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Sample records for base hawaii kaneohe

  1. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, K.; Kandt, A.; Lisell, L.; Booth, S.; Walker, A.; Roberts, J.; Falcey, J.

    2011-11-01

    DOD's U.S. Pacific Command has partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess opportunities for increasing energy security through renewable energy and energy efficiency in Hawaii installations. NREL selected Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay to receive technical support for net zero energy assessment and planning funded through the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI). NREL performed a comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of MCBH Kaneohe Bay to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and electric vehicle integration. This report summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations.

  2. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, K.; Kandt, A.; Lisell, L.; Booth, S.

    2012-05-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an NREL assessment of Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay to appraise the potential of achieving net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and hydrogen vehicle integration. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Defense's U.S. Pacific Command partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess opportunities for increasing energy security through renewable energy and energy efficiency at Hawaii military installations. DOE selected Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay, to receive technical support for net zero energy assessment and planning funded through the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI). NREL performed a comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of MCBH Kaneohe Bay to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and hydrogen vehicle integration. This paper summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations. The analysis shows that MCBH Kaneohe Bay has the potential to make significant progress toward becoming a net zero installation. Wind, solar photovoltaics, solar hot water, and hydrogen production were assessed, as well as energy efficiency technologies. Deploying wind turbines is the most cost-effective energy production measure. If the identified energy projects and savings measures are implemented, the base will achieve a 96% site Btu reduction and a 99% source Btu reduction. Using excess wind and solar energy to produce hydrogen for a fleet and fuel cells could significantly reduce energy use and potentially bring MCBH Kaneohe Bay to net zero. Further analysis with an environmental impact and interconnection study will need to be completed. By achieving net zero status, the base will set an example for other military installations, provide environmental benefits, reduce costs, increase energy security, and exceed its energy goals and mandates.

  3. Kaneohe, Hawaii Wind Resource Assessment Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, R.; Green, J.; Meadows, B.

    2011-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has an interagency agreement to assist the Department of Defense (DOD) in evaluating the potential to use wind energy for power at residential properties at DOD bases in Hawaii. DOE assigned the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to facilitate this process by installing a 50-meter (m) meteorological (Met) tower on residential property associated with the Marine Corps Base Housing (MCBH) Kaneohe Bay in Hawaii.

  4. Alternative landfill cover technology demonstration at Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, L.A.; Harre, B.; Hakonson, T.E.

    1997-12-31

    Surface covers to control water infiltration to waste buried in landfills will be the remediation alternative of choice for most hazardous and sanitary landfills operated by the Department of Defense. Although surface covers are the least expensive method of remediation for landfills, they can still be expensive solutions. Conventional wisdom suggests that landfill capping technology is well developed as evidenced by the availability of EPA guidance for designing and constructing what has become known as the {open_quotes}RCRA Cap{close_quotes}. In practice, however, very little testing of the RCRA cap, or any other design, has been done to evaluate how effective these designs are in limiting infiltration of water into waste. This paper describes a low cost alternative to the {open_quotes}RCRA Cap{close_quotes} that is being evaluated at Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Kaneohe Bay. This study uses an innovative, simple and inexpensive concept to manipulate the fate of water falling on a landfill. The infiltration of water through the cap will be controlled by combining the evaporative forces of vegetation to remove soil water, with engineered structures that limit infiltration of precipitation into the soil. This approach relies on diverting enough of the annual precipitation to runoff, so that the water that does infiltrate into the soil can easily be removed by evapotranspiration.

  5. Disease dynamics of Montipora white syndrome within Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii: distribution, seasonality, virulence, and transmissibility.

    PubMed

    Aeby, G S; Ross, M; Williams, G J; Lewis, T D; Works, T M

    2010-07-26

    We report on an investigation of Montipora white syndrome (MWS), which is a coral disease reported from Hawaii, U.S.A., that results in tissue loss. Disease surveys of Montipora capitata within Kaneohe Bay (Oahu) found colonies that were affected by MWS on 9 reefs within 3 regions of Kaneohe Bay (south, central, north). Mean MWS prevalence ranged from 0.02 to 0.87% and average number of MWS cases per survey site ranged from 1 to 28 colonies. MWS prevalence and number of cases were significantly lower in the central region as compared to those in the north and south regions of Kaneohe Bay. There was a positive relationship between host abundance and MWS prevalence, and differences in host abundance between sites explained approximately 27% of the variation in MWS prevalence. Reefs in central Kaneohe Bay had lower M. capitata cover and lower MWS levels. MWS prevalence on reefs was neither significantly different between seasons (spring versus fall) nor among 57 tagged colonies that were monitored through time. MWS is a chronic and progressive disease causing M. capitata colonies to lose an average of 3.1% of live tissue mo(-1). Case fatality rate was 28% after 2 yr but recovery occurred in some colonies (32%). Manipulative experiments showed that the disease is acquired through direct contact. This is the first study to examine the dynamics of MWS within Hawaii, and our findings suggest that MWS has the potential to degrade Hawaii's reefs through time. PMID:20853736

  6. Runoff nutrient and suspended sediment fluxes, cycling, and management in southern Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringuet, S.; Young, C. W.; Hoover, D. J.; de Carlo, E. H.; MacKenzie, F. T.

    2003-12-01

    Urban runoff and its impact on water quality in Hawaii, especially after heavy rainfall, is highly dynamic. In the past, water quality was determined through "grab samples" that were merely snapshots in time of an ever-changing environment. In contrast, continuous measurements of water quality can capture data that reflect the effects of significant storm runoff events unobtainable using even frequent manual sampling. Continuous multiparameter monitoring facilitates investigation of the both the magnitude and persistence of impacts of storm runoff on coastal waters, which can eventually be related to the health of coral reef ecosystems. Taking advantage of recent technological developments in oceanographic instrumentation, our study assembled an instrument package dubbed Coral Reef Instrumented Monitoring Platform (CRIMP). CRIMP was designed to include probes that measure physical and biological parameters (temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and chlorophyll-a), nutrient analyzers (nitrate and phosphate), and a particle analyzer based on laser in-situ scattering and transmissometry. Various components of the CRIMP were previously used in conjunction with grab samples with the objective of elucidating the water quality of southern Kaneohe Bay and its relationship to physical, biological, and chemical processes operating in the bay, and to coral reef ecosystems. All instruments are now being combined on the CRIMP, and will allow us to study in near real time changes in fluvial inputs to the bay during storm runoff conditions and their impact on bay water quality and the coral reef ecosystem. In this presentation we discuss effects of freshwater delivery on adjacent coastal waters during high rainfall episodes (May 2002 and Feb 2003) that result in large runoff events and increased nutrient loading to coastal waters. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen to phosphorus ratios (DIN:DIP) in the Bay normally range from 2 to 4, suggesting a nitrogen

  7. Ecological impact of a fresh-water ``reef kill'' in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokiel, P. L.; Hunter, C. L.; Taguchi, S.; Watarai, L.

    1993-11-01

    Storm floods on the night of December 31, 1987 reduced salinity to 15‰ in the surface waters of Kaneohe Bay, resulting in massive mortality of coral reef organisms in shallow water. A spectacular phytoplankton bloom occurred in the following weeks. Phytoplankton growth was stimulated by high concentrations of plant nutrients derived partially from dissolved material transported into the bay by flood runoff and partially by decomposition of marine organisms killed by the flood. Within two weeks of the storm, chlorophyll a concentrations reached 40 mg m-3, one of the highest values ever reported. The extremely rapid growth rate of phytoplankton depleted dissolved plant nutrients, leading to a dramatic decline or “crash” of the phytoplankton population. Water quality parameters returned to values approaching the long-term average within 2 to 3 months. Corals, echinoderms, crustaceans and other creatures suffered extremely high rates of mortality in shallow water. Virtually all coral was killed to depths of 1 2m in the western and southern portions of the bay. Elimination of coral species intolerant to lowered salinity during these rare flood events leads to dominance by the coral Porites compressa. After a reef kill, this species can eventually regenerate new colonies from undifferentiated tissues within the “dead” perforate skeleton. Catastrophic flood disturbances in Kaneohe Bay are infrequent, probably occurring once every 20 to 50 years, but play an important role in determination of coral community structure. The last major fresh water reef kill occurred in 1965 when sewage was being discharged into Kaneohe Bay. Coral communities did not recover until after sewage abatement in 1979. Comparison between recovery rate after the two flood events suggests that coral reefs can recover quickly from natural disturbances, but not under polluted conditions.

  8. Statistical Summary of Hydrologic and Water-Quality Data from the Halawa, Haiku, and Kaneohe Drainage Basins Before, During, and After H-3 Highway Construction, Oahu, Hawaii, 1983-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Michael F.; Young, Stacie T.M.

    2001-01-01

    This report provides statistical summaries of rainfall, streamflow, suspended-sediment, and water-quality data collected in the Halawa, Haiku, and Kaneohe drainage basins before, during, and after construction of the H-3 Highway on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Methods of data collection also are described. Data collected during water years 1983 through 1999 at eight streamflow and six stream water-quality gaging stations, and two water-quality stations located in Waimaluhia Reservoir are included. Physiographic data for all basins contributing to the 14 stream stations as well as brief land-use descriptions of the Halawa, Haiku, and Kaneohe drainage basins are provided.

  9. A 20-KW Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS) at the Marine Corps Air Station, Kaneohe, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, D.

    1983-01-01

    The wind turbine generator chosen for the evaluation was a horizontal-axis-propeller-downwind rotor driving a three-phase, self-excited alternator through a step-up gear box. The alternator is fed into the base power distribution system through a three-phase, line-communtated-synchronous inverter using SCRs. The site has moderate wind conditions with an annual average windspeed of 12 to 14 mph, and the WECS turbine has a relatively high (29 mph) rated windspeed. The 20-kW WECS systems was primarily designed to obtain operating experience with, and maintenance information on, a 20-kW-sized WECS. This report describes in detail the experience gained and lessons learned during the field evaluation.

  10. Water Quality in the Halawa, Haiku, and Kaneohe Drainage Basins Before, During, and After H-3 Highway Construction, Oahu, Hawaii, 1983-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    Selected water-quality data collected before, during, and after construction of the H-3 Highway at 13 water-quality stations were compared to the State of Hawaii Department of Health water-quality standards to determine the effects of highway construction on the water quality of the affected streams. Highway construction had no effect on the high concentrations of total nitrogen and nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen observed except for increased nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen concentrations at one station on Hooleinaiwa Stream. Exceedences of the 10- and 2-percent-of-the-time concentration standards for total phosphorus, total suspended solids, and turbidity, all constituents associated with sediment, occurred more commonly and at more stations during construction than either before or after. These exceedences may be, in part, due to land disturbance caused by highway construction. Highway construction had no effect on the physical water-quality properties of pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, and specific conductance except at North Halawa and Kuou Streams, where specific-conductance values increased throughout the study period, most likely due to highway construction. No effects on selected trace metals and organic chemical compounds were observed due to highway construction. No effects due to highway construction were observed in the water quality of Waimaluhia Reservoir. Runoff from areas of urban land use in the Kaneohe drainage basin contributed more to the higher loads of selected water-quality constituents than did runoff from areas affected by highway construction.

  11. 33 CFR 334.1380 - Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay, Island of Oahu, Hawaii-Ulupau Crater Weapons...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... periods of darkness, flashing red warning beacons will be displayed on the shore at Ulupau Crater. (4... will be indicated by the absence of any warning flags, pennants, or beacons displayed ashore. (5)...

  12. 33 CFR 334.1380 - Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay, Island of Oahu, Hawaii-Ulupau Crater Weapons...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... periods of darkness, flashing red warning beacons will be displayed on the shore at Ulupau Crater. (4... will be indicated by the absence of any warning flags, pennants, or beacons displayed ashore. (5)...

  13. 33 CFR 334.1380 - Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay, Island of Oahu, Hawaii-Ulupau Crater Weapons...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... periods of darkness, flashing red warning beacons will be displayed on the shore at Ulupau Crater. (4... will be indicated by the absence of any warning flags, pennants, or beacons displayed ashore. (5)...

  14. 33 CFR 334.1380 - Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay, Island of Oahu, Hawaii-Ulupau Crater Weapons...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... periods of darkness, flashing red warning beacons will be displayed on the shore at Ulupau Crater. (4... will be indicated by the absence of any warning flags, pennants, or beacons displayed ashore. (5)...

  15. 33 CFR 334.1380 - Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay, Island of Oahu, Hawaii-Ulupau Crater Weapons...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... periods of darkness, flashing red warning beacons will be displayed on the shore at Ulupau Crater. (4... will be indicated by the absence of any warning flags, pennants, or beacons displayed ashore. (5)...

  16. KANEOHE BAY SEWAGE DIVERSION EXPERIMENT: PERSPECTIVES ON ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES TO NUTRITIONAL PERTURBATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, received increasing amounts of sewage from the 1950s through 1977. Most sewage was diverted from the bay in 1977 and early 1978. This investigation, begun in January 1976 and continued through August 1979, described the bay over that period, with particular r...

  17. 33 CFR 80.1430 - Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI. 80.1430 Section 80.1430 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1430 Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI. A straight...

  18. 33 CFR 80.1430 - Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI. 80.1430 Section 80.1430 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1430 Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI. A straight...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1430 - Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI. 80.1430 Section 80.1430 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1430 Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI. A straight...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1430 - Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI. 80.1430 Section 80.1430 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1430 Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI. A straight...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1430 - Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI. 80.1430 Section 80.1430 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1430 Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI. A straight...

  2. 77 FR 54902 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Input From Hawaii's Boat-based Anglers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Input From Hawaii's Boat-based Anglers AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)....

  3. Oblique view of the north and east sides, view facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of the north and east sides, view facing southwest - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Interior view showing the gable end of the clerestory and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view showing the gable end of the clerestory and the main roof, view facing southeast - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  5. Contextual view of Building 250 along C Street, view facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of Building 250 along C Street, view facing southwest - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  6. Interior view showing the framing for the long side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view showing the framing for the long side of the clerestory, view facing north - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  7. South side elevation, note clerestory above the lowpitch main roof, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South side elevation, note clerestory above the low-pitch main roof, view facing north - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Interior view showing the framing for the main roof, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view showing the framing for the main roof, view facing south - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  9. Oblique view of the south and west sides, view facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of the south and west sides, view facing northeast - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Interior view of the living room, doorways to kitchen and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of the living room, doorways to kitchen and toilet at the back wall, view facing northwest - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Golf Course Equipment & Repair Shop, Reeves & Moffett Roads, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Side elevation of Building 477 showing the shed roof addition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Side elevation of Building 477 showing the shed roof addition and horizontal siding at the ends, view facing northwest - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Golf Course Equipment & Repair Shop, Reeves & Moffett Roads, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  12. Oblique view of Building 477 showing the southeast end (left) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of Building 477 showing the southeast end (left) and the northeast side (right), view facing west - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Golf Course Equipment & Repair Shop, Reeves & Moffett Roads, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  13. Contextual view of Building 477 along Reeves Road, view facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of Building 477 along Reeves Road, view facing east - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Golf Course Equipment & Repair Shop, Reeves & Moffett Roads, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Oblique view of the northwest end (left) and the southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of the northwest end (left) and the southwest side (right), view facing east - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Golf Course Equipment & Repair Shop, Reeves & Moffett Roads, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Study of a novel range-dependent propagation effect with application to the axial injection of signals from the Kaneohe source.

    PubMed

    Tappert, Frederick D; Spiesberger, John L; Wolfson, Michael A

    2002-02-01

    A novel range-dependent propagation effect occurs when a source is placed on the seafloor in shallow water with a downward refracting sound speed profile, and sound waves propagate down a slope into deep water. Under these conditions, small grazing-angle sound waves slide along the bottom downward and outward from the source until they reach the depth of the sound channel axis in deep water, where they are detached from the sloping bottom and continue to propagate outward near the sound channel axis. This "mudslide" effect is one of a few robust and predictable acoustic propagation effects that occur in range-dependent ocean environments. As a consequence of this effect, a bottom mounted source in shallow water can inject a significant amount of acoustic energy into the axis of the deep ocean sound channel that can then propagate to very long ranges. Numerical simulations with a full-wave range-dependent acoustic model show that the Kaneohe experiment had the appropriate source, bathymetry, and sound speed profiles that allows this effect to operate efficiently. This supports the interpretation that some of the near-axial acoustic signals, received near the coast of California from the bottom mounted source located in shallow water in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii, were injected into the sound channel of the deep Pacific Ocean by this mechanism. Numerical simulations suggest that the mudslide effect is robust. PMID:11863177

  16. Insights in public health: the Hawai'i Home Visiting Network: evidence-based home visiting services in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, D Kaulana; Robertson, N Tod; Hayes, Donald K

    2014-05-01

    Home visiting services are cost-effective and improve the health of children and families among those at increased risk. From 1985-2008, home visiting services in Hawai'i were provided primarily through state funding of the Hawai'i Healthy Start Program, but the program was severely reduced due to the economy and state budget changes over the past decade. The Maternal and Child Health Branch (MCHB) in the Family Health Services Division responded to these changes by seeking out competitive grant opportunities and collaborations in order to continue to promote home visiting services to those children and families in need. In 2010, the MCHB was awarded a federally funded Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) grant for home visiting services to promote maternal, infant, and early childhood health, safety and development, strong parent-child relationships, and responsible parenting. In 2011, the MCHB was also awarded a competitive MIECHV development grant that funded the re-establishment of the hospital Early Identification program. Families in need of additional support identified through this program are referred for family strengthening services to a network of existing home visiting programs called the Hawai'i Home Visiting Network (HHVN). The HHVN is supported by MIECHV and a small amount of state funds to assist programs with capacity building, training, professional development, quality assurance, and accreditation/certification support. The MIECHV grant requires that programs are evidence-based and address specific outcome measures and benchmarks. The HHVN provides home visiting services to families prenatally through 5 years of age that reside in specific at-risk communities, and is aimed at fostering positive parenting and reducing child maltreatment using a strength-based approach by targeting six protective factors: (1) social connections, (2) nurturing and attachment, (3) knowledge of parenting and child development, (4) parental

  17. Coral proxy record of decadal-scale reduction in base flow from Moloka'i, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prouty, N.G.; Jupiter, S.D.; Field, M.E.; McCulloch, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater is a major resource in Hawaii and is the principal source of water for municipal, agricultural, and industrial use. With a growing population, a long-term downward trend in rainfall, and the need for proper groundwater management, a better understanding of the hydroclimatological system is essential. Proxy records from corals can supplement long-term observational networks, offering an accessible source of hydrologie and climate information. To develop a qualitative proxy for historic groundwater discharge to coastal waters, a suite of rare earth elements and yttrium (REYs) were analyzed from coral cores collected along the south shore of Moloka'i, Hawaii. The coral REY to calcium (Ca) ratios were evaluated against hydrological parameters, yielding the strongest relationship to base flow. Dissolution of REYs from labradorite and olivine in the basaltic rock aquifers is likely the primary source of coastal ocean REYs. There was a statistically significant downward trend (-40%) in subannually resolved REY/Ca ratios over the last century. This is consistent with long-term records of stream discharge from Moloka'i, which imply a downward trend in base flow since 1913. A decrease in base flow is observed statewide, consistent with the long-term downward trend in annual rainfall over much of the state. With greater demands on freshwater resources, it is appropriate for withdrawal scenarios to consider long-term trends and short-term climate variability. It is possible that coral paleohydrological records can be used to conduct model-data comparisons in groundwater flow models used to simulate changes in groundwater level and coastal discharge. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Coral proxy record of decadal-scale reduction in base flow from Moloka'i, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prouty, Nancy G.; Jupiter, Stacy D.; Field, Michael E.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater is a major resource in Hawaii and is the principal source of water for municipal, agricultural, and industrial use. With a growing population, a long-term downward trend in rainfall, and the need for proper groundwater management, a better understanding of the hydroclimatological system is essential. Proxy records from corals can supplement long-term observational networks, offering an accessible source of hydrologic and climate information. To develop a qualitative proxy for historic groundwater discharge to coastal waters, a suite of rare earth elements and yttrium (REYs) were analyzed from coral cores collected along the south shore of Moloka'i, Hawaii. The coral REY to calcium (Ca) ratios were evaluated against hydrological parameters, yielding the strongest relationship to base flow. Dissolution of REYs from labradorite and olivine in the basaltic rock aquifers is likely the primary source of coastal ocean REYs. There was a statistically significant downward trend (−40%) in subannually resolved REY/Ca ratios over the last century. This is consistent with long-term records of stream discharge from Moloka'i, which imply a downward trend in base flow since 1913. A decrease in base flow is observed statewide, consistent with the long-term downward trend in annual rainfall over much of the state. With greater demands on freshwater resources, it is appropriate for withdrawal scenarios to consider long-term trends and short-term climate variability. It is possible that coral paleohydrological records can be used to conduct model-data comparisons in groundwater flow models used to simulate changes in groundwater level and coastal discharge.

  19. 75 FR 57857 - Safety Zone; Blue Angels at Kaneohe Bay Air Show, Oahu, HI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) entitled: Safety Zone; Blue Angels at Kaneohe Bay Air Show, Oahu, HI in the Federal Register (75 FR 159). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public meeting was..., HI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is...

  20. 75 FR 51171 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Kaneohe, HI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of...: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389... Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Kaneohe, HI AGENCY: Federal...

  1. 75 FR 43823 - Safety Zone; He'eia Kea Small Boat Harbor, Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; He'eia Kea Small Boat Harbor, Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary Final Rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard...

  2. Hawaii Rifts

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Rifts mapped through reviewing the location of dikes and vents on the USGS 2007 Geologic Map of the State of Hawaii, as well as our assessment of topography, and, to a small extent, gravity data. Data is in shapefile format.

  3. Oahu, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This 60 by 55 km ASTER scene shows almost the entire island of Oahu, Hawaii on June 3, 2000. The data were processed to produce a simulated natural color presentation. Oahu is the commercial center of Hawaii and is important to United States defense in the Pacific. Pearl Harbor naval base is situated here. The chief agricultural industries are the growing and processing of pineapples and sugarcane. Tourism also is important to the economy. Among the many popular beaches is the renowned Waikiki Beach, backed by the famous Diamond Head, an extinct volcano. The largest community, Honolulu, is the state capital.

    The image is located at 21.5 degrees north latitude and 158 degrees west longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties

  4. Rover-Based Instrumentation and Scientific Investigations During the 2012 Analog Field Test on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, L. D.; Graff, T. G.

    2013-01-01

    Rover-based 2012 Moon and Mars Analog Mission Activities (MMAMA) were recently completed on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii. Scientific investigations, scientific input, and operational constraints were tested in the context of existing project and protocols for the field activities designed to help NASA achieve the Vision for Space Exploration [1]. Several investigations were conducted by the rover mounted instruments to determine key geophysical and geochemical properties of the site, as well as capture the geological context of the area and the samples investigated. The rover traverse and associated science investigations were conducted over a three day period on the southeast flank of the Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii. The test area was at an elevation of 11,500 feet and is known as "Apollo Valley" (Fig. 1). Here we report the integration and operation of the rover-mounted instruments, as well as the scientific investigations that were conducted.

  5. Integrating Place-based and Cultural Knowledge Systems into a Communicating Ocean Sciences course in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemus, J.; Coopersmith, A.; Duncan Seraphin, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Pacific Ocean Literacy for Youth, Publics, Professionals and Scientists (POLYPPS) collaborative program between the University of Hawaii and the Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence - California (COSEE CA) at UC Berkeley operates on the premise that ocean literacy is most effectively achieved through scientists and educators working together within a place-based context. We have partnered with a dynamic and respected group of traditional practitioners and a graduate student trained in Hawaiian Studies to advise efforts for respectfully and responsibly integrating aspects of traditional ecological knowledge with the existing course material. The goal is to build a collaborative network that connects ocean research and teaching with traditional knowledge to facilitate active engagement in stewardship and policy by all ocean users. This presentation will include details of ways in which we have adapted the COSEE-CA courses in Communicating Ocean Sciences (COS) and Communicating Ocean Sciences for Informal Audiences (COSIA) for our island setting; approaches for contextualizing course elements that utilize local and traditional exemplars and knowledge systems; and example outreach projects produced by students in our Communicating Ocean Sciences courses.

  6. Satellite-based assessment of water requirement for biofuel feedstock production in Maui, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Anderson, R. G.; Wang, D.

    2012-12-01

    Water availability is one of the limiting factors for sustainable production of biofuel crops. A common method for determining crop water requirement is to multiply daily potential evapotranspiration (ETo) calculated from meteorological parameters by a crop coefficient (Kc) to obtain actual crop evapotranspiration (ETc). Remote sensing data can provide dynamic Kc values that better reflect plant water use. In this study, an algorithm is being developed to estimate sugarcane Kc using normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) obtained from Landsat 7 satellite images. Crop canopy cover was measured with a handheld multispectral camera from two sugarcane fields at the Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Company (HC&S) plantation during the Landsat 7 satellite overpass days. An Eddy Covariance (EC) tower system was set up within each of these two fields and gathered EC flux at a 30-minute interval. Reference evapotranspiration was calculated from the network of automated weather stations at HC&S plantation using a modified Penman equation. Crop canopy cover was highly correlated with satellite NDVI values. A linear relationship between NDVI and measured Kc was obtained. Satellite -based ETc maps of HC&S plantation were developed using the NDVI-based Kc values and reference ET from HC&S weather station network. The satellite-based ETc was compared and validated with field measurements of ET using Eddy Covariance tower. A series of satellite-based ETc maps were developed to indicate the water demand of sugarcane plants at HC&S plantation. These results validate the use of satellite imagery as a tool for estimation of ET of sugarcane plants in Maui, Hawaii.

  7. Hip fracture incidence among Caucasians in Hawaii is similar to Japanese. A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ross, P D; Huang, C

    2000-10-01

    Age-specific hip fracture incidence has been increasing in some parts of the world. The incidence of hip fractures among Japanese on the island of Oahu, Hawaii in 1979-1981 was approximately half that of Caucasians in North America, but similar to the incidence in Japan. We surveyed the incidence on Oahu again in 1991-1995 for all races to compare the incidence among Japanese to the earlier rates, and to other populations, including Caucasians on Oahu. The incidence of hip fracture among Japanese in Hawaii between 1991-1995 had not changed appreciably (compared to 1979-1981), and was similar to that among Caucasians on Oahu. The incidence among Hawaii Japanese and Caucasians was similar to, or lower than Japan overall, and much lower (one-third to one-half) than that reported for Caucasians in North America and Northern Europe, suggesting that the prevalence of certain risk factors may be lower in Hawaii. These findings confirm other studies suggesting that nongenetic factors may be responsible for much of the observed differences in hip fracture incidence between countries, and between races. PMID:11126521

  8. Survival of European mouflon (Artiodactyla: Bovidae) in Hawai'i based on tooth cementum lines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, S.C.; Stephens, R.M.; Thompson, T.L.; Danner, R.M.; Kawakami, B., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable techniques for estimating age of ungulates are necessary to determine population parameters such as age structure and survival. Techniques that rely on dentition, horn, and facial patterns have limited utility for European mouflon sheep (Ovis gmelini musimon), but tooth cementum lines may offer a useful alternative. Cementum lines may not be reliable outside temperate regions, however, because lack of seasonality in diet may affect annulus formation. We evaluated the utility of tooth cementum lines for estimating age of mouflon in Hawai'i in comparison to dentition. Cementum lines were present in mouflon from Mauna Loa, island of Hawai'i, but were less distinct than in North American sheep. The two age-estimation methods provided similar estimates for individuals aged ???3 yr by dentition (the maximum age estimable by dentition), with exact matches in 51% (18/35) of individuals, and an average difference of 0.8 yr (range 04). Estimates of age from cementum lines were higher than those from dentition in 40% (14/35) and lower in 9% (3/35) of individuals. Discrepancies in age estimates between techniques and between paired tooth samples estimated by cementum lines were related to certainty categories assigned by the clarity of cementum lines, reinforcing the importance of collecting a sufficient number of samples to compensate for samples of lower quality, which in our experience, comprised approximately 22% of teeth. Cementum lines appear to provide relatively accurate age estimates for mouflon in Hawai'i, allow estimating age beyond 3 yr, and they offer more precise estimates than tooth eruption patterns. After constructing an age distribution, we estimated annual survival with a log-linear model to be 0.596 (95% CI 0.5540.642) for this heavily controlled population. ?? 2011 by University of Hawai'i Press.

  9. Workforce: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Employment in Hawaii (including hourly and salaried jobs and self-employment) is projected to grow by 14 percent from 2002 to 2012, adding over 78,000 new jobs to the state's economy and growing the workforce from 558,220 to 636,480. The rate of growth is slightly lower than the 15 percent increase projected for the nation as a whole. Over the…

  10. Prevalence of HCV Infection Among Clients in Community-Based Health Settings in Hawaii, 2002–2010: Assessing Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Jeremy C.; Lusk, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to determine the prevalence of HCV infection and identify risk factors associated with HCV infection among at-risk clients presenting to community-based health settings in Hawaii. Methods. Clients from 23 community-based sites were administered risk factor questionnaires and screened for HCV antibodies from December 2002 through May 2010. We performed univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results. Of 3306 participants included in the analysis, 390 (11.8%) tested antibody positive for HCV. Highest HCV antibody prevalence (17.0%) was in persons 45 to 64 years old compared with all other age groups. Significant independent risk factors were current or prior injection drug use (P < .001), blood transfusion prior to July 1992 (P = .002), and having an HCV-infected sex partner (P = .03). Stratification by gender revealed sexual exposure to be significant for males (P = .001). Conclusions. Despite Hawaii’s ethnic diversity, high hepatocellular carcinoma incidence, and a statewide syringe exchange program in place since the early 1990s, our HCV prevalence and risk factor findings are remarkably consistent with those reported from the mainland United States. Hence, effective interventions identified from US mainland population studies should be generalizable to Hawaii. PMID:24028267

  11. Impacts of a Place-Based Science Curriculum on Student Place Attachment in Hawaiian and Western Cultural Institutions at an Urban High School in Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuwahara, Jennifer L. H.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates how students' participation in a place-based science curriculum may influence their place attachment (dependence and identity). Participants attend an urban high school in Hawai'i and are members of different cultural institutions within the school. Students are either enrolled in an environmental science class within the…

  12. Hawaii's Adolescent Wellness Plan: Laulima in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Health, Honolulu.

    Based on a need in Hawaii for a multilevel responsibility and commitment to ensure adolescent wellness, the Hawaii Adolescent Wellness Team developed a plan based on research and discussions with a variety of professionals and community leaders in health, education, and social service. This resource handbook is designed to assist communities in…

  13. Management of flowering and fruiting of 'Kaimana' lychee in Hawaii.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Kaimana' lychee was selected in Hawaii based upon its high fruit quality and capacity to flower under Hawaii's mild winter climate. In Hawaii, consistent lychee production is achieved through management practices that limit high nitrogen content and new vegetative flushes during the time of year w...

  14. Space Radar Image of Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image shows the city of Honolulu, Hawaii and adjacent areas on the island of Oahu. Honolulu lies on the south shore of the island, along the bottom of this image. Diamond Head, an extinct volcanic crater, is seen in the lower right. The bright white strip left of Diamond Head is the Waikiki Beach area. Further west are the downtown area and harbor. Runways of the airport can be seen in the lower left. The Koolau mountain range runs through the center of the image. The steep cliffs on the north side of the range are thought to be remnants of massive landslides that ripped apart the volcanic mountains that built the island thousands of years ago. On the north shore of the island are the Mokapu peninsula and Kaneohe Bay. Densely vegetated areas appear green in this radar image, while urban areas generally appear orange, red or white. Images such as this can be used by land use planners to monitor urban development and its effect on the tropical environment. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttleEndeavour on October 6, 1994.The image is 20.6 kilometers by 31.0kilometers (12.8 miles by 19.2 miles) and is centered at 21.4degrees North latitude, 157.8 degrees West longitude. North is toward the upper left. The colors are assigned to different radarfrequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR,a joint mission of the German, Italian, and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  15. Interior view of the enclosed area, note the twolightover singlepanel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of the enclosed area, note the two-light-over single-panel door to the main warehouse area, view facing northeast - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  16. Exterior view along the west side, showing the alternating wood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior view along the west side, showing the alternating wood and steel ceiling beams and metal sash windows, view facing northeast - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Interior view of the window wall of the enclosed office ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of the window wall of the enclosed office area taken from the main warehouse area showing the metal sash windows, view facing west - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  18. Detail of the ridge framing of the clerestory roof, note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of the ridge framing of the clerestory roof, note the alternating wood and steel beams, view facing northeast - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Warehouse 250, Aviation Storehouse, C Street between Fifth & Sixth Streets, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  19. East side elevation of Building 455, note the area of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East side elevation of Building 455, note the area of raised monitor roof that corresponds to the former motion picture and lecture hall (present gymnasium), view facing west - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Gunnery School, Bingham Way between Minteer Street & Lawrence Road, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  20. Oblique view of the northeast side, note the lava rock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of the northeast side, note the lava rock stem wall below the windows of the shed-roof addition, view facing west - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Golf Course Equipment & Repair Shop, Reeves & Moffett Roads, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  1. Contextual view of the neighborhood looking down O'Neal Street, Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of the neighborhood looking down O'Neal Street, Building 402 is in the foreground, view facing southeast - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, C.P.O. Club & Married Enlisted Men's Quarters, O'Neal Street between Moffat & Lawrence Roads, Kaneohe, Honolulu County, HI

  2. Population characteristics of Hawaii, 1982.

    PubMed

    Oyama, N; Nishi, S; Schmitt, R C

    1984-04-01

    This report, based on a 16,309 person sample of the 6 major islands, presents demographic, social, and economic charateristics for Hawaii in 1982. The Hawaii Health Surveillance Program survey, conducted by the Hawaii State Department of Health, collects health information principally and differs from the 1980 census since it does not include 37,600 persons living in Kalawao and Niihao. Hawaii's household population includes 956,100 persons, with 857,300 civilians, and 98,800 military or military related persons. The median age is 28.9 years; the ratio is 100.6 males to 100 females. More than 1/4 of the household population is of mixed race. The major ethnic groups include 25.5% Caucasian (although 24.7% of this group are military related), 22.3% Japanese, 18.3% Hawaiian, and 11.8% Filipino. 66.6% of the population was born in Hawaii, with 23.6% from other states or US territories, and 14.8% are of foreign birth (chiefly from the Philippines, Japan, Korea, and China). The average length of residence in Hawaii is 16.5 years. 86.6% of the population are native born and 7% are aliens. Mobility rates are high, largely due to the military presence. The population makes up 303,200 households, with an average household size of 3.15, and an average family size of 3.61. The median years of education for persons 25 and over is 12.7; most people work in technical occupations, sales, and administration, followed by managerial and professional speciality jobs. Service jobs and wholesale and retail trade dominate employment; the median income is $23,900 for families and $12,100 for unrelated individuals. PMID:12267641

  3. Acute bronchitis and volcanic air pollution: a community-based cohort study at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, USA.

    PubMed

    Longo, Bernadette M; Yang, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Eruption at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, has continued since 1983, emitting sulfurous air pollution into nearby communities. The purpose of this cohort study was to estimate the relative risk (RR) of acute bronchitis over a period from January 2004 to December 2006 in communities exposed to the volcanic air pollution. A community-based case review was conducted using medical records from clinics and emergency rooms in exposed and unexposed study areas. Initial visits by local residents for diagnosed acute bronchitis were clinically reviewed. The cumulative incidence rate for the 3-yr period was 117.74 per 1000 in unexposed communities and 184.63 per 1000 in exposed communities. RR estimates were standardized for age and gender, revealing an elevated cumulative incidence ratio (CIR) of 1.57 (95% CI = 1.36-1.81) for acute bronchitis in the exposed communities. Highest risk [CIR: 6.56 (95% CI = 3.16-13.6)] was observed in children aged 0-14 yr who resided in the exposed communities. Exposed middle-aged females aged 45-64 yr had double the risk for acute bronchitis than their unexposed counterparts. These findings suggest that communities continuously exposed to sulfurous volcanic air pollution may have a higher risk of acute bronchitis across the life span. PMID:18850456

  4. Evaluation of passive diffusion bag and dialysis samplers in selected wells at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, July 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Pravecek, Tasha

    2002-01-01

    Field comparisons of chemical concentrations obtained from dialysis samplers, passive diffusion bag samplers, and low-flow samplers showed generally close agreement in most of the 13 wells tested during July 2001 at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii. The data for chloride, sulfate, iron, alkalinity, arsenic, and methane appear to show that the dialysis samplers are capable of accurately collecting a passive sample for these constituents. In general, the comparisons of volatile organic compound concentrations showed a relatively close correspondence between the two different types of diffusion samples and between the diffusion samples and the low-flow samples collected in most wells. Divergence appears to have resulted primarily from the pumping method, either producing a mixed sample or water not characteristic of aquifer water moving through the borehole under ambient conditions. The fact that alkalinity was not detected in the passive diffusion bag samplers, highly alkaline waters without volatilization loss from effervescence, which can occur when a sample is acidified for preservation. Both dialysis and passive diffusion bag samplers are relatively inexpensive and can be deployed rapidly and easily. Passive diffusion bag samplers are intended for sampling volatile organic compounds only, but dialysis samplers can be used to sample both volatile organic compounds and inorganic solutes. Regenerated cellulose dialysis samplers, however, are subject to biodegradation and probably should be deployed no sooner than 2 weeks prior to recovery. 1 U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia, South Carolina. 2 Air Florce Center for Environmental Excellence, San Antionio, Texas.

  5. Melanoma and Hawaii's youth.

    PubMed

    Williams, Laura

    2004-03-01

    Hawaii's sandy beaches, warm crystal waters, and mild climate attract tourists and residents alike to enjoy hours of outdoor activities under the sun. As frequent participants of these sun related activities, Hawaii's youth are exposed to high levels and duration of ultraviolet radiation throughout their early lives. This study aims to define occurrence trends of cutaneous malignant melanoma in Hawaii in correlation to increased childhood ultraviolet exposure. This paper addresses trends in melanoma incidence during 1979-2002 for Hawaii residents < 25 years of age. Data obtained from this review were analyzed by age group and ethnicity. Results show that although the incidence of melanoma is increasing for Hawaii residents over 25 years of age, the rate of melanoma occurrence in Hawaii's youth (< 25 years) is not increasing. PMID:15124743

  6. Managing Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae), Using Spinosad-Based Protein Bait Sprays in Papaya Orchards in Hawaii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of GF-120 Fruit Fly Bait was evaluated as a control of female oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) in papaya orchards in Hawaii. Two important components of this study were field sanitation and mass trapping using the male-specific lure methyl eugenol. Three different spray ...

  7. Studying Hammerheads in Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handler, Alex; Duncan, Kanesa

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the High School Scalloped Hammerhead Shark Tagging Program in Hawaii which is an example of a successful partnership research collaboration. High school students and teachers worked with biologists from the University of Hawaii-Manoa (UHM) to conduct research on the life history of scalloped hammerhead sharks…

  8. Hawaii Schools See Green

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses Hawaii's energy conservation efforts. Faced with high electricity costs, the Hawaii Department of Education instituted a pilot program in which schools could earn back half the amount they saved in electricity over the course of a semester. As a result, one school's electricity use decreased by more than 10% for the…

  9. HAWAII UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a point coverage of underground storage tanks(UST) for the state of Hawaii. The original database was developed and is maintained by the State of Hawaii, Dept. of Health. The point locations represent facilities where one or more underground storage tanks occur. Each fa...

  10. Cultural Earth Science in Hawai`i: Hands-on Place-Based Investigations that Merge Traditional Knowledge with Earth Science Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxey, L.; Dias, R. K.; Legaspi, E.

    2011-12-01

    During the summer of 2011, the Mālama Ke Ahupua`a (to care of our watershed) GEARUP summer program provided 25 under-served and under-represented minority public high school students (Hawaiian, part-Hawaiian, Filipino, Pacific Islanders) from Farrington High School (Kalihi, Honolulu) with a hands-on place-based multidiscipline course located within Manoa Valley (Ahupua`a O Kona) with the objective of engaging participants in scientific environmental investigations while exploring Hawaii's linkages between traditional knowledge, culture and science. The 4-week field program enabled students to collect samples along the perennial Manoa Stream and conduct water quality assessments throughout the Manoa watershed. Students collected science quality data from eight different sampling stations by means of field- and laboratory-based quantitative water quality testing equipment and GPS/GIS technology. While earning Hawaii DOE academic credits, students were able to document changes along the stream as related to pollution and urbanization. While conducting the various scientific investigations, students also participated in cultural fieldtrips and activities that highlighted the linkages between historical sustainable watershed uses by native Hawaiian communities, and their connections with natural earth processes. Additionally, students also participated in environmental service-learning projects that highlight the Hawaiian values of laulima (teamwork), mālama (to care for), and imi `ike (to seek knowledge). By contextualizing and merging hands-on place-based earth science inquiry with native Hawaiian traditional knowledge, students experienced the natural-cultural significance of their ahupua`a (watershed). This highlighted the advantages for promoting environmental literacy and geoscience education to under-served and under-represented minority populations in Hawaii from a rich native Hawaiian cultural framework.

  11. Spaceport Hawaii - Environmental issues

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, T.B. )

    1992-03-01

    The geographical, economic, and infrastructural factors of the Island of Hawaii make this island an ideal site for a privately owned and operated commercial launching facility for launching small- to medium-sized payloads into both equatorial and polar orbits. This paper describes the preparation of an environmental impact statement, which was initiated as a prelude to the eventual construction and operation of the commercial launching facility on the Island of Hawaii and which follows the Hawaii State law and the National Environmental Policy Act. The issues discussed are the regional characteristics of the Island of Hawaii, the candidate launch vehicles, the flight safety considerations, the spaceport development issues, and the potential impact of the future spaceport on the Mauna Kea Observatory on the Island of Hawaii.

  12. Generosity and adjusted premiums in job-based insurance: Hawaii is up, Wyoming is down.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Jon; McDevitt, Roland; Gandolfo, Laura; Pickreign, Jeremy; Hawkins, Samantha; Fahlman, Cheryl

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports national and state findings on the generosity or actuarial value of U.S. employer-based plans and adjusted premiums in 2002. The basis for our calculations is simulated bill paying for a large standardized population. After adjusting for the quality of benefits, we find from regression analysis that adjusted premiums are 18 percent higher in the nation's smallest firms than in firms with 1,000 or more workers. They are 25 percent higher in indemnity plans and 18 percent higher in preferred provider organizations than in health maintenance organizations. The generosity of coverage increased from 1997 to 2002. PMID:16684750

  13. Hawaii alternative fuels utilization program. Phase 3, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, C.M.; Staackmann, M.

    1996-08-01

    The Hawaii Alternative Fuels Utilization Program originated as a five-year grant awarded by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) to the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The overall program included research and demonstration efforts aimed at encouraging and sustaining the use of alternative (i.e., substitutes for gasoline and diesel) ground transportation fuels in Hawaii. Originally, research aimed at overcoming technical impediments to the widespread adoption of alternative fuels was an important facet of this program. Demonstration activities centered on the use of methanol-based fuels in alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). In the present phase, operations were expanded to include flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) which can operate on M85 or regular unleaded gasoline or any combination of these two fuels. Additional demonstration work was accomplished in attempting to involve other elements of Hawaii in the promotion and use of alcohol fuels for ground transportation in Hawaii.

  14. Hawaii geothermal project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamins, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Hawaii's Geothermal Project is investigating the occurrence of geothermal resources in the archipelago, initially on the Island of Hawaii. The state's interest in geothermal development is keen, since it is almost totally dependent on imported oil for energy. Geothermal development in Hawaii may require greater participation by the public sector than has been true in California. The initial exploration has been financed by the national, state, and county governments. Maximization of net benefits may call for multiple use of geothermal resources; the extraction of by-products and the application of treated effluents to agricultural and aquacultural uses.

  15. A Comparison of Aircraft and Ground-Based Measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, During GTE PEM-West and MLOPEX 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, E.; Ridley, B.; Walega, J.; Greenberg, J.; Kok, G.; Staffelbach, T.; Schauffler, S.; Lind, J.; Huebler, G.; Norton, R.

    1996-01-01

    During October 19-20, 1991, one flight of the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) Pacific Exploratory Mission (PEM-West A) mission was conducted near Hawaii as an intercomparison with ground-based measurements of the Mauna Loa Observatory Photochemistry Experiment (MLOPEX 2) and the NOAA Climate Modeling and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL). Ozone, reactive nitrogen species, peroxides, hydrocarbons, and halogenated hydrocarbons were measured by investigators aboard the DC-8 aircraft and at the ground site. Lidar cross sections of ozone revealed a complex air mass structure near the island of Hawaii which was evidenced by large variation in some trace gas mixing ratios. This variation limited the time and spatial scales for direct measurement intercomparisons. Where differences occurred between measurements in the same air masses, the intercomparison suggested that biases for some trace gases was due to different calibration scales or, in some cases, instrumental or sampling biases. Relatively large uncertainties were associated with those trace gases present in the low parts per trillion by volume range. Trace gas correlations were used to expand the scope of the intercomparison to identify consistent trends between the different data sets.

  16. Hawaii Space Grant Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Luke P.

    2005-01-01

    The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the University of Hawai'i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges spread over the 4 main Hawaiian islands. Geographic separation is not the only obstacle that we face as a Consortium. Hawai'i has been mired in an economic downturn due to a lack of tourism for almost all of the period (2001 - 2004) covered by this report, although hotel occupancy rates and real estate sales have sky-rocketed in the last year. Our challenges have been many including providing quality educational opportunities in the face of shrinking State and Federal budgets, encouraging science and technology course instruction at the K-12 level in a public school system that is becoming less focused on high technology and more focused on developing basic reading and math skills, and assembling community college programs with instructors who are expected to teach more classes for the same salary. Motivated people can overcome these problems. Fortunately, the Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium (HSGC) consists of a group of highly motivated and talented individuals who have not only overcome these obstacles, but have excelled with the Program. We fill a critical need within the State of Hawai'i to provide our children with opportunities to pursue their dreams of becoming the next generation of NASA astronauts, engineers, and explorers. Our strength lies not only in our diligent and creative HSGC advisory board, but also with Hawai'i's teachers, students, parents, and industry executives who are willing to invest their time, effort, and resources into Hawai'i's future. Our operational philosophy is to FACE the Future, meaning that we will facilitate, administer, catalyze, and educate in order to achieve our objective of creating a highly technically capable workforce both here in Hawai'i and for NASA. In addition to administering to programs and

  17. Hawaii Island Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Hawaii Island. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume II – Island of Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.

  18. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

  19. Hawaii electric system reliability.

    SciTech Connect

    Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

    2012-09-01

    This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

  20. Survival of feral cats, Felis catus (Carnivora: Felidae), on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i, based on tooth cementum lines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danner, Raymond M.; Farmer, Chris; Hess, Steven C.; Stephens, Robert M.; Banko, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    Feral cats (Felis catus) have spread throughout anthropogenic and insular environments of the world. They now threaten many species of native wildlife with chronic depredation. Knowledge of feral cat population dynamics is necessary to understand their ecological effects and to develop effective control strategies. However, there are few studies worldwide regarding annual or lifetime survival rates in remote systems, and none on Pacific islands. We constructed the age distribution and estimated survival of feral cats in a remote area of Hawai'i Island using cementum lines present in lower canine teeth. Our data suggest annual cementum line formation. A log-linear model estimated annual survival ≥ 1 yr of age to be 0.647. Relatively high survival coupled with high reproductive output allows individual cats to affect native wildlife for many years and cat populations to rebound quickly after control efforts.

  1. Mālama I Ka `Āina, Sustainability: learning from Hawai`i's displaced place and culture-based science standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, Pauline W. U.

    2011-03-01

    This response to Mitchell and Mueller's "A philosophical analysis of David Orr's theory of ecological literacy" comments on their critique of Orr's use of the phrase "ecological crisis" and what I perceive as their conflicting views of "crisis." I present my views on ecological crisis informed by standpoint theory and the definition of crisis as turning point. I connect the concept of turning point to tipping point as used in ecology to describe potentially irreversible changes in coupled social-ecological systems. I suggest that sustainable societies may provide models of adaptive learning in which monitoring of ecological phenomena is coupled to human behavior to mitigate threats to sustainability before a crisis/tipping point is reached. Finally, I discuss the Hawai`i State Department of Education's removal of its Indigenous science content standard Mālama I Ka `Āina, Sustainability and its continued use in community-based projects.

  2. The PVUSA-Hawaii Satellite Project

    SciTech Connect

    Rezachek, D.A.; Seki, A.; Sakai, K.

    1995-11-01

    The Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) Project is a national, cooperative research, development and demonstration program designed to promote utility-scale use of photovoltaics. Five 20-kilowatt-peak (nominal) emerging technologies, as well as several other photovoltaic systems, are being demonstrated at a site near Davis, California and one emerging technology system is being demonstrated at Kihei, Maui, Hawaii. The PVUSA-Hawaii Satellite Project was the first satellite system in the US. This paper describes the design, installation, operation and testing, maintenance, performance, and costs of the PVUSA-Hawaii Satellite Project. This system is compared to a similar system in Davis, and conclusions and recommendations based on more than five years of operation are presented.

  3. Immune status of free-ranging green turtles with fibropapillomatosis from Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Rameyer, R.A.; Balazs, G.H.; Cray, C.; Chang, S.P.

    2001-01-01

    Cell-mediated and humoral immune status of free-ranging green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in Hawaii (USA) with and without fibropapillornatosis (FP) were assessed. Tumored and non-tumored turtles from Kaneohe Bay (KB) on the island of Oahu and from FP-free areas on the west (Kona/Kohala) coast of the island of Hawaii were sampled from April 1998 through February 1999. Turtles on Oahu were grouped (0-3) for severity of tumors with 0 for absence of tumors, 1 for light, 2 for moderate, and 3 for most severe. Turtles were weighed, straight carapace length measured and the regression slope of weight to straight carapace length compared between groups (KB0, KB1, KB2, KB3, Kona). Blood was assayed for differential white blood cell count, hematocrit, in vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation in the presence of concanavalin A (ConA) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), and protein electrophoresis. On Oahu, heterophil/lymphocyte ratio increased while eosinophil/monocyte ratio decreased with increasing tumors score. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation indices for ConA and PHA were significantly lower for turtles with tumor scores 2 and 3. Tumor score 3 turtles (KB3) had significantly lower hematocrit, total protein, alpha 1, alpha 2, and gamma globulins than the other four groups. No significant differences in immune status were seen between non-tumored (or KB1) turtles from Oahu and Hawaii. There was no significant difference between groups in regression slopes of body condition to carapace length. We conclude that turtles with severe FP are imunosuppressed. Furthermore, the lack of significant difference in immune status between non-tumored (and KB1) turtles from Oahu and Kona/Kohala indicates that immunosuppression may not be a prerequisite for development of FP.

  4. Hawaii Gravity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-12-15

    Gravity model for the state of Hawaii. Data is from the following source: Flinders, A.F., Ito, G., Garcia, M.O., Sinton, J.M., Kauahikaua, J.P., and Taylor, B., 2013, Intrusive dike complexes, cumulate cores, and the extrusive growth of Hawaiian volcanoes: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 40, p. 3367–3373, doi:10.1002/grl.50633.

  5. Hawaii's Sugar Islands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association, Aiea, HI.

    A warm and sunny subtropical climate helps make Hawaii an important sugar producer. History records that sugarcane was already present when Captain James Cook discovered the islands in 1778, and that the first successful sugarcane plantation was started in 1835 by Ladd and Company at Koloa. The first recorded export of Hawaiian sugar was in 1837,…

  6. Networking Hawaii's School Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

    This guide is designed to assist school librarians in becoming part of the planned statewide school library network in Hawaii. Approaches to the guide for librarians at all stages of planning are suggested, and an overview of the benefits, goals, steps, and historical development are provided together with a model of the networking plan. The steps…

  7. School Libraries in Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bard, Therese Bissen

    This paper outlines the history, functions, administration, and current focus of school library services in Hawaii, which is the only state in the United States with a library staffed by a trained librarian in every public school. Its first school library was established in 1882. Elementary school libraries developed concurrently with secondary…

  8. Digital Broadcasting in Hawaii: The Aloha System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Norman

    1974-01-01

    A look at the ALOHA SYSTEM research project at the University of Hawaii, which developed and built a computer-communication network based upon the use of UHF radio broadcast channels for console to computer and computer to computer communication. (Author)

  9. Hawai'i DOE On-Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kajioka, Vicki; Shiroma, Donna; Tisdell, Debi; Kanemori, Lena; Tsuda, Jean

    2002-01-01

    The E-School Technology Innovation Challenge Grant of 1996 was the genesis of the Department of Education's (DOE's) efforts to initiate a multi-prong approach to bring standards-based curriculum to the children of Hawai'i and use technology to upgrade professional development for its teachers. In this article, the authors describe how various…

  10. Recharge Data for Hawaii Island

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Recharge data for Hawaii Island in shapefile format. The data are from the following sources: Whittier, R.B and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human Health and Environmental Risk Ranking of On-Site Sewage Disposal systems for the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final, Prepared for Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics. Oki, D. S. 1999. Geohydrology and Numerical Simulation of the Ground-Water Flow System of Kona, Island of Hawaii. U.S. Water-Resources Investigation Report: 99-4073. Oki, D. S. 2002. Reassessment of Ground-water Recharge and Simulated Ground-Water Availability for the Hawi Area of North Kohala, Hawaii. U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigation report 02-4006.

  11. 76 FR 72908 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, PA Service Service Type/Location: Corrosion Repair Services, Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay, HI. NPA: Goodwill Contract Services of Hawaii, Inc., Honolulu, HI. Contracting Activity: Regional Contracting Office, Marine Corps Base...

  12. Ground Water in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, Stephen B.; Oki, Delwyn S.

    2000-01-01

    Ground water is one of Hawaii's most important natural resources. It is used for drinking water, irrigation, and domestic, commercial, and industrial needs. Ground water provides about 99 percent of Hawaii's domestic water and about 50 percent of all freshwater used in the State. Total ground water pumped in Hawaii was about 500 million gallons per day during 1995, which is less than 3 percent of the average total rainfall (about 21 billion gallons per day) in Hawaii. From this perspective, the ground-water resource appears ample; however, much of the rainfall runs off to the ocean in streams or returns to the atmosphere by evapotranspiration. Furthermore, ground-water resources can be limited because of water-quality, environmental, or economic concerns. Water beneath the ground surface occurs in two principal zones: the unsaturated zone and the saturated zone. In the unsaturated zone, the pore spaces in rocks contain both air and water, whereas in the saturated zone, the pore spaces are filled with water. The upper surface of the saturated zone is referred to as the water table. Water below the water table is referred to as ground water. Ground-water salinity can range from freshwater to that of seawater. Freshwater is commonly considered to be water with a chloride concentration less than 250 mg/L, and this concentration represents about 1.3 percent of the chloride concentration of seawater (19,500 mg/L). Brackish water has a chloride concentration between that of freshwater (250 mg/L) and saltwater (19,500 mg/L).

  13. Hawaii's reptilian nightmare.

    PubMed

    Holt, A

    1998-01-01

    The invasion of Hawaii by snakes and other pests has threatened the state's economy and natural environment. Pests cause millions of dollars worth of crop losses, the extinction of native species, the destruction of native forests, and the spread of disease. In response to this situation, the Coordinating Group on Alien Pest Species (CGAPS), a multi-agency partnership of 15 federal, state, and private interests, formulated a 10-point action plan aimed at keeping alien pests out of the islands. Part of the plan includes researching new snake control methods and more extensive inspections of aircraft arriving in Hawaii. In addition, the CGAPS brought together the US Deputy Secretary of Agriculture, the Governor of Hawaii, and the state's congressional delegation to launch a statewide alien species public awareness campaign. Campaign activities included the distribution of a 28-page report establishing a central pest-reporting system, developing curricula for schools, and conducting a pre-campaign poll of island residents to gauge levels of awareness of the alien pest issue. Future efforts will put greater emphasis on reaching visitors through a passenger education program that will include airport educational displays, a revamped agricultural declaration form, a flight attendant briefing program, and advertisements in airline and travel publications. Other effective tools to measure the alien pest problem and its impact on the state's economy are also included in the agenda. PMID:12295948

  14. Haku Mele O Hawaii (Poet of Hawaii), Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Caroline, Ed.

    Proving the efficacy of Hawaii's Poets-in-the-Schools program, this collection of descriptive statements by some of Hawaii's leading poets and teachers of poetry, and accompanied by illustrative poems produced by classroom pupils, describes the theories that were generally accepted as a working basis and the related methods each writer used in the…

  15. Issei: Japanese Immigrants in Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimura, Yukiko

    Coming to Hawaii before July 1, 1924, when the Japanese Exclusion Act became effective, the experiences of the Issei or first generation are described. Divided into four parts, this book examines the experiences of Japanese immigrants in Hawaii from 1885 through 1970. Part 1, "The Formation and Stabilization of the Issei Community," explores the…

  16. Occupational Resource Manual for Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu.

    Developed cooperatively between the Occupational Informations and Guidance Services Center under the Community College System and the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Hawaii, this occupational resource manual for Hawaii, bound in a 3-ring notebook, contains pertinent information for students, parents, counselors, and…

  17. Hawaii: Lava or Leave It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Railton, Esther P., Ed.; Railton, Edward, Ed.

    In cooperation with the Hawaii 2000 Outdoor Education Center, a summer ecology course for teachers on the Island of Hawaii developed and conducted an environmental school in Hawaiian outdoor education for 18 children between the ages of 9 and 13. Thirteen teachers enrolled in a California State University field course in environmental education…

  18. HAWAII LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point coverage of leaking underground storage tanks(LUST) for the state of Hawaii. The original database was developed and is maintained by the State of Hawaii, Dept. of Health. The point locations represent facilities where one or more leaking underground storage tank exists. ...

  19. Hawaii Energy Strategy: Program guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Hawaii Energy Strategy program, or HES, is a set of seven projects which will produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. It will include a comprehensive energy vulnerability assessment with recommended courses of action to decrease Hawaii`s energy vulnerability and to better prepare for an effective response to any energy emergency or supply disruption. The seven projects are designed to increase understanding of Hawaii`s energy situation and to produce recommendations to achieve the State energy objectives of: Dependable, efficient, and economical state-wide energy systems capable of supporting the needs of the people, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The seven projects under the Hawaii Energy Strategy program include: Project 1: Develop Analytical Energy Forecasting Model for the State of Hawaii. Project 2: Fossil Energy Review and Analysis. Project 3: Renewable Energy Resource Assessment and Development Program. Project 4: Demand-Side Management Program. Project 5: Transportation Energy Strategy. Project 6: Energy Vulnerability Assessment Report and Contingency Planning. Project 7: Energy Strategy Integration and Evaluation System.

  20. The Japanese in Hawaii: An Annotated Bibliography of Japanese Americans. Hawaii Series No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuda, Mitsugu

    This revision of Mitsugu Matsuda's Japanese in Hawaii, 1868-1967: An Annotated Bibliography of the First Hundred Years, calls attention to writings which are available to students and individuals interested in Americans of Japanese ancestry. The materials range from scholarly pieces based on traditional academic sources for documentation to…

  1. Composition of water and suspended sediment in streams of urbanized subtropical watersheds in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Carlo, E. H.; Beltran, V.L.; Tomlinson, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    Urbanization on the small subtropical island of Oahu, Hawaii provides an opportunity to examine how anthropogenic activity affects the composition of material transferred from land to ocean by streams. This paper investigates the variability in concentrations of trace elements (Pb, Zn, Cu, Ba, Co, As, Ni, V and Cr) in streams of watersheds on Oahu, Hawaii. The focus is on water and suspended particulate matter collected from the Ala Wai Canal watershed in Honolulu and also the Kaneohe Stream watershed. As predicted, suspended particulate matter controls most trace element transport. Elements such as Pb, Zn, Cu, Ba and Co exhibit increased concentrations within urbanized portions of the watersheds. Particulate concentrations of these elements vary temporally during storms owing to input of road runoff containing elevated concentrations of elements associated with vehicular traffic and other anthropogenic activities. Enrichments of As in samples from predominantly conservation areas are interpreted as reflecting agricultural use of fertilizers at the boundaries of urban and conservation lands. Particulate Ni, V and Cr exhibit distributions during storm events that suggest a mineralogical control. Principal component analysis of particulate trace element concentrations establishes eigenvalues that account for nearly 80% of the total variance and separates trace elements into 3 factors. Factor 1 includes Pb, Zn, Cu, Ba and Co, interpreted to represent metals with an urban anthropogenic enrichment. Factor 2 includes Ni, V and Cr, elements whose concentrations do not appear to derive from anthropogenic activity and is interpreted to reflect mineralogical control. Another, albeit less significant, anthropogenic factor includes As, Cd and U and is thought to represent agricultural inputs. Samples collected during a storm derived from an offshore low-pressure system suggest that downstream transport of upper watershed material during tradewind-derived rains results in a 2

  2. Volcanology in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decker, R.; Decker, B.

    1988-01-01

    J.D. Dana, a geologist with a United states exploring expedition in the 1840's, was the first to write about the increase in age of the Hawaiian Islands to the northwest. He noted that weathering of the lavas, erosional destruction of the islands by waves and streams and the growth of reeds around the islands progressively increased away from the Island of Hawaii. He correctly established the islands' relative ages, but absolute ages had to wait for over 120 years until radioactive age-dating techniques became available. 

  3. Modal Interfaces in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, E. Alvey

    1974-01-01

    Hawaii, an archipelago where transportation distances are short but the interfaces are many, seeks elimination of modal changes by totally-submerged hydrofoil craft operating at the water surface directly between tourist resort destinations, by dual mode rapid transit vehicles operating directly between the deplaning bridges at Honolulu International Airport and hotel porte-cochere at Waikiki, by demand responsive vehicles for collection and distribution operating on fixed guideways for line haul, and by roll-on/roll-off inter-island ferries for all models of manually operated ground vehicles. The paper also describes facilitation of unavoidable interfaces by innovative sub-systems.

  4. Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI)

    SciTech Connect

    Busche, S.; Doris, E.; Braccio, R.; Lippert, D.; Finch, P.; O'Toole, D.; Fetter, J.

    2010-04-01

    This report provides detailed analyses of 21 clean energy policy options considered by the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative working groups for recommendation to the 2010 Hawaii State Legislature. The report considers the impact each policy may have on ratepayers, businesses, and the state in terms of energy saved, clean energy generated, and the financial costs and benefits. The analyses provide insight into the possible impacts, both qualitative and quantitative, that these policies may have in Hawaii based on the experience with these policies elsewhere. As much as possible, the analyses incorporate Hawaii-specific context to reflect the many unique aspects of energy use in the State of Hawaii.

  5. 4D Micro-Piston Motion of Halemaumau Lava Lake Surface Measured with Ground-Based Tripod LiDAR, Kilauea, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawden, G. W.; Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Howle, J.; Bond, S.; Thelen, W. A.; Kauahikaua, J. P.; Angeli, K.; Pelkie, A.; Molnia, B. F.

    2013-12-01

    We measured decimeter-scale oscillations in the elevation of the Halemaumau lava lake (HLL) surface at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, during a sequence of ground-based Tripod-LiDAR (T-LiDAR) laser scans September 13-14, 2012. Geodetically measuring elevational changes of a dynamic lava lake surface has inherent risks and technical challenges, including the ability to see the lake surface through the volcanic gases. We successfully penetrated most of the dense volcanic gases from the rim of the HLL using the Optech LR laser scanner 1-micron (1064 nm) laser (a wavelength that is not attenuated by water) to measure elevation changes of the surface of the active lava lake 164 meters below the scanner. We found that the average elevation of the entire lava lake surface oscillated with an average 10-cm amplitude across the HLL with increased amplitude (2-3 times larger) proximal to the downwelling portion of the lake. A temporal power-spectrum analysis of the T-LiDAR point cloud resolved an 8.4-second primary oscillation frequency with secondary frequencies at 3.3-second intervals from the primary (1.8, 5.1, 8.4, 11.7 seconds). Preliminary analysis of the seismic spectra shows a peak in the seismic signal at 7.8 seconds (0.13 hz) for the same time period. Qualitative assessment of time-lapse video of the lava lake surface visually confirms that the lava lake rises and falls about every 8 seconds with superimposed smaller-amplitude elevation changes approximately every 3 seconds. We suggest the term micro-pistoning to distinguish this behavior from the larger-scale gas pistoning events at Kilauea that take place over several minutes (Patrick, M. et al, Bull Volcanol, V73(9)pp 1179-1186, 2011).

  6. Techniques for assessing the wind energy resource in Hawaii and Pacific Islands region

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, T.A.; Hori, A.M.

    1980-08-01

    This report explains the procedures utilized in preparing the Wind Energy Resource Atlas: Hawaii and Pacific Islands Region and contrasts these methods with those used in the other regional assessments. Techniques generally paralleled those of the northwest wind resource assessment. Quality of data bases differed drastically between Hawaii and the Pacific Islands. For example, research data sets constituted a primary data source for Hawaii, but such sets were nonexistent for the Pacific Islands. Forest Service data had minor impact in Hawaii, none in the Pacific Islands. Many Pacific Island anemometers are poorly exposed since limited open spaces exist on small atolls.

  7. Hawaii bibliographic database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, T.L.; Takahashi, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Hawaii bibliographic database has been created to contain all of the literature, from 1779 to the present, pertinent to the volcanological history of the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain. References are entered in a PC- and Macintosh-compatible EndNote Plus bibliographic database with keywords and abstracts or (if no abstract) with annotations as to content. Keywords emphasize location, discipline, process, identification of new chemical data or age determinations, and type of publication. The database is updated approximately three times a year and is available to upload from an ftp site. The bibliography contained 8460 references at the time this paper was submitted for publication. Use of the database greatly enhances the power and completeness of library searches for anyone interested in Hawaiian volcanism.

  8. Hawaii's geothermal program

    SciTech Connect

    Zorpette, G.

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports that in a forest on the island of Hawaii, legal and regulatory activity has postponed the start-up of a small new power plant and imperilled the design and construction of several facilities like it. The same old story Hardly. The power plants at stake are not nuclear or coal- or even oil-fired, but geothermal, widely considered one of the more environmentally benign ways of generating electricity. In a further twist, the opposition is coming not only from the usual citizens; and environmental groups, but also from worshippers of a native good and, it has been alleged, growers of marijuana, a lucrative local crop. The clash occurs just as geothermal power sources have finally proven commercially viable, experts say, adding that technological advances and industry trends in the United States and elsewhere seem to factor great expansion in its use.

  9. Honolulu, Hawaii Radar Image, Wrapped Color as Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This topographic radar image shows the city of Honolulu, Hawaii and adjacent areas on the island of Oahu. Honolulu lies on the south shore of the island, right of center of the image. Just below the center is Pearl Harbor, marked by several inlets and bays. Runways of the airport can be seen to the right of Pearl Harbor. Diamond Head, an extinct volcanic crater, is a blue circle along the coast right of center. The Koolau mountain range runs through the center of the image. The steep cliffs on the north side of the range are thought to be remnants of massive landslides that ripped apart the volcanic mountains that built the island thousands of years ago. On the north shore of the island are the Mokapu Peninsula and Kaneohe Bay. High resolution topographic data allow ecologists and planners to assess the effects of urban development on the sensitive ecosystems in tropical regions.

    This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from pink through blue back to pink) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet) similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2400 meters (8000 feet) of total relief.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA

  10. Fostering Earth Science Inquiry From Within a Native Hawaiian Cultural Framework In O`ahu (Hawai`i) Through A Multidisciplinary Place-Based High School Summer Enrichment Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxey, L.; Dias, R.; Legaspi, E.

    2010-12-01

    During the summer of 2010, twenty-five public high school students from underrepresented communities and ethnicities (Hawaiian, part-Hawaiian, Sāmoan, Filipino, Pacific Islander) in O`ahu (Hawai`i) participated in the Mālama Ke Ahupua`a (protecting our watershed) program. This rigorous three-week hands-on, place-based multidisciplinary program provided students with the opportunity of visiting the Mānoa Valley watershed (O`ahu, Hawaii) for learning and experiencing the Earth Science System dynamics that comprises it, while simultaneously exploring the significance of the ahupua`a (watershed) as related to native Hawaiian history and culture. While earning Hawaii DOE-approved academic credit, students utilized GPS/GIS technology, quantitative water quality testing equipment, and environmental monitoring tools for performing a watershed survey and water quality study of Mānoa Stream (Mānoa Valley) from its inception in the mountains, its advance through Honolulu’s urbanized areas, and its convergence with the Pacific Ocean. Through this hands-on field-based study, students documented changes in the watershed’s environment as reflected in declining water quality induced by anthropogenic pollution sources and urbanization. Students also visited relevant native Hawaiian cultural sites in Mānoa, and explored their direct links with the historical sustainable usage of the watershed’s natural resources, both from a cultural and science-based perspective. Finally, traditional wa`a (native Hawaiian outrigger canoes) were used as both cultural resources for discussing ancient Polynesian exploration, as well as scientific research platforms for conducting near-shore reef surveys & assessments. This program served to promote not only Earth Science literacy and STEM skills, but also contributed to further environmental stewardship while fostering native Hawaiian & Polynesian cultural identities.

  11. Hawaii-Okinawa Building Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, I.; Salasovich, J.

    2013-05-01

    NREL conducted energy evaluations at the Itoman City Hall building in Itoman, Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, and the Hawaii State Capitol building in Honolulu, Hawaii. This report summarizes the findings from the evaluations, including the best practices identified at each site and opportunities for improving energy efficiency and renewable energy. The findings from this evaluation are intended to inform energy efficient building design, energy efficiency technology, and management protocols for buildings in subtropical climates.

  12. A Model of Intercultural Communication: The Interaction of Japanese and Other Ethnic Groups in Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogawa, Dennis M.

    Several research studies have looked at Japanese-American interaction with other ethnic groups in Hawaii. A study by McCandless and Hoyt, "Sex, Ethnicity, and Play Preferences of Preschool Children," reveals that children in Hawaii base their choice of friends on racial distinctions. This is due, however, not to racial hostility or discrimination…

  13. Hawaii Play Fairway Analysis: Hawaiian Place Names

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-11-15

    Compilation of Hawaiian place names indicative of heat. Place names are from the following references: Pukui, M.K., and S.H. Elbert, 1976, Place Names of Hawaii, University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, HI 96822, 289 pp. ; Bier, J. A., 2009, Map of Hawaii, The Big Island, Eighth Edition, University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, HI  96822, 1 sheet.; and Reeve, R., 1993, Kahoolawe Place Names, Consultant Report No. 16, Kahoolawe Island Conveyance Commission, 259 pp.

  14. Hawaii energy strategy report, October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This is a report on the Hawaii Energy Strategy Program. The topics of the report include the a description of the program including an overview, objectives, policy statement and purpose and objectives; energy strategy policy development; energy strategy projects; current energy situation; modeling Hawaii`s energy future; energy forecasts; reducing energy demand; scenario assessment, and recommendations.

  15. Hawaii energy strategy: Executive summary, October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This is an executive summary to a report on the Hawaii Energy Strategy Program. The topics of the report include the a description of the program including an overview, objectives, policy statement and purpose and objectives; energy strategy policy development; energy strategy projects; current energy situation; modeling Hawaii`s energy future; energy forecasts; reducing energy demand; scenario assessment, and recommendations.

  16. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the Hawaii State ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the Hawaii State Archives, Admiral Furlong Collection), HAS Folder PPFUR 2-2. U.S. Navy photograph, 1943. VIEW SHOWS TRANSFORMATION OF KUAHUA ISLAND INTO A PENINSULA, WITH BERTHING AROUND MOST OF THE SHORELINE. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Waterfront Facilities, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Understanding the scale of Marine protection in Hawai'i: from community-based management to the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Alan M; Stamoulis, Kostantinos A; Kittinger, John N; Drazen, Jeffrey C; Tissot, Brian N

    2014-01-01

    Ancient Hawaiians developed a sophisticated natural resource management system that included various forms of spatial management. Today there exists in Hawai'i a variety of spatial marine management strategies along a range of scales, with varying degrees of effectiveness. State-managed no-take areas make up less than 0.4% of nearshore waters, resulting in limited ecological and social benefits. There is increasing interest among communities and coastal stakeholders in integrating aspects of customary Hawaiian knowledge into contemporary co-management. A network of no-take reserves for aquarium fish on Hawai'i Island is a stakeholder-driven, adaptive management strategy that has been successful in achieving ecological objectives and economic benefits. A network of large-scale no-take areas for deepwater (100-400m) bottomfishes suffered from a lack of adequate data during their initiation; however, better technology, more ecological data, and stakeholder input have resulted in improvements and the ecological benefits are becoming clear. Finally, the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (PMNM) is currently the single largest conservation area in the United States, and one of the largest in the world. It is considered an unqualified success and is managed under a new model of collaborative governance. These case studies allow an examination of the effects of scale on spatial marine management in Hawai'i and beyond that illustrate the advantages and shortcomings of different management strategies. Ultimately a marine spatial planning framework should be applied that incorporates existing marine managed areas to create a holistic, regional, multi-use zoning plan engaging stakeholders at all levels in order to maximize resilience of ecosystems and communities. PMID:25358300

  18. Age of tilted reefs, Hawaii.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Campbell, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Submerged carbonate reefs are preserved as a series of submarine terraces between Molokai and Hawaii along a 200-km span of the SE Hawaiian Ridge. Limestones from 2 of the terraces have been dated at 13 and 120 ka. Recognition that the terraces are tilted permits assignment of about a dozen terraces from 150 to 1300 m depth to 8 general reef platforms. These reefs were drowned by the combined effects of island subsidence and sea level rise at the end of successive glacial stages from 13 to 647 ka. The platforms are tilted 5 m/km SE toward the locus of volcanic centered on the island of Hawaii.-from Authors

  19. US hydropower resource assessment for Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.

    1996-09-01

    US DOE is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in US. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model developed by INEL for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was tested using hydropower information and data provided by Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the PC user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes, and generate reports. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Hawaii.

  20. Site selection for concentrated solar thermal systems in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, A.

    1987-01-01

    This report identifies ares on the five major islands (Oahu, Maui, Molakai, Hawaii, and Kauai) that have the potential for concentrating solar thermal applications. The locations are based on existing solar insolation (mostly global and some direct normal) data, other meteorological information, land use, potential end-use, and existing facilities. These areas are: - Western coast of Oahu, especially near Kahe Point - Maui plains area - South-Central Molokai - Kona coast of the Big Island, especially Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii - Western and southern areas of Kauai. Monitoring stations are recommended at some of these sites to obtain direct normal insolation data for future evaluation.

  1. Insects. Hawaii Nature Study Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Curriculum Research and Development Group.

    This teaching guide is one of a series developed by the Curriculum Research and Development Group at the University of Hawaii. The program is laboratory and field oriented for elementary students. The focus of study for the project is the plant and animal life and the physical components of the Hawaiian environment, and their ecological…

  2. First report of Pestalotiopsis virgatula on rambutan in Hawaii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum) is a tropical, exotic fruit that has a rapidly expanding niche market in Hawaii. Diseased rambutan fruit was commonly observed in orchards in Hilo during January 2006. The disease appeared as dark brown to black spots on mature fruit and blackened areas at the base of ...

  3. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Hawaii. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  4. Hawaii Integrated Biofuels Research Program: Final Subcontract Report, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    This report is a compilation of studies done to develop an integrated set of strategies for the production of energy from renewable resources in Hawaii. Because of the close coordination between this program and other ongoing DOE research, the work will have broad-based applicability to the entire United States.

  5. The Big Island of Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Boasting snow-covered mountain peaks and tropical forest, the Island of Hawaii, the largest of the Hawaiian Islands, is stunning at any altitude. This false-color composite (processed to simulate true color) image of Hawaii was constructed from data gathered between 1999 and 2001 by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) instrument, flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite. The Landsat data were processed by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to develop a landcover map. This map will be used as a baseline to chart changes in land use on the islands. Types of change include the construction of resorts along the coastal areas, and the conversion of sugar plantations to other crop types. Hawaii was created by a 'hotspot' beneath the ocean floor. Hotspots form in areas where superheated magma in the Earth's mantle breaks through the Earth's crust. Over the course of millions of years, the Pacific Tectonic Plate has slowly moved over this hotspot to form the entire Hawaiian Island archipelago. The black areas on the island (in this scene) that resemble a pair of sun-baked palm fronds are hardened lava flows formed by the active Mauna Loa Volcano. Just to the north of Mauna Loa is the dormant grayish Mauna Kea Volcano, which hasn't erupted in an estimated 3,500 years. A thin greyish plume of smoke is visible near the island's southeastern shore, rising from Kilauea-the most active volcano on Earth. Heavy rainfall and fertile volcanic soil have given rise to Hawaii's lush tropical forests, which appear as solid dark green areas in the image. The light green, patchy areas near the coasts are likely sugar cane plantations, pineapple farms, and human settlements. Courtesy of the NOAA Coastal Services Center Hawaii Land Cover Analysis project

  6. Tephritid fruit fly Populations in a Dragonfruit Orchard in Hawaii: Border Plant Use and Infestation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dragonfruit, Hylocereus undatus, has been grown commercially in Southeast Asia, Australia, South America, Israel and the United States. In Hawaii, commercial fruit production has recently begun, based on newly introduced varieties. Dragonfruit originating from Vietnam, but intercepted in Japan, ha...

  7. An Evaluation of the Impact of HEW Assistance on Recent Immigrants in the State of Hawaii. A Study of Health, Education and Welfare Service Delivery to Hawaii Immigrants: Recommendations to the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbayani, Amefil

    This study identifies the problems and needs of recent immigrants to Hawaii, identifies those factors that hinder the effective delivery of Federally funded health, educational, and social services to immigrants, and recommends ways in which government agencies can meet immigrant needs in Hawaii. The study is based on a 1978 survey in which…

  8. Bibliography of marine turtles in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.F.

    1981-07-01

    Information on the organisms at proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites is required to assess the potential impacts of OTEC power plant operations. This bibliography is the product of a literature survey on marine turtles at two proposed OTEC sites in Hawaii. The OTEC sites are located off Keahole Point, Hawaii and Kahe Point, Oahu. The references included in this bibliography provide information on the distribution, ecology and biology of marine turtles in Hawaii.

  9. Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii Authority (NELHA): Hawaii Ocean Science & Technology Park; Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

    DOE Data Explorer

    Olson, K.; Andreas, A.

    2012-11-01

    A partnership with the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii Authority and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

  10. NWEI Azura Sept 2015 data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Terry Lettenmaier

    2015-12-14

    Data files for the NWEI Azura grid-connected deployment at the 30-meter berth of the US Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS 30m Site) at the Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) on the windward (northeast) coast of the island of Oahu, HI. See general documentation describing specifics of the data files and formats in a separate submission.

  11. NWEI Azura Oct 2015 data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Terry Lettenmaier

    2015-12-14

    Data files for the NWEI Azura grid-connected deployment at the 30-meter berth of the US Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS 30m Site) at the Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) on the windward (northeast) coast of the island of Oahu, HI. See general documentation describing specifics of the data files and formats in a separate submission.

  12. 77 FR 15736 - Procurement List; Addition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... INFORMATION: Addition On 11/28/2011 (76 FR 72908-72909), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind... added to the Procurement List: Service Service Type/Location: Corrosion Repair Services, Marine Corps.... Contracting Activity: Regional Contracting Office, Marine Corps Base Hawaii, ] Kaneohe Bay, HI....

  13. OVERVIEW, HANGAR No. 3 (FOREGROUND), HANGAR No. 4 (CENTER), AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW, HANGAR No. 3 (FOREGROUND), HANGAR No. 4 (CENTER), AND HANGAR No. 5 (BACKGROUND), FROM AIRCRAFT PARKING APRON, VIEW FACING NORTH - U.S. Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Hangar No. 4, First Street between A & B Streets, Kailua, Honolulu County, HI

  14. NWEI Azura November 2015 data

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Lettenmaier

    2015-12-15

    Data files for the NWEI Azura grid-connected deployment at the 30-meter berth of the US Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS 30m Site) at the Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) on the windward (northeast) coast of the island of Oahu, HI. See general documentation describing specifics of the data files and formats in a separate submission.

  15. NWEI Azura July 2015 data

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Lettenmaier

    2015-12-14

    Data files for the NWEI Azura grid-connected deployment at the 30-meter berth of the US Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS 30m Site) at the Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) on the windward (northeast) coast of the island of Oahu, HI. See general documentation describing specifics of the data files and formats in a separate submission.

  16. NWEI Azura January 2016 data

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Lettenmaier

    2016-01-01

    Data files for the NWEI Azura grid-connected deployment at the 30-meter berth of the US Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS 30m Site) at the Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Hawai'i (MCBH) on the windward (northeast) coast of the island of Oahu, HI. See general documentation describing specifics of the data files and formats in a separate submission.

  17. Early Pleistocene origin of reefs around Lanai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, Jody M.; Clague, David A.; Faichney, Iain D.E.; Fullagar, Paul D.; Hein, James R.; Moore, James G.; Paull, Charles K.

    2010-01-01

    A sequence of submerged terraces (L1–L12) offshore Lanai was previously interpreted as reefal, and correlated with a similar series of reef terraces offshore Hawaii island, whose ages are known to be <500 ka. We present bathymetric, observational, lithologic and 51 87Sr/86Sr isotopic measurements for the submerged Lanai terraces ranging from −300 to −1000 m (L3–L12) that indicate that these terraces are drowned reef systems that grew in shallow coral reef to intermediate and deeper fore-reef slope settings since the early Pleistocene. Age estimates based on 87Sr/86Sr isotopic measurements on corals, coralline algae, echinoids, and bulk sediments, although lacking the precision (∼±0.23 Ma) to distinguish the age–depth relationship and drowning times of individual reefs, indicate that the L12–L3 reefs range in age from ∼1.3–0.5 Ma and are therefore about 0.5–0.8 Ma older than the corresponding reefs around the flanks of Hawaii. These new age data, despite their lack of precision and the influence of later-stage submarine diagenesis on some analyzed corals, clearly revise the previous correlations between the reefs off Lanai and Hawaii. Soon after the end of major shield building (∼1.3–1.2 Ma), the Lanai reefs initiated growth and went through a period of rapid subsidence and reef drowning associated with glacial/interglacial cycles similar to that experienced by the Hawaii reefs. However, their early Pleistocene initiation means they experienced a longer, more complex growth history than their Hawaii counterparts.

  18. Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the Hawaii State ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original photograph located in the Hawaii State Archives, Admiral Furlong Collection), HAS Neg. 199.016. U.S. Navy photograph, August 21, 1919. MRS. JOSEPHUS DANIELS, WIFE OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, PUSHED A BUTTON AND DRYDOCK NO. 1 (FACILITY S779) WAS OFFICIALLY INAUGURATED. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Waterfront Facilities, Various locations throughout base, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Native Hawaiian Profile: State Of Hawaii 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alu Like, Inc., Honolulu, HI.

    This work summarizes statistics from previous reports on native Hawaiians done for the four counties in Hawaii. The data provided were extracted from the Office of Economic Opportunity's 1975 Census Update Surveys of Oahu, Hawaii, and Maui and from the 1974 Kauai Socio-Economic Profile done by the Center for Non-Metropolitan Studies of the…

  20. 14 CFR 99.49 - Hawaii ADIZ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hawaii ADIZ. 99.49 Section 99.49 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC Designated Air Defense Identification Zones § 99.49 Hawaii ADIZ. (a) Outer boundary....

  1. Geothermal energy for Hawaii: a prospectus

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, W.W.S.; Iacofano, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    An overview of geothermal development is provided for contributors and participants in the process: developers, the financial community, consultants, government officials, and the people of Hawaii. Geothermal energy is described along with the issues, programs, and initiatives examined to date. Hawaii's future options are explored. Included in appendices are: a technical glossary, legislation and regulations, a geothermal directory, and an annotated bibliography. (MHR)

  2. Super Science Saturdays: Developing Hawaii's Natural Treasures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hapai, Marlene Nachbar; Sing, David Kekaulike

    1994-01-01

    Takes a closer look at Super Science Saturday, held by the Center for Gifted and Talented Native Hawaiian Children/University of Hawaii at Hilo. These children are known to Hawaiians as Na Pua No'eau, which refers to Hawaii's children as "flowers blossoming toward self-discovery." (ZWH)

  3. 21 CFR 808.61 - Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hawaii. 808.61 Section 808.61 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.61 Hawaii. (a)...

  4. Teaching the New Women's History in Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Barbara Bennett

    With the publication in 1984 of "Notable Women of Hawaii," edited by Barbara Bennett Peterson, women's activities and accomplishments began to be accorded their rightful place in the traditional picture of Hawaiian history. Using this book as a text, a 16-week course entitled "Outstanding Women of Hawaii" was recently added to the curriculum of…

  5. A History of Japanese in Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Japanese Society of Hawaii, Honolulu.

    This handbook contains the history of the first hundred years of Japanese activity in Hawaii, of the pioneer immigrant workers and their progeny. The book offers valuable source material to the people of Hawaii who want to know their origins and who wish to teach their children of the achievements of their ancestors. Ninety-one pages of black and…

  6. 14 CFR 99.49 - Hawaii ADIZ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hawaii ADIZ. 99.49 Section 99.49 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC... Zones § 99.49 Hawaii ADIZ. (a) Outer boundary. The area included in the irregular octagonal...

  7. 14 CFR 99.49 - Hawaii ADIZ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hawaii ADIZ. 99.49 Section 99.49 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC... Zones § 99.49 Hawaii ADIZ. (a) Outer boundary. The area included in the irregular octagonal...

  8. 14 CFR 99.49 - Hawaii ADIZ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hawaii ADIZ. 99.49 Section 99.49 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC... Zones § 99.49 Hawaii ADIZ. (a) Outer boundary. The area included in the irregular octagonal...

  9. 14 CFR 99.49 - Hawaii ADIZ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hawaii ADIZ. 99.49 Section 99.49 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC... Zones § 99.49 Hawaii ADIZ. (a) Outer boundary. The area included in the irregular octagonal...

  10. 76 FR 24554 - Hawaii Disaster # HI-00022

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Hawaii Disaster HI-00022 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2. SUMMARY: This is an amendment to the Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of HAWAII dated...

  11. 76 FR 18613 - Hawaii Disaster #HI-00022

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Hawaii Disaster HI-00022 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Hawaii dated...

  12. 76 FR 21935 - Hawaii Disaster #HI-00022

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Hawaii Disaster HI-00022 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment to the Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Hawaii dated...

  13. Report on Hawaii Geothermal Power Plant Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    The report describes the design, construction, and operation of the Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project. This power plant, located in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii, produces three megawatts of electricity from the steam phase of a geothermal well. (ACR)

  14. Island of Hawaii, Hawaiian Archipelago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This single photo covers almost all of the big island of Hawaii (19.5N, 155.5E) in the Hawaiian Archipelago. The active Kilauea Volcano and lava flow is under clouds and hardly visible at the lower right edge but the Mauna Loa volcano crater and its older lava flow is at the bottom center. The Kona Coast, that produces the only coffee grown in the United States, is to the left. Mauna Kea is the extinct volcano and lava flow in the right center.

  15. 7 CFR 318.13-23 - Cut flowers from Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cut flowers from Hawaii. 318.13-23 Section 318.13-23... From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-23 Cut flowers from Hawaii. (a) Except for cut blooms and leis... paragraph (b) of this section, cut flowers may be moved interstate from Hawaii under limited permit, to...

  16. 7 CFR 318.13-23 - Cut flowers from Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cut flowers from Hawaii. 318.13-23 Section 318.13-23... From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-23 Cut flowers from Hawaii. (a) Except for cut blooms and leis... paragraph (b) of this section, cut flowers may be moved interstate from Hawaii under limited permit, to...

  17. 7 CFR 318.13-23 - Cut flowers from Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cut flowers from Hawaii. 318.13-23 Section 318.13-23... From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-23 Cut flowers from Hawaii. (a) Except for cut blooms and leis... paragraph (b) of this section, cut flowers may be moved interstate from Hawaii under limited permit, to...

  18. 7 CFR 318.13-23 - Cut flowers from Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cut flowers from Hawaii. 318.13-23 Section 318.13-23... From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-23 Cut flowers from Hawaii. (a) Except for cut blooms and leis... paragraph (b) of this section, cut flowers may be moved interstate from Hawaii under limited permit, to...

  19. 7 CFR 318.13-23 - Cut flowers from Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cut flowers from Hawaii. 318.13-23 Section 318.13-23... From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-23 Cut flowers from Hawaii. (a) Except for cut blooms and leis... paragraph (b) of this section, cut flowers may be moved interstate from Hawaii under limited permit, to...

  20. A comparison of participation and performance in age-group finishers competing in and qualifying for Ironman Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Stiefel, Michael; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat

    2013-01-01

    Background Athletes intending to compete in Ironman Hawaii need to qualify in an age-group based qualification system. We compared participation and top ten performances of athletes in various age groups between Ironman Hawaii and its qualifier races. Methods Finishes in Ironman Hawaii and in its qualifier races in 2010 were analyzed in terms of performance, age, and sex. Athletes were categorized into age groups from 18–24 to 75–79 years and split and race times were determined for the top ten athletes in each age group. Results A higher proportion of athletes aged 25–49 years finished in the qualifier races than in Ironman Hawaii. In athletes aged 18–24 and 50–79 years, the percentage of finishes was higher in Ironman Hawaii than in the qualifier races. For women, the fastest race times were slower in Ironman Hawaii than in the qualifier races for those aged 18–24 (P<0.001), 25–29 (P<0.05), and 60–64 (P<0.05) years. Swim split times were slower in Ironman Hawaii than in the qualifier races for all age groups (P<0.05). Cycling times were slower in Ironman Hawaii for 18–24, 25–29, 40–44, 50–54, and 60–64 years (P<0.05) in age groups. For men, finishers aged 18–24 (P<0.001), 40–44 (P<0.001), 50–54 (P<0.01), 55–59 (P<0.001), 60–64 (P<0.01), and 65–69 (P<0.001) years were slower in Ironman Hawaii than in the qualifier races. Swim split times were slower in Ironman Hawaii than in the qualifier races for all age groups (P<0.05). Cycling times were slower in Ironman Hawaii for those aged 18–24 and those aged 40 years and older (P<0.05). Conclusion There are differences in terms of participation and performance for athletes in different age groups between Ironman Hawaii and its qualifier races. Triathletes aged 25–49 years and men generally were underrepresented in Ironman Hawaii compared with in its Ironman qualifier races. These athletes may have had less chance to qualify for Ironman Hawaii than female athletes or younger (<25

  1. A summary of alcid records from Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clapp, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Abstract.-Four species of alcids have now been recorded frorn Hawaii. Two of them, the Tufted Puffin (Fratercula cirrhata and the Cassin's Auklet (Ptychoramchus aleuticus) have been found only once; the occurrence of the latter is reported here for the first time. two other alcids, the Horned Puffin (Fratercula arctica) and the Parakeet .Auklet (Cyclorrhynchus psittacula) have been recorded frorn Hawaii in greater numbers; the latter may be of regular occurrence in subtropical waters near the northwestern portion of the Hawaiian archipelago. Occurrence in Hawaii does not appear to be strongly related to size of populations to the north but instead to the extent to which the species are known to disperse.

  2. Hawai'i's EVolution: Hawai'i Powered. Technology Driven. (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-05-01

    This Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) brochure outlines Hawaii's energy and transportation goals and the implementation of electric vehicles (EV) and electric vehicle infrastructure since HCEI began in 2008. It includes information about Hawaii's role in leading the nation in available EV charging infrastructure per capita; challenges for continuing to implement EV technology; features on various successful EV users, including the Hawaiian Electric Company, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, and Senator Mike Gabbard; how EVs can integrate into and help propel Hawaii's evolving smart grid; and much more.

  3. Hawaii

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... clouds in the stereo image are the Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa volcanoes, each peaking at about 4.2 km above sea level. The southern face of a ... April to June 2000 - Big Island vegetation and volcanoes. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  4. Indoor radon risk potential of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.; Szarzi, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of radon risk potential in the State of Hawaii indicates that the potential for Hawaii is low. Using a combination of factors including geology, soils, source-rock type, soil-gas radon concentrations, and indoor measurements throughout the state, a general model was developed that permits prediction for various regions in Hawaii. For the nearly 3,100 counties in the coterminous U.S., National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) aerorad data was the primary input factor. However, NURE aerorad data was not collected in Hawaii, therefore, this study used geology and soil type as the primary and secondary components of potential prediction. Although the radon potential of some Hawaiian soils suggests moderate risk, most houses are built above ground level and the radon soil potential is effectively decoupled from the house. Only underground facilities or those with closed or recirculating ventilation systems might have elevated radon potential. ?? 2005 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  5. Leptospirosis in Hawaii, USA, 1999–2008

    PubMed Central

    Buchholz, Arlene E.; Hinson, Kialani; Park, Sarah Y.; Effler, Paul V.

    2011-01-01

    Although infrequently diagnosed in the United States, leptospirosis is a notable reemerging infectious disease throughout developing countries. Until 1995, when the disease was eliminated from the US list of nationally notifiable diseases, Hawaii led the nation in reported annual incidence rates. Leptospirosis remains a notifiable disease in Hawaii. To ascertain the status of leptospirosis in Hawaii since the most recent US report in 2002, we reviewed 1999–2008 data obtained from case investigation reports by the Hawaii State Department of Health. Of the 345 case reports related to in-state exposures, 198 (57%) were laboratory confirmed. Our findings indicate a change in seasonal disease occurrence from summer to winter and in the infective serogroup from Icterohemorrhagiae to Australis. Also, during the past 20 years, recreational exposures have plateaued, while occupational exposures have increased. Ongoing surveillance is needed to clarify and track the dynamic epidemiology of this widespread zoonosis. PMID:21291592

  6. Libraries in Hawaii: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... H. Mookini Library 200 West Kawili Street Hilo, HI 96720-4091 808-974-7346 http://library.uhh. ... Sciences Library 651 Ilalo St., MEB 101 Honolulu, HI 96813-5525 808-692-0810 http://jabsom.hawaii. ...

  7. Keyboard Literacy for Hawaii's Primary Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oksendahl, Wilma J.

    1972-01-01

    Article discusses some of the previous experiments in elementary typewriting, the background of the Hawaii English Program, particularly the Language Skills segment, and the Primary Typewriting Program--its rationale, materials and equipment, results and limitations. (Author/CB)

  8. Hawaii Deep Water Cable Program: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1990-09-01

    The Hawaii Deep Water Cable Program has succeeded unequivocally in determining the feasibility of deploying a submarine power cable system between the islands of Hawaii and Oahu. Major accomplishments of the program include designing, fabricating and testing an appropriate power cable, developing an integrated system to control all aspects of the cable laying operation, and testing all deployment systems at sea in the most challenging sections of the route.

  9. John Dewey's Visits to Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    John Dewey visited Hawai'i on three separate occasions. Of all three trips, by far the most important, as far as Dewey's influence on education in Hawai'i is concerned, was in 1899 when he came with his wife, Alice Chipman Dewey, to help launch the University Extension program in Honolulu. The Deweys' second trip was a very brief one--twenty years…

  10. Hawai'i: The Aloha State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Edward F.

    2009-01-01

    August 21, 2009, marks the 50th anniversary of the entry of the 50th state into the United States of America. All the states have their stories, but as a string of islands in the vast Pacific Ocean, more than 2,000 miles from any other land mass, Hawai'i has a story that is unique in many ways. Consider, for example, that Hawai'i has two official…

  11. Quantifying food waste in Hawaii's food supply chain.

    PubMed

    Loke, Matthew K; Leung, PingSun

    2015-12-01

    Food waste highlights a considerable loss of resources invested in the food supply chain. While it receives a lot of attention in the global context, the assessment of food waste is deficient at the sub-national level, owing primarily to an absence of quality data. This article serves to explore that gap and aims to quantify the edible weight, economic value, and calorie equivalent of food waste in Hawaii. The estimates are based on available food supply data for Hawaii and the US Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) loss-adjusted food availability data for defined food groups at three stages of the food supply chain. At its highest aggregated level, we estimate Hawaii's food waste generation at 237,122 t or 26% of available food supply in 2010. This is equivalent to food waste of 161.5 kg per person, per annum. Additionally, this food waste is valued at US$1.025 billion annually or the equivalent of 502.6 billion calories. It is further evident that the occurrence of food waste by all three measures is highest at the consumer stage, followed by the distribution and retail stage, and is lowest at the post-harvest and packing stage. The findings suggest that any meaningful intervention to reduce food waste in Hawaii should target the consumer, and distribution and retail stages of the food supply chain. Interventions at the consumer stage should focus on the two protein groups, as well as fresh fruits and fresh vegetables. PMID:26446198

  12. Report on Hawaii geothermal power plant project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    The Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project is the first power plant in the State of Hawaii to be powered by geothermal energy. This plant, which is located in the Puna District on the Island of Hawaii, produces three (3) megawatts of electricity utilizing the steam phase from the geothermal well. This project represents the climax of the geophysical research efforts going on for two decades in the Hawaiian Islands which resulted in the discovery of a significant reservoir of geothermal energy which could be put to practical use. In 1978 the Department of Energy, in conjunction with the State of Hawaii, entered into negotiations to design and build a power plant. The purpose and objective of this plant was to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing and operating a geothermal power plant located in a remote volcanically active area. A contract was signed in mid 1978 between the Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii (RCUH) and the Department of Energy (DOE). To date, the DOE has provided 8.3 million dollars with the State of Hawaii and others contributing 2.1 million dollars. The cost of the project exceeded its original estimates by approximately 25%. These increases in cost were principally contributed to the higher cost for construction than was originally estimated. Second, the cost of procuring the various pieces of equipment exceed their estimates by 10 to 20 percent, and third, the engineering dollar per man hour rose 20 to 25 percent.

  13. Potential of Renewable Energy to Reduce the Dependence of the State of Hawaii on Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Arent, D.; Barnett, J.; Mosey, G.; Wise, A.

    2009-01-01

    Deriving nearly 90% of its primary energy resources from oil, the State of Hawaii is more dependent on oil than any other U.S. state. The price of electricity in Hawaii is also more than twice the U.S. average. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 directed assessment of the economic implications of Hawaii's oil dependence and the feasibility of using renewable energy to help meet the state's electrical generation and transportation fuel use. This paper is based on the assessments and report prepared in response to that directive.Current total installed electrical capacity for the State of Hawaii is 2,414 MWe, 83% of which is fuel-oil generated, but already including about 170 MWe of renewable capacity. The assessments identified about 2,133 MWe (plus another estimated 2,000 MWe of rooftop PV systems) of potential new renewable energy capacity. Most notable, in addition to the rooftop solar potential, is 750 MWe and 140 MWe of geothermal potential on Hawaii and Maui, respectively, 840 MWe of potential wind capacity, primarily on Lanai and Molokai, and one potential 285 MWe capacity specific solar project (PV or solar thermal) identified on Kauai. Important social, political, and electrical-grid infrastructure challenges would need to be overcome to realize this potential. Among multiple crop and acreage scenarios, biofuels assessment found 360,000 acres in Hawaii zoned for agriculture and appropriate for sugarcane, enough to produce 429 million gallons of ethanol-enough to meet about 64% of current 2005 Hawaiian gasoline use. Tropical oil seed crops-potentially grown on the same land-might meet a substantial portion of current diesel use, but there has been little experience growing such crops in Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Energy and the State of Hawaii initiated in January 2008 a program that seeks to reduce Hawaii's oil dependence and provide 70% of the state's primary energy from clean energy sources by 2030. The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) activities will

  14. The Koreans in Hawaii. An Annotated Bibliography. Hawaii Series No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Arthur L, Comp.

    Two hundred and twenty documents comprise this annotated bibliography concerning Koreans in Hawaii. It includes all the materials presently available in Hawaii in either the English or the Korean language on the Korean community. Most of the materials listed relate to aspects of the life of the original immigrants and their descendents. Others are…

  15. Population and Hawaii: A Case Study [and] Interchange, Hawaii: The State of the State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Population Education Newsletter, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This document presents a variety of materials related to population trends in Hawaii. Materials presented include maps, glossaries, readings, charts, activities, questions, puzzles, tables of data, newspaper and magazine advertisements, and a directory of sources of additional information on Hawaii. The overall objective is to help students in…

  16. Modern History of Hawaii: Instructional Materials/Resources for High School Modern History of Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinoshita, Jane

    This resource guide contains seven units of study on the modern history of Hawaii. The one-semester course for use at the high school level is a study of the historical development of modern Hawaii within the context of social, political, and economic growth and development of the state. An introductory unit attempts to anticipate future problems…

  17. New Opportunities for Astronomy in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasinger, Guenther

    2012-01-01

    As one of the premier astronomy sites in the world, Hawai'i is well positioned to assume a leadership role in the development of the next generation of the world's most powerful ground-based telescopes: the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), and Pan-STARRS, all slated for the Hawaiian islands. The development of these new facilities represents great scientific potential for the astronomy research community. Pan-STARRS, an innovative wide-field imaging facility developed at IfA, has been operational via its first telescope, PS1, since 2010. With the largest digital camera ever built - 1.4 Gigapixels - and an unprecedented field of 7 deg2, PS1 generates a time-lapse movie of the Northern sky in 5 pass-bands. PS1 has already discovered a number of potentially hazardous asteroids, comets, and a new class of very luminous supernova explosions. The second telescope, PS-2, is under construction on Haleakala, with an ultimate aim a four-telescope system in one enclosure on Mauna Kea. Haleakala--the House of the Sun--is the best place on Earth for solar astronomy and has therefore been chosen by NSF as the site of the world's largest solar telescope, the ATST. ATST will employ a 4m primary mirror with a unique off-axis design optimized for high-contrast solar imaging and spectropolarimetry. Construction, which is already funded, is expected to start soon with two of the first-light instruments being developed in Hawaii. The TMT, ready for construction on Mauna Kea, will be among the world's most advanced ground-based observatories, operating in wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet to mid-infrared, integrating the most modern innovations in precision control, segmented mirror design, and adaptive optics. It will address bold scientific questions like the search for habitable extrasolar planets, the First Light in the Universe, the earliest Black Holes and the nature of space itself.

  18. A Unique Marine and Environmental Science Program for High School Teachers in Hawai'i: Professional Development, Teacher Confidence, and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Malia Ana J.; Manning, Mackenzie M.; Krupp, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Hawai'i is a unique and special place to conduct environmental science inquiry through place based learning and scientific investigation. Here, we describe and evaluate a unique professional development program for science teachers in Hawai'i that integrates the traditional approach of providing training to improve content knowledge, with the…

  19. Lava Flow at Kilauea, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On July 21, 2007, the world's most active volcano, Kilauea on Hawaii's Big Island, produced a new fissure eruption from the Pu'u O'o vent, which fed an open lava channel and lava flows toward the east. Access to the Kahauale'a Natural Area Reserve was closed due to fire and gas hazards. The two Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) nighttime thermal infrared images were acquired on August 21 and August 30, 2007. The brightest areas are the hottest lava flows from the recent fissure eruption. The large lava field extending down to the ocean is part of the Kupaianaha field. The most recent activity there ceased on June 20, but the lava is still hot and appears bright on the images. Magenta areas are cold lava flows from eruptions that occurred between 1969 and 2006. Clouds are cold (black) and the ocean is a uniform warm temperature, and light gray in color. These images are being used by volcanologists at the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaii Volcano Observatory to help monitor the progress of the lava flows.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud

  20. Discovering Learning, Discovering Self: The Effects of an Interdisciplinary, Standards-Based School Garden Curriculum on Elementary Students in Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Ming Wei

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the effects of an interdisciplinary standards-based school garden-based education program on student learning. The objective of the program is to help students learn to be self-directed learners, community contributors, complex thinkers, quality producers, effective communicators, and effective/ethical users of technology. For…

  1. Estimation of Median Streamflows at Perennial Stream Sites in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontaine, Richard A.; Wong, Michael F.; Matsuoka, Iwao

    1992-01-01

    The most accurate estimates of median streamflows at perennial stream sites in Hawaii are those made at streamflow-gaging stations. Two alternative methods for estimating median streamflows at ungaged sites are described in this report. Multiple-regression equations were developed for estimating median streamflows at ungaged, unregulated, perennial stream sites. The equations relate combinations of drainage area, mean altitude of the main stream channel, and mean annual precipitation to median streamflow. Streamflow data from 56 long-term continuous-record gaging stations were used in the analysis. Median-streamflow data for all 56 sites were adjusted using record-extension techniques to reflect base period (1912 through 1986) conditions. Hawaii was subdivided into two geographic groups and multiple-regression equations were developed for each. The standard error of predication for the equation developed for the first group, the islands of Oahu, Molokai, and Hawaii, is 41 percent. The standard error of predication for the equation developed for the second group, the islands of Kauai and Maui, is 54 percent. A method for estimating median-streamflow, based on discharge measurements and data from nearby streamflow-gaging stations, was also developed for 27 regulated, perennial windward Oahu sites. Standard errors of prediction for 23 of the sites range from 5 to 34 percent. Median-streamflow estimates for the four remaining sites were considered poor and no measures of accuracy are provided. Discharge measurements can be used to make estimates of median streamflows at ungaged, regulated sites where the regression equations developed in this report are not applicable. Discharge measurements can also be used to make estimates of median streamflows at ungaged, unregulated sites. Estimates of median streamflows based on discharge measurements have greater standard errors than estimates based on continuous streamflow records and in general have smaller standard errors

  2. Geothermal Resources Assessment in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.M.

    1984-10-01

    The Hawaii Geothermal Resources Assessment Program was initiated in 1978. The preliminary phase of this effort identified 20 Potential Geothermal Resource Areas (PGRA's) using available geological, geochemical and geophysical data. The second phase of the Assessment Program undertook a series of field studies, utilizing a variety of geothermal exploration techniques, in an effort to confirm the presence of thermal anomalies in the identified PGRA's and, if confirmed, to more completely characterize them. A total of 15 PGRA's on four of the five major islands in the Hawaiian chain were subject to at least a preliminary field analysis. The remaining five were not considered to have sufficient resource potential to warrant study under the personnel and budget constraints of the program. The island of Kauai was not studied during the current phase of investigation. Geothermal field studies were not considered to be warranted due to the absence of significant geochemical or geophysical indications of a geothermal resource. The great age of volcanism on this island would further suggest that should a thermal resource be present, it would be of low temperature. The geothermal field studies conducted on Oahu focused on the caldera complexes of the two volcanic systems which form the island: Waianae volcano and Koolau volcano. The results of these studies and the interpreted probability for a resource are presented.

  3. Infrasonic troposphere-ionosphere coupling in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The propagation of infrasonic waves in the ionospheric layers has been considered since the 1960's. It is known that space weather can alter infrasonic propagation below the E layer (~120 km altitude), but it was thought that acoustic attenuation was too severe above this layer to sustain long-range propagation. Although volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis (all surface sources) appear to routinely excite perturbations in the ionospheric F layer by the propagation of acoustic and acoustic-gravity waves through the atmosphere, there are few reports of the inverse pathway. This paper discusses some of the routine ground-based infrasonic array observations of ionospheric returns from surface sources. These thermospheric returns generally point back towards the source, with an azimuth deviation that can be corrected using the wind velocity profiles in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. However, the seismic excitation in the North Pacific by the Tohoku earthquake ensonified the coupled lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere waveguide in the 0.01 - 0.1 Hz frequency band, producing anomalous signals observed by infrasound arrays in Hawaii. These infrasonic signals propagated at curiously high velocities, suggesting that some assumptions on ionospheric sound generation and propagation could be revisited.

  4. Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) Scenario Analysis: Quantitative Estimates Used to Facilitate Working Group Discussions (2008-2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Braccio, R.; Finch, P.; Frazier, R.

    2012-03-01

    This report provides details on the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) Scenario Analysis to identify potential policy options and evaluate their impact on reaching the 70% HECI goal, present possible pathways to attain the goal based on currently available technology, with an eye to initiatives under way in Hawaii, and provide an 'order-of-magnitude' cost estimate and a jump-start to action that would be adjusted with a better understanding of the technologies and market.

  5. Forest Bird Distribution, Density and Trends in the Ka'u Region of Hawai'i Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorresen, P. Marcos; Camp, Richard J.; Pratt, Thane K.

    2007-01-01

    An accurate and current measure of population status and trend is necessary for conservation and management efforts. Scott and Kepler (1985) provided a comprehensive review of the status of native Hawaiian birds based on the extensive Hawaii Forest Bird Survey (HFBS) of the main islands (Scott et al. 1986). At that time, they documented declining populations and decreasing ranges for most species, and the extinction of several species over the previous 50 years. Many native bird species continue to decline throughout Hawai`i (Camp et al. In review, Gorresen et al. In prep.). The focus of this study is the mid-to-high elevation rainforest on the southeast windward slopes of Mauna Loa Volcano (Figure 1). Known as Ka`u, the region encompasses forest lands protected by Kamehameha Schools, The Nature Conservancy, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park (HVNP), and the State of Hawai'i's Ka`u Forest Reserve, Kapapala Forest Reserve and Kapapala Cooperative Game Management Area,. Together these lands support one of three main concentrations of native forest birds on the Hawai`i Island (the other two being centered on the Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge and Kulani-Keauhou area in the north and central windward part of the island, respectively.) Because this region harbors important populations of native and endangered forest birds in some of the best remaining forest habitat on the island, it has been a focus of forest bird surveys since the 1970s. The Ka`u region was first quantitatively surveyed in 1976 by the Hawaii Forest Bird Survey (Scott et al. 1986). Surveys were conducted by State of Hawai`i Division of Forestry and Wildlife in 1993 and 2002 and by the U.S. National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey in 2004 and 2005. In this report, we present analyses of the density, distribution and trends of native and introduced forest bird within the Ka`u region of Hawai`i Island. The analyses cover only those species with sufficient detections to model detection

  6. Piliwaiwai: Problem Gambling in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Robin-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Gambling is illegal in Hawai'i, but it is accessible through technology (eg, the internet), inexpensive trips to Las Vegas, and illegal gaming such as lottery sales, internet gambling, and sports betting. Where there are opportunities to gamble, there is a probability that problem gambling exists. The social costs of gambling are estimated to be as high as $26,300,000 for Hawai'i. Because no peer-reviewed research on this topic exists, this paper has gathered together anecdotal accounts and media reports of illegal gambling in Hawai'i, the existence of Gamblers Anonymous meetings operating on some of the islands, and an account of workshops on problem gambling that were provided by the author on three Hawaiian Islands. Through these lenses of gambling in Hawai'i, it is suggested that there are residents in Hawai'i who do experience problem gambling, yet it is unknown to what extent. Nonetheless, this paper argues that research and perhaps a public health initiative are warranted. PMID:27011888

  7. A Technical and Economic Optimization Approach to Exploring Offshore Renewable Energy Development in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Kyle B.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Perkins, Casey J.; Oster, Matthew R.; Warwick, M.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO) as part of ongoing efforts to minimize key risks and reduce the cost and time associated with permitting and deploying ocean renewable energy. The focus of the study was to discuss a possible approach to exploring scenarios for ocean renewable energy development in Hawaii that attempts to optimize future development based on technical, economic, and policy criteria. The goal of the study was not to identify potentially suitable or feasible locations for development, but to discuss how such an approach may be developed for a given offshore area. Hawaii was selected for this case study due to the complex nature of the energy climate there and DOE’s ongoing involvement to support marine spatial planning for the West Coast. Primary objectives of the study included 1) discussing the political and economic context for ocean renewable energy development in Hawaii, especially with respect to how inter-island transmission may affect the future of renewable energy development in Hawaii; 2) applying a Geographic Information System (GIS) approach that has been used to assess the technical suitability of offshore renewable energy technologies in Washington, Oregon, and California, to Hawaii’s offshore environment; and 3) formulate a mathematical model for exploring scenarios for ocean renewable energy development in Hawaii that seeks to optimize technical and economic suitability within the context of Hawaii’s existing energy policy and planning.

  8. 50 CFR 665.210 - Hawaii restricted bottomfish species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hawaii restricted bottomfish species. 665... Fisheries § 665.210 Hawaii restricted bottomfish species. Hawaii restricted bottomfish species means the following species: Local name Englishcommon name Scientific name lehi silver jaw jobfish Aphareus...

  9. 50 CFR 665.210 - Hawaii restricted bottomfish species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hawaii restricted bottomfish species. 665... Fisheries § 665.210 Hawaii restricted bottomfish species. Hawaii restricted bottomfish species means the following species: Local name Englishcommon name Scientific name lehi silver jaw jobfish Aphareus...

  10. 50 CFR 665.210 - Hawaii restricted bottomfish species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hawaii restricted bottomfish species. 665... Fisheries § 665.210 Hawaii restricted bottomfish species. Hawaii restricted bottomfish species means the following species: Local name English common name Scientific name lehi silver jaw jobfish Aphareus...

  11. 50 CFR 665.210 - Hawaii restricted bottomfish species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hawaii restricted bottomfish species. 665... Fisheries § 665.210 Hawaii restricted bottomfish species. Hawaii restricted bottomfish species means the following species: Local name Englishcommon name Scientific name lehi silver jaw jobfish Aphareus...

  12. 50 CFR 665.210 - Hawaii restricted bottomfish species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii restricted bottomfish species. 665... Fisheries § 665.210 Hawaii restricted bottomfish species. Hawaii restricted bottomfish species means the following species: Local name English common name Scientific name lehi silver jaw jobfish Aphareus...

  13. History of Aedes mosquitoes in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Winchester, Jonathan C; Kapan, Durrell D

    2013-06-01

    As a geographically isolated island chain with no native mosquitoes, Hawaii is a model for examining the mechanisms behind insect vector invasions and their subsequent interactions with each other and with human populations. The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, and the Asian tiger mosquito, Ae. albopictus, have been responsible for epidemics of dengue in Hawaii. As one of the world's earliest locations to be invaded by both species, Hawaii's history is particularly relevant because both species are currently invading new areas worldwide and are implicated in outbreaks of emergent or reemergent pathogens such as dengue, chikungunya, and yellow fever. Here we analyze the historical records of mosquito introductions in order to understand the factors that have led to the current distribution of these 2 mosquitoes in the Hawaiian Islands. PMID:23923330

  14. Insights in Public Health: For the Love of Data! The Hawai'i Health Data Warehouse.

    PubMed

    Chosy, Julia; Benson, Katherine; Belen, Dulce; Starr, Ranjani; Lowery St John, Tonya; Starr, Ranjani R; Ching, Lance K

    2015-11-01

    Data form the framework around which important public health decisions are made. Public health data are essential for surveillance and evaluating change. In Hawai'i, public health data come from a multitude of sources and agencies. The Hawai'i Health Data Warehouse (HHDW) was created to pull those data into a single location and to present results in a form that is easy for the public to access and utilize. In the years since its creation, HHDW has built a second consumer-focused web site, Hawai'i Health Matters, and is now introducing new functionality on the original site that allows users to define their own enquiry. The newly adopted Indicator-Based Information System (IBIS) uses a web interface to perform real-time data analysis and display results. This gives users the power to examine health data by a wide range of demographic and socioeconomic dimensions, permitting them to pinpoint the data they need. PMID:26568903

  15. Forecasting the role of renewables in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, J.; Ruderman, H.

    1980-11-01

    Alternative future energy supply systems for Hawaii were investigated. Other elements of the study examined future demand for energy, what indigeneous resources are available, what technologies will be sufficiently developed to exploit them, and what will be their social, economic, and environmental consequences. Each of the four counties in the state appear to have sufficient natural resources to supply nearly all of their energy needs. The island is in the belt of the northeast trade winds, has extensive high temperature geothermal resources, enjoys a higher average insolation than the mainland states, and the large temperature gradients and absence of a continental shelf make Hawaii a prime location for OTEC.

  16. Interim survey report, Wailua River hydropower, Kauai, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Installation of hydroelectric facilities on the South Fork Wailua River three and five miles upstream of Wailua Falls on the Island of Kauai, Hawaii is proposed. The hydroelectric facilities would provide an additional source of energy for the island, effectively utilizing available waters. Addition of hydropower to the island's power system, which is primarily reliant on fuel and diesel oils, would diversify the system's base. Hydropower diversion would reduce flows downstream of the structures, affecting fishery, recreational, and aesthetic resources. Construction activities would disturb approximately 2.7 acres of cropland and create temporary turbidity downstream of the sites.

  17. New geologic map of the Island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, Edward; Morris, Jean

    1990-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping on the Island of Hawaii is compiled in a detailed new 1:100,000-scale geologic map. The lava flows and pyroclastic deposits of each volcano are assigned to major lithostratigraphic units based on lithology and stratigraphic relations. However, the emphasis of the map is strongly chronostratigraphic. Lavas of latest Pleistocene and Holocene age, which form almost all of the surface area of the Island's three active volcanoes, Kilauea, Mauna Loa, and Hualalai, are divided, on the basis of field relations and radiocarbon ages, into six to eight chronostratigraphic groups. The map constitutes a detailed database for geologic analysis and resource assessment.

  18. Norwalk virus-associated gastroenteritis traced to ice consumption aboard a cruise ship in Hawaii: comparison and application of molecular method-based assays.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, A S; Moe, C L; Glass, R I; Monroe, S S; Estes, M K; Chapman, L E; Jiang, X; Humphrey, C; Pon, E; Iskander, J K

    1994-01-01

    Investigation of an outbreak of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis on a cruise ship provided an opportunity to assess new molecular method-based diagnostic methods for Norwalk virus (NV) and the antibody response to NV infection. The outbreak began within 36 h of embarkation and affected 30% of 672 passengers and crew. No single meal, seating, or food item was implicated in the transmission of NV, but a passenger's risk of illness was associated with the amount of ice (but not water) consumed (chi-square for trend, P = 0.009). Of 19 fecal specimens examined, 7 were found to contain 27-nm NV-like particles by electron microscopy and 16 were positive by PCR with very sensitive NV-specific primers, but only 5 were positive by a new highly specific antigen enzyme immunoassay for NV. Ten of 12 serum specimen pairs demonstrated a fourfold or greater rise in antibody titer to recombinant baculovirus-expressed NV antigen. The amplified PCR band shared only 81% nucleotide sequence homology with the reference NV strain, which may explain the lack of utility of the fecal specimen enzyme immunoassay. This report, the first to document the use of these molecular method-based assays for investigation of an outbreak, demonstrates the importance of highly sensitive viral diagnostics such as PCR and serodiagnosis for the epidemiologic investigation of NV gastroenteritis. Images PMID:8150941

  19. Curriculum Materials in the Hawaii English Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Nancy M.

    Contrary to the usual design of curriculum materials, those of the Hawaii English Program (H.E.P.) are not handbooks for teachers. The H.E.P. materials--literature, in this case--consist of booklets for students who thus bear the responsibility for setting their own pace according to their interests, needs, and abilities. The total classroom…

  20. 40 CFR 81.409 - Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hawaii. 81.409 Section 81.409 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Identification of Mandatory Class I Federal Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.409...

  1. 40 CFR 81.409 - Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hawaii. 81.409 Section 81.409 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Identification of Mandatory Class I Federal Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.409...

  2. The University of Hawaii Community Colleges, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Susan, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This document consists of the seven issues of a newsletter concerned with Hawaiian Community Colleges published during 1997. Issue 1 discusses the Maui College Telethon and includes personal stories of academic success. Issue 2 examines distance education and includes descriptions of new programs and facilities for various Hawai'i colleges. Issue…

  3. Proceedings of the First Hawaii Innovations Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Leeward Community Coll.

    The First Hawaii Innovations Institute brought together education specialists in various educational fields to accomplish the following objectives: (1) explore new and imaginative ways of improving teaching and governance; (2) involve each participant in any three study groups, the deliberations of which were facilitated by a research center; (3)…

  4. The Hawai'i Student Film Festival

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olague, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the Hawai'i Student Film Festival (HSFF) which is more than an annual festival. It also facilitates nine, year-round, student outreach programs that are available to more than 400 public and private schools statewide. Through these programs, HSFF offers a wide array of film and video opportunities and experiences for…

  5. Reef and Shore. Hawaii Nature Study Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Curriculum Research and Development Group.

    This teaching guide is one of a series developed by the Curriculum Research and Development Group at the University of Hawaii. The program is laboratory and field oriented for elementary students. The focus of study for the project is the plant and animal life and the physical components of the Hawaiian environment, and their ecological…

  6. Parts of Plants. Hawaii Nature Study Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Curriculum Research and Development Group.

    This teaching guide is one of a series developed by the Curriculum Research and Development Group at the University of Hawaii. The program is laboratory and field oriented for elementary students. The focus of study for the project is the plant and animal life and the physical components of the Hawaiian environment, and their ecological…

  7. The hunt for Heterorhabditis in Hawaii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A survey was conducted to collect Heterorhabditis spp. in natural environments in Hawaiian soils. Quarantine laws currently prevent the importation of commercial isolates of Heterorhabditis into the State of Hawaii for biological control. Documenting natural populations would strengthen the case f...

  8. University of Hawaii Community Colleges, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Hawaii Community Colleges, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This series of newsletters describes information about special activities, academic programs, and honors and awards involving faculty, students, staff and the greater communities served by the University of Hawaii (UH) Community Colleges. This set contains the eight issues of volume 33, 1998, which discuss the following topics, among others: (1)…

  9. Global phylogeographic limits of Hawaii's avian malaria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beadell, J.S.; Ishtiaq, F.; Covas, R.; Melo, M.; Warren, B.H.; Atkinson, C.T.; Bensch, S.; Graves, G.R.; Jhala, Y.V.; Peirce, M.A.; Rahmani, A.R.; Fonseca, D.M.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) to Hawaii has provided a model system for studying the influence of exotic disease on naive host populations. Little is known, however, about the origin or the genetic variation of Hawaii's malaria and traditional classification methods have confounded attempts to place the parasite within a global ecological and evolutionary context. Using fragments of the parasite mitochondrial gene cytochrome b and the nuclear gene dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase obtained from a global survey of greater than 13 000 avian samples, we show that Hawaii's avian malaria, which can cause high mortality and is a major limiting factor for many species of native passerines, represents just one of the numerous lineages composing the morphological parasite species. The single parasite lineage detected in Hawaii exhibits a broad host distribution worldwide and is dominant on several other remote oceanic islands, including Bermuda and Moorea, French Polynesia. The rarity of this lineage in the continental New World and the restriction of closely related lineages to the Old World suggest limitations to the transmission of reproductively isolated parasite groups within the morphological species. ?? 2006 The Royal Society.

  10. 40 CFR 81.312 - Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.312 Hawaii... otherwise noted. Hawaii—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated area Designation Date1 Type Classification Date1... 1 This date is October 18, 2000, unless otherwise noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is...

  11. 40 CFR 81.312 - Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.312 Hawaii... otherwise noted. Hawaii—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated area Designation Date1 Type Classification Date1... 1 This date is October 18, 2000, unless otherwise noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is...

  12. 40 CFR 81.312 - Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.312 Hawaii... otherwise noted. Hawaii—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated area Designation Date1 Type Classification Date1... 1 This date is October 18, 2000, unless otherwise noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is...

  13. 40 CFR 81.312 - Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.312 Hawaii... otherwise noted. Hawaii—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated area Designation Date1 Type Classification Date1... 1 This date is October 18, 2000, unless otherwise noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is...

  14. 77 FR 25010 - Hawaii Disaster # HI-00026

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Hawaii Disaster HI-00026 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  15. 76 FR 21935 - Hawaii Disaster #HI-00023

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Hawaii Disaster HI-00023 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  16. Hawaii integrated biofuels research program, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Patrick K.

    1989-10-01

    Hawaii provides a unique environment for production of biomass resources that can be converted into renewable energy products. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the potential of several biomass resources, including sugarcane, eucalyptus, and leucaena, particularly for utilization in thermochemical conversion processes to produce liquid or gaseous transportation fuels. This research program supports ongoing efforts of the Biofuels and Municipal Solid Waste Technology (BMWT) Program of the Department of Energy (DOE) and has goals that are consistent with BMWT. The Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) work completed here consists of research activities that support two of the five renewable fuel cycles being pursued by DOE researchers. The results are directly applicable in the American territories throughout the Pacific Basin and the Caribbean, and also to many parts of the United States and worldwide. The Hawaii Integrated Biofuels Research Program is organized into the following six research tasks, which are presented as appendices in report form: Biomass Resource Assessment and System Modeling (Task 1); Bioenergy Tree Research (Task 2); Breeding, Culture, and Selection of Tropical Grasses for Increased Energy Potential (Task 3); Study of Eucalyptus Plantations for Energy Production in Hawaii (Task 4); Fundamental Solvolysis Research (Task 5); and Effects of Feedstock Composition on Pyrolysis Products (Task 6).

  17. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Hawaii showed improvement in reading and math in grade 8 at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for Asian and white students, low income students, and boys and girls. Gains in math tended to be larger than in reading. Trends in closing achievement gaps were mixed. Comparable data were available from 2007 through 2009. (Contains 9 tables.)…

  18. Modeling Secular Deformation of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnett, D. K.; Montgomery-Brown, E. D.; Casu, F.; Segall, P.; Fukushima, Y.; Miklius, A.; Poland, M. P.

    2010-12-01

    Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, is a dynamic volcanic and tectonic system that hosts rift intrusions and eruptions, summit inflation/deflation and eruptions, flank earthquakes and slow slip events, as well as quasi-steady flank motion. We seek to identify and characterize the actively deforming structures on Kilauea and study their interactions using a combination of GPS, InSAR, and seismic data. In addition we examine whether the change from summit subsidence to inflation in 2003, led to changes elsewhere in the volcano. We begin by modeling velocities of 16 continuous GPS and 28 campaign GPS sites and mean velocities from three ENVISAT tracks (T93 ascending: 10 acquisitions from 20030120 to 20041115; T200 descending: 13 acquisitions from 20030127 to 20041122, T429 descending: 10 acquisitions from 20030212 to 20041103) between 2003 and 2004, a period lacking major episodic events. We use triangular dislocations to mesh the curving rift zones and décollement. The southwest and east rift zones are continuous through the summit caldera area, where we also include a point center of dilatation beneath the southwest caldera. A décollement beginning about 12 km offshore at seven km depth dips approximately eight degrees northwest to achieving a depth of nine kilometers beneath the summit/rift zone. The décollement mesh continues at a shallower dip beneath the north flank of Kilauea reaching a final depth of 9.5 km beneath the north flank of Kilauea/south flank of Mauna Loa. Kinematic constraints enforce that opening at the base of the rift equal the differential décollement slip across the rift. Future modeling will include tests of Koae and Hilina fault geometries as well as time-dependent modeling of the deformation field.

  19. International lunar observatory / power station: from Hawaii to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durst, S.

    Astronomy's great advantages from the Moon are well known - stable surface, diffuse atmosphere, long cool nights (14 days), low gravity, far side radio frequency silence. A large variety of astronomical instruments and observations are possible - radio, optical and infrared telescopes and interferometers; interferometry for ultra- violet to sub -millimeter wavelengths and for very long baselines, including Earth- Moon VLBI; X-ray, gamma-ray, cosmic ray and neutrino detection; very low frequency radio observation; and more. Unparalleled advantages of lunar observatories for SETI, as well as for local surveillance, Earth observation, and detection of Earth approaching objects add significant utility to lunar astronomy's superlatives. At least nine major conferences in the USA since 1984 and many elsewhere, as well as ILEWG, IAF, IAA, LEDA and other organizations' astronomy-from-the-Moon research indicate a lunar observatory / power station, robotic at first, will be one of the first mission elements for a permanent lunar base. An international lunar observatory will be a transcending enterprise, highly principled, indispensable, soundly and broadly based, and far- seeing. Via Astra - From Hawaii to the Moon: The astronomy and scie nce communities, national space agencies and aerospace consortia, commercial travel and tourist enterprises and those aspiring to advance humanity's best qualities, such as Aloha, will recognize Hawaii in the 21st century as a new major support area and pan- Pacific port of embarkation to space, the Moon and beyond. Astronomical conditions and facilities on Hawaii's Mauna Kea provide experience for construction and operation of observatories on the Moon. Remote and centrally isolated, with diffuse atmosphere, sub-zero temperature and limited working mobility, the Mauna Kea complex atop the 4,206 meter summit of the largest mountain on the planet hosts the greatest collection of large astronomical telescopes on Earth. Lunar, extraterrestrial

  20. Epiphytes as an Indicator of Climate Change in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettwich, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    600 m) where fog incidence is highest and PET is lowest, as well as a marked difference in composition, whereby larger species dominate lower elevations where temperatures are greater. We are also analyzing O18 stable isotopes of both fog and rain water at two forest locations differing in fog input but in which elevation and rainfall are held constant at 1000m and 3000mm respectively. A laboratory experiment uses O18 stable isotope analysis to trace water uptake by five species of epiphytes. Results suggest that fog is an important determinant of how ecophysiological characteristics of epiphytes respond to the environments they inhabit. We further evaluate these results with respect to fine-scale climate models based on statistical downsampling of GCM's. Small, short lived species, especially filmy ferns are likely to exhibit the most rapid response to Hawaii's changing climate whereas larger, longer lived species are likely to respond more slowly.

  1. C-MORE Scholars Program: Encouraging Hawaii`s Undergraduates to Explore the Ocean and Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, B. C.; Gibson, B.

    2008-05-01

    Hawaii residents make up 60% of the undergraduate student body at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), but they are not studying ocean and earth science. The UHM School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology offers four undergraduate majors: Geology (22%), Geology & Geophysics (19%), Meteorology (16%), and Global Environmental Science (23%). The numbers in parentheses show the proportion of Hawaii residents in each major, based on 2006 data obtained from the UHM Institutional Research Office. The numbers of Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) are considerably smaller. The primary goal of the C-MORE Scholars Program, which will launch in Summer 2008, is to recruit and retain local Hawaii students (esp. NHPI) into earth and ocean science majors. To achieve this goal, the C-MORE Scholars Program will: 1. Actively recruit local students, partly by introducing them and their families to job opportunities in their community. Recruiting will be done in partnership with organizations that have successful track records in working with NHPI students; 2. Retain existing students through proactive counseling and course tutoring. Math and physics courses are stumbling blocks for many ocean and earth science majors, often delaying or even preventing graduation. By offering individual and group tutoring, we hope to help local students succeed in these courses; 3. Provide closely mentored, paid undergraduate research experiences at three different academic levels (trainee, intern, and fellow). This research is the cornerstone of the C-MORE Scholars Program. As students progress through the levels, they conduct higher level research with less supervision. Fellows (the highest level) may serve as peer advisors and tutors to underclassmen and assist with recruitment-related activities; and 4. Create a sense of community among the cohort of C-MORE scholars. A two-day summer residential experience will be instrumental in developing a strong cohort, emphasizing links

  2. Mapping Rainfall Trends in Hawai';i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, A. G.; Giambelluca, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Spatial patterns of rainfall in Hawai';i are among the most diverse in the world; ranges on a single island rival those of continents. As the climate warms, it is essential to understand how rainfall has changed so that we can better understand possible future climate changes. This is especially important in a small island context where resources are limited, and understanding the potential impacts of climate change on freshwater supplies is crucial. Utilizing Hawai';i's extensive network of rain gauges (over 2,000 stations have operated since the mid-1800s), data screening, homogeneity testing, and gap filling were performed to produce a serially complete dataset for as many stations as possible. This dataset was used to develop a set of month-year rainfall maps for Hawai';i from 1920-2007. Maps of rainfall values and anomalies (departures from the most recent 30-year mean) were derived for all major Hawaiian Islands at a 250 m resolution. Using this time series of maps, linear trends for the entire period (1920-2007) and the most recent 30-year period available (1978-2007) and the corresponding significance levels (p-values) were calculated at every pixel across the state, accounting for the effects of autocorrelation, for each month and each 3- and 6-month season. These trends and p-values were then mapped to produce spatially continuous trend maps of Hawai';i. The results show drying trends on all islands, with Hawai';i island experiencing the largest significant long-term declines annually (island mean percent change of -1.39% per decade since 1920) and Maui island experiencing the largest short-term declines annually (-8.10% per decade change since 1978). The seasonal analysis reveals that the largest changes are seen in winter and summer months (clear drying trends on all islands), while spring and fall seasons experience more neutral or positive changes (fewer significant trends). Most of the significant declines in long-term winter rainfall are seen in the

  3. Females Lead Population Collapse of the Endangered Hawaii Creeper

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Leonard A.; Cann, Rebecca L.

    2013-01-01

    Population collapses result from drastic environmental changes, but the sexes may differ in vulnerability. Collapse of the endangered Hawaii creeper (Oreomystis mana) at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge resulted from food limitation associated with increased numbers of an introduced bird (Japanese white-eye, Zosterops japonicus), which competes with the creeper for food. Both creeper sexes had stunted bill growth and the greatest change in molt of native species in the community. With a surge in numbers of white-eyes, a recent cohort of adult females had very low survival after breeding, while adult males from the same cohort, and older females and males, continued to have high survival. Lower female survival resulted in a significantly more male-biased adult sex ratio. Recent low female survival was based on a great cost of reproduction, indicated by molt-breeding overlap that was previously avoided, and lower fat during the lengthy fledgling period. The difference in female survival between cohorts was associated with stunted bills from being reared in and then breeding in an increasingly poor food environment. Trend analysis of survey data indicate that the bird is declining throughout the refuge, with males being 72–80% of adults left six years after the white-eye increased. Competition over time was consistent with that previously documented over space on the Island of Hawaii. Adaptive management to recover the bird in this protected area needs to focus on improving both adult female survival and the adult sex ratio. PMID:23861831

  4. Burst noise in the HAWAII-1RG multiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, Candice M.; McMurtry, Craig W.; Pipher, Judith L.; Forrest, William J.; Garnett, James D.

    2005-08-01

    Burst noise (also known as popcorn noise and random telegraph signal/noise) is a phenomenon that is understood to be a result of defects in the vicinity of a p-n junction. It is characterized by rapid level shifts in both positive and negative directions and can have varying magnitudes. This noise has been seen in both HAWAII-1RG and HAWAII-2RG multiplexers and is under investigation. We have done extensive burst noise testing on a HAWAII-1RG multiplexer, where we have determined a significant percentage of pixels exhibit the phenomenon. In addition, the prevalence of small magnitude transitions make sensitivity of detection the main limiting factor. Since this is a noise source for the HAWAII-1RG multiplexer, its elimination would make the HAWAII-1RG and the HAWAII-2RG even lower noise multiplexers.

  5. Renewable energy in Hawaii lessons learned, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, L.S.; Hubbard, H.M.; Bloyd, C.N.

    1995-12-31

    Hawaii`s extensive renewable resources, limited access to conventional fuels, and its isolated electrical grids all combine to provide an opportunity to clearly observe the development and implementation of renewable energy processes, technologies, and materials. Hawaii is distinctive in its electrical power usage since it is an island chain with isolated grid systems that range in size from less than 5 Megawatts to over 1.5 Gigawatts and also has many off grid dwellings and at least one isolated village system. However, it has been noted that lessons learned from Hawaii`s early experiences in trying to utilize renewable energy have a great deal in common with problems encountered by mainland utilities trying to do the same thing. Furthermore, conditions in Hawaii are very similar to those in many tropical and semitropical locations in the Pacific and Southeast Asia. Hence, Hawaii`s renewable energy experience is shared here in the hope that it may prove useful to others. This review is the second part of a two part series that describes the progress of renewable energy in the state of Hawaii. The steps taken in Hawaii with regards to ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), wave energy, photovoltaics (PV), solar thermal water heating, hydroelectric, and geothermal technologies over the past 20 years are reviewed. Conclusions drawn from Hawaii`s renewable energy experience are summarized in a list of lessons learned that are provided for the interest of those who may be carrying out similar efforts in other locations. 64 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Dengue fever, Hawaii, 2001-2002.

    PubMed

    Effler, Paul V; Pang, Lorrin; Kitsutani, Paul; Vorndam, Vance; Nakata, Michele; Ayers, Tracy; Elm, Joe; Tom, Tammy; Reiter, Paul; Rigau-Perez, José G; Hayes, John M; Mills, Kristin; Napier, Mike; Clark, Gary G; Gubler, Duane J

    2005-05-01

    Autochthonous dengue infections were last reported in Hawaii in 1944. In September 2001, the Hawaii Department of Health was notified of an unusual febrile illness in a resident with no travel history; dengue fever was confirmed. During the investigation, 1,644 persons with locally acquired denguelike illness were evaluated, and 122 (7%) laboratory-positive dengue infections were identified; dengue virus serotype 1 was isolated from 15 patients. No cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome were reported. In 3 instances autochthonous infections were linked to a person who reported denguelike illness after travel to French Polynesia. Phylogenetic analyses showed the Hawaiian isolates were closely associated with contemporaneous isolates from Tahiti. Aedes albopictus was present in all communities surveyed on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and Kauai; no Ae. aegypti were found. This outbreak underscores the importance of maintaining surveillance and control of potential disease vectors even in the absence of an imminent disease threat. PMID:15890132

  7. Hawaii Energy Strategy program. [First Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program began on March 2, 1992, under United States Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-92F19168, and is scheduled for completion by December 31, 1994. As outlined in the Statement of Joint Objectives: The purpose of the study is to develop an integrated State of Hawaii energy strategy, including an assessment of the State's fossil fuel reserve requirements and the most effective way to meet those needs, the availability and practicality of increasing the use of native energy resources, potential alternative fossil energy technologies such as coal gasification and potential energy efficiency measures which could lead to demand reduction. This work contributes to the DOE mission, will reduce the State's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions and contributes to the public good.

  8. Hawaii Energy Strategy program. Annual report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program began on March 2, 1992, under United States Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-92F19168, and is scheduled for completion by December 31, 1994. As outlined in the Statement of Joint Objectives: The purpose of the study is to develop an integrated State of Hawaii energy strategy, including an assessment of the State`s fossil fuel reserve requirements and the most effective way to meet those needs, the availability and practicality of increasing the use of native energy resources, potential alternative fossil energy technologies such as coal gasification and potential energy efficiency measures which could lead to demand reduction. This work contributes to the DOE mission, will reduce the State`s vulnerability to energy supply disruptions and contributes to the public good.

  9. Reforestation efforts reshape Hawaii's soil hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-04-01

    Starting with the arrival in Hawaii of Polynesian settlers in the fourth century and peaking in the mid-1800s, the destructive forces of wildfires and pests and the grazing of feral pigs, goats, and cattle reduced the native forests of Maui to just one tenth of their original extent. Maui's native vegetation was replaced largely by imported or invasive species. Over time, the invasive grasses that took root reshaped the hydrological properties of the soil, reducing the viability of native plant species, which had evolved to thrive under Hawaii's previous hydrological dynamics. Maui's ecosystem had been changed for so long that scientists were uncertain whether the region could actually again support the native flora

  10. Hawaii Energy Strategy program. Annual report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This is the second annual report on the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program which began on March 2, 1992, under a Cooperative Agreement (FCO3-92F19l68) with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE). The HES program is scheduled for completion by December 31, 1994. As outlined in the Statement of Joint Objectives. The purpose of the study is to develop an integrated State of Hawaii energy strategy, including an assessment of the State`s fossil fuel reserve requirements and the most effective way to meet those needs, the availability and practicality of increasing the use of native energy resources, potential alternative fossil energy technologies such as coal gasification and potential energy efficiency measures which could lead to demand reduction. This work contributes to the (US)DOE mission, will reduce the State`s vulnerability to energy supply disruptions and contributes to the public good.

  11. Perspective view, Landsat overlay Oahu, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Honolulu, on the island of Oahu, is a large and growing urban area with limited space and water resources. This perspective view, combining a Landsat image with SRTM topography, shows how the topography controls the urban growth pattern, causes cloud formation, and directs the rainfall runoff pattern. Features of interest in this scene include downtown Honolulu (right), Honolulu Harbor (right), Pearl Harbor (center), and offshore reef patterns (foreground). The Koolau mountain range runs through the center of the image. On the north shore of the island are the Mokapu Peninsula and Kaneohe Bay (upper right). Clouds commonly hang above ridges and peaks of the Hawaiian Islands, and in this rendition appear draped directly on the mountains. The clouds are actually about 1000 meters (3300 feet) above sea level. High resolution topographic and image data allow ecologists and planners to assess the effects of urban development on the sensitive ecosystems in tropical regions.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat 7 satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated about six times vertically. The Landsat 7 image was acquired on February 12, 2000, and was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS)Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The

  12. Pathfinder-Plus flight in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus flight in Hawaii June 2002 AeroVironment's Pathfinder-Plus solar-powered flying wing recently flew a three-flight demonstration of its ability to relay third-generation cell phone and video signals as well as provide Internet linkage. The two pods underneath the center section of the wing carried the advanced two-way telecom package, developed by Japanese telecommunications interests.

  13. How much land is needed for feral pig hunting in Hawai'i?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Steven C.; Jacobi, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Hunting is often considered to be incompatible with conservation of native biota and watershed functions in Hawai'i. Management actions for conservation generally exclude large non-native mammals from natural areas, thereby reducing the amount of land area available for hunting activities and the maintenance of sustainable game populations. An approach which may be useful in addressing the necessary minimum amount of land area allocated for hunting in Hawai'i is to determine the amount of land area necessary for sustaining populations of hunted animals to meet current levels harvested by the public. We ask: What is the total amount of land necessary to provide sustained-yield hunting of game meat for food at the current harvest level on Hawai'i Island if only feral pigs (Sus scrofa) were to be harvested? We used a simplistic analysis to estimate that 1 317.6 km2-1 651.4 km2 would be necessary to produce 187 333.6 kg of feral pig meat annually based on the range of dressed weight per whole pig, the proportion of a pig population that can be sustainably removed annually, and the density of pig populations in the wild. This amount of area comprises 12.6-15.8% of the total land area of Hawai'i Island, but more likely represents 27.6-43.5% of areas that may be compatible with sustained-yield hunting.

  14. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Cultural environment and aesthetic resources

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, L.D.; Petrich, C.H.; Saulsbury, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on the cultural environment and aesthetic resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The cultural environment in the Geothermal Resource Zone (GRZ) and associated study area consists of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious practices and both Native Hawaiian and non-Native Hawaiian cultural resources. This report consists of three sections: (1) a description of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious rights, practices, and values; (2) a description of historic, prehistoric, and traditional Native Hawaiian sites; and (3) a description of other (non-native) sites that could be affected by development in the study area. Within each section, the level of descriptive detail varies according to the information currently available. The description of the cultural environment is most specific in its coverage of the Geothermal Resource Subzones in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii and the study area of South Maui. Ethnographic and archaeological reports by Cultural Advocacy Network Developing Options and International Archaeological Research Institute, Inc., respectively, supplement the descriptions of these two areas with new information collected specifically for this study. Less detailed descriptions of additional study areas on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and the island of Hawaii are based on existing archaeological surveys.

  15. Hawaii energy strategy project 2: Fossil energy review. Task 2: Fossil energy in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Breazeale, K.; Yamaguchi, N.D.; Keeville, H.

    1993-12-01

    In Task 2, the authors establish a baseline for evaluating energy use in Hawaii, and examine key energy and economic indicators. They provide a detailed look at fossil energy imports by type, current and possible sources of oil, gas and coal, quality considerations, and processing/transformation. They present time series data on petroleum product consumption by end-use sector, though they caution the reader that the data is imperfect. They discuss fuel substitutability to identify those end-use categories that are most easily switched to other fuels. They then define and analyze sequential scenarios of fuel substitution in Hawaii and their impacts on patterns of demand. They also discuss energy security--what it means to Hawaii, what it means to neighboring economies, whether it is possible to achieve energy security. 95 figs., 48 tabs.

  16. Hawaii's Annual Journey Through the Universe Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J.; Daou, D.; Day, B.; Slater, T. F.; Slater, S. J.

    2012-08-01

    Hawaii's annual Journey through the Universe program is a flagship Gemini public education and outreach event that engages the public, teachers, astronomers, engineers, thousands of local students and staff from all of the Mauna Kea Observatories. The program inspires, educates, and engages teachers, students, and their families as well as the community. From February 10-18, 2011, fifty-one astronomy educators from observatories on Mauna Kea and across the world visited over 6,500 students in 310 classrooms at 18 schools. Two family science events were held for over 2,500 people at the 'Imiloa Astronomy Education Center and the University of Hawaii at Hilo. The local Chamber of Commerce(s) held an appreciation celebration for the astronomers attended by over 170 members from the local government and business community. Now going into its eighth year in Hawaii, the 2012 Journey Through the Universe program will continue working with the observatories on Mauna Kea and with the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI). As a new partner in our Journey program, NLSI will join the Journey team (Janice Harvey, Gemini Observatory, Journey Team Leader) and give an overview of the successes and future developments of this remarkable program and its growth. The future of America rests on our ability to train the next generation of scientists and engineers. Science education is key and Journey through the Universe opens the doors of scientific discovery for our students. www.gemini.edu/journey

  17. Space radar image of Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This image of the Mauna Loa volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii shows the capability of imaging radar to map lava flows and other volcanic structures. Mauna Loa has erupted more than 35 times since the island was first visited by westerners in the early 1800s. The large summit crater, called Mokuaweoweo Caldera, is clearly visible near the center of the image. Leading away from the caldera (towards top right and lower center) are the two main rift zones shown here in orange. Rift zones are areas of weakness within the upper part of the volcano that are often ripped open as new magma (molten rock) approaches the surface at the start of an eruption. The most recent eruption of Mauna Loa was in March and April 1984, when segments of the northeast rift zones were active. If the height of the volcano was measured from its base on the ocean floor instead of from sea level, Mauna Loa would be the tallest mountain on Earth. Its peak (center of the image) rises more than 8 kilometers (5 miles) above the ocean floor. The South Kona District, known for cultivation of macadamia nuts and coffee, can be seen in the lower left as white and blue areas along the coast. North is toward the upper left. The area shown is 41.5 by 75 kilometers (25.7 by 46.5 miles), centered at 19.5 degrees north latitude and 155.6 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/ X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 36th orbit on October 2, 1994. The radar illumination is from the left of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted, vertically received). The resulting color combinations in this radar image are caused by differences in surface roughness of the lava flows. Smoother flows

  18. The Hawai`i Supersite: Update and results (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Hawai`i Supersite was initially established in 2008 and was made permanent in 2012. Over the course of its existence, SAR data have been provided to the Supersite by the Canadian, Japanese, European, Italian, and German space agencies. Well over 2000 individual scenes are part of the Hawai`i archive, amounting to nearly 10 TB of raw data. A diversity of ground-based data, including deformation, seismic, and gas emissions, are also part of the Supersite, supplied by the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and collaborators. The availability of such a broad suite of remote and terrestrial data has facilitated numerous explorations into Hawaiian volcanism, including both operational volcano monitoring and scientific investigations. For example, the 5-9 March 2011 Kamoamoa fissure eruption at Kilauea Volcano was tracked by a spatially and temporally dense set of deformation data. Models based on GPS, tilt, and multiple interferogams acquired over the course of the 4-day-long eruption by the ALOS, TerraSAR-X, and COSMO-SkyMed satellites revealed the complexity of dike opening over time and were corroborated by seismic and gas emission measurements. SAR data provided by the Supersite have also enabled views of surface change that are not possible using other means. High-resolution interferograms (3-m pixel size) from TerraSAR-X and COSMO-SkyMed have detected localized, cm-scale subsidence around Kilauea's summit eruptive vent, with increases in rate during periods of vent instability and rim collapse. South of the summit, along the Koa`e fault zone, InSAR data detected deformation due to shallow earthquakes in June 2011 that could only loosely be characterized by vertical deformation from leveling. Along Kilauea's east rift zone, SAR data have proven invaluable in mapping lava flow activity, especially given their all-weather, broad-scale, and high resolution capabilities. Continued contributions of both ground- and space-based data to the Hawai`i

  19. Early Childhood Vision Screening in Hawai'i Utilizing a Hand-Held Screener.

    PubMed

    Chang, Duane A; Ede, Roger C; Chow, Dominic C; Souza, Ryan D; Gangcuangco, Louie Mar A; Hanks, Nancy; Nakamoto, Beau K; Mitchell, Brooks; Masutani, Alison T; Fisk, Sam; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Dill, Jan E

    2015-09-01

    The goal of early childhood vision screening is to detect subnormal vision and amblyopic risk factors that threaten visual development so that treatment can be initiated early to yield the highest benefit. Hand-held, portable, instrument-based vision screening devices can be used in children as young as 6 months of age. We assessed the feasibility of hand-held photoscreeners to screen for vision disorders in pre-school children in Hawai'i. A total of 137 preschool children on O'ahu in the "Tutu and Me"/Partners in Development program were screened at 6 different locations using the Plusoptix S12 hand-held photoscreener. Once technical issues were resolved, screening was fast and well tolerated. Possible vision abnormalities were found in 11 of the 137 children (8%). Poor compliance for follow-up with formal vision examination limited our ability to confirm these abnormalities. We conclude that photoscreening has the potential to facilitate early childhood vision screening in Hawai'i. The optimal referral criteria for use in Hawai'i will need to be determined after considering the age of the screening population and the available medical resources in Hawai'i. Early detection of treatable eye disorders has far-reaching benefits for the visual development and long term health and well-being of children. A comprehensive early childhood vision screening program in Hawai'i utilizing automated hand-held photoscreeners may have public health value. Such a program should integrate referral to an eye care professional for confirmation and management of vision disorders of at-risk children found on screening. PMID:26468424

  20. Assessment of coal technology options and implications for the State of Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.L.; Elcock, D.; Elliott, T.J.

    1993-12-01

    The mandate of this research report was to provide the state of Hawaii with an assessment of the potential opportunities and drawbacks of relying on coal-fired generating technologies to diversify its fuel mix and satisfy future electric power requirements. This assessment was to include a review of existing and emerging coal-based power technologies-including their associated costs, environmental impacts, land use, and infrastructure requirements-to determine the range of impacts likely to occur if such systems were deployed in Hawaii. Coupled with this review, the report was also to (1) address siting and safety issues as they relate to technology choice and coal transport, (2) consider how environmental costs associated with coal usage are included in the integrated resource planning (ERP) process, and (3) develop an analytical tool from which the Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism of the State of Hawaii could conduct first-order comparisons of power plant selection and siting. The prepared report addresses each element identified above. However, available resources and data limitations limited the extent to which particular characteristics of coal use could be assessed. For example, the technology profiles are current but not as complete regarding future developments and cost/emissions data as possible, and the assessment of coal technology deployment issues in Hawaii was conducted on an aggregate (not site-specific) basis. Nonetheless, the information and findings contained in this report do provide an accurate depiction of the opportunities for and issues associated with coal utilization in the state of Hawaii.

  1. Towards the Establishment of the Hawaii Integrated Seismic Network for Tsunami, Seismic, and Volcanic Hazard Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiro, B. R.; Koyanagi, S. K.; Okubo, P. G.; Wolfe, C. J.

    2006-12-01

    The NOAA Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) located in `Ewa Beach, Hawai`i, provides warnings to the State of Hawai`i regarding locally generated tsunamis. The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) located in Hawai`i National Park monitors earthquakes on the island of Hawai`i in order to characterize volcanic and earthquake activity and hazards. In support of these missions, PTWC and HVO operate seismic networks for rapidly detecting and evaluating earthquakes for their tsunamigenic potential and volcanic risk, respectively. These existing seismic networks are comprised mostly of short-period vertical seismometers with analog data collection and transmission based on decades-old technology. The USGS National Strong Motion Program (NSMP) operates 31 accelerometers throughout the state, but none currently transmit their data in real time. As a result of enhancements to the U.S. Tsunami Program in the wake of the December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami disaster, PTWC is upgrading and expanding its seismic network using digital real-time telemetry from broadband and strong motion accelerometer stations. Through new cooperative agreements with partners including the USGS (HVO and NSMP), IRIS, University of Hawai`i, and Germany's GEOFON, the enhanced seismic network has been designed to ensure maximum benefit to all stakeholders. The Hawaii Integrated Seismic Network (HISN) will provide a statewide resource for tsunami, earthquake, and volcanic warnings. Furthermore, because all data will be archived by the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC), the HISN will become a research resource to greater scientific community. The performance target for the enhanced HISN is for PTWC to provide initial local tsunami warnings within 90 seconds of the earthquake origin time. This will be accomplished using real-time digital data transmission over redundant paths and by implementing contemporary analysis algorithms in real-time and near-real-time. Earthquake location, depth, and

  2. NWEI Azura December 2015 data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Terry Lettenmaier

    2016-02-21

    Data files for the NWEI Azura grid-connected deployment at the 30-meter berth of the US Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS 30m Site) at the Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Hawai'i (MCBH) on the windward (northeast) coast of the island of O'ahu, HI. See general documentation describing specifics of the data files and formats in a separate submission.

  3. NWEI Azura June 2015 data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Terry Lettenmaier

    2015-12-14

    Data files for the NWEI Azura grid-connected deployment at the 30-meter berth of the US Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS 30m Site) at the Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Hawai'i (MCBH) on the windward (northeast) coast of the island of O'ahu, HI. See general documentation describing specifics of the data files and formats in a separate submission.

  4. NWEI Azura Aug 2015 data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Terry Lettenmaier

    2015-12-14

    Data files for the NWEI Azura grid-connected deployment at the 30-meter berth of the US Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS 30m Site) at the Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Hawai'i (MCBH) on the windward (northeast) coast of the island of O'ahu, HI. See general documentation describing specifics of the data files and formats in a separate submission.

  5. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...

  6. 33 CFR 80.1480 - Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1480 Section 80.1480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1480 Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. A line...

  7. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...

  9. 33 CFR 80.1480 - Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1480 Section 80.1480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1480 Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. A line...

  10. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...