.018±0.006  MeV/c(2), m(Ξ(b)(*-))-m(Ξ(b)(0))-m(π(-))=23.96±0.12±0.06  MeV/c(2), Γ(Ξ(b)(*-))=1.65±0.31±0.10  MeV, where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The width of the lighter state is consistent with zero, and we place an upper limit of Γ(Ξ(b)('-))<0.08  MeV at 95% confidence level. Relative production rates of these states are also reported. PMID:25723210

  1. Study of a possible S = + 1 dynamically generated baryonic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sourav; Oset, E.; Vicente Vacas, M. J.

    2005-05-01

    Starting from the lowest-order chiral Lagrangian for the interaction of the baryon decuplet with the octet of pseudoscalar mesons we find an attractive interaction in the ΔK channel with L = 0 and I = 1, while the interaction is repulsive for I = 2. The attractive interaction leads to a pole in the second Riemann sheet of the complex plane and manifests itself in a large strength of the ΔK scattering amplitude close to the ΔK threshold, which is not the case for I = 2. However, we also make a study of uncertainties in the model and conclude that the existence of this pole depends sensitively upon the input used and can disappear within reasonable variations of the input parameters. We take advantage to study the stability of the other poles obtained for the {{3}/{2}}- dynamically generated resonances of the model and conclude that they are stable and not contingent to reasonable changes in the input of the theory.

  2. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fernando, I. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2015-02-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0⁺] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations,more » as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.« less

  3. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, I. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2015-02-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0⁺] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.

  4. Study of decuplet baryon resonances from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, C.; Negele, J. W.; Petschlies, M.; Pochinsky, A. V.; Syritsyn, S. N.

    2016-06-01

    A lattice QCD study of the strong decay width and coupling constant of decuplet baryons to an octet baryon-pion state is presented. The transfer matrix method is used to obtain the overlap of lattice states with decuplet baryon quantum numbers on the one hand and octet baryon-pion quantum numbers on the other as an approximation of the matrix element of the corresponding transition. By making use of leading-order effective field theory, the coupling constants as well as the widths for the various decay channels are determined. The transitions studied are Δ →π N , Σ*→Λ π , Σ*→Σ π and Ξ*→Ξ π . We obtain results for two ensembles of Nf=2 +1 dynamical fermion configurations: one using domain wall valence quarks on a staggered sea at a pion mass of 350 MeV and a box size of 3.4 fm and a second one using domain wall sea and valence quarks at pion mass 180 MeV and box size 4.5 fm.

  5. The Need for Polarization for Extracting Baryon Resonances and the NSTAR Program at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Philip L.

    2007-10-26

    We report on the NSTAR program in Hall B of JLab on using polarization observables to extract parameters of baryon resonances. The scientific purpose of the program is to improve the understanding of the underlying quark degrees of freedom, especially in the higher resonance regions, where we expect to uncover many of missing baryon resonances that mainly decay through multi-meson channels. With the high-quality beam of circularly- and linearly-polarized photons onto unpolarized and polarized proton and deteurium targets, and coupled with the nearly complete solid angle coverage of CLAS, we will extract the differential cross sections and associated polarization observables obtained by the photoproduction of vector mesons and kaons at center of mass energies of 1.7 to 2.2 GeV. The paper will primarily present the photon beam aspects of the excited baryon program.

  6. The Need for Polarization for Extracting Baryon Resonances and the NSTAR Program at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    P.L. Cole

    2007-10-01

    We report on the NSTAR program in Hall B of JLab on using polarization observables to extract parameters of baryon resonances. The scientific purpose of the program is to improve the understanding of the underlying quark degrees of freedom, especially in the higher resonance regions, where we expect to uncover many of missing baryon resonances that mainly decay through multi-meson channels. With the high-quality beam of circularly- and linearly-polarized photons onto unpolarized and polarized proton and deteurium targets, and coupled with the nearly complete solid angle coverage of CLAS, we will extract the differential cross sections and associated polarization observables obtained by the photoproduction of vector mesons and kaons at center of mass energies of 1.7 to 2.2 GeV. The paper will primarily present the photon beam aspects of the excited baryon program.

  7. Strange baryonic resonances and resonances coupling to strange hadrons at SIS energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbietti, L.

    2016-01-01

    The role played by baryonic resonances in the production of final states containing strangeness for proton-proton reactions at 3.5 GeV measured by HADES is discussed by means of several very different measurements. First the associate production of Δ resonances accompanying final states with strange hadrons is presented, then the role of interferences among N* resonances, as measured by HADES for the first time, is summarised. Last but not least the role played by heavy resonances, with a mass larger than 2 GeV/c2 in the production of strange and non-strange hadrons is discussed. Experimental evidence for the presence of a Δ(2000)++ are presented and hypotheses are discussed employing the contribution of similar objects to populate the excesses measured by HADES for the Ξ in A+A and p+A collisions and in the dilepton sector for A+A collisions. This extensive set of results helps to better understand the dynamic underlaying particle production in elementary reactions and sets a more solid basis for the understanding of heavy ion collisions at the same energies and even higher as planned at the FAIR facility.

  8. Including the {delta}(1232) resonance in baryon chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, C.; Wies, N.; Scherer, S.; Gegelia, J.

    2005-11-01

    Baryon chiral perturbation theory with explicit {delta}(1232) degrees of freedom is considered. The most general interactions of pions, nucleons, and {delta} consistent with all underlying symmetries as well as with the constraint structure of higher-spin fields are constructed. By use of the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme, a manifestly Lorentz-invariant effective-field theory with a systematic power counting is obtained. As applications, we discuss the mass of the nucleon, the pion-nucleon {sigma} term, and the pole of the {delta} propagator.

  9. New Exotic Meson and Baryon Resonances from Doubly Heavy Hadronic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L

    2015-09-18

    We predict several new exotic doubly heavy hadronic resonances, inferring from the observed exotic bottomoniumlike and charmoniumlike narrow states X(3872), Z_{b}(10610), Z_{b}(10650), Z_{c}(3900), and Z_{c}(4020/4025). We interpret the binding mechanism as mostly molecularlike isospin-exchange attraction between two heavy-light mesons in a relative S-wave state. We then generalize it to other systems containing two heavy hadrons which can couple through isospin exchange. The new predicted states include resonances in meson-meson, meson-baryon, baryon-baryon, and baryon-antibaryon channels. These include those giving rise to final states involving a heavy quark Q=c,b and antiquark Q[over ¯]^{'}=c[over ¯],b[over ¯], namely, DD[over ¯]^{*}, D^{*}D[over ¯]^{*}, D^{*}B^{*}, B[over ¯]B^{*}, B[over ¯]^{*}B^{*}, Σ_{c}D[over ¯]^{*}, Σ_{c}B^{*}, Σ_{b}D[over ¯]^{*}, Σ_{b}B^{*}, Σ_{c}Σ[over ¯]_{c}, Σ_{c}Λ[over ¯]_{c}, Σ_{c}Λ[over ¯]_{b}, Σ_{b}Σ[over ¯]_{b}, Σ_{b}Λ[over ¯]_{b}, and Σ_{b}Λ[over ¯]_{c}, as well as corresponding S-wave states giving rise to QQ^{'} or Q[over ¯]Q[over ¯]^{'}. PMID:26430989

  10. Study of the baryon resonances structure via η photoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenping; Saghai, Bijan

    1998-12-01

    Within a quark model the process γp-->ηp, for Eγlab < 1.2 GeV, is investigated. We find that the recent data from GRAAL on the polarized beam asymmetry require significant contributions from the resonances D13(1520), F15(1680), and to a lesser extent from P13(1720) in addition to those from the dominant S11(1535) resonance, implied by the Mainz differential cross-section data. The contributions from the resonances S11(1650), D13(1700) and D15(1675) are found consistently small but sensitive to the polarized target asymmetry measured recently at ELSA. These results are shown to be consistent with the quark model predictions.

  11. The width of the Roper resonance in baryon chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gegelia, Jambul; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Yao, De-Liang

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the width of the Roper resonance at next-to-leading order in a systematic expansion of baryon chiral perturbation theory with pions, nucleons, and the delta and Roper resonances as dynamical degrees of freedom. Three unknown low-energy constants contribute up to the given order. One of them can be fixed by reproducing the empirical value for the width of the Roper decay into a pion and a nucleon. Assuming that the remaining two couplings of the Roper interaction take values equal to those of the nucleon, the result for the width of the Roper decaying into a nucleon and two pions is consistent with the experimental value.

  12. Hyperon AND Hyperon Resonance Properties From Charm Baryon Decays At BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Veronique; /Iowa U.

    2007-07-03

    This report describes studies of hyperons and hyperon resonances produced in charm baryon decays at BABAR. Using two-body decays of the {Xi}{sub c}{sup 0} and {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0}, it is shown, for the first time, that the spin of the {omega}{sup -} is 3/2. The {Omega}{sup -} analysis procedures are extended to three-body final states and properties of the {Xi}(1690){sup 0} are extracted from a detailed isobar model analysis of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{bar K}{sup 0}K{sup +} Dalitz plot. The mass and width values of the {Xi}(1690){sup 0} are measured with much greater precision than attained previously. The hypothesis that the spin of the {Xi}(1690) resonance is 1/2 yields an excellent description of the data, while spin values 3/2 and 5/2 are disfavored. The {Lambda}a{sub 0}(980){sup +} decay mode of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} is observed for the first time. Similar techniques are then used to study {Xi}(1530){sup 0} production in {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} decay. The spin of the {Xi}(1530) is established for the first time to be 3/2. The existence of an S-wave amplitude in the {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} system is shown, and its interference with the {Xi}(1530){sup 0} amplitude provides the first clear demonstration of the Breit-Wigner phase motion expected for the {Xi}(1530). The {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} mass distribution in the vicinity of the {Xi}(1690){sup 0} exhibits interesting structure which may be interpreted as indicating that the {Xi}(1690) has negative parity.

  13. Observation of a narrow baryon resonance with positive strangeness formed in K+Xe collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmin, V. V.; Asratyan, A. E.; Borisov, V. S.; Curceanu, C.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Guaraldo, C.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Larin, I. F.; Matveev, V. A.; Shebanov, V. A.; Shishov, N. N.; Sokolov, L. I.; Tarasov, V. V.; Tumanov, G. K.; Verebryusov, V. S.; Diana Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    The charge-exchange reaction K+Xe→K0pXe' is investigated using the data of the DIANA experiment. The distribution of the pK0 effective mass shows a prominent enhancement near 1538 MeV formed by nearly 80 events above the background, whose width is consistent with being entirely due to the experimental resolution. Under the selections based on a simulation of K+Xe collisions, the statistical significance of the signal reaches 5.5σ. We interpret this observation as strong evidence for formation of a pentaquark baryon with positive strangeness, Θ+(uudds¯), in the charge-exchange reaction K+n→K0p on a bound neutron. The mass of the Θ+ baryon is measured as m (Θ+)=1538±2 MeV. Using the ratio between the numbers of resonant and nonresonant charge-exchange events in the peak region, the intrinsic width of this baryon resonance is determined as Γ (Θ+)=0.34±0.10 MeV.

  14. The ep --> e'pn Reaction at and above the S11(1535) Baryon Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    R. Thompson; et.Al.

    2001-02-01

    New cross sections for the reaction e p -> ep eta are reported for total center of mass energy W = 1.5--1.86 GeV and invariant momentum transfer Q{sup 2} = 0.25--1.5 GeV{sup 2}. This large kinematic range allows extraction of important new information about response functions, photocouplings, and eta N coupling strengths of baryon resonances. Expanded W coverage shows sharp structure at W {approx} 1.7 GeV; this is shown to come from interference between S and P waves and can be interpreted in terms of known resonances. Improved values are derived for the photon coupling amplitude for the S11(1535) resonance.

  15. Formation of a narrow baryon resonance with positive strangeness in K + collisions with Xe nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmin, V. V.; Asratyan, A. E.; Borisov, V. S.; Curceanu, C.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Guaraldo, C.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Larin, I. F.; Matveev, V. A.; Shebanov, V. A.; Shishov, N. N.; Sokolov, L. I.; Tumanov, G. K.; Verebryusov, V. S.

    2010-07-01

    The data on the charge-exchange reaction K +Xe → K 0 pXe', obtained with the bubble chamber DIANA, are reanalyzed using increased statistics and updated selections. Our previous evidence for formation of a narrow pK 0 resonance with mass near 1538 MeV is confirmed. The statistical significance of the signal reaches some 8 (6) standard deviations when estimated as {S {sqrt B ( {{S {/ {sqrt {B + S} }}} )}} . The mass and intrinsic width of the Θ+ baryon are measured as m = 1538 ± 2 MeV and Γ = 0.39 ± 0.10 MeV.

  16. High statistics analysis using anisotropic clover lattices: (III) Baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Lin, H; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Savage, M; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2010-01-19

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m{sub {pi}} {approx} 390 MeV, a spatial volume of L{sup 3} {approx} (2.5 fm){sup 3}, and a spatial lattice spacing of b {approx} 0.123 fm. Luescher's method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The isospin-3/2 N{Sigma} interactions are found to be highly spin-dependent, and the interaction in the {sup 3}S{sub 1} channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N{Lambda} interactions are found to be spin-independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion-exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy-shift is found is {Lambda}{Lambda}, indicating that the {Lambda}{Lambda} interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H-dibaryon. The NN scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN-sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous Lattice QCD calculation of NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting is explored. In particular, focus is placed on the window of time slices for which the signal-to-noise ratio does not degrade exponentially, as this provides the opportunity to extract quantitative information about multi-baryon systems.

  17. A proposed U.S./China theoretical/experimental collaborative effort on baryon resonance extraction

    SciTech Connect

    P.L. Cole

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the reasons for our work towards establishing a new collaboration between Jefferson Lab (JLab) and the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing. We seek to combine experimentalists and theorists into a dedicated group focused on better understanding the current and future data from JLab and from the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). Recent JLab results on the extraction of single- and double-polarization observables in both the 1{pi}- and 2{pi}-channel show their high sensitivity to small production amplitudes and therefore their importance for the extraction of resonance parameters. The Beijing Electron Spectrometer (BES) at the BEPC has collected high statistics data on J/{Psi} production. Its decay into baryon-antibaryon channels offers a unique and complementary way of probing nucleon resonances. The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, CLAS, has access to N* form factors at high Q{sup 2}, which is advantageous for the study of dynamical properties of nucleon resonances, while the low-background BES results will be able to provide guidance for the search for less-dominant excited states at JLab. Moreover, with the recently approved experimental proposal Nucleon Resonance Studies with CLAS12 and the high-quality data streaming from BES-III and CLAS, the time has come for forging a new Trans-Pacific collaboration of theorists and experimentalists on NSTAR physics.

  18. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (III) Baryon-Baryon Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Detmold, William; Lin, Huey-Wen; Luu, Thomas C.; Orginos, Kostas; Savage, Martin; Torok, Aaron M.; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2010-03-01

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m_pi ~ 390 MeV, a spatial volume of L^3 ~ (2.5 fm)^3, and a spatial lattice spacing of b ~ 0.123 fm. Luscher’s method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The N-Sigma interactions are found to be highly spin-dependent, and the interaction in the ^3 S _1 channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N-Lambda interactions are found to be spin-independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion-exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy-shift is found is Lambda-Lambda, indicating that the Lambda-Lambda interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H-dibaryon. The NN scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN-sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous Lattice QCD calculation of the NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting

  19. Baryon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Klempt, Eberhard; Richard, Jean-Marc

    2010-04-15

    About 120 baryons and baryon resonances are known, from the abundant nucleon with u and d light-quark constituents up to the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -}=(bsd), which contains one quark of each generation and to the recently discovered {Omega}{sub b}{sup -}=(bss). In spite of this impressively large number of states, the underlying mechanisms leading to the excitation spectrum are not yet understood. Heavy-quark baryons suffer from a lack of known spin parities. In the light-quark sector, quark-model calculations have met with considerable success in explaining the low-mass excitations spectrum but some important aspects such as the mass degeneracy of positive-parity and negative-parity baryon excitations remain unclear. At high masses, above 1.8 GeV, quark models predict a very high density of resonances per mass interval which is not yet observed. In this review, issues are identified discriminating between different views of the resonance spectrum; prospects are discussed on how open questions in baryon spectroscopy may find answers from photoproduction and electroproduction experiments which are presently carried out in various laboratories.

  20. Observation of a Narrow Baryon Resonance Decaying to pK{sup 0}{sub S} in Proton-Nucleus Interactions at 70 GeV/c with the SVD-2 Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Aleev, A.N.; Amaglobeli, N.S.; Balandin, V.P.; Boguslavsky, I.V.; Gramenitsky, I.M.; Zhidkov, N.K.; Kokoulina, E.S.; Kosarev, I.G.; Kuzmin, N.A.; Lanshikov, G.I.; Nikitin, V.A.; Oleinik, A.A.; Rufanov, I.A.; Topuria, T.P.; Furmanec, N.F.; Shafranov, M.D.; Yukaev, A.I.; Ardashev, E.N.; Vasiliev, M.V.; Vorobiev, A. P.

    2005-06-01

    Data from the SVD-2 experiment that were obtained at the IHEP accelerator in 70-GeV/c proton-nucleus interactions are analyzed with the aim of searches for an exotic {theta}{sup +} baryon that decays through the pK{sup 0}{sub S} channel. The reaction pN {yields} pK{sup 0}{sub S} + X characterized by a bounded multiplicity of charged secondaries is used for this analysis. A resonance of mass M = 1526 {+-} 3(stat.) {+-} 3(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and width {gamma} < 24 MeV/c{sup 2} is observed in the invariant-mass spectrum of the pK{sup 0}{sub S} system at a statistical significance of 5.6{sigma}. The mass and the width of this resonance correspond to the recently found positive-strangeness {theta}{sup +} baryon, which was predicted to be an exotic baryon consisting of five quarks (pentaquark), uudds-bar. The total cross section for the production of a {theta}{sup +} baryon in pA interactions is estimated at a value within the range 30-120 {mu}b for x{sub F} {>=} 0. An analysis of the A dependence of the cross section for {theta}{sup +}-baryon production does not reveal a significant deviation from the A dependence for inelastic events ({approx}A{sup 0.7})

  1. Analysis of 56-plet Positive Parity Baryon Decays in the 1/Nc Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Goity, Norberto Scoccola, Chandana Jayalath

    2009-10-01

    The partial decay widths of positive parity baryons belonging to 56-plets of SU(6) are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion. The channels considered are those with emission of a single pion, K or K-bar mesons, and the analysis is carried out to subleading order in 1/Nc and to first order in SU(3) symmetry breaking. The results for the multiplet [56,0+], to which the Roper resonance belongs, indicate a poor description at leading order, requiring large next to leading order corrections. For the multiplet [56,2+], the P-wave decays in the non-strange sector are well described at leading order and important SU(3) breaking corrections are necessary to describe transitions involving strangeness, on the other hand, the F-wave decays require the next to leading order corrections, which turn out to be however of natural magnitude.

  2. Application of Wavelet Packet Analysis to the Measurement of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadowaki, Kevin; Garcia, Noel; Ford, Taurean; Pando, Jesus; SDSS-FAST Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We develop a method of wavelet packet analysis to measure the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) peak and apply this method to the CMASS galaxy catalog from the SDSS Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) collaboration. We compare our results to a fiducial ?CDM flat cosmological model and detect a BAO signature in the power spectrum comparable to the previous consensus results of the BOSS collaboration. We find DA = 1365rd /rd , fid at z = . 54 . Member ID Forthcoming.

  3. The ep -->e'p eta reaction at and above the S11(1535) baryon resonance.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R; Dytman, S; Kim, K Y; Mueller, J; Adams, G S; Amaryan, M J; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Auger, T; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bertozzi, W; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W; Burkert, V D; Calarco, J R; Capitani, G; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Connelly, J; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J; Day, D; Degtyarenko, P V; Demirchyan, R A; Dennis, L C; Deppman, A; De Sanctis, E; De Vita, R; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Eckhause, M; Efremenko, Y V; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Farhi, L; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Fissum, K; Freyberger, A; Funsten, H; Gai, M; Gavrilov, V B; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K; Gilad, S; Girard, P; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Gyurjyan, V; Hancock, D; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Heisenberg, J; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hicks, R S; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Kane, J; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Kuang, Y; Laget, J M; Lawrence, D; Leskin, G A; Longhi, A; Loukachine, K; Lucas, M; Magahiz, R; Major, R W; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; Matthews, S K; McAleer, S; McCarthy, J; McNabb, J W; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Muccifora, V; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Niyazov, R A; Ohandjanyan, M S; O'Brien, J T; Opper, A; Patois, Y; Peterson, G A; Philips, S; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Reolon, A R; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Roudot, F; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Salgado, C W; Sanzone, M; Sapunenko, V; Sarty, A; Sargsyan, M; Schumacher, R A; Shafi, A; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Shuvalov, S M; Skabelin, A; Smith, T; Smith, C; Smith, E S; Sober, D I; Spraker, M; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D; Tung, T Y; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A; Weller, H; Weinstein, L B; Welsh, R; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, S; Witkowski, M; Wolin, E; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zhou, Z; Zhao, J

    2001-02-26

    New cross sections for the reaction e p-->e p eta are reported for total center of mass energy W = 1.5--1.86 GeV and invariant momentum transfer Q2 = 0.25--1.5 (GeV/c)(2). This large kinematic range allows extraction of important new information about response functions, photocouplings, and eta N coupling strengths of baryon resonances. Newly observed structure at W approximately 1.65 GeV is shown to come from interference between S and P waves and can be interpreted with known resonances. Improved values are derived for the photon coupling amplitude for the S11(1535) resonance. PMID:11290228

  4. Analyses of Transverse Momentum Spectra of Baryon Resonances in C+C Collisions at 4.2 A GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Picuric, Ivana

    2010-01-21

    The production of Delta baryon resonances in heavy ion C+C collisions, using a 2-m propane bubble chamber exposed to beams of light relativistic nuclei from the Dubna synchrophasotron, has been investigated. The transverse momentum spectra of Delta baryon resonances have been measured and analyzed within a simple thermodynamical collective flow model and a boundary model. The goal was to find a simple, but realistic parameterization of the freeze-out stage in these collisions. As typical freeze-out parameters temperature T and beta have been obtained from the collective flow and temperature T from the boundary model.

  5. The Nc dependencies of baryon masses: Analysis with Lattice QCD and Effective Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Calle Cordon, Alvaro C.; DeGrand, Thomas A.; Goity, Jose L.

    2014-07-01

    Baryon masses at varying values of Nc and light quark masses are studied with Lattice QCD and the results are analyzed in a low energy effective theory based on a combined framework of the 1/Nc and Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory expansions. Lattice QCD results for Nc=3, 5 and 7 obtained in quenched calculations, as well as results for unquenched calculations for Nc=3, are used for the analysis. The results are consistent with a previous analysis of Nc=3 LQCD results, and in addition permit the determination of sub-leading in 1/Nc effects in the spin-flavor singlet component of the baryon masses as well as in the hyperfine splittings.

  6. Formation of a narrow baryon resonance with positive strangeness in K{sup +} collisions with Xe nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, V. V.; Asratyan, A. E.; Borisov, V. S.; Curceanu, C.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Guaraldo, C.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Larin, I. F.; Matveev, V. A.; Shebanov, V. A.; Shishov, N. N.; Sokolov, L. I.; Tumanov, G. K.; Verebryusov, V. S.

    2010-07-15

    The data on the charge-exchange reaction K{sup +}Xe {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}pXe', obtained with the bubble chamber DIANA, are reanalyzed using increased statistics and updated selections. Our previous evidence for formation of a narrow pK{sup 0} resonance with mass near 1538 MeV is confirmed. The statistical significance of the signal reaches some 8{sigma} (6{sigma}) standard deviations when estimated as S/{radical}B (S/{radical}B + S. The mass and intrinsic width of the {Theta}{sup +} baryon are measured as m = 1538 {+-} 2 MeV and {Gamma} = 0.39 {+-} 0.10 MeV.

  7. Wavelet analysis of baryon acoustic structures in the galaxy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnalte-Mur, P.; Labatie, A.; Clerc, N.; Martínez, V. J.; Starck, J.-L.; Lachièze-Rey, M.; Saar, E.; Paredes, S.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) are imprinted in the density field by acoustic waves travelling in the plasma of the early universe. Their fixed scale can be used as a standard ruler to study the geometry of the universe. Aims: The BAO have been previously detected using correlation functions and power spectra of the galaxy distribution. We present a new method to detect the real-space structures associated with BAO. These baryon acoustic structures are spherical shells of relatively small density contrast, surrounding high density central regions. Methods: We design a specific wavelet adapted to search for shells, and exploit the physics of the process by making use of two different mass tracers, introducing a specific statistic to detect the BAO features. We show the effect of the BAO signal in this new statistic when applied to the Λ - cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model, using an analytical approximation to the transfer function. We confirm the reliability and stability of our method by using cosmological N-body simulations from the MareNostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (MICE). Results: We apply our method to the detection of BAO in a galaxy sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use the "main" catalogue to trace the shells, and the luminous red galaxies (LRG) as tracers of the high density central regions. Using this new method, we detect, with a high significance, that the LRG in our sample are preferentially located close to the centres of shell-like structures in the density field, with characteristics similar to those expected from BAO. We show that stacking selected shells, we can find their characteristic density profile. Conclusions: We delineate a new feature of the cosmic web, the BAO shells. As these are real spatial structures, the BAO phenomenon can be studied in detail by examining those shells. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  8. Further evidence for formation of a narrow baryon resonance with positive strangeness in K + collisions with Xe nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmin, V. V.; Asratyan, A. E.; Borisov, V. S.; Curceanu, C.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Guaraldo, C.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Larin, I. F.; Matveev, V. A.; Shebanov, V. A.; Shishov, N. N.; Sokolov, L. I.; Tumanov, G. K.

    2007-01-01

    We have continued our investigation of the charge-exchange reaction K +Xe → K 0 pXe’ in the bubble chamber DIANA. In agreement with our previous results based on part of the present statistics, formation of a narrow pK 0 resonance with mass of 1537 ± 2 MeV/c 2 is observed in the elementary transition K + n → K 0 p on a neutron bound in the xenon nucleus. The visible width of the peak is consistent with being entirely due to instrumental resolution and allows one to place an upper limit on its intrinsic width: Γ < 9 MeV/c 2. A more precise estimate of the resonance intrinsic width, Γ = 0.36 ± 0.11 MeV/c 2, is obtained from the ratio between the numbers of resonant and nonresonant charge-exchange events. The signal is observed in a restricted interval of incident K + momentum that is consistent with smearing of a narrow pK 0 resonance by Fermi motion of the target neutron. The statistical significance of the signal is some 7.3, 5.3, and 4.3 standard deviations for the estimators S/sqrt B ,S/sqrt {S + B} and S/sqrt {S + 2B} , respectively. This observation confirms and reinforces our earlier results, and offers strong evidence for formation of a pentaquark baryon with positive strangeness in the charge-exchange reaction K + n → K 0 p on a bound neutron.

  9. Resonance frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajiv K; Padmanabhan, Thallam V

    2011-01-01

    Initial stability at the placement and development of osseointegration are two major issues for implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon which is related to the local bone quality and quantity, type of implant, and placement technique used. The application of a simple, clinically applicable, non-invasive test to assess implant stability and osseointegration is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) is one of such techniques which is most frequently used now days. The aim of this paper was to review and analyze critically the current available literature in the field of RFA, and to also discuss based on scientific evidence, the prognostic value of RFA to detect implants at risk of failure. A search was made using the PubMed database to find all the literature published on "Resonance frequency analysis for implant stability" till date. Articles discussed in vivo or in vitro studies comparing RFA with other methods of implant stability measurement and articles discussing its reliability were thoroughly reviewed and discussed. A limited number of clinical reports were found. Various studies have demonstrated the feasibility and predictability of the technique. However, most of these articles are based on retrospective data or uncontrolled cases. Randomized, prospective, parallel-armed longitudinal human trials are based on short-term results and long-term follow up are still scarce in this field. Nonetheless, from available literature, it may be concluded that RFA technique evaluates implant stability as a function of stiffness of the implant bone interface and is influenced by factors such as bone type, exposed implant height above the alveolar crest. Resonance frequency analysis could serve as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for detecting the implant stability of dental implants during the healing stages and in subsequent routine follow up care after treatment. Future studies, preferably randomized, prospective

  10. Time delay plots of unflavoured baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, N. G.; Nowakowski, M.; Khemchandani, K. P.; Jain, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    We explore the usefulness of the existing relations between the S-matrix and time delay in characterizing baryon resonances in pion-nucleon scattering. We draw attention to the fact that the existence of a positive maximum in time delay is a necessary criterion for the existence of a resonance and should be used as a constraint in conventional analyses which locate resonances from poles of the S-matrix and Argand diagrams. The usefulness of the time delay plots of resonances is demonstrated through a detailed analysis of the time delay in several partial waves of πN elastic scattering.

  11. Heavy baryonic resonances, multistrange hadrons, and equilibration at energies available at the GSI Schwerionensynchrotron, SIS18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinheimer, J.; Lorenz, M.; Becattini, F.; Stock, R.; Bleicher, M.

    2016-06-01

    We study the details and time dependence of particle production in nuclear collisions at a fixed target beam energy of Elab=1.76 A GeV with the UrQMD transport model. We find that the previously proposed production mechanisms for multistrange hadrons ϕ and Ξ are possible due to secondary interactions of incoming nuclei of the projectile and target with already created nuclear resonances, while the Fermi momenta of the nuclei play only a minor role. We also show how the centrality dependence of these particle multiplicities can be used to confirm the proposed mechanism, as it strongly depends on the number of participants in the reaction. Furthermore we investigate the time dependence of particle production in collisions of Ca + Ca at this beam energy, in order to understand the origins of the apparent chemical equilibration of the measured particle yields. We find that indeed the light hadron yields appear to be in equilibrium already from the very early stage of the collision, while in fact no local equilibration, through multicollision processes, takes place. The apparent equilibrium is reached only through the decay of the resonances according to available phase space.

  12. Net-baryon number fluctuations with the hadron resonance gas model using Tsallis distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, D. K.; Garg, P.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Mohanty, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    We explore a hadron resonance gas (HRG) model using the Tsallis non-extensive distribution to study the energy dependence of the product of the moments, Sσ and κ {σ }2 of the net-proton multiplicity distributions of published STAR data for Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider energies. While excellent agreement was found between model predictions and measurements of Sσ and κ {σ }2 of most peripheral collisions and Sσ of most central collisions, the κ {σ }2 for most central collisions deviates significantly from the predictions particularly at \\sqrt{{s}{{NN}}} = 19.6 GeV and 27 GeV. This could be an indication of the presence of dynamical fluctuations, which are not contained in the HRG-Tsallis model.

  13. Staggered baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Jon Andrew

    The strong force binds protons and neutrons within nuclei and quarks within mesons and baryons. Calculations of the masses of the light-quark baryons from the theory of the strong force, quantum chromodynamics (QCD), require numerical methods in which continuous Minkowski spacetime is replaced by a discrete Euclidean spacetime lattice. Finite computational resources and theoretical constraints impose significant limitations on lattice calculations. The price of perhaps the fastest formulation of lattice QCD, rooted staggered QCD, includes quark degrees of freedom called tastes, associated discretization effects called taste violations, and the rooting conjecture for eliminating the tastes in the continuum limit. Empirically successful rooted staggered QCD calculations of the baryon spectrum would constitute numerical evidence for the rooting conjecture and further vindication of QCD as the theory of the strong force. With such calculations as the goal, I discuss expected features of the staggered baryon spectrum, examine the spectra of interpolating operators transforming irreducibly under the staggered lattice symmetry group, construct such a set of baryon operators, and show how they could allow for particularly clean calculations of the masses of the nucleon, Delta, Sigma*, Ξ*, and O-. To quantify taste violations in baryonic quantities, I develop staggered chiral perturbation theory for light-quark baryons by mapping the Symanzik action into heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, calculate the masses of flavor-symmetric nucleons to third order in partially quenched and fully dynamical staggered chiral perturbation theory, and discuss in detail the pattern of taste symmetry breaking and the resulting baryon degeneracies and mixings. The resulting chiral forms could be used with interpolating operators already in use to study the restoration of taste symmetry in the continuum limit.

  14. Baryon spectroscopy and the omega minus

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-12-31

    In this report, I will mainly discuss baryon resonances with emphasis on the discovery of the {Omega}{sup {minus}}. However, for completeness, I will also present some data on the meson resonances which together with the baryons led to the uncovering of the SU(3) symmetry of particles and ultimately to the concept of quarks.

  15. Brane-induced Skyrmion on S{sup 3}: Baryonic matter in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nawa, Kanabu; Suganuma, Hideo; Kojo, Toru

    2009-01-15

    We study baryonic matter in holographic QCD with D4/D8/D8 multi-D brane system in type IIA superstring theory. The baryon is described as the 'brane-induced Skyrmion', which is a topologically nontrivial chiral soliton in the four-dimensional meson effective action induced by holographic QCD. We employ the ''truncated-resonance model'' approach for the baryon analysis, including pion and {rho} meson fields below the ultraviolet cutoff scale M{sub KK}{approx}1 GeV, to keep the holographic duality with QCD. We describe the baryonic matter in large N{sub c} as single brane-induced Skyrmion on the three-dimensional closed manifold S{sup 3} with finite radius R. The interactions between baryons are simulated by the curvature of the closed manifold S{sup 3}, and the decrease of the size of S{sup 3} represents the increase of the total baryon-number density in the medium in this modeling. We investigate the energy density, the field configuration, the mass and the root-mean-square radius of single baryon on S{sup 3} as the function of its radius R. We find a new picture of 'pion dominance' near the critical density in the baryonic matter, where all the (axial) vector meson fields disappear and only the pion fields survive. We also find the swelling phenomena of the baryons as the precursor of the deconfinement, and propose the mechanism of the swelling in the general context of QCD. The properties of the deconfinement and the chiral symmetry restoration in the baryonic matter are examined by taking the proper order parameters. We also compare our truncated-resonance model with another instanton description of the baryon in holographic QCD, considering the role of cutoff scale M{sub KK}.

  16. Evidence for excitation of two resonance states in the isovector two-baryon system with a mass of 2.2 GeV/ c2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, V.; Tsirkov, D.; Azaryan, T.; Bagdasarian, Z.; Dymov, S.; Gebel, R.; Gou, B.; Kacharava, A.; Khoukaz, A.; Kulikov, A.; Kurbatov, V.; Lorentz, B.; Macharashvili, G.; Mchedlishvili, D.; Merzliakov, S.; Mikirtytchiants, S.; Ohm, H.; Papenbrock, M.; Rathmann, F.; Serdyuk, V.; Shmakova, V.; Ströher, H.; Trusov, S.; Uzikov, Yu.; Valdau, Yu.

    2016-06-01

    We report on measurements of the differential cross section d σ /d Ω and the first measurement of the analyzing power Ay in the Δ (1232 ) excitation energy region of the reaction p p →{pp } sπ0 where {pp } s is a S10 proton pair. The experiment has been performed with the ANKE spectrometer at COSY-Jülich. The data reveal a peak in the energy dependence of the forward {pp } s differential cross section, a minimum at zero degrees of its angular distribution, and a large analyzing power. The results present a direct manifestation of two two-baryon resonance-like states with JP=2- and 0- and an invariant mass of 2.2 GeV /c2.

  17. Radiative decays of dynamically generated charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Gamermann, D.; Jimenez-Tejero, C. E.; Ramos, A.

    2011-04-01

    In this work we study the radiative decay of dynamically generated J{sup P}=(1{sup -}/2) charm baryons into the ground state J{sup P}=(1{sup +}/2) baryons. Since different theoretical interpretations of these baryonic resonances and, in particular, of the {Lambda}{sub c}(2595), give different predictions, a precise experimental measurement of these decays would be an important step for understanding their nature.

  18. Higher moments of nucleon spin structure functions in heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory and in a resonance model

    SciTech Connect

    C. Kao; D. Drechsel; S. Kamalov; M. Vanderhaeghen

    2003-11-01

    The third moment d{sub 2} of the twist-3 part of the nucleon spin structure function g{sub 2} is generalized to arbitrary momentum transfer Q{sup 2} and is evaluated in heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory (HBChPT) up to order {Omicron}(p{sup 4}) and in a unitary isobar model (MAID). We show how to link d{sub 2} as well as higher moments of the nucleon spin structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} to nucleon spin polarizabilities. We compare our results with the most recent experimental data, and find a good description of these available data within the unitary isobar model. We proceed to extract the twist-4 matrix element f{sub 2} which appears in the 1/Q{sup 2} suppressed term in the twist expansion of the spin structure function g{sub 1} for proton and neutron.

  19. Analysis of heavy spin-3/2 baryon-heavy spin-1/2 baryon-light vector meson vertices in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, T. M.; Savci, M.; Azizi, K; Zamiralov, V. S.

    2011-05-01

    The heavy spin-3/2 baryon-heavy spin-1/2 baryon vertices with light vector mesons are studied within the light cone QCD sum rules method. These vertices are parametrized in terms of three coupling constants. These couplings are calculated for all possible transitions. It is shown that correlation functions for these transitions are described by only one invariant function for every Lorenz structure. The obtained relations between the correlation functions of the different transitions are structure independent while explicit expressions of invariant functions depend on the Lorenz structure.

  20. SELEX: Recent Progress in the Analysis of Charm-Strange and Double-Charm Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Engelfried, Jurgen

    2007-02-01

    SELEX (Fermilab Experiment 781) [1] employs beams of {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -}, and protons at around 600 GeV/c to study production and decay properties of charmed baryons. It took data in the 1996/7 fixed target run and is currently analyzing those data. Here they focus on recently obtained results concerning the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} lifetime and the doubly-charmed baryons {Xi}{sub cc}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++}.

  1. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  2. Analysis of the [53, l=2] Baryon Masses in the 1/N{sub c} Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Goity; C.L. Schat; N.N. Scoccola

    2003-03-01

    The mass spectrum of the [56,{ell}=2] baryons is studied in the 1/N{sub c} expansion up to and including {Omicron}(1/N{sub c}) effects with SU(3) symmetry breaking implemented to first order. A total of eighteen mass relations result, several of which are tested with the available data.

  3. Results of Nucleon Resonance Extraction via Dynamical Coupled-Channels Analysis from Collaboration @ EBAC

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroyuki Kamano

    2012-04-01

    We review a global analysis of meson production reactions off the nucleons by a collaboration at Excited Baryon Analysis Center of Jefferson Lab. The analysis is pursued with a dynamical coupled-channels approach, within which the dynamics of multi-channel reaction processes are taken into account in a fully consistent way with the two-body as well as three-body unitarity of the S-matrix. With this approach, new features of nucleon excitations are revealed as resonant particles originating from the non-trivial multi-channel reaction dynamics, which cannot be addressed by static hadron models where the nucleon excitations are treated as stable particles.

  4. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (II) Three-Baryon Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Savage, M; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2009-05-05

    We present the results of an exploratory Lattice QCD calculation of three-baryon systems through a high-statistics study of one ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations with a pion mass of m{sub {pi}} {approx} 390 MeV. Because of the computational cost of the necessary contractions, we focus on correlation functions generated by interpolating-operators with the quantum numbers of the {Xi}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0}n system, one of the least demanding three baryon systems in terms of the number of contractions. We find that the ground state of this system has an energy of E{sub {Xi}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0}n} = 3877.9 {+-} 6.9 {+-} 9.2 {+-} 3.3 MeV corresponding to an energy-shift due to interactions of {delta}E{sub {Xi}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0}n} = E{sub {Xi}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0}n} - 2M{sub {Xi}{sup 0}} - M{sub n} = 4.6 {+-} 5.0 {+-} 7.9 {+-} 4.2 MeV. There are a significant number of time-slices in the three-baryon correlation function for which the signal-to-noise ratio is only slowly degrading with time. This is in contrast to the exponential degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio that is observed at larger times, and is due to the suppressed overlap of the source and sink interpolating-operators that are associated with the variance of the three-baryon correlation function onto the lightest eigenstates in the lattice volume (mesonic systems). As one of the motivations for this area of exploration is the calculation of the structure and reactions of light nuclei, we also present initial results for a system with the quantum numbers of the triton (pnn). This present work establishes a path to multi-baryon systems, and shows that Lattice QCD calculations of the properties and interactions of systems containing four and five baryons are now within sight.

  5. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (II) Three-Baryon Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andre Walker-Loud, Will Detmold, William Detmold, Aaron Torok, Konstantinos Orginos, Silas Beane, Tom Luu, Martin Savage, Assumpta Parreno

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of an exploratory Lattice QCD calculation of three-baryon systems through a high-statistics study of one ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations with a pion mass of m_\\pi ~ 390 MeV. Because of the computational cost of the necessary contractions, we focus on correlation functions generated by interpolating-operators with the quantum numbers of the $\\Xi^0\\Xi^0 n$ system, one of the least demanding three baryon systems in terms of the number of contractions. We find that the ground state of this system has an energy of E_{\\Xi^0\\Xi^0n}= 3877.9\\pm 6.9\\pm 9.2\\pm3.3 MeV corresponding to an energy-shift due to interactions of \\delta E_{\\Xi^0\\Xi^0n}=E_{\\Xi^0\\Xi^0n}-2M_{\\Xi^0} -M_n=4.6\\pm 5.0\\pm 7.9\\pm 4.2 MeV. There are a significant number of time-slices in the three-baryon correlation function for which the signal-to-noise ratio is only slowly degrading with time. This is in contrast to the exponential degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio that is observed at larger times, and is due to the suppressed overlap of the source and sink interpolating-operators that are associated with the variance of the three-baryon correlation function onto the lightest eigenstates in the lattice volume (mesonic systems). As one of the motivations for this area of exploration is the calculation of the structure and reactions of light nuclei, we also present initial results for a system with the quantum numbers of the triton (pnn). This present work establishes a path to multi-baryon systems, and shows that Lattice QCD calculations of the properties and interactions of systems containing four and five baryons are now within sight.

  6. Exciting Baryons with MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrick, Michael

    Meson photoproduction is an important tool in baryon spectroscopy. In modern experiments all spin degrees of freedom can be exploited in order to determine partial wave amplitudes and resonance parameters. With the Crystal Ball/TAPS detector setup at the energy-tagged photon facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI photoproduction can be studied up to the center-of-mass energy W = 1.9 GeV. Selected results for differential cross sections and transverse target asymmetries in π0, η, and η' production are presented.

  7. Evolution of perturbations in a baryon-dominated universe - Gauge-invariant analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gouda, N.; Sasaki, M.; Suto, Y.; Hiroshima Univ.; California Univ., Berkeley; Ibaraki Univ., Mito )

    1989-06-01

    The evolution of scalar (density) perturbations in a baryon-dominated universe is comprehensively studied on the basis of a gauge-invariant method. In particular, the residual anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation are calculated and are compared with the recent observational upper limits. To the extent that the universe has not been reionized after recombination, the observed upper limits of the temperature anisotropies on small angular scales rule out the cosmological models without nonbaryonic dark matter. In turn, this would provide strong support for (nonbaryonic) dark matter, independently of the results of standard primordial nucleosynthesis. Reionization after recombination, if any, might allow an isocurvature baryonic universe as a viable model, only when the initial density power spectrum was very steep. 64 refs.

  8. Extracting meson-baryon contributions to the electroexcitation of the N (1675)-5/2 nucleon resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker D.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the determination of the electrocouplings for the transition from the proton to the N (1675)-5/2 resonance state using recent differential cross section data on ep → eπ+n by the CLAS collaboration at 1.8 ≤ Q² < 4.5GeV². The data have been analyzed using two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and fixed-t dispersion relations. The extracted γ*p → N (1675)-5/2 helicity amplitudes show considerable coupling through the AP1/2 amplitude, that is significantly larger than predicted three-quark contribution to this amplitude. The amplitude AP3/2 is much smaller. Both results are consistent with the predicted sizes of the meson-baryon contributions at Q² ≥ 1.8 GeV² from the dynamical coupled-channel model.

  9. Baryonic popcorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplunovsky, Vadim; Melnikov, Dmitry; Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2012-11-01

    In the large N c limit cold dense nuclear matter must be in a lattice phase. This applies also to holographic models of hadron physics. In a class of such models, like the generalized Sakai-Sugimoto model, baryons take the form of instantons of the effective flavor gauge theory that resides on probe flavor branes. In this paper we study the phase structure of baryonic crystals by analyzing discrete periodic configurations of such instantons. We find that instanton configurations exhibit a series of "popcorn" transitions upon increasing the density. Through these transitions normal (3D) lattices expand into the transverse dimension, eventually becoming a higher dimensional (4D) multi-layer lattice at large densities. We consider 3D lattices of zero size instantons as well as 1D periodic chains of finite size instantons, which serve as toy models of the full holographic systems. In particular, for the finite-size case we determine solutions of the corresponding ADHM equations for both a straight chain and for a 2D zigzag configuration where instantons pop up into the holographic dimension. At low density the system takes the form of an "abelian anti- ferromagnetic" straight periodic chain. Above a critical density there is a second order phase transition into a zigzag structure. An even higher density yields a rich phase space characterized by the formation of multi-layer zigzag structures. The finite size of the lattices in the transverse dimension is a signal of an emerging Fermi sea of quarks. We thus propose that the popcorn transitions indicate the onset of the "quarkyonic" phase of the cold dense nuclear matter.

  10. Theory Support for the Excited Baryon Analysis Program at the JLAB 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker; Lee, Tsung-Shung; Mokeev, Viktor; Aznauryan, Inna; Braun, Vladimir; Capstick, Simon; Cloet, Ian; Edwards, Robert; Gianinni, M.; Lin, Huey-Wen; Roberts, C.D.; Stoler, Paul; Zhao, Qiang; Zou, Bing-Song

    2009-01-01

    This document summarizes the contributions of the Electromagnetic $\\gamma_vNN^*$ Transition Form Factors workshop participants that provide theoretical support of the excited baryon program at the 12 GeV energy upgrade at JLab. The main objectives of the workshop were (a) review the status of the $\\gamma_vNN^*$ transition form factors extracted from the meson electroproduction data, (b) call for the theoretical interpretations of the extracted $N$-$N^*$ transition form factors, that enable access to the mechanisms responsible for the N* formation and to their emergence from QCD.

  11. Extracting meson-baryon contributions to the electroexcitation of the N (1675)-5/2 nucleon resonance

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker D.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the determination of the electrocouplings for the transition from the proton to the N (1675)-5/2 resonance state using recent differential cross section data on ep → eπ+n by the CLAS collaboration at 1.8 ≤ Q² < 4.5GeV². The data have been analyzed using two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and fixed-t dispersion relations. The extracted γ*p → N (1675)-5/2 helicity amplitudes show considerable coupling through the AP1/2 amplitude, that is significantly larger than predicted three-quark contribution to this amplitude. The amplitude AP3/2 is much smaller. Both results are consistent with the predicted sizes of the meson-baryonmore » contributions at Q² ≥ 1.8 GeV² from the dynamical coupled-channel model.« less

  12. Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

    1997-09-01

    Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

  13. Baryon asymmetry, inflation and squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Bambah, Bindu A. . E-mail: bbsp@uohyd.ernet.in; Chaitanya, K.V.S. Shiv; Mukku, C.

    2007-04-15

    We use the general formalism of squeezed rotated states to calculate baryon asymmetry in the wake of inflation through parametric amplification. We base our analysis on a B and CP violating Lagrangian in an isotropically expanding universe. The B and CP violating terms originate from the coupling of complex fields with non-zero baryon number to a complex background inflaton field. We show that a differential amplification of particle and antiparticle modes gives rise to baryon asymmetry.

  14. Global Analysis Of The Negative Parity Non-Strange Baryons In The 1/N{sub c} Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, Jose L.; Gonzalez de Urreta, Emiliano Jose; Scoccola, Norberto N.

    2014-02-01

    A global study of the negative parity non-strange baryon observables is performed in the framework of the 1/N{sub c} expansion. Masses, partial decay widths and photo-couplings are simultaneously analyzed. A main objective is to determine the composition of the spin 1/2 and 3/2 nucleon states, which come in pairs and involve two mixing angles which can be determined and tested for consistency by the mentioned observables. The issue of the assignment of those nucleon states to the broken SU(4) X O(3) mixed-symmetry multiplet is studied in detail, with the conclusion that the assignment made in the old studies based on the non-relativistic quark model is the preferred one. In addition, the analysis involves an update of the input data with respect to previous works.

  15. Strong decays of excited baryons in Large Nc QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, J. L.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2007-02-12

    We present the analysis of the strong decays widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  16. Strong decays of excited baryons in Large Nc QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, Jose; Scoccola, Norberto

    2007-02-01

    We present the analysis of the strong decays widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  17. Electromagnetic properties of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Ledwig, T.; Pascalutsa, V.; Vanderhaeghen, M.; Martin-Camalich, J.

    2011-10-21

    We discuss the chiral behavior of the nucleon and {Delta}(1232) electromagnetic properties within the framework of a SU(2) covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. Our one-loop calculation is complete to the order p{sup 3} and p{sup 4}/{Delta} with {Delta} as the {Delta}(1232)-nucleon energy gap. We show that the magnetic moment of a resonance can be defined by the linear energy shift only when an additional relation between the involved masses and the applied magnetic field strength is fulfilled. Singularities and cusps in the pion mass dependence of the {Delta}(1232) electromagnetic moments reflect a non-fulfillment. We show results for the pion mass dependence of the nucleon iso-vector electromagnetic quantities and present preliminary results for finite volume effects on the iso-vector anomalous magnetic moment.

  18. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Solovieva, E. I.

    2015-12-15

    Apresent-day classification of charmed baryons is presented, a quark model for ground states is briefly described, and the energy levels of excited states are analyzed. In addition, a survey of experimentally observed states of charmed baryons is given.

  19. The CLAS Excited Baryon Program at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Crede, Volker

    2007-10-26

    Nucleons are complex systems of confined quarks and exhibit characteristic spectra of excited states. Highly excited nucleon states are sensitive to details of quark confinement which is poorly understood within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Thus, measurements of excited states and the corresponding determination of their properties are needed to come to a better understanding of how confinement works in nucleons. However, the excited states of the nucleon cannot simply be inferred from cleanly separated spectral lines. Quite the contrary, a spectral analysis in nucleon resonance physics is challenging because of the fact that the resonances are broadly overlapping states which decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. To provide a consistent and complete picture of an individual nucleon resonance, the various possible production and decay channels must be treated in a multichannel framework that permits separating resonance from background contributions. Very often, resonances reveal themselves more clearly through interference with dominant amplitudes. These interference terms can be isolated via polarization observables. The current CLAS effort is to utilize highly-polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as polarized photon beams toward a complete measurement of a large number of reaction channels.

  20. The CLAS Excited Baryon Program at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Volker Crede

    2007-10-01

    Nucleons are complex systems of confined quarks and exhibit characteristic spectra of excited states. Highly excited nucleon states are sensitive to details of quark confinement which is poorly understood within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Thus, measurements of excited states and the corresponding determination of their properties are needed to come to a better understanding of how confinement works in nucleons. However, the excited states of the nucleon cannot simply be inferred from cleanly separated spectral lines. Quite the contrary, a spectral analysis in nucleon resonance physics is challenging because of the fact that the resonances are broadly overlapping states which decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. To provide a consistent and complete picture of an individual nucleon resonance, the various possible production and decay channels must be treated in a multichannel framework that permits separating resonance from background contributions. Very often, resonances reveal themselves more clearly through interference with dominant amplitudes. These interference terms can be isolated via polarization observables. The current CLAS effort is to utilize highly-polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as polarized photon beams toward a complete measurement of a large number of reaction channels.

  1. Baryon-baryon mixing in hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, B.F.

    1998-12-31

    Implications of few-body hypernuclei for the understanding of the baryon-baryon interaction are examined. Octet-octet coupling effects not present in conventional, non strange nuclei are the focus. The need to identify strangeness {minus}2 hypernuclei to test model predictions is emphasized.

  2. Combined heavy-quark symmetry and large-Nc operator analysis for 2-body counterterms in the chiral Lagrangian with D mesons and charmed baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samart, Daris; Nualchimplee, Chakrit; Yan, Yupeng

    2016-06-01

    In this work we construct a chiral SU(3) Lagrangian with D mesons of spin JP=0- and JP=1- and charmed baryons of spin JP=1 /2+ and JP=3 /2+. There are 42 leading two-body counterterms involving two charmed baryon fields and two D meson fields in the constructed Lagrangian. The heavy-quark spin symmetry leads to 35 sum rules, while the large-Nc operator analysis predicts 29 at the next-to leading order of the 1 /Nc expansion. The combination of the sum rules from both the heavy-quark symmetry and the large-Nc analysis results in 38 independent sum rules, which reduces the number of free parameters in the chiral Lagrangian to only four. This is a remarkable result demonstrating the consistency of the heavy-quark symmetry and large-Nc operator analysis.

  3. Physical processes effecting the baryonic matter content of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayotova, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    We have discussed physical processes effecting the generation of the matter content of the Universe. First we have studied the processes effecting Big Bang Nucleosynthesis during which the chemical content of the baryonic component of the Universe was produced. We have provided detail numerical analysis of the BBN production of ^4He, Y_p, in the presence of ν_e ← ν_s neutrino oscillations, effective after electron neutrino decoupling. We have accounted for all known effects of neutrino oscillations on cosmological nucleosyntesis. We have obtained cosmological bounds corresponding to δ Y_p/Y_p= 5.2 % in correspondance with the recently found higher uncertainty in ^4He. Iso-helium contours for δ Y_p/Y_p > 5% and population of the ν_s state δ N_s = 0; 0.5; 0.7; 0.9, both for resonant and non-resonant oscillations have been calculated. Next we have studied the processes effecting the formation of the baryon content of the Universe. We have investigated a baryogenesis model based on Affleck and Dine baryogenesis scenario, Scalar Field Condensate (SFC) baryogenesis model. We have provided precise numerical analysis of the SFC baryogenesis model numerically accounting for the particle creation processes by the time varying scalar field. We have numerically obtained the dependence of the field and baryon charge evolution and their final values on the model's parameters, namely: the gauge coupling constant α, the Hubble constant during inflation H_I, the mass of the field m and the self coupling constants λ_i. We have found the range of the model parameters for which a baryon asymmetry value close to the observed one can be generated.

  4. Excited Baryons in Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2011-11-08

    The light-front holographic QCD approach is used to describe baryon spectroscopy and the systematics of nucleon transition form factors. Baryon spectroscopy and the excitation dynamics of nucleon resonances encoded in the nucleon transition form factors can provide fundamental insight into the strong-coupling dynamics of QCD. The transition from the hard-scattering perturbative domain to the non-perturbative region is sensitive to the detailed dynamics of confined quarks and gluons. Computations of such phenomena from first principles in QCD are clearly very challenging. The most successful theoretical approach thus far has been to quantize QCD on discrete lattices in Euclidean space-time; however, dynamical observables in Minkowski space-time, such as the time-like hadronic form factors are not amenable to Euclidean numerical lattice computations.

  5. Resonance extraction from the SAID analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, Ron; Švarc, Alfred

    2016-05-01

    Resonances are extracted from a number of energy-dependent and single-energy fits to scattering data. The influence of recent, precise EPECUR data is investigated. Results for the single-energy fits are derived using the Laurent+Pietarinen (L+P) method of analysis and are compared to those obtained using contour integration applied to the global energy-dependent fits.

  6. Baryon spectroscopy at ELPH and LEPS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takatsugu

    2014-09-01

    Baryon spectroscopy is an important testing ground for understanding low energy QCD. Meson photoproduction is complementary to π induced reactions for studying excited baryons. Among the meson photo-produced reactions, the neutron target, kaon photo-produced, and multi-meson photo-produced reactions are important to reveal the properties of baryon resonances. The photoproduction experiments at ELPH and the planned experiments at LEPS2 will be discussed. The nucleon and Δ resonances are studied with an electromagnetic calorimeter FOREST at ELPH, Tohoku University by using various photoproduction reactions. A narrow resonance observed at W-75 MeV in η photoproduction on the neutron is of great interest. It would be attributed to a member of anti-decuplet pentaquark baryons with hidden strangeness since no signature corresponding to this bump has been observed so far in the proton channel. Multi-meson/kaon photoproduction is a good tool to study highly excited baryons. The results obtained at ELPH and planned experiments at LEPS2 will be presented.

  7. Utilization of Solar Dynamics Observatory space weather digital image data for comparative analysis with application to Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekoyan, V.; Dehipawala, S.; Liu, Ernest; Tulsee, Vivek; Armendariz, R.; Tremberger, G.; Holden, T.; Marchese, P.; Cheung, T.

    2012-10-01

    Digital solar image data is available to users with access to standard, mass-market software. Many scientific projects utilize the Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) format, which requires specialized software typically used in astrophysical research. Data in the FITS format includes photometric and spatial calibration information, which may not be useful to researchers working with self-calibrated, comparative approaches. This project examines the advantages of using mass-market software with readily downloadable image data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory for comparative analysis over with the use of specialized software capable of reading data in the FITS format. Comparative analyses of brightness statistics that describe the solar disk in the study of magnetic energy using algorithms included in mass-market software have been shown to give results similar to analyses using FITS data. The entanglement of magnetic energy associated with solar eruptions, as well as the development of such eruptions, has been characterized successfully using mass-market software. The proposed algorithm would help to establish a publicly accessible, computing network that could assist in exploratory studies of all FITS data. The advances in computer, cell phone and tablet technology could incorporate such an approach readily for the enhancement of high school and first-year college space weather education on a global scale. Application to ground based data such as that contained in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey is discussed.

  8. Analysis and calibration techniques for superconducting resonators.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Wollack, Edward J; Barrentine, Emily M; Brown, Ari D; Moseley, S Harvey; U-Yen, Kongpop

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed and experimentally explored for in-situ calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response is analyzed in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microstrip and coplanar-waveguide resonator devices were investigated and a recovery within 1% of the observed complex transmission amplitude was achieved with both analysis approaches. The experimental configuration used in microwave characterization of the devices and self-consistent constraints for the electromagnetic constitutive relations for parameter extraction are also presented. PMID:25638068

  9. Analysis and calibration techniques for superconducting resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Wollack, Edward J.; Barrentine, Emily M.; Brown, Ari D.; Moseley, S. Harvey; U-Yen, Kongpop

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed and experimentally explored for in-situ calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response is analyzed in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microstrip and coplanar-waveguide resonator devices were investigated and a recovery within 1% of the observed complex transmission amplitude was achieved with both analysis approaches. The experimental configuration used in microwave characterization of the devices and self-consistent constraints for the electromagnetic constitutive relations for parameter extraction are also presented.

  10. Baryonic B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this talk the decays of B-mesons into baryons are discussed. Large mass of B-meson makes possible the decays of the type B → baryon (+mesons). Experimental observations and measurements of these decays at B-factories Belle and BaBar have stimulate the development of theoretical models in this field. We briefly review the experimental results together with the current theoretical models which describe baryonic B decays.

  11. Extraction of Nucleon Resonances From Global Analysis of Meson Production Reactions at EBAC

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroyuki Kamano

    2011-10-01

    We report the current status of exploring the dynamical aspect of the excited nucleon states through the comprehensive coupled-channels analysis of meson production reactions at the Excited Baryon Analysis Center of Jefferson Lab.

  12. Updated 1 /Nc expansion analysis of [56 ,2+] and [70 ,ℓ+] baryon multiplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matagne, N.; Stancu, Fl.

    2016-05-01

    The mass spectra of the [56 ,2+] and [70 ,ℓ+ ] multiplets, both belonging to the N =2 band, are reviewed in the 1 /Nc expansion method. Previous studies, separately made for each multiplet, are presently updated to the 2014 Particle Data Group. The mass formula, including corrections up to O (1 /Nc) and first order in SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking, has the same independent operator basis in both cases. A special emphasis is made on the role of the SU(3) symmetry breaking operators Bi (i =1 ,2 ,3 ). This can allow for multiplet assignment of Λ and Σ hyperons, which generally is quite difficult to make. Tentative assignments of hyperons with two- and one-star resonances are made to the [70 ,ℓ+ ] multiplet. Another important aim is to find out whether or not a common value of the coefficient c1 of the dominant operator in the mass formula can well fit the present data in both multiplets. A negative answer, which is here the case, implies distinct Regge trajectories for symmetric and mixed symmetric states.

  13. Sterile neutrinos as the origin of dark and baryonic matter.

    PubMed

    Canetti, Laurent; Drewes, Marco; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that three sterile neutrinos alone can simultaneously explain neutrino oscillations, the observed dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe without new physics above the Fermi scale. The key new point of our analysis is leptogenesis after sphaleron freeze-out, which leads to resonant dark matter production, evading thus the constraints on sterile neutrino dark matter from structure formation and x-ray searches. We identify the range of sterile neutrino properties that is consistent with all known constraints. We find a domain of parameters where the new particles can be found with present day experimental techniques, using upgrades to existing experimental facilities. PMID:23432234

  14. Lattice Calculation of Baryon Masses using Clover Fermion Action

    SciTech Connect

    D.G. Richards; M. Gockeler; P.E.L. Rakow; D. Pleiter; G. Schierholz; R. Horsley; C.M. Maynard

    2002-03-01

    We present a calculation of the lowest-lying baryon masses in the quenched approximation to QCD. The calculations are performed using a non-perturbatively improved clover fermion action, and a splitting found between the masses of the nucleon and its parity partner. An analysis of the mass of the first radial excitation of the nucleon finds a value considerably larger than that of the parity partner of the nucleon, and thus little evidence for the Roper resonance as a simple three-quark state.

  15. Error analysis of quartz crystal resonator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lucklum, R.; Behling, C.; Hauptmann, P.; Cernosek, R.W.; Martin, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    Quartz crystal resonators in chemical sensing applications are usually configured as the frequency determining element of an electrical oscillator. By contrast, the shear modulus determination of a polymer coating needs a complete impedance analysis. The first part of this contribution reports the error made if common approximations are used to relate the frequency shift to the sorbed mass. In the second part the authors discuss different error sources in the procedure to determine shear parameters.

  16. Explosives detection with quadrupole resonance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Timothy J.; Thorson, Benjamin D.; Beevor, Simon; West, Rebecca; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1997-02-01

    The increase in international terrorist activity over the past decade has necessitated the exploration of new technologies for the detection of plastic explosives. Quadrupole resonance analysis (QRA) has proven effective as a technique for detecting the presence of plastic, sheet, and military explosive compounds in small quantities, and can also be used to identify narcotics such as heroin and cocaine base. QRA is similar to the widely used magnetic resonance (MR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, but has the considerable advantage that the item being inspected does not need to be immersed in a steady, homogeneous magnetic field. The target compounds are conclusively identified by their unique quadrupole resonance frequencies. Quantum magnetics has develop and introduced a product line of explosives and narcotics detection devices based upon QRA technology. The work presented here concerns a multi-compound QRA detection system designed to screen checked baggage, cargo, and sacks of mail at airports and other high-security facilities. The design philosophy and performance are discussed and supported by test results from field trials conducted in the United States and the United Kingdom. This detection system represents the current state of QRA technology for field use in both commercial and government sectors.

  17. Hybrid baryons in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.

    2012-03-21

    In this study, we present the first comprehensive study of hybrid baryons using lattice QCD methods. Using a large basis of composite QCD interpolating fields we extract an extensive spectrum of baryon states and isolate those of hybrid character using their relatively large overlap onto operators which sample gluonic excitations. We consider the spectrum of Nucleon and Delta states at several quark masses finding a set of positive parity hybrid baryons with quantum numbers $N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{3/2^+},\\, N_{3/2^+},\\,N_{5/2^+},\\,$ and $\\Delta_{1/2^+},\\, \\Delta_{3/2^+}$ at an energy scale above the first band of `conventional' excited positive parity baryons. This pattern of states is compatible with a color octet gluonic excitation having $J^{P}=1^{+}$ as previously reported in the hybrid meson sector and with a comparable energy scale for the excitation, suggesting a common bound-state construction for hybrid mesons and baryons.

  18. Neutron-Resonance Capture Analysis of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, H.; Bode, P.; Blaauw, M.; Corvi, F.

    1999-11-14

    Epithermal neutron activation analysis is a well-established approach to improve the sensitivity for certain elements by suppressing the activation of interfering elements. If epithermal neutrons of a given energy could be selected, the signal-to-noise ratio might be further improved by taking advantage of resonance capture. This reaction occurs mainly by intermediate and heavy nuclei. Moreover, most of these reactions take place with epithermal or fast neutrons. Intense epithermal neutrons are available as ''white'' beams at accelerator-driven neutron sources. Neutron resonance capture offers interesting analytical opportunities. Low-Z elements have little capture of epithermal neutrons and are thus virtually absent in the time-of-flight spectrum. Relatively large objects can be placed in the neutron beam and analyzed nondestructively. The induced radioactivity is relatively low. If an element has several stable isotopes, each of these isotopes can be recognized by its specific resonances. This would allow for multitracer studies with several isotopically labeled compounds. Different from mass spectrometry, the sample remains intact and can be used for further studies after analysis. Applications may be in the field of archaeology, metallurgy, and certification of reference materials.

  19. Radiative corrections in baryon semileptonic decays with the emission of a polarized baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez-Leon, C.; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, R.

    2010-07-29

    We present an overview of the calculation of radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons. We discuss both charged and neutral decaying baryons, restricted to the three-body region of the Dalitz plot. Our analysis is specialized to cover two possible scenarios: The center-of-mass frames of the emitted and the decaying baryons. We have accounted for terms up to order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup 0}, where q is the momentum-transfer and M{sup 1} is the mass of the decaying baryon, and neglected terms of order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup n} for n{>=}1. The expressions displayed are ready to obtain numerical results, suitable for model-independent experimental analyses.

  20. Precision Holographic Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Piljin

    2011-10-21

    We overview a holographic QCD based on the D4-D8 string theory model, with emphasis on baryons and nucleon-meson interactions thereof. Baryons are realized as holographic images of Skyrmions, but with much qualitative changes. This allows us to derive, without adjustable parameters, couplings of baryons to the entire tower of spin one mesons and also to pseudoscalar mesons. We find some surprisingly good match against empirical values for nucleons, in particular. Tensor couplings to all axial-vectors and iso-singlet vectors all vanish, while, for {rho} mesons, tensor couplings are found to be dominant. We close with various cautionary comments and speculations.

  1. Precision Holographic Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Piljin

    2011-10-01

    We overview a holographic QCD based on the D4-D8 string theory model, with emphasis on baryons and nucleon-meson interactions thereof. Baryons are realized as holographic images of Skyrmions, but with much qualitative changes. This allows us to derive, without adjustable parameters, couplings of baryons to the entire tower of spin one mesons and also to pseudoscalar mesons. We find some surprisingly good match against empirical values for nucleons, in particular. Tensor couplings to all axial-vectors and iso-singlet vectors all vanish, while, for ρ mesons, tensor couplings are found to be dominant. We close with various cautionary comments and speculations.

  2. Multi-baryon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kostas Orginos, Will Detmold

    2012-12-01

    In this talk I review the challenges related to calculations of properties of interacting baryons on the lattice. I present the progress made addressing the problem of calculating the large number of Wick contractions necessary to compute states with the quantum numbers of many baryons in lattice QCD. Examples of correlation functions computed using these techniques are shown for the quantum numbers of the light nuclei, He-4, Be-8, C-12, O-16 and Si-28.

  3. Charm Baryon Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    B-factories Belle and BaBar during its operation made not only measurements connected with B-meson decays but also numerous observation and measurements in charm physics. In particular, their results on charm baryon decays and spectroscopy have enlarged and enriched the current picture of heavy flavour hadrons. In this talk we overview current status of charm baryons and their excited states.

  4. Hybrid baryons [alpha].

    SciTech Connect

    Page, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    The authors review the status of hybrid baryons. The only known way to study hybrids rigorously is via excited adiabatic potentials. Hybrids can be modeled by both the bag and flux tube models. The low lying hybrid baryon is N 1/2{sup +} with a mass of 1.5 - 1.8 GeV. Hybrid baryons can be produced in the glue rich processes of diffractive {gamma}N and {pi}N production, {Psi} decays and p{bar p} annihilation. We review the current status of research on three quarks with a gluonic excitation, called a hybrid baryon. The excitation is not an orbital or radial excitation between the quarks. Hybrid baryons have also been reviewed elsewhere. The Mercedes-Benz logl in Figure 1 indicates two possible views of the confining interaction of three quarks, an essential issue in the study of hybrid baryons. In the logo the three points where the Y shape meets the boundary circle should be identified with the three quarks. There are two possibilities fo rthe interaction of the quarks: (1) a pairwise interaction of the quarks represented by the circle, or (2) a Y shaped interaction between the quarks, represented by the Y-shape in the logo.

  5. Baryonic matter perturbations in decaying vacuum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Marttens, R.F. vom; Zimdahl, W.; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W.S. E-mail: wiliam.ricaldi@ufes.br

    2014-08-01

    We consider the perturbation dynamics for the cosmic baryon fluid and determine the corresponding power spectrum for a Λ(t)CDM model in which a cosmological term decays into dark matter linearly with the Hubble rate. The model is tested by a joint analysis of data from supernovae of type Ia (SNIa) (Constitution and Union 2.1), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO), the position of the first peak of the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale-structure (LSS) data (SDSS DR7). While the homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics is only marginally influenced by the baryons, there are modifications on the perturbative level if a separately conserved baryon fluid is included. Considering the present baryon fraction as a free parameter, we reproduce the observed abundance of the order of 5% independently of the dark-matter abundance which is of the order of 32% for this model. Generally, the concordance between background and perturbation dynamics is improved if baryons are explicitly taken into account.

  6. Strangeness in the baryon ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semke, A.; Lutz, M. F. M.

    2012-10-01

    We compute the strangeness content of the baryon octet and decuplet states based on an analysis of recent lattice simulations of the BMW, PACS, LHPC and HSC groups for the pion-mass dependence of the baryon masses. Our results rely on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian and large-Nc sum rule estimates of the counter terms relevant for the baryon masses at N3LO. A partial summation is implied by the use of physical baryon and meson masses in the one-loop contributions to the baryon self energies. A simultaneous description of the lattice results of the BMW, LHPC, PACS and HSC groups is achieved. From a global fit we determine the axial coupling constants F ≃ 0.45 and D ≃ 0.80 in agreement with their values extracted from semi-leptonic decays of the baryons. Moreover, various flavor symmetric limits of baron octet and decuplet masses as obtained by the QCDSF-UKQCD group are recovered. We predict the pion- and strangeness sigma terms and the pion-mass dependence of the octet and decuplet ground states at different strange quark masses.

  7. Resonance parameter measurements and analysis of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Barry, D. P.; Trbovich, M. J.; Burke, J. A.; Drindak, N. J.; Knox, H. D.; Ballad, R. V.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.; Severnyak, L. I.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of gadolinium accurately. Gd has the highest thermal absorption cross section of any natural element. Therefore it is an important element for thermal reactor applications Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Gd samples. The liquid samples were isotopically-enriched in either {sup 155}Gd or {sup 157}Gd. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a sodium iodide detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. The multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY was used to extract resonance parameters. The results of the thermal region analysis are significant. Resonance parameters for the low energy doublet, at 0.025 and 0.032 eV, are presented. The thermal (2200 m/s) capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd has been measured to be 11% smaller than that calculated from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 8. Thermal capture cross sections and capture resonance integrals for each isotope as well as elemental gadolinium are presented. In the epithermal region, natural metal samples were measured in capture and transmission. Neutron interaction data up to 300 eV have been analyzed. Substantial improvement to the understanding of gadolinium cross sections is presented, particularly above 180 eV where the ENDF resolved region for {sup 155}Gd ends. (authors)

  8. Studying time-like baryonic transitions with HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstein, B.

    2016-05-01

    Recent results of the HADES collaboration are presented with emphasis on the e+e- production in elementary reactions. Via the Dalitz decay of baryonic resonances (R →Ne+e-), access is given to the time-like electromagnetic structure of baryonic transitions. This process could be measured for the first time for Δ(1232) in pp reactions at 1.25 GeV. At higher energies, the sensitivity of e+e- emission to transition form factors of the Vector Dominance type has been demonstrated. Very recently, experiments with the GSI pion beam started, allowing for more direct studies of baryonic resonances Dalitz decays. In addition, the measurement of hadronic channels provides a new data base for baryon spectroscopy issues, in particular in the 2πN channel.

  9. Consistent analysis of the [70,1{sup -}] baryon properties in the 1/N{sub c} expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez de Urreta, E. J.; Scoccola, Norberto N.

    2011-05-23

    We report on the application of the 1/N{sub c} expansion of QCD to the description of the properties of non-strange excited baryons belonging to the [70,1{sup -}]-plet. In particular, we present the results of an improved determination of the corresponding mixing angles obtained by performing a simultaneous fit of masses, strong decay widths and e.m. helicity amplitudes. We find {theta}{sub 1} = 0.40(8) and {theta}{sub 3} = 2.81(10). These values are compatible with those determined in previous non-global analyses but have smaller uncertainties.

  10. New Results on Baryon Spectroscopy from MAMI

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, Sven

    2010-08-05

    An overview of the MAMI-C electron accelerator facility (E{sub 0} = 1.6 GeV) and the experimental setups of the A1 and A2 collaborations for electro- and photoproduction reactions is given. Several experimental results and their interpretations for baryon spectroscopy are discussed. The topics presented here are the beam-helicity asymmetry I{center_dot} for {pi}{pi} photoproduction in the second resonance region, the photoproduction of {pi}{sup 0{eta}} up to beam energies of {omega} = 1.4 GeV as a way to study the {Delta}(1700)D{sub 33} baryon, and polarisation observables in h electro- and photoproduction in order to investigate an unexpected s-d-wave phase shift and its possible implications for the nature of the S{sub 11}(1535) resonance.

  11. Baryonic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lynden-Bell, D. ); Gilmore, G. )

    1990-01-01

    Dark matter, first definitely found in the large clusters of galaxies, is now known to be dominant mass in the outer parts of galaxies. All the mass definitely deduced could be made up of baryons, and this would fit well with the requirements of nucleosynthesis in a big bang of small {Omega}{sub B}. However, if inflation is the explanation of the expansion and large scale homogeneity of the universe and of baryon synthesis, and if the universe did not have an infinite extent at the big bang, then {Omega} should be minutely greater than unity. It is commonly hypothesized that most mass is composed of some unknown, non-baryonic form. This book first discusses the known forms, comets, planets, brown dwarfs, stars, gas, galaxies and Lyman {alpha} clouds in which baryons are known to exist. Limits on the amount of dark matter in baryonic form are discussed in the context of the big bang. Inhomogeneities of the right type alleviate the difficulties associated with {Omega}{sub B} = 1 cosmological nucleosynthesis.

  12. Hybrid baryons in QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.

    2012-03-21

    In this study, we present the first comprehensive study of hybrid baryons using lattice QCD methods. Using a large basis of composite QCD interpolating fields we extract an extensive spectrum of baryon states and isolate those of hybrid character using their relatively large overlap onto operators which sample gluonic excitations. We consider the spectrum of Nucleon and Delta states at several quark masses finding a set of positive parity hybrid baryons with quantum numbersmore » $$N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{3/2^+},\\, N_{3/2^+},\\,N_{5/2^+},\\,$$ and $$\\Delta_{1/2^+},\\, \\Delta_{3/2^+}$$ at an energy scale above the first band of `conventional' excited positive parity baryons. This pattern of states is compatible with a color octet gluonic excitation having $$J^{P}=1^{+}$$ as previously reported in the hybrid meson sector and with a comparable energy scale for the excitation, suggesting a common bound-state construction for hybrid mesons and baryons.« less

  13. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01

    The spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of exper- iments for some time, it is interesting compute this spectrum from QCD and compare results between lattice calculations and continuum theoretical models. Several lattice calculations ex- ist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. Here, we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. We present preliminary results for the ground state spectrum.

  14. Baryon production at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, G.; Weiss, J.M.

    1981-09-01

    Measurements of inclusive ..lambda.. + anti ..lambda.. production for 1.0 less than or equal to p less than or equal to 10.0 GeV/c and p + anti p production for 0.4 less than or equal to p less than or equal to 2.0 GeV/c show significant baryon production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at E/sub cm/ = 29 GeV. ..lambda.. + anti ..lambda.. production represents 0.2 ..lambda..'s or anti ..lambda..'s per PEP event while the observed p + anti p production implies all baryon-antibaryon pair production is occurring at least as often as 0.6 per event, depending on the yet to be measured p + anti p production at high momentum. Comparisons are made with the first theoretical attempts to account for baryon production at these energies.

  15. Electromagnetic structure of decuplet baryons towards the chiral regime

    SciTech Connect

    Boinepalli, S.; Leinweber, D. B.; Moran, P. J.; Williams, A. G.; Zanotti, J. M.; Zhang, J. B.

    2009-09-01

    The electromagnetic properties of the baryon decuplet are calculated in quenched QCD on a 20{sup 3}x40 lattice with a lattice spacing of 0.128 fm using the fat-link irrelevant clover fermion action with quark masses providing a pion mass as low as 300 MeV. Magnetic moments and charge radii are extracted from the electric and magnetic form factors for each individual quark sector. From these, the corresponding baryon properties are constructed. We present results for the higher-order moments of the spin-3/2 baryons, including the electric-quadrupole moment E2 and the magnetic-octupole moment M3. The world's first determination of a nonzero M3 form factor for the {delta} baryon is presented. With these results we provide a conclusive analysis which shows that decuplet baryons are deformed. We compare the decuplet-baryon results from a similar lattice calculation of the octet baryons. We establish that the environment sensitivity is far less pronounced for the decuplet baryons compared to the octet baryons. A surprising result is that the charge radii of the decuplet baryons are generally smaller than those of the octet baryons. The magnetic moment of the {delta}{sup +} reveals a turnover in the low quark-mass region, making it smaller than the proton magnetic moment. These results are consistent with the expectations of quenched chiral perturbation theory. A similar turnover is also noticed in the magnetic moment of the {sigma}*{sup 0}, but not for {xi}* where only kaon loops can appear in quenched QCD. The electric-quadrupole moment of the {omega}{sup -} baryon is positive when the negative charge factor is included, and is equal to 0.86{+-}0.12x10{sup -2} fm{sup 2}, indicating an oblate shape.

  16. Analysis of an integrated optic micro racetrack resonator based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malathi, S.; Hegde, Gopalkrishna; Srinivas, T.; Roy, Ugra M.

    2014-06-01

    Silicon-On- Insulator (SOI) technology has huge potential in fabricating compact devices for various applications such as integrated optic waveguides, directional couplers, resonators etc. In this work, we present the analysis of a biosensor based on an integrated optic racetrack resonator, interrogated by a bus waveguide. The biomaterial is applied as a cladding layer. Here we analyze the coupling between the resonator and the bus waveguide, and its dependence on the bio layer. In traditional analysis, the effective refractive index and resonator total path length are the factors influencing the resonant wavelength. Our analysis shows that all parametric values decrease with increase in waveguide width and spacing. The inclusion of waveguide mode overlap and perturbation in coupled mode equation results in enhanced resonator sensitivity of an order of magnitude

  17. Study of nucleon resonances at EBAC@Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroyuki Kamano

    2010-05-01

    We present the dynamical origin of the P11 nucleon resonances resulting from a dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) analysis of meson production reactions off a nucleon target, which is conducted in Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) at Jefferson Lab. Two resonance poles are found in the energy region where the Roper resonance P11(1440) is supposed to be observed. Furthermore, the two resonance poles and the next higher resonance pole corresponding to P11(1710) are found to originate from a single bare state.

  18. Study of nucleon resonances at EBAC-JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Kamano, Hiroyuki

    2010-05-12

    We present the dynamical origin of the P{sub 11} nucleon resonances resulting from a dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) analysis of meson production reactions off a nucleon target, which is conducted at Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) of Jefferson Lab. Two resonance poles are found in the energy region where the Roper resonance P{sub 11}(1440) was identified. Furthermore, the two resonance poles and the next higher resonance pole corresponding to P{sub 11}(1710) are found to originate from a single bare state.

  19. Problems in baryon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Capstick, S.

    1994-04-01

    Current issues and problems in the physics of ground- and excited-state baryons are considered, and are classified into those which should be resolved by CEBAF in its present form, and those which may require CEBAF to undergo an energy upgrade to 8 GeV or more. Recent theoretical developments designed to address these problems are outlined.

  20. Baryons and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1997-03-01

    The author presents an idiosyncratic view of baryons which calls for a marriage between quark-based and hadronic models of QCD. He advocates a treatment based on valence quark plus glue dominance of hadron structure, with the sea of q pairs (in the form of virtual hadron pairs) as important corrections.

  1. Strange Baryon Resonance Production in {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV p+p and Au+Au Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Caines, H.; Catu, O.; Chikanian, A.; Du, F.; Finch, E.; Harris, J. W.; Heinz, M.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Lin, G.; Majka, R.; Nattrass, C.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Smirnov, N.; Witt, R.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.

    2006-09-29

    We report the measurements of {sigma}(1385) and {lambda}(1520) production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV from the STAR Collaboration. The yields and the p{sub T} spectra are presented and discussed in terms of chemical and thermal freeze-out conditions and compared to model predictions. Thermal and microscopic models do not adequately describe the yields of all the resonances produced in central Au+Au collisions. Our results indicate that there may be a time span between chemical and thermal freeze-out during which elastic hadronic interactions occur.

  2. Characterization of nuclear material by Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradela, C.; Alaerts, G.; Becker, B.; Heyse, J.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Mondelaers, W.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Koizumi, M.; Tsuchiya, H.

    2016-11-01

    The use of Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis for the characterization of nuclear materials is discussed. The method, which relies on resonance structures in neutron-induced reaction cross sections, can be applied as a non-destructive method to characterise complex nuclear materials such as melted fuel resulting from a severe nuclear accident. Results of a demonstration experiment at the GELINA facility reveal that accurate data can be obtained at a compact facility even in the case of strong overlapping resonances.

  3. Baryons as Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, Sarada Gangadharan

    In this dissertation we study the soliton models of baryons originally proposed by Skyrme. Baryons are interpreted in the naive quark model as bound states of three quarks. Here, we interpret them as solitonic bound states of mesons. This is natural in Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory of strong interactions. The low energy properties of chromodynamics are well accounted for by the chiral model. The Wess-Zumino anomaly plays a crucial role in this model. A derivation within the canonical formulation of the Wess-Zumino is given. It is shown that the anomaly leads to a modification of the current algebra. An operator that creates solitonic states out of the vacuum is constructed. It is shown that this operator is fermionic if the number of colors is odd. The Wess -Zumino anomaly is shown to be responsible for this fact. The anomaly is studied in detail in the simpler context of a two dimensional theory. The operator creating solitons is constructed and its equations of motion are found. This model has an infinite number of conserved charges satisfying a Kac-Moody algebra. A derivation of the Wess-Zumino anomaly starting from Quantum Chromodynamics is given. Further the Skyrme constant is calculated, within certain approximations. This enables us to calculate the mass of the soliton and it agrees with the baryon mass to 20%. The constants D and F that couple the baryons to mesons are also computed. They also agree to about 20%. Thus the identification of baryons as solitons of the chiral model is established.

  4. Stakeholder acceptance analysis ResonantSonic drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning ResonantSonic Drilling (Sonic Drilling), derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. Sonic Drilling is an innovative method to reach contamination in soil and groundwater. The resonant sonic drill rig uses counter-rotating weights to generate energy, which causes the drill pipe to vibrate elastically along its entire length. In the resonant condition, forces of up to 200,000 pounds are transmitted to the drill bit face to create a cutting action. The resonant energy causes subsurface materials to move back into the adjacent formation, permitting the drill pipe to advance. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of sonic drilling to the remediation problems they face.

  5. Baryons in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nawa, Kanabu; Suganuma, Hideo; Kojo, Toru

    2007-04-15

    We study baryons in holographic QCD with D4/D8/D8 multi-D-brane system. In holographic QCD, the baryon appears as a topologically nontrivial chiral soliton in a four-dimensional effective theory of mesons. We call this topological soliton brane-induced Skyrmion. Some review of D4/D8/D8 holographic QCD is presented from the viewpoints of recent hadron physics and QCD phenomenologies. A four-dimensional effective theory with pions and {rho} mesons is uniquely derived from the non-Abelian Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) action of D8 brane with D4 supergravity background at the leading order of large N{sub c}, without small amplitude expansion of meson fields to discuss chiral solitons. For the hedgehog configuration of pion and {rho}-meson fields, we derive the energy functional and the Euler-Lagrange equation of brane-induced Skyrmion from the meson effective action induced by holographic QCD. Performing the numerical calculation, we obtain the soliton solution and figure out the pion profile F(r) and the {rho}-meson profile G-tilde(r) of the brane-induced Skyrmion with its total energy, energy density distribution, and root-mean-square radius. These results are compared with the experimental quantities of baryons and also with the profiles of standard Skyrmion without {rho} mesons. We analyze interaction terms of pions and {rho} mesons in brane-induced Skyrmion, and find a significant {rho}-meson component appearing in the core region of a baryon.

  6. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary Brown, William Detmold, Stefan Meinel, Konstantinos Orginos

    2012-09-01

    The arena of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. This has led to a great deal of theoretical effort being put forth in the calculation of mass spectra in this sector. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of experiments for some time, it is interesting to compare results between lattice QCD computations and continuum theoretical models. Several recent lattice QCD calculations exist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. In this work we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of the mass spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. The wide range of quark masses in these systems require that the various flavors of quarks be treated with different lattice actions. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. The calculation of the ground state spectrum is presented and compared to recent models.

  7. Neutron Resonance Spectroscopy for the Analysis of Materials and Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Borella, A.; Lampoudis, C.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Kopecky, S.; Postma, H.; Moxon, M.

    2009-12-02

    The presence of resonances in neutron induced reaction cross sections is the basis of the Neutron Resonance Capture (NRCA) and Transmission (NRTA) Analysis techniques. Since resonances can be observed at neutron energies which are specific for each nuclide, they can be used as fingerprints to identify and quantify elements in materials and objects. Both NRCA and NRTA are fully non-destructive methods which determine the bulk elemental composition, do not require any sample preparation and result in a negligible residual activation. In this text we review the technique and present an analysis procedures including one based on a more methodological approach which relies on a full Resonance Shape Analysis (RSA) and accounts directly for the neutron self-shielding, multiple scattering, Doppler broadening and instrumental resolution.

  8. Spectroscopy of doubly charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Vijande, J.; Valcarce, A.; Fernandez, F.; Garcilazo, H.

    2006-02-11

    We study the mass spectrum of baryons with two and three charmed quarks. For double charm baryons the spin splitting is found to be smaller than standard quark-model potential predictions. This splitting is not influenced either by the particular form of the confining potential or by the regularization taken for the contact term of the spin-spin potential. We consistently predict the spectra for triply charmed baryons.

  9. Plasmon resonance microsensor for droplet analysis.

    PubMed

    Chaigneau, M; Balaa, K; Minea, T; Louarn, G

    2007-08-15

    Microscale fiber tip sensors based on the plasmon resonance are reported. The fabrication process derived from our previous approach for manufacturing near-field scanning optical microscopy probes has been optimized for sensing applications. A typical tip sensor is a tapered fiber 400 microm in length, coated with a nanoporous thin silver film. The miniaturized geometry of the sensor allows detection in a single droplet of liquid solution (approximately 20 microl). The tip sensor is sensitive for refractive indices between 1.33 and 1.40 with a sensitivity of at least 3 x 10(-4) refractive index unit (RIU)/nm. The Raman scattering enhancement through these microsensors demonstrates the important role played by the localized plasmon resonance. The sensors' linear response covers a large region, interesting for biosensing in aqueous environments such as biomedical applications. PMID:17700810

  10. Partial Decay Widths of Negative Parity Baryons in the 1/N{sub c} Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez de Urreta, Emiliano; Scoccola, Norberto; Jayalath, Chandala; Goity, Jose

    2013-04-01

    The partial decay widths of lowest lying negative parity baryons belonging to the 70-plet of SU(6) are analyzed in the framework of the 1/N{sub c} expansion. The channels considered are those with single pseudoscalar meson emission. The analysis is carried out to sub-leading order in 1/N{sub c} and to first order in SU(3) symmetry breaking. Conclusions about the magnitude of SU(3) breaking effects along with predictions for some unknown or poorly determined partial decay widths of known resonances are given.

  11. Partial decay widths of negative parity baryons in the 1/N{sub c} expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez de Urreta, E. J.; Scoccola, N. N.; Jayalath, C. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2013-03-25

    The partial decay widths of lowest lying negative parity baryons belonging to the 70-plet of SU(6) are analyzed in the framework of the 1/N{sub c} expansion. The channels considered are those with single pseudoscalar meson emission. The analysis is carried out to sub-leading order in 1/N{sub c} and to first order in SU(3) symmetry breaking. Conclusions about the magnitude of SU(3) breaking effects along with predictions for some unknown or poorly determined partial decay widths of known resonances are given.

  12. Negative parity baryon decays in the 1/N{sub c} expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Jayalath, C.; Goity, J. L.; Gonzalez de Urreta, E.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2011-10-01

    The partial decay widths of lowest lying negative parity baryons belonging to the 70-plet of SU(6) are analyzed in the framework of the 1/N{sub c} expansion. The channels considered are those with single pseudoscalar meson emission. The analysis is carried out to sub-leading order in 1/N{sub c} and to first order in SU(3) symmetry breaking. Conclusions about the magnitude of SU(3) breaking effects along with predictions for some unknown or poorly determined partial decay widths of known resonances are obtained.

  13. Baryons, neutrinos, feedback and weak gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Viola, Massimo; Heymans, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    The effect of baryonic feedback on the dark matter mass distribution is generally considered to be a nuisance to weak gravitational lensing. Measurements of cosmological parameters are affected as feedback alters the cosmic shear signal on angular scales smaller than a few arcminutes. Recent progress on the numerical modelling of baryon physics has shown that this effect could be so large that, rather than being a nuisance, the effect can be constrained with current weak lensing surveys, hence providing an alternative astrophysical insight on one of the most challenging questions of galaxy formation. In order to perform our analysis, we construct an analytic fitting formula that describes the effect of the baryons on the mass power spectrum. This fitting formula is based on three scenarios of the OverWhelmingly Large hydrodynamical simulations. It is specifically calibrated for z < 1.5, where it models the simulations to an accuracy that is better than 2 per cent for scales k < 10 h Mpc-1 and better than 5 per cent for 10 < k < 100 h Mpc-1. Equipped with this precise tool, this paper presents the first constraint on baryonic feedback models using gravitational lensing data, from the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). In this analysis, we show that the effect of neutrino mass on the mass power spectrum is degenerate with the baryonic feedback at small angular scales and cannot be ignored. Assuming a cosmology precision fixed by WMAP9, we find that a universe with massless neutrinos is rejected by the CFHTLenS lensing data with 85-98 per cent confidence, depending on the baryon feedback model. Some combinations of feedback and non-zero neutrino masses are also disfavoured by the data, although it is not yet possible to isolate a unique neutrino mass and feedback model. Our study shows that ongoing weak gravitational lensing surveys (KiDS, HSC and DES) will offer a unique opportunity to probe the physics of baryons at galactic scales, in

  14. Baryon and chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsky, A.; Krikun, A.

    2014-07-23

    We briefly review the generalized Skyrmion model for the baryon recently suggested by us. It takes into account the tower of vector and axial mesons as well as the chiral symmetry breaking. The generalized Skyrmion model provides the qualitative explanation of the Ioffe’s formula for the baryon mass.

  15. [Immune resonance scattering spectral analysis of fenvalerate].

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen-Sheng; Wang, Su-Mei; Jiang, Zhi-Liang

    2009-01-01

    In the pH 7.2 Na2HPO4-NaH2PO4 buffer solutions and in the presence of PEG-6000, fenvalerate (Fen) antisera was combined with Fen specifically, and aggregated to form immune complex particles that exhibited five resonance scattering peaks at 350, 390, 420, 440 and 480 nm respectively. The peak at 390 nm was the strongest and was chosen for use. Fen concentration (c) in the range of 0.20 to 6.40 microg x mL(-1) was proportional to the resonance scattering intensity at 390 nm. Its regression equation was DeltaIRS 23.05c-1.39, the correlation coefficient was 0.9978, and the detection limit was 0.07 microg x mL(-1). Effects of buffer solution type, pH value, buffer solution volume, fenvalerate antisera concentration, PEG-6000 concentration, incubation temperature and time on the resonance scattering intensity were considered in detail. With pH (5.8-8.0) increasing, the IRS and Ib all decreased. When the pH value was at 7.2, the DeltaIRS was bigger. Three buffer solutions of pH 7.2, including Na2HPO4-citric acid, Na2HPO4-KH2PO4 and Na2HPO4-NaH2PO4, were examined. The pH 7.2 Na2HPO4-NaH2PO4 buffer solution gives the biggest DeltaIRS value. PEG-6000 could enhance the DeltaIRS value. When the concentration of PEG-6000 was 50.0 mg x mL(-1), the DeltaIRS was achieved at max. Fen was a stable chemical. The IRS increased within 20 min,while the DeltaIRS remained constant when incubation time was in the range of 20-40 min. The condition of a pH 7.2 Na2HPO4-NaH2PO4 buffer solution-50.0 mg x mL(-1) PEG-6000-6.67 microg x mL(-1) Fen antisera-30 degrees C-incubation time 20 min was chosen. According to the procedure, the influence of foreign substances on the determination of 1.60 microg x mL(-1) Fen was examined, within a relative error of +/- 5%. Results showed that the following coexistent substances had no impact on the RS assay: 96 microg x mL(-1) ametryne, 96 microg x mL(-1) m-aminotoluene, 48 microg x mL(-1) simetryne, 48 microg x mL(-1) p-aminotoluene,80 microg x mL(-1) BSA

  16. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, M J; Barry, D P; Slovacek, R E; Danon, Y; Block, R C; Francis, N C; Lubert, M; Burke, J A; Drindak, N J; Lienweber, G; Ballad, R

    2007-02-06

    The focus of this work is to determine the resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005 - 200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. Accurate hafnium cross sections and resonance parameters are needed in order to quantify the effects of hafnium found in zirconium, a metal commonly used in reactors. The accuracy of the cross sections and the corresponding resonance parameters used in current nuclear analysis tools are rapidly becoming the limiting factor in reducing the overall uncertainty on reactor physics calculations. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission are routinely performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC using the time-of flight technique. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m, respectively. Capture experiments were performed using a sixteen section NaI multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized several thicknesses of metallic and isotope-enriched liquid Hf samples. The liquid Hf samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analyses were performed using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. A combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005 - 200 eV. Additionally, resonance integrals were calculated, along with errors for each hafnium isotope, using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previous values. The {sup 176}Hf resonance integral, based on this work, is approximately 73% higher than the ENDF/B-VI value. This is due primarily to the changes to resonance parameters in the 8 eV resonance, the neutron width presented in this work is more than twice that of the previous value. The calculated elemental

  17. Chemometric Analysis of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Data

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,TODD M.; ALAM,M. KATHLEEN

    2000-07-20

    Chemometric analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has increased dramatically in recent years. A variety of different chemometric techniques have been applied to a wide range of problems in food, agricultural, medical, process and industrial systems. This article gives a brief review of chemometric analysis of NMR spectral data, including a summary of the types of mixtures and experiments analyzed with chemometric techniques. Common experimental problems encountered during the chemometric analysis of NMR data are also discussed.

  18. Resonant-cavity apparatus for cytometry or particle analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gourley, Paul L.

    1998-01-01

    A resonant-cavity apparatus for cytometry or particle analysis. The apparatus comprises a resonant optical cavity having an analysis region within the cavity for containing one or more biological cells or dielectric particles to be analyzed. In the presence of a cell or particle, a light beam in the form of spontaneous emission or lasing is generated within the resonant optical cavity and is encoded with information about the cell or particle. An analysis means including a spectrometer and/or a pulse-height analyzer is provided within the apparatus for recovery of the information from the light beam to determine a size, shape, identification or other characteristics about the cells or particles being analyzed. The recovered information can be grouped in a multi-dimensional coordinate space for identification of particular types of cells or particles. In some embodiments of the apparatus, the resonant optical cavity can be formed, at least in part, from a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. The apparatus and method are particularly suited to the analysis of biological cells, including blood cells, and can further include processing means for manipulating, sorting, or eradicating cells after analysis thereof.

  19. Resonant-cavity apparatus for cytometry or particle analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gourley, P.L.

    1998-08-11

    A resonant-cavity apparatus for cytometry or particle analysis is described. The apparatus comprises a resonant optical cavity having an analysis region within the cavity for containing one or more biological cells or dielectric particles to be analyzed. In the presence of a cell or particle, a light beam in the form of spontaneous emission or lasing is generated within the resonant optical cavity and is encoded with information about the cell or particle. An analysis means including a spectrometer and/or a pulse-height analyzer is provided within the apparatus for recovery of the information from the light beam to determine a size, shape, identification or other characteristics about the cells or particles being analyzed. The recovered information can be grouped in a multi-dimensional coordinate space for identification of particular types of cells or particles. In some embodiments of the apparatus, the resonant optical cavity can be formed, at least in part, from a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. The apparatus and method are particularly suited to the analysis of biological cells, including blood cells, and can further include processing means for manipulating, sorting, or eradicating cells after analysis. 35 figs.

  20. Decay and spectra of baryons especially beauty baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, C. S.

    1996-06-01

    Masses and decays of the baryons are considered. The entire spectroscopy of baryons containing u,d,s,c and b quarks is calculated using the five quark masses and only four additional parameters describing the potential between the baryons. This potential is taken to be a short-range Coulomb potential together with a long-range linear potential modified by a harmonic-oscillator potential. Decays are studied using the quark pair creation model of Le Yaouanc et. al. The pair strength γ is replaced by kγ . This and the meson radius are the only parameters used in the calculation of the decays. Overall, we have a useful model, employing a small number of parameters, yet capable of yielding a description of the baryons in good accord with experimental data.

  1. Baryon asymmetry and split SUSY

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Shinta

    2005-12-02

    It is one of the greatest mysteries that the baryon asymmetry in our universe is so small. It is argued that it may originate from some profound physics beyond the standard model. We investigate the Affleck-Dine baryogenesis in split supersymmetry, and find that the smallness of the baryon asymmetry is directly related to the hierarchy between the supersymmetry breaking squark/slepton masses and the weak scale. Put simply, the baryon asymmetry is small because of the split mass spectrum. LHC may prove or falsify our scenario.

  2. Measurement of b-Baryons with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect

    Heuser, Joachim; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2007-10-01

    We report the observation of new bottom baryon states. The most recent result is the observation of the baryon {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} through the decay {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{Xi}{sup -}. The significance of the signal corresponds to 7.7{sigma} and the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 5792.9{+-}2.5(stat.){+-}1.7(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. In addition we observe four resonances in the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {+-}} spectra, consistent with the bottom baryons {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*){+-}}. All observations are in agreement with theoretical expectations.

  3. Observation of the sigma_b baryons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Pursley, Jennifer M.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2007-03-01

    We present a measurement of four new bottom baryons in proton-antiproton collisions with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Using 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector, we observe four {Lambda}{sup 0}{sub b}{pi}{+-} resonances in the fully reconstructed decay mode {Lambda}{sup 0}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}{pi}{sup -}, where {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c} {yields} pK{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. The probability for the background to produce a similar or larger signal is less than 8.3 x 10{sup -8}, corresponding to a significance of greater than 5.2 {sigma}. We interpret these baryons as the {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*){+-}} baryons.

  4. Cascade ({xi}) Physics: a New Approach to Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B. M. K.

    2006-11-17

    Cascade hyperons have two special characteristics, which are particularly valuable as experimental and theoretical tools: cascades have strangeness minus two and their widths are quite narrow compared to the N* and {delta}+ resonances. The narrow width allows the detection by the missing mass or invariant mass techniques. The makeup of the cascade states is two ''massive'' strange and one light quark, this makes them much more amendable to Lattice Gauge calculations. Using the well established Flavor Symmetry of QCD we can use a comparison of the Cascades with the N* and {delta}* resonances to make a conclusive search for the 'Unseen Resonances' of the quark model, for Hybrid Baryons, Meson-Baryon Bound States and other Exotica. We can investigate the flavor dependence of confinement: is the string tension between two strange quarks the same as between two down quarks?.

  5. Cascade (Ξ) Physics: a New Approach to Baryon Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefkens, B. M. K.

    2006-11-01

    Cascade hyperons have two special characteristics, which are particularly valuable as experimental and theoretical tools: cascades have strangeness minus two and their widths are quite narrow compared to the N* and Δ+ resonances. The narrow width allows the detection by the missing mass or invariant mass techniques. The makeup of the cascade states is two "massive" strange and one light quark, this makes them much more amendable to Lattice Gauge calculations. Using the well established Flavor Symmetry of QCD we can use a comparison of the Cascades with the N* and Δ* resonances to make a conclusive search for the "Unseen Resonances" of the quark model, for Hybrid Baryons, Meson-Baryon Bound States and other Exotica. We can investigate the flavor dependence of confinement: is the string tension between two strange quarks the same as between two down quarks?

  6. Decays of J/psi (3100) to baryon final states

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, M.W.

    1982-05-01

    We present results for the decays of psi(3100) into baryon and hyperon final states. The sample studied here consists of 1.3 million produced psi decays. The decays into nonstrange baryons agree well with currently established results, but with better statistics. In addition, significant resonance formation in multibody final states is observed. The decay psi ..-->.. anti pp..gamma.., the first direct photon decay of the psi involving baryons in the final state, is presented and the theoretical implications of the decays are briefly explored. Several new decays of the psi involving strange baryons are explored, including the first observations of three body final states involving hyperons. The I-spin symmetry of the strong decay psi ..-->.. baryons has clearly been observed. The reduced matrix elements for psi ..-->.. B anti B are presented for final states of different SU(3) content. The B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ results are in excellent agreement with the psi being an SU(3) singlet as are the results for psi ..-->.. B/sub 10/ anti B/sub 10/. We present the first evidence for the SU(3) violating decays of the type psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 10/ + c.c.. Angular distributions for psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Statistics are limited, but the data tends to prefer other than a 1 + Cos/sup 2/theta distribution.

  7. Compressed baryonic matter at FAIR: JINR participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilkin, P.; Ladygin, V.; Malakhov, A.; Senger, P.

    2015-11-01

    The scientific mission of the Compressed Baryonic Matter(CBM) experiment is the study of the nuclear matter properties at the high baryon densities in heavy ion collisions at the Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. We present the results on JINR participation in the CBM experiment. JINR teams are responsible on the design, the coordination of superconducting(SC) magnet manufacture, its testing and installation in CBM cave. Together with Silicon Tracker System it will provide the momentum resolution better 1% for different configuration of CBM setup. The characteristics and technical aspects of the magnet are discussed. JINR plays also a significant role in the manufacture of two straw tracker station for the muon detection system. JINR team takes part in the development of new method for simulation, processing and analysis experimental data for different basic detectors of CBM.

  8. Baryon-Baryon Interactions ---Nijmegen Extended-Soft-Core Models---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, T. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    pseudo-scalar-, vector-, scalar-, and axial-mesons, (ii) diffractive (i.e. multiple-gluon) exchanges, (iii) two pseudo-scalar exchange (PS-PS), and (iv) meson-pair-exchange (MPE). The OBE- and pair-vertices are regulated by gaussian form factors producing potentials with a soft behavior near the origin. The assignment of the cutoff masses for the BBM-vertices is dependent on the SU(3)-classification of the exchanged mesons for OBE, and a similar scheme for MPE. The ESC-models ESC04 and ESC08 describe the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY) interactions in a unified way using broken SU(3)-symmetry. Novel ingredients in the OBE-sector in the ESC-models are the inclusion of (i) the axial-vector meson potentials, (ii) a zero in the scalar- and axial-vector meson form factors. These innovations made it possible for the first time to keep the meson coupling parameters of the model qualitatively in accordance with the predictions of the (3P_0) quark-antiquark creation (QPC) model. This is also the case for the F/(F+D)-ratios. Furthermore, the introduction of the zero helped to avoid the occurrence of unwanted bound states in Lambda N. Broken SU(3)-symmetry serves to connect the NN and the YN channels, which leaves after fitting NN only a few free parameters for the determination of the YN-interactions. In particular, the meson-baryon coupling constants are calculated via SU(3) using the coupling constants of the NN oplus YN-analysis as input. In ESC04 medium strong flavor-symmetry-breaking (FSB) of the coupling constants was investigated, using the (3}P_{0) -model with a Gell-Mann-Okubo hypercharge breaking for the BBM-coupling. In ESC08 the couplings are kept SU(3)-symmetric. The charge-symmetry-breaking (CSB) in the Lambda p and Lambda n channels, which is an SU(2) isospin breaking, is included in the OBE-, TME-, and MPE-potentials. In ESC04 and ESC08 simultaneous fits to the NN- and the YN- scattering data have been achieved, using different

  9. Properties of hadron matter. II - Dense baryon matter and neutron stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Y. C.; Wang, C. G.

    1971-01-01

    In this article we have provided certain details of a nuclear-matter computation, based on the Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone theory of nuclear reaction, which leads to an equation of state for matter in the density region of 10 to 500 trillion g/cu cm. We also explore the possibilities that at very high baryon densities or for very short baryon separations, the net baryon-baryon interaction may be negligible so that the results of dynamical models, like the statistical bootstrap model and the dual-resonance model, may be applicable to the study of dense baryon matter. Several plausible equations of state are constructed, and their effect on the limiting mass of the neutron star is examined.

  10. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    MJ Trbovich; DP Barry; RE Slovacck; Y Danon; RC Block; JA Burke; NJ Drindak; G Leinweber; RV Ballad

    2004-10-13

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically-enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY [1] and INTER [2] codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  11. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, Michael J.; Barry, Devin P.; Burke, John A.; Drindak, Noel J.; Leinweber, Greg; Ballad, Robert V.; Slovacek, Rudy E.; Danon, Yaron; Block, Robert C.

    2005-05-24

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping 176Hf and 178Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions.Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. 6Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen-section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the 176Hf and 178Hf contributions to the 8-eV doublet without saturation.Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  12. Resonances, and mechanisms of Theta-production

    SciTech Connect

    Ya.I. Azimov; I.I. Strakovsky

    2004-09-01

    After explaining necessity of exotic hadrons, we discuss mechanisms which could determine production of the exotic Theta-baryon. A possible important role of resonances (producing the Theta in real or virtual decays) is emphasized for various processes. Several experimental directions for studies of such resonances, and the Theta itself, are suggested. We briefly discuss also recent negative results on the Theta-baryon.

  13. Evidence for a narrow anti-charmed baryon state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bähr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J. C.; Böhme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brisson, V.; Bröker, H.-B.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J. G.; Coppens, Y. R.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flucke, G.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formánek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garutti, E.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.-D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Höting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kückens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leißner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Lüke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakyt≐, R.; Pöschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Ratiani, Z.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; H1 Collaboration

    2004-05-01

    A narrow resonance in D∗ -p and D∗ +p¯ invariant mass combinations is observed in inelastic electron-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 300 GeV and 320 GeV at HERA. The resonance has a mass of 3099±3(stat.)±5(syst.) MeV and a measured Gaussian width of 12±3(stat.) MeV, compatible with the experimental resolution. The resonance is interpreted as an anti-charmed baryon with a minimal constituent quark composition of uuddc¯, together with the charge conjugate.

  14. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physicalmore » pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.« less

  15. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.

  16. The Nucleon Resonance Program at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Ralf W. Gothe

    2006-02-01

    The status of the program to study baryon resonances at Jefferson Lab will be exemplified by the latest results on resonance parameters and transition form factors in single and double-pion production as well as kaon-hyperon decays.

  17. THE BARYON CONTENT OF COSMIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    McGaugh, Stacy S.; Schombert, James M.; De Blok, W. J. G.; Zagursky, Matthew J. E-mail: jschombe@uoregon.edu E-mail: mzagursk@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2010-01-01

    We make an inventory of the baryonic and gravitating mass in structures ranging from the smallest galaxies to rich clusters of galaxies. We find that the fraction of baryons converted to stars reaches a maximum between M {sub 500} = 10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13} M {sub sun}, suggesting that star formation is most efficient in bright galaxies in groups. The fraction of baryons detected in all forms deviates monotonically from the cosmic baryon fraction as a function of mass. On the largest scales of clusters, most of the expected baryons are detected, while in the smallest dwarf galaxies, fewer than 1% are detected. Where these missing baryons reside is unclear.

  18. DETECTING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Labatie, A.; Starck, J. L.

    2012-02-20

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) are a feature imprinted in the galaxy distribution by acoustic waves traveling in the plasma of the early universe. Their detection at the expected scale in large-scale structures strongly supports current cosmological models with a nearly linear evolution from redshift z Almost-Equal-To 1000 and the existence of dark energy. In addition, BAOs provide a standard ruler for studying cosmic expansion. In this paper, we focus on methods for BAO detection using the correlation function measurement {xi}-hat. For each method, we want to understand the tested hypothesis (the hypothesis H{sub 0} to be rejected) and the underlying assumptions. We first present wavelet methods which are mildly model-dependent and mostly sensitive to the BAO feature. Then we turn to fully model-dependent methods. We present the method used most often based on the {chi}{sup 2} statistic, but we find that it has limitations. In general the assumptions of the {chi}{sup 2} method are not verified, and it only gives a rough estimate of the significance. The estimate can become very wrong when considering more realistic hypotheses, where the covariance matrix of {xi}-hat depends on cosmological parameters. Instead, we propose to use the {Delta}l method based on two modifications: we modify the procedure for computing the significance and make it rigorous, and we modify the statistic to obtain better results in the case of varying covariance matrix. We verify with simulations that correct significances are different from the ones obtained using the classical {chi}{sup 2} procedure. We also test a simple example of varying covariance matrix. In this case we find that our modified statistic outperforms the classical {chi}{sup 2} statistic when both significances are correctly computed. Finally, we find that taking into account variations of the covariance matrix can change both BAO detection levels and cosmological parameter constraints.

  19. Resonant nuclear reaction analysis with high depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kul'ment'ev, A. I.; Storizhko, V. E.; Zabashta, O. I.

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses the potential of the resonant NRA technique for measuring the impurity depth profiles. An integrated program package is developed for analysis of the experimental data with high depth resolution. The input information for the package consists of the experimental yield from the impurity reaction selected. The impurity profile can be obtained by solving either a direct or an inverse problem. In the former case the simulated yield from the assigned profile is fitted to the experimental yield. In the latter case the depth profile is obtained by solving the theoretical yield equation. Since the latter procedure is an incorrect problem, we used Tikhonov's regularization method. This approach allows a correct inclusion of the experimental yield errors as well as of the assumptions made in the model describing the incident ion beam interaction with the material. The equation for the yield is derived taking into account the energy distribution of the initial beam, energy loss straggling, resonance width and Doppler effect. The package of programs is menu-driven with a friendly user interface and possibilities of visual representation, which makes the spectrum processing procedure simple and easy even to an unexperienced user. The computational system permits convenient selection of a certain reaction with an arbitrary shape of the resonance, selection of the beam-material interaction and energy loss straggling model and allows the processing of the spectra from a single or several simultaneously excited resonances.

  20. Holographic baryons from oblate instantons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozali, Moshe; Stang, Jared B.; Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2014-02-01

    We investigate properties of baryons in a family of holographic field theories related to the Sakai-Sugimoto model of holographic QCD. Starting with the N f = 2 Sakai-Sugimoto model, we truncate to a 5D Yang-Mills action for the gauge fields associated with the noncompact directions of the flavor D8-branes. We define a free parameter γ that controls the strength of this Yang-Mills term relative to the Chern-Simons term that couples the Abelian gauge field to the SU(2) instanton density. Moving away from γ = 0 should incorporate some of the effects of taking the Sakai-Sugimoto model away from large 't Hooft coupling λ. In this case, the baryon ground state corresponds to an oblate SU(2) instanton on the bulk flavor branes: the usual SO(4) symmetric instanton is deformed to spread more along the field theory directions than the radial direction. We numerically construct these anisotropic instanton solutions for various values of γ and calculate the mass and baryon charge profile of the corresponding baryons. Using the value γ = 2.55 that has been found to best fit the mesonic spectrum of QCD, we find a value for the baryon mass of 1.19 GeV, significantly more realistic than the value 1.60 GeV computed previously using an SO(4) symmetric ansatz for the instanton.

  1. Prelude to compressed baryonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    Why study compressed baryonic matter, or more generally strongly interacting matter at high densities and temperatures? Most obviously, because it's an important piece of Nature. The whole universe, in the early moments of the big bang, was filled with the stuff. Today, highly compressed baryonic matter occurs in neutron stars and during crucial moments in the development of supernovae. Also, working to understand compressed baryonic matter gives us new perspectives on ordinary baryonic matter, i.e. the matter in atomic nuclei. But perhaps the best answer is a variation on the one George Mallory gave, when asked why he sought to scale Mount Everest: Because, as a prominent feature in the landscape of physics, it's there. Compressed baryonic matter is a material we can produce in novel, challenging experiments that probe new extremes of temperature and density. On the theoretical side, it is a mathematically well-defined domain with a wealth of novel, challenging problems, as well as wide-ranging connections. Its challenges have already inspired a lot of very clever work, and revealed some wonderful surprises, as documented in this volume.

  2. Effect of three-pion unitarity on resonance poles from heavy meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi X. Nakamura

    2011-10-01

    We study the final state interaction in 3-pion decay of meson resonances at the Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) of JLab. We apply the dynamical coupled-channels formulation which has been extensively used by EBAC to extract N* information. The formulation satisfies the 3-pion unitarity condition which has been missed in the existing works with the isobar models. We report the effect of the 3-pion unitarity on the meson resonance pole positions and Dalitz plot.

  3. Electromagnetic corrections to baryon masses

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, Loyal; Ha, Phuoc

    2005-04-01

    We analyze the electromagnetic contributions to the octet and decuplet baryon masses using the heavy-baryon approximation in chiral effective field theory and methods we developed in earlier analyses of the baryon masses and magnetic moments. Our methods connect simply to Morpurgo's general parametrization of the electromagnetic contributions and to semirelativistic quark models. Our calculations are carried out including the one-loop mesonic corrections to the basic electromagnetic interactions, so to two loops overall. We find that to this order in the chiral loop expansion there are no three-body contributions. The Coleman-Glashow relation and other sum rules derived in quark models with only two-body terms therefore continue to hold, and violations involve at least three-loop processes and can be expected to be quite small. We present the complete formal results and some estimates of the matrix elements here. Numerical calculations will be presented separately.

  4. 1/Nc Countings in Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Goity

    2004-05-01

    The 1/N{sub c} power countings for baryon decays and configuration mixings are determined by means of a non-relativistic quark picture. Such countings are expected to be robust as the quark masses are decreased towards the chiral limit. It is shown that excited baryons have natural widths of {Omicron}(N{sub c}{sup 0}). These dominant widths are due to the decays that proceed directly to the ground state baryons, with cascade decays being suppressed to {Omicron}(1/N{sub c}). Configuration mixings, defined as mixings between states belonging to different O(3) x SU(2N{sub f}) multiplets, are shown to be sub-leading in an expansion in 1/{radical}N{sub c}, except for certain mixings between excited multiplets belonging to the mixed-symmetric spin-flavor representation and different O(3) representations, where the mixings are of zeroth order in 1/N{sub c}.

  5. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting of levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.

  6. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting ofmore » levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.« less

  7. B baryons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Donati, S.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review the most recent results concerning B Baryons at CDF, including the study of the {Omega}{sub b}{sup -}, {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup {+-}(*)} observation and properties, and a new measurement of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime and the observation of new {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} decay modes. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} bayron is observed through the decay chain {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{Psi}{Omega}{sup -}, where J/{Psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}K{sup -}, and {Lambda} {yields} pK{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 6054.4 {+-} 6.8(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}, and the lifetime 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup _0.53}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. For the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} the mass is measured 5790.9 {+-} 2.6(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and the lifetime 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. The four new states {Sigma}{sub b}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup -}, {Sigma}*{sub b}{sup +}, and {Sigma}*{sub b}{sup -} have been observed in 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data, and the masses have been determined, m({Sigma}{sub b}{sup +}) = 5807.8{sub -2.2}{sup +2.0}(stat.) {+-} 1.7(syst.), m({Sigma}{sub b}{sup -}) = 5815.2 {+-} 1.0(stat.) {+-} 1.7(syst.), m({Sigma}*{sub b}{sup +}) = 5829.0{sub -1.8-1.8}{sup +1.6+1.7}, and m{Sigma}*{sub b}{sup -} = 5836.4 {+-} 2.0(stat.){sub -1.7}{sup +1.8}(syst.). CDF has performed a new measurement of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime using 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the displaced vertex trigger 1.401 {+-} 0.046(stat.) {+-} 0.035(syst.), where the main systematic error is due to the uncertainty on the trigger model.

  8. Strange Baryon Physics in Full Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2007-11-01

    Strange baryon spectra and form factors are key probes to study excited nuclear matter. The use of lattice QCD allows us to test the strength of the Standard Model by calculating strange baryon quantities from first principles.

  9. Deforming baryons into confining strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Portugues, Rubén

    2004-09-01

    We find explicit probe D3-brane solutions in the infrared of the Maldacena-Nuñez background. The solutions describe deformed baryon vertices: q external quarks are separated in spacetime from the remaining N-q. As the separation is taken to infinity we recover known solutions describing infinite confining strings in N=1 gauge theory. We present results for the mass of finite confining strings as a function of length. We also find probe D2-brane solutions in a confining type IIA geometry, the reduction of a G2 holonomy M theory background. The relation between these deformed baryons and confining strings is not as straightforward.

  10. Radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of charged and neutral baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Manriquez, J. J. Torres; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Garcia, A.

    2008-07-02

    Because of the near future work of the NA48 experimental group, we have calculated the radiative corrections (RC) to the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons. This work covers the two cases, charged and neutral decaying baryons, and it is restricted to the so called three body region of the Dalitz plot. Also it is specialized at the c.m. frame of the emitted baryon. We consider terms up to ({alpha}/ product )(q/M{sub 1}){sup 0}, where q is the momentum transfer and M{sub 1} is the mass of the decaying baryon, and neglect terms of the order ({alpha}/ product )(q/M{sub 1}){sup n}, n = 1,2,.... The analytical expressions displayed are ready to obtain numerical results, suitable for a model-independent experimental analysis.

  11. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A resonance in CELESTIAL MECHANICS occurs when some of the quantities characterizing the motion of two or more celestial bodies can be considered as commensurable, i.e. their ratio is close to an integer fraction. In a simplified form, this can be expressed as ...

  12. Baryon-Baryon-Meson Coupling Constants in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, T. M.; Ozpineci, A.; Savci, M.; Azizi, K.; Zamiralov, V.

    2010-12-22

    The strong coupling constant of decuplet and octet baryons to vector and pseudoscalar mesons are calculated in light cone QCD sum rules in general case and when the SU(3){sub f} symmetry is taken into account. A comparison of the obtained results with the existing experimental data and predictions of the other nonperturbative approaches is also made.

  13. Charmed baryon spectroscopy from CLEO at CESR

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M. Sajjad

    1999-02-17

    Charmed baryon spectroscopy has been unfolding since the discovery of the first charmed baryon in 1975. The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has now established itself as a charmed particle factory. In this report, we present results on charmed baryon production at CESR using the CLEO detector.

  14. Analysis and suppression of side radiation in leaky SAW resonators.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shogo; Tsutsumi, Jun; Matsuda, Takashi; Ueda, Masanori; Ikata, Osamu; Satoh, Yoshio

    2007-08-01

    This paper discusses side acoustic radiation in leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) resonators on rotated Y-cut lithium tantalite substrates. The mechanism behind side radiation, which causes a large insertion loss, is analyzed by using the scalar potential theory. This analysis reveals that side radiation occurs when the guiding condition is not satisfied, and the LSAW most strongly radiates at the frequency in which the LSAW velocities in the grating and busbar regions approximately correspond to each other. Based on these results, we propose a "narrow finger structure," which satisfies the guiding condition and drastically suppresses the side radiation. Experiments show that the resonance Q of the proposed structure drastically improves to over 1000 by suppressing the side radiation, which is three times higher than for a conventional structure. Applying the proposed resonators to the ladder-type SAW filters, ultra-low-loss and steep cut-off characteristics are achieved in the range of 800 MHz and 1.9 GHz. PMID:17703674

  15. Cosmological baryon diffusion and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, James H.; Hogan, Craig J.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    1987-02-01

    The diffusion rate of baryons through the big-bang plasma is calculated. Fluctuations in baryon density in the early Universe lead to inhomogeneities in the neutron-proton ratio, due to the differential diffusion of these particles through the radiation plasma. For certain types of nonlinear fluctuations, some nucleosynthesis would occur in very neutron-rich regions. Nuclear products of homogeneous neutron-enriched regions are evaluated numerically using a standard reaction network and these results are used to estimate final abundances in an inhomogeneous universe. Net deuterium and lithium abundances tend to increase and the net helium abundance tends to decrease compared to an unperturbed standard model. It is suggested that pronounced nonlinear baryon-density fluctuations produced in QCD- or electroweak-epoch phase transitions could alter abundances sufficiently to make a closed baryonic universe consistent with current observations of these elements. In such a model the abundance of heavier elements (C,N,O, etc.) increases significantly and approaches observable levels. Abundances can be used to place constraints on extreme scenarios for phase transitions at these epochs.

  16. Search for Popcorn Mesons in Events with Two Charmed Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Hartfiel, Brandon; /SLAC

    2006-07-07

    The physics of this note is divided into two parts. The first part measures the {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} {pi}kp continuum momentum spectrum at a center of mass energy of 10.54 GeV/c. The data sample consists of 15,400 {Lambda}{sub c} baryons from 9.46 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. With more than 13 times more data than the best previous measurement, we are able to exclude some of the simpler, one parameter fragmentation functions. In the second part, we add the {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} K{sup 0}p mode, and look for events with a {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} and a {bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -} in order to look for ''popcorn'' mesons formed between the baryon and antibaryon. We add on-resonance data, with a kinematic cut to eliminate background from B decays, as well as BaBar run 3 and 4 data to increase the total data size to 219.70 fb{sup -1}. We find 619 events after background subtraction. After a subtraction of 1.06 {+-} .09 charged pions coming from decays of known resonances to {Lambda}{sub c} + {eta}{pi}, we are left with 2.63 {+-} .21 additional charged pions in each of these events. This is significantly higher than the .5 popcorn mesons per baryon pair used in the current tuning of Pythia 6.2, the most widely used Monte Carlo generator. The extra mesons we find appear to be the first direct evidence of popcorn mesons, although some of them could be arising from hypothetical unresolved, unobserved charmed baryon resonances contributing decay mesons to our data. To contribute a significant fraction, this hypothesis requires a large number of such broad unresolved states and seems unlikely, but can not be completely excluded.

  17. Finite volume effects in the chiral extrapolation of baryon masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, M. F. M.; Bavontaweepanya, R.; Kobdaj, C.; Schwarz, K.

    2014-09-01

    We perform an analysis of the QCD lattice data on the baryon octet and decuplet masses based on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian. The baryon self-energies are computed in a finite volume at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO), where the dependence on the physical meson and baryon masses is kept. The number of free parameters is reduced significantly down to 12 by relying on large-Nc sum rules. Altogether we describe accurately more than 220 data points from six different lattice groups, BMW, PACS-CS, HSC, LHPC, QCDSF-UKQCD and NPLQCD. Values for all counterterms relevant at N3LO are predicted. In particular we extract a pion-nucleon sigma term of 39-1+2 MeV and a strangeness sigma term of the nucleon of σsN=84-4+28 MeV. The flavor SU(3) chiral limit of the baryon octet and decuplet masses is determined with (802±4) and (1103±6) MeV. Detailed predictions for the baryon masses as currently evaluated by the ETM lattice QCD group are made.

  18. Analysis of the line shape of electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, M.; Cao, Z. X.; Gui, Y. S.; Fan, X. L.; Hu, C.-M.

    2011-08-01

    This work reviews and examines two particular issues related with the new technique of electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). This powerful technique has been broadly applied for studying magnetization and spin dynamics over the past ten years. The first issue is the relation and distinction between different mechanisms that give rise to a photovoltage via FMR in spintronic devices, and the second is the proper analysis of the FMR line shape, which has become the “Achilles heel” in interpreting experimental results, especially for either studying the spin pumping effect or quantifying spin Hall angles via the electrically detected FMR.

  19. Ground resonance analysis using a substructure modeling approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, S. Y.; Austin, E. E.; Berman, A.

    1985-01-01

    A convenient and versatile procedure for modeling and analyzing ground resonance phenomena is described and illustrated. A computer program is used which dynamically couples differential equations with nonlinear and time dependent coefficients. Each set of differential equations may represent a component such as a rotor, fuselage, landing gear, or a failed damper. Arbitrary combinations of such components may be formulated into a model of a system. When the coupled equations are formed, a procedure is executed which uses a Floquet analysis to determine the stability of the system. Illustrations of the use of the procedures along with the numerical examples are presented.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in laboratory petrophysical core analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.; Holland, D. J.; Gladden, L. F.; Fordham, E. J.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well-known technique in medical diagnosis and materials science. In the more specialized arena of laboratory-scale petrophysical rock core analysis, the role of MRI has undergone a substantial change in focus over the last three decades. Initially, alongside the continual drive to exploit higher magnetic field strengths in MRI applications for medicine and chemistry, the same trend was followed in core analysis. However, the spatial resolution achievable in heterogeneous porous media is inherently limited due to the magnetic susceptibility contrast between solid and fluid. As a result, imaging resolution at the length-scale of typical pore diameters is not practical and so MRI of core-plugs has often been viewed as an inappropriate use of expensive magnetic resonance facilities. Recently, there has been a paradigm shift in the use of MRI in laboratory-scale core analysis. The focus is now on acquiring data in the laboratory that are directly comparable to data obtained from magnetic resonance well-logging tools (i.e., a common physics of measurement). To maintain consistency with well-logging instrumentation, it is desirable to measure distributions of transverse (T2) relaxation time-the industry-standard metric in well-logging-at the laboratory-scale. These T2 distributions can be spatially resolved over the length of a core-plug. The use of low-field magnets in the laboratory environment is optimal for core analysis not only because the magnetic field strength is closer to that of well-logging tools, but also because the magnetic susceptibility contrast is minimized, allowing the acquisition of quantitative image voxel (or pixel) intensities that are directly scalable to liquid volume. Beyond simple determination of macroscopic rock heterogeneity, it is possible to utilize the spatial resolution for monitoring forced displacement of oil by water or chemical agents, determining capillary pressure curves, and estimating

  1. Study of ψ(3770) decaying to baryon anti-baryon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Li-Gang

    2016-05-01

    To study the decays of ψ (3770) going to baryon anti-baryon pairs (B B bar), all available experiments of measuring the cross sections of e+e- → B B bar at center-of-mass energy ranging from 3.0 GeV to 3.9 GeV are combined. To relate the baryon octets, a model based on the SU(3) flavor symmetry is used and the SU(3) breaking effects are also considered. Assuming the electric and magnetic form factors are equal (|GE | = |GM |), a global fit including the interference between the QED process and the resonant process is performed. The branching fraction of ψ (3770) → B B bar is determined to be (2.4 ± 0.8 ± 0.3) ×10-5, (1.7 ± 0.6 ± 0.1) ×10-5, (4.5 ± 0.9 ± 0.1) ×10-5, (4.5 ± 0.9 ± 0.1) ×10-5, (2.0 ± 0.7 ± 0.1) ×10-5, and (2.0 ± 0.7 ± 0.1) ×10-5 for B = p , Λ ,Σ+ ,Σ0 ,Ξ- and Ξ0, respectively, where the first uncertainty is from the global fit and the second uncertainty is the systematic uncertainty due to the assumption |GE | = |GM |. They are at least one order of magnitude larger than a simple scaling of the branching fraction of J / ψ / ψ (3686) → B B bar .

  2. Clinical evaluation of osseointegration using resonance frequency analysis

    PubMed Central

    Satwalekar, Parth; Nalla, Sandeep; Reddy, Ramaswamy; Chowdary, Sheeba Glory

    2015-01-01

    The stability of the implant at the time of placement and during the development of the osseointegration process are the two major issues governing the implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon related to local factors such as bone quality, quantity, type of placement technique and type of implant used. The application of a user-friendly, clinically reliable, non-invasive method to assess implant stability and the osseointegration process is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) is one such method which shows almost perfect reproducibility and repeatability after statistical analysis. The aim of this paper is to review the various methods used to assess implant stability and on the currently used RFA method which is being highly accepted in the recent times. PMID:26929512

  3. Clinical evaluation of osseointegration using resonance frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Satwalekar, Parth; Nalla, Sandeep; Reddy, Ramaswamy; Chowdary, Sheeba Glory

    2015-01-01

    The stability of the implant at the time of placement and during the development of the osseointegration process are the two major issues governing the implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon related to local factors such as bone quality, quantity, type of placement technique and type of implant used. The application of a user-friendly, clinically reliable, non-invasive method to assess implant stability and the osseointegration process is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) is one such method which shows almost perfect reproducibility and repeatability after statistical analysis. The aim of this paper is to review the various methods used to assess implant stability and on the currently used RFA method which is being highly accepted in the recent times. PMID:26929512

  4. The Compressed Baryonic Matter Experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senger, Peter

    Substantial experimental and theoretical efforts worldwide are devoted to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter. At top RHIC and LHC energies, the QCD phase diagram is studied at very high temperatures and very low net-baryon densities. These conditions presumably existed in the early universe about a microsecond after the big bang. For larger net-baryon densities and lower temperatures, it is expected that the QCD phase diagram exhibits a rich structure such as a critical point, a first order phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter, or new phases like quarkyonic matter. The experimental discovery of these prominent landmarks of the QCD phase diagram would be a major breakthrough in our understanding of the properties of nuclear matter. The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will be one of the major scientific pillars of the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. The goal of the CBM research program is to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryon densities using high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes the study of the equation-of-state of nuclear matter at neutron star core densities, and the search for the deconfinement and chiral phase transitions. The CBM detector is designed to measure rare diagnostic probes such as multi-strange hyperons, charmed particles and vector mesons decaying into lepton pairs with unprecedented precision and statistics. Most of these particles will be studied for the first time in the FAIR energy range. In order to achieve the required precision, the measurements will be performed at very high reaction rates of 100 kHz to 10 MHz. This requires very fast and radiation-hard detectors, and a novel data read-out and analysis concept based on free streaming front-end electronics and a high-performance computing cluster for online event selection. The layout, the physics performance, and the status of the proposed CBM experimental

  5. Observation of the Heavy Baryons Sigma b and Sigma b*.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-11-16

    We report an observation of new bottom baryons produced in pp collisions at the Tevatron. Using 1.1 fb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector, we observe four Lambda b 0 pi+/- resonances in the fully reconstructed decay mode Lambda b 0-->Lambda c + pi-, where Lambda c+-->pK* pi+. We interpret these states as the Sigma b(*)+/- baryons and measure the following masses: m Sigma b+=5807.8 -2.2 +2.0(stat.)+/-1.7(syst.) MeV/c2, m Sigma b- =5815.2+/-1.0(stat.)+/-1.7(syst.) MeV/c2, and m(Sigma b*)-m(Sigma b)=21.2-1.9 +2.0(stat.)-0.3+0.4(syst.) MeV/c2. PMID:18233134

  6. The status of pentaquark baryons

    SciTech Connect

    V.D. Burkert

    2006-06-01

    The status of the search for peritaquark baryon states is reviewed in light of new results from the first two dedicated experiments from CLAS at Jefferson Lab and of new analyses from several labs on the Theta^+(1540). Evidence for and against the heavier pentaquark states, the Xi(1862) and the Theta^0_c(3100) observed at CERN and at HERA, respectively, are also discussed. I conclude that the evidence against the latter two heavier pentaquark baryons is rapidly increasing making their existence highly questionable. I also conclude that the evidence for the Theta^+ state has significantly eroded with the recent CLAS results, and just leaves room for a possible state with an intrinsic width of Gamma < 0.5 MeV. Preliminary new evidence from various experiments will be discussed as well.

  7. Searching for the missing baryons in clusters.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Bilhuda; Bahcall, Neta; Bode, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies suggest that they contain fewer baryons (gas plus stars) than the cosmic baryon fraction. This "missing baryon" puzzle is especially surprising for the most massive clusters, which are expected to be representative of the cosmic matter content of the universe (baryons and dark matter). Here we show that the baryons may not actually be missing from clusters, but rather are extended to larger radii than typically observed. The baryon deficiency is typically observed in the central regions of clusters (∼0.5 the virial radius). However, the observed gas-density profile is significantly shallower than the mass-density profile, implying that the gas is more extended than the mass and that the gas fraction increases with radius. We use the observed density profiles of gas and mass in clusters to extrapolate the measured baryon fraction as a function of radius and as a function of cluster mass. We find that the baryon fraction reaches the cosmic value near the virial radius for all groups and clusters above ∼5 x 10(13)h(-1)(72)M. This suggests that the baryons are not missing, they are simply located in cluster outskirts. Heating processes (such as shock-heating of the intracluster gas, supernovae, and Active Galactic Nuclei feedback) likely contribute to this expanded distribution. Upcoming observations should be able to detect these baryons. PMID:21321229

  8. Analysis of series resonant converter with series-parallel connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bor-Ren; Huang, Chien-Lan

    2011-02-01

    In this study, a parallel inductor-inductor-capacitor (LLC) resonant converter series-connected on the primary side and parallel-connected on the secondary side is presented for server power supply systems. Based on series resonant behaviour, the power metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors are turned on at zero voltage switching and the rectifier diodes are turned off at zero current switching. Thus, the switching losses on the power semiconductors are reduced. In the proposed converter, the primary windings of the two LLC converters are connected in series. Thus, the two converters have the same primary currents to ensure that they can supply the balance load current. On the output side, two LLC converters are connected in parallel to share the load current and to reduce the current stress on the secondary windings and the rectifier diodes. In this article, the principle of operation, steady-state analysis and design considerations of the proposed converter are provided and discussed. Experiments with a laboratory prototype with a 24 V/21 A output for server power supply were performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed converter.

  9. Vibrometry analysis of electrooptical coupling near piezoelectric resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Robert; Bhalla, Amar S.; Guo, Ruyan

    2014-09-01

    The electrooptic response of crystals becomes attenuated in the megahertz or higher frequencies where it is of the most use for communication systems. This research explores new possibilities of improved electrooptic interaction at high frequencies, discovered as a result of coupled electrooptic effects near selected piezoelectric resonances. Results suggest that for electrooptics the key to a large interaction at high frequencies is the gradient of the strain in a modulated crystal and the acceleration of the accompanying lattice waves. While strains tend to be damped, acceleration of the lattice wave retains its amplitude at high frequencies. This interaction is studied by a high frequency Laser Doppler Vibrometer and by numerical finite element analysis modeling using COMSOL. PMN-PT crystal was the primary material studied due to its large piezoelectric coupling and electrooptic coefficients. The dynamic displacement of the samples was measured over a broad range of frequencies, including the fundamental resonant modes and higher order harmonics where the mode structure becomes complex and not well described by existing analytical models.

  10. One-baryon spectrum and analytical properties of one-baryon dispersion curves in 3 + 1 dimensional strongly coupled lattice QCD with three flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria da Veiga, Paulo A.; O'Carroll, Michael; Valencia Alvites, José C.

    2016-03-01

    Considering a 3 + 1 dimensional lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) model defined with the improved Wilson action, three flavors, and 4 × 4 Dirac spin matrices, in the strong coupling regime, we reanalyze the question of the existence of the eightfold way baryons and complete our previous work where the existence of isospin octet baryons was rigorously solved. Here, we show the existence of isospin decuplet baryons which are associated with isolated dispersion curves in the subspace of the underlying quantum mechanical Hilbert space with vectors constructed with an odd number of fermion and antifermion basic quark and antiquark fields. Moreover, smoothness properties for these curves are obtained. The present work deals with a case for which the traditional method to solve the implicit equation for the dispersion curves, based on the use of the analytic implicit function theorem, cannot be applied. We do not have only one but two solutions for each one-baryon decuplet sector with fixed spin third component. Instead, we apply the Weierstrass preparation theorem, which also provides a general method for the general degenerate case. This work is completed by analyzing a spectral representation for the two-baryon correlations and providing the leading behaviors of the field strength normalization and the mass of the spectral contributions with more than one-particle. These are needed results for a rigorous analysis of the two-baryon and meson-baryon particle spectra.

  11. Universal fitting formulae for baryon oscillation surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Chris; Parkinson, David; Bassett, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Kunz, Martin; Nichol, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The next generation of galaxy surveys will attempt to measure the baryon oscillations in the clustering power spectrum with high accuracy. These oscillations encode a preferred scale which may be used as a standard ruler to constrain cosmological parameters and dark energy models. In this paper we present simple analytical fitting formulae for the accuracy with which the preferred scale may be determined in the tangential and radial directions by future spectroscopic and photometric galaxy redshift surveys. We express these accuracies as a function of survey parameters such as the central redshift, volume, galaxy number density and (where applicable) photometric redshift error. These fitting formulae should greatly increase the efficiency of optimizing future surveys, which requires analysis of a potentially vast number of survey configurations and cosmological models. The formulae are calibrated using a grid of Monte Carlo simulations, which are analysed by dividing out the overall shape of the power spectrum before fitting a simple decaying sinusoid to the oscillations. The fitting formulae reproduce the simulation results with a fractional scatter of 7 per cent (10 per cent) in the tangential (radial) directions over a wide range of input parameters. We also indicate how sparse-sampling strategies may enhance the effective survey area if the sampling scale is much smaller than the projected baryon oscillation scale.

  12. Transport coefficients of heavy baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Das, Santosh K.

    2016-08-01

    We compute the transport coefficients (drag and momentum diffusion) of the low-lying heavy baryons Λc and Λb in a medium of light mesons formed at the later stages of high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We employ the Fokker-Planck approach to obtain the transport coefficients from unitarized baryon-meson interactions based on effective field theories that respect chiral and heavy-quark symmetries. We provide the transport coefficients as a function of temperature and heavy-baryon momentum, and analyze the applicability of certain nonrelativistic estimates. Moreover we compare our outcome for the spatial diffusion coefficient to the one coming from the solution of the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport equation, and we find a very good agreement between both calculations. The transport coefficients for Λc and Λb in a thermal bath will be used in a subsequent publication as input in a Langevin evolution code for the generation and propagation of heavy particles in heavy-ion collisions at LHC and RHIC energies.

  13. Triton and hypertriton binding energies with SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.

    2008-04-29

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU{sub 6} quark-model interaction which is obtained by a resonating-group method for two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction which is energy-independent and still preserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that the energy to be accounted for by three-body forces is about 350 keV.

  14. Addendum to triton and hypertriton binding energies calculated from SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.

    2008-02-15

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU{sub 6} quark-model interaction obtained by a resonating-group method of two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction that is energy-independent and still preserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that the energy to be accounted for by three-body forces is about 350 keV.

  15. Search for popcorn mesons in events with two charmed baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartfiel, Brandon

    The physics of this dissertation is divided into two parts. The first part measures the Λc → pi kp continuum momentum spectrum at a center of mass energy of 10.54 GeV/c, which is just below the Υ(4s) resonance. The data sample consists of 15,400 Λc baryons from 9.46 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. With more than 13 times more data than the best previous measurement, we are able to exclude some of the simpler, one parameter fragmentation functions. In the second part, we add the Λc → K0p mode, and look for events with a Λc+ and a Λ c- in order to look for "popcorn" mesons formed between the baryon and antibaryon. We add on-resonance data, with a kinematic cut to eliminate background from B decays, as well as BaBar run 3 and 4 data to increase the total data size to 219.70 fb-1. We find 619 events after background subtraction. After a subtraction of 1.06+/-.09 charged pions coming from decays of known resonances to Λc + npi, we are left with 2.63+/-.21 additional charged pious in each of these events. This is significantly higher than the .5 popcorn mesons per bayon pair used in the current tuning of Pythia 6.2, the most widely used Monte Carlo generator. The extra mesons we find appear to be the first direct evidence of popcorn mesons, although some of them could be arising from hypothetical unresolved, unobserved charmed baryon resonances contributing decay mesons to our data. To contribute a significant fraction, this hypothesis requires a large number of such broad unresolved states and seems unlikely, but can not be completely excluded.

  16. Dispersion analysis of whispering gallery mode microbubble resonators.

    PubMed

    Riesen, Nicolas; Zhang, Wen Qi; Monro, Tanya M

    2016-04-18

    This paper examines the opportunities existing for engineering dispersion in non-silica whispering gallery mode microbubble resonators, for applications such as optical frequency comb generation. More specifically, the zero dispersion wavelength is analyzed as a function of microbubble diameter and wall thickness for several different material groups such as highly-nonlinear soft glasses, polymers and crystalline materials. The zero dispersion wavelength is shown to be highly-tunable by changing the thickness of the shell. Using certain materials it is shown that dispersion equalization can be realized at interesting wavelengths such as deep within the visible or mid-infrared, opening up new possibilities for optical frequency comb generation. This study represents the first extensive analysis of the prospects of using non-silica microbubbles for nonlinear optics. PMID:27137317

  17. Undersampled dynamic magnetic resonance imaging using kernel principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Ying, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is a promising approach to accelerate dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Most existing CS methods employ linear sparsifying transforms. The recent developments in non-linear or kernel-based sparse representations have been shown to outperform the linear transforms. In this paper, we present an iterative non-linear CS dynamic MRI reconstruction framework that uses the kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) to exploit the sparseness of the dynamic image sequence in the feature space. Specifically, we apply KPCA to represent the temporal profiles of each spatial location and reconstruct the images through a modified pre-image problem. The underlying optimization algorithm is based on variable splitting and fixed-point iteration method. Simulation results show that the proposed method outperforms conventional CS method in terms of aliasing artifact reduction and kinetic information preservation. PMID:25570262

  18. Methods for magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Wind, Robert A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Majors, Paul D.

    2011-11-22

    Methods of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object are disclosed that include placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. In particular embodiments the method includes pulsing the radio frequency to provide at least two of a spatially selective read pulse, a spatially selective phase pulse, and a spatially selective storage pulse. Further disclosed methods provide pulse sequences that provide extended imaging capabilities, such as chemical shift imaging or multiple-voxel data acquisition.

  19. A Study of Double-Charm and Charm-Strange Baryons inElectron-Positron Annihilations

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Adam J.; /SLAC

    2007-10-15

    In this dissertation I describe a study of double-charm and charm-strange baryons based on data collected with the BABAR Detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. In this study I search for new baryons and make precise measurements of their properties and decay modes. I seek to verify and expand upon double-charm and charm-strange baryon observations made by other experiments. The BABAR Detector is used to measure subatomic particles that are produced at the PEP-II storage rings. I analyze approximately 300 million e+e- {yields} c{bar c} events in a search for the production of double-charm baryons. I search for the double-charm baryons {Xi}{sup +}{sub cc} (containing the quarks ccd) and {Xi}{sup ++}{sub cc} (ccu) in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}, respectively. No statistically significant signals for their production are found, and upper limits on their production are determined. Statistically significant signals for excited charm-strange baryons are observed with my analysis of approximately 500 million e+e- {yields} c{bar c} events. The charged charm-strange baryons {Xi}{sub c}(2970){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3055){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3123){sup +} are found in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, the same decay mode used in the {Xi}{sup +}{sub cc} search. The neutral charm-strange baryon {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup 0} is observed in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}{pi}{sup -}. I also search for excited charm-strange baryon decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}, {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}, {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, and {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. No significant charm-strange baryon signals a f h these decay modes. For each excited charm-strange baryon state that I observe, I measure its mass, natural width (lifetime), and production rate. The properties of these excited charm-strange baryons and their

  20. Resonant leptogenesis in the minimal B-L extended standard model at TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Iso, Satoshi; Orikasa, Yuta; Okada, Nobuchika

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the resonant leptogenesis scenario in the minimal B-L extended standard model with the B-L symmetry breaking at the TeV scale. Through detailed analysis of the Boltzmann equations, we show how much the resultant baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis is enhanced or suppressed, depending on the model parameters, in particular, the neutrino Dirac-Yukawa couplings and the TeV scale Majorana masses of heavy degenerate neutrinos. In order to consider a realistic case, we impose a simple ansatz for the model parameters and analyze the neutrino oscillation parameters and the baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis as a function of only a single CP phase. We find that for a fixed CP phase all neutrino oscillation data and the observed baryon asymmetry of the present Universe can be simultaneously reproduced.

  1. Decay properties of double heavy baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-08-05

    We study the semileptonic decays of double heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. We present complete results on transition form factors between double-heavy baryons for finite values of the heavy quark/baryon masses and in the heavy quark symmetry limit which is valid at and close to zero recoil. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit.

  2. Smallness of baryon asymmetry from split supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Shinta; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2005-06-15

    The smallness of the baryon asymmetry in our universe is one of the greatest mysteries and may originate from some profound physics beyond the standard model. We investigate the Affleck-Dine baryogenesis in split supersymmetry, and find that the smallness of the baryon asymmetry is directly related to the hierarchy between the supersymmetry breaking squark/slepton masses and the weak scale. Put simply, the baryon asymmetry is small because of the split mass spectrum.

  3. Searching for the missing baryons in clusters

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Bilhuda; Bahcall, Neta; Bode, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies suggest that they contain fewer baryons (gas plus stars) than the cosmic baryon fraction. This “missing baryon” puzzle is especially surprising for the most massive clusters, which are expected to be representative of the cosmic matter content of the universe (baryons and dark matter). Here we show that the baryons may not actually be missing from clusters, but rather are extended to larger radii than typically observed. The baryon deficiency is typically observed in the central regions of clusters (∼0.5 the virial radius). However, the observed gas-density profile is significantly shallower than the mass-density profile, implying that the gas is more extended than the mass and that the gas fraction increases with radius. We use the observed density profiles of gas and mass in clusters to extrapolate the measured baryon fraction as a function of radius and as a function of cluster mass. We find that the baryon fraction reaches the cosmic value near the virial radius for all groups and clusters above . This suggests that the baryons are not missing, they are simply located in cluster outskirts. Heating processes (such as shock-heating of the intracluster gas, supernovae, and Active Galactic Nuclei feedback) likely contribute to this expanded distribution. Upcoming observations should be able to detect these baryons. PMID:21321229

  4. Measurement and analysis of cryogenic sapphire dielectric resonators and DROs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the experimental and computational results of a study on a new kind of dielectric resonator oscillator (DRO). It consists of a cooled, cylindrically symmetric sapphire resonator surrounded by a metallic shield and is capable of higher Q's than any other dielectric resonator. Isolation of fields to the sapphire by the special nature of the electromagnetic mode allows the very low loss of the sapphire itself to be expressed. Calculations show that the plethora of modes in such resonators can be effectively reduced through the use of a ring resonator with appropriate dimensions. Experimental results show Q's ranging from 3 x 10 to the 8th at 77 K to 10 to the 9th at 4.2 K. Performance is estimated for several types of DROs incorporating these resonators. Phase noise reductions in X-band sources are indicated at values substantially lower than those previously available.

  5. Analysis and modeling of Fano resonances using equivalent circuit elements.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bo; Li, Rujiang; Fu, Jiahui; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Kuang; Chen, Wan; Wang, Zhefei; Ma, Ruyu

    2016-01-01

    Fano resonance presents an asymmetric line shape formed by an interference of a continuum coupled with a discrete autoionized state. In this paper, we show several simple circuits for Fano resonances from the stable-input impedance mechanism, where the elements consisting of inductors and capacitors are formulated for various resonant modes, and the resistor represents the damping of the oscillators. By tuning the pole-zero of the input impedance, a simple circuit with only three passive components e.g. two inductors and one capacitor, can exhibit asymmetric resonance with arbitrary Q-factors flexiblely. Meanwhile, four passive components can exhibit various resonances including the Lorentz-like and reversely electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) formations. Our work not only provides an intuitive understanding of Fano resonances, but also pave the way to realize Fano resonaces using simple circuit elements. PMID:27545610

  6. Analysis and modeling of Fano resonances using equivalent circuit elements

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Bo; Li, Rujiang; Fu, Jiahui; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Kuang; Chen, Wan; Wang, Zhefei; Ma, Ruyu

    2016-01-01

    Fano resonance presents an asymmetric line shape formed by an interference of a continuum coupled with a discrete autoionized state. In this paper, we show several simple circuits for Fano resonances from the stable-input impedance mechanism, where the elements consisting of inductors and capacitors are formulated for various resonant modes, and the resistor represents the damping of the oscillators. By tuning the pole-zero of the input impedance, a simple circuit with only three passive components e.g. two inductors and one capacitor, can exhibit asymmetric resonance with arbitrary Q-factors flexiblely. Meanwhile, four passive components can exhibit various resonances including the Lorentz-like and reversely electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) formations. Our work not only provides an intuitive understanding of Fano resonances, but also pave the way to realize Fano resonaces using simple circuit elements. PMID:27545610

  7. jSIPRO - analysis tool for magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiru, Filip; Skoch, Antonin; Wagnerova, Dita; Dezortova, Monika; Hajek, Milan

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) involves a huge number of spectra to be processed and analyzed. Several tools enabling MRSI data processing have been developed and widely used. However, the processing programs primarily focus on sophisticated spectra processing and offer limited support for the analysis of the calculated spectroscopic maps. In this paper the jSIPRO (java Spectroscopic Imaging PROcessing) program is presented, which is a java-based graphical interface enabling post-processing, viewing, analysis and result reporting of MRSI data. Interactive graphical processing as well as protocol controlled batch processing are available in jSIPRO. jSIPRO does not contain a built-in fitting program. Instead, it makes use of fitting programs from third parties and manages the data flows. Currently, automatic spectra processing using LCModel, TARQUIN and jMRUI programs are supported. Concentration and error values, fitted spectra, metabolite images and various parametric maps can be viewed for each calculated dataset. Metabolite images can be exported in the DICOM format either for archiving purposes or for the use in neurosurgery navigation systems. PMID:23870172

  8. BRYNTRN: A baryon transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Chun, Sang Y.; Hong, B. S.; Buck, Warren W.; Lamkin, S. L.; Ganapol, Barry D.; Khan, Ferdous; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1989-01-01

    The development of an interaction data base and a numerical solution to the transport of baryons through an arbitrary shield material based on a straight ahead approximation of the Boltzmann equation are described. The code is most accurate for continuous energy boundary values, but gives reasonable results for discrete spectra at the boundary using even a relatively coarse energy grid (30 points) and large spatial increments (1 cm in H2O). The resulting computer code is self-contained, efficient and ready to use. The code requires only a very small fraction of the computer resources required for Monte Carlo codes.

  9. Exploring Baryons for Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    There is on-going research for the detection of WIMP's based on a speculative idea of supersymmetry, which attempts to unify the fundamental forces of nature, including gravity. The detection of WIMP's is expected to find a solution to the issue of dark matter. We continue to hold and support our view of the millennium that gravity is not a fundamental force of Nature. We are therefore exploring baryons as the particles to address the issue of dark matter. We poster present our analyses to support our proposal.

  10. Baryon-Meson Mass Inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, S.

    1983-12-01

    It is suggested that the inequality mB>32mM is a rigorous result in quantum chromodynamics. The analog for a (q1...qN) baryon in SU(N) is mB>(12N)mM. The inequality is proved for weak coupling and a version of the strong-coupling expansion where a separation Hq1q2q3=H12+H23+H31 of the problem can be achieved. Implications for quantum chromodynamics and composite models are briefly discussed.

  11. Analysis of transmission lines loaded with pairs of coupled resonant elements and application to sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqui, J.; Su, L.; Mata, J.; Martín, F.

    2015-06-01

    This paper is focused on the analysis of transmission lines loaded with pairs of magnetically coupled resonators. We have considered two different structures: (i) a microstrip line loaded with pairs of stepped impedance resonators (SIRs), and (ii) a coplanar waveguide (CPW) transmission line loaded with pairs of split ring resonators (SRRs). In both cases, the line exhibits a single resonance frequency (transmission zero) if the resonators are identical (symmetric structure with regard to the line axis), and this resonance is different to the one of the line loaded with a single resonator due to inter-resonator coupling. If the structures are asymmetric, inter-resonator coupling enhances the distance between the two split resonance frequencies that arise. In spite that the considered lines and loading resonators are very different and are described by different lumped element equivalent circuit models, the phenomenology associated to the effects of coupling is exactly the same, and the resonance frequencies are given by identical expressions. The reported lumped element circuit models of both structures are validated by comparing the circuit simulations with extracted parameters with both electromagnetic simulations and experimental data. These structures can be useful for the implementation of microwave sensors based on symmetry properties.

  12. Krypton isotope analysis using near-resonant stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, C.A.; Cannon, B.D.; Wacker, J.F.

    1994-12-01

    A method for measuring low relative abundances of {sup 85}Kr in one liter or less samples of air has been under development here at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is to measure ratios of 10{sup {minus}10} or less of {sup 85}Kr to more abundant stable krypton. Mass spectrometry and beta counting are the main competing technologies used in rare-gas trace analysis and are limited in application by such factors as sample size, counting times, and selectivity. The use of high-resolution lasers to probe hyperfine levels to determine isotopic abundance has received much attention recently. In this study, we report our progress on identifying and implementing techniques for trace {sup 85}Kr analysis on small gas samples in a static cell as well as limitations on sensitivity and selectivity for the technique. High-resolution pulsed and cw lasers are employed in a laser-induced fluorescence technique that preserves the original sample. This technique, is based on resonant isotopic depletion spectroscopy (RIDS) in which one isotope is optically depleted while preserving the population of a less abundant isotope. The KILA method consists of three steps. In the first step, the 1s{sub 5} metastable level of krypton is populated via radiative cascade following two-photon excitation of the 2p{sub 6} energy level. Next, using RBDS, the stable krypton isotopes are optically depleted to the ground state through the 1s{sub 4} level with the bulk of the {sup 85}Kr population being preserved. Finally, the remaining metastable population is probed to determine {sup 85}Kr concentration. The experimental requirements for each of these steps are outlined below.

  13. Results on Charm Baryon Spectroscopy from Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Felix

    2011-05-01

    Due to an excellent mass resolution and a large amount of available data, the CDF experiment, located at the Tevatron proton-antiproton accelerator, allows the precise measurement of spectroscopic properties, like mass and decay width, of a variety of states. This was exploited to examine the first orbital excitations of the {Lambda}{sub c} baryon, the resonances {Lambda}{sub c}(2595) and {Lambda}{sub c}(2625), in the decay channel {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, as well as the {Lambda}{sub c} spin excitations {Sigma}{sub c}(2455) and {Sigma}{sub c}(2520) in its decays to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} final states in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.2 fb{sup -1}. We present measurements of the mass differences with respect to the {Lambda}{sub c} and the decay widths of these states, using significantly higher statistics than previous experiments.

  14. Selective Ultratrace Analysis of Ca41 by Laser Resonance Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, K.; Blaum, K.; Diel, S.; Geppert, C.; Kuschnick, A.; Muller, P.; Trautmann, N.; Nortershauser, W.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2001-05-15

    A compact resonance ionization mass spectrometer is presented. It is presently applied for sensitive and highly selective ultratrace detemination of the long-lived radioisotope 41Ca for environmental, biological, and fundamental investigations. The development of coherent multistep resonance ionization enables the realization of experimental detection limits as low as 6 10 atoms per sample and very high isotopic selectivity above 12 10.

  15. Isospin Splittings of Doubly Heavy Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Guo, Feng-Kun; Hanhart, Christoph; Meissner, Ulf-G.; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.

    2011-08-18

    The SELEX Collaboration has reported a very large isospin splitting of doubly charmed baryons. We show that this effect would imply that the doubly charmed baryons are very compact. One intriguing possibility is that such baryons have a linear geometry Q-q-Q where the light quark q oscillates between the two heavy quarks Q, analogous to a linear molecule such as carbon dioxide. However, using conventional arguments, the size of a heavy-light hadron is expected to be around 0.5 fm, much larger than the size needed to explain the observed large isospin splitting. Assuming the distance between two heavy quarks is much smaller than that between the light quark and a heavy one, the doubly heavy baryons are related to the heavy mesons via heavy quark-diquark symmetry. Based on this symmetry, we predict the isospin splittings for doubly heavy baryons including {Xi}{sub cc}, {Xi}{sub bb} and {Xi}{sub bc}. The prediction for the {Xi}{sub cc} is much smaller than the SELEX value. On the other hand, the {Xi}{sub bb} baryons are predicted to have an isospin splitting as large as (6.3 {+-} 1.7) MeV. An experimental study of doubly bottomed baryons is therefore very important to better understand the structure of baryons with heavy quarks.

  16. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K.Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  17. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Lichtl, Adam C.; Mathur, Nilmani; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  18. Marriage between the baryonic and dark matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhiani, Zurab

    2006-11-01

    The baryonic and dark matter fractions in the universe can be both generated simultaneously and with comparable amounts, if dark matter is constituted by the baryons of the mirror world, a parallel hidden sector with the same microphysics as that of the observable world.

  19. Exploring the simplest purely baryonic decay processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, C. Q.; Hsiao, Y. K.; Rodrigues, Eduardo

    2016-07-01

    Though not considered in general, purely baryonic decays could shed light on the puzzle of the baryon number asymmetry in the universe by means of a better understanding of the baryonic nature of our matter world. As such, they constitute a yet unexplored class of decay processes worth investigating. We propose to search for purely baryonic decay processes at the LHCb experiment. No such type of decay has ever been observed. In particular, we concentrate on the decay Λb0→p p ¯n , which is the simplest purely baryonic decay mode, with solely spin-1 /2 baryons involved. We predict its decay branching ratio to be B (Λb0→p p ¯ n )=(2. 0-0.2+0.3)×10-6 , which is sufficiently large to make the decay mode accessible to LHCb. Our study can be extended to other purely baryonic decays such as Λb0→p p ¯ Λ , Λb0→Λ p ¯ Λ , and Λb0→Λ Λ ¯Λ , as well as to similar decays of antitriplet b baryons such as Ξb0 ,-.

  20. Charm Baryon Results from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Veronique; /SLAC

    2012-04-27

    We present experimental results from the BaBar experiment on charm baryon spectroscopy and production studies, including studies of excited cascades produced in charm baryon decays. We review the discovery of new decay modes of known states and searches for predicted states.

  1. Charm Baryon Results from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Veronique

    2011-10-24

    We present experimental results from the BaBar experiment on charm baryon spectroscopy and production studies, including studies of excited cascades produced in charm baryon decays. We review the discovery of new decay modes of known states and searches for predicted states.

  2. Design and analysis of coupled-resonator reconfigurable antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. I.; Faruque, M. R. I.; Islam, M. T.; Ali, M. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a coupled resonator with the microstrip patch antenna is proposed as a frequency reconfigurable antenna. The ground plane of the proposed microstrip patch antenna is modified with the proposed resonator structure to obtain reconfigurable characteristics. The resonator structure consists of two square split rings. The incorporation of proposed resonator structure with antenna makes it single-band antenna. The characteristics of proposed resonator structure can effectively deactivate by closing the splits of rings using switches, and hence, the dual-band characteristics of the antenna are recovered. The finite integration technique of computer simulation technology microwave studio is used throughout the investigation. The measurement of antenna performances is taken in an anechoic chamber. The measured and simulated performances of proposed reconfigurable antenna show very good agreement.

  3. Baryon symmetric big bang cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Both the quantum theory and Einsteins theory of special relativity lead to the supposition that matter and antimatter were produced in equal quantities during the big bang. It is noted that local matter/antimatter asymmetries may be reconciled with universal symmetry by assuming (1) a slight imbalance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, annihilation, and a subsequent remainder of matter; (2) localized regions of excess for one or the other type of matter as an initial condition; and (3) an extremely dense, high temperature state with zero net baryon number; i.e., matter/antimatter symmetry. Attention is given to the third assumption, which is the simplest and the most in keeping with current knowledge of the cosmos, especially as pertains the universality of 3 K background radiation. Mechanisms of galaxy formation are discussed, whereby matter and antimatter might have collided and annihilated each other, or have coexisted (and continue to coexist) at vast distances. It is pointed out that baryon symmetric big bang cosmology could probably be proved if an antinucleus could be detected in cosmic radiation.

  4. On the peculiar momentum of baryons after reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Ho, Shirley

    2009-09-01

    The peculiar motion of ionized baryons is known to introduce temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation by means of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect. In this work, we present an all-sky computation of angular power spectrum of the temperature anisotropies introduced by kSZ momentum of all baryons in the Universe during and after reionization. In an attempt to study the bulk flows of the missing baryons not yet detected, we separately address the contribution from all baryons in the intergalactic medium (IGM) and those baryons located in collapsed structures like groups and clusters of galaxies. In the first case, our approach provides a complete all-sky computation of the kSZ effect in the second order of cosmological perturbation theory [also known as the Ostriker-Vishniac (OV) effect]. Most of the power of the OV effect is generated during reionization, although it has a non-negligible tail at low redshifts, when the bulk of the kSZ peculiar momentum of the halo (cluster + group) population arises. If gas outside haloes is comoving with clusters as the theory predicts, then the signature of the bulk flows of the missing baryons should be recovered by a cross-correlation analysis of future CMB data sets with kSZ estimates in clusters of galaxies. For an Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) or South Pole Telescope (SPT) type of CMB experiment, all-sky kSZ estimates of all clusters above 2 × 1014h-1Msolar should provide a detection of dark flows with signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of ~23 (S/N ~ 5-11 for 2000-10000 deg2). Improving kSZ estimates with data from Large Scale Structure surveys should enable a deeper confrontation of the theoretical predictions for bulk flows with observations. The combination of future CMB and optical data should shed light on the dark flows of the nearby, so far undetected, diffuse baryons.

  5. Spherical tensor analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Jacco D; Carravetta, Marina; Antonioli, Gian Carlo; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2005-06-22

    In a nuclear magnetic-resonance (NMR) experiment, the spin density operator may be regarded as a superposition of irreducible spherical tensor operators. Each of these spin operators evolves during the NMR experiment and may give rise to an NMR signal at a later time. The NMR signal at the end of a pulse sequence may, therefore, be regarded as a superposition of spherical components, each derived from a different spherical tensor operator. We describe an experimental method, called spherical tensor analysis (STA), which allows the complete resolution of the NMR signal into its individual spherical components. The method is demonstrated on a powder of a (13)C-labeled amino acid, exposed to a pulse sequence generating a double-quantum effective Hamiltonian. The propagation of spin order through the space of spherical tensor operators is revealed by the STA procedure, both in static and rotating solids. Possible applications of STA to the NMR of liquids, liquid crystals, and solids are discussed. PMID:16035785

  6. SNR analysis of 3D magnetic resonance tomosynthesis (MRT) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Oh; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2012-03-01

    In conventional 3D Fourier transform (3DFT) MR imaging, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is governed by the well-known relationship of being proportional to the voxel size and square root of the imaging time. Here, we introduce an alternative 3D imaging approach, termed MRT (Magnetic Resonance Tomosynthesis), which can generate a set of tomographic MR images similar to multiple 2D projection images in x-ray. A multiple-oblique-view (MOV) pulse sequence is designed to acquire the tomography-like images used in tomosynthesis process and an iterative back-projection (IBP) reconstruction method is used to reconstruct 3D images. SNR analysis is performed and shows that resolution and SNR tradeoff is not governed as with typical 3DFT MR imaging case. The proposed method provides a higher SNR than the conventional 3D imaging method with a partial loss of slice-direction resolution. It is expected that this method can be useful for extremely low SNR cases.

  7. Measurements of the b baryon lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, L.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Cassel, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Engelhardt, A.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Oest, T.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Morton, W. T.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wanke, R.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Thulasidas, M.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Gambino, D.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, L. M.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Using about 1.5 million hadronic Z decays recorded with the ALEPH detector, the lifetime of the b baryons has been measured using two independent data samples. From a maximum likelihood fit to the impact parameter distribution of leptons in 519 Λℓ - combinations containing a b baryon sample of 290 decays, the measured b baryon lifetime is τb-baryon = 1.05 -0.11+0.12(stat)±0.09(syst) ps. The lifetime of the Λb0 baryon from a maximum likelihood fit to the proper time distribution of 58 Λc+ℓ - candidates containing a Λb0 sample of 44 decays, is τΛb0 = 1.02 -0.18+0.23(stat) ± 0.06(syst) ps.

  8. Baryon destruction by asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl H.; Morrissey, D.; Sigurdson, K.; Tulin, S.

    2011-11-10

    We investigate new and unusual signals that arise in theories where dark matter is asymmetric and carries a net antibaryon number, as may occur when the dark matter abundance is linked to the baryon abundance. Antibaryonic dark matter can cause induced nucleon decay by annihilating visible baryons through inelastic scattering. These processes lead to an effective nucleon lifetime of 10{sup 29}-10{sup 32} yrs in terrestrial nucleon decay experiments, if baryon number transfer between visible and dark sectors arises through new physics at the weak scale. The possibility of induced nucleon decay motivates a novel approach for direct detection of cosmic dark matter in nucleon decay experiments. Monojet searches (and related signatures) at hadron colliders also provide a complementary probe of weak-scale dark-matter-induced baryon number violation. Finally, we discuss the effects of baryon-destroying dark matter on stellar systems and show that it can be consistent with existing observations.

  9. Baryon destruction by asymmetric dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Morrissey, David E.; Tulin, Sean; Sigurdson, Kris

    2011-11-01

    We investigate new and unusual signals that arise in theories where dark matter is asymmetric and carries a net antibaryon number, as may occur when the dark matter abundance is linked to the baryon abundance. Antibaryonic dark matter can cause induced nucleon decay by annihilating visible baryons through inelastic scattering. These processes lead to an effective nucleon lifetime of 10{sup 29}-10{sup 32} yrs in terrestrial nucleon decay experiments, if baryon number transfer between visible and dark sectors arises through new physics at the weak scale. The possibility of induced nucleon decay motivates a novel approach for direct detection of cosmic dark matter in nucleon decay experiments. Monojet searches (and related signatures) at hadron colliders also provide a complementary probe of weak-scale dark-matter-induced baryon number violation. Finally, we discuss the effects of baryon-destroying dark matter on stellar systems and show that it can be consistent with existing observations.

  10. Rotational-vibrational coupling in the BPS Skyrme model of baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2013-11-01

    We calculate the rotational-vibrational spectrum in the BPS Skyrme model for the hedgehog skyrmion with baryon number one. The resulting excitation energies for the nucleon and delta Roper resonances are slightly above their experimental values. Together with the fact that in the standard Skyrme model these excitation energies are significantly lower than the experimental ones, this provides strong evidence for the conjecture that the inclusion of the BPS Skyrme model is required for a successful quantitative description of physical properties of baryons and nuclei.

  11. Analysis of a Precambrian resonance-stabilized day length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Benjamin C.; Stevenson, David J.

    2016-06-01

    During the Precambrian era, Earth's decelerating rotation would have passed a 21 h period that would have been resonant with the semidiurnal atmospheric thermal tide. Near this point, the atmospheric torque would have been maximized, being comparable in magnitude but opposite in direction to the lunar torque, halting Earth's rotational deceleration, maintaining a constant day length, as detailed by Zahnle and Walker (1987). We develop a computational model to determine necessary conditions for formation and breakage of this resonant effect. Our simulations show the resonance to be resilient to atmospheric thermal noise but suggest a sudden atmospheric temperature increase like the deglaciation period following a possible "snowball Earth" near the end of the Precambrian would break this resonance; the Marinoan and Sturtian glaciations seem the most likely candidates for this event. Our model provides a simulated day length over time that resembles existing paleorotational data, though further data are needed to verify this hypothesis.

  12. Analysis and approximations for crossing two nearby spin resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar, V. H.

    2014-01-07

    Solutions to the T-BMT spin equation have to date been confined to the single resonance crossing. However, in reality most cases of interest concern the overlapping of several resonances. To date there has been several serious studies of this problem; however, a good analytical solution or even approximation has eluded the community. We show that the T-BMT equation can be transformed into a Hill’s like equation. In this representation it can be shown that, while the single resonance crossing represents the solution to the Parabolic Cylinder equation, the overlapping case becomes a parametric type of resonance. We present possible approximations for both the non-accelerating case and accelerating case.

  13. Transform analysis of the resonance Raman excitation profile of lycopene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    1992-10-01

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles (RREPs) of the ν 1, ν 2 and ν 3 vibrations of lycopene in acetone, ethyl alcohol, toluene and carbon disulphide solvents have been analyzed using the transform method for calculating resonance Raman excitation profiles. The tests show excellent agreement between the calculated and observed profiles for the ν 2 and ν 3 RREPs, but greater difference between experiment and theory occurs for the ν 1 RREP, especially in carbon disulphide solvent.

  14. Analysis of morphological structuring elements generated using adaptive resonance theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, John P.; Sungar, Nilgun; Narayanswamy, Ramkumar; Johnson, Kristina M.

    1995-03-01

    In this paper we consider the formation of morphological templates using adaptive resonance theory. We examine the role of object variability and noise on the clustering of different sized objects as a function of the vigilance parameter. We demonstrate that the fuzzy adaptive resonance theory is robust in the presence of noise but that for poor choice of vigilance there is a proliferation of prototypical categories. We apply the technique to detection of abnormal cells in pap smears.

  15. Improvement of impedance spectroscopy methods: resonance analysis of samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmus, Sorin-Bogdan; Ciomaga, Cristina E.; Horchidan, Nadejda; Mitoseriu, Liliana; Dumitru, Ioan

    2015-06-01

    An impedance spectroscopy method, using an Agilent E4991A RF Impedance/Material Analyzer, was employed for the investigation of radiofrequency and microwave dielectric characteristics for some ceramic materials with high dielectric permittivity. Experimental observations recorded single, double and even triple resonances in the permittivity spectra, while for the selected samples significantly different values of permittivity from the ones found in existing literature were directly measured and observed in the frequency range of 100 MHz-1 GHz. The specified material analyzer is designed to work within certain permittivity-frequency domains; working outside these limits leads to significant errors when carrying out direct measurements of permittivity. Having observed that the resonance measurements are not associated with the intrinsic material properties but with the sample resonances, we proposed a dielectric resonance cavity model for sample purposes and we determined the dielectric permittivity at different resonance frequencies. A scaling procedure, based on the computed values of permittivity, was applied in order to correct the directly measured permittivity spectra where the frequency was outside the resonance domains. The corrected data are in good agreement with those measured using other techniques and suggest that the proposed procedure extends the spectroscopy method currently used for high permittivity measurements. The sources of error for the proposed method were investigated.

  16. Baryon census in hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planelles, S.; Borgani, S.; Dolag, K.; Ettori, S.; Fabjan, D.; Murante, G.; Tornatore, L.

    2013-05-01

    We carry out an analysis of a set of cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters and groups aimed at studying the total baryon budget in clusters, and how this budget is shared between the hot diffuse component and the stellar component. Using the TreePM+SPH GADGET-3 code, we carried out one set of non-radiative simulations, and two sets of simulations including radiative cooling, star formation and feedback from supernovae (SNe), one of which also accounting for the effect of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN). The analysis is carried out with the twofold aim of studying the implication of stellar and hot gas content on the relative role played by SNe and AGN feedback, and to calibrate the cluster baryon fraction and its evolution as a cosmological tool. With respect to previous similar analysis, the simulations used in this study provide us with a sufficient statistics of massive objects and including an efficient AGN feedback. We find that both radiative simulation sets predict a trend of stellar mass fraction with cluster mass that tends to be weaker than the observed one. However this tension depends on the particular set of observational data considered. Including the effect of AGN feedback alleviates this tension on the stellar mass and predicts values of the hot gas mass fraction and total baryon fraction to be in closer agreement with observational results. We further compute the ratio between the cluster baryon content and the cosmic baryon fraction, Yb, as a function of clustercentric radius and redshift. At R500 we find for massive clusters with M500 > 2 × 1014 h-1 M⊙ that Yb is nearly independent of the physical processes included and characterized by a negligible redshift evolution: Yb, 500 = 0.85 ± 0.03 with the error accounting for the intrinsic rms scatter within the set of simulated clusters. At smaller radii, R2500, the typical value of Yb slightly decreases, by an amount that

  17. Evidence for an Exotic Baryon State, Theta{sup +}(1540), in Photoproduction Reactions from Protons and Deuterons with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Valery Kubarovsky; Stepan Stepanyan

    2003-05-01

    CLAS photoproduction data on deuterium and hydrogen targets have been analyzed in a search for an exotic baryon state with strangeness S = +1, the {Theta}{sup +} (originally named the Z{sup +}). This resonance was predicted recently in theoretical work based on the chiral soliton model as a lowest mass member of an anti-decuplet of 5-quark states. The reaction {gamma}d {yields} pK{sup -}K{sup +}n, which requires a final state interaction inside the deuteron, was used in the analysis of deuteron data. In the analysis of proton data, the reaction {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}n was studied. Evidence for the {Theta}{sup +} state is found in both analyzes in the invariant mass distribution of the nK{sup +}. Our results are consistent with previously reported results by LEPS/Spring-8 collaboration (Japan), and by the ITEP (Moscow) group.

  18. Accurate circuit analysis of resonant-type left handed transmission lines with inter-resonator coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, I.; Bonache, J.; Gil, M.; García-García, J.; Martín, F.; Marqués, R.

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, a circuit model for the description of left handed transmission lines based on complementary split rings resonators (CSRRs) is proposed. As compared to previous models, coupling between adjacent resonators is included in the present work. The conditions that make this coupling significant are discussed. Specifically, it will be shown that it is barely present when circular CSRRs are used to implement the left handed transmission line. However, if the line is loaded with rectangular CSRRs separated by a small distance, inter-resonator coupling is important and it significantly influences the electromagnetic behavior of the structures. It will be also shown that under low or moderate coupling, it is possible to describe the structures by means of a simplified model with modified parameters. Several prototype devices with different CSRR topologies and coupling levels have been fabricated to illustrate the phenomenology associated with these structures and the accuracy of their model descriptions. The results of this work can be of interest for the design of planar microwave circuits based on CSRR left handed lines.

  19. Detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in thin metal plates by low frequency resonant model analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, B.; Namkung, M.; Birt, E. A.

    1992-01-01

    Low-frequency resonant model analysis, a technique for the detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in thin metal plates, which could be adapted to rapid scan or large area testing, is considered. Experimental data displaying a direct correlation between fatigue crack geometry and resonance frequency for the second vibrational plate mode are presented. FEM is used to calculate the mechanical behavior of the plates, and provides a comparison basis for the experimentally determined resonance frequency values. The waveform of the acoustic emission generated at the resonant frequency is examined; it provides the basis for a model of the interaction of fatigue crack faces during plate vibration.

  20. Detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in thin metal plates by low frequency resonant model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincheski, B.; Namkung, M.; Birt, E. A.

    Low-frequency resonant model analysis, a technique for the detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in thin metal plates, which could be adapted to rapid scan or large area testing, is considered. Experimental data displaying a direct correlation between fatigue crack geometry and resonance frequency for the second vibrational plate mode are presented. FEM is used to calculate the mechanical behavior of the plates, and provides a comparison basis for the experimentally determined resonance frequency values. The waveform of the acoustic emission generated at the resonant frequency is examined; it provides the basis for a model of the interaction of fatigue crack faces during plate vibration.

  1. Theoretical analysis of surface-plasmon-polariton resonators in free space and close to an interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jesper; Søndergaard, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) resonators consisting of metal strips in free space, and gap plasmon polariton resonators consisting of a metal strip close to either a block of metal or a metal surface, are studied as optical resonators. The analysis is performed using the Green's function surface integral equation method. For strips in free space, we show how the scattering resonances can be understood, by thinking of the strips as optical resonators for short-range SPPs. The two gap resonator configurations, strip-block and strip-surface, have different structure terminations as the width of the strip and the block are identical whereas the surface is infinite. In the strip-surface configuration, the scattering resonances are broader and red-shifted, compared to the strip-block configuration. This is explained as a consequence of the effective length of the resonator being larger in the strip-surface configuration. By varying the gap size, we study the transition from a SPP resonator to a gap plasmon polariton resonator. In the strip-surface configuration, light can be scattered into both out-of-plane propagating waves and into SPPs that propagate along the surface. For small gaps of a few tens of nanometers, a large enhancement in the scattering cross section is seen due to strong scattering into SPPs.

  2. Neutral Pion Electroproduction in the Delta Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Villano, Anthony

    2007-11-01

    The electroproduction of baryon resonances at high Q2 is examined. Analysis focuses on the Delta(1232) resonance via exclusive pseudoscalar meson production of À0 particles. Differential cross sections are extracted for exclusive À0 electroproduction. In the central invariant mass (W) region the cross sections are used to extract resonant multipole amplitudes. In particular, the ratio of the electric quadrupole to magnetic dipole amplitudes (E2/M1) will be discussed for the Delta(1232) resonance. The transition to pQCD is discussed in terms of E2/M1 and other multipoles. The helicity amplitude A3/2 can be used as a baryon helicity conservation meter in this context and will be discussed. The fast shrinking of the resonant contribution in the Delta region is observed at this high momentum transfer. Apart from the observables related to pQCD scaling, the transition form factor G M is extracted along with the scalar to magnetic dipole ratio C2/M1.

  3. Heavy baryons - Recent and very new results

    SciTech Connect

    Peter S Cooper

    2003-01-15

    Recent results on observations, properties and decay modes of the charmed and beauty baryons will be reviewed. Candidates for several new high mass states which include a cleanly-identified daughter {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon are seen in data from the SELEX experiment at Fermilab. These states are candidates for doubly-charmed baryons: a {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++} state and a {Xi}{sub cc}{sup +} state. These candidates are more than 5{sigma} signals in each case at masses of 3520 and 3460 MeV respectively.

  4. Beauty Baryons at CDF and DO

    SciTech Connect

    Kryemadhi, Abaz

    2006-11-17

    The results from Tevatron in the baryonic sector are presented. The lifetime of {lambda}b {yields} J/{psi}{lambda}, the observation of hadronic decay of {lambda}b {yields} {lambda}c{pi}, the semileptonic decays of {lambda}b {yields} {lambda}c{mu}{nu}, the hadronization of the b-baryons, and the {lambda}b decays to {lambda}b {yields} p{pi} and {lambda}b {yields} pK are discussed. These measurements paint a nice picture of our understanding of the beauty baryons.

  5. Analysis of vibrational resonance in a quintic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyakumari, S.; Chinnathambi, V.; Rajasekar, S.; Sanjuan, M. A. F.

    2009-12-01

    We consider a damped quintic oscillator with double-well and triple-well potentials driven by both low-frequency force f cos ωt and high-frequency force g cos Ωt with Ω ≫ω and analyze the occurrence of vibrational resonance. The response consists of a slow motion with frequency ω and a fast motion with frequency Ω. We obtain an approximate analytical expression for the response amplitude Q at the low-frequency ω. From the analytical expression of Q, we determine the values of ω and g (denoted as ωVR and gVR) at which vibrational resonance occurs. The theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement with numerical results. We show that for fixed values of the parameters of the system, as ω varies, resonance occurs at most one value of ω. When the amplitude g is varied we found two and four resonances in the system with double-well and triple-well cases, respectively. We present examples of resonance (i) without cross-well motion and (ii) with cross-well orbit far before and far after it. ωVR depends on the damping strength d while gVR is independent of d. Moreover, the effect of d is found to decrease the response amplitude Q.

  6. Dielectric loss analysis using linear resonators with different impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabi, Bahman; Khalil, M. S.; Khasawneh, M. A.; Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Gladchenko, Sergiy; Wellstood, F. C.; Lobb, C. J.; Osborn, K. D.

    2012-02-01

    It is known that amorphous dielectrics are a major source of decoherence in superconducting qubits due to energy absorption by two-level systems coupled to the electric fields. Linear resonators have been applied extensively to study loss in different dielectrics used in qubit circuits due to their versatility and relative simplicity in design, fabrication and measurement. We have designed linear resonators with multi-turn inductors and parallel-plate capacitors with resonance frequencies of 4.8-6.4 GHz. We achieve substantially different L/C values and capacitor volumes by varying the number of inductance turns and the area of the capacitors. We will present results of continuous wave measurements with SiNx capacitors and show how loss tangent and phase noise are related to impedance and capacitor volume.

  7. How resonance assists hydrogen bonding interactions: an energy decomposition analysis.

    PubMed

    Beck, John Frederick; Mo, Yirong

    2007-01-15

    Block-localized wave function (BLW) method, which is a variant of the ab initio valence bond (VB) theory, was employed to explore the nature of resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds (RAHBs) and to investigate the mechanism of synergistic interplay between pi delocalization and hydrogen-bonding interactions. We examined the dimers of formic acid, formamide, 4-pyrimidinone, 2-pyridinone, 2-hydroxpyridine, and 2-hydroxycyclopenta-2,4-dien-1-one. In addition, we studied the interactions in beta-diketone enols with a simplified model, namely the hydrogen bonds of 3-hydroxypropenal with both ethenol and formaldehyde. The intermolecular interaction energies, either with or without the involvement of pi resonance, were decomposed into the Hitler-London energy (DeltaEHL), polarization energy (DeltaEpol), charge transfer energy (DeltaECT), and electron correlation energy (DeltaEcor) terms. This allows for the examination of the character of hydrogen bonds and the impact of pi conjugation on hydrogen bonding interactions. Although it has been proposed that resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds are accompanied with an increasing of covalency character, our analyses showed that the enhanced interactions mostly originate from the classical dipole-dipole (i.e., electrostatic) attraction, as resonance redistributes the electron density and increases the dipole moments in monomers. The covalency of hydrogen bonds, however, changes very little. This disputes the belief that RAHB is primarily covalent in nature. Accordingly, we recommend the term "resonance-assisted binding (RAB)" instead of "resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RHAB)" to highlight the electrostatic, which is a long-range effect, rather than the electron transfer nature of the enhanced stabilization in RAHBs. PMID:17143867

  8. Microbeam titanium isotopic analysis by resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, D.R.; Davis, A.M.; Clayton, R.N. . Enrico Fermi Inst.); Pellin, M.J.; Calaway, W.F.; Burnett, J.W.; Coon, S.R.; Young, C.E.; Gruen, D.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The importance of isotopic anomalies in refractory inclusions in meteorites is well established. Measurements of the anomalies using conventional mass spectrometry are often rendered difficult, however, by isobarically interfering isotopes: for example, {sup 48}Ti and {sup 48}Ca. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) can substantially reduce isobaric interferences in a number of systems. We have employed RIMS for the in situ detection of Ti atoms sputtered from pure Ti metal and from several terrestrial oxides containing both Ti and Ca. Tunable lasers were employed to resonantly ionize neutral Ti atoms. We have chosen Ti specifically because of the importance of Ti isotopic anomalies in cosmochemistry.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging as a tool for extravehicular activity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickenson, R.; Lorenz, C.; Peterson, S.; Strauss, A.; Main, J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a means of conducting kinematic studies of the hand for the purpose of EVA capability enhancement. After imaging the subject hand using a magnetic resonance scanner, the resulting 2D slices were reconstructed into a 3D model of the proximal phalanx of the left hand. Using the coordinates of several landmark positions, one is then able to decompose the motion of the rigid body. MRI offers highly accurate measurements due to its tomographic nature without the problems associated with other imaging modalities for in vivo studies.

  10. Suppression of Baryon Diffusion and Transport in a Baryon Rich Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-11-01

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2 +1 ) -flavor lattice QCD calculations at zero and nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures 130 MeV ≤T ≤300 MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0 ≤μB≤400 MeV . Diffusive transport is predicted to be suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram, which is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities. We also calculate the fourth-order baryon susceptibility at zero baryon chemical potential and find quantitative agreement with recent lattice results. The baryon transport coefficients computed in this Letter can be readily implemented in state-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes used to investigate the dense QGP currently produced at RHIC's low energy beam scan.

  11. Suppression of Baryon Diffusion and Transport in a Baryon Rich Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma.

    PubMed

    Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-11-13

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD calculations at zero and nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures 130  MeV≤T≤300  MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0≤μ(B)≤400  MeV. Diffusive transport is predicted to be suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram, which is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities. We also calculate the fourth-order baryon susceptibility at zero baryon chemical potential and find quantitative agreement with recent lattice results. The baryon transport coefficients computed in this Letter can be readily implemented in state-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes used to investigate the dense QGP currently produced at RHIC's low energy beam scan. PMID:26613433

  12. Simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging and pharmacokinetic analysis of intramuscular depots.

    PubMed

    Probst, Mareike; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Scheuch, Eberhard; Seidlitz, Anne; Hadlich, Stefan; Evert, Katja; Oswald, Stefan; Siegmund, Werner; Weitschies, Werner

    2016-04-10

    The present pilot study introduces a method that might give novel insights in drug absorption processes from intramuscularly administered depots. An oily suspension or an aqueous solution of paracetamol (6 mg/kg body mass), prednisolone or its hemisuccinate sodium salt for the aqueous solutions (10mg/kg body mass) or diclofenac (10mg/kg body mass) was injected into the muscle tissue of the hind leg of female Lewis-rats (n=47). For the oily suspensions the micronized particles were suspended in medium-chain triglycerides. The aqueous solutions were buffered to a pH of 7.4 ± 0.5. Polyethylene glycol was added as a cosolvent in the formulations containing paracetamol (acetaminophen) and diclofenac and sodium chloride was added to the aqueous solutions of prednisolone hemisuccinate sodium to achieve nearly isotonic formulations. The formed depot was visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and characterized with regard to volume and surface area. A 7 T-small animal scanner was used and T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences including a fat saturation were performed. Simultaneously blood samples were taken and the drugs were quantitatively analyzed. The water based solvent and the oily dispersion agent were visible in the MRI images without the use of contrast agents. Since a free hand injection mostly led to an application directly into the fascia, resulting in a fast removal of the depot, MRI-guided injection was conducted. Comparing pharmacokinetic data with MRI data it was observed that maximal blood levels occurred before the solvent and the dispersion agent were removed from the muscle tissue. Thus, the drug is not absorbed together with the depot. Furthermore, no correlation was found between the shape of the depot and the rate of absorption. Consequently, a higher surface area or volume of the depot did not result in a faster release or absorption of the drugs from the tested formulations. In contrast to the paracetamol and prednisolone formulations the

  13. Carotenoid Analysis of Halophilic Archaea by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Craig P.; Leuko, Stefan; Coyle, Candace M.; Walter, Malcolm R.; Burns, Brendan P.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2007-08-01

    Recently, halite and sulfate evaporate rocks have been discovered on Mars by the NASA rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. It is reasonable to propose that halophilic microorganisms could have potentially flourished in these settings. If so, biomolecules found in microorganisms adapted to high salinity and basic pH environments on Earth may be reliable biomarkers for detecting life on Mars. Therefore, we investigated the potential of Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy to detect biomarkers derived from microorganisms adapted to hypersaline environments. RR spectra were acquired using 488.0 and 514.5 nm excitation from a variety of halophilic archaea, including Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, Halococcus morrhuae, and Natrinema pallidum. It was clearly demonstrated that RR spectra enhance the chromophore carotenoid molecules in the cell membrane with respect to the various protein and lipid cellular components. RR spectra acquired from all halophilic archaea investigated contained major features at approximately 1000, 1152, and 1505 cm-1. The bands at 1505 cm-1 and 1152 cm-1 are due to in-phase C=C (ν1 ) and C-C stretching ( ν2 ) vibrations of the polyene chain in carotenoids. Additionally, in-plane rocking modes of CH3 groups attached to the polyene chain coupled with C-C bonds occur in the 1000 cm-1 region. We also investigated the RR spectral differences between bacterioruberin and bacteriorhodopsin as another potential biomarker for hypersaline environments. By comparison, the RR spectrum acquired from bacteriorhodopsin is much more complex and contains modes that can be divided into four groups: the C=C stretches (1600-1500 cm-1), the CCH in-plane rocks (1400-1250 cm-1), the C-C stretches (1250-1100 cm-1), and the hydrogen out-of-plane wags (1000-700 cm-1). RR spectroscopy was shown to be a useful tool for the analysis and remote in situ detection of carotenoids from halophilic archaea without the need for large sample sizes and complicated extractions, which are

  14. Dynamic Analysis of 2D Electromagnetic Resonant Optical Scanner Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Katsuhiro; Hong, Sara; Maeda, Kengo

    The optical scanner is a scanning device in which a laser beam is reflected by a mirror that can be rotated or oscillated. In this paper, we propose a new 2D electromagnetic resonant optical scanner that employs electromagnets and leaf springs. Torque characteristics and resonance characteristics of the scanner are analyzed using the 3D finite element method. The validity of the analysis is shown by comparing the characteristics inferred from the analysis with the characteristics of the prototype. Further, 2D resonance is investigated by introducing a superimposed-frequency current in a single coil.

  15. Analysis of Continuous Microseismic Recordings: Resonance Frequencies and Unconventional Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tary, J.; van der Baan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrofracture experiments, where fluids and proppant are injected into reservoirs to create fractures and enhance oil recovery, are often monitored using microseismic recordings. The total stimulated volume is then estimated by the size of the cloud of induced micro-earthquakes. This implies that only brittle failure should occur inside reservoirs during the fracturing. Yet, this assumption may not be correct, as the total energy injected into the system is orders of magnitude larger than the total energy associated with brittle failure. Instead of using only triggered events, it has been shown recently that the frequency content of continuous recordings may also provide information on the deformations occurring inside reservoirs. Here, we use different kinds of time-frequency transforms to track the presence of resonance frequencies. We analyze different data sets using regular, long-period and broadband geophones. The resonance frequencies observed are mainly included in the frequency band of 5-60 Hz. We systematically examine first the possible causes of resonance frequencies, dividing them into source, path and receiver effects. We then conclude that some of the observed frequency bands likely result from source effects. The resonance frequencies could be produced by either interconnected fluid-filled fractures in the order of tens of meters, or by small repetitive events occurring at a characteristic periodicity. Still, other mechanisms may occur or be predominant during reservoir fracturing, depending on the lithology as well as the pressure and temperature conditions at depth. During one experiment, both regular micro-earthquakes, long-period long-duration events (LPLD) and resonance frequencies are observed. The lower part of the frequency band of these resonance frequencies (5-30 Hz) overlaps with the anticipated frequencies of observed LPLDs in other experiments (<50 Hz). The exact origin of both resonance frequencies and LPLDs is still under debate

  16. String junction as a baryonic constituent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Yu. S.; Nefediev, A. V.

    1996-02-01

    We extend the model for QCD string with quarks to consider the Mercedes Benz string configuration describing the three-quark baryon. Under the assumption of adiabatic separation of quark and string junction motion we formulate and solve the classical equation of motion for the junction. We dare to quantize the motion of the junction, and discuss the impact of these modes on the baryon spectra.

  17. Meson and Baryon Spectroscopy on the Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, D. G.

    2010-12-28

    Recent progress at understanding the excited state spectrum of mesons and baryons is described. I begin by outlining the application of the variational method to compute the spectrum, and the program of anisotropic clover lattice generation designed for hadron spectroscopy. I present results for the excited meson spectrum, with continuum quantum numbers of the states clearly delineated. I conclude with recent results for the low lying baryon spectrum, and the prospects for future calculations.

  18. Meson and baryon spectroscopy on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2010-12-01

    Recent progress at understanding the excited state spectrum of mesons and baryons is described. I begin by outlining the application of the variational method to compute the spectrum, and the program of anisotropic clover lattice generation designed for hadron spectroscopy. I present results for the excited meson spectrum, with continuum quantum numbers of the states clearly delineated. I conclude with recent results for the low lying baryon spectrum, and the prospects for future calculations.

  19. Doubly charmful baryonic B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Chua, C.-K.; Tsai, S.-Y.

    2006-04-01

    There are two apparent puzzles connected with the two-body and three-body doubly charmed baryonic B decays. First, earlier calculations based on QCD sum rules or the diquark model predict B(B{sup 0}{yields}{xi}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}){approx_equal}B(B{sup 0}{yields}B{sub c}N), while experimentally the former has a rate 2 orders of magnitude larger than the latter. Second, a naive estimate of the branching ratio O(10{sup -9}) for the color-suppressed three-body decay B{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}K, which is highly suppressed by phase space, is too small by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude compared to the experiment. We show that the great suppression for the {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}K production can be alleviated provided that there exists a narrow hidden charm bound state with a mass near the {lambda}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c} threshold. This new state that couples strongly to the charmed baryon pair can be searched for in B decays and in pp collisions by studying the mass spectrum of D{sup (*)}D{sup (*)} or {lambda}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c}. The doubly charmful decay B{yields}{xi}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c} has a configuration more favorable than the singly charmful one such as B{sup 0}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}p since no hard gluon is needed to produce the energetic {xi}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c} pair in the former decay, while two hard gluons are needed for the latter process. Assuming that a soft qq quark pair is produced through the {sigma} and {pi} meson exchanges in the configuration for B{yields}{xi}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c}, it is found that its branching ratio is of order 10{sup -3}, in agreement with the experiment.

  20. The baryon content of the Cosmic Web

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, HuanYuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Big-Bang nucleosynthesis indicates that baryons account for 5% of the Universe’s total energy content[1]. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two[2,3]. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not yet condensed into virialised halos, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web: a low-density plasma at temperature 105–107 K known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM)[3,4,5,6]. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars[7,8,9,10] and hot gas between interacting clusters[11,12,13,14]. These observations were however unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of ten-million-degree gas associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster[15] were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we reveal hot gas structures that are coherent over 8 Mpc scales. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10% of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster's gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. PMID:26632589

  1. Precombination Cloud Collapse and Baryonic Dark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple spherical model of dense baryon clouds in the hot big bang 'strongly nonlinear primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuations' is reviewed and used to describe the dependence of cloud behavior on the model parameters, baryon mass, and initial over-density. Gravitational collapse of clouds before and during recombination is considered including radiation diffusion and trapping, remnant type and mass, and effects on linear large-scale fluctuation modes. Sufficiently dense clouds collapse early into black holes with a minimum mass of approx. 1 solar mass, which behave dynamically like collisionless cold dark matter. Clouds below a critical over-density, however, delay collapse until recombination, remaining until then dynamically coupled to the radiation like ordinary diffuse baryons, and possibly producing remnants of other kinds and lower mass. The mean density in either type of baryonic remnant is unconstrained by observed element abundances. However, mixed or unmixed spatial variations in abundance may survive in the diffuse baryon and produce observable departures from standard predictions.

  2. Spin-flavor composition of excited baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Ishara; Goity, Jose

    2015-10-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1 /Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU (6) × O (3) , where the [ 56 ,lP =0+ ] ground state and excited baryons, and the [ 56 ,2+ ] and [ 70 ,1- ] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to O 1 /Nc and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. Predictions for physically unknown states for each multiplet are obtained. From the quark-mass dependence of the coefficients in the baryon mass formulas an increasingly simpler picture of the spin-flavor composition of the baryons is observed with increasing pion mass (equivalently, increasing mu , d masses), as measured by the number of significant mass operators. This work was supported in part by DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177 under which JSA operates the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (J. L. G.), and by the NSF (USA) through Grant PHY-0855789 and PHY-1307413 (I. P. F and J. L. G).

  3. Disentangling the Dynamical Origin of P11 Nucleon Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Nobuhiko Suzuki, Bruno Julia Diaz, Hiroyuki Kamano, Tsung-Shung Lee, Akihiko Matsuyama, Toru Sato

    2010-01-01

    The dynamical origins of the two poles associated with the Roper resonance are examined. Both of them together with the next higher resonance in the P11 partial wave are found to have the same originating bare state, indicating that the coupling to the meson-baryon continuum induces multiple observed resonances from the same bare state. Concerning other partial waves, the resonance poles extracted within the same multi-channels multi-resonances model of pi N reactions are compared to those listed by the Particle Data Group (PDG). Within our reaction model, all the identified resonances consist of a core state and meson-baryon components.

  4. High Spin Baryons in Quantum Mechanical Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchbach, M.; Compean, C. B.

    2009-04-20

    A framework of quantum mechanical chromodynamics (QMCD) is developed with the aim to place the description of the nucleon on a comparable footing with Schroedinger's quantum mechanical treatment of the hydrogen atom. Such indeed turns out to be possible upon replacing the (e{sup -}-p) by a (q-qq) system, on the one hand, and the Coulomb potential by the recently reported by us exactly solvable trigonometric extension of the Cornell (TEC) potential, on the other. The TEC potential translates the inverse distance potential in ordinary flat space to a space of constant positive curvature, the 3D hypersphere, a reason for which both potentials have the SO(4) and SO(2, 1) symmetries in common. In effect, the nucleon spectrum, inclusive its {delta} branch, acquire the degeneracy patterns of the electron excitations with spin in {sup 1}H without copying them, however. There are two essential differences between the N({delta}) and H atom spectra. The first concerns the parity of the states which can be unnatural for the N and {delta} excitations due to compositeness of the diquark, the second refers to the level splittings in the baryon spectra which contain besides the Balmer term also its inverse of opposite sign. Our scheme reproduces the complete number of states (except the hybrid {delta}(1600)), predicts a total of 33 new resonances, and explains the splittings of the N and {delta} levels containing high-spin resonances. It also describes accurately the proton electric charge form factor. We here calculate the potential in momentum space (instantaneous effective gluon propagator) as a Fourier transform of the TEC potential and show that the concept of curvature allows to avoid the integral divergences suffered by schemes based on power potentials. We find a propagator that is finite at origin, likely to produce confinement. The advocated new potential picture allows for deconfinement too as effect of space flattening in the limit of infinite radius of the 3D

  5. An analysis method for asymmetric resonator transmission applied to superconducting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. S.; Stoutimore, M. J. A.; Wellstood, F. C.; Osborn, K. D.

    2012-03-01

    We examine the transmission through nonideal microwave resonant circuits. The general analytical resonance line shape is derived for both inductive and capacitive coupling with mismatched input and output transmission impedances, and it is found that, for certain non-ideal conditions, the line shape is asymmetric. We describe an analysis method for extracting an accurate internal quality factor (Qi), the diameter correction method (DCM), and compare it to the conventional method used for millikelvin resonator measurements, the φ rotation method (φRM). We analytically find that the φRM deterministically overestimates Qi when the asymmetry of the resonance line shape is high, and that this error is eliminated with the DCM. A consistent discrepancy between the two methods is observed when they are used to analyze both simulations from a numerical linear solver and data from asymmetric coplanar superconducting thin-film resonators.

  6. Harmonic Resonance Analysis for PEP II Power Factor Control Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvin, C.

    1997-05-01

    Recent upgrades to the high voltage utility distribution network at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center have been accompanied by the installation of a large number of power supplies associated with the PEP-II B Factory project. These power supplies include a diverse assortment of single and three phase units, in two, six and twelve pulse configurations, with chopped, pulsed and continuous loading. Viewed as harmonic power sources in a range from a hundred to several kilohertz, they have the potential to be in resonance with the utility system network, a condition to be avoided. This paper analyzes and evaluates these resonance conditions with a view toward adding electric power factor correction upgrades to achieve substantial cost savings associated with power factor penalty avoidance. Similar studies and upgrades at SLAC in the past have reduced electric power costs over time by several hundred thousand dollars, thus providing the incentive to evaluate the recent upgrades to the PEP-II utility network.

  7. UV resonance Raman analysis of trishomocubane and diamondoid dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Reinhard Thomsen, Christian; Maultzsch, Janina; Richter, Robert; Merli, Andrea; Fokin, Andrey A.; Koso, Tetyana V.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Rodionov, Vladimir N.

    2014-01-21

    We present resonance Raman measurements of crystalline trishomocubane and diamantane dimers containing a C=C double bond. Raman spectra were recorded with excitation energies between 2.33 eV and 5.42 eV. The strongest enhancement is observed for the C=C stretch vibration and a bending mode involving the two carbon atoms of the C=C bond, corresponding to the B{sub 2g} wagging mode of ethylene. This is associated with the localization of the π-HOMO and LUMO and the elongation of the C=C bond length and a pyramidalization of the two sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon atoms at the optical excitation. The observed Raman resonance energies of the trishomocubane and diamantane dimers are significantly lower than the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the corresponding unmodified diamondoids.

  8. Multipacting analysis for half wave resonators in the China ADS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Sheng-Hu; He, Yuan; Yue, Wei-Ming; Chang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    In the China ADS (CIADS) proton accelerator, multipacting is an issue of concern for the superconducting cavities. The parallel codes Omega3P and Track3P, developed at SLAC under the support of the DOE SciDAC program, have been used to calculate the electromagnetic field distribution and to analyze the multipacting barriers of such cavities. In this paper, two types of 162.5 MHz half wave resonator cavities, HWR-010 (cylinder type with β of 0.10) and HWR-015 (taper type with β of 0.15) have been analyzed, and the results of the multipacting analyses show that the resonant electrons occur at different regions with different accelerating gradients. The two-point 1st order multipacting on the short plate has also been researched and discussed. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation (11221064, 91026001)

  9. An electrochemical surface plasmon resonance imaging system targeting cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. L.; Chen, X.; Wei, H. T.; Li, H.; Sun, J. H.; Cai, H. Y.; Chen, J. L.; Cui, D. F.

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents an electrochemical-surface plasmon resonance imaging (EC-SPRI) system, enabling the characterization of optical and electrical properties of cells, simultaneously. The developed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging system was capable of imaging micro cavities with a dimension of 10 μm × 10 μm and differentiated glycerol solutions with a group of refractive indices (RIs). Furthermore, the EC-SPRI system was used to image A549 cells, suggesting corresponding RI and morphology changes during the cell death process. In the end, electrochemical and SPR methods were used in combination, recording oxidation peaks of A549 cells in the cyclic voltage curves and SPR response unit increase, simultaneously.

  10. Analysis of a Non-resonant Ultrasonic Levitation Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    In this study, a non-resonant configuration of ultrasonic levitation device is presented, which is formed by a small diameter ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. The influence of different levitator parameters on the levitation performance is investigated by using a numerical model that combines the Gor'kov theory with a matrix method based on the Rayleigh integral. In contrast with traditional acoustic levitators, the non-resonant ultrasonic levitation device allows the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be adjusted continually, without requiring the separation distance to be set to a multiple of half-wavelength. It is also demonstrated, both numerically and experimentally, that the levitating particle can be manipulated by maintaining the transducer in a fixed position in space and moving the reflector in respect to the transducer.

  11. The quest for missing baryon states in electromagnetic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, Volker

    2016-03-01

    The excitation spectrum of nucleons reveals properties of the quark and gluon interactions in a confined system. Knowledge of the nucleon excitations is central to our understanding of the basic interactions underlying the spectrum, and is a fundamental goal of experimental nuclear and hadronic physics. Accounting for the complete baryon spectrum has recently been shown as critical for modeling the transition from the quark-gluon plasma phase to the confinement phase of stable nucleons in the early universe. Microscopic approaches such as constituent quark models and more recently Lattice QCD make predictions regarding masses and quantum numbers of the excited states and their internal structure according to radial, spin, and orbital transitions of the quark-gluon system. Pion induced transitions have revealed many nucleon states consistent with these predictions, but most of the predicted states have not been observed, especially those in the higher mass range. The quest for a more complete understanding of the systematic and the internal structure of baryons has led to a worldwide experimental effort to measure electromagnetically induced meson production including many polarization observables. The CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab is playing a key role in measuring many of the key observables with unprecedented precision, and some of these data have been employed in coupled-channel resonance analyses that led to strong evidence for a number of excited states that were previously unobserved or lacked sufficient evidence. In this talk I will discuss the current status of and future directions in the search for new baryon states using electromagnetic probes.

  12. LOCATING THE ''MISSING'' BARYONS WITH EXTRAGALACTIC DISPERSION MEASURE ESTIMATES

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Matthew

    2014-01-10

    Recently, Thornton and coworkers confirmed a class of millisecond radio bursts likely of extragalactic origin that is well-suited for estimating dispersion measures (DMs). We calculate the probability distribution of DM(z) in different models for how the cosmic baryons are distributed (both analytically and with cosmological simulations). We show that the distribution of DM is quite sensitive to whether the ''missing'' baryons lie around the virial radius of 10{sup 11}-10{sup 13} M{sub ☉} halos or further out, which is not easily constrained with other observational techniques. The intrinsic contribution to DM from each source could complicate studies of the extragalactic contribution. This difficulty is avoided by stacking based on the impact parameter to foreground galaxies. We show that a stacking analysis using a sample of ∼100 DM measurements from arcminute-localized, z ≳ 0.5 sources would place interesting constraints at 0.2-2 halo virial radii on the baryonic mass profile surrounding different galaxy types. Conveniently for intergalactic studies, sightlines that intersect intervening galactic disks should be easily identified owing to scattering. A detectable level of scattering may also result from turbulence in the circumgalactic medium.

  13. Probing the Missing Baryons via kSZ Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Han; Lin, Wei-Peng; Zhang, Peng-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) stacking has great potential to become a powerful probe of missing baryons, due to advances in CMB experiments and galaxy surveys. In this paper, we study kSZ stacking in hydrodynamic simulations with different gastrophysics. We quantify the kSZ stacking signal as a function of halo mass, redshift and projection depth. We compare between different simulations to estimate the impact of gastrophysics such as cooling and supernova feedback. Furthermore, we measure the contribution from warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM), which is believed to be the reservoir for most, if not all, missing baryons. We find that the WHIM contribution is significant, at the level of ∼ 10%–70%, depending on the angular separation from the stacked halos and other factors. However, contribution from the intracluster medium along the line of sight is in general non-negligible. This complexity requires more detailed and comprehensive analysis on probing the missing baryons with kSZ stacking.

  14. A proposal to construct SELEX - segmented large-x baryon spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, J.,; Edelstein, R.; Gibaut, D.; Lipton, R.; Potter, D.; Lach, J.; Stutte, L.; Li, Yun-Shan; Tang, Fu-Kun; Lang, Feng-Fei; Li, Cheng-Ze; Denisov, A.S.; Golovtsov, V.; Grachev, V.; Krivshich, A.; Kuropatkin, N.; Schegelsky, V.; Smirnov, N.; Terentiev, N.K.; Uvarov, L.; Vorobyov, A.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Iowa U. /Sao Paulo U. /Yale U.

    1987-11-01

    Heavy flavor experiments currently in progress at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders or in the fixed target programs at CERN and Fermilab are aimed at collecting large samples (> 10,000 reconstructed events) of charmed events. These experiments will provide a great deal of information about charmed meson systems, but the expected yield of charmed baryons is not large--10% or less of the sample size. The most detailed study of the charm strange baryon {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} comes not from a large-statistics central production experiment at high energy but rather from a 20-day run at modest beam flux in the CERN hyperon beam. This proposal exploits the advantages in triggering and particle identification of large-x production to make a systematic study of charm baryon production and decay systematics. For the dominant ({approx} 10% branching ratio) modes of these baryons, they expect to collect 10{sup 6} triggered events in each mode per running period. This will give adequate statistics to study even highly suppressed modes. The study of meson systematics by the Mark III spectrometer at SPEAR led to a revolution in the understanding of charmed meson decay mechanisms. No present experiment will supply a similar data set for the charmed baryons. A fixed target experiment cannot supply the absolute branching ratios that e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation on the {Upsilon}(3770) resonance provides for the Mark III data. They can supply relative branching ratios for the non-leptonic and semileptonic decay modes of charmed baryons and establish the importance of two-body resonance modes in the decay mechanism. This information, along with lifetime measurements for {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub c}{sup ++}, {Sigma}{sub c}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub c}{sup 0}, {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} and {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons, will permit evaluation in the baryon sector of the role of color suppression, Pauli suppression, sextet enhancement and other varied mechanisms which influence decay rates of charmed

  15. Study of B-Meson Decays to Final States with a Single Charm Baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Stephanie A.

    2007-08-01

    A study of B-meson decays to final states with a single charm baryon is presented based on data recorded by the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Although the B meson is the lightest bottom-flavored meson, it is heavy enough to decay to a baryon made of three quarks and an antibaryon made of three antiquarks. By studying the baryonic weak decays of the B meson, we can investigate baryon production mechanisms in heavy meson decays. In particular, we measure the rates of the decays B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π- and $\\bar{B}$0 → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$. Comparing these rates, we confirm an observed trend in baryonic B decays that the decay with the lower energy release, B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π-, is favored over $\\bar{B}$0 → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$. The dynamics of the baryon-antibaryon (Λ+c$\\bar{p}$) system in the three-body decay also provide insight into baryon-antibaryon production mechanisms. The B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π- system is a laboratory for searches for excited #c baryon states; we observe the resonant decays B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ and B- → Σc(2800) 0$\\bar{p}$. This is the first observation of the decay B- → Σc(2800) 0$\\bar{p}$; however, the mass of the observed #c(2800)0 state is inconsistent with previous measurements. Finally, we examine the angular distribution of the B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ decays and measure the spin of the B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ baryon to be J = 1/2, as predicted by the quark model.

  16. Detecting the Baryons in Matter Power Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Chen, Xuelei

    2002-11-01

    We examine power spectra from the Abell/ACO rich cluster survey and the Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) for observational evidence of features produced by the baryons. A nonnegligible baryon fraction produces relatively sharp oscillatory features at specific wavenumbers in the matter power spectrum. However, the mere existence of baryons will also produce a global suppression of the power spectrum. We look for both of these features using the false discovery rate statistic. We show that the window effects on the Abell/ACO power spectrum are minimal, which has allowed for the discovery of discrete oscillatory features in the power spectrum. On the other hand, there are no statistically significant oscillatory features in the 2dFGRS power spectrum, which is expected from the survey's broad window function. After accounting for window effects we apply a scale-independent bias to the 2dFGRS power spectrum, PAbell(k)=b2P2dF(k) and b=3.2. We find that the overall shapes of the Abell/ACO and the biased 2dFGRS power spectra are entirely consistent over the range 0.02<=k<=0.15h Mpc-1. We examine the range of Ωmatter and baryon fraction, for which these surveys could detect significant suppression in power. The reported baryon fractions for both the Abell/ACO and 2dFGRS surveys are high enough to cause a detectable suppression in power (after accounting for errors, windows, and k-space sampling). Using the same technique, we also examine, given the best-fit baryon density obtained from big bang nucleosynthesis, whether it is possible to detect additional suppression due to dark matter-baryon interaction. We find that the limit on dark matter cross section/mass derived from these surveys is the same as those ruled out in a recent study by Chen, Hannestad, & Scherrer.

  17. Efficient and robust analysis of complex scattering data under noise in microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Probst, S.; Song, F. B.; Bushev, P. A.; Ustinov, A. V.; Weides, M.

    2015-02-15

    Superconducting microwave resonators are reliable circuits widely used for detection and as test devices for material research. A reliable determination of their external and internal quality factors is crucial for many modern applications, which either require fast measurements or operate in the single photon regime with small signal to noise ratios. Here, we use the circle fit technique with diameter correction and provide a step by step guide for implementing an algorithm for robust fitting and calibration of complex resonator scattering data in the presence of noise. The speedup and robustness of the analysis are achieved by employing an algebraic rather than an iterative fit technique for the resonance circle.

  18. Vibration analysis of carbon nanotube-based resonator using nonlocal elasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsuki, Toshiaki; Matsuyama, Nobuhiro; Ni, Qing-Qing

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are nanomaterials with extremely favorable mass sensor properties. In this paper, we propose that CNTs under clamped boundary condition and an axial tensile load are considered as CNT-based resonators. Moreover, the resonant frequencies and frequency shifts of the CNTs with attached nanomass are investigated based on vibration analysis, which used the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model. Using the present methods, we analyze and discuss the effects of the aspect ratio, the concentrated mass and the axial force on the resonant frequency of the CNTs. The results indicate that the CNT beam under the axial tensile loads could provide higher sensitivity as nanomechanical mass sensor.

  19. QCD at zero baryon density and the Polyakov loop paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvila, Slavo; Forcrand, Philippe de

    2006-06-01

    We compare the grand-canonical partition function at fixed chemical potential {mu} with the canonical partition function at fixed baryon number B, formally and by numerical simulations at {mu}=0 and B=0 with four flavors of staggered quarks. We verify that the free energy densities are equal in the thermodynamic limit, and show that they can be well described by the hadron resonance gas at TT{sub c}. Small differences between the two ensembles, for thermodynamic observables characterizing the deconfinement phase transition, vanish with increasing lattice size. These differences are solely caused by contributions of nonzero baryon density sectors, which are exponentially suppressed with increasing volume. The Polyakov loop shows a different behavior: for all temperatures and volumes, its expectation value is exactly zero in the canonical formulation, whereas it is always nonzero in the commonly used grand-canonical formulation. We clarify this paradoxical difference, and show that the nonvanishing Polyakov loop expectation value is due to contributions of nonzero triality states, which are not physical, because they give zero contribution to the partition function.

  20. Nuclear quadrupole resonance studies project. [spectrometer design and spectrum analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, A. N.

    1978-01-01

    The participation of undergraduates in nuclear quadrupole resonance research at Grambling University was made possible by NASA grants. Expanded laboratory capabilities include (1) facilities for high and low temperature generation and measurement; (2) facilities for radio frequency generation and measurement with the modern spectrum analyzers, precision frequency counters and standard signal generators; (3) vacuum and glass blowing facilities; and (4) miscellaneous electronic and machine shop facilities. Experiments carried out over a five year period are described and their results analyzed. Theoretical studies on solid state crystalline electrostatic fields, field gradients, and antishielding factors are included.

  1. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy for trace analysis of plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, N.; Albus, F.; Deiβenberger, R.; Eberhardt, K.; Funk, H.; Hasse, H.-U.; Herrmann, G.; Huber, G.; Kluge, H.-J.; Köhler, S.; Nunnemann, M.; Passler, G.; Trautmann, N.; Urban, F.-J.

    1995-04-01

    Trace amounts of plutonium are determined by means of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS). Plutonium atoms evaporated from a heated filament are ionized via a three-step exciation leading to an autoionizing state. The ions are mass-selectively detected with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Several types of filaments have been tested with respect to atomic yield after evaporation and reproducibility. The best results have been obtained using tantalum as backing and titanium as covering. An overall detection efficiency of 1ṡ10-5 could be determined with such filaments yielding a detection limit of 2ṡ106 atoms of 239Pu.

  2. Resonance Analysis and Evaluation of the Uranium -235 Neutron-Induced Cross-Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Luiz Carlos

    Neutron cross sections of fissile nuclei are of considerable interest for the understanding of parameters such as resonance absorption, resonance escape probability, resonance self-shielding, and the dependence of the reactivity on temperature. In the present study, new techniques for the evaluation of the ^{235}U neutron cross sections are described. The Reich-Moore formalism of the Bayesian computer code SAMMY was used to perform consistent R-matrix multilevel analyses of the selected neutron cross-section data. The Delta_3 -statistics of Dyson and Mehta, along with high -resolution data and the spin-separated fission cross-section data, have provided the possibility of developing a new methodology for the analysis and evaluation of neutron -nucleus cross-sections. The result of the analysis consists of a set of resonance parameters which describe the ^{235}U neutron cross sections up to 500 eV. The set of resonance parameters obtained through a R-matrix analysis are expected to satisfy statistical properties which lead to information on the nuclear structure. The resonance parameters were tested and showed good agreement with the theory. It is expected that the parametrization of the ^{235}U neutron cross sections obtained in this dissertation represents the current state of art in data as well as in theory and, therefore, can be of direct use in reactor calculations.

  3. Hints for the existence of hexaquark states in the baryon-antibaryon sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abud, Mario; Buccella, Franco; Tramontano, Francesco

    2010-04-01

    The discovery of some baryon-antibaryon resonances has led us to consider 3q 3q¯ systems as possible candidates. We predict their spectrum in the framework of a constituent model, where the chromomagnetic interaction plays the main role. The relevant parameters are fixed by the present knowledge of tetraquarks. The emerging scenario complies well with experiment; besides the description of the baryon-antibaryon resonances, we find evidence for new tetraquark states, namely, the a0(Y) in the hidden strangeness sector and the Y(4140) and X(4350) in the cscs¯ sector. A detailed account of the spectra and the decay channels is provided for future comparisons with data.

  4. Frequency-selective analysis of multichannel magnetic resonance spectroscopy data.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Niclas; Stoica, Petre

    2005-01-01

    In several practical magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) applications the user is interested only in the spectral content of a specific frequency band of the spectrum. A frequency-selective (or sub-band) method estimates only the parameters of those spectroscopic components that lie in a pre-selected frequency band of the spectrum in a computationally efficient manner. Multichannel MRS is a technique that employs phased-array receive coils to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the spectra by combining several simultaneous measurements of the magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation of an excited sample. In this paper we suggest a frequency-selective multichannel parameter estimation approach that combines the appealing features (high speed and improved SNR) of the two techniques above. The presented method shows parameter estimation accuracies comparable to those of existing fullband multichannel techniques in the high SNR case, but at a considerably lower computational complexity, and significantly better parameter estimation accuracies in low SNR scenarios. PMID:17282712

  5. Analysis of Chaotic Resonance in Izhikevich Neuron Model.

    PubMed

    Nobukawa, Sou; Nishimura, Haruhiko; Yamanishi, Teruya; Liu, Jian-Qin

    2015-01-01

    In stochastic resonance (SR), the presence of noise helps a nonlinear system amplify a weak (sub-threshold) signal. Chaotic resonance (CR) is a phenomenon similar to SR but without stochastic noise, which has been observed in neural systems. However, no study to date has investigated and compared the characteristics and performance of the signal responses of a spiking neural system in some chaotic states in CR. In this paper, we focus on the Izhikevich neuron model, which can reproduce major spike patterns that have been experimentally observed. We examine and classify the chaotic characteristics of this model by using Lyapunov exponents with a saltation matrix and Poincaré section methods in order to address the measurement challenge posed by the state-dependent jump in the resetting process. We found the existence of two distinctive states, a chaotic state involving primarily turbulent movement and an intermittent chaotic state. In order to assess the signal responses of CR in these classified states, we introduced an extended Izhikevich neuron model by considering weak periodic signals, and defined the cycle histogram of neuron spikes as well as the corresponding mutual correlation and information. Through computer simulations, we confirmed that both chaotic states in CR can sensitively respond to weak signals. Moreover, we found that the intermittent chaotic state exhibited a prompter response than the chaotic state with primarily turbulent movement. PMID:26422140

  6. Integrated microwave resonant device for dielectric analysis of microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, D. J.; Porch, A.; Barrow, D. A.; Allender, C. J.

    2011-08-01

    Herein we present a device for performing non-contact dielectric spectroscopy upon liquids in a microfluidic environment. The device is comprised of a compression-sealed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) chip with an embedded coaxial resonator, which is overmoded for dielectric measurements at six discrete frequencies between 1 and 8 GHz. A novel capacitive coupling structure allows transmission measurements to be taken from one end of the resonator, and an optimised microchannel design maximises sensitivity and repeatability. The use of a PTFE substrate and a non-contact measurement gives excellent chemical and biological compatibility. A simple 'fingerprint' method for identifying solvents is demonstrated, whereby a sample is characterised by air-referenced changes in complex frequency. Complex permittivity values are also obtained via a perturbation theory-based inversion. A combination of experimental and simulated results is used to characterise the device behaviour, limits of operation and measurement uncertainty. The high stability of temporal measurements, coupled with the robustness of the design, make this device ideal for analytical chemistry and industrial process control.

  7. Analysis of Chaotic Resonance in Izhikevich Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Nobukawa, Sou; Nishimura, Haruhiko; Yamanishi, Teruya; Liu, Jian-Qin

    2015-01-01

    In stochastic resonance (SR), the presence of noise helps a nonlinear system amplify a weak (sub-threshold) signal. Chaotic resonance (CR) is a phenomenon similar to SR but without stochastic noise, which has been observed in neural systems. However, no study to date has investigated and compared the characteristics and performance of the signal responses of a spiking neural system in some chaotic states in CR. In this paper, we focus on the Izhikevich neuron model, which can reproduce major spike patterns that have been experimentally observed. We examine and classify the chaotic characteristics of this model by using Lyapunov exponents with a saltation matrix and Poincaré section methods in order to address the measurement challenge posed by the state-dependent jump in the resetting process. We found the existence of two distinctive states, a chaotic state involving primarily turbulent movement and an intermittent chaotic state. In order to assess the signal responses of CR in these classified states, we introduced an extended Izhikevich neuron model by considering weak periodic signals, and defined the cycle histogram of neuron spikes as well as the corresponding mutual correlation and information. Through computer simulations, we confirmed that both chaotic states in CR can sensitively respond to weak signals. Moreover, we found that the intermittent chaotic state exhibited a prompter response than the chaotic state with primarily turbulent movement. PMID:26422140

  8. Multipacting Analysis for the Half-Wave Spoke Resonator Crab Cavity for LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Lixin; Li, Zenghai; /SLAC

    2011-06-23

    A compact 400-MHz half-wave spoke resonator (HWSR) superconducting crab cavity is being developed for the LHC upgrade. The cavity shape and the LOM/HOM couplers for such a design have been optimized to meet the space and beam dynamics requirements, and satisfactory RF parameters have been obtained. As it is known that multipacting is an issue of concern in a superconducting cavity which may limit the achievable gradient. Thus it is important in the cavity RF design to eliminate the potential MP conditions to save time and cost of cavity development. In this paper, we present the multipacting analysis for the HWSR crab cavity using the Track3P code developed at SLAC, and to discuss means to mitigate potential multipacting barriers. Track3P was used to analyze potential MP in the cavity and the LOM, HOM and FPC couplers. No resonances were found in the LOM couplers and the coaxial beam pipe. Resonant trajectories were identified on various locations in cavity, HOM and FPC couplers. Most of the resonances are not at the peak SEY of Nb. Run-away resonances were identified in broader areas on the cavity end plate and in the HOM coupler. The enhancement counter for run-away resonances does not show significant MP. HOM coupler geometry will be optimized to minimize the high SEY resonance.

  9. Analysis of light propagation in slotted resonator based systems via coupled-mode theory.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Kirankumar R; Niegemann, Jens; Busch, Kurt

    2011-04-25

    Optical devices with a slot configuration offer the distinct feature of strong electric field confinement in a low refractive index region and are, therefore, of considerable interest in many applications. In this work we investigate light propagation in a waveguide-resonator system where the resonators consist of slotted ring cavities. Owing to the presence of curved material interfaces and the vastly different length scales associated with the sub-wavelength sized slots and the waveguide-resonator coupling regions on the one hand, and the spatial extent of the ring on the other hand, this prototypical system provides significant challenges to both direct numerical solvers and semi-analytical approaches. We address these difficulties by modeling the slot resonators via a frequency-domain spatial Coupled-Mode Theory (CMT) approach, and compare its results with a Discontinuous Galerkin Time-Domain (DGTD) solver that is equipped with curvilinear finite elements. In particular, the CMT model is built on the underlying physical properties of the slotted resonators, and turns out to be quite efficient for analyzing the device characteristics. We also discuss the advantages and limitations of the CMT approach by comparing the results with the numerically exact solutions obtained by the DGTD solver. Besides providing considerable physical insight, the CMT model thus forms a convenient basis for the efficient analysis of more complex systems with slotted resonators such as entire arrays of waveguide-coupled resonators and systems with strongly nonlinear optical properties. PMID:21643116

  10. A Census of Baryons in Galaxy Clusters and Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2007-09-01

    We determine the contribution of stars in galaxies, intracluster stars, and the intracluster medium to the total baryon budget in nearby galaxy clusters and groups. We find that the baryon mass fraction (fb≡Ωb/Ωm) within r500 is constant for systems with M500 between 6×1013 and 1×1015 Msolar. Although fb is lower than the WMAP value, the shortfall is on the order of both the observational systematic uncertainties and the depletion of baryons within r500 that is predicted by simulations. The data therefore provide no compelling evidence for undetected baryonic components, particularly any that would be expected to vary in importance with cluster mass. A unique feature of the current analysis is direct inclusion of the contribution of intracluster light (ICL) in the baryon budget. With the addition of the ICL to the stellar mass in galaxies, the increase in X-ray gas mass fraction with increasing total mass is entirely accounted for by a decrease in the total stellar mass fraction, supporting the argument that the behavior of both the stellar and X-ray gas components is dominated by a decrease in star formation efficiency in more massive environments. Within just the stellar component, the fraction of the total stellar luminosity in the central, giant brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) and ICL (hereafter the BCG+ICL component) decreases as velocity dispersion (σ) increases for systems with 145 km s-1<=σ<=1026 km s-1, suggesting that the BCG+ICL component, and in particular the dominant ICL component, grows less efficiently in higher mass environments. The degree to which this behavior arises from our sample selection, which favored systems with central, giant elliptical galaxies, remains unclear. A more robust result is the identification of low-mass groups with large BCG+ICL components, demonstrating that the creation of ``intracluster'' stars does not require a massive cluster environment. Within r500 and r200, the BCG+ICL contributes on average 40% and 33% of

  11. Characteristic analysis of a polarization output coupling Porro prism resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hailong; Meng, Junqing; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-02-01

    An Electro-optical Q-switched Nd:YAG slab laser with a crossed misalignment Porro prism resonator for space applications has been theoretically and experimentally investigated. The phase shift induced by the combination of different wave plates and Porro prism azimuth angles have been studied for creating high loss condition prior to Q-switching. The relationship of the effective output coupling reflectivity and the employed Q-switch driving voltage is explored by using Jones matrix optics. In the experiment, the maximum output pulse energy of 93 mJ with 14-ns pulse duration is obtained at the repetition rate of 20 Hz and the optical-to-optical conversion efficiency is 16.8%. The beam quality factors are M 2 x = 2.5 and M 2y = 2.2, respectively.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis and molecular properties of berberine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Ju; Lee, Ken S.; Hurley, Sharon J.

    An extensive theoretical study of berberine has been performed at the ab initio HF/6-31G**, HF/6-311G**, and B3LYP/6-311G** levels with and without solvent effects. The optimized structures are compared with X-ray data. We found that the optimized structures with solvent effects are in slightly better agreement with X-ray data than those without solvent effects. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of berberine were calculated by using the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) (with and without solvent effects), CSGT, and IGAIM methods. The calculated chemical shifts were compared with the two-dimensional NMR experimental data. Overall, the calculated chemical shifts show very good agreement with the experimental results. The harmonic vibrational frequencies for berberine were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G** level.

  13. Radar target classification by natural resonances: System analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Peter C.

    1990-09-01

    This thesis examines the system implementation considerations of a resonance based radar target classification system. The basis of the system is the aspect and excitation independent property of electromagnetic scattering from a conducting body. Such a system consists of two components: pole extraction and annihilation filtering. The algorithms investigated here for these purposes are the Cadzow-Solomon pole extraction algorithm and the K-Pulse annihilation filter. Additionally, an aspect-dependent annihilation filter based on an inverse autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model is introduced. The procedures are applied to noise polluted synthetic data, as well as scattering data collected for a thin-wire and silver coated 1/72 scale model aircraft.

  14. Heavy Baryons in a Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Winston Roberts; Muslema Pervin

    2007-11-14

    A quark model is applied to the spectrum of baryons containing heavy quarks. The model gives masses for the known heavy baryons that are in agreement with experiment, but for the doubly-charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}$, the model prediction is too heavy. Mixing between the $\\Xi_Q$ and $\\Xi_Q^\\prime$ states is examined and is found to be small for the lowest lying states. In contrast with this, mixing between the $\\Xi_{bc}$ and $\\Xi_{bc}^\\prime$ states is found to be large, and the implication of this mixing for properties of these states is briefly discussed. We also examine heavy-quark spin-symmetry multiplets, and find that many states in the model can be placed in such multiplets.

  15. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6) x O(3) symmetry. Various energy splittings between the extracted states, including splittings due to hyperfine as well as spin-orbit coupling, are considered and those are also compared against similar energy splittings at other quark masses.

  16. Baryon Spectroscopy and Operator Construction in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    S. Basak; I. Sato; S. Wallace; R. Edwards; D. Richards; R. Fiebig; G. Fleming; U. Heller; C. Morningstar

    2004-07-01

    This talk describes progress at understanding the properties of the nucleon and its excitations from lattice QCD. I begin with a review of recent lattice results for the lowest-lying states of the excited baryon spectrum. The need to approach physical values of the light quark masses is emphasized, enabling the effects of the pion cloud to be revealed. I then outline the development of techniques that will enable the extraction of the masses of the higher resonances. I will describe how such calculations provide insight into the structure of the hadrons, and enable comparison both with experiment, and with QCD-inspired pictures of hadron structure, such as calculations in the limit of large N{sub c}.

  17. Hand-held resonance sensor for tissue stiffness measurements—a theoretical and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalkanen, Ville

    2010-05-01

    A piezoelectric transducer in a feedback circuit operating in a resonance state is the basis of a resonance sensor. Upon contact with a soft object a change in the resonance frequency reflects the acoustic impedance. Together with force measurement it is possible to obtain the elastic stiffness of the object. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concept of a hand-held resonance sensor for tissue stiffness measurement. A time derivative analysis of the force and the frequency change showed that a stiffness-sensitive parameter was independent of the impression speed. Soft tissue phantoms of gelatin were used in an experimental validation of the theory. A force indentation method was used as a reference method for assessing the gelatin's elastic stiffness. Results from the hand-held measurements showed that the stiffness parameter accurately measured the elastic stiffness of the gelatin (R2 = 0.94, p < 0.05). The stiffness parameter was weakly (on average R2 = 0.15) and non-significantly (p > 0.05, 14 out of 17) dependent on an impression speed parameter. On average, a small amount of the total variance was explained by the impression speed. In conclusion, soft tissue stiffness can be objectively measured with free-hand measurement with a resonance sensor. This study contributes a theoretical analysis and an experimental demonstration of the concept of a hand-held resonance sensor for stiffness measurements.

  18. A measurement of the b baryon lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Mours, B.; Alemany, R.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Pacheco, A.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Lou, J.; Qiao, C.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Atwood, W. B.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Bossi, F.; Boudreau, J.; Burnett, T. H.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lançon, E.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Mattison, T.; Meinhard, H.; Menary, S.; Meyer, T.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Roth, A.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Bencheikh, A. M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Stimpfl, G.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rosowsky, A.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Wasserbaech, S.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Altoon, B.; Boyle, O.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geiges, R.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Nash, J.; Patton, S. J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J.-J.; Benchouk, C.; Bernard, V.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Qian, Z.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cowan, G.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Takashima, M.; Thomas, J.; Wolf, G.; Bertin, V.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, X.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Abbaneo, D.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Ligabue, F.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Kozanecki, W.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Loucatos, S.; Monnier, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R. E.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hatfield, F.; Reeves, P.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Mirabito, L.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Ganis, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jared, R. C.; Leclaire, B. W.; Lishka, C.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Sharma, V.; Schmitt, M.; Shi, Z. H.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Whitney, M. H.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1992-12-01

    In 451 000 hadronic Z 0 decays, recorded with the ALEPH detector at LEP, the yields of Λℓ - and Λℓ + combinations are measured. Semileptonic decays of b baryons result in a signal of 122± 18 (stat.) -23+22 (syst.) Λℓ - combinations. From a fit to the impact parameter distributions of the leptons in the Λℓ - sample, the lifetime of b baryons is measured to be 1.12 -0.29+0.32 (stat.) ±0.16 (syst.) ps.

  19. Observational tests of Baryon symmetric cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Observational evidence for Baryon symmetric (matter/antimatter) cosmology and future observational tests are reviewed. The most significant consequences of Baryon symmetric cosmology lie in the prediction of an observable cosmic background of gamma radiation from the decay of pi(0)-mesons produced in nucleon-antinucleon annihilations. Equations for the prediction of the amma ray background spectrum for the case of high redshifts are presented. The theoretical and observational plots of the background spectrum are shown to be in good agreement. Measurement of cosmic ray antiprotons and the use of high energy neutrino astronomy to look for antimatter elsewhere in the universe are also addressed.

  20. Baryon Spectroscopy Results at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kooten, R.

    2010-08-05

    The Tevatron at Fermilab continues to collect data at high luminosity resulting in datasets in excess of 6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The high collision energies allow for the observation of new heavy quark baryon states not currently accessible at any other facility. In addition to the ground state Lb, the spectroscopy and properties of the new heavy baryon states {Omega}{sub b}, {Xi}{sub b}, and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)} as measured by the CDF and DOe Collaborations will be presented.

  1. Exciting baryons: Now and in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    This is the final talk of NSTAR2011 conference. It is not a summary talk, but rather a looking forward to what still needs to be done in excited baryon physics. In particular, we need to hone our tools connecting experimental inputs with QCD. At present we rely on models that often have doubtful connections with the underlying theory, and this needs to be dramatically improved, if we are to reach definitive conclusions about the relevant degrees of freedom of excited baryons. Conclusions that we want to have by NSTAR2021.

  2. Orbit-based analysis of resonant excitations of Alfvén waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Bierwage, Andreas; Shinohara, Kouji

    2014-11-15

    The exponential growth phase of fast-ion-driven Alfvénic instabilities is simulated and the resonant wave-particle interactions are analyzed numerically. The simulations are carried out in realistic magnetic geometry and with a realistic particle distribution for a JT-60U plasma driven by negative-ion-based neutral beams. In order to deal with the large magnetic drifts of the fast ions, two new mapping methods are developed and applied. The first mapping yields the radii and pitch angles at the points, where the unperturbed orbit of a particle intersects the mid-plane. These canonical coordinates allow to express analysis results (e.g., drive profiles and resonance widths) in a form that is easy to understand and directly comparable to the radial mode structure. The second mapping yields the structure of the wave field along the particle trajectory. This allows us to unify resonance conditions for trapped and passing particles, determine which harmonics are driven, and which orders of the resonance are involved. This orbit-based resonance analysis (ORA) method is applied to fast-ion-driven instabilities with toroidal mode numbers n = 1-3. After determining the order and width of each resonance, the kinetic compression of resonant particles and the effect of linear resonance overlap are examined. On the basis of the ORA results, implications for the fully nonlinear regime, for the long-time evolution of the system in the presence of a fast ion source, and for the interpretation of experimental observations are discussed.

  3. Analysis and design of a single-resonator GaAs FET oscillator with noise degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galani, Z.; Bianchini, M. J.; Waterman, R. C., Jr.; Dibiase, R.; Laton, R. W.; Cole, J. B.

    1984-12-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a low-noise dielectric resonator GaAs FET oscillator in a frequency-locked loop (FLL), which is used for FM noise degeneration. In this circuit, one resonator serves both as the frequency-determining element of the oscillator and as the dispersive element of the discriminator. The results of the analysis are used to generate design guidelines. These guidelines were followed in an experimental realization of an X-band circuit. The measured FM noise was -120 and -142 dBc/Hz at 10- and 100-kHz offset frequencies, respectively, and corresponded closely to predicted results.

  4. Matrix theory for baryons: an overview of holographic QCD for nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Sinya; Hashimoto, Koji; Iizuka, Norihiro

    2013-10-01

    We provide, for non-experts, a brief overview of holographic QCD (quantum chromodynamics) and a review of the recent proposal (Hashimoto et al 2010 (arXiv:1003.4988[hep-th])) of a matrix-like description of multi-baryon systems in holographic QCD. Based on the matrix model, we derive the baryon interaction at short distances in multi-flavor holographic QCD. We show that there is a very universal repulsive core of inter-baryon forces for a generic number of flavors. This is consistent with a recent lattice QCD analysis for Nf = 2, 3 where the repulsive core looks universal. We also provide a comparison of our results with the lattice QCD and the operator product expansion analysis.

  5. Matrix theory for baryons: an overview of holographic QCD for nuclear physics.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sinya; Hashimoto, Koji; Iizuka, Norihiro

    2013-10-01

    We provide, for non-experts, a brief overview of holographic QCD (quantum chromodynamics) and a review of the recent proposal (Hashimoto et al 2010 (arXiv:1003.4988[hep-th])) of a matrix-like description of multi-baryon systems in holographic QCD. Based on the matrix model, we derive the baryon interaction at short distances in multi-flavor holographic QCD. We show that there is a very universal repulsive core of inter-baryon forces for a generic number of flavors. This is consistent with a recent lattice QCD analysis for Nf = 2, 3 where the repulsive core looks universal. We also provide a comparison of our results with the lattice QCD and the operator product expansion analysis. PMID:24088334

  6. The Thermal Delocalization of the Flux Tubes in Mesons and Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Bakry, Ahmed S.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Williams, Anthony G.

    2011-05-24

    The gluon action density in a static mesonic system is analyzed at finite temperature using lattice QCD techniques in quenched QCD. The obtained results are compared to predictions of bosonic string models for the flux-tube profiles to understand the changes of the flux-tube profiles with temperature. The mesonic flux tube curved-width profile is found to compare well with that of the bosonic string at large distances. In the intermediate distance region, a free bosonic string behaviour is observed for analysis performed on highly UV-filtered gauge configurations. Extending the analysis to the static baryon reveals a delocalization of the baryonic node in the Y-shape gluonic configuration observed at zero temperature. At finite temperature, a filled delta-shaped configuration is observed, even at large distances. We study a baryonic string model at finite temperature.

  7. Surface plasmon resonance sensor based on spectral interferometry: numerical analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfang; Li, Hui; Duan, Jingyuan; Shi, Ancun; Liu, Yuliang

    2013-05-10

    In this paper, we introduce a numerical simulation of a phase detecting surface plasmon resonance (SPR) scheme based on spectral interference. Based on the simulation, we propose a method to optimize various aspects of SPR sensors, which enables better performance in both measurement range (MR) and sensitivity. In the simulation, four parameters including the spectrum of the broadband light source, incident angle, Au film thickness, and refractive index of the prism coupler are analyzed. The results show that it is a good solution for better performance to use a warm white broadband (625-800 nm) light source, a divergence angle of the collimated incident light less than 0.02°, and an optimized 48 nm thick Au film when a visible broadband light source is used. If a near-IR light source is used, however, the Au film thickness should be somewhat thinner according the specific spectrum. In addition, a wider MR could be obtained if a prism coupler with higher refractive index is used. With all the parameters appropriately set, the SPR MR could be extended to 0.55 refractive index units while keeping the sensitivity at a level of 10(-8). PMID:23669838

  8. Analysis of thickness modes of contoured doubly rotated, quartz resonators.

    PubMed

    EerNisse, E P

    2001-09-01

    It is the intent of this work to provide a working resource for calculating all three mode families of a doubly rotated, contoured quartz resonator. It is shown that the theoretical development of Stevens and Tiersten [1] can be used for this purpose. Their approach uses a transformation of the mechanical displacement vector to the eigenvector triad of the pure thickness solution. The solution methodology here reorganizes the transformation matrix Q in their formulation to calculate the other two mode families. Calculations compare well with experimental results for the three mode families of an SC-cut crystal and an FC-cut crystal and with published calculations for the SBTC-cut mode family with major displacement along the x3 blank axis. The key constants for the SC-cut are presented for workers to use in the future. In addition, the equations of motion and boundary conditions are derived for the two additional mode families using assumptions parallel to those used by Stevens and Tiersten [1]. Calculations with these equations are presented for completeness to support the present conclusions by showing the equivalence of either simply reorganizing the Q matrix or using separate equations for each of the three mode families. PMID:11570760

  9. Accurate Analysis and Computer Aided Design of Microstrip Dual Mode Resonators and Filters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grounds, Preston Whitfield, III

    1995-01-01

    Microstrip structures are of interest due to their many applications in microwave circuit design. Their small size and ease of connection to both passive and active components make them well suited for use in systems where size and space is at a premium. These include satellite communication systems, radar systems, satellite navigation systems, cellular phones and many others. In general, space is always a premium for any mobile system. Microstrip resonators find particular application in oscillators and filters. In typical filters each microstrip patch corresponds to one resonator. However, when dual mode patches are employed, each patch acts as two resonators and therefore reduces the amount of space required to build the filter. This dissertation focuses on the accurate electromagnetic analysis of the components of planar dual mode filters. Highly accurate analyses are required so that the resonator to resonator coupling and the resonator to input/output can be predicted with precision. Hence, filters can be built with a minimum of design iterations and tuning. The analysis used herein is an integral equation formulation in the spectral domain. The analysis is done in the spectral domain since the Green's function can be derived in closed form, and the spatial domain convolution becomes a simple product. The resulting set of equations is solved using the Method of Moments with Galerkin's procedure. The electromagnetic analysis is applied to range of problems including unloaded dual mode patches, dual mode patches coupled to microstrip feedlines, and complete filter structures. At each step calculated results are compared to measured results and good agreement is found. The calculated results are also compared to results from the circuit analysis program HP EESOF^{ rm TM} and again good agreement is found. A dual mode elliptic filter is built and good performance is obtained.

  10. Observation of an exotic baryon with S=+1 in photoproduction from the proton.

    PubMed

    Kubarovsky, V; Guo, L; Weygand, D P; Stoler, P; Battaglieri, M; DeVita, R; Adams, G; Li, Ji; Nozar, M; Salgado, C; Ambrozewicz, P; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Audit, G; Auger, T; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cetina, C; Chen, S; Ciciani, L; Cole, P L; Connelly, J; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Dharmawardane, K V; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Farhi, L; Fatemi, R; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Forest, T A; Frolov, V; Funsten, H; Gaff, S J; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girard, P; Gothe, R; Gordon, C I O; Griffioen, K; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hancock, D; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Heimberg, P; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Ilieva, Y; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kelley, J H; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kuhn, S E; Kuhn, J; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Longhi, A; Lukashin, K; Major, R W; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; McAleer, S; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Mozer, M U; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Nelson, S O; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; O'Brien, J T; O'Rielly, G V; Opper, A K; Osipenko, M; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Sabourov, K; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Sargsyan, M; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Shafi, A; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, T; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Spraker, M; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weisberg, A; Whisnant, C S; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2004-01-23

    The reaction gamma p-->pi(+)K(-)K(+)n was studied at Jefferson Laboratory using a tagged photon beam with an energy range of 3-5.47 GeV. A narrow baryon state with strangeness S=+1 and mass M=1555+/-10 MeV/c(2) was observed in the nK(+) invariant mass spectrum. The peak's width is consistent with the CLAS resolution (FWHM=26 MeV/c(2)), and its statistical significance is (7.8+/-1.0)sigma. A baryon with positive strangeness has exotic structure and cannot be described in the framework of the naive constituent quark model. The mass of the observed state is consistent with the mass predicted by the chiral soliton model for the Theta(+) baryon. In addition, the pK(+) invariant mass distribution was analyzed in the reaction gamma p-->K(-)K(+)p with high statistics in search of doubly charged exotic baryon states. No resonance structures were found in this spectrum. PMID:14753864

  11. Observation of an Exotic Baryon with S=+1 in Photoproduction from the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Valery Kubarovsky; Lei Guo; Dennis Weygand; Paul Stoler; Marco Battaglieri; Raffaella De Vita; Gary Adams; Ji Li; Mina Nozar; Carlos Salgado; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Eric Anciant; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; Gerard Audit; Thierry Auger; Harutyun AVAKIAN; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Jacques Ball; Steve Barrow

    2004-01-01

    The reaction {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +} K{sup -} K{sup +}n was studied at Jefferson Lab using a tagged photon beam with an energy range of 3-5.47 GeV. A narrow baryon state with strangeness S = +1 and mass M = 1555 {+-} 10 MeV/c{sup 2} was observed in the nK{sup +} invariant mass spectrum. The peak's width is consistent with the CLAS resolution (FWHM = 26 MeV/c{sup 2}), and its statistical significance is 7.8 {+-} 1.0 {sigma}. A baryon with positive strangeness has exotic structure and cannot be described in the framework of the naive constituent quark model. The mass of the observed state is consistent with the mass predicted by a chiral soliton model for the {Theta}{sup +} baryon. In addition, the pK{sup +} invariant mass distribution was analyzed in the reaction {gamma} p {yields} K{sup -} K{sup +}p with high statistics in search of doubly-charged exotic baryon states. No resonance structures were found in this spectrum.

  12. Electroweak interactions and dark baryons in the sextet BSM model with a composite Higgs particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Zoltan; Holland, Kieran; Kuti, Julius; Mondal, Santanu; Nogradi, Daniel; Wong, Chik Him

    2016-07-01

    The electroweak interactions of a strongly coupled gauge theory are discussed with an outlook beyond the Standard Model (BSM) under global and gauge anomaly constraints. The theory is built on a minimal massless fermion doublet of the SU(2) BSM flavor group (bsm-flavor) with a confining gauge force at the TeV scale in the two-index symmetric (sextet) representation of the BSM SU(3) color gauge group (bsm-color). The intriguing possibility of near-conformal sextet gauge dynamics could lead to the minimal realization of the composite Higgs mechanism with a light 0++ scalar, far separated from strongly coupled resonances of the confining gauge force in the 2-3 TeV range, distinct from Higgsless technicolor. In previous publications we have presented results for the meson spectrum of the theory, including the light composite scalar, which is perhaps the emergent Higgs impostor. Here we discuss the critically important role of the baryon spectrum in the sextet model investigating its compatibility with what we know about thermal evolution of the early Universe including its galactic and terrestrial relics. For an important application, we report the first numerical results on the baryon spectrum of this theory from nonperturbative lattice simulations with baryon correlators in the staggered fermion implementation of the strongly coupled gauge sector. The quantum numbers of composite baryons and their spectroscopy from lattice simulations are required inputs for exploring dark matter contributions of the sextet BSM model, as outlined for future work.

  13. Dirac form factors and electric charge radii of baryons in the combined chiral and 1 /Nc expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Mendieta, Rubén; Rivera-Ruiz, Mayra Alejandra

    2015-11-01

    The baryon Dirac form factor is computed at one-loop order in large-Nc baryon chiral perturbation theory, where Nc is the number of color charges. Loop graphs with octet and decuplet intermediate states are systematically incorporated into the analysis and the effects of the decuplet-octet mass difference are accounted for. There are large-Nc cancellations between different one-loop graphs as a consequence of the large-Nc spin-flavor symmetry of QCD baryons. As a byproduct, the mean-square charge radius is also computed through a detailed numerical analysis. The predictions of large-Nc baryon chiral perturbation theory are in very good agreement both with the expectations from the 1 /Nc expansion and with the experimental data.

  14. Negative-parity {Lambda}{sub Q} baryons in the baryon-meson continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Sachiko; Takizawa, Makoto; Shimizu, Kiyotaka

    2011-10-21

    The negative-parity charmed baryons are investigated by employing the quark model as well as the effective baryon meson model with a bound state embedded in the continuum. Especially the mass difference between the J{sup P} 1/2{sup -} and 3/2{sup -}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryons is discussed. The observed value of this mass splitting is almost the same as that of {Xi}{sub c}, about 30 MeV. It is found that most of this splitting can be reproduced by assuming a simple qqQ configuration. The coupling to the baryon-meson scattering state may enlarge the splitting as it does for the {Lambda}(1405)(1/2{sup -}) and {Lambda}(1520)(3/2{sup -}) case. We investigate this coupling effect and find that with an appropriately modified coupling or the pole energy, the peak can be reproduced.

  15. Probing internal structure of {Lambda}(1405) in meson-baryon dynamics with chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sekihara, Takayasu; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke

    2011-10-21

    The internal structure of the resonant {Lambda}(1405) state is investigated based on meson-baryon coupled-channels chiral dynamics, by evaluating density distributions obtained from the form factors of the {Lambda}(1405) state. The form factors are extracted from current-coupled scattering amplitudes in which the current is coupled to the constituent hadrons inside {Lambda}(1405). Using several probe interactions and channel decomposition, we find that the resonant {Lambda}(1405) state is dominantly composed of widely spread K-bar around N, with a small fraction of the escaping {pi}{Sigma} component.

  16. Weak radiative baryonic decays of B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2004-11-01

    Weak radiative baryonic B decays B{yields}B{sub 1}B{sub 2}-bar{gamma} are studied under the assumption of the short-distance b{yields}s{gamma} electromagnetic penguin transition dominance. The relations among the decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  17. Beauty baryon decays: a theoretical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ming

    2014-11-01

    I overview the theoretical status and recent progress on the calculations of beauty baryon decays focusing on the QCD aspects of the exclusive semi-leptonic Λb → plμ decay at large recoil and theoretical challenges of radiative and electro-weak penguin decays Λb → Λγ,Λl+l-.

  18. The baryonic self similarity of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alard, C.

    2014-06-20

    The cosmological simulations indicates that dark matter halos have specific self-similar properties. However, the halo similarity is affected by the baryonic feedback. By using momentum-driven winds as a model to represent the baryon feedback, an equilibrium condition is derived which directly implies the emergence of a new type of similarity. The new self-similar solution has constant acceleration at a reference radius for both dark matter and baryons. This model receives strong support from the observations of galaxies. The new self-similar properties imply that the total acceleration at larger distances is scale-free, the transition between the dark matter and baryons dominated regime occurs at a constant acceleration, and the maximum amplitude of the velocity curve at larger distances is proportional to M {sup 1/4}. These results demonstrate that this self-similar model is consistent with the basics of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) phenomenology. In agreement with the observations, the coincidence between the self-similar model and MOND breaks at the scale of clusters of galaxies. Some numerical experiments show that the behavior of the density near the origin is closely approximated by a Einasto profile.

  19. On the nature of the baryon asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Whether the baryon asymmetry in the universe is a locally varying or universally fixed number is examined with focus on the existence of a possible matter antimatter domain structure in the universe arising from a GUT with spontaneous CP symmetry breaking. Theoretical considerations and observational data and astrophysical tests relating to this fundamental question are reviewed.

  20. Electromagnetic production of hyperon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    K. Hicks, D. Keller, W. Tang

    2011-10-01

    The study of hyperon resonances has entered a new era of precision with advent of high-statistics photoproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. These data have multi-particle final states, allowing clean identification of exclusive reactions associated with strange mesons and baryons. Examples of physics results are: evidence for isospin interference in the decay of the {Lambda}(1405) resonance; a strong suggestion of meson cloud effects in the structure of the {Sigma}(1385) resonance; data from K* photoproduction that will test the existence of the purported K{sub 0}(800)$ meson. Properties of other hyperon resonances will also be studied in the near future.

  1. Hyperon Resonance Photoproduction at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    K. Hicks, D. Keller, W. Tang

    2011-02-01

    The study of hyperon resonances has entered a new era of precision with advent of high-statistics photoproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jeffersonnext term Lab. These data have multi-particle final states, allowing clean identification of exclusive reactions associated with strange mesons and baryons. Examples of physics results are: evidence for isospin interference in the decay of the Λ(1405) resonance; a strong suggestion of meson cloud effects in the structure of the Sigma (1385) resonance; data from Klow asterisk photoproduction that will test the existence of the purported K0(800) meson. Properties of other hyperon resonances will also be studied in the near future.

  2. Electromagnetic production of hyperon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, K.; Keller, D.; Tang, W.

    2011-10-24

    The study of hyperon resonances has entered a new era of precision with advent of high-statistics photoproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. These data have multi-particle final states, allowing clean identification of exclusive reactions associated with strange mesons and baryons. Examples of physics results are: evidence for isospin interference in the decay of the {Lambda}(1405) resonance; a strong suggestion of meson cloud effects in the structure of the {Sigma}(1385) resonance; data from K* photoproduction that will test the existence of the purported K{sub 0}(800) meson. Properties of other hyperon resonances will also be studied in the near future.

  3. Neutron Capture and Transmission Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Samarium

    SciTech Connect

    G. Leinweber; J.A. Burke; H.D. Knox; N.J. Drindak; D.W. Mesh; W.T. Haines; R.V. Ballad; R.C. Block; R.E. Slovacek; C.J. Werner; M.J. Trbovich; D.P. Barry; T. Sato

    2001-07-16

    The purpose of the present work is to accurately measure the neutron cross sections of samarium. The most significant isotope is {sup 149}Sm, which has a large neutron absorption cross section at thermal energies and is a {sup 235}U fission product with a 1% yield. Its cross sections are thus of concern to reactor neutronics. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic institute (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Sm samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25 meter flight station with a multiplicity-type capture detector, and the transmission total cross-section measurements were performed at 15- and 25-meter flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. Resonance parameters were determined by a combined analysis of six experiments (three capture and three transmission) using the multi-level R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M2. The significant features of this work are as follows. Dilute samples of samarium nitrate in deuterated water (D{sub 2}O) were prepared to measure the strong resonances at 0.1 and 8 eV without saturation. Disk-shaped spectroscopic quartz cells were obtained with parallel inner surfaces to provide a uniform thickness of solution. The diluent feature of the SAMMY program was used to analyze these data. The SAMMY program also includes multiple scattering corrections to capture yield data and resolution functions specific to the RPI facility. Resonance parameters for all stable isotopes of samarium were deduced for all resonances up to 30 eV. Thermal capture cross-section and capture resonance integral calculations were made using the resultant resonance parameters and were compared to results obtained using resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 3. Extending the definition of the capture resonance integral to include the strong 0.1 eV resonance in {sup 149}Sm, present measurements agree within estimated

  4. Observation of an Excited Charm Baryon Ωc* Decaying to Ωc0γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Barrett, M.; Ford, K. E.; Hart, A. J.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Watson, A. T.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Burke, J. P.; Cottingham, W. N.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dvoretskii, A.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Brandt, T.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Bard, D. J.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Ziegler, V.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Oyanguren, A.; Pruvot, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, K. A.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Menges, W.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; Naisbit, M. T.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Chen, C.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lae, C. K.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Kim, H.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Therin, G.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Wagoner, D. E.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Legendre, M.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Berger, N.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Halyo, V.; Hast, C.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; van Bakel, N.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Ricca, G. Della; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Pappagallo, M.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2006-12-01

    We report the first observation of an excited singly charmed baryon Ωc* (css) in the radiative decay Ωc0γ, where the Ωc0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Ω-π+, Ω-π+π0, Ω-π+π-π+, and Ξ-K-π+π+. This analysis is performed using a data set of 230.7fb-1 collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the Ωc* and the Ωc0 baryons is measured to be 70.8±1.0(stat)±1.1(syst)MeV/c2. We also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of Ωc* and Ωc0 in e+e- annihilation.

  5. Observation of an excited charm baryon Omega c* decaying to Omega c0gamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Bard, D J; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-12-01

    We report the first observation of an excited singly charmed baryon Omega c* (css) in the radiative decay Omega c0gamma, where the Omega c0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Omega(-)pi+, Omega(-)pi+pi0, Omega(-)pi+pi(-)pi+, and Xi(-)K(-)pi+pi+. This analysis is performed using a data set of 230.7 fb(-1) collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the Omega c* and the Omega c0 baryons is measured to be 70.8+/-1.0(stat)+/-1.1(syst) MeV/c2. We also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of Omega c* and Omega c0 in e+e(-) annihilation. PMID:17280195

  6. On the consistency of recent QCD lattice data of the baryon ground-state masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, M. F. M.; Semke, A.

    2012-11-01

    In our recent analysis of lattice data of the BMW, LHPC and PACS-CS groups we determined a parameter set of the chiral Lagrangian that allows a simultaneous description of the baryon octet and decuplet masses as measured by those lattice groups. The results on the baryon spectrum of the HSC group were recovered accurately without their inclusion into our six parameter fit. We show that the same parameter set provides an accurate reproduction of the recent results of the QCDSF-UKQCD group probing the baryon masses at quite different quark masses. This shows a remarkable consistency amongst the different lattice simulations. With even more accurate lattice data in the near future it will become feasible to determine all low-energy parameters relevant at N3LO.

  7. Multiquark baryons and color screening at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoroku, Kazuo; Ishihara, Masafumi; Nakamura, Akihiro; Toyoda, Fumihiko

    2009-03-15

    We study baryons in SU(N) gauge theories at finite temperature according to the gauge/string correspondence based on IIB string theory. The baryon is constructed out of the D5-brane and N fundamental strings to form a color singlet N-quark bound state. At finite temperature and in the deconfining phase, we could find k(baryons. Thermal properties of such k-quark baryons and also of the N-quark baryon are examined. We study the temperature dependence of color screening distance and the Debye length of the baryon of the k quark and the N quark. We also estimate the melting temperature, where the baryons decay into quarks and gluons completely.

  8. Lambda Baryon a Production in 91 GEV Positron - Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routenburg, Paul

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of Lambda + | Lambda production in the data collected with the OPAL detector during 1990 is presented. A total inclusive rate is determined and checked through detailed systematic studies. This rate is found to be 0.356 +/- 0.011 (stat.) +/- 0.028 (syst.) per multihadron event. The inclusive cross sections as a function of the fractional Lambda energy (x _{E}) and xi (xi = ln(1/x_{p }), where x_{p} is the fractional Lambda momentum) are determined and compared to the predictions of the HERWIG 5.0 and JETSET 7.2 Monte Carlos as tuned to agree with global event shapes at an average centre-of-mass energy of 91 GeV. The overall Lambda rate is in agreement with the JETSET prediction but less than that predicted by HERWIG. The fragmentation function observed is softer than predicted by either Monte Carlo. Scaling violations are observed in the x_{E } distribution compared to the observations between 29 and 35 GeV. This is attributed to increased gluon radiation. A study is then made of the Lambda decay length distribution, and of the production and decay angles. Reasonable agreement is found between the data and the expectations. There is some indication that the Lambda rate increases faster with event sphericity than does the charged multiplicity. This effect is thought to be due to increased baryon production in gluon fragmentation. Finally, an investigation into Lambda - | Lambda, Lambda - Lambda and | Lambda - | Lambda production in the same event is presented. The results support local baryon number conservation and agree with the JETSET prediction. It is also shown that an additional meson is produced between the baryon and the antibaryon a significant fraction of the time.

  9. Resonance parameters based analysis for metallic thickness optimization of a bimetallic plasmonic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Mahua; Banerjee, Jayeta; Ray, Mina

    2014-02-01

    Metallic film thickness optimization in mono- and bimetallic plasmonic structures has been carried out in order to determine the correct device parameters. Different resonance parameters, such as reflectivity, phase, field enhancement, and the complex amplitude reflectance Argand diagram (CARAD), have been investigated for the proposed optimization procedure. Comparison of mono- and bimetallic plasmonic structures has been carried out in the context of these resonance parameters with simultaneous angular and spectral interrogation. Differential phase analysis has also been performed and its application to sensing has been discussed along with a proposed interferometric set-up.

  10. Neutron Capture and Transmission Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Samarium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Burke, J.A.; Knox, H.D.; Drindak, N.J.; Mesh, D.W.; Haines, W.T.; Ballad, R.V.; Block, R.C.; Slovacek, R.E.; Werner, C.J.; Trbovich, M.J.; Barry, D.P.; Sato, T.

    2002-09-15

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of samarium accurately. The most significant isotope is {sup 149}Sm, which has a large neutron absorption cross section at thermal energies and is a {sup 235}U fission product with a 1% yield. Its cross sections are thus of concern to reactor neutronics.Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Sm samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a multiplicity-type capture detector, and the transmission total cross-section measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. Resonance parameters were determined by a combined analysis of six experiments (three capture and three transmission) using the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M2.The significant features of this work are as follows. Dilute samples of samarium nitrate in deuterated water (D{sub 2}O) were prepared to measure the strong resonances at 0.1 and 8 eV without saturation. Disk-shaped spectroscopic quartz cells were obtained with parallel inner surfaces to provide a uniform thickness of solution. The diluent feature of the SAMMY program was used to analyze these data. The SAMMY program also includes multiple-scattering corrections to capture yield data and resolution functions specific to the RPI facility.Resonance parameters for all stable isotopes of samarium were deduced for all resonances up to 30 eV. Thermal capture cross-section and capture resonance integral (RI) calculations were made using the resultant resonance parameters and were compared to results obtained using resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 3. Extending the definition of the capture RI to include the strong 0.1-eV resonance in {sup 149}Sm, present measurements agree within estimated uncertainties with ENDF

  11. Extended-soft-core baryon-baryon model. II. Hyperon-nucleon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, Th. A.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-04-01

    The YN results are presented from the extended soft-core (ESC) interactions. They consist of local and nonlocal potentials because of (i) one-boson exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of pseudoscalar, vector, scalar, and axial mesons; (ii) diffractive exchanges; (iii) two-pseudoscalar exchange; and (iv) meson-pair exchange (MPE). Both the OBE and pair vertices are regulated by Gaussian form factors producing potentials with a soft behavior near the origin. The assignment of the cutoff masses for the baryon-baryon-meson (BBM) vertices is dependent on the SU(3) classification of the exchanged mesons for OBE and a similar scheme for MPE. The particular version of the ESC model, called ESC04 [T. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 73, 044007 (2006)], describes nucleon-nucleon (NN) and hyperon-nucleon (YN) interactions in a unified way using broken SU(3) symmetry. Novel ingredients are the inclusion of (i) the axial-vector meson potentials and (ii) a zero in the scalar- and axial-vector meson form factors. These innovations made it possible for the first time to keep the parameters of the model close to the predictions of the 3P0 quark-antiquark creation model. This is also the case for the F/(F+D) ratios. Furthermore, the introduction of the zero helped to avoid the occurrence of unwanted bound states. Broken SU(3) symmetry serves to connect the NN and the YN channels, which leaves after fitting NN only a few free parameters for the determination of the YN interactions. In particular, the meson-baryon coupling constants are calculated via SU(3) using the coupling constants of the NN analysis as input. Here, as a novel feature, medium-strong flavor-symmetry breaking (FSB) of the coupling constants was allowed, using the 3P0 model with a Gell-Mann-Okubo hypercharge breaking for the BBM coupling. Very good fits for ESC model with and without FSB were obtained. The charge-symmetry breaking in the Λp and Λn channels, which is an SU(2) isospin breaking, is included in the

  12. Extended-soft-core baryon-baryon model. II. Hyperon-nucleon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rijken, Th.A.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-04-15

    The YN results are presented from the extended soft-core (ESC) interactions. They consist of local and nonlocal potentials because of (i) one-boson exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of pseudoscalar, vector, scalar, and axial mesons; (ii) diffractive exchanges; (iii) two-pseudoscalar exchange; and (iv) meson-pair exchange (MPE). Both the OBE and pair vertices are regulated by Gaussian form factors producing potentials with a soft behavior near the origin. The assignment of the cutoff masses for the baryon-baryon-meson (BBM) vertices is dependent on the SU(3) classification of the exchanged mesons for OBE and a similar scheme for MPE. The particular version of the ESC model, called ESC04 [T. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 73, 044007 (2006)], describes nucleon-nucleon (NN) and hyperon-nucleon (YN) interactions in a unified way using broken SU(3) symmetry. Novel ingredients are the inclusion of (i) the axial-vector meson potentials and (ii) a zero in the scalar- and axial-vector meson form factors. These innovations made it possible for the first time to keep the parameters of the model close to the predictions of the {sup 3}P{sub 0} quark-antiquark creation model. This is also the case for the F/(F+D) ratios. Furthermore, the introduction of the zero helped to avoid the occurrence of unwanted bound states. Broken SU(3) symmetry serves to connect the NN and the YN channels, which leaves after fitting NN only a few free parameters for the determination of the YN interactions. In particular, the meson-baryon coupling constants are calculated via SU(3) using the coupling constants of the NN analysis as input. Here, as a novel feature, medium-strong flavor-symmetry breaking (FSB) of the coupling constants was allowed, using the {sup 3}P{sub 0} model with a Gell-Mann-Okubo hypercharge breaking for the BBM coupling. Very good fits for ESC model with and without FSB were obtained. The charge-symmetry breaking in the {lambda}p and {lambda}n channels, which is an SU(2

  13. Predicting flaw-induced resonance spectrum shift with theoretical perturbation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, C.; Sun, X.

    2013-10-01

    Resonance inspection is an emerging non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique used by the automotive casting industry which uses the resonance spectra differences between the good part population and the flawed parts to identify anomalous parts. It was previously established that finite-element (FE)-based modal analysis can be used to predict the resonance spectrum for an engineering scale part with relatively good accuracy. However, FE-based simulations can be time consuming in examining the spectrum shifts induced by all possible structural flaws. This paper aims at developing a computationally efficient perturbation technique to quantify the frequency shifts induced by small structural flaws, based on the FE simulated resonance spectrum for the perfect part. A generic automotive connecting rod is used as the example part for our study. The results demonstrate that the linear perturbation theory provides a very promising way in predicting frequency changes induced by small structural flaws. As the flaw size increases, the discrepancy between the perturbation analysis and the actual FE simulation results increases due to nonlinearity, yet the perturbation analysis is still able to predict the right trend in frequency shift.

  14. Predicting Flaw-Induced Resonance Spectrum Shift with Theoretical Perturbation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Canhai; Sun, Xin

    2013-10-28

    Resonance inspection is an emerging non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique which uses the resonance spectra differences between the good part population and the flawed parts to identify anomalous parts. It was previously established that finite-element (FE)-based modal analysis can be used to predict the resonance spectrum for an engineering scale part with relatively good accuracy. However, FE-based simulations can be time consuming in examining the spectrum shifts induced by all possible structural flaws. This paper aims at developing a computationally efficient perturbation technique to quantify the frequency shifts induced by small structural flaws, based on the FE simulated resonance spectrum for the perfect part. A generic automotive connecting rod is used as the example part for our study. The results demonstrate that the linear perturbation theory provides a very promising way in predicting frequency changes induced by small structural flaws. As the flaw size increases, the discrepancy between the perturbation analysis and the actual FE simulation results increases due to nonlinearity, yet the perturbation analysis is still able to predict the right trend in frequency shift.

  15. Resonance cone diagnostics of ionospheric plasma: A refined analysis of COREX data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, A.; Rohde, V.; Thiemann, H.; Oyama, K. I.

    1991-11-01

    A refined analysis of COREX data which invokes the signal attenuation is presented. The COREX resonance cone instrument was part of a coordinated rocket payload for investigating the E region temperature anomaly in the mid-latitude ionosphere. The conventional method of deriving electron density and temperature from the resonance cone's main maximum and interference spacing had given satisfactory agreement of COREX data with independent instruments at E region altitudes. However, in the F layer, a large overshoot in electron density was observed which represents the well known density limit of this method. It is shown that this density limit can be circumvented by analyzing resonance cone amplitudes, and that close agreement is established in the F layer. Moreover, amplitude asymmetries are found to be consistent with electron drift related angular shifts, which hint at an anomalously high electron circulation in the rocket's environment. The influence of collisional damping in the lower E layer is discussed in terms of amplitude ratios.

  16. Finite element analysis of cylinder shell resonator and design of intelligent density meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    W, Sui X.; M, Fan Y.; X, Zhang G.; R, Qiu Z.

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of the mathematical model and finite element analysis of the cylinder shell resonator, a novel resonant liquid density meter is designed. The meter consists of a cylinder shell resonator fixed on both ends, a measurement circuit with automatic gain control and automatic phase control, and a signal processing system with microcomputer unit C8051F021. The density meter is insensitive to the liquid pressure, and it can intelligently compensate for the temperature. The experiment results show the meter characteristic coefficients of K0, K1, and K2 at 25 centigrade are -129.5668 kg m-3, -0.2535 × 106 kg m-3 s-1 and 0.6239 × 1010 kg m-3 s-2, respectively. The accuracy of the sensor is ±0.1% in range of 700-900 kg m-3

  17. Real-time analysis of mechanical and electrical resonances with open-source sound card software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makan, G.; Kopasz, K.; Gingl, Z.

    2014-01-01

    We present an easily reproducible, open-source, sound card based experimental set-up to support transfer function measurement. Our system is able to visualize the signals of mechanical and electrical resonances and their spectra in real time. We give a brief description of the system, and show some examples of electrical and mechanical resonance experiments that are supported by the system. The theoretical background, experimental set-up, component selection and digital signal processing are all discussed, and more detailed information (building instructions, software download) is provided on a dedicated web page (www.noise.inf.u-szeged.hu/edudev/RealTimeAnalysisOfResonances/). The experimental set-up can support the undergraduate and graduate education of students of physics, physics education and engineering by means of experimental demonstrations and laboratory exercises. The very low cost, high efficiency and transparent system provides a scalable experimental environment that can be easily built in several instances.

  18. Ab initio analysis of frequency selective surfaces based on conventional and complementary split ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marqués, R.; Baena, J. D.; Beruete, M.; Falcone, F.; Lopetegi, T.; Sorolla, M.; Martín, F.; Garcia, J.

    2005-02-01

    Frequency selective surfaces (FSSs) made up of periodic arrays of split ring resonators (SRRs) are analysed. This analysis includes complementary screens, or complementary SRR-FSSs (CSRR-FSSs). It is shown that these FSSs show a dual behaviour, with a stop/pass band behaviour at the frequency of resonance of the SRRs/CSRRs. Cross-polarization effects in the SRR and the CSRR are considered, and it is shown that they permit resonance to occur for normally incident plane wave excitation. This latter property of SRRs and CSRRs also implies that the FSSs considered may act as polarizers and polarization converters as well. An analytical theory, valid for perfectly conducting and infinitely thin screens, is proposed for the SRR-FSSs and CSRR-FSSs. These approximations are valid in the microwave and millimetre-wave range, and up to the terahertz range.

  19. Coupled-channel analysis of K{lambda} production in the nucleon resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Shklyar, V.; Lenske, H.; Mosel, U.

    2005-07-01

    A unitary coupled-channel effective Lagrangian model is applied to the combined analysis of the ({pi},{gamma})N{yields}K{lambda} reactions in the energy region up to 2 GeV. To constrain the resonance couplings to the K{lambda} final state the recent photoproduction data obtained by the SAPHIR, Spring-8, and CLAS groups are included in the calculations. The main resonance contributions to the process stem from the S{sub 11}(1650),P{sub 13}(1720), and P{sub 13}(1900) states. The second peak at 1.9 GeV seen in the photoproduction cross-section data is described as a coherent sum of the resonance and background contributions. The prediction for the beam polarization observable is presented.

  20. Magnetic resonance analysis of malignant transformation in recurrent glioma

    PubMed Central

    Jalbert, Llewellyn E.; Neill, Evan; Phillips, Joanna J.; Lupo, Janine M.; Olson, Marram P.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) have a relatively long survival, and a balance is often struck between treating the tumor and impacting quality of life. While lesions may remain stable for many years, they may also undergo malignant transformation (MT) at the time of recurrence and require more aggressive intervention. Here we report on a state-of-the-art multiparametric MRI study of patients with recurrent LGG. Methods One hundred and eleven patients previously diagnosed with LGG were scanned at either 1.5 T or 3 T MR at the time of recurrence. Volumetric and intensity parameters were estimated from anatomic, diffusion, perfusion, and metabolic MR data. Direct comparisons of histopathological markers from image-guided tissue samples with metrics derived from the corresponding locations on the in vivo images were made. A bioinformatics approach was applied to visualize and interpret these results, which included imaging heatmaps and network analysis. Multivariate linear-regression modeling was utilized for predicting transformation. Results Many advanced imaging parameters were found to be significantly different for patients with tumors that had undergone MT versus those that had not. Imaging metrics calculated at the tissue sample locations highlighted the distinct biological significance of the imaging and the heterogeneity present in recurrent LGG, while multivariate modeling yielded a 76.04% accuracy in predicting MT. Conclusions The acquisition and quantitative analysis of such multiparametric MR data may ultimately allow for improved clinical assessment and treatment stratification for patients with recurrent LGG. PMID:26911151

  1. Black-hole quasinormal resonances: Wave analysis versus a geometric-optics approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2009-09-01

    It has long been known that null unstable geodesics are related to the characteristic modes of black holes—the so-called quasinormal resonances. The basic idea is to interpret the free oscillations of a black hole in the eikonal limit in terms of null particles trapped at the unstable circular orbit and slowly leaking out. The real part of the complex quasinormal resonances is related to the angular velocity at the unstable null geodesic. The imaginary part of the resonances is related to the instability time scale (or the inverse Lyapunov exponent) of the orbit. While this geometric-optics description of the black-hole quasinormal resonances in terms of perturbed null rays is very appealing and intuitive, it is still highly important to verify the validity of this approach by directly analyzing the Teukolsky wave equation which governs the dynamics of perturbation waves in the black-hole spacetime. This is the main goal of the present paper. We first use the geometric-optics technique of perturbing a bundle of unstable null rays to calculate the resonances of near-extremal Kerr black holes in the eikonal approximation. We then directly solve the Teukolsky wave equation (supplemented by the appropriate physical boundary conditions) and show that the resultant quasinormal spectrum obtained directly from the wave analysis is in accord with the spectrum obtained from the geometric-optics approximation of perturbed null rays.

  2. 2-pi Photoproduction from CLAS and CB-ELSA - The Search for Missing Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrike Thoma

    2003-10-01

    2-pi-photoproduction is one of the promising reactions to search for baryon resonances that have been predicted but have not yet been observed. The gamma-rho --> rho-pi{sup 0}-pi{sup 0}(CB-ELSA) and the gamma-rho --> rho-pi{sup +}-pi{sup -} (CLAS) data show interesting resonance structures. A partial wave analysis (PWA) has to be done to determine which baryon resonances contribute what their quantum numbers and their relative couplings to the different accessible rho-2-pi-channels and to the photon are. First preliminary PWA-results on the lowest energy rho-pi{sup 0}-pi{sup 0} data (sq rt s<1.8 GeV)look very promising. From an extension of this analysis to higher energies combining the rho-pi{sup 0}-pi{sup 0} and the rho-pi{sup +}-pi{sup -}-data, one can expect; interesting results on resonances decaying into Delta-pi, N-rho, N(pi-pi)s, N*-pi, and Delta*-pi.

  3. Strategies for detecting the missing hot baryons in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Alves, Guilherme Camargo; Miller, Matthew J.; Hodges-Kluck, Edmund

    2015-10-01

    About 30% to 50% of the baryons in the local universe are unaccounted for and are likely in a hot phase, 105.5 to 108 K. A hot halo (106.3 K) is detected around the Milky Way through the O VII and O VIII resonance absorption and emission lines in the soft x-ray band. Current instruments are not sensitive enough to detect this gas in absorption around other galaxies and galaxy groups, the two most likely sites. We show that resonant line absorption by this hot gas can be detected with current technology, with a collecting area exceeding ˜300 cm2 and a spectral resolution R>2000. For a few notional x-ray telescope configurations that could be constructed as Explorer or Probe missions, we calculate the differential number of O VII and O VIII absorbers as a function of equivalent width through redshift space, dN/dz. The hot halos of individual external galaxies produce absorption that should be detectable out to about their virial radii. For the Milky Way, one can determine the radial distribution of density, temperature, and metallicity after making optical depth corrections. Spectroscopic observations can determine the rotation of a hot gaseous halo.

  4. A Study of Excited Charm-Strange Baryons withEvidence for new Baryons Xi_c(3055)+ and Xi_c(3123)+

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The BABAR; Aubert, B.

    2007-10-30

    We present a study of excited charm-strange baryon states produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at or near a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV, in a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 384 fb{sup -1} recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e storage rings at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We study strong decays of charm-strange baryons to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. This study confirms the existence of the states {Xi}{sub c}(2980){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup +}, and {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup -}, with a more accurate determination of the {Xi}{sub c}(2980){sup +} mass and width. We also present evidence for two new states, {Xi}{sub c}(3055){sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}(3123){sup +}, decaying through the intermediate resonant modes {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}K{sup -} and {Sigma}{sub c}(2520){sup ++}K{sup -}, respectively. For each of these baryons, we measure the yield in each final state, determine the statistical significance, and calculate the product of the production cross-section and branching fractions. We also measure the masses and widths of these excited charm-strange baryons.

  5. A deterministic and statistical energy analysis of tyre cavity resonance noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Zamri; Wang, Xu

    2016-03-01

    Tyre cavity resonance was studied using a combination of deterministic analysis and statistical energy analysis where its deterministic part was implemented using the impedance compact mobility matrix method and its statistical part was done by the statistical energy analysis method. While the impedance compact mobility matrix method can offer a deterministic solution to the cavity pressure response and the compliant wall vibration velocity response in the low frequency range, the statistical energy analysis method can offer a statistical solution of the responses in the high frequency range. In the mid frequency range, a combination of the statistical energy analysis and deterministic analysis methods can identify system coupling characteristics. Both methods have been compared to those from commercial softwares in order to validate the results. The combined analysis result has been verified by the measurement result from a tyre-cavity physical model. The analysis method developed in this study can be applied to other similar toroidal shape structural-acoustic systems.

  6. THE BARYON CENSUS IN A MULTIPHASE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM: 30% OF THE BARYONS MAY STILL BE MISSING

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, J. Michael; Danforth, Charles W.; Smith, Britton D. E-mail: smit1685@msu.edu

    2012-11-01

    Although galaxies, groups, and clusters contain {approx}10% of the baryons, many more reside in the photoionized and shocked-heated intergalactic medium (IGM) and in the circumgalactic medium (CGM). We update the baryon census in the (H I) Ly{alpha} forest and warm-hot IGM (WHIM) at 10{sup 5-6} K traced by O VI {lambda}1032, 1038 absorption. From Enzo cosmological simulations of heating, cooling, and metal transport, we improve the H I and O VI baryon surveys using spatially averaged corrections for metallicity (Z/Z {sub Sun }) and ionization fractions (f {sub HI}, f {sub OVI}). Statistically, the O VI correction product correlates with column density, (Z/Z {sub Sun })f {sub OVI} Almost-Equal-To (0.015)(N {sub OVI}/10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}){sup 0.70}, with an N {sub OVI}-weighted mean of 0.01, which doubles previous estimates of WHIM baryon content. We also update the Ly{alpha} forest contribution to baryon density out to z = 0.4, correcting for the (1 + z){sup 3} increase in absorber density, the (1 + z){sup 4.4} rise in photoionizing background, and cosmological proper length dl/dz. We find substantial baryon fractions in the photoionized Ly{alpha} forest (28% {+-} 11%) and WHIM traced by O VI and broad-Ly{alpha} absorbers (25% {+-} 8%). The collapsed phase (galaxies, groups, clusters, CGM) contains 18% {+-} 4%, leaving an apparent baryon shortfall of 29% {+-} 13%. Our simulations suggest that {approx}15% reside in hotter WHIM (T {>=} 10{sup 6} K). Additional baryons could be detected in weaker Ly{alpha} and O VI absorbers. Further progress requires higher-precision baryon surveys of weak absorbers, down to minimum column densities N {sub HI} {>=} 10{sup 12.0} cm{sup -2}, N {sub OVI} {>=} 10{sup 12.5} cm{sup -2}, N {sub OVII} {>=} 10{sup 14.5} cm{sup -2}, using high signal-to-noise data from high-resolution UV and X-ray spectrographs.

  7. An Unquenched Quark Model of Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Bijker, Roelof; Santopinto, Elena

    2007-10-26

    We present the formalism for a new generation of unquenched quark models for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, quark-antiquark creation mechanism. The present approach is an extension of the fiux-tube breaking model of Geiger and Isgur in which now the contribution of quark-antiquark pairs can be studied for any inital baryon, for any fiavor of the qq-bar pair (not only ss-bar but also uu-bar and dd-bar) and for arbitrary hadron wave functions. The method is illustrated with an application to the spin of the proton and the flavor asymmetry of the nucleon sea.

  8. Two Baryons with Twisted Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Briceno, Raul; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas; Savage, Martin

    2014-04-01

    The quantization condition for two particle systems with arbitrary number of two-body open coupled-channels, spin and masses in a finite cubic volume is presented. The condition presented is in agreement with all previous studies of two-body systems in a finite volume. The result is fully relativistic and holds for all momenta below inelastic thresholds and is exact up to exponential volume corrections that are governed by m{sub {pi}} L, where m{sub {pi}} is the pion mass and L is the spatial extent of my box. Its implication for the studies of coupled-channel baryon-baryon systems is discussed, and the necessary tools for implementing the formalism are review.

  9. The Missing Baryons Around Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel

    2013-10-01

    Dwarf galaxies are missing nearly all of their baryons, which have presumably flowed away as a wind. This mass loss accounts for a significant fraction of all baryons lost from galaxies, so there is great interest in determining the size and scope of the gas lost. This gas is not visible in emission but is detectable through absorption features toward background AGNs. Here we propose to observe the absorbing material around three isolated dwarfs on the periphery of the Local Group: Sextans A, Sextans B, and NGC 3109. Unlike more distant dwarfs, the star formation history and cold gaseous content of these galaxies are well-studied. The isolation of these dwarfs, far from large galaxies, means that they have not yet interacted with other systems so their mass loss history is well-preserved, making them ideal targets for study.

  10. Observational tests of baryon symmetric cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1983-01-01

    Observational evidence for Baryon symmetric (matter/antimatter) cosmology and future observational tests are reviewed. The most significant consequences of Baryon symmetric cosmology lie in the prediction of an observable cosmic background of gamma radiation from the decay of Pi(O)-mesons produced in nucleon-antinucleon annihilations. Equations for the prediction of the gamma ray background spectrum for the case of high redshifts are presented. The theoretical and observational plots of the background spectrum are shown to be in good agreement. Measurements of cosmic ray antiprotons and the use of high energy neutrino astronomy to look for antimatter elsewhere in the universe are also addressed. Previously announced in STAR as N83-10996

  11. Resonances in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Matthias F. M.; Lange, Jens Sören; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B.; Metag, Volker; Nakano, Takashi; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015. A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions: What is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD? Where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers? What experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus. This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  12. Analysis and experimental realization of locally resonant phononic plates carrying a periodic array of beam-like resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yong; Wen, Jihong; Huang, Lingzhi; Wen, Xisen

    2014-01-01

    We present theoretical examination and experimental demonstration of locally resonant (LR) phononic plates consisting of a periodic array of beam-like resonators attached to a thin homogeneous plate. Such phononic plates feature unique wave physics due to the coexistence of localized resonance and structural periodicity. We demonstrate that a low-frequency complete band gap for flexural plate waves can be created in the proposed structure owing to the interaction between the localized resonant modes of the beam-like resonators and the flexural wave modes of the host plate. We show that the location and width of the complete band gap can be dramatically tuned by changing the properties of the beam-like resonators. To understand the opening mechanism and evolution behaviour of the complete band gap, some approximate but explicit models are provided and discussed. We further perform experimental measurements of a specimen fabricated by an array of double-stacked aluminum beam-like resonators attached to a thin aluminum plate with 5 cm structure periodicity. The experimental results evidence a complete band gap extending from 465 to 860 Hz, matching well with our theoretical prediction. The LR phononic plates proposed in this work can find potential applications in attenuation of low-frequency mechanical vibrations and insulation of low-frequency audible sound.

  13. Analysis of photonic crystal double heterostructure resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, Adam

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals represent a versatile technology platform for constructing photonic integrated circuits. Low-loss and small footprint waveguides and cavities can be combined to make delay lines, modulators, filters and lasers for efficient optical signal processing. However, this diverse functionality comes at the expense of higher complexity in both the fabrication and themodeling of these devices. This Thesis discusses the finite-difference time-domain numerical modeling of large quality factor photonic crystal cavities for chip-scale laser applications. In Chapter 2 the role of the quality factor in estimating laser threshold is derived starting from Maxwell's equations. Expressions for modal loss and gain are derived. Chapter 3 discusses methods for extracting the quality factor from finite-difference time-domain simulations. Even with large-scale parallel computing, only a short record of the time evolution of the fields can be recorded. To get around this issue, Pade functions are fitted to the available data in the frequency domain. Once the analysis tools have been described and demonstrated, they are applied to the photonic crystal double heterostructure cavity which has been shown to have quality factors in excess of one million and mode volumes on the order of a cubic wavelength. A detailed description of the spectral and modal properties of heterostructure cavities is presented, and a method for mode discrimination is discussed. The effect of heat sinking dielectric lower substrates on the optical loss of the heterostructure cavity is investigated, and it is seen that the quality factor is significantly reduced as the index of the lower substrate is increased. A modified heterostructure cavity with glide plane symmetry is shown to have significantly reduced out-of-plane leakage. An optimized design is proposed for continuous wave edge-emitting laser operation. Finally, a novel approach for laser simulation is introduced in which a

  14. Relativistic spin effects in the baryon spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Garcilazo, Humberto

    2005-04-01

    We study the nonstrange baryon spectrum within a three-body theory that treats relativistically both the space and the spin variables. The relativistic effects of the spin are about one order of magnitude smaller than those due to the use of relativistic momentum variables. The relativistic treatment of the spin breaks the degenerancy that is present in the nonrelativistic model and in the model with only relativistic momentum variables.

  15. Recent results on baryon production at PETRA

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    One of the recent excitements at PETRA is the observation of the copious production of baryons. About a year ago, TASSO observed the inclusive production of protons and antiprotons. More recently JADE confirmed the inclusive antiproton spectrum to about 1 GeV/c and also observed the inclusive anti ..lambda.. spectrum to about 1.4 GeV/c, while TASSO obtained the ..lambda.. and anti-..lambda.. spectrum all the way up 10 GeV/c in momentum.

  16. Understanding the baryon and meson spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2013-10-01

    A brief overview is given of what we know of the baryon and meson spectra, with a focus on what are the key internal degrees of freedom and how these relate to strong coupling QCD. The challenges, experimental, theoretical and phenomenological, for the future are outlined, with particular reference to a program at Jefferson Lab to extract hadronic states in which glue unambiguously contributes to their quantum numbers.

  17. Baryon currents in QCD with compact dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lucini, B.; Patella, A.; Pica, C.

    2007-06-15

    On a compact space with nontrivial cycles, for sufficiently small values of the radii of the compact dimensions, SU(N) gauge theories coupled with fermions in the fundamental representation spontaneously break charge conjugation, time reversal, and parity. We show at one loop in perturbation theory that a physical signature for this phenomenon is a nonzero baryonic current wrapping around the compact directions. The persistence of this current beyond the perturbative regime is checked by lattice simulations.

  18. Kinematics of Baryons Cycling Through Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Nikole M.

    2015-01-01

    In a modern view of galaxy evolution, the baryon cycle is key to understanding the observed global properties of galaxies. Red galaxies passively evolve due to quenching of their star formation, whereas blue galaxies actively evolve, presumably due to a replenishing gas supply. Signatures of the baryon cycle such as IGM accretion, minor mergers, and stellar-driven outflows and fountains are best probed in gaseous halos, i.e., the circumgalactic medium (CGM). We study the spatial and kinematic distribution of the low-ionization metal-enriched CGM with QSO absorption lines for a population of 182 galaxies in the MgII Absorber-Galaxy Catalog (MAGIICAT). We present our findings detailing how the extent and patchiness of the CGM depends on MgII absorption strength, and galaxy luminosity and color. For the first time, we placed the kinematics of 39 MgII absorbers with high-resolution spectra in the context of their host galaxy color, redshift, and orientation. By examining the velocity dispersions of absorbers, we find possible effects of quenching on red galaxies where the velocity dispersions decrease over 2 Gyrs time and are smaller at larger radii. The velocity dispersions for blue galaxies remain constant over time and radius and possibly indicate a sustained flow of baryons feeding star formation. Blue, face-on galaxies probed along the minor axis show the largest velocity dispersions to very high significance. This result provides the strongest direct evidence to date for galactic-scale outflows which, for this orientation, are pointing nearly towards the observer. We discuss how our results place observational constraints on simulations which are just now beginning to accurately model the baryon cycle and its role in galaxy evolution.

  19. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, Jonathan A.; McEwen, Joseph E.; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2016-03-01

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ˜5 ) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation.

  20. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Jonathan A; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-03-25

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ∼5) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation. PMID:27058069

  1. Where Are the ``Missing'' Galactic Baryons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer-Larsen, Jesper

    2006-06-01

    Based on 19 high-resolution N-body/gasdynamical galaxy formation simulations in the ΛCDM cosmology, it is shown that for a galaxy like the Milky Way, in addition to the baryonic mass of the galaxy itself, about 70% extra baryonic mass should reside around the galaxy (inside of the virial radius), chiefly in the form of hot gas. Averaging over the entire field galaxy population, this ``external'' component amounts to 64%-85% of the baryonic mass of the population itself. These results are supported by the recent detection of very extended, soft X-ray emission from the halo of the quiescent, massive disk galaxy NGC 5746. Some of the hot gas may, by thermal instability, have condensed into mainly pressure-supported, warm clouds, similar to the Galactic high-velocity clouds (HVCs). Based on an ultra-high-resolution cosmological test simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy (with a gas particle mass and gravity softening length of only 7.6×103 h-1 Msolar and 83 h-1 pc, respectively), it is argued that the hot gas phase dominates over the warm gas phase, in the halo. Finally, an origin of HVCs as ``leftovers'' from filamentary, ``cold'' accretion events, mainly occurring early in the history of galaxies, is proposed.

  2. Charming Mesons with Baryons and Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura

    2013-11-01

    The properties of charmed mesons in nuclear matter and nuclei are reviewed. Different frameworks are discussed paying a special attention to unitarized coupled-channel approaches which incorporate heavy-quark spin symmetry. Several charmed baryon states with negative parity are generated dynamically by the s-wave interaction between pseudoscalar and vector meson multiplets with 1/2+ and 3/2+ baryons. These states are compared to experimental data. Moreover, the properties of open-charm mesons in matter are analyzed. The in-medium solution accounts for Pauli blocking effects, and for the meson self-energies in a self-consistent manner. The behavior in the nuclear medium of the rich spectrum of dynamically-generated baryon states is studied as well as their influence in the self-energy and, hence, the spectral function of open charm. The possible experimental signatures of the in-medium properties of open charm are finally addressed, such as the formation of charmed nuclei, in connection with the future FAIR facility.

  3. Staggered heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2008-03-01

    Although taste violations significantly affect the results of staggered calculations of pseudoscalar and heavy-light mesonic quantities, those entering staggered calculations of baryonic quantities have not been quantified. Here I develop staggered chiral perturbation theory in the light-quark baryon sector by mapping the Symanzik action into heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. For 2+1 dynamical quark flavors, the masses of flavor-symmetric nucleons are calculated to third order in partially quenched and fully dynamical staggered chiral perturbation theory. To this order the expansion includes the leading chiral logarithms, which come from loops with virtual decuplet-like states, as well as terms of O(mπ3), which come from loops with virtual octet-like states. Taste violations enter through the meson propagators in loops and tree-level terms of O(a2). The pattern of taste symmetry breaking and the resulting degeneracies and mixings are discussed in detail. The resulting chiral forms are appropriate to lattice results obtained with operators already in use and could be used to study the restoration of taste symmetry in the continuum limit. I assume that the fourth root of the fermion determinant can be incorporated in staggered chiral perturbation theory using the replica method.

  4. Search for a narrow baryonic state decaying to p KS0 and p ‾ KS0 in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    A search for a narrow baryonic state in the p KS0 and p ‾ KS0 system has been performed in ep collisions at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 358pb-1 taken in 2003-2007. The search was performed with deep inelastic scattering events at an ep centre-of-mass energy of 318GeV for exchanged photon virtuality, Q2, between 20 and 100GeV2. Contrary to evidence presented for such a state around 1.52 GeV in a previous ZEUS analysis using a sample of 121 pb-1 taken in 1996-2000, no resonance peak was found in the p (p ‾) KS0 invariant-mass distribution in the range 1.45-1.7 GeV. Upper limits on the production cross section are set.

  5. A simple method for the analysis of neutron resonance capture spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Clarijs, Martijn C.; Bom, Victor R.; Eijk, Carel W. E. van

    2009-03-15

    Neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA) is a method used to determine the bulk composition of various kinds of objects and materials. It is based on analyzing direct capture resonance peaks. However, the analysis is complicated by scattering followed by capture effects in the object itself. These effects depend on the object's shape and size. In this paper the new Delft elemental analysis program (DEAP) is presented which can automatically and quickly analyze multiple NRCA spectra in a practical and simple way, yielding the elemental bulk composition of an object, largely independent of its shape and size. The DEAP method is demonstrated with data obtained with a Roman bronze water tap excavated in Nijmegen (The Netherlands). DEAP will also be used in the framework of the Ancient Charm project as data analysis program for neutron resonance capture imaging (NRCI) experiments. NRCI provides three-dimensional visualization and quantification of the internal structure of archaeological objects by performing scanning measurements with narrowly collimated neutron beams on archaeological objects in computed tomography based experimental setups. The large amounts (hundreds to thousands) of spectra produced during a NRCI experiment can automatically and quickly be analyzed by DEAP.

  6. X-ray-spectroscopy analysis of electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, J. P.; Martins, M. C.; Parente, F.; Costa, A. M.; Marques, J. P.; Indelicato, P.

    2010-12-15

    Analysis of x-ray spectra emitted by highly charged ions in an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (ECRIS) may be used as a tool to estimate the charge-state distribution (CSD) in the source plasma. For that purpose, knowledge of the electron energy distribution in the plasma, as well as the most important processes leading to the creation and de-excitation of ionic excited states are needed. In this work we present a method to estimate the ion CSD in an ECRIS through the analysis of the x-ray spectra emitted by the plasma. The method is applied to the analysis of a sulfur ECRIS plasma.

  7. A fully automated trabecular bone structural analysis tool based on T2* -weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kraiger, Markus; Martirosian, Petros; Opriessnig, Peter; Eibofner, Frank; Rempp, Hansjoerg; Hofer, Michael; Schick, Fritz; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2012-03-01

    One major source affecting the precision of bone structure analysis in quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is inter- and intraoperator variability, inherent in delineating and tracing regions of interest along longitudinal studies. In this paper an automated analysis tool, featuring bone marrow segmentation, region of interest generation, and characterization of cancellous bone of articular joints is presented. In evaluation studies conducted at the knee joint the novel analysis tool significantly decreased the standard error of measurement and improved the sensitivity in detecting minor structural changes. It further eliminated the need of time-consuming user interaction, and thereby increasing reproducibility. PMID:21862288

  8. Introduction to theory and analysis of resolved (and unresolved) neutron resonances via SAMMY

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.

    1998-07-01

    Neutron cross-section data are important for two distinct purposes: first, they provide insight into the nature of matter, thus assisting in the understanding of fundamental physics; second, they are needed for practical applications (e.g., for calculating when and how a reactor will become critical, or how much shielding is needed for storage of nuclear materials, and for medical applications). Neutron cross section data in the resolved-resonance region are generally obtained by time-of-flight experiments, which must be carefully analyzed if they are to be properly understood and utilized. In this paper, important features of the analysis process are discussed, with emphasis on the particular technique used in the analysis code SAMMY. Other features of the code are also described; these include such topics as calculation of group cross sections (including covariance matrices), generation and fitting of integral quantities, and extensions into the unresolved-resonance region and higher-energy regions.

  9. Introduction to the Theory and Analysis of Resolved (and Unresolved) Neutron Resonances via SAMMY

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.

    2000-03-13

    Neutron cross-section data are important for two purposes: First, they provide insight into the nature of matter, increasing our understanding of fundamental physics. Second, they are needed for practical applications (e.g., for calculating when and how a reactor will become critical, or how much shielding is needed for storage of nuclear materials, or for medical applications). Neutron cross section data in the resolved-resonance region are generally obtained by time-of-flight experiments, which must be carefully analyzed if they are to be properly understood and utilized. In this report, important features of the analysis process are discussed, with emphasis on the particular techniques used in the analysis code SAMMY. Other features of the code are also described; these include such topics as calculation of group cross sections (including covariance matrices), generation and fitting of integral quantities, and extensions into the unresolved-resonance region and higher-energy regions.

  10. Introduction to the theory and analysis of resolved (and unresolved) neutron resonances via SAMMY

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.

    1998-02-01

    Neutron cross-section data are important for two distinct purposes: First, they provide insight into the nature of matter, thus assisting in the understanding of fundamental physics. Second, they are needed for practical applications (e.g., for calculating when and how a reactor will become critical, or how much shielding is needed for storage of nuclear materials, and for medical applications). Neutron cross section data in the resolved-resonance region are generally obtained by time-of-flight experiments, which must be carefully analyzed if they are to be properly understood and utilized. In this paper, important features of the analysis process are discussed, with emphasis on the particular techniques used in the analysis code SAMMY. Other features of the code are also described; these include such topics as calculation of group cross sections (including covariance matrices), generation and fitting of integral quantities, and extensions into the unresolved-resonance region and higher energy regions.

  11. Whispering-gallery-mode analysis of phase-matched doubly resonant second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumeige, Yannick; Féron, Patrice

    2006-12-01

    We propose a coupled modes analysis of second-harmonic generation in microdisk resonators. We demonstrate that whispering gallery modes can be used to obtain a combination of modal and geometrical quasi-phase-matching (without domain inversion) to obtain efficient conversion in isotropic and nonferroelectric materials such as III-V semiconductor compounds. Finally we use an analytical model to describe the coupling between a bus waveguide and the nonlinear microdisk to achieve an optimization scheme for practical configuration.

  12. [Identification of organic substances by means of spectral methods in forensic toxicological analysis. II. Nuclear magnetic resonance].

    PubMed

    Smysl, B

    1975-05-01

    In opening the paper, the authors present a brief outline of the fundamentals of nuclear magnetic resonance. Using selected cases from practice, they demonstrate the use of nuclear magnetic resonance for the purpose of forensic toxicologic analysis. The method is particularly suitable for identifying unknown organic compounds and for analysing mixtures of substances. PMID:1242821

  13. Effect of slice thickness on brain magnetic resonance image texture analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The accuracy of texture analysis in clinical evaluation of magnetic resonance images depends considerably on imaging arrangements and various image quality parameters. In this paper, we study the effect of slice thickness on brain tissue texture analysis using a statistical approach and classification of T1-weighted images of clinically confirmed multiple sclerosis patients. Methods We averaged the intensities of three consecutive 1-mm slices to simulate 3-mm slices. Two hundred sixty-four texture parameters were calculated for both the original and the averaged slices. Wilcoxon's signed ranks test was used to find differences between the regions of interest representing white matter and multiple sclerosis plaques. Linear and nonlinear discriminant analyses were applied with several separate training and test sets to determine the actual classification accuracy. Results Only moderate differences in distributions of the texture parameter value for 1-mm and simulated 3-mm-thick slices were found. Our study also showed that white matter areas are well separable from multiple sclerosis plaques even if the slice thickness differs between training and test sets. Conclusions Three-millimeter-thick magnetic resonance image slices acquired with a 1.5 T clinical magnetic resonance scanner seem to be sufficient for texture analysis of multiple sclerosis plaques and white matter tissue. PMID:20955567

  14. Magnetic resonance velocity imaging derived pressure differential using control volume analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is hindered by a lack of systemic understanding of the interrelationships between pressures and flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. Control volume analysis provides a fluid physics approach to quantify and relate pressure and flow information. The objective of this study was to use control volume analysis and magnetic resonance velocity imaging to non-invasively estimate pressure differentials in vitro. Method A flow phantom was constructed and water was the experimental fluid. The phantom was connected to a high-resolution differential pressure sensor and a computer controlled pump producing sinusoidal flow. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements were taken and subsequently analyzed to derive pressure differential waveforms using momentum conservation principles. Independent sensor measurements were obtained for comparison. Results Using magnetic resonance data the momentum balance in the phantom was computed. The measured differential pressure force had amplitude of 14.4 dynes (pressure gradient amplitude 0.30 Pa/cm). A 12.5% normalized root mean square deviation between derived and directly measured pressure differential was obtained. These experiments demonstrate one example of the potential utility of control volume analysis and the concepts involved in its application. Conclusions This study validates a non-invasive measurement technique for relating velocity measurements to pressure differential. These methods may be applied to clinical measurements to estimate pressure differentials in vivo which could not be obtained with current clinical sensors. PMID:21414222

  15. Baryons as Fock states of 3,5,... Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Diakonov; Victor Petrov

    2004-09-01

    We present a generating functional producing quark wave functions of all Fock states in the octet, decuplet and antidecuplet baryons in the mean field approximation, both in the rest and infinite momentum frames. In particular, for the usual octet and decuplet baryons we get the SU(6)-symmetric wave functions for their 3-quark component but with specific corrections from relativism and from additional quark-antiquark pairs. For the exotic antidecuplet baryons we obtain the 5-quark wave function.

  16. Electroweak-scale resonant leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Underwood, Thomas E.J.

    2005-12-01

    We study minimal scenarios of resonant leptogenesis near the electroweak phase transition. These models offer a number of testable phenomenological signatures for low-energy experiments and future high-energy colliders. Our study extends previous analyses of the relevant network of Boltzmann equations, consistently taking into account effects from out of equilibrium sphalerons and single lepton flavors. We show that the effects from single lepton flavors become very important in variants of resonant leptogenesis, where the observed baryon asymmetry in the Universe is created by lepton-to-baryon conversion of an individual lepton number, for example, that of the {tau}-lepton. The predictions of such resonant {tau}-leptogenesis models for the final baryon asymmetry are almost independent of the initial lepton-number and heavy neutrino abundances. These models accommodate the current neutrino data and have a number of testable phenomenological implications. They contain electroweak-scale heavy Majorana neutrinos with appreciable couplings to electrons and muons, which can be probed at future e{sup +}e{sup -} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} high-energy colliders. In particular, resonant {tau}-leptogenesis models predict sizable 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay, as well as e- and {mu}-number-violating processes, such as {mu}{yields}e{gamma} and {mu}{yields}e conversion in nuclei, with rates that are within reach of the experiments proposed by the MEG and MECO collaborations.

  17. STOPPING AND BARYON TRANSPORT IN HEAVY ION REACTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    VIDEBAEK, F.

    2005-02-05

    In this report I will give an experimental overview on nuclear stopping in hadron collisions, and relate observations to understanding of baryon transport. Baryon number transport is not only evidenced via net-proton distributions but also by the enhancement of strange baryons near mid-rapidity. Although the focus is on high-energy data obtained from pp and heavy ions from RHIC, relevant data from SPS and ISR will be considered. A discussion how the available data at higher energy relates and gives information on baryon junction, quark-diquark breaking will be made.

  18. R-MATRIX RESONANCE ANALYSIS AND STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE RESONANCE PARAMETERS OF 233U IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY RANGE FROM THERMAL TO 600 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    2001-02-27

    The R-matrix resonance analysis of experimental neutron transmission and cross sections of {sup 233}U, with the Reich-Moore Bayesian code SAMMY, was extended up to the neutron energy of 600 eV by taking advantage of new high resolution neutron transmission and fission cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). The experimental data base is described. In addition to the microscopic data (time-of-flight measurements of transmission and cross sections), some experimental and evaluated integral quantities were included in the data base. Tabulated and graphical comparisons between the experimental data and the SAMMY calculated cross sections are given. The ability of the calculated cross sections to reproduce the effective multiplication factors k{sub eff} for various thermal, intermediate, and fast systems was tested. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters were examined and recommended values of the average s-wave resonance parameters are given.

  19. Energy harvesting using rattleback: Theoretical analysis and simulations of spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Aditya; Singla, Puneet; Karami, M. Amin

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the spin resonance of a rattleback subjected to base oscillations which is able to transduce vibrations into continuous rotary motion and, therefore, is ideal for applications in Energy harvesting and Vibration sensing. The rattleback is a toy with some curious properties. When placed on a surface with reasonable friction, the rattleback has a preferred direction of spin. If rotated anti to it, longitudinal vibrations are set up and spin direction is reversed. In this paper, the dynamics of a rattleback placed on a sinusoidally vibrating platform are simulated. We can expect base vibrations to excite the pitch motion of the rattleback, which, because of the coupling between pitch and spin motion, should cause the rattleback to spin. Results are presented which show that this indeed is the case-the rattleback has a mono-peak spin resonance with respect to base vibrations. The dynamic response of the rattleback was found to be composed of two principal frequencies that appeared in the pitch and rolling motions. One of the frequencies was found to have a large coupling with the spin of the rattleback. Spin resonance was found to occur when the base oscillatory frequency was twice the value of the coupled frequency. A linearized model is developed which can predict the values of the two frequencies accurately and analytical expressions for the same in terms of the parameters of the rattleback have been derived. The analysis, thus, forms an effective and easy method for obtaining the spin resonant frequency of a given rattleback. Novel ideas for applications utilizing the phenomenon of spin resonance, for example, an energy harvester composed of a magnetized rattleback surrounded by ferromagnetic walls and a small scale vibration sensor comprising an array of several magnetized rattlebacks, are included.

  20. Time-domain analysis of resonant acoustic nonlinearity arising from cracks in multilayer ceramic capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ward L.; Kim, Sudook A.; White, Grady S.; Herzberger, Jaemi; Peterson, Kirsten L.; Heyliger, Paul R.

    2016-02-01

    Acoustic nonlinearity of cracked and uncracked multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) was characterized through time-domain analysis of resonant waveforms following tone-burst excitation. A phase-sensitive receiver was employed to measure the phase, relative to a reference sinusoid, of decaying oscillations of a resonant mode near 1 MHz that was excited through ferroelectric coupling within the barium-titanate-based ceramic of the MLCC. Amplitude dependence of the resonant frequency during decay of the oscillations was characterized through measurements of changes in the resonant phase versus time. Waveforms were analyzed by fitting the recorded RF amplitude versus time to a decaying exponential and inserting the parameters of this fit into a second function to fit the time-dependent phase, with amplitude dependence of the resonant frequency incorporated in the second function. The measurements and analyses were performed on unmounted type-1210 MLCCs before and after quenching in ice water from elevated temperatures. This thermal treatment generated surface-breaking cracks in a fraction of the specimens. Measurements of a nonlinear parameter B of the capacitors before quenching were used to set a range corresponding to plus and minus three standard deviations (±3σ) relative to the mean of a Gaussian fit to the distribution of this parameter. 93 % of the values of B determined for heat-treated MLCCs with cracks were outside of this ±3σ range of the as-received MLCCs, while only 10 % of the values of B for heat-treated MLCCs without visible cracks were outside this range. These results indicate that time-domain nonlinear measurements with tone-burst excitation are a promising approach for rapid nondestructive detection of cracks that have no significant initial effect on the electrical characteristics of an MLCC but can evolve into conductive pathways during service and lead to electrical-device failure. They also illustrate the potential of this approach for

  1. Analysis of optical instability in a double-coupler nonlinear fiber ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongpu; Ogusu, Kazuhiko

    1998-12-01

    Instability in a double-coupler nonlinear fiber ring resonator has been investigated by using a linear stability analysis. Numerical results show that although Ikeda instability appears in the positive-branch regions, it hardly interrupts bistable device application since the threshold power for instability is one or two orders of magnitude larger than the switching power for optical bistability. By the transient analysis when an optical pulse with a finite pulse duration is incident, we moreover confirm that period-doubling oscillations, being one of characteristics of Ikeda instability, take place in the unstable state.

  2. Resonance enhanced laser mass spectrometry for process- and environmental-analysis: Applications and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Ralf; Heger, Hans Jörg; Dorfner, Ralph; Boesl, Ulrich; Kettrup, Antonius

    1998-12-01

    Laser induced Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (REMPI TOFMS) is a highly selective as well as sensitive analytical technique, well suited for species selective, on-line monitoring of trace-substances. In this contribution some analytical applications of a mobile REMPI-TOFMS are presented. This includes REMPI-TOMS on-line analysis of coffee roasting gas and waste incineration flue gas as well as headspace measurements of pulp processing lye or rapid analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soil samples via thermal desorption.

  3. Resonance enhanced laser mass spectrometry for process- and environmental-analysis: Applications and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Ralf; Dorfner, Ralph; Kettrup, Antonius; Heger, Hans Joerg; Boesl, Ulrich

    1998-12-16

    Laser induced Resonance-Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (REMPI TOFMS) is a highly selective as well as sensitive analytical technique, well suited for species selective, on-line monitoring of trace-substances. In this contribution some analytical applications of a mobile REMPI-TOFMS are presented. This includes REMPI-TOMS on-line analysis of coffee roasting gas and waste incineration flue gas as well as headspace measurements of pulp processing lye or rapid analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soil samples via thermal desorption.

  4. A three-phase series-parallel resonant converter -- analysis, design, simulation and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, A.K.S.; Zheng, L.

    1995-12-31

    A three-phase dc-to-dc series-parallel resonant converter is proposed and its operating modes for 180{degree} wide gating pulse scheme are explained. A detailed analysis of the converter using constant current model and Fourier series approach is presented. Based on the analysis, design curves are obtained and a design example of 1 kW converter is given. SPICE simulation results for the designed converter and experimental results for a 500 W converter are presented to verify the performance of the proposed converter for varying load conditions. The converter operates in lagging PF mode for the entire load range and requires a narrow variation in switching frequency.

  5. Analysis of antimycin A by reversed-phase liquid chromatography/nuclear magnetic-resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ha, Steven T.K.; Wilkins, Charles L.; Abidi, Sharon L.

    1989-01-01

    A mixture of closely related streptomyces fermentation products, antimycin A, Is separated, and the components are identified by using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with directly linked 400-MHz proton nuclear magnetic resonance detection. Analyses of mixtures of three amino acids, alanine, glycine, and valine, are used to determine optimal measurement conditions. Sensitivity increases of as much as a factor of 3 are achieved, at the expense of some loss in chromatographic resolution, by use of an 80-μL NMR cell, Instead of a smaller 14-μL cell. Analysis of the antimycin A mixture, using the optimal analytical high performance liquid chromatography/nuclear magnetic resonance conditions, reveals it to consist of at least 10 closely related components.

  6. Quantifying charge resonance and multiexciton character in coupled chromophores by charge and spin cumulant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzanov, Anatoliy V.; Casanova, David; Feng, Xintian; Krylov, Anna I.

    2015-06-01

    We extend excited-state structural analysis to quantify the charge-resonance and multi-exciton character in wave functions of weakly interacting chromophores such as molecular dimers. The approach employs charge and spin cumulants which describe inter-fragment electronic correlations in molecular complexes. We introduce indexes corresponding to the weights of local, charge resonance, and biexciton (with different spin structure) configurations that can be computed for general wave functions thus allowing one to quantify the character of doubly excited states. The utility of the approach is illustrated by applications to several small dimers, e.g., He-H2, (H2)2, and (C2H4)2, using full and restricted configuration interaction schemes. In addition, we present calculations for several systems relevant to singlet fission, such as tetracene, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, and 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran dimers.

  7. Quantifying charge resonance and multiexciton character in coupled chromophores by charge and spin cumulant analysis.

    PubMed

    Luzanov, Anatoliy V; Casanova, David; Feng, Xintian; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-06-14

    We extend excited-state structural analysis to quantify the charge-resonance and multi-exciton character in wave functions of weakly interacting chromophores such as molecular dimers. The approach employs charge and spin cumulants which describe inter-fragment electronic correlations in molecular complexes. We introduce indexes corresponding to the weights of local, charge resonance, and biexciton (with different spin structure) configurations that can be computed for general wave functions thus allowing one to quantify the character of doubly excited states. The utility of the approach is illustrated by applications to several small dimers, e.g., He-H2, (H2)2, and (C2H4)2, using full and restricted configuration interaction schemes. In addition, we present calculations for several systems relevant to singlet fission, such as tetracene, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, and 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran dimers. PMID:26071698

  8. A resonance photoionization sputtered neutral mass spectrometry instrument for submicron microarea analysis of ULSI devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shichi, H.; Osabe, S.; Sugaya, M.; Ino, T.; Kakibayashi, H.; Kanehori, K.; Mitsui, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The lateral profile of boron in an actual microdevice was obtained by 3D analysis—using the newly developed resonance photoionization sputtered neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) instrument—with a detection limit of 10 18 atoms/cm 3. The primary ion beam optical system of the instrument uses a Ga liquid metal ion source. The Ga beam diameter was about 30 nm and the ion beam current was about 60 pA. The analysis time to get the profile was about 40 min. Boron was excited by using one ultraviolet photon (249.7 nm) and by one visible photon (563 nm), and then it was ionized by an infrared photon (1064 nm): the so-called three-color resonance ionization. Lateral diffusion profile of boron in the device after chemical vapor deposition (CVD) including heating the wafer was also obtained. These results mean that this SNMS instrument will enable us to easily determine semiconductor processing conditions.

  9. Nuclear quadrupole resonance lineshape analysis for different motional models: Stochastic Liouville approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Earle, K. A.; Mielczarek, A.; Kubica, A.; Milewska, A.; Moscicki, J.

    2011-12-01

    A general theory of lineshapes in nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), based on the stochastic Liouville equation, is presented. The description is valid for arbitrary motional conditions (particularly beyond the valid range of perturbation approaches) and interaction strengths. It can be applied to the computation of NQR spectra for any spin quantum number and for any applied magnetic field. The treatment presented here is an adaptation of the "Swedish slow motion theory," [T. Nilsson and J. Kowalewski, J. Magn. Reson. 146, 345 (2000), 10.1006/jmre.2000.2125] originally formulated for paramagnetic systems, to NQR spectral analysis. The description is formulated for simple (Brownian) diffusion, free diffusion, and jump diffusion models. The two latter models account for molecular cooperativity effects in dense systems (such as liquids of high viscosity or molecular glasses). The sensitivity of NQR slow motion spectra to the mechanism of the motional processes modulating the nuclear quadrupole interaction is discussed.

  10. Analysis of ringing effects due to magnetic core materials in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N. Bouda, N. R. Y.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Hadimani, R. L.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C.; Bulu, I.; Ganesan, K.; Song, Y. Q.

    2015-05-07

    This work presents investigations and detailed analysis of ringing in a non-resonant pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) circuit. Ringing is a commonly observed phenomenon in high power switching circuits. The oscillations described as ringing impede measurements in pulsed NMR systems. It is therefore desirable that those oscillations decay fast. It is often assumed that one of the causes behind ringing is the role of the magnetic core used in the antenna (acting as an inductive load). We will demonstrate that an LRC subcircuit is also set-up due to the inductive load and needs to be considered due to its parasitic effects. It is observed that the parasitics associated with the inductive load become important at certain frequencies. The output response can be related to the response of an under-damped circuit and to the magnetic core material. This research work demonstrates and discusses ways of controlling ringing by considering interrelationships between different contributing factors.

  11. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2004-12-28

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  12. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-12-30

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  13. A neutron resonance capture analysis experimental station at the ISIS spallation source.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Antonino; Gorini, Giuseppe; Festa, Giulia; Reali, Enzo; Grazzi, Francesco; Schooneveld, Erik M

    2010-09-01

    Neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA) is a nuclear technique that is used to determine the elemental composition of materials and artifacts (e.g., bronze objects) of archaeological interest. NRCA experiments are mostly performed at the GELINA facility in Belgium, a pulsed neutron source operating with an electron linear accelerator. Very intense fluxes of epithermal neutrons are also provided by spallation neutron sources, such as the ISIS spallation neutron source in the United Kingdom. In the present study, the suitability of the Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) beam line for NRCA measurements is assessed using a compact (n, γ) resonance detector made of a Yttrium-Aluminum-Perovskite (YAP) scintillation crystal coupled with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout. The measurements provided a qualitative recognition of the composition of the standard sample, a lower limit for the sensitivity for NRCA for almost-in-traces elements, and an estimation of the relative isotopic concentration in the sample. PMID:20828445

  14. Coupled mode theory analysis for circular photonic crystal ring resonator-based add-drop filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Savarimuthu; Nakkeeran, Rangaswamy

    2012-11-01

    A two-dimensional circular photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR)-based add-drop filter (ADF) is designed for ITU-T G.694.2 eight-channel coarse wavelength division multiplexing systems. The resonant wavelength and pass-band width of the ADF are 1491 and 13 nm, respectively. Close to 100% of coupling and dropping efficiencies and a 114.69 quality factor are observed through simulation. Then the coupled mode theory (CMT) analysis of circular PCRR-based ADF is attempted to compare obtained CMT response into simulated finite difference time domain method response. The overall size of the device is much smaller; that is, 11.4×11.4 μm, which is highly suitable for photonic integrated circuits and all optical photonic network applications.

  15. Quantifying charge resonance and multiexciton character in coupled chromophores by charge and spin cumulant analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Luzanov, Anatoliy V.; Casanova, David; Feng, Xintian; Krylov, Anna I.

    2015-06-14

    We extend excited-state structural analysis to quantify the charge-resonance and multi-exciton character in wave functions of weakly interacting chromophores such as molecular dimers. The approach employs charge and spin cumulants which describe inter-fragment electronic correlations in molecular complexes. We introduce indexes corresponding to the weights of local, charge resonance, and biexciton (with different spin structure) configurations that can be computed for general wave functions thus allowing one to quantify the character of doubly excited states. The utility of the approach is illustrated by applications to several small dimers, e.g., He-H{sub 2}, (H{sub 2}){sub 2}, and (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}, using full and restricted configuration interaction schemes. In addition, we present calculations for several systems relevant to singlet fission, such as tetracene, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, and 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran dimers.

  16. Full Polarization Analysis of Resonant Superlattice and Forbidden x-ray Reflections in Magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S.B.; Bland, S.R.; Detlefs, B.; Beale, T.A.W.; Mazzoli, C.; Joly, Y.; Hatton, P.D.; Lorenzo, J.E.; Brabers, V.A.M.

    2009-12-02

    Despite being one of the oldest known magnetic materials, and the classic mixed valence compound, thought to be charge ordered, the structure of magnetite below the Verwey transition is complex and the presence and role of charge order is still being debated. Here, we present resonant x-ray diffraction data at the iron K-edge on forbidden (0, 0, 2n+1){sub C} and superlattice (0, 0, 2n+1/2)C reflections. Full linear polarization analysis of the incident and scattered light was conducted in order to explore the origins of the reflections. Through simulation of the resonant spectra we have confirmed that a degree of charge ordering takes place, while the anisotropic tensor of susceptibility scattering is responsible for the superlattice reflections below the Verwey transition. We also report the surprising result of the conversion of a significant proportion of the scattered light from linear to nonlinear polarization.

  17. B baryons at D-Zero

    SciTech Connect

    Ratoff, Peter Neil; /Lancaster U.

    2009-01-01

    The observation of the b baryons {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} in high energy proton-antiproton collisions in the D-Zero Detector at Fermilab's Tevatron Collider are presented, along with measurements of the masses and production rates of these states. Within the standard model a total of 15 b baryons are predicted (counting quark content only). Taking into consideration intrinsic angular momentum, there are 10 charmless b baryons in J=1/2 and J=3/2 muliplets. These states are unique to hadron colliders since the B factories operate at insufficient energy to produce them, and they are expected to be produced copiously at the Tevatron. There are interesting mass predictions for these states from various theoretical models but the experimental challenge to observe them is very substantial. At the start of Tevatron Run II ({approx}2003) only the {Lambda}{sub b} had been observed (first by the UA1 collaboration in 1991). However, in the past three years at the Tevatron, another four of the predicted J=1/2 states containing just one b quark have been observed. The {Sigma}{sub b}{sup +} (uub) and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup -} (ddb) were recorded by the CDF collaboration in the {Sigma}{sub b} {yields} {pi}{Lambda}{sub c} {pi} ({Lambda}{sub c} {pi}) channel while at D-Zero the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} (bds) and {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} (bss) states were observed. The measurements leading to the identification of the latter two states are the subject of the remainder of this presentation.

  18. The baryon vector current in the combined chiral and 1/Nc expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Goity, Jose L

    2014-12-01

    The baryon vector current is computed at one-loop order in large-Nc baryon chiral perturbation theory, where Nc is the number of colors. Loop graphs with octet and decuplet intermediate states are systematically incorporated into the analysis and the effects of the decuplet-octet mass difference and SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking are accounted for. There are large-Nc cancellations between different one-loop graphs as a consequence of the large-Nc spin-flavor symmetry of QCD baryons. The results are compared against the available experimental data through several fits in order to extract information about the unknown parameters. The large-Nc baryon chiral perturbation theory predictions are in very good agreement both with the expectations from the 1/Nc expansion and with the experimental data. The effect of SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking for the |Delta S|=1 vector current form factors f1(0) results in a reduction by a few percent with respect to the corresponding SU(3) symmetric values.

  19. Quasielastic production of charmed baryons in neutrino-nucleon interaction processes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhizhin, E.D.; Nikitin, Y.P.; Fanchenko, M.S.

    1983-06-01

    The processes of quasielastic production of the charmed baryons ..lambda../sup +//sub c/, ..sigma../sup +//sub c/, and ..sigma../sup + +//sub c/ in neutrino-nucleon reactions are considered. Calculations are made of the differential and total cross sections for two sets of the parameters M/sub V/ and M/sub A/ which determine the form factors of weak transitions of nucleons into charmed baryons. The chosen parameter values make it possible to obtain for the cross sections results which completely span the currently existing range of uncertainties in the theoretical predictions. Attention is drawn to an important kinematic effect which restricts the emission angles of the charmed baryons to the range thetaanalysis is made of the prospects for experimental investigation of the studied processes and extraction from the experimental data of unique information about the structure of charmed baryons.

  20. Pattern of (Multi)strange (Anti)baryon Production and Search for Deconfinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafelski, Johann

    1998-04-01

    We study (multi)strange particle abundances obtained recently in relativistic heavy ion collisions and determine thermal and chemical source parameters(J. Letessier et al., Phys. Lett. B410 (1997) 315--322 hep-ph/9710310 and: Acta Physica Polonica in press, hep- ph/9710340). These are primarily constrained by (multi)strange (anti)baryon relative abundances, which have been measured for Pb--Pb 158 A GeV interactions(I. Kralik, for WA97 collaboration, QM97 Tsukuba, to appear in Nucl. Phys. A) and S-S/W/Pb 200 A GeV interactions(See: proceedings of S'96-Budapest, APH N.S., Heavy Ion Physics 4 (1996) vii--x). We have extended our analysis and have now determined the properties of the particle source using the fitted macro canonical parameters, allowing as required for non-equilibrium dynamics of the locally thermal fireball. We find that in the 158 A GeV Pb--Pb collisions the entropy per baryon, energy per baryon, strangeness per baryon implied by particle spectra are all in the range of values associated commonly with the deconfined QGP phase.

  1. Non-baryonic dark matter in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper is based on lectures given at the IX Mexican School on Gravitation and Mathematical Physics. The lectures (as the paper) were a broad-band review of the current status of non-baryonic dark matter research. I start with a historical overview of the evidences of dark matter existence, then I discuss how dark matter is distributed from small scale to large scale, and I then verge the attention to dark matter nature: dark matter candidates and their detection. I finally discuss some of the limits of the ΛCDM model, with particular emphasis on the small scale problems of the paradigm.

  2. Baryon number violation via Majorana neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue

    2016-06-01

    We propose and investigate a novel, minimal, and experimentally testable framework for baryo- genesis, dubbed dexiogenesis, using baryon number violating effective interactions of right-handed Majorana neutrinos responsible for the seesaw mechanism. The distinct LHC signature of our framework is same-sign top quark final states, possibly originating from displaced vertices. The region of parameters relevant for LHC phenomenology can also yield concomitant signals in nucleon decay experiments. We provide a simple ultraviolet origin for our effective operators, by adding a color-triplet scalar, which could ultimately arise from a grand unified theory.

  3. Synthesis of baryons from unconfined quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dicus, D.A.; Pati, J.C.; Teplitz, V.L.

    1980-02-15

    We calculate, for a number of cases, the cosmic temperature at which primordial quarks condense into baryons, within a field theory of partially confined quarks that enjoys temporary asymptotic freedom. We assume that the mass of a quark in a dense quark-antiquark medium is a monotonic function of the medium: that is, we assume the validity of the so-called ''Archimedes effect.'' We show that, within such models, unbound-quark lifetimes are larger than the age of the universe at the time of the transition.

  4. The Missing Baryons Around Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel

    2013-09-01

    Based on their stellar and cool gas content, galaxies are missing most of their baryons, yet additional gas may lie in a hot multi-million degree halo stretching to the virial radius. Our ROSAT stacking analysis shows that the average galaxy possesses only a modest extended gas halo, but studies of two individual isolated elliptical galaxies indicate that such massive halos exist. To investigate this difference, we propose observations of two ellipticals with specially designed observations that minimize systematic uncertainties. The derived halo masses will show if the gas mass to dark matter ratio is nearly constant of if it varies greatly between galaxies. These gas masses and radial distributions are fundamental quantities, critical in constraining galaxy formation models.

  5. Baryon Antibaryon Photoproduction using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, William; CLAS Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    There is little known about the baryon antibaryon production mechanism. The following reactions were looked at, γp -->pp p , γp -->ppπ- n , and γp -->p p π+ n. For these reactions the photon energies that were selected were from 4.4-5.45 GeV. The data were from the g12 experiment taken with the CLAS detector using a liquid hydrogen target at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This experiment had high statistics, with a luminosity of 68 pb-1. Features of the data such as invariant mass spectra, missing mass spectra, and angular distributions necessary for the analysis will be shown. In addition, a first observation of antineutrons in photoproduction in the missing mass spectra of γp -->ppπ- n will also be shown.

  6. Baryon Antibaryon Photoproduction using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, William; CLAS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    There is little known about the baryon antibaryon photoproduction mechanism. Three reactions, γ p --> pp p , γp --> pp π- n , and γp --> p p π+ n have been investigated for the photon energy range of 4.4-5.45 GeV. The data were from the g12 experiment taken with the CLAS detector using a liquid hydrogen target at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This experiment had high statistics, with an integrated luminosity of 68 pb-1. General features of the data for these three reactions will be shown. In particular, the angular and energy dependence of the antibaryons as well as the preliminary normalized yields will be presented. Also, preliminary partial wave analysis results for the p p system will be discussed.

  7. Baryon Antibaryon Photoproduction using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, William

    2015-04-01

    There is little known about the baryon antibaryon photoproduction mechanism. Three reactions, γp --> pp p , γp --> ppπ- n , and γp --> p p π+ n have been investigated for the photon energy range of 4.4-5.45 GeV. The data were from the g12 experiment taken with the CLAS detector using a liquid hydrogen target at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This experiment had high statistics, with an integrated luminosity of 68 pb-1. General features of the data for these three reactions will be shown. In particular, the angular and energy dependence of the antibaryons as well as the preliminary normalized yields will be presented. Also, preliminary partial wave analysis results for the p p system will be discussed.

  8. Production of the charmed strange baryon. xi. /sub c//sup +/ by neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    We report on the observation of a narrow resonance at a mass of 2450 MeV/c/sup 2/ in the final states ..lambda..K/sup -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup +/ and ..sigma../sup 0/K/sup -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup +/. The mass, width, lifetime, and decay modes support the interpretation of a hadronically produced charm-strange baryon, the ..xi../sub c//sup +/. We present our preliminary measurements of the lifetime, and the ..lambda.., x/sub feynman,/ and p/sub t/ dependence of the state.

  9. Extraction of P11 Resonance from pi-N Data and Its Stability

    SciTech Connect

    S. X. Nakamura, H. Kamano, T.-S. H. Lee, T. Sato

    2011-09-01

    An important question about resonance extraction is how much resonance poles and residues extracted from data depend on a model used for the extraction, and on the precision of data. We address this question with the dynamical coupled-channel (DCC) model developed in Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) at JLab. We focus on the P11 pi-N scattering. We examine the model-dependence of the poles by varying parameters to a large extent within the EBAC-DCC model. We find that two poles associated with the Roper resonance are fairly stable against the variation. We also develop a model with a bare nucleon, thereby examining the stability of the Roper poles against different analytic structure of the P11 amplitude below pi-N threshold. We again find a good stability of the Roper poles.

  10. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam C.; Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Mathur, Nilmani; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  11. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K. Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  12. Design of an active-passive device for human ankle movement during functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Belforte, Guido; Eula, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis has made major strides in recent years, both because of the development of new scanners and owing to magnetic resonance compatible systems that make it possible to stimulate parts of the human body during analysis. The significant gains in our knowledge of the brain that can thus be achieved justify efforts to construct machines with control circuits suitable for this purpose. This paper presents a magnetic resonance compatible mechatronic device with electropneumatic control that can be used to move one or both feet during functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis of the cerebral motor zones. The system is innovative and original. The results obtained at the end of the investigation were good, and demonstrated that the design is feasible. PMID:22888581

  13. Analysis of a single ring resonator with 2×2 90-degree multimode waveguide turning couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, C. L.; Liao, Yen-Hsun

    2016-02-01

    A novel design of a single ring resonator with two low-loss 2×2 90-degree multimode waveguide turning mirror couplers based on a InP structure. The coupling factor of the 2×2 90-degree multimode waveguide turning mirror coupler is inversed for K=0.85 to K=0.15 when one folding is achieved. The 2×2 90-degree turning mirror coupler for K=0.15 is (3/4)Lπ in length. Its length is reduced 3 times than the conventional straight 2×2 multimode waveguide interference coupler (9/4)Lπ in length for K=0.15. The cavity length of the curve waveguide (90-degree arc length) in this ring resonator with two 2×2 90-degree multimode waveguide turning couplers is decreased 1/2 times than with two 2×2 MMI couplers (180-degree arc length). The free spectral range (FSR) is increased 2 times. The output spectral response gets a FSR of 82 GHz for the device and a contrast of 4 dB and FWHM of 0.24 nm for the drop port. The results of numerical analysis calculated by the transfer functions in a single ring resonator are agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Optimized spectral analysis in magnetic resonance spectroscopy for early tumor diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkić, Karen; Belkić, Dževad

    2014-12-01

    Molecular imaging through magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can provide information about key metabolites. Conventional applications of MRS are hampered by data analysis via the fast Fourier transform (FFT). Most MRS studies for cancer detection have relied upon estimations of a mere handful or even a single composite metabolite, e.g. total choline. These have yielded incremental improvements in diagnostic accuracy. In vitro studies reveal richer metabolic information for identifying cancer, particularly in closely-overlapping resonances. Among these are phosphocholine, a marker of malignant transformation. The FFT cannot assess these congested spectral components. This can be done by the fast Pade transform (FPT), an advanced, high-resolution, quantification-equipped method, applied to MRS time signals as encoded from patients with breast cancers and other cancers, with benign pathology and with normal tissue, as illustrated herein for the latter. With realistic noise levels, the FPT accurately computes the metabolite concentrations, including phosphocholine, which completely underlies phosphoethanolamine. In sharp contrast, the FFT produces a rough envelope spectrum with only a few shortened, broadened peaks, and key metabolites altogether absent. The FPT clearly separates true metabolites from spurious resonances. The efficiency and high resolution of the FPT translates into shortened examination time of the patient. These capabilities strongly suggest that by applying the FPT to time signals encoded in vivo from breast cancer and other malignancies, MRS will fulfill its potential to become a clinically- reliable, cost-effective method for early cancer detection.

  15. Baryogenesis from baryon-number-violating scalar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowes, J. P.; Volkas, R. R.

    1997-03-01

    In the following work we consider the possibility of explaining the observed baryon-number asymmetry in the universe from simple baryon-number-violating modifications, involving massive scalar bosons, to the standard model. In these cases baryon-number violation is mediated through a combination of Yukawa and scalar self-coupling interactions. Starting with a previously compiled catalogue of baryon-number-violating extensions of the standard model, we identify the minimal subsets which can induce a B-L asymmetry and thus be immune to sphaleron washout. For each of these models, we identify the region of parameter space that leads to the production of a baryon number asymmetry of the correct order of magnitude.

  16. Octet Baryon Electromagnetic Form Factors in a Relativistic Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gilberto Ramalho, Kazuo Tsushima

    2011-09-01

    We study the octet baryon electromagnetic properties by applying the covariant spectator quark model, and provide covariant parametrization that can be used to study baryon electromagnetic reactions. While we use the lattice QCD data in the large pion mass regime (small pion cloud effects) to determine the parameters of the model in the valence quark sector, we use the nucleon physical and octet baryon magnetic moment data to parameterize the pion cloud contributions. The valence quark contributions for the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors are estimated by extrapolating the lattice parametrization in the large pion mass regime to the physical regime. As for the pion cloud contributions, we parameterize them in a covariant, phenomenological manner, combined with SU(3) symmetry. We also discuss the impact of the pion cloud effects on the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors and their radii.

  17. Quantitative analysis of (styrene/acrylonitrile/methyl methacrylate) co-polymer systems by infrared resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.; Jiang, Tao; Fengqi, Liu; Ding, C.; Darwish, Abdalla M.

    2002-02-01

    A detailed careful analysis of the infrared resonance (IR) spectra of polystyrene (PSt), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and their co-mixtures were performed. Through this study the absorption peak area to weight ratios as well as working curves were obtained to test for their reliability as well as their suitability. Satisfactory results were achieved and these working curves were then used to measure the polymerized components of binary and ternary co-polymers. By investigating the acquired data we conclude that the monomer preferential polymeric sequence is St>MMA>AN. A quantitative method to measure P (St/AN/MMA) concentrations by IR spectroscopy is proposed in this work.

  18. Analysis of C II resonance lines in some main sequence early-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cugier, H.; Hardorp, J.

    1988-01-01

    IUE data are used to investigate C II resonance lines at 1335 A in eight main-sequence stars of spectral types from A0 to B3, and both LTE and non-LTE line profiles have been computed. In stars with low rotational velocities (such as Vega, Pi Cet, and Tau Her), logarithmic carbon abundances log N(C/H) of -3.55 to -3.45 are obtained for the non-LTE case. The LTE analysis reveals lower carbon abundances by about 0.1 dex. Significant differences among the fast rotating stars are pointed out.

  19. An Analysis Method for Superconducting Resonator Parameter Extraction with Complex Baseline Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    A new semi-empirical model is proposed for extracting the quality (Q) factors of arrays of superconducting microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The determination of the total internal and coupling Q factors enables the computation of the loss in the superconducting transmission lines. The method used allows the simultaneous analysis of multiple interacting discrete resonators with the presence of a complex spectral baseline arising from reflections in the system. The baseline removal allows an unbiased estimate of the device response as measured in a cryogenic instrumentation setting.

  20. Dynamics of firing patterns, synchronization and resonances in neuronal electrical activities: experiments and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qishao; Gu, Huaguang; Yang, Zhuoqin; Shi, Xia; Duan, Lixia; Zheng, Yanhong

    2008-12-01

    Recent advances in the experimental and theoretical study of dynamics of neuronal electrical firing activities are reviewed. Firstly, some experimental phenomena of neuronal irregular firing patterns, especially chaotic and stochastic firing patterns, are presented, and practical nonlinear time analysis methods are introduced to distinguish deterministic and stochastic mechanism in time series. Secondly, the dynamics of electrical firing activities in a single neuron is concerned, namely, fast-slow dynamics analysis for classification and mechanism of various bursting patterns, one- or two-parameter bifurcation analysis for transitions of firing patterns, and stochastic dynamics of firing activities (stochastic and coherence resonances, integer multiple and other firing patterns induced by noise, etc.). Thirdly, different types of synchronization of coupled neurons with electrical and chemical synapses are discussed. As noise and time delay are inevitable in nervous systems, it is found that noise and time delay may induce or enhance synchronization and change firing patterns of coupled neurons. Noise-induced resonance and spatiotemporal patterns in coupled neuronal networks are also demonstrated. Finally, some prospects are presented for future research. In consequence, the idea and methods of nonlinear dynamics are of great significance in exploration of dynamic processes and physiological functions of nervous systems.

  1. An analysis method for transmission measurements of superconducting resonators with applications to quantum-regime dielectric-loss measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chunqing; Otto, Martin; Lupascu, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Superconducting resonators provide a convenient way to measure loss tangents of various dielectrics at low temperature. For the purpose of examining the microscopic loss mechanisms in dielectrics, precise measurements of the internal quality factor at different values of energy stored in the resonators are required. Here, we present a consistent method to analyze a LC superconducting resonator coupled to a transmission line. We first derive an approximate expression for the transmission S-parameter S21(ω), with ω the excitation frequency, based on a complete circuit model. In the weak coupling limit, we show that the internal quality factor is reliably determined by fitting the approximate form of S21(ω). Since the voltage V of the capacitor of the LC circuit is required to determine the energy stored in the resonator, we next calculate the relation between V and the forward propagating wave voltage Vin+, with the latter being the parameter controlled in experiments. Due to the dependence of the quality factor on voltage, V is not simply proportional to Vin+. We find a self-consistent way to determine the relation between V and Vin+, which employs only the fitting parameters for S21(ω) and a linear scaling factor. We then examine the resonator transmission in the cases of port reflection and impedance mismatch. We find that resonator transmission asymmetry is primarily due to the reflection from discontinuity in transmission lines. We show that our analysis method to extract the internal quality factor is robust in the non-ideal cases above. Finally, we show that the analysis method used for the LC resonator can be generalized to arbitrary weakly coupled lumped and distributed resonators. The generalization uses a systematic approximation on the response function based on the pole and zero which are closest to the resonance frequency. This Closest Pole and Zero Method is a valuable tool for analyzing physical measurements of high-Q resonators.

  2. Automated analysis of infarct heterogeneity on delayed enhancement magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, YingLi; Paul, Gideon A.; Connelly, Kim A.; Wright, Graham A.; Radau, Perry E.

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we propose an automated infarct heterogeneity analysis method for cardiac delayed enhancement magnetic resonance images (DE-MRI). Advantages of this method include that it eliminates manual contouring of the left ventricle and automatically distinguishes infarct, "gray zone" (heterogeneous mixture of healthy and infarct tissue), and healthy tissue pixels despite variability in intensity and noise across images. Quantitative evaluation was performed on 12 patients. The automatically determined infarct core size and gray zone size showed high correlation with that derived from manual delineation (R2 = 0.91 for infarct core size and R2 = 0.87 for gray zone size). The automatic method shortens the evaluation to 5.6 +/-2.2 s per image, compared with 3 min for the manual method. These results indicate a promising method for automatic analysis of infarct heterogeneity with DE-MRI that should be beneficial for reducing variability in quantitative analysis and improving workflow.

  3. Analysis of two stacked cylindrical dielectric resonators in a TE 102 microwave cavity for magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattar, Saba M.; ElNaggar, Sameh Y.

    2011-04-01

    The frequency, field distributions and filling factors of a DR/TE 102 probe, consisting of two cylindrical dielectric resonators (DR1 and DR2) in a rectangular TE 102 cavity, are simulated and analyzed by finite element methods. The TE +++ mode formed by the in-phase coupling of the TE 01δ(DR1), TE 01δ(DR2) and TE 102 basic modes, is the most appropriate mode for X-band EPR experiments. The corresponding simulated B +++ fields of the TE +++ mode have significant amplitudes at DR1, DR2 and the cavity's iris resulting in efficient coupling between the DR/TE 102 probe and the microwave bridge. At the experimental configuration, B +++ in the vicinity of DR2 is much larger than that around DR1 indicating that DR1 mainly acts as a frequency tuner. In contrast to a simple microwave shield, the resonant cavity is an essential component of the probe that affects its frequency. The two dielectric resonators are always coupled and this is enhanced by the cavity. When DR1 and DR2 are close to the cavity walls, the TE +++ frequency and B +++ distribution are very similar to that of the empty TE 102 cavity. When all the experimental details are taken into account, the agreement between the experimental and simulated TE +++ frequencies is excellent. This confirms that the resonating mode of the spectrometer's DR/TE 102 probe is the TE +++ mode. Additional proof is obtained from B1x, which is the calculated maximum x component of B +++. It is predominantly due to DR2 and is approximately 4.4 G. The B1x maximum value of the DR/TE 102 probe is found to be slightly larger than that for a single resonator in a cavity because DR1 further concentrates the cavity's magnetic field along its x axis. Even though DR1 slightly enhances the performance of the DR/TE 102 probe its main benefit is to act as a frequency tuner. A waveguide iris can be used to over-couple the DR/TE 102 probe and lower its Q to ≈150. Under these conditions, the probe has a short dead time and a large bandwidth

  4. Analysis of two stacked cylindrical dielectric resonators in a TE₁₀₂ microwave cavity for magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Saba M; Elnaggar, Sameh Y

    2011-04-01

    The frequency, field distributions and filling factors of a DR/TE₁₀₂ probe, consisting of two cylindrical dielectric resonators (DR1 and DR2) in a rectangular TE₁₀₂ cavity, are simulated and analyzed by finite element methods. The TE(+++) mode formed by the in-phase coupling of the TE₀₁(δ)(DR1), TE₀₁(δ)(DR2) and TE₁₀₂ basic modes, is the most appropriate mode for X-band EPR experiments. The corresponding simulated B(+++) fields of the TE(+++) mode have significant amplitudes at DR1, DR2 and the cavity's iris resulting in efficient coupling between the DR/TE₁₀₂ probe and the microwave bridge. At the experimental configuration, B(+++) in the vicinity of DR2 is much larger than that around DR1 indicating that DR1 mainly acts as a frequency tuner. In contrast to a simple microwave shield, the resonant cavity is an essential component of the probe that affects its frequency. The two dielectric resonators are always coupled and this is enhanced by the cavity. When DR1 and DR2 are close to the cavity walls, the TE(+++) frequency and B(+++) distribution are very similar to that of the empty TE₁₀₂ cavity. When all the experimental details are taken into account, the agreement between the experimental and simulated TE(+++) frequencies is excellent. This confirms that the resonating mode of the spectrometer's DR/TE₁₀₂ probe is the TE(+++) mode. Additional proof is obtained from B₁(x), which is the calculated maximum x component of B(+++). It is predominantly due to DR2 and is approximately 4.4 G. The B₁(x) maximum value of the DR/TE₁₀₂ probe is found to be slightly larger than that for a single resonator in a cavity because DR1 further concentrates the cavity's magnetic field along its x axis. Even though DR1 slightly enhances the performance of the DR/TE₁₀₂ probe its main benefit is to act as a frequency tuner. A waveguide iris can be used to over-couple the DR/TE₁₀₂ probe and lower its Q to ≈150. Under

  5. The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: a cosmological forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Wang, Yuting; Ross, Ashley J.; Shandera, Sarah; Percival, Will J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Myers, Adam D.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Comparat, Johan; Delubac, Timothée; Gao, Pengyuan; Hojjati, Alireza; Koyama, Kazuya; McBride, Cameron K.; Meza, Andrés; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pogosian, Levon; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tao, Charling; Wang, Dandan; Yèche, Christophe; Zhang, Hanyu; Zhang, Yuecheng; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Fangzhou; Zou, Hu

    2016-04-01

    We present a science forecast for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) survey. Focusing on discrete tracers, we forecast the expected accuracy of the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO), the redshift-space distortion (RSD) measurements, the fNL parameter quantifying the primordial non-Gaussianity, the dark energy and modified gravity parameters. We also use the line-of-sight clustering in the Lyman α forest to constrain the total neutrino mass. We find that eBOSS luminous red galaxies, emission line galaxies and clustering quasars can achieve a precision of 1, 2.2 and 1.6 per cent, respectively, for spherically averaged BAO distance measurements. Using the same samples, the constraint on fσ8 is expected to be 2.5, 3.3 and 2.8 per cent, respectively. For primordial non-Gaussianity, eBOSS alone can reach an accuracy of σ(fNL) ˜ 10-15. eBOSS can at most improve the dark energy figure of merit by a factor of 3 for the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder parametrization, and can well constrain three eigenmodes for the general equation-of-state parameter. eBOSS can also significantly improve constraints on modified gravity parameters by providing the RSD information, which is highly complementary to constraints obtained from weak lensing measurements. A principal component analysis shows that eBOSS can measure the eigenmodes of the effective Newton's constant to 2 per cent precision; this is a factor of 10 improvement over that achievable without eBOSS. Finally, we derive the eBOSS constraint (combined with Planck, Dark Energy Survey and BOSS) on the total neutrino mass, σ(Σmν) = 0.03 eV (68 per cent CL), which in principle makes it possible to distinguish between the two scenarios of neutrino mass hierarchies.

  6. THE BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY OF SDSS-III

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Kyle S.; Ahn, Christopher P.; Bolton, Adam S.; Schlegel, David J.; Bailey, Stephen; Anderson, Scott F.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Aubourg, Eric; Bautista, Julian E.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Borde, Arnaud; Brandt, W. N.; and others

    2013-01-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) is designed to measure the scale of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the clustering of matter over a larger volume than the combined efforts of all previous spectroscopic surveys of large-scale structure. BOSS uses 1.5 million luminous galaxies as faint as i = 19.9 over 10,000 deg{sup 2} to measure BAO to redshifts z < 0.7. Observations of neutral hydrogen in the Ly{alpha} forest in more than 150,000 quasar spectra (g < 22) will constrain BAO over the redshift range 2.15 < z < 3.5. Early results from BOSS include the first detection of the large-scale three-dimensional clustering of the Ly{alpha} forest and a strong detection from the Data Release 9 data set of the BAO in the clustering of massive galaxies at an effective redshift z = 0.57. We project that BOSS will yield measurements of the angular diameter distance d{sub A} to an accuracy of 1.0% at redshifts z = 0.3 and z = 0.57 and measurements of H(z) to 1.8% and 1.7% at the same redshifts. Forecasts for Ly{alpha} forest constraints predict a measurement of an overall dilation factor that scales the highly degenerate D{sub A} (z) and H {sup -1}(z) parameters to an accuracy of 1.9% at z {approx} 2.5 when the survey is complete. Here, we provide an overview of the selection of spectroscopic targets, planning of observations, and analysis of data and data quality of BOSS.

  7. Risk management in magnetic resonance: failure mode, effects, and criticality analysis.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Antonella; Fusco, Roberta; Granata, Vincenza; Filice, Salvatore; Raiano, Nicola; Amato, Daniela Maria; Zirpoli, Maria; di Finizio, Alessandro; Sansone, Mario; Russo, Anna; Covelli, Eugenio Maria; Pedicini, Tonino; Triassi, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to perform a risk management procedure in "Magnetic Resonance Examination" process in order to identify the critical phases and sources of radiological errors and to identify potential improvement projects including procedures, tests, and checks to reduce the error occurrence risk. In this study we used the proactive analysis "Failure Mode Effects Criticality Analysis," a qualitative and quantitative risk management procedure; has calculated Priority Risk Index (PRI) for each activity of the process; have identified, on the PRI basis, the most critical activities and, for them, have defined improvement projects; and have recalculated the PRI after implementation of improvement projects for each activity. Time stop and audits are performed in order to control the new procedures. The results showed that the most critical tasks of "Magnetic Resonance Examination" process were the reception of the patient, the patient schedule drafting, the closing examination, and the organization of activities. Four improvement projects have been defined and executed. PRI evaluation after improvement projects implementation has shown that the risk decreased significantly following the implementation of procedures and controls defined in improvement projects, resulting in a reduction of the PRI between 43% and 100%. PMID:24171173

  8. Risk Management in Magnetic Resonance: Failure Mode, Effects, and Criticality Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Vincenza; Filice, Salvatore; Raiano, Nicola; Amato, Daniela Maria; Zirpoli, Maria; di Finizio, Alessandro; Sansone, Mario; Russo, Anna; Covelli, Eugenio Maria; Pedicini, Tonino; Triassi, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to perform a risk management procedure in “Magnetic Resonance Examination” process in order to identify the critical phases and sources of radiological errors and to identify potential improvement projects including procedures, tests, and checks to reduce the error occurrence risk. In this study we used the proactive analysis “Failure Mode Effects Criticality Analysis,” a qualitative and quantitative risk management procedure; has calculated Priority Risk Index (PRI) for each activity of the process; have identified, on the PRI basis, the most critical activities and, for them, have defined improvement projects; and have recalculated the PRI after implementation of improvement projects for each activity. Time stop and audits are performed in order to control the new procedures. The results showed that the most critical tasks of “Magnetic Resonance Examination” process were the reception of the patient, the patient schedule drafting, the closing examination, and the organization of activities. Four improvement projects have been defined and executed. PRI evaluation after improvement projects implementation has shown that the risk decreased significantly following the implementation of procedures and controls defined in improvement projects, resulting in a reduction of the PRI between 43% and 100%. PMID:24171173

  9. Theoretical and experimental analysis of optical gyroscopes based on fiber ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao-ying; Xue, Chen-yang; Cui, Xiao-wen; Cui, Dan-feng; Wei, Li-ping; Wang, Yong-hua; Li, Yan-na

    2014-12-01

    The research on gyroscopes has lasted for a long time, but there is not a thorough analysis of them. In this paper, a detailed theoretical analysis of fiber ring gyroscope and its gyroscope effect were presented, the performance characteristics of optical resonator gyroscope ranging from transmission function Tfrr, Finesse, Q-factor, the gyro sensitivity, signal noise ratio, random walk to dynamic range are all deduced in detail. In addition, a large number of experiments have been done to verify the deduced theoretical results. Simulating the relevance of dQ and turn number of fiber ring, analyzing the frequency difference of two counter transmitted waves (CW and CCW) of the rotated system, make the conclusion that with the increase of turn number of ring, the resonance depth increased while the dQ value decreased, obtain a high sensitivity of 0.210/h, random walk of 0.00350/√h, and Q factor of 8×106. Moreover, in the digital frequency locked dual rotation gyro experiments, obvious step effect was observed. And the experimental line of frequency difference is very agreement with the theoretical line. The research provides a good theoretical and experimental basis for the study of gyroscopes.

  10. A Second Look at Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis as a Spent Fuel NDA Technique

    SciTech Connect

    James W .Sterbentz; David L. Chichester

    2011-07-01

    Many different nondestructive analysis techniques are currently being investigated as a part of the United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) seeking methods to quantify plutonium in spent fuel. Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) is one of these techniques. Having first been explored in the mid-1970s for the analysis of individual spent-fuel pins a second look, using advanced simulation and modeling methods, is now underway to investigate the suitability of the NRTA technique for assaying complete spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The technique is similar to neutron time-of-flight methods used for cross-section determinations but operates over only the narrow 0.1-20 eV range where strong, distinguishable resonances exist for both the plutonium (239, 240, 241,242Pu) and uranium (235,236,238U) isotopes of interest in spent fuel. Additionally, in this energy range resonances exists for six important fission products (99Tc, 103Rh, 131Xe, 133Cs, 145Nd, and 152Sm) which provide additional information to support spent fuel plutonium assay determinations. Initial modeling shows excellent agreement with previously published experimental data for measurements of individual spent-fuel pins where plutonium assays were demonstrated to have a precision of 2-4%. Within the simulation and modeling analyses of this project scoping studies have explored fourteen different aspects of the technique including the neutron source, drift tube configurations, and gross neutron transmission as well as the impacts of fuel burn up, cooling time, and fission-product interferences. These results show that NRTA may be a very capable experimental technique for spent-fuel assay measurements. The results suggest sufficient transmission strength and signal differentiability is possible for assays through up to 8 pins. For an 8-pin assay (looking at an assembly diagonally), 64% of the pins in a typical 17 ? 17 array of a pressurized water reactor fuel

  11. First Observation of a Baryonic Bc+ Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    A baryonic decay of the Bc+ meson, Bc+→J/ψpp ¯π+, is observed for the first time, with a significance of 7.3 standard deviations, in pp collision data collected with the LHCb detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 taken at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. With the Bc+→J/ψπ+ decay as the normalization channel, the ratio of branching fractions is measured to be B(Bc+→J/ψpp ¯π+)/B(Bc+→J/ψπ+)=0.143-0.034+0.039(stat)±0.013(syst). The mass of the Bc+ meson is determined as M(Bc+)=6274.0±1.8(stat)±0.4(syst) MeV/c2, using the Bc+→J/ψpp ¯π+ channel.

  12. Quantum Operator Design for Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam

    2006-09-07

    A previously-proposed method of constructing spatially-extended gauge-invariant three-quark operators for use in Monte Carlo lattice QCD calculations is tested, and a methodology for using these operators to extract the energies of a large number of baryon states is developed. This work is part of a long-term project undertaken by the Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration to carry out a first-principles calculation of the low-lying spectrum of QCD. The operators are assemblages of smeared and gauge-covariantly-displaced quark fields having a definite flavor structure. The importance of using smeared fields is dramatically demonstrated. It is found that quark field smearing greatly reduces the couplings to the unwanted high-lying short-wavelength modes, while gauge field smearing drastically reduces the statistical noise in the extended operators.

  13. Shedding light on baryonic dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Halo dark matter, if it is baryonic, may plausibly consist of compact stellar remnants. Jeans mass clouds containing 10 to the 6th to 10 to the 8th solar masses could have efficiently formed stars in the early universe and could plausibly have generated, for a suitably top-heavy stellar initial mass function, a high abundance of neutron stars as well as a small admixture of long-lived low mass stars. Within the resulting clusters of dark remnants, which eventually are tidally disrupted when halos eventually form, captures of neutron stars by nondegenerate stars resulted in formation of close binaries. These evolve to produce, by the present epoch, an observable X-ray signal associated with dark matter aggregations in galaxy cluster cores.

  14. Baryonic strangeness and related susceptibilities in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, A.; Müller, B.

    2006-11-01

    The ratios of off-diagonal to diagonal conserved charge susceptibilities, e.g., χBS/χS,χQS/χS, related to the quark flavor susceptibilities, have proven to be discerning probes of the flavor carrying degrees of freedom in hot strongly interacting matter. Various constraining relations between the different susceptibilities are derived based on the Gell-Mann-Nishijima formula and the assumption of isospin symmetry. Using generic models of deconfined matter and results from lattice quantum chromodynamics, it is demonstrated that the flavor-carrying degrees of freedom at a temperature above 1.5Tc are quarklike quasiparticles. A new observable related by isospin symmetry to CBS=-3χBS/χS and equal to it in the baryon free regime is identified. This new observable, which is blind to neutral and nonstrange particles, carries the potential of being measured in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  15. Cluster outskirts and the missing baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, D.

    2016-06-01

    Galaxy clusters are located at the crossroads of intergalactic filaments and are still forming through the continuous merging and accretion of smaller structures from the surrounding cosmic web. Deep, wide-field X-ray studies of the outskirts of the most massive clusters bring us valuable insight into the processes leading to the growth of cosmic structures. In addition, cluster outskirts are privileged sites to search for the missing baryons, which are thought to reside within the filaments of the cosmic web. I will present the XMM cluster outskirts project, a VLP that aims at mapping the outskirts of 13 nearby clusters. Based on the results obtained with this program, I will then explore ideas to exploit the capabilities of XMM during the next decade.

  16. A three-phase series-parallel resonant converter -- analysis, design, simulation, and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, A.K.S.; Zheng, R.L.

    1996-07-01

    A three-phase dc-to-dc series-parallel resonant converter is proposed /and its operating modes for a 180{degree} wide gating pulse scheme are explained. A detailed analysis of the converter using a constant current model and the Fourier series approach is presented. Based on the analysis, design curves are obtained and a design example of a 1-kW converter is given. SPICE simulation results for the designed converter and experimental results for a 500-W converter are presented to verify the performance of the proposed converter for varying load conditions. The converter operates in lagging power factor (PF) mode for the entire load range and requires a narrow variation in switching frequency, to adequately regulate the output power.

  17. "More is different" in functional magnetic resonance imaging: a review of recent data analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Gabriele; Stelzer, Johannes; Neumann, Jane; Ay, Nihat; Turner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Two aspects play a key role in recently developed strategies for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data analysis: first, it is now recognized that the human brain is a complex adaptive system and exhibits the hallmarks of complexity such as emergence of patterns arising out of a multitude of interactions between its many constituents. Second, the field of fMRI has evolved into a data-intensive, big data endeavor with large databases and masses of data being shared around the world. At the same time, ultra-high field MRI scanners are now available producing data at previously unobtainable quality and quantity. Both aspects have led to shifts in the way in which we view fMRI data. Here, we review recent developments in fMRI data analysis methodology that resulted from these shifts in paradigm. PMID:23402339

  18. Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Mass Spectrometry (REMPI-MS): Applications for Process Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streibel, Thorsten; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2014-06-01

    Process analysis is an emerging discipline in analytical sciences that poses special requirements on analytical techniques, especially when conducted in an online manner. Mass spectrometric methods seem exceedingly suitable for this task, particularly if a soft ionization method is applied. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) provides a selective and sensitive means for monitoring (poly)aromatic compounds in process flows. The properties of REMPI and various variations of the ionization process are presented. The potential of REMPI for process analysis is highlighted with several examples, and drawbacks of the method are also noted. Applications of REMPI-TOFMS for the detection and monitoring of aromatic species in a large variety of combustion processes comprising flames, vehicle exhaust, and incinerators are discussed. New trends in technical development and combination with other analytical methods are brought forward.

  19. 3D Analysis of Wake Field Excitation in a Dielectric Loaded Rectangular Resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, Gennadij V.; Onishchenko, Ivan N.; Marshall, Thomas C.

    2006-11-27

    The results of a three-dimensional analysis of wake field excitation in a slab-symmetric dielectric-loaded resonator by rigid electron bunches are presented. The complete set of solutions, including the solenoidal and potential parts of the electromagnetic field, consists of LSM and LSE modes. Each of the LSM and LSE modes contains odd and even waves. A numerical analysis of wake field excitation by symmetric electron bunches is carried out. The three-dimensional spatial structure of the longitudinal electric field is investigated. The influence of the drift vacuum channel on the wake field amplitude and on the coherent summation of wakefields for a regular sequence of bunches is studied.

  20. Comparative loss analysis and efficiency performance of resonance-based PDP sustain drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, S.-S.; Kim, I.-G.; Lee, J.

    2016-01-01

    Sustain drivers based on the LC resonant operation have a significant influence on the entire circuit efficiency and cost of plasma display panels (PDPs). Although circuit efficiency of PDP drivers is extremely important, theoretical loss analysis and comparative studies of the sustain drivers have been missed in the literature, despite a variety of developed PDP sustain drivers. This paper presents in detail theoretical analyses and systematic comparisons of semiconductor losses in the PDP sustain drivers, including the inevitable conduction losses by the displacement currents, the undesirable extra conduction losses, the switching losses by the forced current commutations and the switching losses by the step voltage changes. Based on derived theoretical analysis and comparative features, sustain drivers are evaluated in terms of PDP operating speed as well as circuits' efficiency.

  1. Partial wave analysis of the reaction gamma p -> p omega$ and the search for nucleon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    M. Williams, D. Applegate, M. Bellis, C.A. Meyer

    2009-12-01

    An event-based partial wave analysis (PWA) of the reaction gamma p -> p omega has been performed on a high-statistics dataset obtained using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies from threshold up to 2.4 GeV. This analysis benefits from access to the world's first high precision spin density matrix element measurements, available to the event-based PWA through the decay distribution of omega-> pi+ pi - pi0. The data confirm the dominance of the t-channel pi0 exchange amplitude in the forward direction. The dominant resonance contributions are consistent with the previously identified states F[15](1680) and D[13](1700) near threshold, as well as the G[17](2190) at higher energies. Suggestive evidence for the presence of a J(P)=5/2(+) state around 2 GeV, a "missing" state, has also been found. Evidence for other states is inconclusive.

  2. Evidence for formation of KS0p resonances with masses near 1532, 1578, and 1659 MeV in neutrino interactions with nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asratyan, A. E.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Kubantsev, M. A.

    2005-05-01

    Three baryon resonances with masses of 1532.2±1.3, 1577.7±1.9, and 1658.6±4.4MeV are observed in invariant mass of the KS0p system formed in neutrino and antineutrino collisions with deuterons and neon nuclei. Observed widths of the 1532-MeV and 1578-MeV resonances are consistent with being entirely due to apparatus smearing, and their intrinsic widths are restricted to Γ<12 and 23 MeV, respectively. For the 1659-MeV resonance, the data suggest a nonvanishing intrinsic width of Γ˜20MeV. Significance levels of the three signals are near 7.1 σ, 5.0 σ, and 4.5 σ, respectively. The Σ hypothesis for either of these three resonances is disfavored by the data on associated Λ hyperons and on formation of the Λ π system. These resonant states are tentatively interpreted as the recently discovered pentaquark baryon Θ(1530) and its spin/isospin partners. The analysis is based on neutrino data collected by past bubble-chamber experiments.

  3. Three-flavor chiral effective model with four baryonic multiplets within the mirror assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbrich, Lisa; Zétényi, Miklós; Giacosa, Francesco; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2016-02-01

    In the case of three quark flavors, (pseudo)scalar diquarks transform as antiquarks under chiral transformations. We construct four spin-1 /2 baryonic multiplets from left- and right-handed quarks as well as left- and right-handed diquarks. The fact that two of these multiplets transform in a "mirror" way allows for chirally invariant mass terms. We then embed these baryonic multiplets into the Lagrangian of the so-called extended linear sigma model, which features (pseudo)scalar and (axial-)vector mesons, as well as glueballs. Reducing the Lagrangian to the two-flavor case, we obtain four doublets of nucleonic states. These mix to produce four experimentally observed states with definite parity: the positive-parity nucleon N (939 ) and Roper resonance N (1440 ), as well as the negative-parity resonances N (1535 ) and N (1650 ). We determine the parameters of the nucleonic part of the Lagrangian from a fit to masses and decay properties of the aforementioned states. Studying the limit of vanishing quark condensate, we conclude that N (939 ) and N (1535 ), as well as N (1440 ) and N (1650 ), form pairs of chiral partners.

  4. Baryon-baryon interactions in the SU6 quark model and their applications to light nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakamoto, C.

    2007-04-01

    Interactions between the octet-baryons ( B8) in the spin-flavor SU6 quark model are investigated in a unified coupled-channels framework of the resonating-group method (RGM). The interaction Hamiltonian for quarks consists of the phenomenological confinement potential, the color Fermi-Breit interaction with explicit flavor-symmetry breaking (FSB), and effective-meson exchange potentials of scalar-, pseudoscalar- and vector-meson types. The model parameters are determined to reproduce the properties of the nucleon-nucleon ( NN) system and the low-energy cross section data for the hyperon-nucleon interactions. Mainly due to the introduction of the vector mesons, the NN phase shifts at non-relativistic energies up to T=350 MeV are greatly improved in comparison with the previous quark-model NN interactions. The deuteron properties and the low-energy observables of the B8B8 interactions, including the inelastic capture ratio at rest for the Σ-p scattering, are examined in the particle basis with the pion-Coulomb correction. The nuclear saturation properties and the single-particle (s.p.) potentials of B8 in nuclear medium are examined through the G-matrix calculations, using the quark-exchange kernel. The Σ s.p. potential is weakly repulsive in symmetric nuclear matter. The s.p. spin-orbit strength for Λ is very small, due to the strong antisymmetric spin-orbit force generated from the Fermi-Breit interaction. The qualitative behavior of the B8B8 interactions is systematically understood by (1) the spin-flavor SU6 symmetry of B8, (2) the special role of the pion exchange, and (3) the FSB of the underlying quark Hamiltonian. In particular, the B8B8 interaction becomes less attractive according to the increase of strangeness, implying that there exists no B8B8 di-baryon bound state except for the deuteron. The strong ΛN-ΣN coupling results from the important tensor component of the one-pion exchange. The ΛΛ-ΞN-ΣΣ coupling in the strangeness S=-2 and isospin I=0

  5. Properties of the baryon number distribution in QGP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Keitaro; Kashiwa, Kouji; Mochizuki-Nishigaki, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Atsushi

    2014-09-01

    We study properties of the baryon number distribution in QGP phase. We first point out that a Gaussian type of the canonical partition function with regard to the baryon number means the Roberge-Weiss phase transition. The canonical partition function of QCD at high temperatures is studied both analytically and numerically. We find that the canonical partition function obtained in lattice QCD simulation agrees with that obtained for Stefan-Boltzmann limit for T higher than Tc, and is the Gaussian function of the baryon number.

  6. Baryon asymmetry from hypermagnetic helicity in dilaton hypercharge electromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Kazuharu

    2006-12-15

    The generation of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe from the hypermagnetic helicity, the physical interpretation of which is given in terms of hypermagnetic knots, is studied in inflationary cosmology, taking into account the breaking of the conformal invariance of hypercharge electromagnetic fields through both a coupling with the dilaton and with a pseudoscalar field. It is shown that, if the electroweak phase transition is strongly first order and the present amplitude of the generated magnetic fields on the horizon scale is sufficiently large, a baryon asymmetry with a sufficient magnitude to account for the observed baryon-to-entropy ratio can be generated.

  7. DO HOT HALOS AROUND GALAXIES CONTAIN THE MISSING BARYONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael E.; Bregman, Joel N. E-mail: jbregman@umich.ed

    2010-05-01

    Galaxies are missing most of their baryons, and many models predict these baryons lie in a hot halo around galaxies. We establish observationally motivated constraints on the mass and radii of these halos using a variety of independent arguments. First, the observed dispersion measure of pulsars in the Large Magellanic Cloud allows us to constrain the hot halo around the Milky Way: if it obeys the standard Navarro, Frenk, and White (NFW) profile, it must contain less than 4%-5% of the missing baryons from the Galaxy. This is similar to other upper limits on the Galactic hot halo, such as the soft X-ray background and the pressure around high-velocity clouds. Second, we note that the X-ray surface brightness of hot halos with NFW profiles around large isolated galaxies is high enough that such emission should be observed, unless their halos contain less than 10%-25% of their missing baryons. Third, we place constraints on the column density of hot halos using nondetections of O VII absorption along active galactic nucleus (AGN) sightlines: in general they must contain less than 70% of the missing baryons or extend to no more than 40 kpc. Flattening the density profile of galactic hot halos weakens the surface brightness constraint so that a typical L{sub *} galaxy may hold half its missing baryons in its halo, but the O VII constraint remains unchanged, and around the Milky Way a flattened profile may only hold 6%-13% of the missing baryons from the Galaxy ((2-4) x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}). We also show that AGN and supernovae at low to moderate redshift-the theoretical sources of winds responsible for driving out the missing baryons-do not produce the expected correlations with the baryonic Tully-Fisher relationship and, therefore, are insufficient to explain the missing baryons from galaxies. We conclude that most of missing baryons from galaxies do not lie in hot halos around the galaxies, and that the missing baryons never fell into the potential wells of

  8. Measurements of the properties of Λc(2595) , Λc(2625) , Σc(2455) , and Σc(2520) baryons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-07-13

    We report measurements of the resonance properties of Λc(2595)+ and Λc(2595)+ baryons in their decays to Λc+π+π- as well as Σc(2455)++,0 and Σc(2455)++,0 baryons in their decays to Λc+π± final states. These measurements are performed using data corresponding to 5.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from pp̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, exploiting the largest available charmed baryon sample, we measure masses and decay widths with uncertainties comparable to the world averages for Σc states, and significantly smaller uncertainties than the world averages for excited Λc+ states.

  9. Analysis of resonant optical gyroscopes with two input/output waveguides.

    PubMed

    Hah, Dooyoung; Zhang, Dan

    2010-08-16

    Rotation sensitivity of optical gyroscopes with ring resonators and two input/output waveguides in a coplanar add-drop filter configuration is studied. First, the gyroscope with a single resonator is analyzed, which is shown to have slightly higher sensitivity than the one with one waveguide. Next, the sensor with two identical resonators coupled through waveguides is investigated, which turns out to have half the sensitivity of the one with a single resonator when compared for the same footprints. The last point is valid when the resonators have the same coupling coefficients to the waveguides in the sensor with two resonators. PMID:20721209

  10. Hamiltonian Effective Field Theory Study of the N*(1535 ) Resonance in Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhan-Wei; Kamleh, Waseem; Leinweber, Derek B.; Stokes, Finn M.; Thomas, Anthony W.; Wu, Jia-Jun

    2016-02-01

    Drawing on experimental data for baryon resonances, Hamiltonian effective field theory (HEFT) is used to predict the positions of the finite-volume energy levels to be observed in lattice QCD simulations of the lowest-lying JP=1 /2- nucleon excitation. In the initial analysis, the phenomenological parameters of the Hamiltonian model are constrained by experiment and the finite-volume eigenstate energies are a prediction of the model. The agreement between HEFT predictions and lattice QCD results obtained on volumes with spatial lengths of 2 and 3 fm is excellent. These lattice results also admit a more conventional analysis where the low-energy coefficients are constrained by lattice QCD results, enabling a determination of resonance properties from lattice QCD itself. Finally, the role and importance of various components of the Hamiltonian model are examined.

  11. Analysis and development of fourth order LCLC resonant based capacitor charging power supply for pulse power applications.

    PubMed

    Naresh, P; Hitesh, C; Patel, A; Kolge, T; Sharma, Archana; Mittal, K C

    2013-08-01

    A fourth order (LCLC) resonant converter based capacitor charging power supply (CCPS) is designed and developed for pulse power applications. Resonant converters are preferred t utilize soft switching techniques such as zero current switching (ZCS) and zero voltage switching (ZVS). An attempt has been made to overcome the disadvantages in 2nd and 3rd resonant converter topologies; hence a fourth order resonant topology is used in this paper for CCPS application. In this paper a novel fourth order LCLC based resonant converter has been explored and mathematical analysis carried out to calculate load independent constant current. This topology provides load independent constant current at switching frequency (fs) equal to resonant frequency (fr). By changing switching condition (on time and dead time) this topology has both soft switching techniques such as ZCS and ZVS for better switching action to improve the converter efficiency. This novel technique has special features such as low peak current through switches, DC blocking for transformer, utilizing transformer leakage inductance as resonant component. A prototype has been developed and tested successfully to charge a 100 μF capacitor to 200 V. PMID:24007087

  12. Power and efficiency analysis of a realistic resonant tunneling diode thermoelectric

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Akshay; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran

    2014-07-07

    Low-dimensional systems with sharp features in the density of states have been proposed as a means for improving the efficiency of thermoelectric devices. Quantum dot systems, which offer the sharpest density of states achievable, however, suffer from low power outputs while bulk (3-D) thermoelectrics, while displaying high power outputs, offer very low efficiencies. Here, we analyze the use of a resonant tunneling diode structure that combines the best of both aspects, that is, density of states distortion with a finite bandwidth due to confinement that aids the efficiency and a large number of current carrying transverse modes that enhances the total power output. We show that this device can achieve a high power output (∼0.3 MW∕m{sup 2}) at efficiencies of ∼40% of the Carnot efficiency due to the contribution from these transverse momentum states at a finite bandwidth of kT∕2. We then provide a detailed analysis of the physics of charge and heat transport with insights on parasitic currents that reduce the efficiency. Finally, a comparison between the resonant tunneling diode and a quantum dot device with comparable bandwidth reveals that a similar performance requires ultra-dense areal quantum dot densities of ∼10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}.

  13. Design and analysis of chevrons shaped split ring resonator in the mid-infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan, N.; Saini, T. S.; Kumar, A.; Sinha, R. K.

    2015-09-01

    The terahertz and mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum is relatively new area of interest and incorporates a wide range of applications from image sensing to spectroscopy and many more yet to be discovered. In the area of metamaterials many new designs have been discovered, but "chevrons" shaped split ring resonators (ch-SRRs) in the mid-infrared region has not been studied to the best of our knowledge. This paper presents the analysis and simulation of ch-SRRs in the mid infrared region. Tunability of SRRs is important for various industrial and scientific applications and hence this paper analyzes the tunability of the ch-SRRs by variation of angle. The device is simulated in two configurations i.e., one with two chevrons shaped SRRs on the same plane of the dielectric substrate and the other with each of the two chevron shaped SRRs on the opposite plane of the substrate. Gold SRRs is used, since we are working in the terahertz region Lorentz-Drude model is employed to incorporate the losses. The ch-SRRs have been embedded upon the silicon substrate. The models are designed and simulated in COMSOL and result is shown in MATLAB. The results obtained for reflectance are of particular interest. The effective medium parameters viz. Impendence, permittivity, permeability and refractive index obtained for the split ring resonator are also evaluated. This design shows sharp results for reflectance which can be used in sensors application.

  14. Power and efficiency analysis of a realistic resonant tunneling diode thermoelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Akshay; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran

    2014-07-01

    Low-dimensional systems with sharp features in the density of states have been proposed as a means for improving the efficiency of thermoelectric devices. Quantum dot systems, which offer the sharpest density of states achievable, however, suffer from low power outputs while bulk (3-D) thermoelectrics, while displaying high power outputs, offer very low efficiencies. Here, we analyze the use of a resonant tunneling diode structure that combines the best of both aspects, that is, density of states distortion with a finite bandwidth due to confinement that aids the efficiency and a large number of current carrying transverse modes that enhances the total power output. We show that this device can achieve a high power output (˜0.3 MW/m2) at efficiencies of ˜40% of the Carnot efficiency due to the contribution from these transverse momentum states at a finite bandwidth of kT/2. We then provide a detailed analysis of the physics of charge and heat transport with insights on parasitic currents that reduce the efficiency. Finally, a comparison between the resonant tunneling diode and a quantum dot device with comparable bandwidth reveals that a similar performance requires ultra-dense areal quantum dot densities of ˜ 10 12 / cm 2.

  15. Efficiency analysis of magnetic resonance wireless power transfer with three-dimensional transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. F.; Huang, X. L.; Wang, W.

    2015-05-01

    Generally, the transfer power of wireless power transfer (WPT) system reduces significantly with the increase of distance and angle between transmitting and receiving coils in traditional WPT system. Experiments with two transmitters in the magnetic resonance coupling WPT system have been shown that it can enlarge transfer power and create a stable region in power transfer efficiency in a certain space. However, two transmitters have a limited transfer power comparing to the three-dimensional WPT. In this paper, a model of WPT system with three-dimensional transmitters (3DT-WPT), which are perpendicular to each other and so cover three dimensional spaces, is proposed to overcome the drawbacks mentioned above and the 3DT-WPT system via magnetic resonance coupling is designed to verify the proposed model. The diversity of the characteristics of the transfer power is observed through changing the distance and normal angle between transmitting and receiving coils. Analysis and experiment results show that the proposed method has better performance than the two transmitters.

  16. Pion-Nucleon Scattering and Analysis from threshold to the N*(1440) Resonance Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael; Watson, Shon; Stahov, Jugoslav

    2008-10-01

    Many measurements for pion-nucleon scattering from threshold to the N*(1440) resonance region have been made since 1980, when the landmark Karlsruhe-Helsinki (KH) and Carnegie Mellon-Berkeley (CMB) partial wave analyses (PWA) were completed. These measurements consist of differential cross sections and analyzing powers for elastic scattering and charge exchange. Spin rotation parameters for elastic scattering in the momentum interval 0.4 -- 0.7 GeV/c have also been obtained. The program culminated with measurements of π-p -> Neutrals (charge exchange, multiple pi-zero final states, eta production, and inverse photoproduction) using the Crystal Ball at BNL. Resonance parameters for the N*(1440) in the Review of Particle Physics by the Particle Data Group have been obtained from the KH and CMB analyses. The 2006 edition also includes the analysis by George Washington University (GWU) ``for averages, fits, limits, etc.'', but the parameters were unchanged. An overview of the data will be presented along with comparisons to PWA.

  17. Analysis of Rovibrational Resonances Observed in the Microwave Spectrum of FCCCN.

    PubMed

    Okabayashi; Tanaka; Tanaka

    1999-05-01

    Microwave spectrum of fluorocyanoacetylene (FCCCN) produced by a glow discharge in pentafluorobenzonitrile (C6F5CN) was observed using a source modulation spectrometer with a free-space absorption cell. Rotational transitions in the range from J = 9-8 to 53-52 were observed for the vibrationally excited states of nu4 (C&sbond;C stretch), nu5 (CCN bend), nu6 (FCC bend), nu7 (CCC bend), and their associated overtone and combination states up to about 1000 cm-1. Most of the vibrational states above 500 cm-1 are perturbed by rovibrational resonances. The effective vibration-rotation constant of the nu4 state has a negative value (-0.4 MHz), although a vibration-rotation constant generally has a positive value in the excited state of the stretching vibrational mode in a linear molecule. This anomalous behavior is interpreted as due to the rovibrational resonances between the nu4 and several nearby states. By the simultaneous analysis of the states concerned, the unperturbed vibrational energy and rotational constant of the nu4 state are obtained to be 686.50(76) cm-1 and 2068.2387(21) MHz, respectively, where the uncertainties correspond to one standard deviation. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10191150

  18. Resonant laser-SNMS of boron for analysis of paleoceanographic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vering, G.; Crone, C.; Kathers, P.; Bijma, J.; Arlinghaus, H. F.

    2006-07-01

    Calcite shells of foraminifera, which are accumulated in the ocean sediment, are an important object of paleoceanographic studies to reconstruct environmental parameters of the past. Foraminifera are unicellular organisms living in almost all parts of the ocean during the entire paleoceanographic time scale. The isotope ratio of boron incorporated in the calcite shell delivers information about the pH-value of the ocean at the time the shell was formed. Since the boron fraction of such a shell is about 5 ppm, an extremely sensitive technique is necessary for an exact boron isotope ratio determination. Resonant laser secondary neutral mass spectrometry (r-laser-SNMS) was used to measure boron isotope ratios in calcite shells. Analysis was carried out with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with an electron impact gun for sputtering and a Ga + primary ion source. Resonant ionization of sputtered boron neutrals was performed via a three-step ionization scheme accomplished with two tunable dye lasers and the fundamental wavelength of a Nd:YAG laser. After optimizing the boron ionization and detection process, boron isotope ratios were directly measured on single foraminiferal shells after removing contaminants by Ar + ion beam sputtering.

  19. Analysis of in vitro SUMOylation using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET).

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Pil; Jin, Zongwen; Kim, Eunkyung; Park, Sunyoung; Oh, Young-Hee; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrated in vitro small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-mediated modification (SUMOylation) of RanGTPase activating protein-1 (RanGAP1) by using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) for studying protein interactions. Renilla luciferase (Rluc) was fused to SUMO, and RanGAP1, the binding partner of SUMO, was fused to enhanced yellow fluorescence protein (EYFP). Upon binding of SUMO and RanGAP1, BRET was observed between EYFP (donor) and Rluc (acceptor) in the presence of E1 (Aos1/Uba2) and E2 (Ubc9) enzymes, whereas mutation (K524A) of RanGAP1 at its SUMO binding site prevented significant energy transfer. Comparing BRET and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiencies using this in vitro model system, we observed that BRET efficiency was 3-fold higher than FRET efficiency, due to the lower background signal intensity of EYFP in the BRET system. Consequently, BRET system is expected to be useful for in vitro analysis of SUMOylation as well as studying other protein interactions. PMID:19289109

  20. Analysis of Resonance Response Performance of C-Band Antenna Using Parasitic Element

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. T.; Misran, N.; Mandeep, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the resonance response improvement of a planar C-band (4–8 GHz) antenna is proposed using parasitic element method. This parasitic element based method is validated for change in the active and parasitic antenna elements. A novel dual-band antenna for C-band application covering 5.7 GHz and 7.6 GHz is designed and fabricated. The antenna is composed of circular parasitic element with unequal microstrip lines at both sides and a rectangular partial ground plane. A fractional bandwidth of 13.5% has been achieved from 5.5 GHz to 6.3 GHz (WLAN band) for the lower band. The upper band covers from 7.1 GHz to 8 GHz with a fractional bandwidth of 12%. A gain of 6.4 dBi is achieved at the lower frequency and 4 dBi is achieved at the upper frequency. The VSWR of the antenna is less than 2 at the resonance frequency. PMID:24895643

  1. Analysis of resonance response performance of C-band antenna using parasitic element.

    PubMed

    Zaman, M R; Islam, M T; Misran, N; Mandeep, J S

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the resonance response improvement of a planar C-band (4-8 GHz) antenna is proposed using parasitic element method. This parasitic element based method is validated for change in the active and parasitic antenna elements. A novel dual-band antenna for C-band application covering 5.7 GHz and 7.6 GHz is designed and fabricated. The antenna is composed of circular parasitic element with unequal microstrip lines at both sides and a rectangular partial ground plane. A fractional bandwidth of 13.5% has been achieved from 5.5 GHz to 6.3 GHz (WLAN band) for the lower band. The upper band covers from 7.1 GHz to 8 GHz with a fractional bandwidth of 12%. A gain of 6.4 dBi is achieved at the lower frequency and 4 dBi is achieved at the upper frequency. The VSWR of the antenna is less than 2 at the resonance frequency. PMID:24895643

  2. A surface plasmon resonance imaging system for the stimulated living cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu-lu; Chen, Xing; Du, Yang; Zhang, Qian; Li, Hui; Sun, Jian-hai; Cui, Da-fu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) system for cell analysis is developed for obtaining the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) signal from the interactions between cells and different stimuli. The system is constructed with a red laser light source, a P-polarizer, a glass prism, a 5× objective lens, a charge coupled device (CCD) camera, a gold sensor chip, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) reaction well and a mechanical scanning device. The system is applied to mapping living cells in response to stimuli by characterization of the refractive index (RI) changes. Cell responses to K+ in KCl solutions with concentrations of 5 mmol/L, 20 mmol/L, 50 mmol/L and 100 mmol/L are collected, which indicates that the SPRI method can distinguish the concentration of the stimuli. Furthermore, cell responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are studied independently. The binding of EGF receptor (EGFR) and EGF is collected as the first signal, and the internal change in cells is recorded as the second signal. The cell response to VEGF is different from that to EGF, which indicates that the SPRI as a label-free, real-time, fast and quantitative method has a potential to distinguish the cell responses to different stimuli.

  3. Analysis of the Impedance Resonance of Piezoelectric Multi-Fiber Composite Stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, S.; Djrbashian, A.; Bradford, S C

    2013-01-01

    Multi-Fiber CompositesTM (MFC's) produced by Smart Materials Corp behave essentially like thin planar stacks where each piezoelectric layer is composed of a multitude of fibers. We investigate the suitability of using previously published inversion techniques for the impedance resonances of monolithic co-fired piezoelectric stacks to the MFCTM to determine the complex material constants from the impedance data. The impedance equations examined in this paper are those based on the derivation. The utility of resonance techniques to invert the impedance data to determine the small signal complex material constants are presented for a series of MFC's. The technique was applied to actuators with different geometries and the real coefficients were determined to be similar within changes of the boundary conditions due to change of geometry. The scatter in the imaginary coefficient was found to be larger. The technique was also applied to the same actuator type but manufactured in different batches with some design changes in the non active portion of the actuator and differences in the dielectric and the electromechanical coupling between the two batches were easily measureable. It is interesting to note that strain predicted by small signal impedance analysis is much lower than high field stains. Since the model is based on material properties rather than circuit constants, it could be used for the direct evaluation of specific aging or degradation mechanisms in the actuator as well as batch sorting and adjustment of manufacturing processes.

  4. Chiral Effective Field Theory in the $\\Delta$-resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Pascalutsa

    2006-09-18

    I discuss the problem of constructing an effective low-energy theory in the vicinity of a resonance or a bound state. The focus is on the example of the $\\Delta(1232)$, the lightest resonance in the nucleon sector. Recent developments of the chiral effective-field theory in the $\\Delta$-resonance region are briefly reviewed. I conclude with a comment on the merits of the manifestly covariant formulation of chiral EFT in the baryon sector.

  5. Design and analysis of rotor systems with multiple trailing edge flaps and resonant actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    The purpose of this thesis is to develop piezoelectric resonant actuation systems and new active control methods utilizing the multiple trailing-edge flaps' configuration for rotorcraft vibration suppression and blade loads control. An aeroelastic model is developed for a composite rotor blade with multiple trailing-edge flaps. The rotor blade airloads are calculated using quasi-steady blade element aerodynamics with a free wake model for rotor inflow. A compressible unsteady aerodynamics model is employed to accurately predict the incremental trailing edge flap airloads. Both the finite wing effect and actuator saturation for trailing-edge flaps are also included in an aeroelastic analysis. For a composite articulated rotor, a new active blade loads control method is developed and tested numerically. The concept involves straightening the blade by introducing dual trailing edge flaps. The objective function, which includes vibratory hub loads, bending moment harmonics and active flap control inputs, is minimized by an integrated optimal control/optimization process. A numerical simulation is performed for the steady-state forward flight of an advance ratio of 0.35. It is demonstrated that through straightening the rotor blade, which mimics the behavior of a rigid blade, both the bending moments and vibratory hub loads can be significantly reduced by 32% and 57%, respectively. An active vibration control method is developed and analyzed for a hingeless rotor. The concept involves deflecting each individual trailing-edge flap using a compact resonant actuation system. Each resonant actuation system could yield high authority, while operating at a single frequency. Parametric studies are conducted to explore the finite wing effect of trailing-edge flaps and actuator saturation. A numerical simulation has been performed for the steady-state forward flight (mu = 0.15 ˜ 0.35). It is demonstrated that multiple trailing-edge flap configuration with the resonant actuation

  6. Evaluation of an Automated Analysis Tool for Prostate Cancer Prediction Using Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Roethke, Matthias C.; Kuru, Timur H.; Mueller-Wolf, Maya B.; Agterhuis, Erik; Edler, Christopher; Hohenfellner, Markus; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Hadaschik, Boris A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic performance of an automated analysis tool for the assessment of prostate cancer based on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) of the prostate. Methods A fully automated analysis tool was used for a retrospective analysis of mpMRI sets (T2-weighted, T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced, and diffusion-weighted sequences). The software provided a malignancy prediction value for each image pixel, defined as Malignancy Attention Index (MAI) that can be depicted as a colour map overlay on the original images. The malignancy maps were compared to histopathology derived from a combination of MRI-targeted and systematic transperineal MRI/TRUS-fusion biopsies. Results In total, mpMRI data of 45 patients were evaluated. With a sensitivity of 85.7% (with 95% CI of 65.4–95.0), a specificity of 87.5% (with 95% CI of 69.0–95.7) and a diagnostic accuracy of 86.7% (with 95% CI of 73.8–93.8) for detection of prostate cancer, the automated analysis results corresponded well with the reported diagnostic accuracies by human readers based on the PI-RADS system in the current literature. Conclusion The study revealed comparable diagnostic accuracies for the detection of prostate cancer of a user-independent MAI-based automated analysis tool and PI-RADS-scoring-based human reader analysis of mpMRI. Thus, the analysis tool could serve as a detection support system for less experienced readers. The results of the study also suggest the potential of MAI-based analysis for advanced lesion assessments, such as cancer extent and staging prediction. PMID:27454770

  7. Octet baryon masses and sigma terms from an SU(3) chiral extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Ross; Thomas, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the consequences of the remarkable new results for octet baryon masses calculated in 2+1- avour lattice QCD using a low-order expansion about the SU(3) chiral limit. We demonstrate that, even though the simulation results are clearly beyond the power-counting regime, the description of the lattice results by a low-order expansion can be significantly improved by allowing the regularisation scale of the effective field theory to be determined by the lattice data itself. The model dependence of our analysis is demonstrated to be small compared with the present statistical precision. In addition to the extrapolation of the absolute values of the baryon masses, this analysis provides a method to solve the difficult problem of fine-tuning the strange-quark mass. We also report a determination of the sigma terms for all of the octet baryons, including an accurate value of the pion-nucleon sigma term and the first determination of the strangeness sigma term based on 2+1-flavour l

  8. Penguin diagram dominance in radiative weak decays of bottom baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2005-05-01

    Radiative weak decays of antitriplet bottom baryons are studied under the assumption of penguin diagram dominance and flavor-SU(3) (or SU(2)) symmetry. Relations among decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  9. Baryon spectroscopy in a three-quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanzadeh, M.; Rajabi, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a three-body quark model for investigating the internal structure of baryons as well as baryon spectroscopy. In order to describe the SU(6) -invariant part of the spectrum, we assumed the spin-independent part of the interaction hypercentral, and treated using the hyperspherical formalism. For SU(6) -invariant potential, we used a generalized version of the popular "Coulomb-plus-linear" potential which contains "linear-plus-logarithmic" terms as confinement part and some inverse power terms. To obtain an analytical solution, we applied some approximations for dealing with problematic linear and logarithmic terms, leading to a qualitative reproducing of the spectrum. Then, to describe the hyperfine structure of the baryon and the splittings within the SU(6) -multiplets, we used the generalized Gürsey-Radicati Mass Formula as a SU(6) breaking interaction. Our calculations lead to a generally fair description of the baryon spectrum.

  10. Differentiating CDM and baryon isocurvature models with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: sekiguti@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2011-10-01

    We discuss how one can discriminate models with cold dark matter (CDM) and baryon isocurvature fluctuations. Although current observations such as cosmic microwave background (CMB) can severely constrain the fraction of such isocurvature modes in the total density fluctuations, CMB cannot differentiate CDM and baryon ones by the shapes of their power spectra. However, the evolution of CDM and baryon density fluctuations are different for each model, thus it would be possible to discriminate those isocurvature modes by extracting information on the fluctuations of CDM/baryon itself. We discuss that observations of 21 cm fluctuations can in principle differentiate these modes and demonstrate to what extent we can distinguish them with future 21 cm surveys. We show that, when the isocurvature mode has a large blue-tilted initial spectrum, 21 cm surveys can clearly probe the difference.

  11. The electroweak axion, dark energy, inflation and baryonic matter

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran, L.

    2015-03-15

    In a previous paper [1], the standard model was generalized to include an electroweak axion which carries baryon plus lepton number, B + L. It was shown that such a model naturally gives the observed value of the dark energy, if the scale of explicit baryon number violation A was chosen to be of the order of the Planck mass. In this paper, we consider the effect of the modulus of the axion field. Such a field must condense in order to generate the standard Goldstone boson associated with the phase of the axion field. This condensation breaks baryon number. We argue that this modulus might be associated with inflation. If an additional B − L violating scalar is introduced with a mass similar to that of the modulus of the axion field, we argue that decays of particles associated with this field might generate an acceptable baryon asymmetry.

  12. Color fluxes in the production of doubly heavy baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, S. P.

    2007-04-15

    The production of doubly heavy baryons in hadron-hadron collisions is considered. A method is proposed for decomposing the respective differential cross section into parts associated with contributions of various color-flux configurations.

  13. Multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance of solids: A cautionary note for data analysis and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacelle, Serge; Hwang, Son-Jong; Gerstein, Bernard C.

    1993-12-01

    The conventional method of data analysis and interpretation of time-resolved multiple quantum (MQ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of solids is closely examined. Intensity profiles of experimental 1H MQ NMR spectra of polycrystalline adamantane and hexamethylbenzene serve to test the Gaussian statistical model approach. Consequences of this model are explored with a least-squares fitting procedure, transformation of data to yield linear plots, and a scaling analysis. Non-Gaussian behavior of the MQ NMR spectral intensity profiles, as a function of order of coherences, is demonstrated with all these methods of analysis. A heuristic argument, based on the multiplicative properties of dipolar coupling constants in the equation of motion of the density operator, leads to the prediction of exponentially decaying MQ NMR spectral intensity profiles. Scaling analysis and semilog plots of experimental time-resolved MQ NMR spectra of adamantane and hexamethylbenzene support this deduction. Dynamical scale invariance in the growth process of multiple spin coherences is revealed with this new approach. The validity of spin counting in solids with MQ NMR is discussed in light of the present results.

  14. Multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance of solids: A cautionary note for data analysis and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Lacelle, S. ); Hwang, S. ); Gerstein, B.C. )

    1993-12-01

    The conventional method of data analysis and interpretation of time-resolved multiple quantum (MQ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of solids is closely examined. Intensity profiles of experimental [sup 1]H MQ NMR spectra of polycrystalline adamantane and hexamethylbenzene serve to test the Gaussian statistical model approach. Consequences of this model are explored with a least-squares fitting procedure, transformation of data to yield linear plots, and a scaling analysis. Non-Gaussian behavior of the MQ NMR spectral intensity profiles, as a function of order of coherences, is demonstrated with all these methods of analysis. A heuristic argument, based on the multiplicative properties of dipolar coupling constants in the equation of motion of the density operator, leads to the prediction of exponentially decaying MQ NMR spectral intensity profiles. Scaling analysis and semilog plots of experimental time-resolved MQ NMR spectra of adamantane and hexamethylbenzene support this deduction. Dynamical scale invariance in the growth process of multiple spin coherences is revealed with this new approach. The validity of spin counting in solids with MQ NMR is discussed in light of the present results.

  15. R-matrix Analysis for the 8Be System and Features in the p+7Li Reaction Over Resonance Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunieda, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    A comprehensive R-matrix analysis is currently underway for the 8Be compound system toward a consistent evaluation of the p+7Li reaction cross-sections over the resonance energy region. In this analysis, the energy eigenvalues are fixed to the level energies given in ENSDF, and we searched for values of the boundary condition parameters as well as the reduced-width amplitudes. It is found that some additional levels are necessary to fit the resonant shape of experimental cross-sections. Besides, the channel radii obtained may be consistent with well-known physical pictures of the atomic nucleus.

  16. Enhancing dominant modes in nonstationary time series by means of the symbolic resonance analysis.

    PubMed

    beim Graben, Peter; Drenhaus, Heiner; Brehm, Eva; Rhode, Bela; Saddy, Douglas; Frisch, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    We present the symbolic resonance analysis (SRA) as a viable method for addressing the problem of enhancing a weakly dominant mode in a mixture of impulse responses obtained from a nonlinear dynamical system. We demonstrate this using results from a numerical simulation with Duffing oscillators in different domains of their parameter space, and by analyzing event-related brain potentials (ERPs) from a language processing experiment in German as a representative application. In this paradigm, the averaged ERPs exhibit an N400 followed by a sentence final negativity. Contemporary sentence processing models predict a late positivity (P600) as well. We show that the SRA is able to unveil the P600 evoked by the critical stimuli as a weakly dominant mode from the covering sentence final negativity. PMID:18163770

  17. Alzheimer's Disease Detection in Brain Magnetic Resonance Images Using Multiscale Fractal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lahmiri, Salim; Boukadoum, Mounir

    2013-01-01

    We present a new automated system for the detection of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The MRI is analyzed by means of multiscale analysis (MSA) to obtain its fractals at six different scales. The extracted fractals are used as features to differentiate healthy brain MRI from those of AD by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The result of classifying 93 brain MRIs consisting of 51 images of healthy brains and 42 of brains affected by AD, using leave-one-out cross-validation method, yielded 99.18% ± 0.01 classification accuracy, 100% sensitivity, and 98.20% ± 0.02 specificity. These results and a processing time of 5.64 seconds indicate that the proposed approach may be an efficient diagnostic aid for radiologists in the screening for AD. PMID:24967286

  18. Resonant waveguide grating imagers for single cell analysis and high throughput screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Resonant waveguide grating (RWG) systems illuminate an array of diffractive nanograting waveguide structures in microtiter plate to establish evanescent wave for measuring tiny changes in local refractive index arising from the dynamic mass redistribution of living cells upon stimulation. Whole-plate RWG imager enables high-throughput profiling and screening of drugs. Microfluidics RWG imager not only manifests distinct receptor signaling waves, but also differentiates long-acting agonism and antagonism. Spatially resolved RWG imager allows for single cell analysis including receptor signaling heterogeneity and the invasion of cancer cells in a spheroidal structure through 3-dimensional extracellular matrix. High frequency RWG imager permits real-time detection of drug-induced cardiotoxicity. The wide coverage in target, pathway, assay, and cell phenotype has made RWG systems powerful tool in both basic research and early drug discovery process.

  19. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-11-25

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the biological object in a main magnetic field and in a radio frequency field, the main magnetic field having a static field direction; rotating the biological object at a rotational frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. According to another embodiment, the radio frequency is pulsed to provide a sequence capable of producing a spectrum that is substantially free of spinning sideband peaks.

  20. Protein folding at atomic resolution: analysis of autonomously folding supersecondary structure motifs by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Sborgi, Lorenzo; Verma, Abhinav; Sadqi, Mourad; de Alba, Eva; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The study of protein folding has been conventionally hampered by the assumption that all single-domain proteins fold by an all-or-none process (two-state folding) that makes it impossible to resolve folding mechanisms experimentally. Here we describe an experimental method for the thermodynamic analysis of protein folding at atomic resolution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The method is specifically developed for the study of small proteins that fold autonomously into basic supersecondary structure motifs, and that do so in the sub-millisecond timescale (folding archetypes). From the NMR experiments we obtain hundreds of atomic unfolding curves that are subsequently analyzed leading to the determination of the characteristic network of folding interactions. The application of this approach to a comprehensive catalog of elementary folding archetypes holds the promise of becoming the first experimental approach capable of unraveling the basic rules connecting protein structure and folding mechanism. PMID:22987355

  1. CDM/baryon isocurvature perturbations in a sneutrino curvaton model

    SciTech Connect

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Hayakawa, Taku; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: taku1215@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: shuichiro@rikkyo.ac.jp

    2014-10-01

    Matter isocurvature perturbations are strictly constrained from cosmic microwave background observations. We study a sneutrino curvaton model where both cold dark matter (CDM)/baryon isocurvature perturbations are generated. In our model, total matter isocurvature perturbations are reduced since the CDM/baryon isocurvature perturbations compensate for each other. We show that this model can not only avoid the stringent observational constraints but also suppress temperature anisotropies on large scales, which leads to improved agreement with observations.

  2. Hydrogen detection near surfaces and shallow interfaces with resonant nuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Markus; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2014-12-01

    This review introduces hydrogen depth profiling by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) via the resonant 1H(15N,αγ)12C reaction as a versatile method for the highly depth-resolved observation of hydrogen (H) at solid surfaces and interfaces. The technique is quantitative, non-destructive, and readily applied to a large variety of materials. Its fundamentals, instrumental requirements, advantages and limitations are described in detail, and its main performance benchmarks in terms of depth resolution and sensitivity are compared to those of elastic recoil detection (ERD) as a competing method. The wide range of 1H(15N,αγ)12C NRA applications in research of hydrogen-related phenomena at surfaces and interfaces is reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on the powerful combination of 1H(15N,αγ)12C NRA with surface science techniques of in-situ target preparation and characterization, as the NRA technique is ideally suited to investigate hydrogen interactions with atomically controlled surfaces and intact interfaces. In conjunction with thermal desorption spectroscopy, 15N NRA can assess the thermal stability of absorbed hydrogen species in different depth locations against diffusion and desorption. Hydrogen diffusion dynamics in the near-surface region, including transitions of hydrogen between the surface and the bulk, and between shallow interfaces of nanostructured thin layer stacks can directly be visualized. As a unique feature of 15N NRA, the analysis of Doppler-broadened resonance excitation curves allows for the direct measurement of the zero-point vibrational energy of hydrogen atoms adsorbed on single crystal surfaces.

  3. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Bautista, Julian E.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Busca, Nicolás G.; Carithers, William; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Delubac, Timothée; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Le Goff, J.-M.; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A.; Gott, J. Richard; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Howlett, Cullan; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lee, Khee-Gan; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H.; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; McBride, Cameron K.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Myers, Adam D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Prada, Francisco; Reid, Beth; Rich, James; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Samushia, Lado; Santos, Ricardo Tanausú Génova; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin; Simmons, Audrey; Skibba, Ramin A.; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Viel, Matteo; Wake, David A.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; BOSS Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. In particular, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibrated physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an "inverse distance ladder" yields a measurement of H0=67.3 ±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1 , with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat Λ CDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ ), our BAO +SN +CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301 ±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003 ±0.003 . When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO +SN +CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat Λ CDM values at ≈1 σ . While the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2 - 2.5 σ ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species, ∑mν<0.56 eV (95% confidence), improving to ∑mν<0.25 eV if we include the

  4. Orbit-based analysis of nonlinear energetic ion dynamics in tokamaks. I. Effective mode number profile and resonant frequency tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierwage, Andreas; Shinohara, Kouji

    2016-04-01

    The nonlinear interactions between shear Alfvén modes and tangentially injected beam ions in the 150-400 keV range are studied numerically in a JT-60U tokamak scenario with realistic geometry, large magnetic drifts, and strong beam drive. For this purpose, the recently developed orbit-based resonance analysis (ORA) method for circulating particles is extended, so that it can be applied to the nonlinear regime, where the spectrum of orbit-based poloidal mode numbers m orb varies in time as the fast ions undergo wave-particle trapping and radial transport. In particular, the extended ORA method captures the effect of nonlinear overlaps between resonances associated with neighboring harmonics ( m orb , n ) and ( m orb + 1 , n ) that cause long-distance ballistic transport. Two cases with low toroidal mode numbers n ≳ 1 are studied: an n = 1 mode without resonance overlap and a strongly driven n = 3 mode with resonance overlap. For both cases, an effective radial profile of the resonant poloidal mode number m res = M eff ( r ) is computed and used to track the effective resonant frequency ω res ( t ) of individual particles during their radial motion r(t). In Paper II, this frequency tracking technique will be applied to study the nonlinear frequency chirping and convective amplification of the modes.

  5. K{sup +} production in baryon-baryon and heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.Q.; Ko, C.M.; Chung, W.S.

    1998-01-01

    Kaon production cross sections in nucleon-nucleon, nucleon-{Delta}, and {Delta}-{Delta} interactions are studied in a boson exchange model. For the latter two interactions, the exchanged pion can be on-mass shell; only contributions due to a virtual pion are included via the Peierls method by taking into account the finite {Delta} width. With these cross sections and also those for pion-baryon interactions, subthreshold kaon production from heavy-ion collisions is studied in the relativistic transport model. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Integrated system modeling analysis of a cryogenic multi-cell deflecting-mode cavity resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min; Church, Michael

    2013-09-15

    A deflecting mode cavity is the integral element for six-dimensional phase-space beam control in bunch compressors and emittance transformers at high energy beam test facilities. RF performance of a high-Q device is, however, highly sensitive to operational conditions, in particular in a cryo-cooling environment. Using analytic calculations and RF simulations, we examined cavity parameters and deflecting characteristics of TM{sub 110,π} mode of a 5 cell resonator in a liquid nitrogen cryostat, which has long been used at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector (A0PI). The sensitivity analysis indicated that the cavity could lose 30%–40% of deflecting force due to defective input power coupling accompanying non-uniform field distribution across the cells with 40 ∼ 50 MeV electron beam and 70–80 kW klystron power. Vacuum-cryomodules of the 5 cell cavity are planned to be installed at the Fermilab Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. Comprehensive modeling analysis integrated with multi-physics simulation tools showed that RF loading of 1 ms can cause a ∼5 K maximum temperature increase, corresponding to a ∼4.3 μm/ms deformation and a 1.32 MHz/K maximum frequency shift. The integrated system modeling analysis will improve design process of a high-Q cavity with more accurate prediction of cryogenic RF performance under a high power pulse operation.

  7. Surface-based analysis methods for high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rez; Zhang, Qin; Darayan, Shayan; Dhandapani, Sankari; Katyal, Sucharit; Greene, Clint; Bajaj, Chandra; Ress, David

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a popular technique for studies of human brain activity. Typically, fMRI is performed with >3-mm sampling, so that the imaging data can be regarded as two-dimensional samples that average through the 1.5—4-mm thickness of cerebral cortex. The increasing use of higher spatial resolutions, <1.5-mm sampling, complicates the analysis of fMRI, as one must now consider activity variations within the depth of the brain tissue. We present a set of surface-based methods to exploit the use of high-resolution fMRI for depth analysis. These methods utilize white-matter segmentations coupled with deformable-surface algorithms to create a smooth surface representation at the gray-white interface and pial membrane. These surfaces provide vertex positions and normals for depth calculations, enabling averaging schemes that can increase contrast-to-noise ratio, as well as permitting the direct analysis of depth profiles of functional activity in the human brain. PMID:22125419

  8. Rotational temperature analysis of N2 by resonant enhanced multi-photon ionization with fluorescence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Steven F.; Williamson, James M.; Fisher, Dustin M.

    2011-10-01

    A non-invasive, optical technique to determine the rotational temperature of molecular nitrogen at atmospheric pressure by direct probing of the N2(X1Σg+,v =0) ground state with subsequent analysis of the rotational state distribution is presented. A tunable probe laser was scanned over resonant-enhanced, multi-photon ionization transitions initiating from various N2(X1Σg+,v =0,J″) states. At atmospheric pressure, the laser photo-ionization also induced N2+ fluorescence bands. Analysis of the relative fluorescence as a function of laser wavelength produced a calculated N2(X1Σg+,v =0,J″) rotational state distribution and determined the rotational temperature. The analysis also resulted in the assignment and tabulation of 11 previously unreported term energies for N2(b1Πu+,v =6) and N2(b1Πu-,v =6) for J' > 22, based on the experimental data. The method resulted in temperature determinations for two experimental trials in atmospheric N2 gas flows at room temperature and 600 K that were in good agreement with thermocouple measurements in the vicinity of the laser probe region.

  9. Analysis and design of negative resistance oscillators using surface transverse wave-based single port resonators.

    PubMed

    Avramov, Ivan D

    2003-03-01

    This practically oriented paper presents the fundamentals for analysis, optimization, and design of negative resistance oscillators (NRO) stabilized with surface transverse wave (STW)-based single-port resonators (SPR). Data on a variety of high-Q, low-loss SPR devices in the 900- to 2000-MHz range, suitable for NRO applications, are presented, and a simple method for SPR parameter extraction through Pi-circuit measurements is outlined. Negative resistance analysis, based on S-parameter data of the active device, is performed on a tuned-base, grounded collector transistor NRO, known for its good stability and tuning at microwave frequencies. By adding a SPR in the emitter network, the static transducer capacitance is absorbed by the circuit and is used to generate negative resistance only over the narrow bandwidth of the acoustic device, eliminating the risk of spurious oscillations. The analysis allows exact prediction of the oscillation frequency, tuning range, loaded Q, and excess gain. Simulation and experimental data on a 915-MHz fixed-frequency NRO and a wide tuning range, voltage-controlled STW oscillator, built and tested experimentally, are presented. Practical design aspects including the choice of transistor, negative feedback circuits, load coupling, and operation at the highest phase slope for minimum phase noise are discussed. PMID:12699155

  10. An automated real-time microscopy system for analysis of fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, André; Wotzlaw, Christoph; Lipinski, Hans-Gerd; Fandrey, Joachim

    2010-05-01

    Molecular imaging based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is widely used in cellular physiology both for protein-protein interaction analysis and detecting conformational changes of single proteins, e.g. during activation of signaling cascades. However, getting reliable results from FRET measurements is still hampered by methodological problems such as spectral bleed through, chromatic aberration, focal plane shifts and false positive FRET. Particularly false positive FRET signals caused by random interaction of the fluorescent dyes can easily lead to misinterpretation of the data. This work introduces a Nipkow Disc based FRET microscopy system, that is easy to operate without expert knowledge of FRET. The system automatically accounts for all relevant sources of errors and provides various result presentations of two, three and four dimensional FRET data. Two examples are given to demonstrate the scope of application. An interaction analysis of the two subunits of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1 demonstrates the use of the system as a tool for protein-protein interaction analysis. As an example for time lapse observations, the conformational change of the fluorophore labeled heat shock protein 33 in the presence of oxidant stress is shown.

  11. Data analysis and calibration for a bulk-refractive-index-compensated surface plasmon resonance affinity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinowsky, Timothy M.; Yee, Sinclair S.

    2002-02-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) affinity sensing, the problem of bulk refractive index (RI) interference in SPR sensing, and a sensor developed to overcome this problem are briefly reviewed. The sensor uses a design based on Texas Instruments' Spreeta SPR sensor to simultaneously measure both bulk and surface RI. The bulk RI measurement is then used to compensate the surface measurement and remove the effects of bulk RI interference. To achieve accurate compensation, robust data analysis and calibration techniques are necessary. Simple linear data analysis techniques derived from measurements of the sensor response were found to provide a versatile, low noise method for extracting measurements of bulk and surface refractive index from the raw sensor data. Automatic calibration using RI gradients was used to correct the linear estimates, enabling the sensor to produce accurate data even when the sensor has a complicated nonlinear response which varies with time. The calibration procedure is described, and the factors influencing calibration accuracy are discussed. Data analysis and calibration principles are illustrated with an experiment in which sucrose and detergent solutions are used to produce changes in bulk and surface RI, respectively.

  12. [Research of Left Ventricle Function Analysis Using Real-time Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging].

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; He, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Yin

    2015-12-01

    Real-time free breathing cardiac cine imaging is a reproducible method with shorter acquisition time and without breath-hold for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. However, the detection of end-diastole and end-systole frames of real-time free breathing cardiac cine imaging for left ventricle function analysis is commonly completed by visual identification, which is time-consuming and laborious. In order to save processing time, we propose a method for semi-automatic identification of end-diastole and end-systole frames. The method fits respiratory motion signal and acquires the expiration phase, end-diastole and end-systole frames by cross correlation coefficient. The procedure successfully worked on ten healthy volunteers and validated by the analysis of left ventricle function compared to the standard breath-hold steady-state free precession cardiac cine imaging without any significant statistical differences. The results demonstrated that the present method could correctly detect end-diastole and end-systole frames. In the future, this technique may be used for rapid left ventricle function analysis in clinic. PMID:27079101

  13. BASE - The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Bojtar, L.; Borchert, M.; Franke, K. A.; Higuchi, T.; Leefer, N.; Nagahama, H.; Matsuda, Y.; Mooser, A.; Niemann, M.; Ospelkaus, C.; Quint, W.; Schneider, G.; Sellner, S.; Tanaka, T.; Van Gorp, S.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ulmer, S.

    2015-11-01

    The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) aims at performing a stringent test of the combined charge parity and time reversal (CPT) symmetry by comparing the magnetic moments of the proton and the antiproton with high precision. Using single particles in a Penning trap, the proton/antiproton g-factors, i.e. the magnetic moment in units of the nuclear magneton, are determined by measuring the respective ratio of the spin-precession frequency to the cyclotron frequency. The spin precession frequency is measured by non-destructive detection of spin quantum transitions using the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, and the cyclotron frequency is determined from the particle*s motional eigenfrequencies in the Penning trap using the invariance theorem. By application of the double Penning-trap method we expect that in our measurements a fractional precision of δg/g 10-9 can be achieved. The successful application of this method to the antiproton will consist a factor 1000 improvement in the fractional precision of its magnetic moment. The BASE collaboration has constructed and commissioned a new experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. This article describes and summarizes the physical and technical aspects of this new experiment.

  14. Soft RPV through the baryon portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krnjaic, Gordan; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2014-03-01

    Supersymmetric (SUSY) models with R-parity generically predict sparticle decays with invisible neutralinos, which yield distinctive missing energy events at colliders. Since most LHC searches are designed with this expectation, the putative bounds on sparticle masses become considerably weaker if R-parity is violated so that squarks and gluinos decay to jets with large QCD backgrounds. Here we introduce a scenario in which baryonic R-parity violation (RPV) arises effectively from soft SUSY breaking interactions, but leptonic RPV remains accidentally forbidden to evade constraints from proton decay and FCNCs. The model features a global R-symmetry that initially forbids RPV interactions, a hidden R-breaking sector, and a heavy mediator that communicates this breaking to the visible sector. After R-symmetry breaking, the mediator is integrated out and an effective RPV A-term arises at tree level; RPV couplings between quarks and squarks arise only at loop level and receive additional suppression. Although this mediator must be heavy compared to soft masses, the model introduces no new hierarchy since viable RPV can arise when the mediator mass is near the SUSY breaking scale. In generic regions of parameter space, a light thermally-produced gravitino is stable and can be a viable dark matter candidate.

  15. The baryons in the Milky Way satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, O. H.; Eke, V. R.; Frenk, C. S.; Okamoto, T.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of satellite galaxies using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of a Milky Way (MW) like system, focusing on the best resolved examples, analogous to the classical MW satellites. Comparing with a pure dark matter simulation, we find that the condensation of baryons has had a relatively minor effect on the structure of the satellites' dark matter haloes. The stellar mass that forms in each satellite agrees relatively well over three levels of resolution (a factor of ˜64 in particle mass) and scales with (sub)halo mass in a similar way in an independent semi-analytical model. Our model provides a relatively good match to the average luminosity function of the MW and M31. To establish whether the potential wells of our satellites are realistic, we measure their masses within observationally determined half-light radii, finding that they have somewhat higher mass-to-light ratios than those derived for the MW dSphs from stellar kinematic data; the most massive examples are most discrepant. A statistical test yields an ˜6 per cent probability that the simulated and observationally derived distributions of masses are consistent. If the satellite population of the MW is typical, our results could imply that feedback processes not properly captured by our simulations have reduced the central densities of subhaloes, or that they initially formed with lower concentrations, as would be the case, for example, if the dark matter were made of warm, rather than cold particles.

  16. Is the cygnet the quintessential baryon?

    PubMed Central

    Segal, I E

    1991-01-01

    The apparently new hadron-like particle ("cygnet") indicated by cosmic ray observations on certain neutron stars is predicted to be a spin 1/2 fermion of magnetic moment and charge 0 and lifetime infinity. This derives from the natural identification of the cygnet with the one hitherto unobserved fundamental fermion of chronometric particle theory, the x or "exon", which plays the role of a quintessential baryon. The "partons" are represented by the other fundamental fermions, consisting of e, nue, and numu; e.g., n = x + e+ + e-, p = x + e+ + nue. With further empirical assignments, chronometric theory has a potential for explaining diverse phenomena, such as mixing in the neutral kaon complex and the nature of the higher electrons. Its fundamental fermion and boson fields transform indecomposably under its symmetry group, the conformal group G. Theoretical elementary particles transforming irreducibly under G derive as successive quotients in a maximal chain of invariant subspaces. Mass fixing by Mach's principle breaks the symmetry down to microscopically observed covariance with respect to the Poincare group P0. The resulting representation is normally irreducible, but splits in the case of the K0 into two P0-irreducible components that are mixed by the excess of the chronometric over the relativistic energy ("gravity"), which provides a "superweak" force that may be explanatory of CP violation. PMID:11607152

  17. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  18. Baryon-Derived Scaling Relations from CLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czakon, Nicole G.; Donahue, M.; Medezinski, E.; CLASH; Bolocam

    2014-01-01

    The CLASH observing program has produced a unique data set which allows the accurate calibration of a large set of galaxy cluster masses. The cosmological and astrophysical implications of these measurements extend far beyond HST-only science. To capitalize on the astronomy community’s interest in the CLASH data products, our collaboration has assembled a team of experts across many different observational cluster probes, including: strong lensing, weak lensing, X-ray, and the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich Effect (SZE). By combining weak- and strong-lensing measurements, full cluster profiles can be constrained from the inner tens of kpc out to several Mpc. This has important implications in cross-probe analyses as different observational probes are sensitive to different regions of a cluster’s mass profile. Another goal of the CLASH program is to characterize the level of hydrostatic mass bias in X-ray measurements. This is important as hydrostatic mass estimates are commonly used to calibrate X-ray and SZE cluster studies. In my talk, I will report on the status of several cross-probe scaling relations comparing the CLASH lensing masses and various baryonic cluster mass probes, including: optical richness, X-ray, and SZE observations of the full CLASH cluster catalog. The results of these investigations will be interesting for both large-scale surveys and individual cluster studies, when high quality lensing data is unavailable.

  19. A NEW WAY OF DETECTING INTERGALACTIC BARYONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lieu, Richard; Duan Lingze

    2013-02-01

    For each photon wave packet of extragalactic light, the dispersion by line-of-sight intergalactic plasma causes an increase in the envelope width and a chirp (drift) in the carrier frequency. It is shown that for continuous emission of many temporally overlapping wave packets with random epoch phases such as quasars in the radio band, this in turn leads to quasi-periodic variations in the intensity of the arriving light on timescales between the coherence time (defined as the reciprocal of the bandwidth of frequency selection, taken here as of order 0.01 GHz for radio observations) and the stretched envelope, with most of the fluctuation power on the latter scale which is typically in the millisecond range for intergalactic dispersion. Thus, by monitoring quasar light curves on such short scales, it should be possible to determine the line-of-sight plasma column along the many directions and distances to the various quasars, affording one a three-dimensional picture of the ionized baryons in the near universe.

  20. Quark Interchange Model of Baryon Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslow, Joel Neal

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point -like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and we assume that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (qq) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of Yn scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.