Sample records for base height cloud

  1. Development of methods for inferring cloud thickness and cloud-base height from satellite radiance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L., Jr.; Minnis, Patrick; Alvarez, Joseph M.; Uttal, Taneil; Intrieri, Janet M.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Clothiaux, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    Cloud-top height is a major factor determining the outgoing longwave flux at the top of the atmosphere. The downwelling radiation from the cloud strongly affects the cooling rate within the atmosphere and the longwave radiation incident at the surface. Thus, determination of cloud-base temperature is important for proper calculation of fluxes below the cloud. Cloud-base altitude is also an important factor in aircraft operations. Cloud-top height or temperature can be derived in a straightforward manner using satellite-based infrared data. Cloud-base temperature, however, is not observable from the satellite, but is related to the height, phase, and optical depth of the cloud in addition to other variables. This study uses surface and satellite data taken during the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Phase-2 Intensive Field Observation (IFO) period (13 Nov. - 7 Dec. 1991, to improve techniques for deriving cloud-base height from conventional satellite data.

  2. Biogeography, Cloud Base Heights and Cloud Immersion in Tropical Montane Cloud Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, R. M.; Asefi, S.; Zeng, J.; Nair, U. S.; Lawton, R. O.; Ray, D. K.; Han, Q.; Manoharan, V. S.

    2007-05-01

    Tropical Montane Cloud Forests (TMCFs) are ecosystems characterized by frequent and prolonged immersion within orographic clouds. TMCFs often lie at the core of the biological hotspots, areas of high biodiversity, whose conservation is necessary to ensure the preservation of a significant amount of the plant and animal species in the world. TMCFs support islands of endemism dependent on cloud water interception that are extremely susceptible to environmental and climatic changes at regional or global scales. Due to the ecological and hydrological importance of TMCFs it is important to understand the biogeographical distribution of these ecosystems. The best current list of TMCFs is a global atlas compiled by the United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP). However, this list is incomplete, and it does not provide information on cloud immersion, which is the defining characteristic of TMCFs and sorely needed for ecological and hydrological studies. The present study utilizes MODIS satellite data both to determine orographic cloud base heights and then to quantify cloud immersion statistics over TMCFs. Results are validated from surface measurements over Northern Costa Rica for the month of March 2003. Cloud base heights are retrieved with approximately 80m accuracy, as determined at Monteverde, Costa Rica. Cloud immersion derived from MODIS data is also compared to an independent cloud immersion dataset created using a combination of GOES satellite data and RAMS model simulations. Comparison against known locations of cloud forests in Northern Costa Rica shows that the MODIS-derived cloud immersion maps successfully identify these cloud forest locations, including those not included in the UNEP data set. Results also will be shown for cloud immersion in Hawaii. The procedure appears to be ready for global mapping.

  3. Cumulus cloud base height estimation from high spatial resolution Landsat data - A Hough transform approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berendes, Todd; Sengupta, Sailes K.; Welch, Ron M.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Navar, Murgesh

    1992-01-01

    A semiautomated methodology is developed for estimating cumulus cloud base heights on the basis of high spatial resolution Landsat MSS data, using various image-processing techniques to match cloud edges with their corresponding shadow edges. The cloud base height is then estimated by computing the separation distance between the corresponding generalized Hough transform reference points. The differences between the cloud base heights computed by these means and a manual verification technique are of the order of 100 m or less; accuracies of 50-70 m may soon be possible via EOS instruments.

  4. The Study of Verification and Correction of Cloud Base and Top Height Retrievals from Ka-band Cloud Radar in Boseong, Korea during Fall 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Oh, S. B.; Kim, K. H.; Cho, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the cloud base and top heights observed by Ka-band (33.44 GHz) cloud radar at the Boseong National Center for Intensive Observation of severe weather (NCIO) in Korea during the fall of 2013 (September to November) were verified and corrected. For comparative verification, the base and top heights data obtained from ceilometer (CL51) and Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite (COMS), respectively were used. During rainfall, the cloud base and top heights observed by the cloud radar were lower than that observed by ceilometer-COMS due to signal attenuation and reflectivity caused by raindrops. The stronger rainfall intensity gets, the more the difference grows. In the case of rainfall, the base and top heights data from cloud radar could be replaced with these obtained data from ceilometer-COMS. In the case of no rainfall, the cloud base and top heights observed by the cloud radar and ceilometer-COMS were relatively similar. The clouds with thin thickness or low density were more effectively observed in cloud radar compared to ceilometer-COMS. Based on these results, in case of rainfall or missing cloud radar data, the ceilometer and COMS data were effectively used to correct the cloud radar data. These corrected cloud data were used to classify the cloud types of low (Cloud base height (CBH) < 2 km), middle (2 km ? CBH < 6 km), and high (CBH ? 6 km) clouds, and it was shown that the frequency of occurrence for low clouds were highest. When the low clouds were further subdivided, the most common type was shown to be deep precipitable clouds (CBH < 200 m and Cloud top height (CTH) ? 2 km), followed by non-precipitable clouds (200 m ? CBH < 2 km) and shallow precipitable clouds (CBH < 200 m and CTH < 2 km) in this order.

  5. Observations of orographic Cloud Base Heights from satellite and in-situ measurements at the Monteverde Cloud Mist Forest Reserve, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asefi, S.; Zeng, J.; Han, Q.; Welch, R. M.; Lawton, R. O.; Nair, U. S.; Ray, D.; McCarty, W. R.; Jedlovec, G.

    2005-12-01

    Tropical montane cloud mist forests are among the most biologically rich and diverse ecosystems, providing habitats for many of the world's endangered species. Survival of these habitats depends strongly on regular and frequent immersion in orographic clouds. At the Monteverde Cloud Mist Forest Reserve in Costa Rica, the bases of the clouds have shifted upslope, leading to anuran population crashes, an increase in the upper elevation of bird ranges on the Pacific slope, and longer dry season mist-free intervals. Satellite remote sensing techniques have been developed to determine the orographic cloud base heights; these are tested for the dry season month of March 2003 over the Monteverde cloud forests. The approach derives MODIS cloud top pressures and then converts them to cloud top heights using geopotential height profiles. The NCAR Land Use and Cloud Interaction Experiment (LUCIE), consisting of paired mobile radiosonde systems deployed in Costa Rica, provided the means for validating the retrievals. Results show that the four MODIS CO2 slicing channels do not provide sufficiently accurate cloud top height values, although some of the differences are due to a mismatch in the observational periods. In order to improve the results, two alternative approaches are examined. Simulated geopotential height profiles from the CSU Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) initialized with soundings provided superior results. Another approach investigated the utility of multiple combinations of channels in the CO2 slicing technique using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data for cloud height assignment. Using AIRS a more accurate determination of cloud top height is achieved. Cloud thicknesses are estimated using three different approaches: 1) constant liquid water content (CLWC); 2) an empirical relationship; and 3) an adiabatic model. The CLWC approach provided the most consistent results. Cloud base heights are computed from subtracting cloud thickness from cloud top height. Orographic cloud base heights derived from the combined MODIS/RAMS approach and AIRS were then compared with values observed at the study sites. Differences between the observed and remotely sensed values were on the order of 200-300m for MODIS/RAMS. The results suggest that it is possible to monitor global cloud mist forest cloud base heights using the combination of MODIS satellite imagery combined with AIRS and model simulations.

  6. Evaluation of Satellite-Based Upper Troposphere Cloud Top Height Retrievals in Multilayer Cloud Conditions During TC4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Fu-Lung; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. Kirk; McGill, Matthew J.; Palikonda, Rabindra; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Smith, William L., Jr.; Yost, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    Upper troposphere cloud top heights (CTHs), restricted to cloud top pressures (CTPs) less than 500 hPa, inferred using four satellite retrieval methods applied to Twelfth Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-12) data are evaluated using measurements during the July August 2007 Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling Experiment (TC4). The four methods are the single-layer CO2-absorption technique (SCO2AT), a modified CO2-absorption technique (MCO2AT) developed for improving both single-layered and multilayered cloud retrievals, a standard version of the Visible Infrared Solar-infrared Split-window Technique (old VISST), and a new version of VISST (new VISST) recently developed to improve cloud property retrievals. They are evaluated by comparing with ER-2 aircraft-based Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) data taken during 9 days having extensive upper troposphere cirrus, anvil, and convective clouds. Compared to the 89% coverage by upper tropospheric clouds detected by the CPL, the SCO2AT, MCO2AT, old VISST, and new VISST retrieved CTPs less than 500 hPa in 76, 76, 69, and 74% of the matched pixels, respectively. Most of the differences are due to subvisible and optically thin cirrus clouds occurring near the tropopause that were detected only by the CPL. The mean upper tropospheric CTHs for the 9 days are 14.2 (+/- 2.1) km from the CPL and 10.7 (+/- 2.1), 12.1 (+/- 1.6), 9.7 (+/- 2.9), and 11.4 (+/- 2.8) km from the SCO2AT, MCO2AT, old VISST, and new VISST, respectively. Compared to the CPL, the MCO2AT CTHs had the smallest mean biases for semitransparent high clouds in both single-layered and multilayered situations whereas the new VISST CTHs had the smallest mean biases when upper clouds were opaque and optically thick. The biases for all techniques increased with increasing numbers of cloud layers. The transparency of the upper layer clouds tends to increase with the numbers of cloud layers.

  7. Neural network sensor fusion: Creation of a virtual sensor for cloud-base height estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasika, Hugh Joseph Christopher

    2000-10-01

    Sensor fusion has become a significant area of signal processing research that draws on a variety of tools. Its goals are many, however in this thesis, the creation of a virtual sensor is paramount. In particular, neural networks are used to simulate the output of a LIDAR (LASER. RADAR) that measures cloud-base height. Eye-safe LIDAR is more accurate than the standard tool that would be used for such measurement; the ceilometer. The desire is to make cloud-base height information available at a network of ground-based meteorological stations without actually installing LIDAR sensors. To accomplish this, fifty-seven sensors ranging from multispectral satellite information to standard atmospheric measurements such as temperature and humidity, are fused in what can only be termed as a very complex, nonlinear environment. The result is an accurate prediction of cloud-base height. Thus, a virtual sensor is created. A total of four different learning algorithms were studied; two global and two local. In each case, the very best state-of-the-art learning algorithms have been selected. Local methods investigated are the regularized radial basis function network, and the support vector machine. Global methods include the standard backpropagation with momentum trained multilayer perceptron (used as a benchmark) and the multilayer perceptron trained via the Kalman filter algorithm. While accuracy is the primary concern, computational considerations potentially limit the application of several of the above techniques. Thus, in all cases care was taken to minimize computational cost. For example in the case of the support vector machine, a method of partitioning the problem in order to reduce memory requirements and make the optimization over a large data set feasible was employed and in the Kalman algorithm case, node-decoupling was used to dramatically reduce the number of operations required. Overall, the methods produced somewhat equivalent mean squared errors indicating that the descriptive capacity of the data had been reached. However, the support vector machine was the clear winner in terms of computational complexity. As well, through its ability to determine its own dimensionality it is able to relate information about the physics of the problem back to the user. This thesis, contributes to the literature on three fronts. First, it demonstrates the concept of creating of a virtual sensor via sensor fusion. Second, in the remote-sensing field where focus has typically been on pattern classification tasks, this thesis provides an in-depth look at the use of neural networks for tough regression problems. And lastly, it provides a useful tool for the meteorological community in creating the ability to add large-scale, cloud-field information to predictive models.

  8. Modeling atmospheric longwave radiation at the surface during overcast skies: The role of cloud base height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viúdez-Mora, A.; Costa-Surós, M.; Calbó, J.; González, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    behavior of the atmospheric downward longwave radiation at the surface under overcast conditions is studied. For optically thick clouds, longwave radiation depends greatly on the cloud base height (CBH), besides temperature and water vapor profiles. The CBH determines the cloud emission temperature and the air layers contributing to the longwave radiation that reaches the surface. Overcast situations observed at Girona (NE Iberian Peninsula) were studied by using a radiative transfer model. The data set includes different seasons, and a large range of CBH (0-5000 m). The atmosphere profiles were taken from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast analysis. The CBH was determined from ceilometer measurements and also estimated by using a suitable method applied to the vertical profile of relative humidity. The agreement between calculations and pyrgeometer measurements is remarkably good (1.6 ± 6.2 W m-2) if the observed CBH is used; poorer results are obtained with the estimated CBH (4.3 ± 7.0 W m-2). These results are better than those obtained from a simple parameterization based upon ground-level data (1.1 ± 11.6 W m-2), which can be corrected by adding a term that takes into account the CBH (-0.1 ± 7.3 W m-2). At this site, the cloud radiative effect (CRE) at the surface lies in the range 50-80 W m-2, has a clear seasonal behavior (higher CRE in winter), and depends upon the CBH. For the cold and the warm seasons, CRE decreases with CBH at a rate of -5 and -4 W m-2/km, respectively. Results obtained for other climates (subarctic and tropical) are also presented.

  9. Development of an analysis tool for cloud base height and visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umdasch, Sarah; Reinhold, Steinacker; Manfred, Dorninger; Markus, Kerschbaum; Wolfgang, Pöttschacher

    2014-05-01

    The meteorological variables cloud base height (CBH) and horizontal atmospheric visibility (VIS) at surface level are of vital importance for safety and effectiveness in aviation. Around 20% of all civil aviation accidents in the USA from 2003 to 2007 were due to weather related causes, around 18% of which were owing to decreased visibility or ceiling (main CBH). The aim of this study is to develop a system generating quality-controlled gridded analyses of the two parameters based on the integration of various kinds of observational data. Upon completion, the tool is planned to provide guidance for nowcasting during take-off and landing as well as for flights operated under visual flight rules. Primary input data consists of manual as well as instrumental observation of CBH and VIS. In Austria, restructuring of part of the standard meteorological stations from human observation to automatic measurement of VIS and CBH is currently in progress. As ancillary data, satellite derived products can add 2-dimensional information, e.g. Cloud Type by NWC SAF (Nowcasting Satellite Application Facilities) MSG (Meteosat Second Generation). Other useful available data are meteorological surface measurements (in particular of temperature, humidity, wind and precipitation), radiosonde, radar and high resolution topography data. A one-year data set is used to study the spatial and weather-dependent representativeness of the CBH and VIS measurements. The VERA (Vienna Enhanced Resolution Analysis) system of the Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics of the University of Vienna provides the framework for the analysis development. Its integrated "Fingerprint" technique allows the insertion of empirical prior knowledge and ancillary information in the form of spatial patterns. Prior to the analysis, a quality control of input data is performed. For CBH and VIS, quality control can consist of internal consistency checks between different data sources. The possibility of two-dimensional consistency checks has to be explored. First results in the development of quality control features and fingerprints will be shown.

  10. A Qualitative Comparison between MISR and Cloud Radar Cloud Heights at the North Slope of Alaska ARM Site paquita.zuidema@noaa.gov

    E-print Network

    Zuidema, Paquita

    A Qualitative Comparison between MISR and Cloud Radar Cloud Heights at the North Slope of Alaska between cloud heights as perceived by a surface-based cloud radar located at Pt.Barrow,Alaska (71.2N,156 heights and winds are codetermined using a stereo-matching process.The cloud radar cloud heights

  11. Research of Confirming Height Rules of Human Characteristic Positions Based on 3D Point-Cloud Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hai-yan Kong; Bing-fei Gu; Jun-qiang Su; Guo-lian Liu

    2010-01-01

    In this research, Point-cloud diagrams can be obtained by using 3D body scanner and then characteristic positions of the body (such as waist, abdomen and buttocks) can be confirmed. Then height of characteristic positions can be measured from diagrams by the software of Image-ware. The correlation relationship between height of characteristic positions and height can be analyzed by the software

  12. Comparison of MISR and MODIS cloud-top heights in the presence of cloud overlap

    E-print Network

    Baum, Bryan A.

    Comparison of MISR and MODIS cloud-top heights in the presence of cloud overlap C.M. Naud a, , B July 2006; accepted 3 September 2006 Abstract Coincident MISR and MODIS cloud-top heights retrieved March 2000 and October 2003. The difference between MODIS and MISR cloud-top heights is assessed

  13. Stratocumulus Cloud-Top Height Estimates and Their Climatic Implications PAQUITA ZUIDEMA AND DAVID PAINEMAL

    E-print Network

    Zuidema, Paquita

    Stratocumulus Cloud-Top Height Estimates and Their Climatic Implications PAQUITA ZUIDEMA AND DAVID-rate dependence on boundary layer height is weak, decreasing from a best fit of 7.6 to 7.2 K km21 as the boundary layer deepens from 800 m to 2 km. Ship-based cloud-base heights up to 800 m correspond well to lifting

  14. Analysis of cloud top height and cloud coverage from satellites using the O2 A and B bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuze, Akihiko; Chance, Kelly V.

    1994-01-01

    Cloud height and cloud coverage detection are important for total ozone retrieval using ultraviolet and visible scattered light. Use of the O2 A and B bands, around 761 and 687 nm, by a satellite-borne instrument of moderately high spectral resolution viewing in the nadir makes it possible to detect cloud top height and related parameters, including fractional coverage. The measured values of a satellite-borne spectrometer are convolutions of the instrument slit function and the atmospheric transmittance between cloud top and satellite. Studies here determine the optical depth between a satellite orbit and the Earth or cloud top height to high accuracy using FASCODE 3. Cloud top height and a cloud coverage parameter are determined by least squares fitting to calculated radiance ratios in the oxygen bands. A grid search method is used to search the parameter space of cloud top height and the coverage parameter to minimize an appropriate sum of squares of deviations. For this search, nonlinearity of the atmospheric transmittance (i.e., leverage based on varying amounts of saturation in the absorption spectrum) is important for distinguishing between cloud top height and fractional coverage. Using the above-mentioned method, an operational cloud detection algorithm which uses minimal computation time can be implemented.

  15. Insights into Cloud-Top Height and Dynamics from the Seasonal Cycle of Cloud-Top Heights Observed by MISR in the West Pacific Region

    E-print Network

    Sherwood, Steven

    Insights into Cloud-Top Height and Dynamics from the Seasonal Cycle of Cloud-Top Heights Observed July 2009) ABSTRACT The connection between environmental stability and the height of tropical deep convective clouds is an- alyzed using stereo cloud height data from the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer

  16. A method of retrieving cloud top height and cloud geometrical thickness with oxygen A and B bands for the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) mission: Radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuekui; Marshak, Alexander; Mao, Jianping; Lyapustin, Alexei; Herman, Jay

    2013-06-01

    The Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) onboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) was designed to measure the atmosphere and surface properties over the whole sunlit half of the Earth from the L1 Lagrangian point. It has 10 spectral channels ranging from the UV to the near-IR, including two pairs of oxygen (O2) A-band (779.5 and 764nm) and B-band (680 and 687.75nm) reference and absorption channels selected for the cloud height measurements. This paper presents the radiative transfer analysis pertinent to retrieving cloud top height and cloud geometrical thickness with EPIC A- and B-band observations. Due to photon cloud penetration, retrievals from either O2 A- or B-band channels alone gives the corresponding cloud centroid height, which is lower than the cloud top. However, we show both the sum and the difference between the retrieved cloud centroid heights in the A and B bands are functions of cloud top height and cloud geometrical thickness. Based on this fact, the paper develops a new method to retrieve cloud top height and cloud geometrical thickness simultaneously for fully cloudy scenes over ocean surface. First, cloud centroid heights are calculated for both A and B bands using the ratios between the reflectances of the absorbing and reference channels; then the cloud top height and the cloud geometrical thickness are retrieved from the two dimensional look up tables that relate the sum and the difference between the retrieved centroid heights for A and B bands to the cloud top height and the cloud geometrical thickness. This method is applicable for clouds thicker than an optical depth of 5.

  17. Southeast Paci c Stratocumulus Cloud Top Heights Paquita Zuidema David Painemal Simon de Szoeke Chris Fairall

    E-print Network

    Zuidema, Paquita

    Southeast Paci c Stratocumulus Cloud Top Heights Paquita Zuidema David Painemal Simon de Szoeke height observations, or its proxy, cloud top height, serve as a critical test of cloud simulations, and to deductions of mean cloudtop entrainment. Stratocumulus cloud top heights in the southeast Pacific (SEP

  18. Automatic cloud top height determination using a cost-effective time-lapse camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, H. M.; Chang, S.-C.; Thies, B.; Bendix, J.

    2014-03-01

    A new method for the determination of cloud top heights from the footage of a time-lapse camera is presented. Contact points between cloud tops and underlying terrain are automatically detected in the camera image based on differences in the brightness, texture and movement of cloudy and non-cloudy areas. The height of the detected cloud top positions is determined by comparison with a digital elevation model projected to the view of the camera. The technique has been validated using data about the cloud immersion of a second camera as well as via visual assessment. The validation shows a high detection quality, especially regarding the requirements for the validation of satellite cloud top retrieval algorithms.

  19. VOLCANIC ASH CLOUD HEIGHTS USING THE MODIS CO2-SLICING ALGORITHM

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    VOLCANIC ASH CLOUD HEIGHTS USING THE MODIS CO2-SLICING ALGORITHM by Michael S. Richards A thesis, must be known. There are several methods used for estimating the height of an ash cloud, including Spectroradiometer (MODIS) "CO2-slicing" technique as a method for retrieving volcanic cloud heights from space

  20. Comparison of marine stratocumulus cloud top heights in the southeastern Pacific retrieved from satellites

    E-print Network

    Comparison of marine stratocumulus cloud top heights in the southeastern Pacific retrieved from. [1] In order to better understand the general problem of satellite cloud top height retrievals top heights, determined from the cloud top pressures, were found to be biased high by between 1400

  1. Cloud top height comparisons from ASTER, MISR, and MODIS for trade wind cumuli

    E-print Network

    Zuidema, Paquita

    Cloud top height comparisons from ASTER, MISR, and MODIS for trade wind cumuli Iliana Genkova a ASTER stereo and ASTER infrared (IR) retrieved cloud top heights (CTHs) at 90 m spatial resolution height frequency distributions were derived for 41 trade wind cumulus cloud scenes with no cirrus

  2. Cloud Height Maps for Hurricanes Frances and Ivan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) captured these images and cloud-top height retrievals of Hurricane Frances on September 4, 2004, when the eye sat just off the coast of eastern Florida, and Hurricane Ivan on September 5th, after this cyclone had devastated Grenada and was heading toward the central and western Caribbean. Hurricane Frances made landfall in the early hours of September 5, and was downgraded to Tropical Storm status as it swept inland through the Florida panhandle and continued northward. On the heels of Frances is Hurricane Ivan, which is on record as the strongest tropical cyclone to form at such a low latitude in the Atlantic, and was the most powerful hurricane to have hit the Caribbean in nearly a decade.

    The ability of forecasters to predict the intensity and amount of rainfall associated with hurricanes still requires improvement, especially on the 24 to 48 hour timescale vital for disaster planning. To improve the operational models used to make hurricane forecasts, scientists need to better understand the multi-scale interactions at the cloud, mesoscale and synoptic scales that lead to hurricane intensification and dissipation, and the various physical processes that affect hurricane intensity and rainfall distributions. Because these uncertainties with regard to how to represent cloud processes still exist, it is vital that the model findings be evaluated against hurricane observations whenever possible. Two-dimensional maps of cloud height such as those shown here offer an unprecedented opportunity for comparing simulated cloud fields against actual hurricane observations.

    The left-hand panel in each image pair is a natural color view from MISR's nadir camera. The right-hand panels are cloud-top height retrievals produced by automated computer recognition of the distinctive spatial features between images acquired at different view angles. These results indicate that at the time that these images were acquired, clouds within Frances and Ivan had attained altitudes of 15 kilometers and 16 kilometers above sea level, respectively. The height fields pictured here are uncorrected for the effects of cloud motion. Wind-corrected heights (which have higher accuracy but sparser spatial coverage) are within about 1 kilometer of the heights shown here.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82o north and 82o south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbits 25081 and 25094. The panels cover an area of 380 kilometers x 924 kilometers, and utilize data from within blocks 65 to 87 within World Reference System-2 paths 14 and 222, respectively.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California In

  3. Cloud Coverage and Height Distribution from the GLAS Polar Orbiting Lidar: Comparison to Passive Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhime, J. D.; Palm, S. P.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Mahesh, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) began full on orbit operations in September 2003. A main application of the two-wavelength GLAS lidar is highly accurate detection and profiling of global cloud cover. Initial analysis indicates that cloud and aerosol layers are consistently detected on a global basis to cross-sections down to 10(exp -6) per meter. Images of the lidar data dramatically and accurately show the vertical structure of cloud and aerosol to the limit of signal attenuation. The GLAS lidar has made the most accurate measurement of global cloud coverage and height to date. In addition to the calibrated lidar signal, GLAS data products include multi level boundaries and optical depth of all transmissive layers. Processing includes a multi-variable separation of cloud and aerosol layers. An initial application of the data results is to compare monthly cloud means from several months of GLAS observations in 2003 to existing cloud climatologies from other satellite measurement. In some cases direct comparison to passive cloud retrievals is possible. A limitation of the lidar measurements is nadir only sampling. However monthly means exhibit reasonably good global statistics and coverage results, at other than polar regions, compare well with other measurements but show significant differences in height distribution. For polar regions where passive cloud retrievals are problematic and where orbit track density is greatest, the GLAS results are particularly an advance in cloud cover information. Direct comparison to MODIS retrievals show a better than 90% agreement in cloud detection for daytime, but less than 60% at night. Height retrievals are in much less agreement. GLAS is a part of the NASA EOS project and data products are thus openly available to the science community (see http://glo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

  4. Image Segmentation Based on Height Maps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriele Peters; Jochen Kerdels

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new method for image segmen- tation. It is based on a height map generated from the input image. The height map characterizes the image content in such a way that the application of the watershed concept provides a proper segmentation of the image. The height map enables the watershed method to provide better segmentation

  5. Cloud Height Retrieval with Oxygen A and B bands for the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Marshak, A.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Mao, J.; Meyer, K.; Herman, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    At the Earth's L1 Lagrangian point, the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) would see the whole sunlit half of the Earth and would provide simultaneous data on cloud and aerosol properties from its Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC). EPIC images the Earth on a 2Kx2K CCD array, which gives a horizontal resolution of about 10 km at nadir. A filter-wheel provides consecutive images in 10 spectral channels ranging from the UV to the near-IR, including the oxygen A and B bands, which are designed for cloud height retrievals. In this talk, we will present the progress on EPIC cloud height retrieval using Oxygen A and B band. As the first step, a study on the effect of cloud phase, particle size, optical depth, extinction coefficient, cloud fraction, sun-view geometry, and surface type on the cloud height determination is conducted. Second, based on the simple Lambertian cloud reflectance model, two cloud pressure retrieval algorithms are developed: one utilizes the absolute radiances at the Oxygen A and B bands and the other uses the radiance ratios between the absorption and reference channels of the two bands. Third, a cloud height retrieval model that is suitable for operational use is implemented. Test results with the data from the EPIC simulator will be presented.

  6. A Simple Stochastic Model for Generating Broken Cloud Optical Depth and Top Height Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prigarin, Sergei M.; Marshak, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    A simple and fast algorithm for generating two correlated stochastic twodimensional (2D) cloud fields is described. The algorithm is illustrated with two broken cumulus cloud fields: cloud optical depth and cloud top height retrieved from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). Only two 2D fields are required as an input. The algorithm output is statistical realizations of these two fields with approximately the same correlation and joint distribution functions as the original ones. The major assumption of the algorithm is statistical isotropy of the fields. In contrast to fractals and the Fourier filtering methods frequently used for stochastic cloud modeling, the proposed method is based on spectral models of homogeneous random fields. For keeping the same probability density function as the (first) original field, the method of inverse distribution function is used. When the spatial distribution of the first field has been generated, a realization of the correlated second field is simulated using a conditional distribution matrix. This paper is served as a theoretical justification to the publicly available software that has been recently released by the authors and can be freely downloaded from http://i3rc.gsfc.nasa.gov/Public codes clouds.htm. Though 2D rather than full 3D, stochastic realizations of two correlated cloud fields that mimic statistics of given fields have proved to be very useful to study 3D radiative transfer features of broken cumulus clouds for better understanding of shortwave radiation and interpretation of the remote sensing retrievals.

  7. Tornado occurrences related to overshooting cloud-top heights as determined from ATS pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1972-01-01

    A sequence of ATS 3 pictures including the development history of large anvil clouds near Salina, Kansas was enlarged by NASA into 8X negatives which were used to obtain the best quality prints by mixing scan lines in 8 steps to minimize checker-board patterns. These images resulted in the best possible resolution, permitting use to compute the heights of overshooting tops above environmental anvil levels based on cloud shadow relationships along with the techniques of lunar topographic mapping. Of 39 heights computed, 6 were within 15 miles of reported positions of 3 tornadoes. It was found that the tornado proximity tops were mostly less than 5000 ft, with one exception of 7000 ft, suggesting that tornadoes are most likely to occur when overshooting height decreases. In order to simulate surface vortices induced by cloud-scale rotation and updraft fields, a laboratory model was constructed. The model experiment has shown that the rotation or updraft field induces a surface vortex but their combination does prevent the formation of the surface vortex. This research leads to a conclusion that the determination of the cloud-top topography and its time variation is of extreme importance in predicting severe local storms for a period of 0 to 6 hours.

  8. Automatic cloud top height determination in mountainous areas using a cost-effective time-lapse camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, H. M.; Chang, S.-C.; Thies, B.; Bendix, J.

    2014-12-01

    A new method is presented for the determination of cloud top heights using the footage of a time-lapse camera that is placed above a frequently occurring cloud layer in a mountain valley. Contact points between cloud tops and underlying terrain are automatically detected in the camera image based on differences in the brightness, texture and movement of cloudy and non-cloudy areas. The height of the detected cloud top positions is determined by comparison with a digital elevation model projected to the view of the camera. The technique has been validated using data about the cloud immersion of a second camera as well as via visual assessment. The validation shows a high detection quality, especially regarding the requirements for the validation of satellite cloud top retrieval algorithms.

  9. A Stereoscopic Technique to Estimate Cloud-Top Height Using Combined Geostationary and Low Earth Orbiting Satellites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Veenhuis Bruce Albert Jr

    2009-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of cloud-top height is important for a range of meteorological applications. Uses include cloud classification and the assignment of height levels to cloud drift winds. Such data may also be useful for monitoring tropical cyclone intensity over observation sparse oceans. A new method to retrieve cloud-top height has been developed in order to improve the temporal and spatial

  10. Improved Boundary Layer and Cloud Heights from the NASA Micro Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J.; Welton, E. J.; Belcher, L. R.; Mplnet Team

    2011-12-01

    The NASA Micro Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) Level 1.5b data product provides identification of aerosol and cloud layers. New algorithms have been developed for determining planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights and cloud heights from MPLNET data. An overview of the new methods will be discussed, along with their advantages and limitations. Seasonal and diurnal trends observed at the Goddard Space Flight Center site in Greenbelt, MD will also be evaluated. Results from the improved algorithms are compared to the current operational MPLNET cloud and PBL height products as well as the corresponding products from the GEOS-5 model.

  11. A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 slicing

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2]. Other studies have compared CO2- slicing cloud heights with those computed from lidar data [Smith in assessing the accuracy of the CO2-slicing cloud height algorithm. Infrared measurements of upwelling

  12. Changes in Cloud-Ceiling Heights and Frequencies over the United States since the Early 1950s

    E-print Network

    Changes in Cloud-Ceiling Heights and Frequencies over the United States since the Early 1950s BOMIN military stations, and by further comparison with changes in physically related parameters, inhomogeneous records, including all NWS records based only on automated observing systems and the military records

  13. Global Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud detection and height evaluation using CALIOP

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Global Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud detection and height evaluation with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for both cloud. Frey, S. Dutcher, R. E. Kuehn, M. A. Vaughan, and B. Baum (2008), Global Moderate Resolution Imaging

  14. Are Satellite-Retrieved Correlations Between Cloud-Top-Height and Aerosol Optical Depth Evidence of Aerosol Invigoration of Convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, P.; Gryspeerdt, E.; Grandey, B. S.; Wagner, T. M.; Kipling, Z.

    2013-12-01

    A robust negative correlation between cloud top pressure (CTP) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been documented in a number of studies and triggered hypotheses on aerosol invigoration of convective clouds. However, correlation based analysis is limited in its explanatory power as it does not directly establish physical causality between the correlated properties which may be cross-correlated with other meteorological factors. In this study we combine the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAM with mechanistic coupling of the aerosol microphysics (HAM) to the two-moment cloud microphysics in the Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) and satellite data from SEVIRI, MODIS, ISCCP, CALIOP and CloudSat. CCFM explicitly simulates a spectrum of convective cloud top heights within each grid box, providing enhanced realism over traditional mass flux schemes. Consistency is established through sampling of the models at satellite overpass times and the use of ISCCP and COSP satellite simulators in the model. We employ this setup to investigate the contributions of aerosol-cloud interactions and meteorological cross-correlations to AOD--CTP correlations. Our analysis shows that a significant fraction of the observed AOD-CTP relationship is driven by the meteorological link between CTP and cloud fraction (CF), which itself is strongly linked to AOD via the humidification of aerosol in humid (hence preferentially cloudy) environments. Our results shed light on this controversial issue with potentially significant climate implications and emphasise the difficulty to constrain for meteorological variability in observational studies of aerosol-cloud interactions.

  15. Retrieval of cloud fraction and height anomalies and their trend from temporally and spatially averaged infrared spectra observed from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, S.; Rose, F. G.; Liu, X.; Wielicki, B. A.; Mlynczak, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding how clouds and atmospheric properties change with time under radiative forcing is necessary to understand feedback. Generally, global clouds and atmospheric Understanding how clouds and atmospheric properties change with time under radiative forcing is necessary to understand feedback. Generally, global clouds and atmospheric properties are retrieved from satellite-based instruments. Subsequently, retrieved values from an instrument's field-of-view are averaged and the time rate of change of cloud or atmospheric properties can be inferred from averaged properties. This is simple in concept but identifying artifacts of the retrieval is difficult in practice. An alternative way to derive a trend of cloud and atmospheric properties is tying their property change directly to the observed radiance change. This average-then-retrieve approach directly utilizes instrument stability but requires separating cloud and atmospheric property changes contributing to the highly spatially and temporally averaged observed radiance change. In this presentation, we demonstrate the average-then-retrieve approach by simulating the retrieval of cloud fraction and height anomalies from highly averaged longwave spectra. We use 28 years of reanalysis (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research MERRA) for the simulation and retrieve annual 10° zonal cloud fraction and height anomalies, as well as temperature and water vapor amount anomalies. The error in retrieved anomalies is estimated based on the method discussed in Kato et al. (2011). The uncertainty in the trend estimated from retrieved anomalies is also discussed. Reference Kato, S., B. A. Wielicki, F. G. Rose, X. Liu, P. C. Taylor, D. P. Kratz, M. G. Mlynczak, D. F. Young, N. Phojanamongkolkij, S. Sun-Mack, W. F. Miller, Y. Chen, 2011b, Detection of atmospheric changes in spatially and temporally averaged infrared spectra observed from space, J Climate, 24, 6392-6407, Doi: 10.1175/JCLI-D-10-05005.1.

  16. Cloud-top Height Esimation Method by Geostationary Satellite Split-Window Measurements Trained with CALIPSO and CloudSat data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Noriyuki; Hamada, Atsushi; Hirose, Hitoshi

    2015-04-01

    We released a database of cloud top height and visible optical thickness (CTOP) with one-hour resolution over the tropical western Pacific and Maritime Continent, by using infrared split-window data of the geostationary satellites (MTSAT) (http://database.rish.kyoto-u.ac.jp/arch/ctop/). We made lookup tables for estimating cloud top height only with geostationary infrared observations by comparing them with the direct cloud observation by CloudSat (Hamada and Nishi, 2010, JAMC). We picked out the same-time observations by MTSAT and CloudSat and regressed the cloud top height observation of CloudSat back onto 11 micro m brightness temperature (Tb) and the difference between the 11 micro m Tb and 12 micro m Tb of MTSAT. The database contains digital data and quick look images from Jul 2005 to real time and the area in 85E-155W (MTSAT2) and 20S-20N. Though the CTOP dataset is particularly useful for the upper tropospheric clouds, it has one serious problem. The cloud radar onboard CloudSat cannot well detect the optically thin cirrus clouds composed of small ice crystals and misses a certain part of cirriform clouds in the upper troposphere. In order to overcome this weakness, we are now making next version of the CTOP by using the lidar data (CALIOP) onboard CALIPSO satellite. One problem on the use of lidar observation is that they observe very thin cirrus formed around the tropopause. The main purpose of CTOP dataset is to provide the top height of clouds that originate from cloud clusters including cumulonimbus and nimbostratus, not of in-situ cirrus clouds formed near the tropopause. To exclude the very thin tropopause cirrus, we define cloud-top height of CALIOP observation as the height at which the optical depth accumulated from the cloud top is 0.2, instead of the CALIOP cloud top itself. With this criterion we can succeed in estimating the top height of cirruiform clouds, but it has another problem for thick clouds like cumulonimbus. For such clouds, the height of accumulated optical depth 0.2 is considerably lower than the real cloud top, possibly due to rather small number of large cloud particles near the top. Therefore, the estimation using CloudSat data is closer to the real top for the thick clouds, while that using CALIOP data is closer for cirriform clouds. So we are now making a lookup table with using both CloudSat and CALIPSO data to estimate cloud-top heights both for thick and thin clouds seamlessly.

  17. Photogrammetric retrieval of volcanic ash cloud top height from SEVIRI and MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakšek, Klemen; Hort, Matthias; Zaletelj, Janez; Langmann, Bärbel

    2013-04-01

    Even if erupting in remote areas, volcanoes can have a significant impact on the modern society due to volcanic ash dispersion in the atmosphere. The ash does not affect merely air traffic - its transport in the atmosphere and its deposition on land and in the oceans may also significantly influence the climate through modifications of atmospheric CO2. The emphasis of this contribution is the retrieval of volcanic ash plume height (ACTH). ACTH is important information especially for air traffic but also to predict ash transport and to estimate the mass flux of the ejected material. ACTH is usually estimated from ground measurements, pilot reports, or satellite remote sensing. But ground based instruments are often not available at remote volcanoes and also the pilots reports are a matter of chance. Volcanic ash cloud top height (ACTH) can be monitored on the global level using satellite remote sensing. The most often used method compares brightness temperature of the cloud with the atmospheric temperature profile. Because of uncertainties of this method (unknown emissivity of the ash cloud, tropopause, etc.) we propose photogrammetric methods based on the parallax between data retrieved from geostationary (SEVIRI) and polar orbiting satellites (MODIS). The parallax is estimated using automatic image matching in three level image pyramids. The procedure works well if the data from both satellites are retrieved nearly simultaneously. MODIS does not retrieve the data at exactly the same time as SEVIRI. To compensate for advection we use two sequential SEVIRI images (one before and one after the MODIS retrieval) and interpolate the cloud position from SEVIRI data to the time of MODIS retrieval. ACTH is then estimated by intersection of corresponding lines-of-view from MODIS and interpolated SEVIRI data. The proposed method was tested using MODIS band 1 and SEVIRI HRV band for the case of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in April 2010. The parallax between MODIS and SEVIRI data can reach over 30 km which implies ACTH of more than 12 km. The accuracy of ACTH was estimated to 0.6 km. The limitation of this procedure is that it has difficulties with automatic image matching if the ash cloud is not opaque.

  18. Automatic analysis of stereoscopic satellite image pairs for determination of cloud-top height and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Strong, J.; Woodward, R. H.; Pierce, H.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented on an automatic stereo analysis of cloud-top heights from nearly simultaneous satellite image pairs from the GOES and NOAA satellites, using a massively parallel processor computer. Comparisons of computer-derived height fields and manually analyzed fields show that the automatic analysis technique shows promise for performing routine stereo analysis in a real-time environment, providing a useful forecasting tool by augmenting observational data sets of severe thunderstorms and hurricanes. Simulations using synthetic stereo data show that it is possible to automatically resolve small-scale features such as 4000-m-diam clouds to about 1500 m in the vertical.

  19. Obtaining cloud top height from WRF model vertical profiles: application to the EUSO program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Andrés; López, Laura; Sánchez, José Luis; Rodriguez-Frias, Maria Dolores; Del Peral, Luis; Franchini, Sebastian; Licandro, Javier; García-Ortega, Eduardo; Marcos, José Luis; Gascón, Estíbaliz; Fernández-González, Sergio; Hermida, Lucía; Rodriguez, Elena

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) program is detection and measurement of high-energy particles that reach earth's atmosphere from space. Clouds at mid and upper levels of the troposphere can interfere with such detection. Therefore, determining cloud top height with high accuracy is crucial to estimating the effect of clouds on these measurements. With this aim, we developed a method to extract that height using cloud temperature via vertical profiles predicted by the WRF model. First, we evaluated model ability to represent temperature and humidity profiles in different climatic regions of the globe. To this end, we established 12 windows covering the earth and all seasons of the year. From these, points with available soundings were selected to calibrate and obtain the optimal WRF configuration for producing vertical temperature profiles. Within the WRF, we defined two domains for each window, with spatial resolutions 15 and 5 km. Vertical resolution was established with 58 levels, because we required profiles of high accuracy. In each study window, we evaluated a series of parameterizations (microphysics, cumulus, radiation). For this, we compared vertical profiles obtained by the WRF for each parameterization, using sounding data in each study area. Once we obtained the optimum physical configuration of the model for each climatic region, we developed an application to automatically determine cloud top height at each pixel of the infrared camera images, taking as input cloud-top temperature plus temperature and humidity profiles output by the WRF at each pixel.

  20. Cloud Height Retrieval with Oxygen A and B Bands for the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yuekui; Marshak, Alexander; Mao, Jianping; Lyapustin, Alexei; Herman, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Planned to fly in 2014, the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) would see the whole sunlit half of the Earth from the L 1 Lagrangian point and would provide simultaneous data on cloud and aerosol properties with its Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC). EPIC images the Earth on a 2Kx2K CCD array, which gives a horizontal resolution of about 10 km at nadir. A filter-wheel provides consecutive images in 10 spectral channels ranging from the UV to the near-IR, including the oxygen A and B bands. This paper presents a study of retrieving cloud height with EPIC's oxygen A and B bands. As the first step, we analyzed the effect of cloud optical and geometrical properties, sun-view geometry, and surface type on the cloud height determination. Second, we developed two cloud height retrieval algorithms that are based on the Mixed Lambertian-Equivalent Reflectivity (MLER) concept: one utilizes the absolute radiances at the Oxygen A and B bands and the other uses the radiance ratios between the absorption and reference channels of the two bands. Third, we applied the algorithms to the simulated EPIC data and to the data from SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY (SCIAMACHY) observations. Results show that oxygen A and B bands complement each other: A band is better suited for retrievals over ocean, while B band is better over vegetated land due to a much darker surface. Improvements to the MLER model, including corrections to surface contribution and photon path inside clouds, will also be discussed.

  1. Satellite and Surface Data Synergy for Developing a 3D Cloud Structure and Properties Characterization Over the ARM SGP. Stage 1: Cloud Amounts, Optical Depths, and Cloud Heights Reconciliation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genkova, I.; Long, C. N.; Heck, P. W.; Minnis, P.

    2003-01-01

    One of the primary Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program objectives is to obtain measurements applicable to the development of models for better understanding of radiative processes in the atmosphere. We address this goal by building a three-dimensional (3D) characterization of the cloud structure and properties over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP). We take the approach of juxtaposing the cloud properties as retrieved from independent satellite and ground-based retrievals, and looking at the statistics of the cloud field properties. Once these retrievals are well understood, they will be used to populate the 3D characterization database. As a first step we determine the relationship between surface fractional sky cover and satellite viewing angle dependent cloud fraction (CF). We elaborate on the agreement intercomparing optical depth (OD) datasets from satellite and ground using available retrieval algorithms with relation to the CF, cloud height, multi-layer cloud presence, and solar zenith angle (SZA). For the SGP Central Facility, where output from the active remote sensing cloud layer (ARSCL) valueadded product (VAP) is available, we study the uncertainty of satellite estimated cloud heights and evaluate the impact of this uncertainty for radiative studies.

  2. Multi-Sensor Analysis of Cloud-Top Height in Sc - Cu Transition Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewig, E.; Horvath, A.

    2010-12-01

    In the eastern basins of the subtropical oceans unbroken sheets of stratocumulus transition to fields of scattered cumulus as boundary-layer air masses advect equatorward in the trades. This shift in cloud regimes is the subject of intense modeling efforts, because it has profound effects on the local and the planetary albedo. To provide observational constraints for such modeling studies, we analyzed satellite measurements of boundary-layer cloud-top heights (CTHs) in the northeast and southeast Atlantic and Pacific. Our sensor suite comprised CALIPSO-CALIOP, MODIS, MISR, and Meteosat-9. The study covered the summer months June-August and September-November for the northern and southern hemisphere, respectively, spanning the period 2006-2009. We considered CALIOP lidar measurements the most accurate and, hence, used them as reference. The operational Collection 5 MODIS CTHs were based on fitting measured cloud-top temperatures (CTTs) to forecast temperature profiles and were known to have large biases in case of low-level inversions. Therefore, we also evaluated CTHs derived from CTT-SST differences and various lapse rate formulations, which is the method suggested for the upcoming Collection 6 dataset. The MISR stereo CTHs were computed from a purely geometric method, which, however, is rather sensitive to errors in along-track wind speed. Because our previous work indicated a MISR cross-swath speed bias, we created a modified CTH dataset by replacing MISR winds with Meteosat-9 winds to correct the raw MISR stereo heights. The various satellite retrievals were then compared over whole regions as well as along characteristic Sc-Cu transition trajectories computed with the HYSPLIT model. For context, results from LES transition simulations were also analyzed. Some highlights of our study are summarized below. The CALIOP, MISR, and lapse-rate-based MODIS CTHs all showed a systematic increase of 500-700 m in the southeast Atlantic and northeast Pacific as Sc transitioned to Cu. In the northeast Atlantic and southeast Pacific, however, these CTHs had no obvious trends and remained fairly constant. Operational MODIS CTHs indicated an erroneously decreasing trend along transition trajectories in all four regions due to large (500-1500 m) overestimations in the Sc regime (although they were fairly reasonable in the Cu regime). The best MODIS dataset was a hybrid one combining current operational retrievals and lapse-rate-based heights depending on the presence or lack of low-level inversions. Overall, MISR CTHs compared most favorably to CALIOP with typical correlations and biases of 0.7 and 150 m, respectively. In the southeast Atlantic, MISR CTH errors could be further reduced by 15-30% when using Meteosat-9 winds for height correction, thereby removing apparent cross-swath biases.

  3. Ground-Based Lidar and Radar Remote Sensing of Tropical Cirrus Clouds at Nauru Island: Cloud Statistics and Radiative Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Mace, Gerald G.

    2002-12-12

    Ground based active and passive remote sensing instrumentation are combined to derive radiative and macrophysical properties of tropical cirrus clouds. Eight months of cirrus observations at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site located on Nauru Island provide independent retrieval of cloud height and visible optical depth using lidar and radar techniques. Comparisons reveal the millimeter cloud radar does not detect 13% of cirrus clouds with a cloud base higher than 15 km that are detected by the lidar. Lidar and radar cloud heights demonstrate good agreement when the cloud lies below 15 km. Radar and lidar retrievals of visible optical depth also compare well for all but the optically thinnest clouds. Cloud occurrence at Nauru as measured by lidar, reveal clear sky conditions occur on average 40%, low clouds 16%, and high clouds 44% of the time. Analysis of observed cirrus macrophysical and radiative properties suggests that two different types of cirrus exist in the tropical western Pacific: high, thin, laminar cirrus with cloud base higher than 15 km, and lower, physically thicker, more structured cirrus clouds. Differences in cirrus types are likely linked to their formation mechanisms. Radiosonde profiles of temperature and equivalent potential temperature near the tropical tropopause show a clear transition between neutrally stable and stable air at ~15 km, which may also explain the presence of two distinct cirrus types. Radiative heating rate and cloud forcing calculations for specific cirrus cases reveal the impact of tropical cirrus clouds on the earth?s radiation budget.

  4. CloudSat-constrained cloud ice water path and cloud top height retrievals from MHS 157 and 183.3 GHz radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J.; Wu, D. L.

    2014-06-01

    Ice water path (IWP) and cloud top height (ht) are two of the key variables in determining cloud radiative and thermodynamical properties in climate models. Large uncertainty remains among IWP measurements from satellite sensors, in large part due to the assumptions made for cloud microphysics in these retrievals. In this study, we develop a fast algorithm to retrieve IWP from the 157, 183.3 ± 3 and 190.3 GHz radiances of the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) such that the MHS cloud ice retrieval is consistent with CloudSat IWP measurements. This retrieval is obtained by constraining the empirical forward models between collocated and coincident measurements of CloudSat IWP and MHS cloud-induced radiance depression (Tcir) at these channels. The empirical forward model is represented by a look-up table (LUT) of Tcir-IWP relationships as a function of ht and the frequency channel. With ht simultaneously retrieved, the IWP is found to be more accurate. The useful range of the MHS IWP retrieval is between 0.5 and 10 kg m-2, and agrees well with CloudSat in terms of the normalized probability density function (PDF). Compared to the empirical model, current operational radiative transfer models (RTMs) still have significant uncertainties in characterizing the observed Tcir-IWP relationships. Therefore, the empirical LUT method developed here remains an effective approach to retrieving ice cloud properties from the MHS-like microwave channels.

  5. CloudSat-Constrained Cloud Ice Water Path and Cloud Top Height Retrievals from MHS 157 and 183.3 GHz Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J.; Wu, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    Ice water path (IWP) and cloud top height (ht) are two of the key variables in determining cloud radiative and thermodynamical properties in climate models. Large uncertainty remains among IWP measurements from satellite sensors, in large part due to the assumptions made for cloud microphysics in these retrievals. In this study, we develop a fast algorithm to retrieve IWP from the 157, 183.3+/-3 and 190.3 GHz radiances of the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) such that the MHS cloud ice retrieval is consistent with CloudSat IWP measurements. This retrieval is obtained by constraining the empirical forward models between collocated and coincident measurements of CloudSat IWP and MHS cloud-induced radiance depression (Tcir) at these channels. The empirical forward model is represented by a lookup table (LUT) of Tcir-IWP relationships as a function of ht and the frequency channel.With ht simultaneously retrieved, the IWP is found to be more accurate. The useful range of the MHS IWP retrieval is between 0.5 and 10 kg/sq m, and agrees well with CloudSat in terms of the normalized probability density function (PDF). Compared to the empirical model, current operational radiative transfer models (RTMs) still have significant uncertainties in characterizing the observed Tcir-IWP relationships. Therefore, the empirical LUT method developed here remains an effective approach to retrieving ice cloud properties from the MHS-like microwave channels.

  6. Retrieval of cloud height from SCIAMACHY using oxygen absorption around 630nm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Grzegorski; Tim Deutschmann; Ulrich Platt; Ping Wang; Thomas Wagner

    2010-01-01

    The SCanning Imaging Absorption spectrometer for Atmospheric ChartographY (SCIAMACHY) on ENVISAT allows measurements of different atmospheric trace gases (e.g. O3, NO2, SO2, CH4, HCHO, CO, BrO, H2O, O2, O4) using the DOAS technique. The HICRU algorithm retrieves cloud height using the spectral analysis of the oxygen absorption around 630nm combined with results of the Monte-Carlo model TRACY-II and a new

  7. Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2014-05-15

    Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

  8. Remote sensing of cloud top pressure/height from SEVIRI: analysis of ten current retrieval algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, U.; Walther, A.; Baum, B.; Bennartz, R.; Bugliaro, L.; Derrien, M.; Francis, P.; Heidinger, A.; Joro, S.; Kniffka, A.; Le Gléau, H.; Lockhoff, M.; Lutz, H.-J.; Meirink, J. F.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Roebeling, R.; Thoss, A.; Platnick, S.; Watts, P.; Wind, G.

    2014-01-01

    The role of clouds remains the largest uncertainty in climate projections. They influence solar and thermal radiative transfer and the earth's water cycle. Therefore, there is an urgent need for accurate cloud observations to validate climate models and to monitor climate change. Passive satellite imagers measuring radiation at visible to thermal infrared wavelengths provide a wealth of information on cloud properties. Among others, the cloud top height (CTH) - a crucial parameter to estimate the thermal cloud radiative forcing - can be retrieved. In this paper we investigate the skill of ten current retrieval algorithms to estimate the CTH using observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In the first part we compare the ten SEVIRI cloud top pressure (CTP) datasets with each other. The SEVIRI algorithms catch the latitudinal variation of the CTP in a similar way. The agreement is better in the extratropics than in the tropics. In the tropics multi-layer clouds and thin cirrus layers complicate the CTP retrieval, whereas good agreement is found for the cores of the deep convective system having a high optical depth. Furthermore, a good agreement between the algorithms is observed for trade wind cumulus and marine stratocumulus clouds. In the second part of the paper the SEVIRI retrievals are compared to CTH observations from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) instruments. It is important to note that the different measurement techniques cause differences in the retrieved CHT data. SEVIRI measures a radiatively effective CTH, while the CTH of the active instruments is derived from the return time of the emitted signal. Therefore some systematic diffrences are expected. On average the CTHs detected by the SEVIRI algorithms are 1.0 to 2.5 km lower than CALIOP observations, and the correlation coefficients between the SEVIRI and the CALIOP datasets range between 0.77 and 0.90. The mean CTH differences between the SEVIRI algorithms and CPR observations are smaller than for CALIOP ranging from -0.8 km to 0.6 km. The correlation coefficients of CPR and SEVIRI observations range between 0.82 and 0.89. To discuss the origin of the CTH deviation we elaborate the comparison for three cloud categories: optically thin and thick single layer as well as multi-layer clouds. For optically thick clouds the correlation coefficients between the SEVIRI and the reference datasets are usually above 0.95. For optically thin single layer clouds the correlation coefficients are still above 0.92. For this cloud category the SEVIRI algorithms yield CTHs that are lower than CALIOP but similar to CPR observations. Most challenging are the multi-layer clouds, where the correlation coefficients are for most algorithms between 0.6 and 0.8. Finally, we evaluate the performance of the SEVIRI retrievals for boundary layer clouds. While the CTH retrieval for this cloud type is relatively accurate, there are still considerable differences between the algorithms. These are related to uncertainties in and limited vertical resolution of the assumed temperature profiles in combination with the presence of temperature inversions, which lead to ambiguities in the CTH retrieval. Alternative approaches for the CTH retrieval of low clouds are discussed.

  9. Remote sensing of cloud top pressure/height from SEVIRI: analysis of ten current retrieval algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, U.; Walther, A.; Baum, B.; Bennartz, R.; Bugliaro, L.; Derrien, M.; Francis, P. N.; Heidinger, A.; Joro, S.; Kniffka, A.; Le Gléau, H.; Lockhoff, M.; Lutz, H.-J.; Meirink, J. F.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Roebeling, R.; Thoss, A.; Platnick, S.; Watts, P.; Wind, G.

    2014-09-01

    The role of clouds remains the largest uncertainty in climate projections. They influence solar and thermal radiative transfer and the earth's water cycle. Therefore, there is an urgent need for accurate cloud observations to validate climate models and to monitor climate change. Passive satellite imagers measuring radiation at visible to thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths provide a wealth of information on cloud properties. Among others, the cloud top height (CTH) - a crucial parameter to estimate the thermal cloud radiative forcing - can be retrieved. In this paper we investigate the skill of ten current retrieval algorithms to estimate the CTH using observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In the first part we compare ten SEVIRI cloud top pressure (CTP) data sets with each other. The SEVIRI algorithms catch the latitudinal variation of the CTP in a similar way. The agreement is better in the extratropics than in the tropics. In the tropics multi-layer clouds and thin cirrus layers complicate the CTP retrieval, whereas a good agreement among the algorithms is found for trade wind cumulus, marine stratocumulus and the optically thick cores of the deep convective system. In the second part of the paper the SEVIRI retrievals are compared to CTH observations from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) instruments. It is important to note that the different measurement techniques cause differences in the retrieved CTH data. SEVIRI measures a radiatively effective CTH, while the CTH of the active instruments is derived from the return time of the emitted radar or lidar signal. Therefore, some systematic differences are expected. On average the CTHs detected by the SEVIRI algorithms are 1.0 to 2.5 km lower than CALIOP observations, and the correlation coefficients between the SEVIRI and the CALIOP data sets range between 0.77 and 0.90. The average CTHs derived by the SEVIRI algorithms are closer to the CPR measurements than to CALIOP measurements. The biases between SEVIRI and CPR retrievals range from -0.8 km to 0.6 km. The correlation coefficients of CPR and SEVIRI observations vary between 0.82 and 0.89. To discuss the origin of the CTH deviation, we investigate three cloud categories: optically thin and thick single layer as well as multi-layer clouds. For optically thick clouds the correlation coefficients between the SEVIRI and the reference data sets are usually above 0.95. For optically thin single layer clouds the correlation coefficients are still above 0.92. For this cloud category the SEVIRI algorithms yield CTHs that are lower than CALIOP and similar to CPR observations. Most challenging are the multi-layer clouds, where the correlation coefficients are for most algorithms between 0.6 and 0.8. Finally, we evaluate the performance of the SEVIRI retrievals for boundary layer clouds. While the CTH retrieval for this cloud type is relatively accurate, there are still considerable differences between the algorithms. These are related to the uncertainties and limited vertical resolution of the assumed temperature profiles in combination with the presence of temperature inversions, which lead to ambiguities in the CTH retrieval. Alternative approaches for the CTH retrieval of low clouds are discussed.

  10. Remote Sensing of Cloud Top Height from SEVIRI: Analysis of Eleven Current Retrieval Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamann, U.; Walther, A.; Baum, B.; Bennartz, R.; Bugliaro, L.; Derrien, M.; Francis, P. N.; Heidinger, A.; Joro, S.; Kniffka, A.; Le Gleau, H.; Lockhoff, M.; Lutz, H.-J.; Meirink, J. F.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Roebeling, R.; Thoss, A.; Platnick, S.; Watts, P.; Wind, G.

    2014-01-01

    The role of clouds remains the largest uncertainty in climate projections. They influence solar and thermal radiative transfer and the earth's water cycle. Therefore, there is an urgent need for accurate cloud observations to validate climate models and to monitor climate change. Passive satellite imagers measuring radiation at visible to thermal infrared (IR) wavelengths provide a wealth of information on cloud properties. Among others, the cloud top height (CTH) - a crucial parameter to estimate the thermal cloud radiative forcing - can be retrieved. In this paper we investigate the skill of ten current retrieval algorithms to estimate the CTH using observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In the first part we compare ten SEVIRI cloud top pressure (CTP) data sets with each other. The SEVIRI algorithms catch the latitudinal variation of the CTP in a similar way. The agreement is better in the extratropics than in the tropics. In the tropics multi-layer clouds and thin cirrus layers complicate the CTP retrieval, whereas a good agreement among the algorithms is found for trade wind cumulus, marine stratocumulus and the optically thick cores of the deep convective system. In the second part of the paper the SEVIRI retrievals are compared to CTH observations from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) instruments. It is important to note that the different measurement techniques cause differences in the retrieved CTH data. SEVIRI measures a radiatively effective CTH, while the CTH of the active instruments is derived from the return time of the emitted radar or lidar signal. Therefore, some systematic differences are expected. On average the CTHs detected by the SEVIRI algorithms are 1.0 to 2.5 kilometers lower than CALIOP observations, and the correlation coefficients between the SEVIRI and the CALIOP data sets range between 0.77 and 0.90. The average CTHs derived by the SEVIRI algorithms are closer to the CPR measurements than to CALIOP measurements. The biases between SEVIRI and CPR retrievals range from -0.8 kilometers to 0.6 kilometers. The correlation coefficients of CPR and SEVIRI observations vary between 0.82 and 0.89. To discuss the origin of the CTH deviation, we investigate three cloud categories: optically thin and thick single layer as well as multi-layer clouds. For optically thick clouds the correlation coefficients between the SEVIRI and the reference data sets are usually above 0.95. For optically thin single layer clouds the correlation coefficients are still above 0.92. For this cloud category the SEVIRI algorithms yield CTHs that are lower than CALIOP and similar to CPR observations. Most challenging are the multi-layer clouds, where the correlation coefficients are for most algorithms between 0.6 and 0.8. Finally, we evaluate the performance of the SEVIRI retrievals for boundary layer clouds. While the CTH retrieval for this cloud type is relatively accurate, there are still considerable differences between the algorithms. These are related to the uncertainties and limited vertical resolution of the assumed temperature profiles in combination with the presence of temperature inversions, which lead to ambiguities in the CTH retrieval. Alternative approaches for the CTH retrieval of low clouds are discussed.

  11. Rise of volcanic eruption clouds: Relationship between cloud height and eruption intensity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Settle

    1976-01-01

    The rise of eruption clouds is produced by the upward momentum and thermal buoyancy of volcanic dust and gas, processes which play important roles in other phenomena. The expansion of a turbulent jet in free flow is controlled by the rate at which the forward momentum of the jet is dissipated. Thermal buoyancy of industrial waste gases provides a mechanism

  12. Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota

    E-print Network

    Delene, David J.

    accuracy #12;POLCAST4 Polarimetric Cloud Analysis and Seeding Test 4 Field campaign held in the summerCloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota · Mariusz Starzec #12;Motivation Compare University of Wyoming (UWyo) and Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT) cloud condensation nuclei

  13. A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO 2 slicing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard A. Frey; Bryan A. Baum; W. Paul Menzel; Steven A. Ackerman; Christopher C. Moeller; James D. Spinhirne

    1999-01-01

    Data from two instruments onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) ER-2 high-altitude aircraft have been utilized in the largest validation study to date in assessing the accuracy of the CO2-slicing cloud height algorithm. Infrared measurements of upwelling radiance from the MODIS (Moderate- Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) airborne simulator (MAS) were used to generate cloud top heights and then compared

  14. Thin and thick cloud top height retrieval algorithm with the Infrared Camera and LIDAR of the JEM-EUSO Space Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez-Cano, G.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; del Peral, L.; Neronov, A.; Wada, S.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.

    2015-03-01

    The origin of cosmic rays have remained a mistery for more than a century. JEM-EUSO is a pioneer space-based telescope that will be located at the International Space Station (ISS) and its aim is to detect Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) and Extremely High Energy Cosmic Rays (EHECR) by observing the atmosphere. Unlike ground-based telescopes, JEM-EUSO will observe from upwards, and therefore, for a properly UHECR reconstruction under cloudy conditions, a key element of JEM-EUSO is an Atmospheric Monitoring System (AMS). This AMS consists of a space qualified bi-spectral Infrared Camera, that will provide the cloud coverage and cloud top height in the JEM-EUSO Field of View (FoV) and a LIDAR, that will measure the atmospheric optical depth in the direction it has been shot. In this paper we will explain the effects of clouds for the determination of the UHECR arrival direction. Moreover, since the cloud top height retrieval is crucial to analyze the UHECR and EHECR events under cloudy conditions, the retrieval algorithm that fulfills the technical requierements of the Infrared Camera of JEM-EUSO to reconstruct the cloud top height is presently reported.

  15. Grain boundary barrier height in base and space charge regions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Dugas; J. P. Crest; C. M. Singal; J. Qualid

    1983-01-01

    The influence of grain boundary barrier height is of great importance for polycrystalline electronic devices and solar cells. The g.b. barrier height is computed in a forward biased one-sided step junction. Within the base, it is calculated by means of analytical expressions which depend on the interface state distribution. Within the space charge region, the population of the interface states

  16. Monitoring cirrus clouds with lidar in the Southern Hemisphere: A local study over Buenos Aires. 1. Tropopause heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakkis, Susan Gabriela; Lavorato, Mario; Canziani, Pablo Osvaldo

    2009-03-01

    Cirrus clouds in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere have recently drawn much attention due to their important role and impact on the atmospheric radiative balance. Because they are located in the upper troposphere their study requires a high resolution technique not only to detect them but also to characterize their behaviour and evolution. A good dynamic range in lidar backscattering signals is necessary to observe and improve our knowledge of cirrus clouds, and thereof, atmospheric parameters in the troposphere and UT/LS due to their vicinity to the tropopause layer. The lidar system measures, in real time, the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer, stratospheric aerosols, tropopause height and cirrus clouds evolution. The aim of the work is to present the main properties of cirrus clouds over central Argentina and to monitor tropopause height together with their temporal evolution using a backscatter lidar system located in Buenos Aires (34.6 °S, 58.5 °W). A cirrus clouds detection method was used to analyze a set of 60 diurnal events, during 2001-2005, in order to estimate tropopause height and its temporal evolution, using the top of cirrus clouds present on the upper troposphere as a tropopause tracer. The results derived from lidar show a remarkable good agreement when compared with rawinsonde data, considering values of tropopause height with differences less than or equal to 500 m, depending on the signal to noise ratio of the measurements. Clouds properties analysis reveals the presence of thick cirrus clouds with thickness between 0.5 and 4.2 km, with the top cloud located at the tropopause height.

  17. A physically based algorithm for non-blackbody correction of the cloud top temperature for the convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Luo, Z. J.; Chen, X.; Zeng, X.; Tao, W.; Huang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Cloud top temperature is a key parameter to retrieval in the remote sensing of convective clouds. Passive remote sensing cannot directly measure the temperature at the cloud tops. Here we explore a synergistic way of estimating cloud top temperature by making use of the simultaneous passive and active remote sensing of clouds (in this case, CloudSat and MODIS). Weighting function of the MODIS 11?m band is explicitly calculated by feeding cloud hydrometer profiles from CloudSat retrievals and temperature and humidity profiles based on ECMWF ERA-interim reanalysis into a radiation transfer model. Among 19,699 tropical deep convective clouds observed by the CloudSat in 2008, the averaged effective emission level (EEL, where the weighting function attains its maximum) is at optical depth 0.91 with a standard deviation of 0.33. Furthermore, the vertical gradient of CloudSat radar reflectivity, an indicator of the fuzziness of convective cloud top, is linearly proportional to, d_{CTH-EEL}, the distance between the EEL of 11?m channel and cloud top height (CTH) determined by the CloudSat when d_{CTH-EEL}<0.6km. Beyond 0.6km, the distance has little sensitivity to the vertical gradient of CloudSat radar reflectivity. Based on these findings, we derive a formula between the fuzziness in the cloud top region, which is measurable by CloudSat, and the MODIS 11?m brightness temperature assuming that the difference between effective emission temperature and the 11?m brightness temperature is proportional to the cloud top fuzziness. This formula is verified using the simulated deep convective cloud profiles by the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model. We further discuss the application of this formula in estimating cloud top buoyancy as well as the error characteristics of the radiative calculation within such deep-convective clouds.

  18. Cloud-Based Data Storage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2011-01-01

    The vulnerability and inefficiency of backing up data on-site is prompting school districts to switch to more secure, less troublesome cloud-based options. District auditors are pushing for a better way to back up their data than the on-site, tape-based system that had been used for years. About three years ago, Hendrick School District in…

  19. CSc-165 Spring 2014 Week 9(a) Image-Based Height Maps

    E-print Network

    Gordon, Scott

    CSc-165 Spring 2014 Week 9(a) Image-Based Height Maps (based on code example 4[b]) public class myGame extends BaseGame { . . . private void initTerrain() { // create height map and terrain block ImageBasedHeightMap myHeightMap = new ImageBasedHeightMap("height.jpg"); TerrainBlock imageTerrain = createTerBlock(myHeight

  20. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-07-21

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  1. Automatic measurement of crops canopy height based on monocular vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenghong; Cao, Zhiguo; Bai, Xiaodong

    2011-12-01

    Computer vision technology has been increasingly used for automatically observing crop growth state, but as one of the key parameters in the field of agro-meteorological observation, crop canopy height is still measured manually in the actual observation process up to now. In order to automatically measure the height based on the forward-and-downward-looking image in the existing monocular vision observation system, a novel method is proposed, that is, to measure the canopy height indirectly by the solving algorithm for the actual height of the vertical objects (SAAH) with the help of the intelligent sensor device. The experiment results verified the feasibility and validity of our method, and that the method could meet the actual observation demand.

  2. Cloud Types

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This table provides a quick reference to cloud types. Clouds are divided into groups mainly based on the height of the cloud's base above the Earth's surface. The table further divides the types according to group, atmospheric layer, and base height. Links to additional information are embedded in the text, and users can select beginner, intermediate, or advanced levels of difficulty. A Spanish translation is available.

  3. Evaluation of single field-of-view cloud top height retrievals from hyperspectral infrared sounder radiances with CloudSat and CALIPSO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhigang; Li, Jun; Weisz, Elisabeth; Heidinger, Andrew; Liu, Chian-Yi

    2013-08-01

    Accurate cloud top height retrievals from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounder radiances are needed for weather and climate prediction. To account for the nonlinearity of the cloud parameters with respect to the IR radiances, a one-dimensional variational retrieval algorithm is used to derive the cloud top heights (CTHs) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances on a single field-of-view basis. The CTHs are evaluated by comparison with the measurements from radar and lidar instruments onboard the Earth Observing System (EOS) CloudSat and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellites. Using the retrievals from a global 3 day dataset, it is found that the variational algorithm compared with the regression algorithm could reduce the variability of the difference between the AIRS and active measurements by 1 km. And the biases of AIRS CTHs range from +1.5 to -1.4 km and from +1.6 to -3.8 km, depending on the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) and CALIPSO CTHs between 3 and 18 km, respectively. Globally, the AIRS CTH is overestimated (underestimated) when the CTH from active measurements is below (above) 5 km. The bias decreases from -1.9 to -0.8 km, and the variability decreases from 2.8 to about 1.6 km with the increase of the CALIPSO cloud optical thickness from 0.1 to 2.5. It also reveals that the AIRS CTHs agree better with the CPR than the CALIPSO.

  4. Monitoring volcanic ash cloud top height through simultaneous retrieval of optical data from polar orbiting and geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakšek, K.; Hort, M.; Zaletelj, J.; Langmann, B.

    2013-03-01

    Volcanic ash cloud-top height (ACTH) can be monitored on the global level using satellite remote sensing. Here we propose a photogrammetric method based on the parallax between data retrieved from geostationary and polar orbiting satellites to overcome some limitations of the existing methods of ACTH retrieval. SEVIRI HRV band and MODIS band 1 are a good choice because of their high resolution. The procedure works well if the data from both satellites are retrieved nearly simultaneously. MODIS does not retrieve the data at exactly the same time as SEVIRI. To compensate for advection we use two sequential SEVIRI images (one before and one after the MODIS retrieval) and interpolate the cloud position from SEVIRI data to the time of MODIS retrieval. The proposed method was tested for the case of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in April 2010. The parallax between MODIS and SEVIRI data can reach 30 km, which implies an ACTH of approximately 12 km at the beginning of the eruption. At the end of April eruption an ACTH of 3-4 km is observed. The accuracy of ACTH was estimated to be 0.6 km.

  5. Monitoring volcanic ash cloud top height through simultaneous retrieval of optical data from polar orbiting and geostationary satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakšek, K.; Hort, M.; Zaletelj, J.; Langmann, B.

    2012-09-01

    Volcanic ash cloud top height (ACTH) can be monitored on the global level using satellite remote sensing. Here we propose a photogrammetric method based on the parallax between data retrieved from geostationary and polar orbiting satellites to overcome some limitations of the existing methods of ACTH retrieval. SEVIRI HRV band and MODIS band 1 are a good choice because of their high resolution. The procedure works well if the data from both satellites are retrieved nearly simultaneously. MODIS does not retrieve the data at exactly the same time as SEVIRI. To compensate for advection we use two sequential SEVIRI images (one before and one after the MODIS retrieval) and interpolate the cloud position from SEVIRI data to the time of MODIS retrieval. The proposed method was tested for the case of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in April 2010. The parallax between MODIS and SEVIRI data can reach over 30 km which implies ACTH of more than 12 km in the beginning of the eruption. In the end of April eruption ACTH of 3-4 km is observed. The accuracy of ACTH was estimated to be 0.6 km.

  6. Height-based Indices of Pubertal Timing in Male Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Khairullah, Ammar; May, Margaret T.; Tilling, Kate; Howe, Laura D.; Leonard, Gabriel; Perron, Michel; Richer, Louis; Veillette, Suzanne; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    It is important to account for timing of puberty when studying the adolescent brain and cognition. The use of classical methods for assessing pubertal status may not be feasible in some studies, especially in male adolescents. Using data from a sample of 478 males from a longitudinal birth cohort, we describe the calculations of three independent height-based markers of pubertal timing: Age at Peak Height Velocity (APHV), Height Difference in Standard Deviations (HDSDS), and Percent Achieved of Adult Stature (PAAS). These markers correlate well with each other. In a separate cross-sectional study, we show that the PAAS marker correlates well with testosterone levels and self-reported pubertal-stage scores. We conclude by discussing key considerations for investigators when drawing upon these methods of assessing pubertal timing.

  7. Integration of Satellite-Derived Cloud Phase, Cloud Top Height, and Liquid Water Path into an Operational Aircraft Icing Nowcasting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, Julie; McDonough, Frank; Black, Jennifer; Landott, Scott; Wolff, Cory; Mueller, Steven; Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Operational products used by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration to alert pilots of hazardous icing provide nowcast and short-term forecast estimates of the potential for the presence of supercooled liquid water and supercooled large droplets. The Current Icing Product (CIP) system employs basic satellite-derived information, including a cloud mask and cloud top temperature estimates, together with multiple other data sources to produce a gridded, three-dimensional, hourly depiction of icing probability and severity. Advanced satellite-derived cloud products developed at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) provide a more detailed description of cloud properties (primarily at cloud top) compared to the basic satellite-derived information used currently in CIP. Cloud hydrometeor phase, liquid water path, cloud effective temperature, and cloud top height as estimated by the LaRC algorithms are into the CIP fuzzy logic scheme and a confidence value is determined. Examples of CIP products before and after the integration of the LaRC satellite-derived products will be presented at the conference.

  8. Satellite Inference of Thermals and Cloud Base Updraft Speeds Based on Retrieved Surface and Cloud Base Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Rosenfeld, D.; Li, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Updraft speeds of thermals have always been difficult to measure, despite the significant role they play in transporting pollutants and in cloud formation and precipitation. In this study, updraft speeds measured by Doppler lidar are found to be correlated with the observed planetary boundary layer (PBL) and surface properties in the buoyancy-driven PBL over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site operated by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Program (ARM). Based on the found relationships, two approaches are proposed to estimate both maximum (Wmax ) and cloud base (Wb ) updraft speeds. The required input data are PBL height, 10-m horizontal wind speed, wind shear, surface skin temperature and 2-m air temperature. The application for remote sensing of updraft speeds in cloud-topped PBL from space was tested by using satellite-retrieved surface and cloud base temperature in combination with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim reanalysis data. Validation against lidar-measured updraft speeds indicates the feasibility of retrieving Wmax (root-mean-square error, RMSE, is 0.32 m/s) and Wb (RMSE is 0.42 m/s) for global coverage. This information is essential to advance the understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions. This method does not work for stable or mechanically-driven PBL.

  9. Satellite-Based Insights into Precipitation Formation Processes in Continental and Maritime Convective Clouds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Rosenfeld; Itamar M. Lensky

    1998-01-01

    Multispectral analyses of satellite images are used to calculate the evolution of the effective radius of convective cloud particles with temperature, and to infer from that information about precipitation forming processes in theclouds. Different microphysical processes are identified at different heights. From cloud base to top, the microphysical classification includes zones of diffusional droplet growth, coalescence droplet growth, rainout, mixed-phase

  10. Estimating plot-level tree heights with lidar: local filtering with a canopy-height based variable

    E-print Network

    Á/ density, small-footprint lidar data set. The lidar data were acquired over deciduous, coniferous instances, to subcanopy layers of vegetation and to the ground. Airborne lidars have been used to describeEstimating plot-level tree heights with lidar: local filtering with a canopy-height based variable

  11. Royal Meteorological Society 1 INTRODUCTION TO CLOUDS

    E-print Network

    Allan, Richard P.

    1 © Royal Meteorological Society 1 INTRODUCTION TO CLOUDS · Clouds are very common, with 50% of Earth covered in cloud at any one time. · Only 1 ­ 2% will be raining. · They are classified by height and nature: - Low clouds: base 0 ­ 2 km - Medium clouds: base 2 ­ 7 km - High clouds: base above 5 km Over

  12. Science Report: Atmosphere A Comparison of Satellite-Based Cloud Observations to GLOBE Cloud Observations using the MODIS Cloud Product

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matt Rogers; Graeme Stephens

    GLOBE student observations of cloud type are compared to coincident satellite-derived observations, using MODIS Cloud Product data from the EOS-PM satellite. Cloud type is computed using satellite observed cloud top pressure and cloud optical thickness in the framework of the ISCCP cloud classification scheme (Rossow and Schiffer, 1991.) Common errors and biases in the surface based observations are explored, with

  13. Real-Time Estimation of Volcanic ASH/SO2 Cloud Height from Combined Uv/ir Satellite Observations and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, Gilberto A.

    An efficient iterative method has been developed to estimate the vertical profile of SO2 and ash clouds from volcanic eruptions by comparing near real-time satellite observations with numerical modeling outputs. The approach uses UV based SO2 concentration and IR based ash cloud images, the volcanic ash transport model PUFF and wind speed, height and directional information to find the best match between the simulated and the observed displays. The method is computationally fast and is being implemented for operational use at the NOAA Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) in Washington, DC, USA, to support the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) effort to detect, track and measure volcanic ash cloud heights for air traffic safety and management. The presentation will show the methodology, results, statistical analysis and SO2 and Aerosol Index input products derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the NASA EOS/Aura research satellite and from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) instrument in the MetOp-A. The volcanic ash products are derived from AVHRR instruments in the NOAA POES-16, 17, 18, 19 as well as MetOp-A. The presentation will also show how a VAAC volcanic ash analyst interacts with the system providing initial condition inputs such as location and time of the volcanic eruption, followed by the automatic real-time tracking of all the satellite data available, subsequent activation of the iterative approach and the data/product delivery process in numerical and graphical format for operational applications.

  14. Validation of Satellite-Based Objective Overshooting Cloud-Top Detection Methods Using CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedka, Kristopher M.; Dworak, Richard; Brunner, Jason; Feltz, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Two satellite infrared-based overshooting convective cloud-top (OT) detection methods have recently been described in the literature: 1) the 11-mm infrared window channel texture (IRW texture) method, which uses IRW channel brightness temperature (BT) spatial gradients and thresholds, and 2) the water vapor minus IRW BT difference (WV-IRW BTD). While both methods show good performance in published case study examples, it is important to quantitatively validate these methods relative to overshooting top events across the globe. Unfortunately, no overshooting top database currently exists that could be used in such study. This study examines National Aeronautics and Space Administration CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar data to develop an OT detection validation database that is used to evaluate the IRW-texture and WV-IRW BTD OT detection methods. CloudSat data were manually examined over a 1.5-yr period to identify cases in which the cloud top penetrates above the tropopause height defined by a numerical weather prediction model and the surrounding cirrus anvil cloud top, producing 111 confirmed overshooting top events. When applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R Series (GOES-R) Advanced Baseline Imager proxy data, the IRW-texture (WV-IRW BTD) method offered a 76% (96%) probability of OT detection (POD) and 16% (81%) false-alarm ratio. Case study examples show that WV-IRW BTD.0 K identifies much of the deep convective cloud top, while the IRW-texture method focuses only on regions with a spatial scale near that of commonly observed OTs. The POD decreases by 20% when IRW-texture is applied to current geostationary imager data, highlighting the importance of imager spatial resolution for observing and detecting OT regions.

  15. Satellite Remote Sensing of Mid-level Clouds 

    E-print Network

    Jin, Hongchun 1980-

    2012-11-07

    This dissertation aims to study the mid-level clouds using satellite observations. It consists of two major parts: characteristics (including cloud top/base heights, cloud top pressure and temperature, and cloud thickness) and thermodynamic phase...

  16. The effects of cloud inhomogeneities upon radiative fluxes, and the supply of a cloud truth validation dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Ronald M.

    1993-01-01

    A series of cloud and sea ice retrieval algorithms are being developed in support of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Science Team objectives. These retrievals include the following: cloud fractional area, cloud optical thickness, cloud phase (water or ice), cloud particle effective radius, cloud top heights, cloud base height, cloud top temperature, cloud emissivity, cloud 3-D structure, cloud field scales of organization, sea ice fractional area, sea ice temperature, sea ice albedo, and sea surface temperature. Due to the problems of accurately retrieving cloud properties over bright surfaces, an advanced cloud classification method was developed which is based upon spectral and textural features and artificial intelligence classifiers.

  17. Initial assessment of space-based lidar CALIOP aerosol and cloud layer structures through inter-comparison with a ground-based back-scattering lidar and CloudSat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S.-W. Kim; S.-C. Yoon; E.-S. Chung; B.-J. Sohn; S. Berthier; J.-C. Raut; P. Chazette; F. Dulac

    2009-01-01

    This study presents results of the intercomparison of aerosol\\/cloud top and bottom heights obtained from a space-borne active sensor Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard CALIPSO, and the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) onboard CloudSat, and the space-borne passive sensor Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard Aqua, and ground-based 2-wavelenght polarization lidar system (532 and 1064 nm) at Seoul National

  18. Total body height estimation using sacrum height in Anatolian Caucasians: multidetector computed tomography-based virtual anthropometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hakki Muammer Karakas; Osman Celbis; Ahmet Harma; Banu Alicioglu

    2011-01-01

    Objective  Estimation of total body height is a major step when a subject has to be identified from his\\/her skeletal structures. In the\\u000a presence of decomposed skeletons and missing bones, estimation is usually based on regression equation for intact long bones.\\u000a If these bones are fragmented or missing, alternative structures must be used. In this study, the value of sacrum height

  19. Identity-Based Authentication for Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongwei; Dai, Yuanshun; Tian, Ling; Yang, Haomiao

    Cloud computing is a recently developed new technology for complex systems with massive-scale services sharing among numerous users. Therefore, authentication of both users and services is a significant issue for the trust and security of the cloud computing. SSL Authentication Protocol (SAP), once applied in cloud computing, will become so complicated that users will undergo a heavily loaded point both in computation and communication. This paper, based on the identity-based hierarchical model for cloud computing (IBHMCC) and its corresponding encryption and signature schemes, presented a new identity-based authentication protocol for cloud computing and services. Through simulation testing, it is shown that the authentication protocol is more lightweight and efficient than SAP, specially the more lightweight user side. Such merit of our model with great scalability is very suited to the massive-scale cloud.

  20. CloudAnalyst: A CloudSim-based Visual Modeller for Analysing Cloud Computing Environments and Applications

    E-print Network

    Calheiros, Rodrigo N.

    CloudAnalyst: A CloudSim-based Visual Modeller for Analysing Cloud Computing Environments and Applications Bhathiya Wickremasinghe1 , Rodrigo N. Calheiros2 , and Rajkumar Buyya1 1 The Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems (CLOUDS) Laboratory Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering The University

  1. CLOUD-BASED DATA STREAM PROCESSING

    E-print Network

    Tucci, Sara

    CLOUD-BASED DATA STREAM PROCESSING Thomas Heinze, Leonardo Aniello, Leonardo Querzoni, Zbigniew Jerzak DEBS 2014 Mumbai 26/5/2014 #12;TUTORIAL GOALS Data stream processing (DSP) was in the past 25/05/14 CLoud-Based Data Stream Processing #12;TUTORIAL GOALS Here we present an overview about

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A PROCEDURE FOR VERTICAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS AND 3D-SINGLE TREE EXTRACTION WITHIN FORESTS BASED ON LIDAR POINT CLOUD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yunsheng Wang; Holger Weinacker; Barbara Koch

    2007-01-01

    A procedure for both vertical canopy structure analysis and 3D single tree extraction based on Lidar raw point cloud is presented in this paper. The whole study area is segmented into small study cells by a raster net. For each cell, a normalized point cloud whose point heights represent the absolute heights of the ground objects is generated from the

  3. A voxel-based lidar method for estimating crown base height for deciduous and pine trees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sorin C. Popescu; Kaiguang Zhao

    2008-01-01

    The overall goal of this study was to develop methods for assessing crown base height for individual trees using airborne lidar data in forest settings typical for the southeastern United States. More specific objectives are to: (1) develop new lidar-derived features as multiband height bins and processing techniques for characterizing the vertical structure of individual tree crowns; (2) investigate several

  4. The effects of cloud inhomogeneities upon radiative fluxes, and the supply of a cloud truth validation dataset. Semiannual progress report, 1 July-31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    A series of cloud and sea ice retrieval algorithms are being developed in support of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Science Team objectives. These retrievals include the following: cloud fractional area, cloud optical thickness, cloud phase (water or ice), cloud particle effective radius, cloud top heights, cloud base height, cloud top temperature, cloud emissivity, cloud 3-D structure, cloud field scales of organization, sea ice fractional area, sea ice temperature, sea ice albedo, and sea surface temperature. Due to the problems of accurately retrieving cloud properties over bright surfaces, an advanced cloud classification method was developed which is based upon spectral and textural features and artificial intelligence classifiers.

  5. Object-Based Classification of Urban Airborne LIDAR Point Clouds with Multiple Echoes Using Svm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. X.; Lin, X. G.

    2012-07-01

    Airborne LiDAR point clouds classification is meaningful for various applications. In this paper, an object-based analysis method is proposed to classify the point clouds in urban areas. In the process of classification, outliers in the point clouds are first removed. Second, surface growing algorithm is employed to segment the point clouds into different clusters. The above point cloud segmentation is helpful to derive useful features such as average height, size/area, proportion of multiple echoes, slope/orientation, elevation difference, rectangularity, ratio of length to width, and compactness. At last, SVM-based classification is performed on the segmented point clouds with radial basis function as kernel. Two datasets with high point densities are employed to test the proposed method, and three classes are predefined. The results suggest that our method will produce the overall classification accuracy larger than 97% and the Kappa coefficient larger than 0.95.

  6. The Height Measurement of Virtual Object Based on Level Set Method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xu Yan; Wang Zhong-qiu; Zheng Yi; Wang Hong-ru

    2012-01-01

    This paper involves a method for height measurement of the virtual objects in a gray-scale image, it is based on the algorithm of level set method through level set function gray gradient changes. This method is adequate on height measurement on calculation and could be used in rich areas such as wave height measurement.

  7. Design of an Accounting and Metric-based Cloud-shifting and Cloud-seeding framework for Federated

    E-print Network

    Design of an Accounting and Metric-based Cloud-shifting and Cloud-seeding framework for Federated Clouds, Cloud seeding, Cloud shifting. 1. INTRODUCTION Batch, Cloud and Grid computing build the pillars Clouds and Bare-metal Environments Gregor von Laszewski1 *, Hyungro Lee1 , Javier Diaz1 , Fugang Wang1

  8. GROUND-BASED REAL TIME MONITORING OF ERUPTION CLOUDS IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kisei Kinoshita; Satoshi Tsuchida; Chikara Kanagaki; Andrew C. Tupper; Ernesto G. Corpuz; Eduardo P. Laguerta

    Ground-based observation of eruption clouds, combined with satellite imagery, is very important for understanding their properties under various volcanic and meteorological conditions. Real time monitoring contributes greatly to aviation safety, since height information is essential for dispersion model prediction. The near-infrared camera serves to improve the observation because it is less sensitive to atmospheric haze and able to detect hot

  9. Model based building height retrieval from single SAR images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li-bing Jiang; Zhuang Wang; Wen-xian Yu

    2011-01-01

    With the improvements of spaceborne and airborne SAR system resolution, the applications of radar remote sensing has been extended to building 3D geometric information retrieval and reconstruction from urban SAR images, which is the foundation of build-up areas reconstruction and urban analysis. This paper mainly focuses on the problem of building height estimation from a single high resolution (HR) SAR

  10. Clouds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this scenario-based, problem-based learning (PBL) activity, students investigate cloud formation, cloud classification, and the role of clouds in heating and cooling the Earth; how to interpret TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) images and data; and the role clouds play in the Earth’s radiant budget and climate. Students assume the role of weather interns in a state climatology office and assist a frustrated student in a homework assignment. Learning is supported by a cloud in a bottle and an ice-albedo demonstration, a three-day cloud monitoring outdoor activity, and student journal assignments. The hands-on activities require two 2-liter soda bottles, an infrared heat lamp, and two thermometers. The resource includes a teacher's guide, questions and answer key, assessment rubric, glossary, and an appendix with information supporting PBL in the classroom.

  11. A Physically Based Algorithm for Non-Blackbody Correction of Cloud-Top Temperature and Application to Convection Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chunpeng; Lou, Zhengzhao Johnny; Chen, Xiuhong; Zeng, Xiping; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Huang, Xianglei

    2014-01-01

    Cloud-top temperature (CTT) is an important parameter for convective clouds and is usually different from the 11-micrometers brightness temperature due to non-blackbody effects. This paper presents an algorithm for estimating convective CTT by using simultaneous passive [Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)] and active [CloudSat 1 Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO)] measurements of clouds to correct for the non-blackbody effect. To do this, a weighting function of the MODIS 11-micrometers band is explicitly calculated by feeding cloud hydrometer profiles from CloudSat and CALIPSO retrievals and temperature and humidity profiles based on ECMWF analyses into a radiation transfer model.Among 16 837 tropical deep convective clouds observed by CloudSat in 2008, the averaged effective emission level (EEL) of the 11-mm channel is located at optical depth; approximately 0.72, with a standard deviation of 0.3. The distance between the EEL and cloud-top height determined by CloudSat is shown to be related to a parameter called cloud-top fuzziness (CTF), defined as the vertical separation between 230 and 10 dBZ of CloudSat radar reflectivity. On the basis of these findings a relationship is then developed between the CTF and the difference between MODIS 11-micrometers brightness temperature and physical CTT, the latter being the non-blackbody correction of CTT. Correction of the non-blackbody effect of CTT is applied to analyze convective cloud-top buoyancy. With this correction, about 70% of the convective cores observed by CloudSat in the height range of 6-10 km have positive buoyancy near cloud top, meaning clouds are still growing vertically, although their final fate cannot be determined by snapshot observations.

  12. Adjusting thresholds of satellite-based convective initiation interest fields based on the cloud environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, Christopher P.; Mecikalski, John R.

    2013-11-01

    The Time-Space Exchangeability (TSE) concept states that similar characteristics of a given property are closely related statistically for objects or features within close proximity. In this exercise, the objects considered are growing cumulus clouds, and the data sets to be considered in a statistical sense are geostationary satellite infrared (IR) fields that help describe cloud growth rates, cloud top heights, and whether cloud tops contain significant amounts of frozen hydrometeors. In this exercise, the TSE concept is applied to alter otherwise static thresholds of IR fields of interest used within a satellite-based convective initiation (CI) nowcasting algorithm. The convective environment in which the clouds develop dictate growth rate and precipitation processes, and cumuli growing within similar mesoscale environments should have similar growth characteristics. Using environmental information provided by regional statistics of the interest fields, the thresholds are examined for adjustment toward improving the accuracy of 0-1 h CI nowcasts. Growing cumulus clouds are observed within a CI algorithm through IR fields for many 1000 s of cumulus cloud objects, from which statistics are generated on mesoscales. Initial results show a reduction in the number of false alarms of ~50%, yet at the cost of eliminating approximately ~20% of the correct CI forecasts. For comparison, static thresholds (i.e., with the same threshold values applied across the entire satellite domain) within the CI algorithm often produce a relatively high probability of detection, with false alarms being a significant problem. In addition to increased algorithm performance, a benefit of using a method like TSE is that a variety of unknown variables that influence cumulus cloud growth can be accounted for without need for explicit near-cloud observations that can be difficult to obtain.

  13. Error Analysis of Explosion-Height Controlling Method Based on Geomagnetism Information

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Feng Jie; Wang Ming-Hai; Liu Shun cheng; Wu Xiao-lu

    2009-01-01

    A new explosion-height controlling scheme of the ballistic missile based on geomagnetism information was put forward aiming at the deficiency of the traditional explosion-height controlling method. The simplified geomagnetism model was presented in this study for the error analysis and precision calculating. Although the scheme was not feasible yet, it could provide the beneficial reference for the explosion-height controlling system

  14. Designing SCIT Architecture Pattern in a Cloud-based Environment

    E-print Network

    Sood, Arun K.

    C-SCIT (Cloud- based Self-Cleansing Intrusion Tolerant) scheme that can provide enhanced intrusion. The main contribution of this paper is to design a Cloud- based Self-Cleansing Intrusion Tolerance (C

  15. Microprocessor-based ultrasonic height controller for sugarcane harvesters 

    E-print Network

    Coad, Craig Allan

    1980-01-01

    SUGARCANE CUTTING HEIGHT CONTROL ALGORITHM Introduction. Lost Echo Discrimination. vi 7 9 9 12 17 21 21 21 24 27 33 33 36 37 38 38 40 44 44 46 48 49 49 49 The Need for Two Averages Methods of Averaging. LABORATORY TEST...-stalk discrimination and signal averaging. ULTRASONIC SENSING PRINCIPLES Basic Conce t Proximity of a reflecting target to an ultrasonic transducer is indicated by the time elapsi. ng between the transmission of an ultrasonic pulse and the reception of the echo...

  16. Zonal superrotation above Venus' cloud base induced by the semidiurnal tide and the mean meridional circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, A. Y.; Fels, S. B.; Goody, R. M.

    1990-08-01

    The equilibrium zonal wind structure resulting from the interaction of the semidiurnal tide and the mean meridional circulation driven by the zonally averaged solar heating above the Venus cloud base were calculated. The results show that the tidal mechanism proposed by Fels and Lindzen (1974) can account for a substantial fraction (and possibly all) of the increase of the equatorial wind speed above the cloud base. Above the cloud tops, tidal deceleration may be too small to produce the zonal wind decrease with height inferred from thermal data. Tidal forcing does not explain the superrotation below the clouds, and additional eddy sources are needed to account for the zonal wind structure at mid and high latitudes.

  17. Is School-Based Height and Weight Screening of Elementary Students Private and Reliable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Sarah A.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Skay, Carol

    2008-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine recommends school-based body mass index (BMI) screening as an obesity prevention strategy. While school nurses have provided height/weight screening for years, little has been published describing measurement reliability or process. This study evaluated the reliability of height/weight measures collected by school nurses…

  18. Design of intelligent height control system based on eddy current sensor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Haiying Wang; Xuefei Wang; Zhenhe Sun; Yanjun Chen

    2010-01-01

    In water jet cutting process, cutting quality and speed depend on the distance between cutting head and object. To solve the problem that it is difficult to realize precise control of water jet cutting technique in height track system, this paper designs a waterproofing eddy height-adjusting system based on eddy sensor in view of metal plate. This system realizes non-contact

  19. Comparing the Cloud Vertical Structure Derived from Several Methods Based on Radiosonde Profiles and Ground-based Remote Sensing Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Costa-Suros, M.; Calbo, J.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-01-01

    The cloud vertical distribution and especially the cloud base height, which is linked to cloud type, is an important characteristic in order to describe the impact of clouds in a changing climate. In this work several methods to estimate the cloud vertical structure (CVS) based on atmospheric sounding profiles are compared, considering number and position of cloud layers, with a ground based system which is taken as a reference: the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL). All methods establish some conditions on the relative humidity, and differ on the use of other variables, the thresholds applied, or the vertical resolution of the profile. In this study these methods are applied to 125 radiosonde profiles acquired at the ARM Southern Great Plains site during all seasons of year 2009 and endorsed by GOES images, to confirm that the cloudiness conditions are homogeneous enough across their trajectory. The overall agreement for the methods ranges between 44-88%; four methods produce total agreements around 85%. Further tests and improvements are applied on one of these methods. In addition, we attempt to make this method suitable for low resolution vertical profiles, which could be useful in atmospheric modeling. The total agreement, even when using low resolution profiles, can be improved up to 91% if the thresholds for a moist layer to become a cloud layer are modified to minimize false negatives with the current data set, thus improving overall agreement.

  20. Exploring the Effects of Cloud Vertical Structure on Cloud Microphysical Retrievals based on Polarized Reflectances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. J.; Zhang, Z.; Platnick, S. E.; Ackerman, A. S.; Cornet, C.; Baum, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    A polarized cloud reflectance simulator was developed by coupling an LES cloud model with a polarized radiative transfer model to assess the capabilities of polarimetric cloud retrievals. With future remote sensing campaigns like NASA's Aerosols/Clouds/Ecosystems (ACE) planning to feature advanced polarimetric instruments it is important for the cloud remote sensing community to understand the retrievable information available and the related systematic/methodical limitations. The cloud retrieval simulator we have developed allows us to probe these important questions in a realistically relevant test bed. Our simulator utilizes a polarized adding-doubling radiative transfer model and an LES cloud field from a DHARMA simulation (Ackerman et al. 2004) with cloud properties based on the stratocumulus clouds observed during the DYCOMS-II field campaign. In this study we will focus on how the vertical structure of cloud microphysics can influence polarized cloud effective radius retrievals. Numerous previous studies have explored how retrievals based on total reflectance are affected by cloud vertical structure (Platnick 2000, Chang and Li 2002) but no such studies about the effects of vertical structure on polarized retrievals exist. Unlike the total cloud reflectance, which is predominantly multiply scattered light, the polarized reflectance is primarily the result of singly scattered photons. Thus the polarized reflectance is sensitive to only the uppermost region of the cloud (tau~<1) where photons can scatter once and still escape before being scattered again. This means that retrievals based on polarized reflectance have the potential to reveal behaviors specific to the cloud top. For example cloud top entrainment of dry air, a major influencer on the microphysical development of cloud droplets, can be potentially studied with polarimetric retrievals.

  1. Determination of the normal height of the Everest based on EGM 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W. B.; Li, Jin; Han, J.

    2009-04-01

    The orthometric height H is the height above the geoid, which is the equi-geopotential surface nearest to the mean sea level. The normal height H*, however, is the height above the quasi-geoid, which fast coincides with the geoid in the ocean but deviates from the geoid a little in the land areas. In China, the height datum system is based on the quasi-geoid, i.e., in most cases we use the normal height. GPS technique provides the coordinates of an arbitrary point P on ground with the accuracy better than 1 cm, in the geocentric Earth-fixed system. Hence, with the same accuracy, GPS technique provides the geodetic coordinates of the point P . Then, if the quasi-geoid is determined, the normal height can be subsequently determined. In the present paper, we focus on the determination of the normal height of the Everest based on the international gravity field model, EGM 2008. The geodetic coordinates of the Everest could be obtained by different sources. We use the coordinates provided by Chinese Surveying Bureau. In the frame of Molodensky theory, based on EGM 2008 (with degree 2190), we determine the normal height of the Everest by two approaches: point-wise approach and area-average approach. By point-wise and area-average approaches, our results show that the normal heights of the Everest are HEGM2008* = 8847.32 m and HEGM2008* = 8847.37 m, respectively. Concerning the normal height determination of the Everest, we find that the difference between our result and the result provided recently by Chinese Surveying Bureau is less than 0.1 m. Using EGM 96 however, we find that the difference is around 1 m. This study is supported by National 863 Project of China (Grant No.: 2006AA12Z211) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.: 40637034; 40574004).

  2. Estimation of Biomass Potential Based on Classification and Height Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, S.; Büscher, O.; Jandewerth, M.

    2013-05-01

    On the way to make energy supply independent from fossil resources more and more renewable energy sources have to be explored. Biomass has become an important energy resource during the last years and the consumption is rising steadily. Common sources of biomass are agricultural production and forestry but the production of these sources is stagnating due to limited space. To explore new sources of biomass like in the field of landscape conservation the location and available amount of biomass is unknown. Normally, there are no reliable data sources to give information about the objects of interest such as hedges, vegetation along streets, railways and rivers, field margins and ruderal sites. There is a great demand for an inventory of these biomass sources which could be answered by applying remote sensing technology. As biomass objects considered here are sometimes only a few meters wide, spectral unmixing is applied to separate different material mixtures reflected in one image pixel. The spectral images are assumed to have a spatial resolution of 5-20 m with multispectral or hyperspectral band configurations. Combining the identified material part fractions with height information and GIS data afterwards will give estimates about the location of biomass objects. The method is applied to test data of a Sentinel-2 simulation and the results are evaluated visually.

  3. Sharing-based Privacy and Availability of Cloud Data Warehouses

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    issue, we pro- pose a new (m, n, t) multi secret sharing scheme based on block cryptography, secret of the top concerns for cloud users and would-be users. Some security issues in the cloud are inher- ited

  4. Cloud-base distribution and cirrus properties based on micropulse lidar measurements at a site in southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianjun; Li, Zhanqing; Zheng, Youfei; Cribb, Maureen

    2015-07-01

    The cloud fraction (CF) and cloud-base heights (CBHs), and cirrus properties, over a site in southeastern China from June 2008 to May 2009, are examined by a ground-based lidar. Results show that clouds occupied the sky 41% of the time. Significant seasonal variations in CF were found with a maximum/minimum during winter/summer and similar magnitudes of CF in spring and autumn. A distinct diurnal cycle in the overall mean CF was seen. Total, daytime, and nighttime annual mean CBHs were 3.05±2.73 km, 2.46±2.08 km, and 3.51±3.07 km, respectively. The lowest/highest CBH occurred around noon/midnight. Cirrus clouds were present ˜36.2% of the time at night with the percentage increased in summer and decreased in spring. Annual mean values for cirrus geometrical properties were 8.89±1.65 km, 9.80±1.70 km, 10.73±1.86 km and 1.83±0.91 km for the base, mid-cloud, top height, and the thickness, respectively. Seasonal variations in cirrus geometrical properties show a maximum/minimum in summer/winter for all cirrus geometrical parameters. The mean cirrus lidar ratio for all cirrus cases in our study was ˜ 25±17 sr, with a smooth seasonal trend. The cirrus optical depth ranged from 0.001 to 2.475, with a mean of 0.34±0.33. Sub-visual, thin, and dense cirrus were observed in ˜12%, 43%, and 45% of the cases, respectively. More frequent, thicker cirrus clouds occurred in summer than in any other season. The properties of cirrus cloud over the site are compared with other lidar-based retrievals of midlatitude cirrus cloud properties.

  5. Extending the utility of machine based height sensors to spatially monitor cotton growth 

    E-print Network

    Geiger, David William

    2004-09-30

    The recommended procedures for implementing COTMAN; a cotton management expert system; suggest frequent crop scouting at numerous locations for each field. Machine based height sensors coupled with the ability to spatially ...

  6. Wave Heights

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this lesson plan students will learn about the varying heights of ocean waves and what causes the variation. They will begin by learning the parts of a wave, and then discuss the meaning of wave height and wavelength in terms of various points of reference. A demonstration will spark discussion about how geography affects wave heights, and will allow students to experiment with various forces to create different sized waves. Students will use the National Geographic Wave Simulator to experiment with creating different types of waves, and will draw waves based on the heights and lengths of familiar structures around the school.

  7. A new approach to retrieving cirrus cloud height with a combination of MODIS 1.24-and

    E-print Network

    Baum, Bryan A.

    .24- and 1.38-mm) with similar cloud scattering and absorp- tion properties but very different water vapor and Platt [1978, equation (1)], which is located at a geometrical depth within the cloud (beginning at cloudCALIOP). The scaling factor is the highest value of the frequency in each tCALIOP bin; the CALIOP­detected multi

  8. Cloud field classification based on textural features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Sailes Kumar

    1989-01-01

    An essential component in global climate research is accurate cloud cover and type determination. Of the two approaches to texture-based classification (statistical and textural), only the former is effective in the classification of natural scenes such as land, ocean, and atmosphere. In the statistical approach that was adopted, parameters characterizing the stochastic properties of the spatial distribution of grey levels in an image are estimated and then used as features for cloud classification. Two types of textural measures were used. One is based on the distribution of the grey level difference vector (GLDV), and the other on a set of textural features derived from the MaxMin cooccurrence matrix (MMCM). The GLDV method looks at the difference D of grey levels at pixels separated by a horizontal distance d and computes several statistics based on this distribution. These are then used as features in subsequent classification. The MaxMin tectural features on the other hand are based on the MMCM, a matrix whose (I,J)th entry give the relative frequency of occurrences of the grey level pair (I,J) that are consecutive and thresholded local extremes separated by a given pixel distance d. Textural measures are then computed based on this matrix in much the same manner as is done in texture computation using the grey level cooccurrence matrix. The database consists of 37 cloud field scenes from LANDSAT imagery using a near IR visible channel. The classification algorithm used is the well known Stepwise Discriminant Analysis. The overall accuracy was estimated by the percentage or correct classifications in each case. It turns out that both types of classifiers, at their best combination of features, and at any given spatial resolution give approximately the same classification accuracy. A neural network based classifier with a feed forward architecture and a back propagation training algorithm is used to increase the classification accuracy, using these two classes of features. Preliminary results based on the GLDV textural features alone look promising.

  9. Cloud Base Cloud Condensation Nuclei Measurements in Summertime North Dakota Airborne measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) were made just below

    E-print Network

    Delene, David J.

    of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota 2012 Polarimetric Cloud Analysis and Seeding Test 4 (POLCAST4Cloud Base Cloud Condensation Nuclei Measurements in Summertime North Dakota ` Objective Airborne measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) were made just below developing cumulus clouds in North Dakota

  10. Building vulnerability assessment based on cloud model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xixia; Cai, Chao

    2013-10-01

    This study aims at building a general framework for estimating building vulnerability to blast-fragmentation warhead of a missile. Considering the fuzziness and randomness existing in the damage criterion rules, cloud models are applied to represent the qualitative concepts. On the basis of building geometric description, element criticality analysis, blast wave and fragment movement description, and meeting analysis of fragments and target, kill probabilities of the components are estimated by the shot line method. The damage state of the whole building given the threat is obtained by cloud model based uncertainty reasoning and the proposed similarity measure, enabling both randomness of probability reasoning and the fuzziness of the traditional fuzzy logic to be considered. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can provide useful reference for optimizing warhead design and mission efficiency evaluation.

  11. LT Codes-based Secure and Reliable Cloud Storage Service

    E-print Network

    Hou, Y. Thomas

    LT Codes-based Secure and Reliable Cloud Storage Service Ning Cao Shucheng Yu Zhenyu Yang Wenjing for data owners. In this paper, we design a secure cloud storage service which addresses the reliability on data security with cloud storage are arising due to unreliability of the service. For example, recently

  12. Simulation of Cumuliform Clouds Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Miyazaki; Y. Dobashi; T. Nishita

    2002-01-01

    Simulation of natural phenomena is one of the important research fields in computer graphics. In particular, clouds play an important role in creating images of outdoor scenes. Fluid simulation is effective in creating realistic clouds because clouds are the visualization of atmospheric fluid. In this paper, we propose a simulation technique, based on a numerical solution of the partial differential

  13. Process-based Management of Cloud Computing Infrastructure

    E-print Network

    Krause, Rolf

    Process-based Management of Cloud Computing Infrastructure Background Cloud Computing with minimal management effort. Examples of modern cloud computing solutions include (but are not limited to is an emerging computing capability that provides an abstraction between the computing resource and its

  14. Collaboration-Based Cloud Computing Security Management Framework

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohemed Almorsy; John Grundy; Amani S. Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Although the cloud computing model is considered to be a very promising internet-based computing platform, it results in a loss of security control over the cloud-hosted assets. This is due to the outsourcing of enterprise IT assets hosted on third-party cloud computing platforms. Moreover, the lack of security constraints in the Service Level Agreements between the cloud providers and consumers

  15. Cloudy Sounding and Cloud-Top Height Retrieval From AIRS Alone Single Field-of-View Radiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisz, Elisabeth; Li, Jun; Li, Jinlong; Zhou, Daniel K.; Huang, Hung-Lung; Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Yang, Ping

    2007-01-01

    High-spectral resolution measurements from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard the EOS (Earth Observing System) Aqua satellite provide unique information about atmospheric state, surface and cloud properties. This paper presents an AIRS alone single field-of-view (SFOV) retrieval algorithm to simultaneously retrieve temperature, humidity and ozone profiles under all weather conditions, as well as cloud top pressure (CTP) and cloud optical thickness (COT) under cloudy skies. For optically thick cloud conditions the above-cloud soundings are derived, whereas for clear skies and optically thin cloud conditions the profiles are retrieved from 0.005 hPa down to the earth's surface. Initial validation has been conducted by using the operational MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) product, ECMWF (European Center of Medium range Weather Forecasts) analysis fields and radiosonde observations (RAOBs). These inter-comparisons clearly demonstrate the potential of this algorithm to process data from 38 high-spectral infrared (IR) sounder instruments.

  16. Clock-Based Proxy Re-encryption Scheme inClock-Based Proxy Re-encryption Scheme inClock-Based Proxy Re-encryption Scheme inClock-Based Proxy Re-encryption Scheme in Unreliable CloudsUnreliable CloudsUnreliable CloudsUnreliable Clouds

    E-print Network

    Wu, Jie

    Re-encryption Scheme inClock-Based Proxy Re-encryption Scheme in Unreliable CloudsUnreliable CloudsUnreliable CloudsUnreliable Clouds Qin Liu[1][2], Guojun Wang[1], and Jie Wu[2] , The 4The 4The 4The 4thththth International Workshop on Security in Cloud Computing (CloudSecInternational Workshop on Security in Cloud

  17. Efficient modeling of height datum based on GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Q.

    2014-04-01

    Since the proposal of Digital Earth, its research and applications are continuing to be deepened, and now Smart City is more indepth implementation of the Digital Earth. The unification of global or regional vertical datums has always been one of the main geodesy studies to achieve Smart City, as Smart City must first realize the seamless integration of multi-source geo-dataset. This paper introduces spatio-temporal data management and interactive visualization into the entire process of vertical datum modelling. We demonstrate that the efficiency of modelling is greatly improved. In this paper GIS database is used to manage all dataset such as tidal station data, gravity field model data, GPS leveling data, and vertical datum data for evaluation and analysis. We use geographic information visualization technique to graphically display the results, together with the interactive browsing, to convert tedious digital information to easy-to-understand images. Consequently, researchers can quickly and comprehensively grasp the macro and micro information. Finally, an efficient and interactive prototype operating platforms for vertical datum modeling is constructed based on GIS.

  18. Stereoscopic Retrieval of Smoke Plume Heights and Motion from Space-Based Multi-Angle Imaging, Using the MISR INteractive eXplorer(MINX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, David L.; Kahn, Ralph A.

    2014-01-01

    Airborne particles desert dust, wildfire smoke, volcanic effluent, urban pollution affect Earth's climate as well as air quality and health. They are found in the atmosphere all over the planet, but vary immensely in amount and properties with season and location. Most aerosol particles are injected into the near-surface boundary layer, but some, especially wildfire smoke, desert dust and volcanic ash, can be injected higher into the atmosphere, where they can stay aloft longer, travel farther, produce larger climate effects, and possibly affect human and ecosystem health far downwind. So monitoring aerosol injection height globally can make important contributions to climate science and air quality studies. The Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) is a space borne instrument designed to study Earths clouds, aerosols, and surface. Since late February 2000 it has been retrieving aerosol particle amount and properties, as well as cloud height and wind data, globally, about once per week. The MINX visualization and analysis tool complements the operational MISR data products, enabling users to retrieve heights and winds locally for detailed studies of smoke plumes, at higher spatial resolution and with greater precision than the operational product and other space-based, passive remote sensing techniques. MINX software is being used to provide plume height statistics for climatological studies as well as to investigate the dynamics of individual plumes, and to provide parameterizations for climate modeling.

  19. Ground-Based Cloud and Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observations for the Project: High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Advancing Climate Prediction, HD(CP)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsikko, A.; Ebell, K.; Ulrich, U.; Schween, J. H.; Bohn, B.; Görsdorf, U.; Leinweber, R.; Päschke, E.; Baars, H.; Seifert, P.; Klein Baltink, H.

    2014-12-01

    The German research initiative ''High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction, HD(CP)2'' aims for an improved representation of clouds and precipitation in climate models. Model development and its evaluation require comprehensive observational datasets. A specific work package was established to create uniform and documented observational datasets for the HD(CP)2 data base. Datasets included ground-based remote-sensing (Doppler lidars, ceilometers, microwave radiometers, and cloud radars) and in-situ (meteorological and radiation sensors) measurements. Four supersites (Jülich ObservatorY for Cloud Evolution (JOYCE), Lindenberg Meteorological Observatory - Richard Assmann Observatory (RAO), and Leipzig Aerosol and Cloud Remote Observations System (LACROS) in Germany, and Cabauw experimental site for atmospheric research (Cesar) in the Netherlands) are finalizing the operational procedures to provide quality controlled (and calibrated if possible) remote-sensing and in-situ observations, retrievals on atmospheric boundary layer state (e.g. winds, mixing layer height, humidity and temperature), and cloud macro and micro physical properties with uncertainty estimations or at least quality flags. During the project new processing and retrieval methods were developed if no commonly agreed or satisfying methods were available. Especially, large progress was made concerning uncertainty estimation and automated quality control. Additionally, the data from JOYCE are used in a radiative closure studies under cloudy conditions to evaluate retrievals of cloud properties. The current status of work progress will be presented.

  20. Do parental heights influence pregnancy length?: a population-based prospective study, HUNT 2

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to examine the association of maternal and paternal height with pregnancy length, and with the risk of pre- and post-term birth. In addition we aimed to study whether cardiovascular risk factors could explain possible associations. Methods Parents who participated in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT 2; 1995–1997) were linked to offspring data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (1997–2005). The main analyses included 3497 women who had delivered 5010 children, and 2005 men who had fathered 2798 pregnancies. All births took place after parental participation in HUNT 2. Linear regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted differences in pregnancy length according to parental heights. Logistic regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted associations of parental heights with the risk of pre- and post-term births. Results We found a gradual increase in pregnancy length by increasing maternal height, and the association was essentially unchanged after adjustment for maternal cardiovascular risk factors, parental age, offspring sex, parity, and socioeconomic measures. When estimated date of delivery was based on ultrasound, the difference between mothers in the lower height quintile (<163 cm cm) and mothers in the upper height quintile (? 173 cm) was 4.3 days, and when estimated date of delivery was based on last menstrual period (LMP), the difference was 2.8 days. Shorter women (< 163 cm) had lower risk of post-term births, and when estimated date of delivery was based on ultrasound they also had higher risk of pre-term births. Paternal height was not associated with pregnancy length, or with the risks of pre- and post-term births. Conclusions Women with shorter stature had shorter pregnancy length and lower risk of post-term births than taller women, and when EDD was based on ultrasound, they also had higher risk of preterm births. The effect of maternal height was generally stronger when pregnancy length was based on second trimester ultrasound compared to last menstrual period. The association of maternal height with pregnancy length could not be explained by cardiovascular risk factors. Paternal height was neither associated with pregnancy length nor with the risk of pre- and post-term birth. PMID:23383756

  1. Effects of cloud horizontal inhomogeneity and drizzle on remote sensing of cloud droplet effective radius: Case studies based

    E-print Network

    ) and radiative transfer computations. The case studies based on synthetic LES cloud fields indicate that at high also has a strong influence on cloud radiative effects. In satellite-based retrie- vals, re is mostEffects of cloud horizontal inhomogeneity and drizzle on remote sensing of cloud droplet effective

  2. 16 year climatology of cirrus clouds over a tropical station in southern India using ground and space-based lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, A. K.; Gadhavi, H. S.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Raghunath, K.; Rao, S. V. B.; Jayaraman, A.

    2015-06-01

    16 year (1998-2013) climatology of cirrus clouds and their macrophysical (base height, top height and geometrical thickness) and optical properties (cloud optical thickness) observed using a ground-based lidar over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), India, is presented. The climatology obtained from the ground-based lidar is compared with the climatology obtained from seven and half years (June 2006-December 2013) of Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations. A very good agreement is found between the two climatologies in spite of their opposite viewing geometries and difference in sampling frequencies. Nearly 50-55% of cirrus clouds were found to possess geometrical thickness less than 2 km. Ground-based lidar is found to detect more number of sub-visible clouds than CALIOP which has implications for global warming studies as sub-visible cirrus clouds have significant positive radiative forcing. Cirrus clouds with mid-cloud temperatures between -50 to -70 °C have a mean geometrical thickness greater than 2 km in contrast to the earlier reported value of 1.7 km. Trend analyses reveal a statistically significant increase in the altitude of sub-visible cirrus clouds which is consistent with the recent climate model simulations. Also, the fraction of sub-visible cirrus cloud is found to be increasing during the last sixteen years (1998 to 2013) which has implications to the temperature and water vapour budget in the tropical tropopause layer.

  3. A Depolarisation lidar based method for the determination of liquid-cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, David; Klein Baltink, Henk; Henzing, Bas; de Roode, Stephen; Siebesma, Pier

    2015-04-01

    The fact that polarisation lidars measure a~depolarisation signal in liquid clouds due to the occurrence of multiple-scattering is well-known. The degree of measured depolarisation depends on the lidar characteristics (e.g. wavelength and receiver field-of-view) as well as the cloud macrophysical (e.g. cloud base altitude) and microphysical (e.g. effective radius, liquid water content) properties. Efforts seeking to use depolarisation information in a~quantitative manner to retrieve cloud properties have been undertaken with, arguably, limited practical success. In this work we present a~retrieval procedure applicable to clouds with (quasi-)linear liquid water content (LWC) profiles and (quasi-)constant cloud droplet number density in the cloud base region. Thus limiting the applicability of the procedure allows us to reduce the cloud variables to two parameters (namely the derivative of the liquid water content with height and the extinction at a~fixed distance above cloud-base). This simplification, in turn, allows us to employ a~fast and robust optimal-estimation inversion using pre-computed look-up-tables produced using extensive lidar Monte-Carlo multiple-scattering simulations. In this paper, we describe the theory behind the inversion procedure and successfully apply it to simulated observations based on large-eddy simulation model output. The inversion procedure is then applied to actual depolarisation lidar data corresponding to a~range of cases taken from the Cabauw measurement site in the central Netherlands. The lidar results were then used to predict the corresponding cloud-base region radar reflectivities. In non-drizzling condition, it was found that the lidar inversion results can be used to predict the observed radar reflectivities with an accuracy within the radar calibration uncertainty (2--3 dBZ). This result strongly supports the accuracy of the lidar inversion results. Results of a~comparison between ground-based aerosol number concentration and lidar-derived cloud droplet number densities are also presented and discussed. The observed relationship between the two quantities is seen to be consistent with the results of previous studies based on aircraft-based in situ measurements.

  4. Estimating plot-level tree heights with lidar: local filtering with a canopy-height based variable window size

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sorin C. Popescu; Randolph H. Wynne; Ross F. Nelson

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, the use of airborne lidar technology to measure forest biophysical characteristics has been rapidly increasing. This paper discusses processing algorithms for deriving the terrain model and estimating tree heights by using a multiple return, high–density, small-footprint lidar data set. The lidar data were acquired over deciduous, coniferous, and mixed stands of varying age classes and settings typical

  5. Describing the NPOESS Preparatory Project Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Environmental Data Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, C.; Guenther, B.; Kilcoyne, H.; Mineart, G.; St. Germain, K.; Reed, B.

    2008-12-01

    The Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is one of the instruments that make up the suite of sensors on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) scheduled to launch in 2010. VIIRS will produce seven Environmental Data Records (EDRs) describing cloud properties. The VIIRS Cloud EDRs include the Cloud Optical Thickness (COT), Cloud Effective Particle Size Parameter (CEPS), Cloud Top Pressure (CTP), Cloud Top Height (CTH), Cloud Top Temperature (CTT), Cloud Cover/Layers (CCL), and Cloud Base Height (CBH). This paper will describe the VIIRS algorithms used to generate these EDRs and provide a current estimate of performance based on pre-Launch test data.

  6. Fate of Acids in Clouds 1. Combination with bases dissolved in clouds: acids neutralized

    E-print Network

    Schofield, Jeremy

    problems. E#11;ects of Acid Rain 1. Vegetation: SO 2 is toxic to plants #15; Leaves damaged below pH 3 rain { Athens and Rome cathedrals and statues: pollution leads to acid rain #15; SteelFate of Acids in Clouds 1. Combination with bases dissolved in clouds: acids neutralized NH 3 (g

  7. STUDY OF GRIDDED MIXING HEIGHTS AD CLOUD FIELDS DERIVED FROM THE MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL MODEL WITH FOUR DIMENSIONAL DATA ASSIMILATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Meteorological data including wind, temperature and moisture variables, as well as boundary layer parameters including surface fluxes, depth of the mixed layer and cloud and precipitation information are integral components of air quality simulations models (AQSMS). QSMs require ...

  8. Injury Severity Score based estimation of height of fall in bus rolling down the cliff.

    PubMed

    Radojevic, Nemanja; Curovic, Ivana; Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Lazovic, Ranko

    2015-08-01

    A case of bus rollover into the canyon, 40 m down the road, with 47 occupants out of which 18 were fatally injured, was used to compute the Injury Severity Score (ISS) for each passengers as well as the equivalent free fall for this particular accident, to be compared to the height of fall as estimated by the Lau's model based on ISS, resulting the conclusion whether Lau's model and the computation of ISS can be considered reliable to estimate the height of fall in any other case. Dealing with this, we would be also able to assess a protective potential of the bus on occupants while it falls from the height. By using classic energy-related mechanical formulas the presented rollover down the cliff has been transferred into a corresponding free fall from the height (10 m). ISS for each passenger has been used to establish height bands of the corresponding free fall. The analysis of the presented case showed that only 30% of bus passengers sustained injuries similar to the injuries expected in the fall from height in the range of 10-20 m. The chances to be non-severely injured as a consequence of the fall in a bus is 43%, but still remains a very high chance (27%) to sustain injures more severe than expected for the equivalent free fall from height out of a vehicle. Moreover, eight passengers sustained pulmonary detraction which is characteristic of the fall above 40 m. The conclusion is that this mathematical computing for transferring one way of motion into another one may be useful for any other event similar to the fall from height and further usage of Lau's modules. Also, estimated severity of the injuries expressed through ISS can be merely an approximating indicator of the height of the fall of the bus, so ISS is not able to estimate the exact height. Finally, in majority of cases the protective potential of the bus may preserve from severe body damage, but the mortality rate still stands on a very high level. PMID:26165672

  9. Targeting and impacts of AgI cloud seeding based on rain chemical composition and cloud top phase characterization

    E-print Network

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Targeting and impacts of AgI cloud seeding based on rain chemical composition and cloud top phase seeding enhanced rainfall in Northern Israel. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Cloud seeding Silver iodide (AgI) Rain chemistry Satellite images 1. Introduction Cloud seeding with AgI has

  10. Cloud Based Processing of Large Photometric Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farivar, R.; Brunner, R. J.; Santucci, R.; Campbell, R.

    2013-10-01

    Astronomy, as is the case with many scientific domains, has entered the realm of being a data rich science. Nowhere is this reflected more clearly than in the growth of large area surveys, such as the recently completed Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) or the Dark Energy Survey, which will soon obtain PB of imaging data. The data processing on these large surveys is a major challenge. In this paper, we demonstrate a new approach to this common problem. We propose the use of cloud-based technologies (e.g., Hadoop MapReduce) to run a data analysis program (e.g., SExtractor) across a cluster. Using the intermediate key/value pair design of Hadoop, our framework matches objects across different SExtractor invocations to create a unified catalog from all SDSS processed data. We conclude by presenting our experimental results on a 432 core cluster and discuss the lessons we have learned in completing this challenge.

  11. Research on cloud-based remote measurement and analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang; He, Lingsong; Su, Wei; Wang, Can; Zhang, Changfan

    2015-02-01

    The promising potential of cloud computing and its convergence with technologies such as cloud storage, cloud push, mobile computing allows for creation and delivery of newer type of cloud service. Combined with the thought of cloud computing, this paper presents a cloud-based remote measurement and analysis system. This system mainly consists of three parts: signal acquisition client, web server deployed on the cloud service, and remote client. This system is a special website developed using asp.net and Flex RIA technology, which solves the selective contradiction between two monitoring modes, B/S and C/S. This platform supplies customer condition monitoring and data analysis service by Internet, which was deployed on the cloud server. Signal acquisition device is responsible for data (sensor data, audio, video, etc.) collection and pushes the monitoring data to the cloud storage database regularly. Data acquisition equipment in this system is only conditioned with the function of data collection and network function such as smartphone and smart sensor. This system's scale can adjust dynamically according to the amount of applications and users, so it won't cause waste of resources. As a representative case study, we developed a prototype system based on Ali cloud service using the rotor test rig as the research object. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system architecture is feasible.

  12. An Optimized Algorithm for Task Scheduling Based on Activity Based Costing in Cloud Computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qi Cao; Zhi-Bo Wei; Wen-Mao Gong

    2009-01-01

    In cloud computing, traditional way for task scheduling cannot measure the cost of cloud resources accurately by reason that each of the tasks on cloud systems is totally different between each other. There may be no relationship between the overhead application base and the way that different tasks cause overhead costs of resources in cloud systems. The traditional way for

  13. Effects of base station antenna height and mobile terminal movement on the vector propagation channels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adnan Kavak; Weidong Yang; Kapil R. Dandekar; Guanghan Xu

    1999-01-01

    In wireless communications, propagation characteristics of smart antenna systems can be described by vector channels. In order to accurately characterize and model vector channels, extensive measurements in realistic wireless environments are needed. This paper studies the variation of vector channels in non-stationary propagation environments which are caused by (a) deploying the base station antenna at different heights and keeping the

  14. S'COOL Lesson: Estimating Altitude of Water Cloud Base

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Students begin by determining dew point using an aluminum can, stirring rod, ice and thermometer. Air temperature is also measured and recorded. Students then use those two data in conjunction with the Lifting Condensation Level approximation, to estimate the base altitude of visible (low level) clouds. The Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL) project engages students in making and reporting ground truth observations of clouds then comparing those observations with data from the CERES satellite instrument.

  15. S'COOL Cloud Types Tutorial

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    This tutorial provides detailed information about how clouds receive their names and the importance of root words. It was designed to help students make accurate observations for the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL) project. Students will also learn to associate different clouds into height groupings. Information is provided about the cloud types and on how to distinguish similar clouds based on their level (i.e. cumulus, altocumulus and cirrocumulus).

  16. Clouds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Carl Wozniak

    Clouds comprise a wonderful focus for classroom study. They're ubiquitous, ever-changing, scientifically interesting and, most importantly for teachers, they're cheap. The material presented here includes sections on cloud formation, cloud types, cloud pictures, other cloud-related phenomena, and a glossary.

  17. Development of Satellite-based Climatology of Low-level Cloud and Fog in Mountain Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Y.; Barros, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of orographic clouds and fog has major environmental and economic implications that the potential shift in the space-time distribution can effectively redistribute freshwater resources and threaten the sustainability of the ecology, geomorphology and hydrology of mountainous regions and adjacent basins. This includes the Southern Appalachian Mountains, which rely closely on the moisture input from fog, cap clouds and light rainfall, as well as cloud forests in the Andes with frequent occurrence of dense fog. However, the applicability of fog forecasting models becomes limited in regions of complex terrain. The motivation of this project is to develop a satellite-based hydroclimatology and physical parameterization of orographic low-level clouds and fog regimes in the Southern Appalachians using a general methodology that can be applied to mountainous regions elsewhere. An algorithm for the detection and extraction of stratus clouds and fog was developed using changes in vertical gradients of CPR reflectivity and liquid water products from almost 5-years of CLOUDSAT and SRTM terrain data. This population of low-level clouds and fog will be analyzed with GOES infrared and visible imagery, MODIS and CALIPSO products, and with airport cloud height and visibility records to expand the spatial coverage beyond narrow satellite sensor swaths. The climatology will be further developed through integration with results from WRF simulations for selected periods since the bulk of the PMM network has been in place (2008-present) to aid in defining meteorological and time-of-day constraints in the interpretation of simulated satellite radar reflectivity profiles. The overarching goal is to infer a representation of the diurnal cycle, seasonal and inter-annual variations of the vertical distribution of LWC and hydrometeors in orographic clouds and fog that vary spatially with landform toward developing a more general parameterization of seeder-feeder interactions in microphysical models.

  18. Retrievals of Cloud Fraction and Cloud Albedo from Surface-based Shortwave Radiation Measurements: A Comparison of 16 Year Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yu; Liu, Yangang; Long, Charles N.; Min, Qilong

    2014-07-27

    Ground-based radiation measurements have been widely conducted to gain information on clouds and the surface radiation budget; here several different techniques for retrieving cloud fraction (Long2006, Min2008 and XL2013) and cloud albedo (Min2008, Liu2011 and XL2013) from ground-based shortwave broadband and spectral radiation measurements are examined, and sixteen years of retrievals collected at the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are compared. The comparison shows overall good agreement between the retrievals of both cloud fraction and cloud albedo, with noted differences however. The Long2006 and Min2008 cloud fractions are greater on average than the XL2013 values. Compared to Min2008 and Liu2011, the XL2013 retrieval of cloud albedo tends to be greater for thin clouds but smaller for thick clouds, with the differences decreasing with increasing cloud fraction. Further analysis reveals that the approaches that retrieve cloud fraction and cloud albedo separately may suffer from mutual contamination of errors in retrieved cloud fraction and cloud albedo. Potential influences of cloud absorption, land-surface albedo, cloud structure, and measurement instruments are explored.

  19. A Cloud-Based Interactive Application Service

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nayden Markatchev; Roger Curry; Cameron Kiddle; Andrey Mirtchovski; Rob Simmonds; Tingxi Tan

    2009-01-01

    Accessing, running and sharing applications and data presents researchers with many challenges. Cloud computing and social networking technologies have the potential to simplify or eliminate many of these challenges. Cloud computing technologies can provide scientists with transparent and on-demand access to applications served over the Internet in a dynamic and scalable manner. Social networking technologies provide a means for easily

  20. FAME-C: cloud property retrieval using synergistic AATSR and MERIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajal Henken, C. K.; Lindstrot, R.; Preusker, R.; Fischer, J.

    2014-11-01

    A newly developed daytime cloud property retrieval algorithm, FAME-C (Freie Universität Berlin AATSR MERIS Cloud), is presented. Synergistic observations from the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) and the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS), both mounted on the polar-orbiting Environmental Satellite (Envisat), are used for cloud screening. For cloudy pixels two main steps are carried out in a sequential form. First, a cloud optical and microphysical property retrieval is performed using an AATSR near-infrared and visible channel. Cloud phase, cloud optical thickness, and effective radius are retrieved, and subsequently cloud water path is computed. Second, two cloud top height products are retrieved based on independent techniques. For cloud top temperature, measurements in the AATSR infrared channels are used, while for cloud top pressure, measurements in the MERIS oxygen-A absorption channel are used. Results from the cloud optical and microphysical property retrieval serve as input for the two cloud top height retrievals. Introduced here are the AATSR and MERIS forward models and auxiliary data needed in FAME-C. Also, the optimal estimation method, which provides uncertainty estimates of the retrieved property on a pixel basis, is presented. Within the frame of the European Space Agency (ESA) Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project, the first global cloud property retrievals have been conducted for the years 2007-2009. For this time period, verification efforts are presented, comparing, for four selected regions around the globe, FAME-C cloud optical and microphysical properties to cloud optical and microphysical properties derived from measurements of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite. The results show a reasonable agreement between the cloud optical and microphysical property retrievals. Biases are generally smallest for marine stratocumulus clouds: -0.28, 0.41 ?m and -0.18 g m-2 for cloud optical thickness, effective radius and cloud water path, respectively. This is also true for the root-mean-square deviation. Furthermore, both cloud top height products are compared to cloud top heights derived from ground-based cloud radars located at several Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites. FAME-C mostly shows an underestimation of cloud top heights when compared to radar observations. The lowest bias of -0.3 km is found for AATSR cloud top heights for single-layer clouds, while the highest bias of -3.0 km is found for AATSR cloud top heights for multilayer clouds. Variability is low for MERIS cloud top heights for low-level clouds, and high for MERIS cloud top heights for mid-level and high-level single-layer clouds, as well as for both AATSR and MERIS cloud top heights for multilayer clouds.

  1. Classification of storms based on their boundaries and cloud top temperatures using satellite imagery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Baolie Cheng; J. Fernando Vega-Riveros; Kamal Jabbour; Walter Meyer

    1989-01-01

    A system for interpreting and classifying severe weather patterns is presented. The system uses several image-processing and pattern-recognition techniques to detect storms in satellite cloud cover imagery. It performs several basic satellite image-interpretation tasks, i.e. cloud boundary detection, cloud top temperature and height estimation, cloud systems motion analysis, and storm classification. Some preliminary results on actual satellite images are presented

  2. MISR Cloud Detection over Ice and Snow Based on Linear Correlation Matching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tao Shi; Bin Yu; Amy Braverman

    Cloud detection is a crucial step in any climate modelling or prediction. Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) was launched in 1999 by NASA to provide 9 angle and 4 band data to retrieve or estimate the cloud height and hence cloud detection. However, cloud detection even with MISR data has been proven very di-cult over ice and snow. In this paper,

  3. Cloud detection and classification based on MAX-DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Apituley, A.; Beirle, S.; Dörner, S.; Friess, U.; Remmers, J.; Shaiganfar, R.

    2014-05-01

    Multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations of aerosols and trace gases can be strongly influenced by clouds. Thus, it is important to identify clouds and characterise their properties. In this study we investigate the effects of clouds on several quantities which can be derived from MAX-DOAS observations, like radiance, the colour index (radiance ratio at two selected wavelengths), the absorption of the oxygen dimer O4 and the fraction of inelastically scattered light (Ring effect). To identify clouds, these quantities can be either compared to their corresponding clear-sky reference values, or their dependencies on time or viewing direction can be analysed. From the investigation of the temporal variability the influence of clouds can be identified even for individual measurements. Based on our investigations we developed a cloud classification scheme, which can be applied in a flexible way to MAX-DOAS or zenith DOAS observations: in its simplest version, zenith observations of the colour index are used to identify the presence of clouds (or high aerosol load). In more sophisticated versions, other quantities and viewing directions are also considered, which allows subclassifications like, e.g., thin or thick clouds, or fog. We applied our cloud classification scheme to MAX-DOAS observations during the Cabauw intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring instruments (CINDI) campaign in the Netherlands in summer 2009 and found very good agreement with sky images taken from the ground and backscatter profiles from a lidar.

  4. Cloud detection and classification based on MAX-DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T.; Beirle, S.; Dörner, S.; Friess, U.; Remmers, J.; Shaiganfar, R.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-AXis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations of aerosols and trace gases can be strongly influenced by clouds. Thus it is important to identify clouds and characterise their properties. In this study we investigate the effects of clouds on several quantities which can be derived from MAX-DOAS observations, like the radiance, the colour index (radiance ratio at two selected wavelengths), the absorption of the oxygen dimer O4 and the fraction of inelastically scattered light (Ring effect). To identify clouds, these quantities can be either compared to their corresponding clear sky reference values, or their dependencies on time or viewing direction can be analysed. From the investigation of the temporal variability the influence of clouds can be identified even for individual measurements. Based on our investigations we developed a cloud classification scheme, which can be applied in a flexible way to MAX-DOAS or zenith DOAS observations: in its simplest version, zenith observations of the colour index are used to identify the presence of clouds (or high aerosol load). In more sophisticated versions, also other quantities and viewing directions are considered, which allows sub-classifications like e.g. thin or thick clouds, or fog. We applied our cloud classification scheme to MAX-DOAS observations during the CINDI campaign in the Netherlands in Summer 2009 and found very good agreement with sky images taken from ground.

  5. Assessment of Cloudsat Reflectivity Measurements and Ice Cloud Properties Using Ground-Based and Airborne Cloud Radar Observations

    E-print Network

    Protat, Alain

    -based radar calibration accuracy is about 1 dB, it is concluded that the reflectivities of the spaceborne-Based and Airborne Cloud Radar Observations A. PROTAT,* D. BOUNIOL,1 J. DELANOE¨ ,# P. T. MAY,@ A. PLANA-FATTORI,& A backscatter and ice cloud reflectivities measured by an airborne cloud radar and Cloudsat during two field

  6. Interactive physically-based cloud simulation 

    E-print Network

    Overby, Derek Robert

    2002-01-01

    computational fluid solver. This allows us to simulate the complex air motion that contributes to cloud formation in our atmosphere. Among the natural processes that we simulate are buoyancy, relative humidity, and condensation. Because we have built...

  7. A 12-channel VMEbus-based pulse-height analysis module

    SciTech Connect

    Arnone, G.J.

    1993-12-01

    The author describes a 12-channel VMEbus-based pulse-height analysis board that was designed for use in a high-rate, multidetector, gamma-ray imaging system. This module was designed to minimize dead-time losses and to allow all key parameters to be software controlled. Gamma-ray detectors are connected directly to this module, eliminating the need for additional electronics.

  8. INFLUENCE ON HEIGHT MEASURE FROM EARTH CURVATURE BASED ON SPACEBORNE INSAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tang Xiaotao; Niu Rui; Chen Gang; Liu Zhiming

    It is very different from spaceborne InSAR and airborne InS AR because satellite orbit is relatively more higher, the distance between satellite subsatellite point and mapping area may be from hundreds to thousands of kilometers. Height measure based on spaceborne InSAR must eliminate the influence of earth's curvature, otherwise its error may be higher. But how much is the influence

  9. Volcanic plume height measured by seismic waves based on a mechanical model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prejean, Stephanie G.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2011-01-01

    In August 2008 an unmonitored, largely unstudied Aleutian volcano, Kasatochi, erupted catastrophically. Here we use seismic data to infer the height of large eruptive columns such as those of Kasatochi based on a combination of existing fluid and solid mechanical models. In so doing, we propose a connection between a common, observable, short-period seismic wave amplitude to the physics of an eruptive column. To construct a combined model, we estimate the mass ejection rate of material from the vent on the basis of the plume height, assuming that the height is controlled by thermal buoyancy for a continuous plume. Using the estimated mass ejection rate, we then derive the equivalent vertical force on the Earth through a momentum balance. Finally, we calculate the far-field surface waves resulting from the vertical force. The model performs well for recent eruptions of Kasatochi and Augustine volcanoes if v, the velocity of material exiting the vent, is 120-230 m s-1. The consistency between the seismically inferred and measured plume heights indicates that in these cases the far-field ~1 s seismic energy radiated by fluctuating flow in the volcanic jet during the eruption is a useful indicator of overall mass ejection rates. Thus, use of the model holds promise for characterizing eruptions and evaluating ash hazards to aircraft in real time on the basis of far-field short-period seismic data. This study emphasizes the need for better measurements of eruptive plume heights and a more detailed understanding of the full spectrum of seismic energy radiated coeruptively.

  10. Clouds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    First, the Project Atmosphere Canada offers a module to educate primary and secondary students about cloud formation and characteristics (1). The website outlines key points and offers a more in-depth discussion of water vapor, cloud formation, convection, air motion, severe weather, and more. The second website, by Scholastic, supplies many pdf documents of activities and lesson plans for all types of weather phenomena including clouds (2). Students can learn about condensation, discover what makes up a cloud, and find a key identifying the cloud types. Next, USA Today offers an online tutorial of the differing characteristics of clouds (3). Users can learn about Mammatus clouds, contrails, cloud seeding, and other cloud-related topics. At the fourth website, visitors can view meteorologist Dan Satterfield's amazing cloud photographs (4). Educators may find useful materials to supplement their lectures. Next, NASA's Climate and Radiation Branch furnishes "information on the fantastic variety of cloud forms and structures, and their implications for climate" (5). While the website is still being constructed, users can find useful information about the Bounded Cascades Fractal Cloud model, animations, and definitions of inhomogeneous cloud terminology. The sixth website, created by the National Center for Atmospheric Research and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, addresses how clouds impact our lives, how they cause chaos, and how they form (6). The enlightening descriptions are packed with colorful images and short quizzes. Next, The Australian Government's Bureau of Meteorology describes the useful of clouds as an indicator of weather conditions (7). After learning how moist air can form clouds, individuals can view images of the ten most common cloud types. Lastly, Enchanted Learning offers a table of the cloud types with their abbreviation, appearance, composition, and altitude along with explanations of cloud formation and the atmosphere (8). Educators can find simple activities dealing with cloud types and the water cycle.

  11. Wave Height Characteristics in the North Atlantic Ocean: A new approach based on Statistical and Geometrical techniques

    E-print Network

    Dodson, C.T.J.

    Characteristics in the North Atlantic Ocean: A new approach based on Statistical and Geometrical techniques George of the significant wave height in an area of increased interest, the north Atlantic ocean, are studied based

  12. On estimating the effect of clouds on atmospheric absorption based on flux observations above and below cloud level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert Arking; Ming-Dah Chou; William L. Ridgway

    1996-01-01

    Recent attempts to estimate the contribution of clouds to absorption of solar radiation by the atmosphere have been based on the difference between measurements of solar flux at the top-of-the-atmosphere, or in the atmosphere above cloud level, and measurements of solar flux at the surface, or in the atmosphere below cloud level. One problem with this approach is that fluxes

  13. A High Resolution Hydrometer Phase Classifier Based on Analysis of Cloud Radar Doppler Spectra

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward Luke; Pavlos Kollias

    2007-01-01

    The lifecycle and radiative properties of clouds are highly sensitive to the phase of their hydrometeors (i.e., liquid or ice). Knowledge of cloud phase is essential for specifying the optical properties of clouds, or else, large errors can be introduced in the calculation of the cloud radiative fluxes. Current parameterizations of cloud water partition in liquid and ice based on

  14. The effect of clouds on the earth's radiation budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziskin, Daniel; Strobel, Darrell F.

    1991-01-01

    The radiative fluxes from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) and the cloud properties from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) over Indonesia for the months of June and July of 1985 and 1986 were analyzed to determine the cloud sensitivity coefficients. The method involved a linear least squares regression between co-incident flux and cloud coverage measurements. The calculated slope is identified as the cloud sensitivity. It was found that the correlations between the total cloud fraction and radiation parameters were modest. However, correlations between cloud fraction and IR flux were improved by separating clouds by height. Likewise, correlations between the visible flux and cloud fractions were improved by distinguishing clouds based on optical depth. Calculating correlations between the net fluxes and either height or optical depth segregated cloud fractions were somewhat improved. When clouds were classified in terms of their height and optical depth, correlations among all the radiation components were improved. Mean cloud sensitivities based on the regression of radiative fluxes against height and optical depth separated cloud types are presented. Results are compared to a one-dimensional radiation model with a simple cloud parameterization scheme.

  15. Cloud Computing Based E-Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zoube, Mohammed; El-Seoud, Samir Abou; Wyne, Mudasser F.

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing technologies although in their early stages, have managed to change the way applications are going to be developed and accessed. These technologies are aimed at running applications as services over the internet on a flexible infrastructure. Microsoft office applications, such as word processing, excel spreadsheet, access database…

  16. Intuitive Terrain Reconstruction Using Height Observation-Based Ground Segmentation and 3D Object Boundary Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Cho, Kyungeun; Um, Kyhyun; Won, Chee Sun; Sim, Sungdae

    2012-01-01

    Mobile robot operators must make rapid decisions based on information about the robot’s surrounding environment. This means that terrain modeling and photorealistic visualization are required for the remote operation of mobile robots. We have produced a voxel map and textured mesh from the 2D and 3D datasets collected by a robot’s array of sensors, but some upper parts of objects are beyond the sensors’ measurements and these parts are missing in the terrain reconstruction result. This result is an incomplete terrain model. To solve this problem, we present a new ground segmentation method to detect non-ground data in the reconstructed voxel map. Our method uses height histograms to estimate the ground height range, and a Gibbs-Markov random field model to refine the segmentation results. To reconstruct a complete terrain model of the 3D environment, we develop a 3D boundary estimation method for non-ground objects. We apply a boundary detection technique to the 2D image, before estimating and refining the actual height values of the non-ground vertices in the reconstructed textured mesh. Our proposed methods were tested in an outdoor environment in which trees and buildings were not completely sensed. Our results show that the time required for ground segmentation is faster than that for data sensing, which is necessary for a real-time approach. In addition, those parts of objects that were not sensed are accurately recovered to retrieve their real-world appearances. PMID:23235454

  17. Nuclear spectroscopy pulse height analysis based on digital signal processing techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Simoes, J.B.; Simoes, P.C.P.S.; Correia, C.M.B.A. [Univ. of Coimbra (Portugal). Physics Dept.] [Univ. of Coimbra (Portugal). Physics Dept.

    1995-08-01

    A digital approach to pulse height analysis is presented. It consists of entire pulse digitization, using a flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC), being its height estimated by a floating point digital signal processor (DSP) as one parameter of a model best fitting to the pulse samples. The differential nonlinearity (DNL) is reduced by simultaneously adding to the pulse, prior to its digitization, two analog signals provided by a digital-to-analog converter (DAC). One of them is a small amplitude dither signal used to eliminate a bias introduced by the fitting algorithm. The other, with large amplitude, corrects the ADC nonlinearities by a method similar to the well known Gatti`s sliding scale. The simulations carried out showed that, using a 12-bit flash ADC, a 14-bit DAC and a dedicated floating point DSP performing a polynomial fitting to the samples around the pulse peak, it is actually possible to process about 10,000 events per second, with a constant height pulse dispersion of only 4 on 8,192 channels and a very good differential linearity. A prototype system based on the Texas Instruments floating point DSP TMS320C31 and built following the presented methodology has already been tested and performed as expected.

  18. Intuitive terrain reconstruction using height observation-based ground segmentation and 3D object boundary estimation.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Cho, Kyungeun; Um, Kyhyun; Won, Chee Sun; Sim, Sungdae

    2012-01-01

    Mobile robot operators must make rapid decisions based on information about the robot's surrounding environment. This means that terrain modeling and photorealistic visualization are required for the remote operation of mobile robots. We have produced a voxel map and textured mesh from the 2D and 3D datasets collected by a robot's array of sensors, but some upper parts of objects are beyond the sensors' measurements and these parts are missing in the terrain reconstruction result. This result is an incomplete terrain model. To solve this problem, we present a new ground segmentation method to detect non-ground data in the reconstructed voxel map. Our method uses height histograms to estimate the ground height range, and a Gibbs-Markov random field model to refine the segmentation results. To reconstruct a complete terrain model of the 3D environment, we develop a 3D boundary estimation method for non-ground objects. We apply a boundary detection technique to the 2D image, before estimating and refining the actual height values of the non-ground vertices in the reconstructed textured mesh. Our proposed methods were tested in an outdoor environment in which trees and buildings were not completely sensed. Our results show that the time required for ground segmentation is faster than that for data sensing, which is necessary for a real-time approach. In addition, those parts of objects that were not sensed are accurately recovered to retrieve their real-world appearances. PMID:23235454

  19. Agent-Based Service Composition in Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Garcia, J. Octavio; Sim, Kwang-Mong

    In a Cloud-computing environment, consumers, brokers, and service providers interact to achieve their individual purposes. In this regard, service providers offer a pool of resources wrapped as web services, which should be composed by broker agents to provide a single virtualized service to Cloud consumers. In this study, an agent-based test bed for simulating Cloud-computing environments is developed. Each Cloud participant is represented by an agent, whose behavior is defined by means of colored Petri nets. The relationship between web services and service providers is modeled using object Petri nets. Both Petri net formalisms are combined to support a design methodology for defining concurrent and parallel service choreographies. This results in the creation of a dynamic agent-based service composition algorithm. The simulation results indicate that service composition is achieved with a linear time complexity despite dealing with interleaving choreographies and synchronization of heterogeneous services.

  20. Comparison of cloud boundaries measured with 8.6 mm radar and 10.6 micrometer lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uttal, Taneil; Intrieri, Janet M.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most basic cloud properties is location; the height of cloud base and the height of cloud top. The glossary of meteorology defines cloud base (top) as follows: 'For a given cloud or cloud layer, that lowest (highest) level in the atmosphere at which the air contains a perceptible quantity of cloud particles.' Our studies show that for a 8.66 mm radar, and a 10.6 micrometer lidar, the level at which cloud hydrometers become 'perceptible' can vary significantly as a function of the different wavelengths, powers, beamwidths and sampling rates of the two remote sensors.

  1. Clouds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Doxey

    2010-03-26

    Students learn about the varieties of clouds, what they look like and how they can affect our lives. Introduction: Have you ever wondered what kind of cloud makes rain, or which one makes fog? Have you ever wondered if there are clouds that mean the weather if going to be good or not? Today, we're going to learn about three different clouds that may ...

  2. Climatology Of Thin Cirrus Clouds at Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) Using Ground Based Lidar And Satellite Based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motty, G. S.; Jayeshlal, G. S.; Satyanarayana, M.

    2014-11-01

    High altitude cirrus clouds play a significant role in the radiative balance of Earth atmosphere system. Information on cirrus occurrences and their optical properties is essential for climate modeling studies. The influence of high altitude thin cirrus clouds on the climate is important due to their optical and thermodynamic properties. In order to quantify their effect on atmosphere, the vertical structure and optical properties of these thin cirrus clouds are to be characterized. The Lidar technique has become a unique tool for detecting and characterizing cirrus clouds for their optical properties. Ground based LIDAR system offers an excellent way to obtain characteristic values on the cirrus formations, although the microphysical and optical properties of thin cirrus clouds can also obtained on global scale by the observations from Earth-orbiting Satellites .The ground-based lidar observations could provide more intensive measurements on continuous basis, compared to satellite observations. Utilising observations from both, the statistical characteristics, physical and optical properties of thin cirrus clouds can be retrieved more precisely. The present study is based on the ground based lidar measurements using the pulsed monostatic LIDAR system at the National Atmospheric Research Laboratory [NARL], Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), Andhra Pradesh, India. The data obtained in the altitude range of 8-20 km are used for this study. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO and MODIS satellites are compared with the ground based lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology. Optically thin cirrus clouds (? < 0.3) observed during 2009 are selected and their microphysical and geometrical properties are studied. The microphysical properties such as optical depth, lidar ratio and depolarisation ratio for cirrus clouds were obtained. It is observed that the variability in optical depth depends on the composition and thickness of the clouds. The relationships between various quantities were also processed. The study shows that the thin cirrus generally was present in higher altitudes and the optical properties show correlation with the height and the temperature.

  3. Intelligent person identification system using stereo camera-based height and stride estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jung-Hwan; Jang, Jae-Hun; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, a stereo camera-based intelligent person identification system is suggested. In the proposed method, face area of the moving target person is extracted from the left image of the input steros image pair by using a threshold value of YCbCr color model and by carrying out correlation between the face area segmented from this threshold value of YCbCr color model and the right input image, the location coordinates of the target face can be acquired, and then these values are used to control the pan/tilt system through the modified PID-based recursive controller. Also, by using the geometric parameters between the target face and the stereo camera system, the vertical distance between the target and stereo camera system can be calculated through a triangulation method. Using this calculated vertical distance and the angles of the pan and tilt, the target's real position data in the world space can be acquired and from them its height and stride values can be finally extracted. Some experiments with video images for 16 moving persons show that a person could be identified with these extracted height and stride parameters.

  4. The Construction and Realization of the Intelligent NIPS Based on the Cloud Security

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jia Tiejun; Wang Xiaogang

    2009-01-01

    The cloud security is a safe mode applied super Internet based on the cloud computing, also a new technology and the trend of development on network security. On the basis of outlining the cloud security's superiority, key technologies and the IPS technology, this paper proposes a new cloud security-based intelligent NIPS structure, function, characteristic and difference from general NIPS, finally

  5. Identity-based Encryption with Outsourced Revocation in Cloud Computing

    E-print Network

    Hou, Y. Thomas

    1 Identity-based Encryption with Outsourced Revocation in Cloud Computing Jin Li, Jingwei Li, Xiaofeng Chen, Chunfu Jia and Wenjing Lou, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--Identity-Based Encryption (IBE the burden that IBE strives to alleviate. In this paper, aiming at tackling the critical issue of identity

  6. Cloud-Based Collaborative Writing and the Common Core Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yim, Soobin; Warschauer, Mark; Zheng, Binbin; Lawrence, Joshua F.

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards emphasize the integration of technology skills into English Language Arts (ELA) instruction, recognizing the demand for technology-based literacy skills to be college- and career- ready. This study aims to examine how collaborative cloud-based writing is used in in a Colorado school district, where one-to-one…

  7. Knowledge-Based Object Detection in Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boochs, F.; Karmacharya, A.; Marbs, A.

    2012-07-01

    Object identification and object processing in 3D point clouds have always posed challenges in terms of effectiveness and efficiency. In practice, this process is highly dependent on human interpretation of the scene represented by the point cloud data, as well as the set of modeling tools available for use. Such modeling algorithms are data-driven and concentrate on specific features of the objects, being accessible to numerical models. We present an approach that brings the human expert knowledge about the scene, the objects inside, and their representation by the data and the behavior of algorithms to the machine. This "understanding" enables the machine to assist human interpretation of the scene inside the point cloud. Furthermore, it allows the machine to understand possibilities and limitations of algorithms and to take this into account within the processing chain. This not only assists the researchers in defining optimal processing steps, but also provides suggestions when certain changes or new details emerge from the point cloud. Our approach benefits from the advancement in knowledge technologies within the Semantic Web framework. This advancement has provided a strong base for applications based on knowledge management. In the article we will present and describe the knowledge technologies used for our approach such as Web Ontology Language (OWL), used for formulating the knowledge base and the Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL) with 3D processing and topologic built-ins, aiming to combine geometrical analysis of 3D point clouds, and specialists' knowledge of the scene and algorithmic processing.

  8. Image segmentation based on data field and cloud model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Kun; Ou, Leihai; Wu, Tao; Du, Yi

    2010-08-01

    There are many uncertainties in image segmentation, which needs theories and methods with uncertainty to handle. This paper proposes a novel method of image segmentation based on data field and cloud model, which considers the spatial information of image through data field, and handles the uncertainty of image through cloud model. The proposed method inspired from cognitive physics considers each pixel as a physical object, calculates the interactive force of these physical objects, and generates image data field and the potential values which are considered as spatial information. And then, uses cloud transformation and magnitude cloud synthesis to extract the concepts of potential-frequency histogram from low level to high level, realizes the clustering of pixels, finally uses maximum determination to partition the pixels into different classes and segment image into different regions. Results of many experiments indicate that the proposed method obtains better effect than those of Fuzzy C-means clustering, Otsu and cloud based hierarchical method, and it is feasible and effective.

  9. Classification of Cloud Types Through Infrared APT Imagery

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    P Costulis

    2002-09-30

    This activity is designed to teach students about the different classes of clouds, as well as how they are classified. Students will learn about classification by performing their own classification of clouds based on information given them by instructors. Students will also use infrared ATP images to study clouds by height, temperature, and appearance.

  10. Portfolio Theory-Based Resource Assignment in a Cloud Computing System

    E-print Network

    Pedram, Massoud

    Portfolio Theory-Based Resource Assignment in a Cloud Computing System Inkwon Hwang and Massoud-- The focus of this paper is on energy-aware resource management in a cloud computing system. Much. Keywords- Cloud computing; portfolio effect; bin-packing; resource allocation I. INTRODUCTION Cloud

  11. A Satellite-Based Parameter to Monitor the Aerosol Impact on Convective Clouds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Itamar M. Lensky; Ron Drori

    2007-01-01

    A method to monitor the aerosol impact on convective clouds using satellite data is presented. The impacts of forest fires and highly polluting megacities on cloud precipitation formation processes are quantified by the vertical extent above cloud base to which convective cloud tops have to develop for onset of precipitation in terms of temperature difference D15. Large D15 is a

  12. Filtering of LIDAR Point Cloud Using a Strip Based Algorithm in Residential Mountainous Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. A.; Arefi, H.; Gharib, Z.

    2014-10-01

    Several algorithms have been developed to automatically detect the bare earth in LIDAR point clouds referred to as filtering. Previous experimental study on filtering algorithms determined that in flat and uncomplicated landscapes, algorithms tend to do well. Significant differences in accuracies of filtering appear in landscapes containing steep slopes and discontinuities. A solution for this problem is the segmentation of ALS point clouds. In this paper a new segmentation has been developed. The algorithm starts with first slicing a point cloud into contiguous and parallel profiles in different directions. Then the points in each profile are segmented into polylines based on distance and elevation proximity. The segmentation in each profile yields polylines. The polylines are then linked together through their common points to obtain surface segments. At the final stage, the data is partitioned into some windows in which the strips are exploited to analysis the points with regard to the height differences through them. In this case the whole data could be fully segmented into ground and non-ground measurements, sequentially via the strips which make the algorithm fast to implement.

  13. Cloud Protocols

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The GLOBE Program, UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research)

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this activity is to observe the type and cover of clouds including contrails. Students observe which of ten types of clouds and how many of three types of contrails are visible and how much of the sky is covered by clouds (other than contrails) and how much is covered by contrails. Intended outcomes are that students learn how to make estimates from observations and how to categorize specific clouds following general descriptions for the categories. They will learn the meteorological concepts of cloud heights, types, and cloud cover and learn the ten basic cloud types. Supporting background materials for both student and teacher are included.

  14. A cloud based SIM DRM scheme for the mobile internet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peng Zou; Chaokun Wang; Zhang Liu; Jianmin Wang; Jia-Guang Sun

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid growth of the mobile industry, a considerable amount of mobile applications and services are available. Meanwhile, pirates and illegal distributions of digital contents have become serious issues. Digital Rights Management (DRM) aims at protecting digital contents from being abused through regulating the usage of digital contents. In this paper, a cloud based SIM DRM scheme, called CS-DRM,

  15. Dynamic hosting management of web based applications over clouds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zahra Abbasi; Tridib Mukherjee; Georgios Varsamopoulos; Sandeep K. S. Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic Application Hosting Management (DAHM) allows clouds to dynamically host applications in data centers at different locations based on: (i) spatio-temporal variation of energy price, (ii) data center computing and cooling energy efficiency, (iii) Virtual Machine (VM) migration cost for the applications, and (iv) any SLA violations due to migration overhead or network delay. DAHM is complementary to dynamic workload

  16. Exploiting Virtualization for Delivering Cloud-based IPTV Services

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Kathleen

    Exploiting Virtualization for Delivering Cloud-based IPTV Services Vaneet Aggarwal, Xu Chen, Vijay resources on the fly. IPTV services like Video On Demand (VoD) and Live broadcast TV requires substantial constraints. By using real world data from an operational IPTV environment, our results show that anticipating

  17. Cloud-Based Technologies: Faculty Development, Support, and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    The number of instructional offerings in higher education that are online, blended, or web-enhanced, including courses and programs, continues to grow exponentially. Alongside the growth of e-learning, higher education has witnessed the explosion of cloud-based or Web 2.0 technologies, a term that refers to the vast array of socially oriented,…

  18. Contextual cloud-based service oriented architecture for clinical workflow.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Conde, Jesús; Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Núñez-Benjumea, Francisco J; Parra-Calderón, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Given that acceptance of systems within the healthcare domain multiple papers highlighted the importance of integrating tools with the clinical workflow. This paper analyse how clinical context management could be deployed in order to promote the adoption of cloud advanced services and within the clinical workflow. This deployment will be able to be integrated with the eHealth European Interoperability Framework promoted specifications. Throughout this paper, it is proposed a cloud-based service-oriented architecture. This architecture will implement a context management system aligned with the HL7 standard known as CCOW. PMID:25991217

  19. Hiding Amongst the Clouds: A Proposal for Cloud-based Onion Routing Nicholas Jones, Matvey Arye, Jacopo Cesareo, and Michael J. Freedman

    E-print Network

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    Hiding Amongst the Clouds: A Proposal for Cloud-based Onion Routing Nicholas Jones, Matvey Arye number of volunteers (as Tor does), we propose mov- ing onion-routing services to the "cloud" to leverage. This paper de- scribes Cloud-based Onion Routing (COR), which builds onion-routed tunnels over multiple

  20. TRIDEC Cloud - a Web-based Platform for Tsunami Early Warning tested with NEAMWave14 Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammitzsch, Martin; Spazier, Johannes; Reißland, Sven; Necmioglu, Ocal; Comoglu, Mustafa; Ozer Sozdinler, Ceren; Carrilho, Fernando; Wächter, Joachim

    2015-04-01

    In times of cloud computing and ubiquitous computing the use of concepts and paradigms introduced by information and communications technology (ICT) have to be considered even for early warning systems (EWS). Based on the experiences and the knowledge gained in research projects new technologies are exploited to implement a cloud-based and web-based platform - the TRIDEC Cloud - to open up new prospects for EWS. The platform in its current version addresses tsunami early warning and mitigation. It merges several complementary external and in-house cloud-based services for instant tsunami propagation calculations and automated background computation with graphics processing units (GPU), for web-mapping of hazard specific geospatial data, and for serving relevant functionality to handle, share, and communicate threat specific information in a collaborative and distributed environment. The TRIDEC Cloud can be accessed in two different modes, the monitoring mode and the exercise-and-training mode. The monitoring mode provides important functionality required to act in a real event. So far, the monitoring mode integrates historic and real-time sea level data and latest earthquake information. The integration of sources is supported by a simple and secure interface. The exercise and training mode enables training and exercises with virtual scenarios. This mode disconnects real world systems and connects with a virtual environment that receives virtual earthquake information and virtual sea level data re-played by a scenario player. Thus operators and other stakeholders are able to train skills and prepare for real events and large exercises. The GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ), the Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI), and the Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere (IPMA) have used the opportunity provided by NEAMWave14 to test the TRIDEC Cloud as a collaborative activity based on previous partnership and commitments at the European scale. The TRIDEC Cloud has not been involved officially in Part B of the NEAMWave14 scenarios. However, the scenarios have been used by GFZ, KOERI, and IPMA for testing in exercise runs on October 27-28, 2014. Additionally, the Greek NEAMWave14 scenario has been tested in an exercise run by GFZ only on October 29, 2014 (see ICG/NEAMTWS-XI/13). The exercise runs demonstrated that operators in warning centres and stakeholders of other involved parties just need a standard web browser to access a full-fledged TEWS. The integration of GPU accelerated tsunami simulation computations have been an integral part to foster early warning with on-demand tsunami predictions based on actual source parameters. Thus tsunami travel times, estimated times of arrival and estimated wave heights are available immediately for visualization and for further analysis and processing. The generation of warning messages is based on internationally agreed message structures and includes static and dynamic information based on earthquake information, instant computations of tsunami simulations, and actual measurements. Generated messages are served for review, modification, and addressing in one simple form for dissemination via Cloud Messages, Shared Maps, e-mail, FTP/GTS, SMS, and FAX. Cloud Messages and Shared Maps are complementary channels and integrate interactive event and simulation data. Thus recipients are enabled to interact dynamically with a map and diagrams beyond traditional text information.

  1. Cloud based emergency health care information service in India.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, N; Sukanesh, R

    2012-12-01

    A hospital is a health care organization providing patient treatment by expert physicians, surgeons and equipments. A report from a health care accreditation group says that miscommunication between patients and health care providers is the reason for the gap in providing emergency medical care to people in need. In developing countries, illiteracy is the major key root for deaths resulting from uncertain diseases constituting a serious public health problem. Mentally affected, differently abled and unconscious patients can't communicate about their medical history to the medical practitioners. Also, Medical practitioners can't edit or view DICOM images instantly. Our aim is to provide palm vein pattern recognition based medical record retrieval system, using cloud computing for the above mentioned people. Distributed computing technology is coming in the new forms as Grid computing and Cloud computing. These new forms are assured to bring Information Technology (IT) as a service. In this paper, we have described how these new forms of distributed computing will be helpful for modern health care industries. Cloud Computing is germinating its benefit to industrial sectors especially in medical scenarios. In Cloud Computing, IT-related capabilities and resources are provided as services, via the distributed computing on-demand. This paper is concerned with sprouting software as a service (SaaS) by means of Cloud computing with an aim to bring emergency health care sector in an umbrella with physical secured patient records. In framing the emergency healthcare treatment, the crucial thing considered necessary to decide about patients is their previous health conduct records. Thus a ubiquitous access to appropriate records is essential. Palm vein pattern recognition promises a secured patient record access. Likewise our paper reveals an efficient means to view, edit or transfer the DICOM images instantly which was a challenging task for medical practitioners in the past years. We have developed two services for health care. 1. Cloud based Palm vein recognition system 2. Distributed Medical image processing tools for medical practitioners. PMID:22865161

  2. Chemical and physical influences on aerosol activation in liquid clouds: an empirical study based on observations from the Jungfraujoch, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Webster, C. S.; Rieder, H. E.; Hammer, E.; Gysel, M.; Bukowiecki, N.; Weingartner, E.; Steinbacher, M.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-06-01

    A simple empirical model to predict the number of aerosols which activate to form cloud droplets in a warm, free tropospheric cloud has been established, based on data from four summertime Cloud and Aerosol Characterisation Experiments (CLACE) campaigns at the Jungfraujoch (JFJ). It is shown that 76% of the observed variance in droplet numbers can be represented by a model accounting only for the number of potential CCN (defined as number of particles larger than 90 nm in diameter), while the mean errors in the model representation may be reduced by the addition of further explanatory variables, such as the mixing ratios of O3, CO and the height of the measurements above cloud base. The model has similar ability to represent the observed droplet numbers in each of the individual years, as well as for the two predominant local wind directions at the JFJ (north west and south east). Given the central European location of the JFJ, with air masses in summer being representative of the free troposphere with regular boundary layer in-mixing via convection, we expect that this model is applicable to warm, free tropospheric clouds over the European continent.

  3. Correlating Ground-Based Lightning Measurements with Ash Cloud Satellite Data from the 2010 Eruption of Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, N. D.; Thomas, R. J.; Pavolonis, M. J.; Sieglaff, J.; Aster, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Airborne volcanic ash is a major aviation hazard. For example, the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland resulted in the largest air-traffic shutdown since World War II. More than 100,000 flights were grounded, stranding passengers in Europe and across the globe, and producing a multi-billion dollar economic impact. Because of the high impact on aviation, sophisticated tools are needed to provide real-time alerts, tracking, and forecasting of volcanic clouds. In an attempt address the 5-minute volcanic cloud warning criteria established by the international aviation community, an automated volcanic cloud alert system for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R Series (GOES-R) built upon the automated ash cloud alert system for the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is in development. The new system will be capable of identifying ash and SO2 clouds with greater accuracy. One component of GOES-R will be a lightning mapper. To study the temporal, spatial, and physical relationships between ash clouds and lightning, and the utility of lightning detection in a real-time alert system, we analyze data collected by the Lightning Mapping Array, a ground-based lightning detection network, in conjunction with satellite data gathered by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) instrument aboard Meteosat-9 during in the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano. We correlate lightning characteristics, intensity, and distribution with plume location, height, mass loading, and effective particle radius. Lightning mapping in volcanic ash clouds potentially will allow for better characterization of the ash cloud and aid in forecasting the distribution of ash and its effects on aviation.

  4. A cloud-based medical image repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, Anthony J.; Planitz, Birgit M.; El Rifai, Diaa

    2012-02-01

    Many widely used digital medical image collections have been established but these are generally used as raw data sources without related image analysis toolsets. Providing associated functionality to allow specific types of operations to be performed on these images has proved beneficial in some cases (e.g. brain image registration and atlases). However, toolset development to provide generic image analysis functions on medical images has tended to be ad hoc, with Open Source options proliferating (e.g. ITK). Our Automated Medical Image Collection Annotation (AMICA) system is both an image repository, to which the research community can contribute image datasets, and a search/retrieval system that uses automated image annotation. AMICA was designed for the Windows Azure platform to leverage the flexibility and scalability of the cloud. It is intended that AMICA will expand beyond its initial pilot implementation (for brain CT, MR images) to accommodate a wide range of modalities and anatomical regions. This initiative aims to contribute to advances in clinical research by permitting a broader use and reuse of medical image data than is currently attainable. For example, cohort studies for cases with particular physiological or phenotypical profiles will be able to source and include enough cases to provide high statistical power, allowing more individualised risk factors to be assessed and thus allowing screening and staging processes to be optimised. Also, education, training and credentialing of clinicians in image interpretation, will be more effective because it will be possible to select instances of images with specific visual aspects, or correspond to types of cases where reading performance improvement is desirable.

  5. Measuring the accuracy of self-reported height and weight in a community-based sample of young people

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-reported anthropometric data are commonly used to estimate prevalence of obesity in population and community-based studies. We aim to: 1) Determine whether survey participants are able and willing to self-report height and weight; 2) Assess the accuracy of self-reported compared to measured anthropometric data in a community-based sample of young people. Methods Participants (16–29 years) of a behaviour survey, recruited at a Melbourne music festival (January 2011), were asked to self-report height and weight; researchers independently weighed and measured a sub-sample. Body Mass Index was calculated and overweight/obesity classified as ?25kg/m2. Differences between measured and self-reported values were assessed using paired t-test/Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Accurate report of height and weight were defined as <2cm and <2kg difference between self-report and measured values, respectively. Agreement between classification of overweight/obesity by self-report and measured values was assessed using McNemar’s test. Results Of 1405 survey participants, 82% of males and 72% of females self-reported their height and weight. Among 67 participants who were also independently measured, self-reported height and weight were significantly less than measured height (p=0.01) and weight (p<0.01) among females, but no differences were detected among males. Overall, 52% accurately self-reported height, 30% under-reported, and 18% over-reported; 34% accurately self-reported weight, 52% under-reported and 13% over-reported. More females (70%) than males (35%) under-reported weight (p=0.01). Prevalence of overweight/obesity was 33% based on self-report data and 39% based on measured data (p=0.16). Conclusions Self-reported measurements may underestimate weight but accurately identified overweight/obesity in the majority of this sample of young people. PMID:23170838

  6. Comparison of Hydrographic and Altimeter Based Estimates of Sea Level Height Variability in the Atlantic Ocean

    E-print Network

    ) and to dynamic height anomalies (DHA) for the period 1993 through 1997 to determine how much can be inferred were matched (time/location) to Sea height anomalies (SHA) derived from T/P data, converted into DHA between SHA and DHA and an understanding of the details of how temperature variability affects DHA

  7. Influence of Subpixel Scale Cloud Top Structure on Reflectances from Overcast Stratiform Cloud Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Varnai, Tamas; Winker, David M.

    1998-01-01

    Recent observational studies have shown that satellite retrievals of cloud optical depth based on plane-parallel model theory suffer from systematic biases that depend on viewing geometry, even when observations are restricted to overcast marine stratus layers, arguably the closest to plane parallel in nature. At moderate to low sun elevations, the plane-parallel model significantly overestimates the reflectance dependence on view angle in the forward-scattering direction but shows a similar dependence in the backscattering direction. Theoretical simulations are performed that show that the likely cause for this discrepancy is because the plane-parallel model assumption does not account for subpixel, scale variations in cloud-top height (i.e., "cloud bumps"). Monte Carlo simulation, comparing ID model radiances to radiances from overcast cloud field with 1) cloud-top height variation, but constant cloud volume extinction; 2) flat tops but horizontal variations in cloud volume extinction; and 3) variations in both cloud top height and cloud extinction are performed over a approximately equal to 4 km x 4 km domain (roughly the size of an individual GAC AVHRR pixel). The comparisons show that when cloud-top height variations are included, departures from 1D theory are remarkably similar (qualitatively) to those obtained observationally. In contrast, when clouds are assumed flat and only cloud extinction is variable, reflectance differences are much smaller and do not show any view-angle dependence. When both cloud-top height and cloud extinction variations are included, however, large increases in cloud extinction variability can enhance reflectance difference. The reason 3D-1D reflectance differences are more sensitive to cloud-top height variations in the forward-scattering direction (at moderate to low, sun elevations) is because photons leaving the cloud field in that direction experience fewer scattering events (low-order scattering) and are restricted to the topmost portions of the cloud. While reflectance deviations from 1D theory are much larger for bumpy clouds than for flat clouds with variable cloud extinction, differences in cloud albedo are comparable for these two cases.

  8. Cloud Classification Based on Self-Organizing Feature Map and Probabilistic Neural Network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ren Zhang; Yanlei Wang; Wei Liu; Weijun Zhu; Jiguang Wang

    2006-01-01

    For overcoming the shortcoming of single ANN classifier being difficult used to identify and classify complex clouds, based on the multi-spectrum samples of stationary meteorology satellite cloud pictures, by computing and analysing the gray-grads and texture characters of satellite cloud picture samples, and picking-up some suitable cloud classification factors, a synthetic optimization SOM-PNN cloud classifier was designed and established. Firstly,

  9. Assimilating Aircraft-based measurements to improve the State of Distal Volcanic Ash Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guangliang; Lin, Hai Xiang; Heemink, Arnold; Segers, Arjo; Lu, Sha; Palsson, Thorgeir

    2015-04-01

    The sudden eruption at the 1666 m high, ice-capped Eyjafjallajökull volcano, in south Iceland during 14 April to 23 May 2010, had caused an unprecedented closure of the European and North Atlantic airspace resulting in global economic losses of US5 billion. This has initiated a lot of research on how to improve aviation advice after eruption onset. Good estimation of both the state of volcanic ash cloud and the emission of volcano are crucial for providing a successful aviation advice. Currently most of the approaches, employing satellite-based and ground-based measurements, are in the focus of improving the definition of Eruption Source Parameters (ESPs) such as plume height and mass eruption rate, which are certainly very important for estimating volcano emission and state of volcanic ash cloud near to the volcano. However, for ash cloud state in a far field, these approaches can hardly make improvements. This is mainly because the influence of ESPs on the ash plume becomes weaker as the distance to the volcano is getting farther, thus for a distal plume the information of ESPs will have little influence. This study aims to find an efficient way to improve the state of distal volcanic ash cloud. We use real-life aircraft-based observations, measured along Dutch border between Borken and Twist during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, in an data assimilation system combining with a transport model to identify the potential benefit of this kind of observations and the influence on the ash state around Dutch border. We show that assimilating aircraft-based measurements can significantly improve the state of distal ash clouds, and further provide an improved aviation advice on distal ash plume. We compare the performances of different sequential data assimilation methods. The results show standard Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) works better than others, which is because of the strong nonlinearity of the dynamics and the EnKF's resampling Gaussianity nature. Furthermore, another important aspect of data assimilation methodology related to time-correlated errors is also investigated. The result shows for assimilating aircraft-based timely measurements in a far field, time-correlation of model errors on the state is critical to the performance of the assimilation system.

  10. Octree-based region growing for point cloud segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Anh-Vu; Truong-Hong, Linh; Laefer, Debra F.; Bertolotto, Michela

    2015-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel, region-growing algorithm for the fast surface patch segmentation of three-dimensional point clouds of urban environments. The proposed algorithm is composed of two stages based on a coarse-to-fine concept. First, a region-growing step is performed on an octree-based voxelized representation of the input point cloud to extract major (coarse) segments. The output is then passed through a refinement process. As part of this, there are two competing factors related to voxel size selection. To balance the constraints, an adaptive octree is created in two stages. Empirical studies on real terrestrial and airborne laser scanning data for complex buildings and an urban setting show the proposed approach to be at least an order of magnitude faster when compared to a conventional region growing method and able to incorporate semantic-based feature criteria, while achieving precision, recall, and fitness scores of at least 75% and as much as 95%.

  11. A global survey of aerosol-liquid water cloud overlap based on four years of CALIPSO-CALIOP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devasthale, A.; Thomas, M. A.

    2010-09-01

    The presence of aerosols over highly reflective liquid water cloud tops poses a big challenge in simulating their radiative impacts. Particularly, absorbing aerosols, such as smoke, may have significant impact in such situations and even change the sign of net radiative forcing. Until now, it was not possible to obtain information on such overlap events realistically from the existing passive satellite sensors. However, the CALIOP instrument onboard NASA's CALIPSO satellite allows us to examine these events with an unprecedented accuracy. Using four years of collocated CALIPSO 5 km Aerosol and Cloud Layer Version 3 Products (June 2006-May 2010), we quantify, for the first time, the macrophysical characteristics of overlapping aerosol and water cloud layers globally. We investigate seasonal variability in these characteristics over six latitude bands to understand the hemispheric differences. We compute a) the percentage cases when such overlap is seen globally and seasonally when all aerosol types are included (AAO case) in the analysis, b) the joint histograms of aerosol layer base height and cloud layer top height, and c) the joint histograms of aerosol and cloud geometrical thicknesses in such overlap cases. We also investigate frequency of smoke aerosol-cloud overlap (SAO case). The results show a distinct seasonality in overlap frequency in both AAO and SAO cases. Globally, the frequency is highest during JJA months in AAO case, while for the SAO case, it is highest in SON months. The seasonal mean overlap frequency can regionally exceed 20% in AAO case and 10% in SAO case. There is a tendency that the vertical separation between aerosol and cloud layers increases from high to low latitude regions in the both hemispheres. In about 5-10% cases the vertical distance between aerosol and cloud layers is less than 100 m, while about in 45-60% cases it less than a kilometer in the annual means for different latitudinal bands. The frequency of occurrence of thicker aerosol layers gradually increases from poles to tropics. In about 70-80% cases, aerosol layers are less than a kilometer thick, while in about 18-22% cases they are 1-2 km thick. The frequency of aerosol layers 2-3 km thick is about 4-5% in the tropical belts during overlap events. The results further highlight spatial and temporal variations in aerosol-liquid water cloud overlap and suggest that the frequency of occurrence of such overlap events is far from being negligible globally.

  12. Mapping tropical dry forest height, foliage height profiles and disturbance type and age with a time series of cloud-cleared Landsat and ALI image mosaics to characterize avian habitat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. H. Helmer; Thomas S. Ruzycki; Joseph M. Wunderle Jr.; Shannon Vogesser; Bonnie Ruefenacht; Charles Kwit; Thomas J. Brandeis; David N. Ewert

    2010-01-01

    Remote sensing of forest vertical structure is possible with lidar data, but lidar is not widely available. Here we map tropical dry forest height (RMSE=0.9m, R2=0.84, range 0.6–7m), and we map foliage height profiles, with a time series of Landsat and Advanced Land Imager (ALI) imagery on the island of Eleuthera, The Bahamas, substituting time for vertical canopy space. We

  13. Smart Learning Services Based on Smart Cloud Computing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Svetlana; Song, Su-Mi; Yoon, Yong-Ik

    2011-01-01

    Context-aware technologies can make e-learning services smarter and more efficient since context-aware services are based on the user’s behavior. To add those technologies into existing e-learning services, a service architecture model is needed to transform the existing e-learning environment, which is situation-aware, into the environment that understands context as well. The context-awareness in e-learning may include the awareness of user profile and terminal context. In this paper, we propose a new notion of service that provides context-awareness to smart learning content in a cloud computing environment. We suggest the elastic four smarts (E4S)—smart pull, smart prospect, smart content, and smart push—concept to the cloud services so smart learning services are possible. The E4S focuses on meeting the users’ needs by collecting and analyzing users’ behavior, prospecting future services, building corresponding contents, and delivering the contents through cloud computing environment. Users’ behavior can be collected through mobile devices such as smart phones that have built-in sensors. As results, the proposed smart e-learning model in cloud computing environment provides personalized and customized learning services to its users. PMID:22164048

  14. Estimating high quantiles of extreme flood heights in the lower Limpopo River basin of Mozambique using model based Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maposa, D.; Cochran, J. J.; Lesaoana, M.; Sigauke, C.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we discuss a comparative analysis of the maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian parameter estimates of the generalised extreme value (GEV) distribution. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Bayesian method to estimate the parameters of the GEV distribution in order to estimate extreme flood heights and their return periods in the lower Limpopo River basin of Mozambique. The return periods of extreme flood heights based on the Bayesian approach show an improvement over the frequentist approach based on the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method. However, both approaches indicate that the 13 m extreme flood height that occurred at Chokwe in the year 2000 due to cyclone Eline and Gloria had a return period in excess of 200 years, which implies that this event has a very small likelihood of being equalled or exceeded at least once in 200 years.

  15. Designing the Cloud-based DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase

    SciTech Connect

    Lansing, Carina S.; Liu, Yan; Yin, Jian; Corrigan, Abigail L.; Guillen, Zoe C.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Gorton, Ian

    2011-09-01

    Systems Biology research, even more than many other scientific domains, is becoming increasingly data-intensive. Not only have advances in experimental and computational technologies lead to an exponential increase in scientific data volumes and their complexity, but increasingly such databases themselves are providing the basis for new scientific discoveries. To engage effectively with these community resources, integrated analyses, synthesis and simulation software is needed, regularly supported by scientific workflows. In order to provide a more collaborative, community driven research environment for this heterogeneous setting, the Department of Energy (DOE) has decided to develop a federated, cloud based cyber infrastructure - the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (Kbase). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with its long tradition in data intensive science lead two of the five initial pilot projects, these two focusing on defining and testing the basic federated cloud-based system architecture and develop a prototype implementation. Hereby the community wide accessibility of biological data and the capability to integrate and analyze this data within its changing research context were seen as key technical functionalities the Kbase needed to enable. In this paper we describe the results of our investigations into the design of a cloud based federated infrastructure for: (1) Semantics driven data discovery, access and integration; (2) Data annotation, publication and sharing; (3) Workflow enabled data analysis; and (4) Project based collaborative working. We describe our approach, exemplary use cases and our prototype implementation that demonstrates the feasibility of this approach.

  16. Use of satellite remote sensing for determining cloud immersion and biogeography of cloud forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asefi Najafabady, S.; Welch, R. M.; Nair, U.; Lawton, R. O.; Ray, D.

    2006-12-01

    Tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) are ecosystems characterized by frequent and prolonged immersion in orographic clouds. TMCFs are biologically rich and diverse and they lie at the core of several of the global biological hotspots identified for conservation purposes. Recent studies show that TMCFs are sensitive to global and regional scale climate changes. Vegetation in TMCFs directly harvest water from clouds, which is usually termed horizontal precipitation, and is an important input to local hydrological cycle. Mosses and ferns present within the TMCFs absorbs moisture during rainfall and releases slowly over time thereby providing another important hydrological function, namely modulation of runoff. In spite of the ecological and hydrological importance of TMCFs, there is scant information regarding the geographical distribution of the TMCFs. One source of information that is currently available is the atlas of the potential cloud forest distribution published by the United Nations Environmental Program. However, this compilation does not directly consider the defining characteristics of cloud forests, namely frequency of immersion in cloud forests, in their classisification scheme. This talk will present the use of NASA MODIS satellite data to determine cloud immersion frequency and thus the biogeography of cloud forests. The MODIS derived cloud top heights and cloud thickness estimated from MODIS retrieval of cloud microphysical properties is used to estimate cloud base height. If the estimate cloud base height at a location is less than or equal to the surface elevation at that point, then that location is defined as experiencing cloud immersion. This classification procedure was applied to determine cloud immersion frequency at two study sites, namely Hawaii and Monteverde, Costa Rica. The cloud immersion frequency maps identifies some of the know cloud forest locations in these study areas. Comparison against a blended product created using numerical modeling and geostationary satellite data also show good agreement over Monteverde, Costa Rica.

  17. Understanding video transmission decisions in cloud based computer vision services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabtawi, Nijad; Ferzli, Rony M.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a study about the effect of the quality of the input video source on the computer vision system robustness and how to make use of the findings to create a framework generating a set of recommendation or rules for researchers and developers in the field to use. The study is of high importance especially for cloud based computer vision platforms where the transmission of raw uncompressed video is not possible, as such it is desired to have a sweet spot where the usage of bandwidth is at optimal level while maintaining high recognition rate. Experimental results showed that creating such rules is possible and beneficial to integrate in an end to end cloud based computer vision service.

  18. A Petri Net Model for Secure and Fault-Tolerant Cloud-Based Information Storage

    E-print Network

    Xu, Haiping

    333 A Petri Net Model for Secure and Fault-Tolerant Cloud-Based Information Storage Daniel F. Fitch, however, with data security, reliability, and availability in the cloud. In this paper, we address these concerns by proposing a novel security mechanism for secure and fault-tolerant cloud-based information

  19. On Interference-aware Provisioning for Cloud-based Big Data Processing

    E-print Network

    Liu, Jiangchuan (JC)

    On Interference-aware Provisioning for Cloud-based Big Data Processing Yi YUAN, Haiyang WANG, Dan--Recent advances in cloud-based big data analysis offers a convenient mean for providing an elastic and cost and IBM deploy various of big data systems on their cloud platforms, aiming to occupy the huge market

  20. Enforcing Trust-based Intrusion Detection in Cloud Computing Using Algebraic Methods

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Enforcing Trust-based Intrusion Detection in Cloud Computing Using Algebraic Methods Amira Bradai scheme for hybrid cloud computing is proposed. We consider a trust metric based on honesty, cooperation detection, Perron Frobenius, cloud computing, hybrid execution, false alarms, security scores. I

  1. Estimating radiation effective doses from whole body computed tomography scans based on U.S. soldier patient height and weight

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to explore how a patient's height and weight can be used to predict the effective dose to a reference phantom with similar height and weight from a chest abdomen pelvis computed tomography scan when machine-based parameters are unknown. Since machine-based scanning parameters can be misplaced or lost, a predictive model will enable the medical professional to quantify a patient's cumulative radiation dose. Methods One hundred mathematical phantoms of varying heights and weights were defined within an x-ray Monte Carlo based software code in order to calculate organ absorbed doses and effective doses from a chest abdomen pelvis scan. Regression analysis was used to develop an effective dose predictive model. The regression model was experimentally verified using anthropomorphic phantoms and validated against a real patient population. Results Estimates of the effective doses as calculated by the predictive model were within 10% of the estimates of the effective doses using experimentally measured absorbed doses within the anthropomorphic phantoms. Comparisons of the patient population effective doses show that the predictive model is within 33% of current methods of estimating effective dose using machine-based parameters. Conclusions A patient's height and weight can be used to estimate the effective dose from a chest abdomen pelvis computed tomography scan. The presented predictive model can be used interchangeably with current effective dose estimating techniques that rely on computed tomography machine-based techniques. PMID:22004072

  2. An Optimal Workflow Based Scheduling and Resource Allocation in Cloud

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Varalakshmi; Aravindh Ramaswamy; Aswath Balasubramanian; Palaniappan Vijaykumar

    \\u000a The objective of Optimal Workflow based Scheduling (OWS) algorithm is to find a solution that meets the user-preferred Quality\\u000a of Service (QoS) parameters. The work presented focuses on scheduling cloud workflows. First, the Resource discovery algorithm,\\u000a indexes all the resources and this helps in locating the free resources. Second, the scheduling algorithm that takes user\\u000a specified QoS parameters (execution time,

  3. Cloud based metalearning system for predictive modeling of biomedical data.

    PubMed

    Vuki?evi?, Milan; Radovanovi?, Sandro; Milovanovi?, Miloš; Minovi?, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Rapid growth and storage of biomedical data enabled many opportunities for predictive modeling and improvement of healthcare processes. On the other side analysis of such large amounts of data is a difficult and computationally intensive task for most existing data mining algorithms. This problem is addressed by proposing a cloud based system that integrates metalearning framework for ranking and selection of best predictive algorithms for data at hand and open source big data technologies for analysis of biomedical data. PMID:24892101

  4. [Analysis of cloud spectral structure characteristics based on cloud profile radar data].

    PubMed

    Han, Yong; Lü, Da-Ren

    2013-04-01

    Cloud plays a very important role in the earth-atmosphere system. However, the current climate models are still lacking data about internal fine structure of cloud. And when the traditional passive satellite radiometer is used for remote sense, a plentiful information of the vertical distribution of cloud layer will be lost. For these reasons, NASA proposed the launch project of CloudSat, Whose purpose is to provide the necessary observation, and then allow us to understand better the internal structure of the cloud. CloudSat was successfully launched on April 28, 2006. It carried the first cloud profile radar (CPR) with W band (94 GHz), which can provide continuous and global time sequence vertical structure and characteristics of cloud. In the present paper, using CloudSat satellite data, we analyzed the 8th "Morakot" and 15th " Koppu" typhoon cloud systems. According to the "typhoon" cloud detection results, the radar reflectivity, cloud types and optical thickness successive variation of cloud layer were gotten, which will provide a reference for studying optical properties of typhoon cloud system. PMID:23841397

  5. Global aerosol effects on convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Till; Stier, Philip

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect cloud properties, and thereby the radiation balance of the planet and the water cycle. The influence of aerosols on clouds is dominated by increase of cloud droplet and ice crystal numbers (CDNC/ICNC) due to enhanced aerosols acting as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. In deep convective clouds this increase in CDNC/ICNC is hypothesised to increase precipitation because of cloud invigoration through enhanced freezing and associated increased latent heat release caused by delayed warm rain formation. Satellite studies robustly show an increase of cloud top height (CTH) and precipitation with increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD, as proxy for aerosol amount). To represent aerosol effects and study their influence on convective clouds in the global climate aerosol model ECHAM-HAM, we substitute the standard convection parameterisation, which uses one mean convective cloud for each grid column, with the convective cloud field model (CCFM), which simulates a spectrum of convective clouds, each with distinct values of radius, mixing ratios, vertical velocity, height and en/detrainment. Aerosol activation and droplet nucleation in convective updrafts at cloud base is the primary driver for microphysical aerosol effects. To produce realistic estimates for vertical velocity at cloud base we use an entraining dry parcel sub cloud model which is triggered by perturbations of sensible and latent heat at the surface. Aerosol activation at cloud base is modelled with a mechanistic, Köhler theory based, scheme, which couples the aerosols to the convective microphysics. Comparison of relationships between CTH and AOD, and precipitation and AOD produced by this novel model and satellite based estimates show general agreement. Through model experiments and analysis of the model cloud processes we are able to investigate the main drivers for the relationship between CTH / precipitation and AOD.

  6. Monte-Carlo calculations of cloud returns for ground-based and space-based LIDARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winker, D. M.; Poole, L. R.

    1995-04-01

    A Monte-Carlo model is described which has been developed for calculation of multiply scattered LIDAR returns. Results are shown for the common problem selected by the MUSCLE (MUltiple SCattering LIDAR Experiments) group for intercomparison, which represents a typical ground-based cloud-sensing scenario. This is contrasted with returns from the same cloud sensed by a space-based LIDAR, where multiple-scattering effects are much greater. The magnitude of multiple-scattering effects is seen to be largely determined by the optical depth across the receiver field of view at the cloud.

  7. Building Height

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Katie Hendrickson

    2000-01-01

    Working in pairs, students create a clinometer and use isosceles right triangles to find the height of a building. The class will compare measurements, discuss their results, and select the best measure of central tendency to report the most accurate height. All handouts and excellent class discussion questions are provided.

  8. Cloud cover estimation: Use of GOES imagery in development of cloud cover data base for insolation assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huning, J. R.; Logan, T. L.; Smith, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The potential of using digital satellite data to establish a cloud cover data base for the United States, one that would provide detailed information on the temporal and spatial variability of cloud development are studied. Key elements include: (1) interfacing GOES data from the University of Wisconsin Meteorological Data Facility with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's VICAR image processing system and IBIS geographic information system; (2) creation of a registered multitemporal GOES data base; (3) development of a simple normalization model to compensate for sun angle; (4) creation of a variable size georeference grid that provides detailed cloud information in selected areas and summarized information in other areas; and (5) development of a cloud/shadow model which details the percentage of each grid cell that is cloud and shadow covered, and the percentage of cloud or shadow opacity. In addition, comparison of model calculations of insolation with measured values at selected test sites was accomplished, as well as development of preliminary requirements for a large scale data base of cloud cover statistics.

  9. Improved Boundary Layer Heights from the Micropulse Lidar Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. R.; Welton, E. J.; Molod, A.

    2012-12-01

    Continuous lidar observations of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height have been made at the Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) site in Greenbelt, MD since April 2001. However, because of issues with the operational PBL height algorithm, the data is not reliable for determining seasonal and diurnal trends. Therefore, an improved PBL height algorithm has been developed which uses a combination of the wavelet technique and image processing. In general, the improved algorithm produces lower PBL heights by reducing the influence of clouds and residual layers. A 2010 comparison shows the operational algorithm overestimates the daily mean PBL height when compared to the improved algorithm (1.90 and 1.12 km, respectively). A local PBL height climatology based on ten years of lidar measurements at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) shows the maximum daytime PBL height is highest during spring and summer (~2.3 km) and lowest in the winter (~1.6 km). PBL heights from the improved algorithm are compared with results from the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) model. The comparison suggests that the model underestimates the maximum daytime PBL height by ~410 m during the spring and summer. The best agreement between MPLNET and GEOS-5 occurred during the fall. They differed the most in the winter when MPLNET may overestimate the maximum PBL height.

  10. Regime based investigation of the second aerosol indirect effect for liquid water clouds using satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unglaub, Claudia; Quaas, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols may affect cloud micro physical processes and subsequently cloud liquid water path via the so-called "second aerosol indirect effects". To obtain a better quantification of such effects the variability of the liquid water path is investigated to study the sensitivity of liquid water clouds to perturbations in the cloud droplet number concentration. For the statistical analysis the A-Train satellite constellation CCCM data product is used. We will analyze the ISCCP cloud class based correlation between the satellite-derived liquid water path and cloud droplet number concentration for liquid water clouds. Furthermore a possible new cloud classification for the high resolution CCCM data set will be presented. The goal of these studies is a better understanding and the assessment of the radiative forcing by the second aerosol indirect effects on liquid water clouds.

  11. Cloud-Based Model Calibration Using OpenStudio: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, E.; Lisell, L.; Goldwasser, D.; Macumber, D.; Dean, J.; Metzger, I.; Parker, A.; Long, N.; Ball, B.; Schott, M.; Weaver, E.; Brackney, L.

    2014-03-01

    OpenStudio is a free, open source Software Development Kit (SDK) and application suite for performing building energy modeling and analysis. The OpenStudio Parametric Analysis Tool has been extended to allow cloud-based simulation of multiple OpenStudio models parametrically related to a baseline model. This paper describes the new cloud-based simulation functionality and presents a model cali-bration case study. Calibration is initiated by entering actual monthly utility bill data into the baseline model. Multiple parameters are then varied over multiple iterations to reduce the difference between actual energy consumption and model simulation results, as calculated and visualized by billing period and by fuel type. Simulations are per-formed in parallel using the Amazon Elastic Cloud service. This paper highlights model parameterizations (measures) used for calibration, but the same multi-nodal computing architecture is available for other purposes, for example, recommending combinations of retrofit energy saving measures using the calibrated model as the new baseline.

  12. Web-based CERES Clouds QC Property Viewing Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. A.; Chu, C.; Sun-Mack, S.; Chen, Y.; Heckert, E.; Minnis, P.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation will display the capabilities of a web-based CERES cloud property viewer. Terra data will be chosen for examples. It will demonstrate viewing of cloud properties in gridded global maps, histograms, time series displays, latitudinal zonal images, binned data charts, data frequency graphs, and ISCCP plots. Images can be manipulated by the user to narrow boundaries of the map as well as color bars and value ranges, compare datasets, view data values, and more. Other atmospheric studies groups will be encouraged to put their data into the underlying NetCDF data format and view their data with the tool. A laptop will hopefully be available to allow conference attendees to try navigating the tool.

  13. Toward Understanding of Differences in Current Cloud Retrievals of ARM Ground-based Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chuanfeng; Xie, Shaocheng; Klein, Stephen A.; Protat, Alain; Shupe, Matthew D.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Delanoe, Julien; Deng, Min; Dunn, Maureen; Hogan, Robin; Huang, Dong; Jensen, Michael; Mace, Gerald G.; McCoy, Renata; O'Conner, Ewan J.; Turner, Dave; Wang, Zhien

    2012-05-30

    Accurate observations of cloud microphysical properties are needed for evaluating and improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models. However, large differences are found in current cloud products retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements using various retrieval algorithms. Understanding the differences is an important step to address uncertainties in the cloud retrievals. In this study, an in-depth analysis of nine existing ground-based cloud retrievals using ARM remote sensing measurements is carried out. We place emphasize on boundary layer overcast clouds and high level ice clouds, which are the focus of many current retrieval development efforts due to their radiative importance and relatively simple structure. Large systematic discrepancies in cloud microphysical properties are found in these two types of clouds among the nine cloud retrieval products, particularly for the cloud liquid and ice effective radius. It is shown that most of these large differences have their roots in the retrieval algorithms used by these cloud products, including the retrieval theoretical bases, assumptions, as well as input and constraint parameters. This study suggests the need to further validate current retrieval theories and assumptions and even the development of new retrieval algorithms with more observations under different cloud regimes.

  14. Climate change signal and uncertainty in CMIP5-based projections of global ocean surface wave heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolan L.; Feng, Yang; Swail, Val R.

    2015-05-01

    This study uses the analysis of variance approaches to quantify the climate change signal and uncertainty in multimodel ensembles of statistical simulations of significant wave height (Hs), which are based on the CMIP5 historical, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 forcing scenario simulations of sea level pressure. Here the signal of climate change refers to the temporal variations caused by the prescribed forcing. "Significant" means "significantly different from zero at 5% level." In a four-model ensemble of Hs simulations, the common signal—the signal that is simulated in all the four models—is found to strengthen over time. For the historical followed by RCP8.5 scenario, the common signal in annual mean Hs is found to be significant in 16.6% and 82.2% of the area by year 2005 and 2099, respectively. The global average of the variance proportion of the common signal increases from 0.75% in year 2005 to 12.0% by year 2099. The signal is strongest in the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP), featuring significant increases in both the annual mean and maximum of Hs in this region. The climate model uncertainty (i.e., intermodel variability) is significant nearly globally; its magnitude is comparable to or greater than that of the common signal in most areas, except in the ETP where the signal is much larger. In a 20-model ensemble of Hs simulations for the period 2006-2099, the model uncertainty is found to be significant globally; it is about 10 times as large as the variability between the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios. The copyright line for this article was changed on 10 JUNE 2015 after original online publication.

  15. Satellite-based retrieval of ice cloud properties using a semianalytical algorithm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Kokhanovsky; T. Nauss

    2005-01-01

    A semianalytical algorithm for the retrieval of ice cloud properties from satellite data is presented. The new method is based on the semianalytical cloud retrieval algorithm and uses solutions of the asymptotic radiative transfer theory applicable for optically thick media. Therefore the new method is much less computer time expensive than the commonly used lookup table approaches. Usually, the cloud

  16. Hierarchical attribute-based encryption and scalable user revocation for sharing data in cloud servers

    E-print Network

    Wu, Jie

    t With rapid development of cloud computing, more and more enterprises will outsource their sensitive data. Introduction Cloud computing, as an emerging computing paradigm, enables users to remotely store their dataHierarchical attribute-based encryption and scalable user revocation for sharing data in cloud

  17. Content-Based Scheduling of Virtual Machines (VMs) in the Cloud

    E-print Network

    Sanders, William H.

    Azure have made it very cost-effective for companies to host their services on the cloud. Fast to migrate applications and services to the cloud rather than own and maintain their own IT infrastructuresContent-Based Scheduling of Virtual Machines (VMs) in the Cloud Sobir Bazarbayev, Matti Hiltunen

  18. Multi-dimensional SLA-based Resource Allocation for Multi-tier Cloud Computing Systems

    E-print Network

    Pedram, Massoud

    Multi-dimensional SLA-based Resource Allocation for Multi-tier Cloud Computing Systems Hadi for multi-tier applications in the cloud computing is considered. An upper bound on the total profit in the cloud computing system. There are two types of SLA contracts. For the Gold SLA class, response time

  19. Data Security in Cloud Architecture Based on Diffie Hellman and Elliptical Curve Cryptography

    E-print Network

    Data Security in Cloud Architecture Based on Diffie Hellman and Elliptical Curve Cryptography Neha new security threats towards the certitude of data in cloud. The security threats such as maintenance of data integrity, data hiding and data safety dominate our concerns when the issue of cloud security come

  20. Thin apps store for smart phones based on private cloud infrastructure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ashish Tanwer; Abhishek Tayal; Muzahid Hussain; Parminder Singh Reel

    2010-01-01

    A novel approach to implement cloud computing for smart phone devices has been presented based on Eucalyptus, an open source cloud-computing framework that provides infrastructure as a service (IaaS). It has full support of Virtualization and is Amazon Web Services interface compatible. A private cloud has been designed using Eucalyptus to develop a smart phone application store. The architecture, physical

  1. Re-Encryption-Based Key Management Towards Secure and Scalable Mobile Applications in Clouds

    E-print Network

    Re-Encryption-Based Key Management Towards Secure and Scalable Mobile Applications in Clouds Piotr of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario, Canada ahasan@uwaterloo.ca Abstract--Cloud computing confers strong economic advan- tages, but many clients are reluctant to implicitly trust a third-party cloud provider

  2. Quality assessment of satellite retrieved cloud top temperature data with ground based 36 GHz radar measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. I. Weiss; C. Rathke

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of accurate cloud parameters are required for improvements and validations of climate and weather forecast models. Ground based microwave radars are a powerful tool to obtain various cloud parameters with a high spacial and temporal resolution. Likewise satellite observations of clouds are of high data assimilation interest, due to their large area coverage. A new algorithm was developed for

  3. Trace-Based Analysis and Prediction of Cloud Computing User Behavior Using the Fractal Modeling Technique

    E-print Network

    Pedram, Massoud

    Trace-Based Analysis and Prediction of Cloud Computing User Behavior Using the Fractal Modeling and technology. In this paper, we investigate the characteristics of the cloud computing requests received the alpha- stable distribution. Keywords- cloud computing; alpha-stable distribution; fractional order

  4. An Optimal Control Policy in a Mobile Cloud Computing System Based on Stochastic Data

    E-print Network

    Pedram, Massoud

    An Optimal Control Policy in a Mobile Cloud Computing System Based on Stochastic Data Xue Lin Angeles, CA, USA {xuelin, yanzhiwa, pedram}@usc.edu Abstract--The emerging mobile cloud computing (MCC sum. Keywords--mobile cloud computing; remote processing; dynamic voltage and frequency scaling I

  5. A Nested Two Stage Game-Based Optimization Framework in Mobile Cloud Computing System

    E-print Network

    Pedram, Massoud

    A Nested Two Stage Game-Based Optimization Framework in Mobile Cloud Computing System Yanzhi Wang Angeles, USA {yanzhiwa, xuelin, pedram}@usc.edu Abstract--The rapidly developing cloud computing to offload computation and which portion of application should be offloaded to the cloud. In this paper, we

  6. Unification of Intercontinental Height Systems based on the Fixed Geodetic Boundary Value Problem - A Case Study in Spherical Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grombein, T.; Seitz, K.; Heck, B.

    2013-12-01

    In general, national height reference systems are related to individual vertical datums defined by specific tide gauges. The discrepancy of these vertical datums causes height system biases that range in an order of 1-2 m at a global scale. Continental height systems can be connected by spirit leveling and gravity measurements along the leveling lines as performed for the definition of the European Vertical Reference Frame. In order to unify intercontinental height systems, an indirect connection is needed. For this purpose, global geopotential models derived from recent satellite missions like GOCE provide an important contribution. However, to achieve a highly-precise solution, a combination with local terrestrial gravity data is indispensable. Such combinations result in the solution of a Geodetic Boundary Value Problem (GBVP). In contrast to previous studies, mostly related to the traditional (scalar) free GBVP, the present paper discusses the use of the fixed GBVP for height system unification, where gravity disturbances instead of gravity anomalies are applied as boundary values. The basic idea of our approach is a conversion of measured gravity anomalies to gravity disturbances, where unknown datum parameters occur that can be associated with height system biases. In this way, the fixed GBVP can be extended by datum parameters for each datum zone. By evaluating the GBVP at GNSS/leveling benchmarks, the unknown datum parameters can be estimated in a least squares adjustment. Beside the developed theory, we present numerical results of a case study based on the spherical fixed GBVP and boundary values simulated by the use of the global geopotential model EGM2008. In a further step, the impact of approximations like linearization as well as topographic and ellipsoidal effects is taken into account by suitable reduction and correction terms.

  7. Efficient Nash equilibrium based cloud resource allocation by using a continuous double auction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dawei Sun; Guiran Chang; Chuan Wang; Yu Xiong; Xingwei Wang

    2010-01-01

    To allocate cloud resources efficiently and obtain the maximum economic benefit are the major goals of the cloud resource providers and users. The objective of this paper is to present a novel cloud resource allocation algorithm named NECDA to overcome some of the shortcomings of the current mechanisms. A cloud resource allocation model of m*n type based on M\\/M\\/1 queuing

  8. Comparison of Cloud Properties from CALIPSO-CloudSat and Geostationary Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L.; Minnis, P.; Chang, F.; Winker, D.; Sun-Mack, S.; Spangenberg, D.; Austin, R.

    2007-01-01

    Cloud properties are being derived in near-real time from geostationary satellite imager data for a variety of weather and climate applications and research. Assessment of the uncertainties in each of the derived cloud parameters is essential for confident use of the products. Determination of cloud amount, cloud top height, and cloud layering is especially important for using these real -time products for applications such as aircraft icing condition diagnosis and numerical weather prediction model assimilation. Furthermore, the distribution of clouds as a function of altitude has become a central component of efforts to evaluate climate model cloud simulations. Validation of those parameters has been difficult except over limited areas where ground-based active sensors, such as cloud radars or lidars, have been available on a regular basis. Retrievals of cloud properties are sensitive to the surface background, time of day, and the clouds themselves. Thus, it is essential to assess the geostationary satellite retrievals over a variety of locations. The availability of cloud radar data from CloudSat and lidar data from CALIPSO make it possible to perform those assessments over each geostationary domain at 0130 and 1330 LT. In this paper, CloudSat and CALIPSO data are matched with contemporaneous Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT), and Meteosat-8 data. Unlike comparisons with cloud products derived from A-Train imagers, this study considers comparisons of nadir active sensor data with off-nadir retrievals. These matched data are used to determine the uncertainties in cloud-top heights and cloud amounts derived from the geostationary satellite data using the Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) cloud retrieval algorithms. The CERES multi-layer cloud detection method is also evaluated to determine its accuracy and limitations in the off-nadir mode. The results will be useful for constraining the use of the passive retrieval data in models and for improving the accuracy of the retrievals.

  9. Toward understanding of differences in current cloud retrievals of ARM ground-based measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao C.; Dunn M.; Xie, S.; Klein, S. A.; Protat, A.; Shupe, M. D.; McFarlane, S. A.; Comstock, J. M.; Delanoë, J.; Deng, M.; Hogan, R. J.; Huang, D.; Jensen, M. P.; Mace, G. G.; McCoy, R.; O’Connor, E. J.; Turner, D. D.; Wang, Z.

    2012-05-30

    Accurate observations of cloud microphysical properties are needed for evaluating and improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models and better estimate of the Earth radiative budget. However, large differences are found in current cloud products retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements using various retrieval algorithms. Understanding the differences is an important step to address uncertainties in the cloud retrievals. In this study, an in-depth analysis of nine existing ground-based cloud retrievals using ARM remote sensing measurements is carried out. We place emphasis on boundary layer overcast clouds and high level ice clouds, which are the focus of many current retrieval development efforts due to their radiative importance and relatively simple structure. Large systematic discrepancies in cloud microphysical properties are found in these two types of clouds among the nine cloud retrieval products, particularly for the cloud liquid and ice particle effective radius. Note that the differences among some retrieval products are even larger than the prescribed uncertainties reported by the retrieval algorithm developers. It is shown that most of these large differences have their roots in the retrieval theoretical bases, assumptions, as well as input and constraint parameters. This study suggests the need to further validate current retrieval theories and assumptions and even the development of new retrieval algorithms with more observations under different cloud regimes.

  10. Cloud based, Open Source Software Application for Mitigating Herbicide Drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswat, D.; Scott, B.

    2014-12-01

    The spread of herbicide resistant weeds has resulted in the need for clearly marked fields. In response to this need, the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service launched a program named Flag the Technology in 2011. This program uses color-coded flags as a visual alert of the herbicide trait technology within a farm field. The flag based program also serves to help avoid herbicide misapplication and prevent herbicide drift damage between fields with differing crop technologies. This program has been endorsed by Southern Weed Science Society of America and is attracting interest from across the USA, Canada, and Australia. However, flags have risk of misplacement or disappearance due to mischief or severe windstorms/thunderstorms, respectively. This presentation will discuss the design and development of a cloud-based, free application utilizing open-source technologies, called Flag the Technology Cloud (FTTCloud), for allowing agricultural stakeholders to color code their farm fields for indicating herbicide resistant technologies. The developed software utilizes modern web development practices, widely used design technologies, and basic geographic information system (GIS) based interactive interfaces for representing, color-coding, searching, and visualizing fields. This program has also been made compatible for a wider usability on different size devices- smartphones, tablets, desktops and laptops.

  11. UAV based tree height estimation in apple orchards: potential of multiple approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Aguilar, Abraham; Tomelleri, Enrico; Vilardi, Andrea; Zebisch, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Canopy height, as part of vegetation structure, is ecologically important for ecological studies on biomass, matter flows or meteorology. Measuring the growth of canopy can be undertaken by the use multiple remote sensing techniques. In this study, we firstly use data generated from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) with a simultaneous consumer-grade RGB and modified IR cameras, configured in nadir and multi-angle views to generate 3D models for Digital Surface Model (DSM) and Digital Terrain Models (DTM) in order to estimate tree height in apple orchards in South Tyrol, Italy. We evaluate the use of Ground Control Points (GCP) to minimize the error in scale and orientation. Then, we validate and compare the results of our primary data collection with data generated by geolocated field measurements over several selected tree species. Additionally, we compare DSM and DTM obtained from a recent 1-meter resolution LIDAR campaign (Light Detection and Ranging). The main purpose of this study is to contrast multiple estimation approaches and evaluate their utility for the estimation of canopy height, highlighting the use of UAV systems as a fast, reliable and non-expensive technique especially for small scale applications. The study is conducted in a homogenous tree canopy consisting of apple orchards located in Caldaro -South Tyrol, Italy. We end with proposing a potential low-cost and inexpensive application combining models for DSM from the UAV with DTM obtained from LIDAR for applications that should be updated frequently.

  12. Entrainment and mixing mechanism in monsoon clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Sudarsan; Prabhakaran, Thara; Pandithurai, Govindan; Brenguier, Jean-Louis

    2015-04-01

    Entrainment and consequent mixing impacts the cloud microphysical parameters and droplet size distribution (DSD) significantly which are very important for cloud radiative properties and the mechanism for first rain drop formation. The entrainment and mixing mechanisms are investigated in this study using in situ observations in warm cumulus clouds over monsoon region. Entrainment is discussed in the framework of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous mixing concepts and their effects on cloud droplet size distribution, number concentration, liquid water content and mean radius are described. The degree of homogeneity increases with droplet number concentration and adiabatic fraction, indicating homogeneous type mixing in the cloud core where dilution is less. Inhomogeneous mixing is found to be a dominating process at cloud edges where dilution is significant. Cloud droplet size distribution (DSD) is found to shift towards lower sizes during a homogeneous mixing event in the cloud core whereas spectral width of DSD decreases due to inhomogeneous mixing at cloud edges. Droplet size spectra suggests that largest droplets are mainly formed in the less diluted cloud core while diluted cloud edges have relatively smaller droplets, so that raindrop formation occurs mainly in the core of the cloud. The origin of the entrained parcels in deep cumulus clouds is investigated using conservative thermodynamical parameters. The entrained parcels originate from a level close to the observation level or slightly below through lateral edges. Cloud edges are significantly diluted due to entrainment of sub-saturated environmental air which can penetrate several hundred meters inside the cloud before it gets mixed completely with the cloud mass. Less diluted parcels inside the cloud core originates from a level much below the cloud base height. Penetrating downdraft from cloud top is seldom observed at the observation level and strong downdrafts may be attributed to in-cloud oscillation of parcels.

  13. An expert fitness diagnosis system based on elastic cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kevin C; Wu, Chia-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an expert diagnosis system based on cloud computing. It classifies a user's fitness level based on supervised machine learning techniques. This system is able to learn and make customized diagnoses according to the user's physiological data, such as age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). In addition, an elastic algorithm based on Poisson distribution is presented to allocate computation resources dynamically. It predicts the required resources in the future according to the exponential moving average of past observations. The experimental results show that Naïve Bayes is the best classifier with the highest accuracy (90.8%) and that the elastic algorithm is able to capture tightly the trend of requests generated from the Internet and thus assign corresponding computation resources to ensure the quality of service. PMID:24723842

  14. A cloud computing based 12-lead ECG telemedicine service

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the great variability of 12-lead ECG instruments and medical specialists’ interpretation skills, it remains a challenge to deliver rapid and accurate 12-lead ECG reports with senior cardiologists’ decision making support in emergency telecardiology. Methods We create a new cloud and pervasive computing based 12-lead Electrocardiography (ECG) service to realize ubiquitous 12-lead ECG tele-diagnosis. Results This developed service enables ECG to be transmitted and interpreted via mobile phones. That is, tele-consultation can take place while the patient is on the ambulance, between the onsite clinicians and the off-site senior cardiologists, or among hospitals. Most importantly, this developed service is convenient, efficient, and inexpensive. Conclusions This cloud computing based ECG tele-consultation service expands the traditional 12-lead ECG applications onto the collaboration of clinicians at different locations or among hospitals. In short, this service can greatly improve medical service quality and efficiency, especially for patients in rural areas. This service has been evaluated and proved to be useful by cardiologists in Taiwan. PMID:22838382

  15. Three-dimensional geospatial information service based on cloud computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xi; Yue, Peng; Jiang, Liangcun; Wang, Linnan

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing technologies can support high-performance geospatial services in various domains, such as smart city and agriculture. Apache Hadoop, an open-source software framework, can be used to build a cloud environment on commodity clusters for storage and large-scale processing of data sets. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web 3-D Service (W3DS) is a portrayal service for three-dimensional (3-D) geospatial data. Its performance could be improved by cloud computing technologies. This paper investigates how OGC W3DS could be developed in a cloud computing environment. It adopts the Apache Hadoop as the framework to provide a cloud implementation. The design and implementation of the 3-D geospatial information cloud service is presented. The performance evaluation is performed over data retrieval tests running in a cloud platform built by Hadoop clusters. The evaluation results provide a valuable reference on providing high-performance 3-D geospatial information cloud services.

  16. Interactive Physically-Based Cloud Simulation Derek Overby

    E-print Network

    Keyser, John

    @neo.tamu.edu Texas A&M University College Station, TX John Keyser keyser@cs.tamu.edu Abstract Artificial clouds play, cloud structure has been generated by ei- ther procedural or fractal methods[12]. While these meth- ods

  17. Cloud-screening for Africa using a geographically and seasonally variable infrared threshold

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. F. ECK; V. L. KALB

    1991-01-01

    A spatially variable monthly, infrared cloud-threshold data base has been applied to screen cloud-contaminated observations from radiances measured by the NOAA-9 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) over Africa. The infrared threshold for cloud identification was based on the method of Stowe et al. (1988) developed to retreive cloud amount and height from measurements made onboard the Nimbus-7 satellite, which

  18. An Aircraft And Radar Based Analysis Of Cloud And Precipitation Microphysics In Mid-Latitude Continental Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Kumjian, M.; Bansemer, A.; Giangrande, S. E.; Ryzhkov, A.; Toto, T.

    2014-12-01

    An observational analysis of precipitation microphysics was conducted using data obtained during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) that took place around the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Lamont, Oklahoma from April 22- June 6, 2011. MC3E was a collaborative campaign led by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission and the U.S. Department of Energy ARM program. MC3E provided a unique opportunity to compare in-situ data from aircraft based microphysical probes with data from polarimetric radars in the radar bright band region or melting layer. One of the primary objectives of this study was to understand how riming and aggregation affect polarimetric signatures. In depth case study analysis of cloud and precipitation microphysics was performed for two specific cases, April 27th, 2011 (A27) and May 20th, 2011 (M20). Both these cases provided coincident aircraft and radar data in extensive stratiform cloud regions. Measurements from the University of North Dakota (UND) Citation aircraft and polarimetric data from the ARM CSAPR data reveal interesting details of cloud scale processes. Observations based on data from cloud probes (2DC, CIP and HVPS) along with in-situ observations of environmental variables provide remarkable details of particle growth and cloud dynamics for both case studies. For the A27 case study, UND aircraft measurements from two successive spiral profiles through the stratiform cloud region showed a transition from a riming dominated region to an aggregation dominated region. This is supported by polarimetric data from the C-Band ARM Precipitation Radar (CSAPR ). An extensive region of trailing stratiform precipitation was sampled in the M20 case study, where the aggregation, melting, and evaporation processes were measured in detail with the in-situ microphysical instruments. Latest findings from MC3E based on this combined aircraft and polarimetric radar study will be presented at the conference.

  19. Web-Based Self-Reported Height, Weight, and Body Mass Index Among Swedish Adolescents: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Kull, Inger; Nilsson, Sara; Bergström, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Web-collected height and weight are increasingly used in epidemiological studies; however, the validity has rarely been evaluated. Objective The aim of the study was to validate self-reported height, weight, and corresponding body mass index (BMI) among Swedish adolescents aged approximately 16 years. A secondary aim was to investigate possible prediction factors for validity of self-reported BMI. Methods The study included 1698 adolescents from the population-based cohort BAMSE. Height and weight were collected through a Web-based questionnaire and subsequently measured using standard procedures. Differences between reported and measured height, weight, and corresponding BMI were compared by t tests and agreement was evaluated by Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman plots. Multivariable linear regression analysis was used to investigate whether lifestyle and demographic factors predicted validity of self-reported BMI. Results On average, weight was underestimated by 1.1 kg and height was overestimated by 0.5 cm, leading to an underestimation of BMI by 0.5 kg/m2. Correlation coefficients were .98 for height, .97 for weight, and .94 for BMI, and highly significant. Females underestimated weight to a higher extent than males and overweight and obese participants underestimated weight to a higher extent than normal-weight participants, which resulted in higher underestimation of BMI. Underweight participants, on the contrary, overestimated weight and correspondingly BMI. Overall, a high proportion of participants were classified into the correct BMI category; however, among overweight and obese participants, only 60.2% (139/231) and 46% (20/44) were correctly classified, respectively. In the multivariable prediction model, only gender and BMI status significantly predicted discrepancy between reported and measured BMI. Conclusions Web-collected BMI may be used as a valid, quick, and cost-effective alternative to measured BMI among Swedish adolescents. The accuracy of self-reported BMI declines with increasing BMI and self-reported BMI should not be used to estimate the prevalence of overweight or obesity. PMID:25791395

  20. A High Resolution Hydrometer Phase Classifier Based on Analysis of Cloud Radar Doppler Spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Luke,E.; Kollias, P.

    2007-08-06

    The lifecycle and radiative properties of clouds are highly sensitive to the phase of their hydrometeors (i.e., liquid or ice). Knowledge of cloud phase is essential for specifying the optical properties of clouds, or else, large errors can be introduced in the calculation of the cloud radiative fluxes. Current parameterizations of cloud water partition in liquid and ice based on temperature are characterized by large uncertainty (Curry et al., 1996; Hobbs and Rangno, 1998; Intriery et al., 2002). This is particularly important in high geographical latitudes and temperature ranges where both liquid droplets and ice crystal phases can exist (mixed-phase cloud). The mixture of phases has a large effect on cloud radiative properties, and the parameterization of mixed-phase clouds has a large impact on climate simulations (e.g., Gregory and Morris, 1996). Furthermore, the presence of both ice and liquid affects the macroscopic properties of clouds, including their propensity to precipitate. Despite their importance, mixed-phase clouds are severely understudied compared to the arguably simpler single-phase clouds. In-situ measurements in mixed-phase clouds are hindered due to aircraft icing, difficulties distinguishing hydrometeor phase, and discrepancies in methods for deriving physical quantities (Wendisch et al. 1996, Lawson et al. 2001). Satellite-based retrievals of cloud phase in high latitudes are often hindered by the highly reflecting ice-covered ground and persistent temperature inversions. From the ground, the retrieval of mixed-phase cloud properties has been the subject of extensive research over the past 20 years using polarization lidars (e.g., Sassen et al. 1990), dual radar wavelengths (e.g., Gosset and Sauvageot 1992; Sekelsky and McIntosh, 1996), and recently radar Doppler spectra (Shupe et al. 2004). Millimeter-wavelength radars have substantially improved our ability to observe non-precipitating clouds (Kollias et al., 2007) due to their excellent sensitivity that enables the detection of thin cloud layers and their ability to penetrate several non-precipitating cloud layers. However, in mixed-phase clouds conditions, the observed Doppler moments are dominated by the highly reflecting ice crystals and thus can not be used to identify the cloud phase. This limits our ability to identify the spatial distribution of cloud phase and our ability to identify the conditions under which mixed-phase clouds form.

  1. Study of Cloud Computing Security Based on Private Face Recognition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chenguang Wang; Huaizhi Yan

    2010-01-01

    Supporting study of a method to solve cloud computing security issue with private face recognition. The method has three parts: user part provides face images; cloud initialization part has a face subspace and templates database; cloud private matching identification part contains the core algorithm of the method, comparing two encrypted numbers under double-encrypted conditions. The experimental results show the method

  2. Cloud Security Service Providing Schemes Based on Mobile Internet Framework

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lian-chi Zhou; Chun-di Xiu

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the issues about dynamic cloud security services in mobile internet framework, where some important differences compared with traditional cloud security service exist, such as the complexity, mobility, openness and instability of the user groups. In view of these features, different enterprises and users may have different demands for cloud security services. Therefore, in order to provide

  3. Cloud-Based Design and Manufacturing: Status and Promise

    E-print Network

    Schaefer Abstract The information technology industry has benefited considerably from cloud computing by globalization, cloud computing is one of the major advances in the field of computing. In recent years, the information tech- nology (IT) sector has significantly benefited from cloud computing through (1) on

  4. Data Mining of Mass Storage Based on Cloud Computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianzong Wang; Jiguang Wan; Zhuo Liu; Peng Wang

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is an elastic computing model that the users can lease the resources from the rentable infrastructure. Cloud computing is gaining popularity due to its lower cost, high reliability and huge availability. To utilize the powerful and huge capability of cloud computing, this paper is to import it into data mining and machine learning field. As one of the

  5. The Open Cloud Testbed: Supporting Open Source Cloud Computing Systems Based on Large Scale High Performance, Dynamic Network Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Robert; Gu, Yunhong; Sabala, Michal; Bennet, Colin; Seidman, Jonathan; Mambratti, Joe

    Recently, a number of cloud platforms and services have been developed for data intensive computing, including Hadoop, Sector, CloudStore (formerly KFS), HBase, and Thrift. In order to benchmark the performance of these systems, to investigate their interoperability, and to experiment with new services based on flexible compute node and network provisioning capabilities, we have designed and implemented a large scale testbed called the Open Cloud Testbed (OCT). Currently OCT has 120 nodes in 4 data centers: Baltimore, Chicago (two locations), and San Diego. In contrast to other cloud testbeds, which are in small geographic areas and which are based on commodity Internet services, the OCT is a wide area testbed and the 4 data centers are connected with a high performance 10Gb/s network, based on a foundation of dedicated lightpaths. This testbed can address the requirements of extremely large data streams that challenge other types of distributed infrastructure. We have also developed several utilities to support the development of cloud computing systems and services, including novel node and network provisioning services, a monitoring system, and an RPC system. In this paper, we describe the OCT concepts, architecture, infrastructure, a few benchmarks that were developed for this platform, interoperability studies, and results.

  6. Video-Based Point Cloud Generation Using Multiple Action Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, T.

    2015-05-01

    Due to the development of action cameras, the use of video technology for collecting geo-spatial data becomes an important trend. The objective of this study is to compare the image-mode and video-mode of multiple action cameras for 3D point clouds generation. Frame images are acquired from discrete camera stations while videos are taken from continuous trajectories. The proposed method includes five major parts: (1) camera calibration, (2) video conversion and alignment, (3) orientation modelling, (4) dense matching, and (5) evaluation. As the action cameras usually have large FOV in wide viewing mode, camera calibration plays an important role to calibrate the effect of lens distortion before image matching. Once the camera has been calibrated, the author use these action cameras to take video in an indoor environment. The videos are further converted into multiple frame images based on the frame rates. In order to overcome the time synchronous issues in between videos from different viewpoints, an additional timer APP is used to determine the time shift factor between cameras in time alignment. A structure form motion (SfM) technique is utilized to obtain the image orientations. Then, semi-global matching (SGM) algorithm is adopted to obtain dense 3D point clouds. The preliminary results indicated that the 3D points from 4K video are similar to 12MP images, but the data acquisition performance of 4K video is more efficient than 12MP digital images.

  7. Geometric data perturbation-based personal health record transactions in cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, S; Kavitha, V

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new delivery model for information technology services and it typically involves the provision of dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources over the Internet. However, cloud computing raises concerns on how cloud service providers, user organizations, and governments should handle such information and interactions. Personal health records represent an emerging patient-centric model for health information exchange, and they are outsourced for storage by third parties, such as cloud providers. With these records, it is necessary for each patient to encrypt their own personal health data before uploading them to cloud servers. Current techniques for encryption primarily rely on conventional cryptographic approaches. However, key management issues remain largely unsolved with these cryptographic-based encryption techniques. We propose that personal health record transactions be managed using geometric data perturbation in cloud computing. In our proposed scheme, the personal health record database is perturbed using geometric data perturbation and outsourced to the Amazon EC2 cloud. PMID:25767826

  8. Measuring effective leaf area index, foliage profile, and stand height in New England forest stands using a full-waveform ground-based lidar

    E-print Network

    Ni-Meister, Wenge

    Measuring effective leaf area index, foliage profile, and stand height in New England forest stands leaf area index (LAI) retrievals from a scanning, ground-based, near-infrared (1064 nm) lidar). The LAI values also matched published values well. Foliage profiles (leaf area with height) retrieved from

  9. Cloud-property retrieval using merged HIRS and AVHRR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, Bryan A.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Minnis, Patrick; Parker, Lindsay

    1992-01-01

    A technique is developed that uses a multispectral, multiresolution method to improve the overall retrieval of mid- to high-level cloud properties by combining HIRS sounding channel data with higher spatial resolution AVHRR radiometric data collocated with the HIRS footprint. Cirrus cloud radiative and physical properties are determined using satellite data, surface-based measurements provided by rawinsondes and lidar, and aircraft-based lidar data collected during the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program Regional Experiment in Wisconsin during the months of October and November 1986. HIRS cloud-height retrievals are compared to ground-based lidar and aircraft lidar when possible. Retrieved cloud heights are found to have close agreement with lidar for thin cloud, but are higher than lidar for optically thick cloud. The results of the reflectance-emittance relationships derived are compared to theoretical scattering model results for both water-droplet spheres and randomly oriented hexagonal ice crystals. It is found that the assumption of 10-micron water droplets is inadequate to describe the reflectance-emittance relationship for the ice clouds seen here. Use of this assumption would lead to lower cloud heights using the ISCCP approach. The theoretical results show that use of hexagonal ice crystal phase functions could lead to much improved results for cloud retrieval algorithms using a bispectral approach.

  10. Forecasting maximum wave height at selected sites based on high resolution hindcast modeling and local adaptation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogeri, Christina; Galanis, George; Kallos, George

    2014-05-01

    Extreme wave heights play a major role in many deep offshore and coastal activities today. As a result, it is of significant importance to understand and accurately simulate their behavior. The lack of a dense in-situ and remote sensing observational network implies non trivial difficulties in this framework. A way out can be given by the utilization of high resolution third generation spectral wave models that incorporate advanced formulations for the estimation of maximum wave height conditions along with local adaptation techniques which can simulate in a credible way the non-frequent values for a specific area. For this study, a 10-year (2001-2010) hourly high resolution dataset of the main metocean parameters that covers the entire European coastline with a resolution of 5km, developed by the Atmospheric Modeling and Weather Forecasting Group of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in the framework of the FP7 project MARINA Platform (http://www.marina-platform.info/index.aspx) was utilized. The hindcast wave data, based on the latest version of the wave model WAM, in conjunction with non-conventional statistical methods and available buoy measurements for selected locations in the Spanish coastline formed an integrated system able to provide accurate maximum wave height estimations taking into consideration the climatological characteristics of the area.

  11. Predicting within-family variability in juvenile height growth of Salix based upon similarity among parental AFLP fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Kopp, F.; Smart, B.; Maynard, A.; Tuskan, A.; Abrahamson, P.

    2002-07-01

    Willow is being developed as a crop for biomass plantations in the Northeast and North-central United States, but has only recently been the subject of controlled breeding to generate improved genotypes. Maximizing variability among progeny within full-sib families produced by controlled pollination may increase the probability of producing willow clones exhibiting desirable extreme phenotypes. Yet, predicting combinations of parents yielding highly variable progeny is not currently possible. Controlled pollinations were completed among 15 Salix eriocephala clones and the resulting progeny were vegetatively propagated and planted in a greenhouse progeny test. Heights of rooted cuttings were measured after 4 months of growth. Genetic similarity among parents was estimated based on 77 polymorphic AFLP bands. Strong negative correlation ( r = -0.88) was detected between mean female-parent similarity indices and the standard deviation of height among half-sib progeny from those females. Parent combinations that had relatively low similarity indices tended to produce progeny that had greater variability in height. This negative relationship suggests that AFLP fingerprints of S. eriocephala parents may be useful for predicting parent combinations that will yield families with large variability. PMID:12582568

  12. Remote Sensing of Cloud Properties using Ground-based Measurements of Zenith Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, J. Christine; Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Barker, Howard W.; Barnard, James C.; Luo, Yi

    2006-01-01

    An extensive verification of cloud property retrievals has been conducted for two algorithms using zenith radiances measured by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program ground-based passive two-channel (673 and 870 nm) Narrow Field-Of-View Radiometer. The underlying principle of these algorithms is that clouds have nearly identical optical properties at these wavelengths, but corresponding spectral surface reflectances (for vegetated surfaces) differ significantly. The first algorithm, the RED vs. NIR, works for a fully three-dimensional cloud situation. It retrieves not only cloud optical depth, but also an effective radiative cloud fraction. Importantly, due to one-second time resolution of radiance measurements, we are able, for the first time, to capture detailed changes in cloud structure at the natural time scale of cloud evolution. The cloud optical depths tau retrieved by this algorithm are comparable to those inferred from both downward fluxes in overcast situations and microwave brightness temperatures for broken clouds. Moreover, it can retrieve tau for thin patchy clouds, where flux and microwave observations fail to detect them. The second algorithm, referred to as COUPLED, couples zenith radiances with simultaneous fluxes to infer 2. In general, the COUPLED and RED vs. NIR algorithms retrieve consistent values of tau. However, the COUPLED algorithm is more sensitive to the accuracies of measured radiance, flux, and surface reflectance than the RED vs. NIR algorithm. This is especially true for thick overcast clouds where it may substantially overestimate z.

  13. Study and Application on Cloud Covered Rate for Agroclimatical Distribution Using In Guangxi Based on Modis Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xin Yang; Shiquan Zhong; Han Sun; Zongkun Tan; Zheng Li; Meihua Ding

    2009-01-01

    \\u000a Based on analyzing of the physical characteristics of cloud and importance of cloud in agricultural production and national\\u000a economy, cloud is a very important climatic resources such as temperature, precipitation and solar radiation. Cloud plays\\u000a a very important role in agricultural climate division .This paper analyzes methods of cloud detection based on MODIS data\\u000a in China and Abroad . The

  14. Privacy-Preserving Data Publish-Subscribe Service on Cloud-based Platforms

    E-print Network

    of privacy-preserving data publish- subscribe service by refining its security requirements on cloud- based1 Privacy-Preserving Data Publish-Subscribe Service on Cloud-based Platforms Kan Yang, Xiaohua Jia policy in a privacy-preserving way. The security analysis and performance evaluation show that the PDPS

  15. The Effects of Latency on Player Performance in Cloud-based Games

    E-print Network

    Claypool, Mark

    The Effects of Latency on Player Performance in Cloud-based Games Mark Claypool and David Finkel Computer Science and Interactive Media & Game Development Worcester Polytechnic Institute Worcester, MA, USA Email: {claypool,dfinkel}@cs.wpi.edu Abstract--Cloud-based games are an increasingly popular

  16. CloudAnalyst: A CloudSim-Based Visual Modeller for Analysing Cloud Computing Environments and Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bhathiya Wickremasinghe; Rodrigo N. Calheiros; Rajkumar Buyya

    2010-01-01

    Abstract—Advances in Cloud computing opens up many new possibilities for Internet applications developers. Previously, a main,concern of Internet applications developers was deployment and hosting of applications, because it required acquisition of a server with a fixed capacity able to handle the expected application peak demand and the installation and maintenance of the whole software infrastructure of the platform supporting the

  17. Cloud based toolbox for image analysis, processing and reconstruction tasks.

    PubMed

    Bednarz, Tomasz; Wang, Dadong; Arzhaeva, Yulia; Lagerstrom, Ryan; Vallotton, Pascal; Burdett, Neil; Khassapov, Alex; Szul, Piotr; Chen, Shiping; Sun, Changming; Domanski, Luke; Thompson, Darren; Gureyev, Timur; Taylor, John A

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes a novel way of carrying out image analysis, reconstruction and processing tasks using cloud based service provided on the Australian National eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources (NeCTAR) infrastructure. The toolbox allows users free access to a wide range of useful blocks of functionalities (imaging functions) that can be connected together in workflows allowing creation of even more complex algorithms that can be re-run on different data sets, shared with others or additionally adjusted. The functions given are in the area of cellular imaging, advanced X-ray image analysis, computed tomography and 3D medical imaging and visualisation. The service is currently available on the website www.cloudimaging.net.au . PMID:25381109

  18. An improved approach for flow-based cloud point extraction.

    PubMed

    Frizzarin, Rejane M; Rocha, Fábio R P

    2014-04-11

    Novel strategies are proposed to circumvent the main drawbacks of flow-based cloud point extraction (CPE). The surfactant-rich phase (SRP) was directly retained into the optical path of the spectrophotometric cell, thus avoiding its dilution previously to the measurement and yielding higher sensitivity. Solenoid micro-pumps were exploited to improve mixing by the pulsed flow and also to modulate the flow-rate for retention and removal of the SRP, thus avoiding the elution step, often carried out with organic solvents. The heat released and the increase of the salt concentration provided by an on-line neutralization reaction were exploited to induce the cloud point without an external heating device. These innovations were demonstrated by the spectrophotometric determination of iron, yielding a linear response from 10 to 200 ?g L(-1) with a coefficient of variation of 2.3% (n=7). Detection limit and sampling rate were estimated at 5 ?g L(-1) (95% confidence level) and 26 samples per hour, respectively. The enrichment factor was 8.9 and the procedure consumed only 6 ?g of TAN and 390 ?g of Triton X-114 per determination. At the 95% confidence level, the results obtained for freshwater samples agreed with the reference procedure and those obtained for digests of bovine muscle, rice flour, brown bread and tort lobster agreed with the certified reference values. The proposed procedure thus shows advantages in relation to previously proposed approaches for flow-based CPE, being a fast and environmental friendly alternative for on-line separation and pre-concentration. PMID:24745739

  19. A comparison of observations in the tropical western Pacific from ground-based and satellite millimeter-wavelength cloud radars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zheng Liu; Roger Marchand; Thomas Ackerman

    2010-01-01

    Millimeter-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR) can provide information on the vertical structure of cloud fields and thereby improve our understanding of the spatial distribution of clouds and their role in the climate system. Here we consider the representativeness of ground-based vertically pointing MMCR observations, which have been used in numerous climate studies. MMCR cloud statistics collected at Darwin, Australia, are compared

  20. Analysis of Two Triangle-Based Multi-Surface Registration Algorithms of Irregular Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Durgham, M.; Detchev, I.; Habib, A.

    2011-09-01

    The registration of multiple surface point clouds into a common reference frame is a well addressed topic, and the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) is - perhaps - the most used method when registering laser scans due to their irregular nature. In this paper, we examine the proposed Iterative Closest Projected Point (ICPP) algorithm for the simultaneous registration of multiple point clouds. First, a point to triangular patch (i.e. closest three points) match is established by checking if the point falls within the triangular dipyramid, which has the three triangular patch points as a base and a user-chosen normal distance as the height to establish the two peaks. Then, the point is projected onto the patch surface, and its projection is then used as a match for the original point. It is also shown through empirical experimentation that the Delaunay triangles are not a requirement for establishing matches. In fact, Delaunay triangles in some scenarios may force blunders into the final solution, while using the closest three points leads to avoiding some undesired erroneous points. In addition, we review the algorithm by which the ICPP is inspired, namely, the Iterative Closest Patch (ICPatch); where conjugate point-patch pairs are extracted in the overlapping surface areas, and the transformation parameters between all neighbouring surfaces are estimated in a pairwise manner. Then, using the conjugate point-patch pairs, and applying the transformation parameters from the pairwise registration as initial approximations, the final surface transformation parameters are solved for simultaneously. Finally, we evaluate the assumptions made and examine the performance of the new algorithm against the ICPatch.

  1. Cloud-based large-scale air traffic flow optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi

    The ever-increasing traffic demand makes the efficient use of airspace an imperative mission, and this paper presents an effort in response to this call. Firstly, a new aggregate model, called Link Transmission Model (LTM), is proposed, which models the nationwide traffic as a network of flight routes identified by origin-destination pairs. The traversal time of a flight route is assumed to be the mode of distribution of historical flight records, and the mode is estimated by using Kernel Density Estimation. As this simplification abstracts away physical trajectory details, the complexity of modeling is drastically decreased, resulting in efficient traffic forecasting. The predicative capability of LTM is validated against recorded traffic data. Secondly, a nationwide traffic flow optimization problem with airport and en route capacity constraints is formulated based on LTM. The optimization problem aims at alleviating traffic congestions with minimal global delays. This problem is intractable due to millions of variables. A dual decomposition method is applied to decompose the large-scale problem such that the subproblems are solvable. However, the whole problem is still computational expensive to solve since each subproblem is an smaller integer programming problem that pursues integer solutions. Solving an integer programing problem is known to be far more time-consuming than solving its linear relaxation. In addition, sequential execution on a standalone computer leads to linear runtime increase when the problem size increases. To address the computational efficiency problem, a parallel computing framework is designed which accommodates concurrent executions via multithreading programming. The multithreaded version is compared with its monolithic version to show decreased runtime. Finally, an open-source cloud computing framework, Hadoop MapReduce, is employed for better scalability and reliability. This framework is an "off-the-shelf" parallel computing model that can be used for both offline historical traffic data analysis and online traffic flow optimization. It provides an efficient and robust platform for easy deployment and implementation. A small cloud consisting of five workstations was configured and used to demonstrate the advantages of cloud computing in dealing with large-scale parallelizable traffic problems.

  2. Climatology of Warm Boundary Layer Clouds at the ARM SGP Site and Their Comparison to Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manajit Sengupta; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Thomas P. Ackerman

    2004-01-01

    A 4-yr climatology (1997 2000) of warm boundary layer cloud properties is developed for the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Parameters in the climatology include cloud liquid water path, cloud-base height, and surface solar flux. These parameters are retrieved from measurements produced by a dual-channel microwave radiometer, a millimeter-wave cloud radar,

  3. Analysis of cloud-based solutions on EHRs systems in different scenarios.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cardeñosa, Gonzalo; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Rodrigues, Joel J P C

    2012-12-01

    Nowadays with the growing of the wireless connections people can access all the resources hosted in the Cloud almost everywhere. In this context, organisms can take advantage of this fact, in terms of e-Health, deploying Cloud-based solutions on e-Health services. In this paper two Cloud-based solutions for different scenarios of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) management system are proposed. We have researched articles published between the years 2005 and 2011 about the implementation of e-Health services based on the Cloud in Medline. In order to analyze the best scenario for the deployment of Cloud Computing two solutions for a large Hospital and a network of Primary Care Health centers have been studied. Economic estimation of the cost of the implementation for both scenarios has been done via the Amazon calculator tool. As a result of this analysis two solutions are suggested depending on the scenario: To deploy a Cloud solution for a large Hospital a typical Cloud solution in which are hired just the needed services has been assumed. On the other hand to work with several Primary Care Centers it's suggested the implementation of a network, which interconnects these centers with just one Cloud environment. Finally it's considered the fact of deploying a hybrid solution: in which EHRs with images will be hosted in the Hospital or Primary Care Centers and the rest of them will be migrated to the Cloud. PMID:22492177

  4. The Cloud Detection and Ultraviolet Monitoring Experiment (CLUE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbier, Louis M.; Loh, Eugene C.; Krizmanic, John F.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Streitmatter, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new balloon instrument - CLUE - which is designed to monitor ultraviolet (uv) nightglow levels and determine cloud cover and cloud heights with a CO2 slicing technique. The CO2 slicing technique is based on the MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua and Terra spacecraft. CLUE will provide higher spatial resolution (0.5 km) and correlations between the uv and the cloud cover.

  5. Distinguishing cirrus cloud presence in autonomous lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. R.; Vaughan, M. A.; Oo, M.; Holz, R. E.; Lewis, J. R.; Welton, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    2012 Level-2 Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite-based cloud data sets are investigated for thresholds that distinguish the presence of cirrus clouds in autonomous lidar measurements, based on temperatures, heights, optical depth and phase. A thermal threshold, proposed by Sassen and Campbell (2001) for cloud top temperature Ttop ? -37 °C, is evaluated versus CALIOP algorithms that identify ice-phase cloud layers using polarized backscatter measurements. Derived global mean cloud top heights (11.15 vs. 10.07 km above mean sea level; a.m.s.l.), base heights (8.76 km a.m.s.l. vs. 7.95 km a.m.s.l.), temperatures (-58.48 °C vs. -52.18 °C and -42.40 °C vs. -38.13 °C, respectively, for tops and bases) and optical depths (1.18 vs. 1.23) reflect the sensitivity to this constraint. Over 99 % of all Ttop ? -37 °C clouds are classified as ice by CALIOP Level-2 algorithms. Over 81 % of all ice clouds correspond with Ttop ? -37 °C. For instruments lacking polarized measurements, and thus practical estimates of phase, Ttop ? -37 °C provides sufficient justification for distinguishing cirrus, as opposed to the risks of glaciated liquid-water cloud contamination occurring in a given sample from clouds identified at relatively "warm" (Ttop > -37 °C) temperatures. Although accounting for uncertainties in temperatures collocated with lidar data (i.e., model reanalyses/sondes) may justifiably relax the threshold to include warmer cases, the ambiguity of "warm" ice clouds cannot be fully reconciled with available measurements, conspicuously including phase. Cloud top heights and optical depths are investigated, and global distributions and frequencies derived, as functions of CALIOP-retrieved phase. These data provide little additional information, compared with temperature alone, and may exacerbate classification uncertainties overall.

  6. Study and Application on Cloud Covered Rate for Agroclimatical Distribution Using In Guangxi Based on Modis Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Zhong, Shiquan; Sun, Han; Tan, Zongkun; Li, Zheng; Ding, Meihua

    Based on analyzing of the physical characteristics of cloud and importance of cloud in agricultural production and national economy, cloud is a very important climatic resources such as temperature, precipitation and solar radiation. Cloud plays a very important role in agricultural climate division .This paper analyzes methods of cloud detection based on MODIS data in China and Abroad . The results suggest that Quanjun He method is suitable to detect cloud in Guangxi. State chart of cloud cover in Guangxi is imaged by using Quanjun He method .We find out the approach of calculating cloud covered rate by using the frequency spectrum analysis. At last, the Guangxi is obtained. Taking Rongxian County Guangxi as an example, this article analyze the preliminary application of cloud covered rate in distribution of Rong Shaddock pomelo . Analysis results indicate that cloud covered rate is closely related to quality of Rong Shaddock pomelo.

  7. Essentials for CSPs to Succeed with Cloud-based Services

    E-print Network

    or considering entry into the cloud services marketplace, there is good news. Of all the players in the nascent marketplace. Cloud computing delivers common ground among application developers, enterprises, suppliers. Industries that have embraced this concept include consumer electronics, media and entertainment, healthcare

  8. Analysis on Cloud-Based Security Vulnerability Assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huan-Chung Li; Po-Huei Liang; Jiann-Min Yang; Shiang-Jiun Chen

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing delivery model can significantly reduce enterprise IT costs and complexities. This technology can handle the rapidly gowning environment and provide more flexible resources sharing and hence it has become as anew information technology infrastructure recently. In contrast to traditional enterprise IT solution, cloud computing moves the application software and databases to the servers in large data centers which

  9. A Semantic Based Policy Management Framework for Cloud Computing Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takabi, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing paradigm has gained tremendous momentum and generated intensive interest. Although security issues are delaying its fast adoption, cloud computing is an unstoppable force and we need to provide security mechanisms to ensure its secure adoption. In this dissertation, we mainly focus on issues related to policy management and access…

  10. Forest height estimation from mountain forest areas using general model-based decomposition for polarimetric interferometric synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Nghia Pham; Zou, Bin; Cai, Hongjun; Wang, Chengyi

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of forest parameters over mountain forest areas using polarimetric interferometric synthetic aperture radar (PolInSAR) images is one of the greatest interests in remote sensing applications. For mountain forest areas, scattering mechanisms are strongly affected by the ground topography variations. Most of the previous studies in modeling microwave backscattering signatures of forest area have been carried out over relatively flat areas. Therefore, a new algorithm for the forest height estimation from mountain forest areas using the general model-based decomposition (GMBD) for PolInSAR image is proposed. This algorithm enables the retrieval of not only the forest parameters, but also the magnitude associated with each mechanism. In addition, general double- and single-bounce scattering models are proposed to fit for the cross-polarization and off-diagonal term by separating their independent orientation angle, which remains unachieved in the previous model-based decompositions. The efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated with simulated data from PolSARProSim software and ALOS-PALSAR spaceborne PolInSAR datasets over the Kalimantan areas, Indonesia. Experimental results indicate that forest height could be effectively estimated by GMBD.

  11. Distinguishing cirrus cloud presence in autonomous lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. R.; Vaughan, M. A.; Oo, M.; Holz, R. E.; Lewis, J. R.; Welton, E. J.

    2014-07-01

    Level 2 Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite-based cloud datasets from 2012 are investigated for metrics that help distinguish the cirrus cloud presence of in autonomous lidar measurements, using temperatures, heights, optical depth and phase. A thermal threshold, proposed by Sassen and Campbell (2001; SC2001) for cloud top temperature Ttop ? -37 °C, is evaluated vs. CALIOP algorithms that identify ice-phase cloud layers alone using depolarized backscatter. Global mean cloud top heights (11.15 vs. 10.07 km a.m.s.l.), base heights (8.76 vs. 7.95 km a.m.s.l.), temperatures (-58.48 °C vs. -52.18 °C and -42.40 °C vs. -38.13 °C, respectively for tops and bases) and optical depths (1.18 vs. 1.23) reflect the sensitivity to these competing constraints. Over 99% of all Ttop ? -37 °C clouds are classified as ice by CALIOP Level 2 algorithms. Over 81% of all ice clouds correspond with Ttop ? -37 °C. For instruments lacking polarized measurements, and thus practical phase estimates, Ttop ? -37 °C proves stable for distinguishing cirrus, as opposed to the risks of glaciated liquid water cloud contamination occurring in a given sample from clouds identified at warmer temperatures. Uncertainties in temperature profiles use to collocate with lidar data (i.e., model reanalyses/sondes) may justifiably relax the Ttop ? -37 °C threshold to include warmer cases. The ambiguity of "warm" (Ttop > -37 °C) ice cloud genus cannot be reconciled completely with available measurements, however, conspicuously including phase. Cloud top heights and optical depths are evaluated as potential constraints, as functions of CALIOP-retrieved phase. However, these data provide, at best, additional constraint in regional samples, compared with temperature alone, and may exacerbate classification uncertainties overall globally.

  12. Adaptive rate control scheme for cross-device handover in cloud based streaming system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sunghee Lee; Kwangsue Chung

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, cloud services have been introduced to the multimedia streaming applications. The advantage of cloud-based streaming service is that users can access multimedia contents from any device that is connected to the Internet. However, it is not easy to guarantee seamless streaming when the display device is switched. To switch streaming service being provided from one device to

  13. Hyrax: Crowdsourcing Mobile Devices to Develop Proximity-Based Mobile Clouds

    E-print Network

    Hyrax: Crowdsourcing Mobile Devices to Develop Proximity-Based Mobile Clouds Chye Liang Vincent Teo computers and servers. In fact, multi-core mobile phones with 1 GHz processors are readily available- ernment or any other entity. #12;Keywords: mobile, cloud, grid, distributed, computing, Hadoop, Android

  14. Aircraft Microphysical and Surface-Based Radar Observations of Summertime Arctic Clouds

    E-print Network

    Zuidema, Paquita

    Aircraft Microphysical and Surface-Based Radar Observations of Summertime Arctic Clouds R. PAUL Updated analyses of in situ microphysical properties of three Arctic cloud systems sampled by aircraft to the North Pole. Radar­aircraft agreement in reflectivity and derived microphysical parameters was reasonably

  15. The research of Cloud Computing based on service plane over optical networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhen Li; Dahai Han; Jie Zhang; Xiuzhong Chen; Wanyi Gu; Yuefeng Ji

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of Cloud Computing over optical networks faces many challenges and opportunities. A cloud computing architecture over optical networks is proposed based on the service plane. And the validity of the architecture we proposed was experimentally demonstrated in our Adaptive Multi-Service Optical Network testbed.

  16. COMBAT: mobile-Cloud-based cOmpute/coMmunications infrastructure for BATtlefield applications

    E-print Network

    Kwon, Minseok "James"

    Heinzelmana aDept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627; b to this explosive growth in data, a substantial increase in mobile compute-capability and the advances in cloud computing. In this paper, we propose the MObile Cloud-based Hybrid Architecture (MOCHA), which formulates

  17. From Desktop to Cloud: A Primer on Internet-Based Computing for Librarians

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Sorensen; Nancy R. Glassman

    2011-01-01

    In the past several years, cloud-based computing has become a major trend for all levels of computer users. This article examines the reasons surrounding this trend. It focuses in particular on how cloud computing is being used by librarians, scientists, and end users. Data storage and sharing, applications, and product development are examples of the growing number of functions finding

  18. CALIOP-derived Smoke Plume Injection Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, A. J.; Winker, D. M.; Choi, H. D.; Fairlie, T. D.; Westberg, D. J.; Roller, C. M.; Pouliot, G.; Vaughan, M.; Pierce, T. E.; Trepte, C. R.; Rao, V.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning is a dominant natural and anthropogenic disturbance that feeds back to the climate system. Fire regimes, ecosystem fuels, fire severity and intensity vary widely, even within the same system, largely under the control of weather and climate. These strongly influence fire plume injection height and thus the transport of related biomass burning emissions, affecting air quality, human health and the climate system. If our knowledge of plume injection height is incorrect, transport models of those emissions will likewise be incorrect, adversely affecting our ability to analyze and predict climate feedbacks (i.e. black carbon to the Arctic, precipitation, cloud-radiation relationships) and public health (air quality forecast). Historically, plume height was based on the pioneering work of G.A. Briggs [1969; 1971] and verified with limited field campaigns. However, we currently have two satellite instruments, Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard CALIPSO (afternoon overpass) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) onboard TERRA (morning overpass), that can provide the statistics necessary to verify our assumptions and improve fire plume injection height estimates for use in both small- and large-scale models. We have developed a methodology to assess fire plume injection height using the Langley Trajectory Model (LaTM), CALIOP, Hazard Mapping System (HMS) smoke plume, and MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) thermal anomaly data that is capable of generating two distinct types of verification data. A single CALIOP smoke-filled aerosol envelop can be traced back to numerous fire events, and using multiple CALIOP transects from numerous days, a daily smoke plume injection height evolution from a single fire can be defined. Additionally, we have linked the smoke plumes to ecosystems and the meteorological variables that define fire weather. In concert, CALIOP and MISR data can produce the statistical knowledge necessary to improve our understanding of the dynamics of fire plume injection height, thus improving our ability to forecast poor air quality and to accurately define smoke feedbacks to climate change.

  19. Height estimation for buildings in monocular satellite\\/airborne images based on fuzzy reasoning and genetic algorithm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammad Izadi; Parvaneh Saeedi

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a height estimation method for buildings with polygonal footprints in monocular satellite\\/airborne images by combining fuzzy reasoning and genetic algorithm. A fitness function is employed using a set of fuzzy rules that assess various height hypothesis candidates for each building. A genetic algorithm is utilized that optimizes the fitness function to recover the most accurate height quickly

  20. Automatic analysis of stereoscopic GOES/GOES and GOES/NOAA image pairs for measurement of hurricane cloud top height and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Strong, J.; Pierce, H.; Woodward, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented from a baseline study using an synthetic stereo image pair to test the Automatic Stereo Analysis (ASA) technique for reproducing cloud top structure. The ASA analysis, display, and calibration procedures are described. A GEO/LEO (GOES/NOAA AVHRR) image pair from Hurrican Allen in 1980 is used to illustrate the results that can be obtained using the ASA technique. Also, results are presented from applying the ASA technique to a GEO/GEO (GOES/GOES) image pair of Hurricane Gilbert in 1988.

  1. Vertical Structure of Ice Cloud Layers From CloudSat and CALIPSO Measurements and Comparison to NICAM Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Seung-Hee; Sohn, Byung-Ju; Kato, Seiji; Satoh, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    The shape of the vertical profile of ice cloud layers is examined using 4 months of CloudSat and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) global measurements taken on January, April, July, and October 2007. Ice clouds are selected using temperature profiles when the cloud base is located above the 253K temperature level. The obtained ice water content (IWC), effective radius, or extinction coefficient profiles are normalized by their layer mean values and are expressed in the normalized vertical coordinate, which is defined as 0 and 1 at the cloud base and top heights, respectively. Both CloudSat and CALIPSO observations show that the maximum in the IWC and extinction profiles shifts toward the cloud bottom, as the cloud depth increases. In addition, clouds with a base reaching the surface in a high-latitude region show that the maximum peak of the IWC and extinction profiles occurs near the surface, which is presumably due to snow precipitation. CloudSat measurements show that the seasonal difference in normalized cloud vertical profiles is not significant, whereas the normalized cloud vertical profile significantly varies depending on the cloud type and the presence of precipitation. It is further examined if the 7 day Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM) simulation results from 25 December 2006 to 1 January 2007 generate similar cloud profile shapes. NICAM IWC profiles also show maximum peaks near the cloud bottom for thick cloud layers and maximum peaks at the cloud bottom for low-level clouds near the surface. It is inferred that oversized snow particles in the NICAM cloud scheme produce a more vertically inhomogeneous IWC profile than observations due to quick sedimentation.

  2. Cloud Radiative Forcing in East Asia Simulated from IAP/LASG GCM with a Physics-Based, Two-Moment Statistical-Numerical Cloud Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Wang, W. C.; Zhou, L.; Bao, Q.; Li, J.

    2014-12-01

    To improve the treatment of cloud microphysics, a physics-based, two-moment (mass and number) statistical-numerical cloud scheme has been incorporated into IAP/LASG global climate model and simulations conducted to study the model responses. This scheme allows aerosol-cloud interactions through aerosols serving as cloud condensation nuclei. Here we present the results of an analysis of the cloud radiative forcing focusing on East Asia. Compared with the previous treatment of one-moment cloud scheme together with an empirical formula for droplet size, the new scheme simulates larger low cloud cover, liquid water path, and droplet size, which reflect more solar radiation, emit more longwave radiation, thus yield a larger net cloud radiative forcing. We plan to use offline radiation code (RRTMG) to examine the individual effects of cloud cover (low, middle and high) and cloud microphysical properties on the solar and longwave radiation fluxes reaching the surface and their relative roles in affecting the surface temperature. Comparisons with available satellite and ground-based measurements will also be conducted.

  3. Barrier height enhancement of InP-based n-Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As Schottky-barrier diodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Kim; S. S. Li; L. Figueroa

    1988-01-01

    Barrier height enhancement of an InP-based p(+)n-Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As Schottky diode grown by MBE has been demonstrated for infra-red photodetector applications. A barrier height of 0.35 eV for n-Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As Schottky barrier diodes, was increased to the effective barrier height of 0.55 eV, with a p(+)-Ga(0.47)In(0.53)As surface layer of 30 nm thick. The results show a reverse leakage current density of 0.0015 A\\/sq

  4. Retrieval of mixing height and dust concentration with lidar ceilometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münkel, Christoph; Eresmaa, Noora; Räsänen, Janne; Karppinen, Ari

    2007-07-01

    The Vaisala ceilometers CT25K and CL31 are eye-safe single lens lidar systems reporting attenuated backscatter profiles; they often operate 24 h a day in fully automated, hands-off operation mode. These profiles can be used for more than just cloud-base height determination. In dry weather situations, there is a fairly good correlation between the ceilometer near-range backscatter and in situ PM10 concentration readings. The comparison of mixing height values based on soundings and on ceilometer backscattering profiles indicates that ceilometers are suitable instruments for determining the convective mixing height. Its enhanced optics and electronics enables the CL31 ceilometer to detect fine boundary-layer structures whose counterparts are seen in temperature profiles.

  5. Cloud Based Infrastructure, the New Business Possibilities and Barriers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Kloch; Ebbe B. Petersen; Ole Brun Madsen

    2011-01-01

    Realization of the cloud computing infrastructure requires access to data anywhere, anytime at any device at a sufficient\\u000a perceived quality of service. Many Western European countries, such as Denmark, have a high percentage of individuals (inhabitants\\u000a and companies) that has access to broadband internet via cable, satellite and mobile. This gives a unique position in roll-out\\u000a and deploying intelligent cloud

  6. Aneka: A Software Platform for .NET-based Cloud Computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Vecchiola; Xingchen Chu; Rajkumar Buyya

    2009-01-01

    Aneka is a platform for deploying Clouds developing applications on top of\\u000ait. It provides a runtime environment and a set of APIs that allow developers\\u000ato build .NET applications that leverage their computation on either public or\\u000aprivate clouds. One of the key features of Aneka is the ability of supporting\\u000amultiple programming models that are ways of expressing

  7. A prognostic model of cloud cover based on Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, P.; Liberti, G. L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties still remain about the mechanisms of genesis and interaction of clouds in a large scale environment. Through a semi-empirical dynamical model using hourly data from TOGA-COARE IOP (130E-180E and 15S-15N, 01.11.91-28.02.92), we show that the convective activity leading to clouds is a self-regulating, threshold process embedded in a large-scale environment. The convective activity is prescribed through a of hourly fractional cloud cover while the environmental forcings are defined in terms large-scale moist state defined in terms of the average brightness temperature. A prognostic model is then developed for cloud cover as the dynamical variable. To validate the model we integrate it with a given initial condition from observed data. The model reproduces the observed spatio-temporal structure of the cloud with a remarkable degree of success. We identify and quantify two thresholds for large-scale forcing for genesis and intensity of high clouds.

  8. A robust threshold-based cloud mask for the HRV channel of MSG SEVIRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bley, S.; Deneke, H.

    2013-03-01

    A robust threshold-based cloud mask for the high-resolution visible (HRV) channel (1 × 1 km2) of the METEOSAT SEVIRI instrument is introduced and evaluated. It is based on operational EUMETSAT cloud mask for the low resolution channels of SEVIRI (3 × 3 km2), which is used for the selection of suitable thresholds to ensure consistency with its results. The aim of using the HRV channel is to resolve small-scale cloud structures which cannot be detected by the low resolution channels. We find that it is of advantage to apply thresholds relative to clear-sky reflectance composites, and to adapt the threshold regionally. Furthermore, the accuracy of the different spectral channels for thresholding and the suitability of the HRV channel are investigated for cloud detection. The case studies show different situations to demonstrate the behaviour for various surface and cloud conditions. Overall, between 4 and 24% of cloudy low-resolution SEVIRI pixels are found to contain broken clouds in our test dataset depending on considered region. Most of these broken pixels are classified as cloudy by EUMETSAT's cloud mask, which will likely result in an overestimate if the mask is used as estimate of cloud fraction.

  9. A shape-based segmentation method for mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Dong, Zhen

    2013-07-01

    Segmentation of mobile laser point clouds of urban scenes into objects is an important step for post-processing (e.g., interpretation) of point clouds. Point clouds of urban scenes contain numerous objects with significant size variability, complex and incomplete structures, and holes or variable point densities, raising great challenges for the segmentation of mobile laser point clouds. This paper addresses these challenges by proposing a shape-based segmentation method. The proposed method first calculates the optimal neighborhood size of each point to derive the geometric features associated with it, and then classifies the point clouds according to geometric features using support vector machines (SVMs). Second, a set of rules are defined to segment the classified point clouds, and a similarity criterion for segments is proposed to overcome over-segmentation. Finally, the segmentation output is merged based on topological connectivity into a meaningful geometrical abstraction. The proposed method has been tested on point clouds of two urban scenes obtained by different mobile laser scanners. The results show that the proposed method segments large-scale mobile laser point clouds with good accuracy and computationally effective time cost, and that it segments pole-like objects particularly well.

  10. A novel cost based model for energy consumption in cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Horri, A; Dastghaibyfard, Gh

    2015-01-01

    Cloud data centers consume enormous amounts of electrical energy. To support green cloud computing, providers also need to minimize cloud infrastructure energy consumption while conducting the QoS. In this study, for cloud environments an energy consumption model is proposed for time-shared policy in virtualization layer. The cost and energy usage of time-shared policy were modeled in the CloudSim simulator based upon the results obtained from the real system and then proposed model was evaluated by different scenarios. In the proposed model, the cache interference costs were considered. These costs were based upon the size of data. The proposed model was implemented in the CloudSim simulator and the related simulation results indicate that the energy consumption may be considerable and that it can vary with different parameters such as the quantum parameter, data size, and the number of VMs on a host. Measured results validate the model and demonstrate that there is a tradeoff between energy consumption and QoS in the cloud environment. Also, measured results validate the model and demonstrate that there is a tradeoff between energy consumption and QoS in the cloud environment. PMID:25705716

  11. Effect of Clouds on Apertures of Space-based Air Fluorescence Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolsky, P.; Krizmanic, J.

    2003-01-01

    Space-based ultra-high-energy cosmic ray detectors observe fluorescence light from extensive air showers produced by these particles in the troposphere. Clouds can scatter and absorb this light and produce systematic errors in energy determination and spectrum normalization. We study the possibility of using IR remote sensing data from MODIS and GOES satellites to delimit clear areas of the atmosphere. The efficiency for detecting ultra-high-energy cosmic rays whose showers do not intersect clouds is determined for real, night-time cloud scenes. We use the MODIS SST cloud mask product to define clear pixels for cloud scenes along the equator and use the OWL Monte Carlo to generate showers in the cloud scenes. We find the efficiency for cloud-free showers with closest approach of three pixels to a cloudy pixel is 6.5% exclusive of other factors. We conclude that defining a totally cloud-free aperture reduces the sensitivity of space-based fluorescence detectors to unacceptably small levels.

  12. Combining UAV-based plant height from crop surface models, visible, and near infrared vegetation indices for biomass monitoring in barley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendig, Juliane; Yu, Kang; Aasen, Helge; Bolten, Andreas; Bennertz, Simon; Broscheit, Janis; Gnyp, Martin L.; Bareth, Georg

    2015-07-01

    In this study we combined selected vegetation indices (VIs) and plant height information to estimate biomass in a summer barley experiment. The VIs were calculated from ground-based hyperspectral data and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)-based red green blue (RGB) imaging. In addition, the plant height information was obtained from UAV-based multi-temporal crop surface models (CSMs). The test site is a summer barley experiment comprising 18 cultivars and two nitrogen treatments located in Western Germany. We calculated five VIs from hyperspectral data. The normalised ratio index (NRI)-based index GnyLi (Gnyp et al., 2014) showed the highest correlation (R2 = 0.83) with dry biomass. In addition, we calculated three visible band VIs: the green red vegetation index (GRVI), the modified GRVI (MGRVI) and the red green blue VI (RGBVI), where the MGRVI and the RGBVI are newly developed VI. We found that the visible band VIs have potential for biomass prediction prior to heading stage. A robust estimate for biomass was obtained from the plant height models (R2 = 0.80-0.82). In a cross validation test, we compared plant height, selected VIs and their combination with plant height information. Combining VIs and plant height information by using multiple linear regression or multiple non-linear regression models performed better than the VIs alone. The visible band GRVI and the newly developed RGBVI are promising but need further investigation. However, the relationship between plant height and biomass produced the most robust results. In summary, the results indicate that plant height is competitive with VIs for biomass estimation in summer barley. Moreover, visible band VIs might be a useful addition to biomass estimation. The main limitation is that the visible band VIs work for early growing stages only.

  13. Global distribution of total cloud cover and cloud type amounts over the ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.G.; Hahn, C.J.; London, J.; Chervin, R.M.; Jenne, R.L. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (USA). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences; Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA). Dept. of Astrophysical, Planetary, and Atmospheric Sciences; National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (USA))

    1988-12-01

    This is the fourth of a series of atlases to result from a study of the global cloud distribution from ground-based observations. The first two atlases (NCAR/TN-201+STR and NCAR/TN-241+STR) described the frequency of occurrence of each cloud type and the co-occurrence of different types, but included no information about cloud amounts. The third atlas (NCAR/TN-273+STR) described, for the land areas of the earth, the average total cloud cover and the amounts of each cloud type, and their geographical, diurnal, seasonal, and interannual variations, as well as the average base heights of the low clouds. The present atlas does the same for the ocean areas of the earth.

  14. CloudPass - a passport system based on Cloud Computing and Near Field Communication

    E-print Network

    Sudarsanan, Adethya

    2012-01-01

    Wireless communication has penetrated into all fields of technology, especially in mobility, where wireless transactions are gaining importance with improvements in standards like 3G and 4G. There are many technologies that support the wireless forms of interactions between devices. One among them is NFC - Near Field Communication. In addition to NFC, other external technologies like Quick Response (QR) Codes assist in establishing interactions among participating devices. In this paper, we examine an approach that will involve standards and technologies like NFC, QR Codes and Cloud Infrastructure to design a mobile application which will perform desired functionalities. Cloud Storage is used as a reservoir to store the artifacts used by the application. Development and testing of the application is initially carried out on emulators or simulators followed by testing on real handsets/devices.

  15. Maskless imaging of dense samples using pixel super-resolution based multi-height lensfree on-chip microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Greenbaum, Alon; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Lensfree in-line holographic microscopy offers sub-micron resolution over a large field-of-view (e.g., ~24 mm2) with a cost-effective and compact design suitable for field use. However, it is limited to relatively low-density samples. To mitigate this limitation, we demonstrate an on-chip imaging approach based on pixel super-resolution and phase recovery, which iterates among multiple lensfree intensity measurements, each having a slightly different sample-to-sensor distance. By digitally aligning and registering these lensfree intensity measurements, phase and amplitude images of dense and connected specimens can be iteratively reconstructed over a large field-of-view of ~24 mm2 without the use of any spatial masks. We demonstrate the success of this multi-height in-line holographic approach by imaging dense Papanicolaou smears (i.e., Pap smears) and blood samples. PMID:22330550

  16. Model-Based Estimation of Forest Canopy Height in Red and Austrian Pine Stands Using Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and Ancillary Data: a Proof-of-Concept Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brown Jr., C G; Sarabandi, K; Pierce, L E

    2007-04-06

    In this paper, accurate tree stand height retrieval is demonstrated using C-band Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) height and ancillary data. The tree height retrieval algorithm is based on modeling uniform tree stands with a single layer of randomly oriented vegetation particles. For such scattering media, the scattering phase center height, as measured by SRTM, is a function of tree height, incidence angle, and the extinction coefficient of the medium. The extinction coefficient for uniform tree stands is calculated as a function of tree height and density using allometric equations and a fractal tree model. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated using SRTM and TOPSAR data for 15 red pine and Austrian pine stands (TOPSAR is an airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar). The algorithm yields root-mean-square (rms) errors of 2.5-3.6 m, which is a substantial improvement over the 6.8-8.3-m rms errors from the raw SRTM minus National Elevation Dataset Heights.

  17. A commandable pulse height analysis system based on custom VLSI ASICs for the Cassini space mission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Paschalidis; N. Chrissostomidis; N. Stamatopoulos; P. Houlis; E. Sarris; S. Jaskulek; M. Mitchell; B. Tossman; S. Krimigis

    1997-01-01

    The authors have implemented a new commandable threshold PHA-accumulation unit for the MIMI\\/LEMMS particle detection instrument of the Cassini mission to Saturn. The implementation is based on two full custom VLS ASICs specifically designed, fabricated, and space qualified for this project. The present system overcomes common fine tuning pre-flight and in-flight calibration difficulties associated with conventional fixed threshold systems of

  18. Intelligent person identification system using stereo camera-based height and stride estimation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jung-Hwan Ko; Jae-Hun Jang; Eun-Soo Kim

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a stereo camera-based intelligent person identification system is suggested. In the proposed method, face area of the moving target person is extracted from the left image of the input steros image pair by using a threshold value of YCbCr color model and by carrying out correlation between the face area segmented from this threshold value of YCbCr

  19. Automated cloud classification using a ground based infra-red camera and texture analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumi, Emal; Kerr, David; Coupland, Jeremy M.; Sandford, Andrew P.; Brettle, Mike J.

    2013-10-01

    Clouds play an important role in influencing the dynamics of local and global weather and climate conditions. Continuous monitoring of clouds is vital for weather forecasting and for air-traffic control. Convective clouds such as Towering Cumulus (TCU) and Cumulonimbus clouds (CB) are associated with thunderstorms, turbulence and atmospheric instability. Human observers periodically report the presence of CB and TCU clouds during operational hours at airports and observatories; however such observations are expensive and time limited. Robust, automatic classification of cloud type using infrared ground-based instrumentation offers the advantage of continuous, real-time (24/7) data capture and the representation of cloud structure in the form of a thermal map, which can greatly help to characterise certain cloud formations. The work presented here utilised a ground based infrared (8-14 ?m) imaging device mounted on a pan/tilt unit for capturing high spatial resolution sky images. These images were processed to extract 45 separate textural features using statistical and spatial frequency based analytical techniques. These features were used to train a weighted k-nearest neighbour (KNN) classifier in order to determine cloud type. Ground truth data were obtained by inspection of images captured simultaneously from a visible wavelength colour camera at the same installation, with approximately the same field of view as the infrared device. These images were classified by a trained cloud observer. Results from the KNN classifier gave an encouraging success rate. A Probability of Detection (POD) of up to 90% with a Probability of False Alarm (POFA) as low as 16% was achieved.

  20. Improvement in cloud predictions using satellite data assimilation for real-time forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellore, R.; Koracin, D.; Wetzel, M.

    2006-12-01

    The accuracy of quantitative forecasting of low-level operational cloud products such as the cloud top height, cloud top pressure and cloud thickness is rather low. Reliable forecasting of the low-level clouds (cloud top altitudes below 2-3 km) such as fog, stratus or stratocumulus is essential for aviation safety purposes. With the advent of an increased number of spectral channels and high-resolution imagers on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, cloud products can be diagnostically extracted and, furthermore, these cloud products can be used to modify the initial conditions for numerical weather prediction. Although operational methods are relatively successful in determining the cloud top altitudes for deep clouds and high clouds (usually above 5 km), there is no unique way of inferring the cloud top heights for low-level clouds due to their optical properties and low-level inversions. An algorithm has been developed in this study to classify the low-level cloud types using the brightness temperatures extracted from the GOES satellite visible and infrared channels. Cloud top temperatures above 8° C characterize low-level clouds. The brightness temperature differences between the window channel (11 ìm) and the shortwave infrared channel (4 ìm) are used to segregate the optically thin and thick clouds, and the relative humidity obtained from the surface stations is used to distinguish the fog or clouds formed by fog lifting. The infrared satellite imagery on 29 June 2006 is considered for this study with domain coverage of 400 x 400 km2 . The ground-truth observations were obtained from the surface weather station located at the Naval Air Station, Fallon (NASF), Nevada. Upon classification of low-level clouds in the satellite imagery, (a) the first step is to compute the cloud base temperature in the low-level cloudy pixels using the surface temperature and cloud base height obtained from the ceilometer measurements (at NASF) following a dry adiabatic lapse rate; (b) the second step is to compute the cloud top height using cloud base temperature, and the satellite- derived cloud top temperature following the wet adiabatic lapse rate in the cloud layer; (c) the third step is to obtain a representative lapse rate for the computing domain; (d) the fourth step is to compute the cloud top heights for the individual satellite pixels in the entire domain. The information on cloud top height and cloud top temperature obtained from the cloudy pixels is then dynamically assimilated into the model analysis using Cressman's objective analysis. Using the improved model analyses, a deterministic forecast will be carried out with an option of four-dimensional data assimilation of model winds and thermodynamic variables for a pre- forecast period of one complete diurnal cycle. Verification will be carried out using the hourly surface observations and cloud base measurements, and also using the satellite cloud imagery against the simulated cloud imagery and associated cloud products. The data assimilation of the derived cloud products is being tested in modeling systems such as the Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5) and the Weather Research Forecasting Model (WRF). The data assimilation of cloud products and verification is intended for the pre-processing module in a real-time forecasting system using various objective analysis procedures such as the Cressman-type, multi-quadric and 3DVAR. This study is to develop an efficient forecasting system to support naval aircraft and rotorcraft operations at the Fallon Naval Air Station, Fallon, Nevada.

  1. Prediction based proactive thermal virtual machine scheduling in green clouds.

    PubMed

    Kinger, Supriya; Kumar, Rajesh; Sharma, Anju

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing has rapidly emerged as a widely accepted computing paradigm, but the research on Cloud computing is still at an early stage. Cloud computing provides many advanced features but it still has some shortcomings such as relatively high operating cost and environmental hazards like increasing carbon footprints. These hazards can be reduced up to some extent by efficient scheduling of Cloud resources. Working temperature on which a machine is currently running can be taken as a criterion for Virtual Machine (VM) scheduling. This paper proposes a new proactive technique that considers current and maximum threshold temperature of Server Machines (SMs) before making scheduling decisions with the help of a temperature predictor, so that maximum temperature is never reached. Different workload scenarios have been taken into consideration. The results obtained show that the proposed system is better than existing systems of VM scheduling, which does not consider current temperature of nodes before making scheduling decisions. Thus, a reduction in need of cooling systems for a Cloud environment has been obtained and validated. PMID:24737962

  2. Prediction Based Proactive Thermal Virtual Machine Scheduling in Green Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Kinger, Supriya; Kumar, Rajesh; Sharma, Anju

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing has rapidly emerged as a widely accepted computing paradigm, but the research on Cloud computing is still at an early stage. Cloud computing provides many advanced features but it still has some shortcomings such as relatively high operating cost and environmental hazards like increasing carbon footprints. These hazards can be reduced up to some extent by efficient scheduling of Cloud resources. Working temperature on which a machine is currently running can be taken as a criterion for Virtual Machine (VM) scheduling. This paper proposes a new proactive technique that considers current and maximum threshold temperature of Server Machines (SMs) before making scheduling decisions with the help of a temperature predictor, so that maximum temperature is never reached. Different workload scenarios have been taken into consideration. The results obtained show that the proposed system is better than existing systems of VM scheduling, which does not consider current temperature of nodes before making scheduling decisions. Thus, a reduction in need of cooling systems for a Cloud environment has been obtained and validated. PMID:24737962

  3. Sensitivity of a physically-based cloud package in the NCAR/CCM2

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Chih-Yue Jim [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, W.S. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Based on our earlier investigation on the performance of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model Version 2 (CCM2), we have incorporated into this model a physically-based cloud package. This package allows for the prognostic computation of cloud liquid water which is advected using the semi-Lagrangrian transport scheme of CCM2 the formation of anvil clouds from deep convective systems, and the coupling of physically based cloud optical properties to the CCM2`s shortwave and longwave radiation treatment. In this paper, the effect of the cloud package is assessed by comparing the January results of the simulation to model output from a control run over the same period using the original version of CCM2. The model results are also compared to data from the global reanalysis for the same period conducted by the National Center for Experimental Prediction (NCEP) and NCAR. In this paper, we place particular emphasis on the cloud package`s effect on the climate patterns in the Pacific North American Region. The sensitivity of the model performance to the threshold relative humidity for cloud formation in the scheme is also assessed.

  4. Ground-based remote sensing of thin clouds in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Zhao, C.

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a method for using interferometer measurements of downwelling thermal radiation to retrieve the properties of single-layer clouds. Cloud phase is determined from ratios of thermal emission in three "micro-windows" where absorption by water vapor is particularly small. Cloud microphysical and optical properties are retrieved from thermal emission in two micro-windows, constrained by the transmission through clouds of stratospheric ozone emission. Assuming a cloud does not approximate a blackbody, the estimated 95% confidence retrieval errors in effective radius, visible optical depth, number concentration, and water path are, respectively, 10%, 20%, 38% (55% for ice crystals), and 16%. Applied to data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) North Slope of Alaska - Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA-AAO) site near Barrow, Alaska, retrievals show general agreement with ground-based microwave radiometer measurements of liquid water path. Compared to other retrieval methods, advantages of this technique include its ability to characterize thin clouds year round, that water vapor is not a primary source of retrieval error, and that the retrievals of microphysical properties are only weakly sensitive to retrieved cloud phase. The primary limitation is the inapplicability to thicker clouds that radiate as blackbodies.

  5. Buildings and Terrain of Urban Area Point Cloud Segmentation based on PCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Zhong, Ruofei

    2014-03-01

    One current problem with laser radar point data classification is building and urban terrain segmentation, this paper proposes a point cloud segmentation method base on PCL libraries. PCL is a large cross-platform open source C++ programming library, which implements a large number of point cloud related efficient data structures and generic algorithms involving point cloud retrieval, filtering, segmentation, registration, feature extraction and curved surface reconstruction, visualization, etc. Due to laser radar point cloud characteristics with large amount of data, unsymmetrical distribution, this paper proposes using the data structure of kd-tree to organize data; then using Voxel Grid filter for point cloud resampling, namely to reduce the amount of point cloud data, and at the same time keep the point cloud shape characteristic; use PCL Segmentation Module, we use a Euclidean Cluster Extraction class with Europe clustering for buildings and ground three-dimensional point cloud segmentation. The experimental results show that this method avoids the multiple copy system existing data needs, saves the program storage space through the call of PCL library method and class, shortens the program compiled time and improves the running speed of the program.

  6. Scale Dependence of Variability in Stratiform Clouds Based on Millimeter Wave Could Radar

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, Z.N.; Kogan, Y.L.; Mechem, D.B.

    2005-03-18

    Internal variability of stratiform clouds is manifested on grid scales ranging from cloud resolving models to general circulation models, and its accurate formulation is one of the most important tasks in improvement of model predictions. Understanding cloud variability on different scales will help to develop and improve subgrid-scale cloud parameterizations. Information about variability is also crucial when dealing with retrieval of microphysical information from observations of volume averaged reflectivity parameters, since neglecting variability can lead to substantial biases in estimation of retrieved microphysical variables. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) operates millimeter wave cloud radar (MMCR) at the ARM Climate Research Facility over the Southern Great Plains (ACRF SGP) that provides a unique opportunity to obtain continuous observations in order to address issues of cloud variability. These data contain information on spatial and/or temporal short- and long-range correlations in cloudiness, enabling scale-by-scale (scaling) analyses over a range of hundreds of meters to hundreds of kilometers. The objective of this study is to conduct an analysis based on radar reflectivity observations of clouds over the ACRF SGP site with special emphasis on boundary layer clouds, and the effect of drizzle.

  7. Comparison between two algorithms based on different wavelets to obtain the Planetary Boundary Layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arruda Moreira, Gregori; da Silva Lopes, Fabio J.; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan L.; Granados-Muñoz, Maria José; Bourayou, Riad; Landulfo, Eduardo

    2014-10-01

    Comprehension about the behavior of the Planet Boundary Layer (PBL) is an important factor in several fields, from analysis about air quality until modeling. However, monitoring the PBL evolution is a complex problem, because few instruments can provide continuous atmospheric measurements with enough spatial and temporal resolution. Inside this scenario lidar systems appear as an important tool, because it complies with all these capabilities- However, PBL observations are not a direct measure, being necessary to use complex mathematic algorithms. Recently, wavelet covariance transforms have been applied in this field. The objective of this work is to compare the performing of distinct types of algorithms: a structured on Haar wavelet and other based on first derivative of Gaussian and Mexican Hat wavelets, and the results were compared with two Hysplit modelling. For this aim, two campaigns were carried out. From the results were possible to infer that both algorithms provide coherent results as the expected, but the Haar algorithm separates the sub-layers more efficiently, so it is the most appropriate to complex situations.

  8. Scale-Dependence of the Response of Tropopause Height to Deep Cumulus Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishbein, E.; Wong, S.

    2014-12-01

    Deep cumulus convection can influence the height of the tropopause either through plumes which penetration into the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) or by forcing broad-scale vertical motion. This study uses the unique capabilities of satellite-based cross-track sounders to provide three-dimensional images of temperature in the TTL. These are used to derive thermal tropopause height and to study the scale-dependence of tropopause height variability and its relation to distance and intensity of deep convection. The data used in this study are 10 years of tropical Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) swath (level 2) temperature profile data. Localized spatial power spectra are derived from swaths of tropopause height, which are ordered relative to the timing of deep convective clouds. The relative contributions of small-scale and large-scale power are use to characterize the influence of the scale of the vertical motion in the TTL. The highest spatial scales sampled by the AIRS temperature field are mesoscale systems of deep cumulus convection approximately 200 to 400 km across because the horizontal spatial resolution of the AIRS temperature profile product is approximately 50 km. AIRS temperature profiles have state-dependent errors correlated with cloud amount, but are more useful than temperature profiles from microwave sounders because of their higher vertical resolution. TTL temperature has less sampling error then mid and lower troposphere temperature, and the time binning is used to characterize and reduce these errors. The intensity of cumulus convection is inferred from the derived cloud properties, specifically cloud-top height, cloud-ice effective diameter and their power. The height difference between tropopause and cloud-top is used to characterize the likelihood that vertical motions extend to the tropopause, while the cloud-ice effective diameter provides a measure of the intensity of the convective vertical velocity and its ability to lift larger ice particles. This study investigates the seasonal and temporal variability of the tropopause height power spectra, the contributions of measurement error and the relation between tropopause height and cloud properties.

  9. A Depolarisation Lidar Based Method for the Determination of Liquid-Cloud Microphysical Properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D. P.; Klein Baltink, H.; Henzing, J. S.; De Roode, S. R.; Siebesma, P.

    2014-12-01

    The fact that polarisation lidars measure a multiple-scattering induced depolarisation signal in liquid clouds is well-known. The depolarisation signal depends on the lidar characteristics (e.g. wavelength and field-of-view) as well as the cloud properties (e.g. liquid water content (LWC) and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC)). Previous efforts seeking to use depolarisation information in a quantitative manner to retrieve cloud properties have been undertaken with, arguably, limited practical success. In this work we present a retrieval procedure applicable to clouds with (quasi-)linear LWC profiles and (quasi-)constant CDNC in the cloud base region. Limiting the applicability of the procedure in this manner allows us to reduce the cloud variables to two parameters (namely liquid water content lapse-rate and the CDNC). This simplification, in turn, allows us to employ a robust optimal-estimation inversion using pre-computed look-up-tables produced using lidar Monte-Carlo multiple-scattering simulations. Here, we describe the theory behind the inversion procedure and apply it to simulated observations based on large-eddy simulation model output. The inversion procedure is then applied to actual depolarisation lidar data covering to a range of cases taken from the Cabauw measurement site in the central Netherlands. The lidar results were then used to predict the corresponding cloud-base region radar reflectivities. In non-drizzling condition, it was found that the lidar inversion results can be used to predict the observed radar reflectivities with an accuracy within the radar calibration uncertainty (2-3 dBZ). This result strongly supports the accuracy of the lidar inversion results. Results of a comparison between ground-based aerosol number concentration and lidar-derived CDNC are also presented. The results are seen to be consistent with previous studies based on aircraft-based in situ measurements.

  10. Height estimation for buildings with complex contours in monocular satellite\\/airborne images based on fuzzy reasoning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammad Izadi; Parvaneh Saeedi

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel height estimation method for buildings with complex rooftop contours in the presence of partial occlusions or interference by neighboring buildings in monocular satellite\\/aerial images. The proposed method employs fuzzy rules to estimate the most accurate heights even for buildings with partial occlusions using projected shadows of each building. The system utilizes the genetic algorithm for

  11. Feeder-Cell Ingestion of Seeding Aerosol from Cloud Base Determined by Tracking Radar Chaff.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinking, Roger F.; Martner, Brooks E.

    1996-09-01

    Questions of delivery, transport, and dispersion of cloud seeding aerosol in a convective feeder cloud are addressed by using radar chaff as a surrogate for aerosol and tracking it with circular-polarization radar. In a case study, a line source of chaff was released by an aircraft at the roots of a growing cloud flanking and feeding into a thunderstorm line. The chaff was tracked as it dispersed in the boundary layer and rose more than 3 km from the cloud base at +14°C to levels cold enough to nucleate ice-forming seeding aerosols. Quantitative measures of the rates of loft and dispersion, and the volume filling and dilution were obtained. The measurements permit examination of the hypotheses and potential efficacy of cloud-base seeding to increase rain and suppress hail. Notably, the problem of delivery, transport, and dispersion of cloud seeding aerosol is much the same as the air quality question of the nature and effect of cloud venting of the boundary layer, and the findings here apply in that context as well.

  12. THE CLOUDSAT MISSION AND THE A-TRAIN A New Dimension of Space-Based Observations of Clouds and Precipitation

    E-print Network

    THE CLOUDSAT MISSION AND THE A-TRAIN A New Dimension of Space-Based Observations of Clouds, Richard T. Austin, Angela Benedetti, Cristian Mitrescu, and the CloudSat Science Team Bulletin of the images of earth from space are the clouds that move around our planet in quasi-organized large- scale

  13. Improved cloud parameterization for Arctic climate simulations based on satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, Daniel; Dethloff, Klaus; Dorn, Wolfgang; Rinke, Annette

    2015-04-01

    The defective representation of Arctic cloud processes and properties remains a crucial problem in climate modelling and in reanalysis products. Satellite-based cloud observations (MODIS and CPR/CALIOP) and single-column model simulations (HIRHAM5-SCM) were exploited to evaluate and improve the simulated Arctic cloud cover of the atmospheric regional climate model HIRHAM5. The ECMWF reanalysis dataset 'ERA-Interim' (ERAint) was used for the model initialization, the lateral boundary forcing as well as the dynamical relaxation inside the pan-Arctic domain. HIRHAM5 has a horizontal resolution of 0.25° and uses 40 pressure-based and terrain-following vertical levels. In comparison with the satellite observations, the HIRHAM5 control run (HH5ctrl) systematically overestimates total cloud cover, but to a lesser extent than ERAint. The underestimation of high- and mid-level clouds is strongly outweighed by the overestimation of low-level clouds. Numerous sensitivity studies with HIRHAM5-SCM suggest (1) the parameter tuning, enabling a more efficient Bergeron-Findeisen process, combined with (2) an extension of the prognostic-statistical (PS) cloud scheme, enabling the use of negatively skewed beta distributions. This improved model setup was then used in a corresponding HIRHAM5 sensitivity run (HH5sens). While the simulated high- and mid-level cloud cover is improved only to a limited extent, the large overestimation of low-level clouds can be systematically and significantly reduced, especially over sea ice. Consequently, the multi-year annual mean area average of total cloud cover with respect to sea ice is almost 14% lower than in HH5ctrl. Overall, HH5sens slightly underestimates the observed total cloud cover but shows a halved multi-year annual mean bias of 2.2% relative to CPR/CALIOP at all latitudes north of 60° N. Importantly, HH5sens produces a more realistic ratio between the cloud water and ice content. The considerably improved cloud simulation manifests in a more correct radiative transfer and better energy budget in the atmospheric boundary layer and results also in a more realistic surface energy budget associated with more reasonable turbulent fluxes. All this mitigates the positive temperature, relative humidity and horizontal wind speed biases in the lower model levels.

  14. Lightweight Streaming-based Runtime for Cloud Computing

    E-print Network

    · DEMAND PULLS: Process and store large data volumes · Y02 22-EB : Y06 161-EB : Y10 988-EB ~ I ZB sides of the same coin · Desktop: 4 GB RAM, 400 GB Disk, 50 GFLOPS & 4 cores · 250 x Desktop = 1 TB RAM, 100 TB Disk, 6.25TFLOP and 1000 cores 3 #12;Cloud and traditional HPC systems have some fundamental

  15. An E-learning Ecosystem Based on Cloud Computing Infrastructure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bo Dong; Qinghua Zheng; Jie Yang; Haifei Li; Mu Qiao

    2009-01-01

    Recently the research community has believed that an e-learning ecosystem is the next generation e- learning. However, the current models of e-learning ecosystems lack the support of underlying infrastructures, which can dynamically allocate the required computation and storage resources for e- learning ecosystems. Cloud computing is a promising infrastructure which provides computation and storage resources as services. Hence, this paper

  16. Long-term impacts of aerosols on vertical development of cloud and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Z.; Liu Y.; Niu, F.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ding, Y.

    2011-11-13

    Aerosols alter cloud density and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This leads to changes in cloud microphysics and atmospheric stability, which can either suppress or foster the development of clouds and precipitation. The net effect is largely unknown, but depends on meteorological conditions and aerosol properties. Here, we examine the long-term impact of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and rainfall frequencies, using a 10-year dataset of aerosol, cloud and meteorological variables collected in the Southern Great Plains in the United States. We show that cloud-top height and thickness increase with aerosol concentration measured near the ground in mixed-phase clouds-which contain both liquid water and ice-that have a warm, low base. We attribute the effect, which is most significant in summer, to an aerosol-induced invigoration of upward winds. In contrast, we find no change in cloud-top height and precipitation with aerosol concentration in clouds with no ice or cool bases. We further show that precipitation frequency and rain rate are altered by aerosols. Rain increases with aerosol concentration in deep clouds that have a high liquid-water content, but declines in clouds that have a low liquid-water content. Simulations using a cloud-resolving model confirm these observations. Our findings provide unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation.

  17. A hierarchical scheduling strategy for the composition services architecture based on cloud computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kuan-Rong Lee; Meng-Hsuan Fu; Yau-Hwang Kuo

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of composition service scheduling and resource allocation in cloud. In the development of cloud computing with data-intensive and compute-intensive features, many applications are based on Map\\/Reduce model to enhance the performance. A hierarchical scheduling scheme strategy, i.e., PPA2-level scheduler, is proposed in this paper for the composition services architecture to achieve planning of composition service

  18. Forecasting for Grid and Cloud Computing On-Demand Resources Based on Pattern Matching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eddy Caron; Frédéric Desprez; Adrian Muresan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The Cloud phenomenon,brings along the cost-saving benefit of dynamic scaling. Knowledge in advance is necessary as the virtual resources that Cloud computing uses have a setup time that is not negligible. We propose a new approach to the problem of workload prediction based on identifying similar past occurrences to the current short-term workload history. We present in detail the

  19. Point clouds can be represented as implicit surfaces for constraint-based haptic rendering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam Leeper; Sonny Chan; Kenneth Salisbury

    2012-01-01

    We present a constraint-based strategy for haptic rendering of arbitrary point cloud data. With the recent proliferation of low-cost range sensors, dense 3D point cloud data is readily available at high update rates. Taking a cue from the graphics literature, we propose that point data should be represented as an implicit surface, which can be formulated to be mathematically smooth

  20. Cloud-computing-based framework for multi-camera topology inference in smart city sensing system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ye Wen; Xiaokang Yang; Yi Xu

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a cloud-computing-based algorithmic framework which is scalable and adaptive to online smart city video sensing system. One of the most cost-expensive works in such a system is to infer the topology structure of video camera network, thus spatio-temporal relationship inference for large-scale camera network is simulated on a cloud-computing platform to validate the proposed framework. The simulation

  1. An independent evaluation of a South African hygroscopic cloud seeding experiment, 1991–1995

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. K. Bigg

    1997-01-01

    An independent statistical evaluation of a randomised hygroscopic cloud seeding experiment carried out in South Africa from 1991–1995 is presented, based on the original radar data for each storm. It is found that seeded storms clearly lasted longer than unseeded ones. It is suggested that the initiation of precipitation at a lower height in seeded than in unseeded clouds (demonstrated

  2. Factors governing the total rainfall yield from continental convective clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Gagin, Abraham

    1989-01-01

    Several important factors that govern the total rainfall from continental convective clouds were investigated by tracking thousands of convective cells in Israel and South Africa. The rainfall volume yield (Rvol) of the individual cells that build convective rain systems has been shown to depend mainly on the cloud-top height. There is, however, considerable variability in this relationship. The following factors that influence the Rvol were parameterized and quantitatively analyzed: (1) cloud base temperature, (2)atmospheric instability, and (3) the extent of isolation of the cell. It is also shown that a strong low level forcing increases the duration of Rvol of clouds reaching the same vertical extent.

  3. Impacts of cloud heterogeneities on cirrus optical properties retrieved from space-based thermal infrared radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchez, T.; Dubuisson, P.; Cornet, C.; Szczap, F.; Garnier, A.; Pelon, J.; Meyer, K.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a study, based on simulations, of the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneities on the retrieval of cloud parameters (optical thickness and effective diameter) for the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) on board CALIPSO. Cirrus clouds are generated by the stochastic model 3DCLOUD for two different cloud fields and for several averaged cloud parameters. One cloud field is obtained from a cirrus observed on 25 May 2007 during the airborne campaign CIRCLE-2 and the other is a cirrus uncinus. The radiative transfer is simulated with the 3DMCPOL code. To assess the errors due to cloud heterogeneities, two related retrieval algorithms are used: (i) the split-window technique to retrieve the ice crystal effective diameter and (ii) an algorithm similar to the IIR operational algorithm to retrieve the effective emissivity and the effective optical thickness. Differences between input parameters and retrieved parameters are compared as a function of different cloud properties such as the mean optical thickness, the heterogeneity parameter and the effective diameter. The optical thickness heterogeneity for each 1 km × 1 km observation pixel is represented by the optical thickness standard deviation computed using 100 m × 100 m subpixels. We show that optical thickness heterogeneity may have a strong impact on the retrieved parameters, mainly due to the plane-parallel approximation (PPA assumption). In particular, for cirrus clouds with ice crystal diameter of approximately 10 ?m, the averaged error on the retrieved effective diameter and optical thickness is about 2.5 ?m (~ 25%) and -0.20 (~ 12%), respectively. Then, these biases decrease with increasing effective size due to a decrease of the cloud absorption and, thus, the PPA bias. Cloud horizontal heterogeneity effects are greater than other possible sources of retrieval errors such as those due to cloud vertical heterogeneity impact, surface temperature or atmospheric temperature profile uncertainty and IIR retrieval uncertainty. Cloud horizontal heterogeneity effects are larger than the IIR retrieval uncertainty if the standard deviation of the optical thickness, inside the observation pixel, is greater than 1.

  4. Feasibility and Demonstration of a Cloud-Based RIID Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Michael C [ORNL; Hertz, Kristin [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Johnson, Will [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Sword, Eric D [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Sadler, L.E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

    2014-01-01

    A significant limitation in the operational utility of handheld and backpack radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) is the inability of their onboard algorithms to accurately and reliably identify the isotopic sources of the measured gamma-ray energy spectrum. A possible solution is to move the spectral analysis computations to an external device, the cloud, where significantly greater capabilities are available. The implementation and demonstration of a prototype cloud-based RIID analysis system have shown this type of system to be feasible with currently available communication and computational technology. A system study has shown that the potential user community could derive significant benefits from an appropriately implemented cloud-based analysis system and has identified the design and operational characteristics required by the users and stakeholders for such a system. A general description of the hardware and software necessary to implement reliable cloud-based analysis, the value of the cloud expressed by the user community, and the aspects of the cloud implemented in the demonstrations are discussed.

  5. Comprehensive Stability Evaluation of Rock Slope Using the Cloud Model-Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zaobao; Shao, Jianfu; Xu, Weiya; Xu, Fei

    2014-11-01

    This article presents the cloud model-based approach for comprehensive stability evaluation of complicated rock slopes of hydroelectric stations in mountainous area. This approach is based on membership cloud models which can account for randomness and fuzziness in slope stability evaluation. The slope stability is affected by various factors and each of which is ranked into five grades. The ranking factors are sorted into four categories. The ranking system of slope stability is introduced and then the membership cloud models are applied to analyze each ranking factor for generating cloud memberships. Afterwards, the obtained cloud memberships are synthesized with the factor weights given by experts for comprehensive stability evaluation of rock slopes. The proposed approach is used for the stability evaluation of the left abutment slope in Jinping 1 Hydropower Station. It is shown that the cloud model-based strategy can well consider the effects of each ranking factor and therefore is feasible and reliable for comprehensive stability evaluation of rock slopes.

  6. 2D Radiative Processes Near Cloud Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, T.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the importance and complexity of dynamical, microphysical, and radiative processes taking place near cloud edges, the transition zone between clouds and cloud free air has been the subject of intense research both in the ASR program and in the wider community. One challenge in this research is that the one-dimensional (1D) radiative models widely used in both remote sensing and dynamical simulations become less accurate near cloud edges: The large horizontal gradients in particle concentrations imply that accurate radiative calculations need to consider multi-dimensional radiative interactions among areas that have widely different optical properties. This study examines the way the importance of multidimensional shortwave radiative interactions changes as we approach cloud edges. For this, the study relies on radiative simulations performed for a multiyear dataset of clouds observed over the NSA, SGP, and TWP sites. This dataset is based on Microbase cloud profiles as well as wind measurements and ARM cloud classification products. The study analyzes the way the difference between 1D and 2D simulation results increases near cloud edges. It considers both monochromatic radiances and broadband radiative heating, and it also examines the influence of factors such as cloud type and height, and solar elevation. The results provide insights into the workings of radiative processes and may help better interpret radiance measurements and better estimate the radiative impacts of this critical region.

  7. Boys with a Simple Delayed Puberty Reach Their Target Height

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. L. M. Cools; R. Rooman; L. Op De Beeck; M. V. L. Du Caju

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Final height in boys with delayed puberty is thought to be below target height. This conclusion, however, is based on studies that included patients with genetic short stature. We therefore studied final height in a group of 33 untreated boys with delayed puberty with a target height >–1.5 SDS. Methods: Standing height, sitting height, weight and arm span width

  8. Relationship of intracloud lightning radiofrequency power to lightning storm height, as observed by the FORTE satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Abram R.

    2003-04-01

    Prior studies have noted a strongly nonlinear enhancement of lightning flash rates with increasing cloud height. Here we report a related observation, of a tendency for increasing intracloud-discharge radiofrequency-emission power for increased height of the electrified cloud. The FORTE satellite's radio-frequency-receiver payload has performed extensive recordings of electromagnetic emissions of lightning discharges. The most commonly occurring such emission arises from intracloud electrical breakdown and is usually recognizable by a pulse followed by a delayed echo from the ground reflection. We have used other systems of lightning monitors to provide source locations for an extended data set of FORTE intracloud-discharge signals. The interpulse separation within each pulse pair yields the discharge height above the reflective ground. The storm in which the pulse occurs usually provides many (at least 50) recorded events. From the pattern of these events' heights, we can usually infer a capping height, which serves as an upper bound on the lightning discharge heights for that storm. We find that there is a strong statistical increase of effective radiated power of intracloud discharges, for increasing capping height of the parent storm. Thus a future satellite-based lightning monitor that triggers on only the most intense radiofrequency emissions will be strongly selective for electrified storms with very deep vertical development. Such storms are also indicated in severe convective weather.

  9. Global model of the F2 layer peak height for low solar activity based on GPS radio-occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubin, V. N.; Karpachev, A. T.; Tsybulya, K. G.

    2013-11-01

    We propose a global median model SMF2 (Satellite Model of the F2 layer) of the ionospheric F2-layer height maximum (hmF2), based on GPS radio-occultation data for low solar activity periods (F10.7A<80). The model utilizes data provided by GPS receivers onboard satellites CHAMP (~100,000 hmF2 values), GRACE (~70,000) and COSMIC (~2,000,000). The data were preprocessed to remove cases where the absolute maximum of the electron density lies outside the F2 region. Ground-based ionospheric sounding data were used for comparison and validation. Spatial dependence of hmF2 is modeled by a Legendre-function expansion. Temporal dependence, as a function of Universal Time (UT), is described by a Fourier expansion. Inputs of the model are: geographical coordinates, month and F10.7A solar activity index. The model is designed for quiet geomagnetic conditions (K?=1-2), typical for low solar activity. SMF2 agrees well with the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI) in those regions, where the ground-based ionosonde network is dense. Maximal difference between the models is found in the equatorial belt, over the oceans and the polar caps. Standard deviations of the radio-occultation and Digisonde data from the predicted SMF2 median are 10-16 km for all seasons, against 13-29 km for IRI-2012. Average relative deviations are 3-4 times less than for IRI, 3-4% against 9-12%. Therefore, the proposed hmF2 model is more accurate than IRI-2012.

  10. Validation of CERES-MODIS Arctic cloud properties using CloudSat/CALIPSO and ARM NSA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannecchini, K.; Dong, X.; Xi, B.; Minnis, P.; Kato, S.

    2011-12-01

    The traditional passive satellite studies of cloud properties in the Arctic are often affected by the complex surface features present across the region. Nominal visual and thermal contrast exists between Arctic clouds and the snow- and ice-covered surfaces beneath them, which can lead to difficulties in satellite retrievals of cloud properties. However, the addition of active sensors to the A-Train constellation of satellites has increased the availability of validation sources for cloud properties derived from passive sensors in the data-sparse high-latitude regions. In this study, Arctic cloud fraction and cloud heights derived from the NASA CERES team (CERES-MODIS) have been compared with CloudSat/CALIPSO and DOE ARM NSA radar-lidar observations over Barrow, AK, for the two-year period from 2007 to 2008. An Arctic-wide comparison of cloud fraction and height between CERES-MODIS and CloudSat/CALIPSO was then conducted for the same time period. The CERES-MODIS cloud properties, which include cloud fraction and cloud effective heights, were retrieved using the 4-channel VISST (Visible Infrared Solar-Infrared Split-window Technique) [Minnis et al.,1995]. CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud fraction and cloud-base and -top heights were from version RelB1 data products determined by both the 94 GHz radar onboard CloudSat and the lidar on CALIPSO with a vertical resolution of 30 m below 8.2 km and 60 m above. To match the surface and satellite observations/retrievals, the ARM surface observations were averaged into 3-hour intervals centered at the time of the satellite overpass, while satellite observations were averaged within a 3°x3° grid box centered on the Barrow site. The preliminary results have shown that all observed CFs have peaks during April-May and September-October, and dips during winter months (January-February) and summer months (June-July) during the study period of 2007-2008. ARM radar-lidar and CloudSat/CALIPSO show generally good agreement in CF (0.79 vs. 0.74), while CERES-MODIS derived values are much lower (0.60). CERES-MODIS derived cloud effective height (2.7 km) falls between the CloudSat/CALIPSO derived cloud base (0.6 km) and top (6.4 km) and the ARM ceilometers and MMCR derived cloud base (0.9 km) and radar derived cloud top (5.8 km). When extended to the entire Arctic, although the CERES-MODIS and Cloudsat/CALIPSO derived annual mean CFs agree within a few percents, there are significant differences over several regions, and the maximum cloud heights derived from CloudSat/CALIPSO (13.4 km) and CERES-MODIS (10.7 km) show the largest disagreement during early spring.

  11. Observations and trends of clouds based on GOES sounder data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony J. Schreiner; Timothy J. Schmit; W. Paul Menzel

    2001-01-01

    A 26 month (November 1997 through December 1999) data set of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) sounder-derived cloud parameters has been analyzed to discern annual and monthly trends. An important outcome of this study is the identification of diurnal trends made possible by the geostationary satellite frequent observations over specific locations. The area of coverage is 20øN to 50øN and

  12. Analysis of interstellar cloud structure based on IRAS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalo, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop new tools for the analysis of the structure of densely sampled maps of interstellar star-forming regions. A particular emphasis was on the recognition and characterization of nested hierarchical structure and fractal irregularity, and their relation to the level of star formation activity. The panoramic IRAS images provided data with the required range in spatial scale, greater than a factor of 100, and in column density, greater than a factor of 50. In order to construct densely sampled column density maps of star-forming clouds, column density images of four nearby cloud complexes were constructed from IRAS data. The regions have various degrees of star formation activity, and most of them have probably not been affected much by the disruptive effects of young massive stars. The largest region, the Scorpius-Ophiuchus cloud complex, covers about 1000 square degrees (it was subdivided into a few smaller regions for analysis). Much of the work during the early part of the project focused on an 80 square degree region in the core of the Taurus complex, a well-studied region of low-mass star formation.

  13. Barrier height dependence of Fano factor and 1\\/f noise effect on InGaP based Schottky barrier diode

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sutanu Mangal; P. Ghelfi; A. Bogoni; P. Banerji

    2011-01-01

    We report a study on flicker noise reduction in the space charge limitation region of a Zn-Pd\\/n-In0.49Ga0.51P Schottky barrier diode (SBD). A suitable model has been suggested to explain the barrier height dependence of the Fano factor. The reduction of Fano factor with barrier height has been experimentally investigated from I-V characteristics and noise power density measurements. Finally a comparative

  14. Comparison between ATSR-2 stereo, MOS O2-A band and ground-based cloud top heights

    E-print Network

    , Room 678, New York, NY 10025, USA {now at Mail Stop 183-601, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove derived from a 94-GHz radar, radiosonde profiles and independently from the Modular Optoelectronic Scanner

  15. An imager-based multispectral retrieval of above-cloud absorbing aerosol optical depth and the optical and microphysical properties of underlying marine stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, K.; Platnick, S. E.; Zhang, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Clouds, aerosols, and their interactions are widely considered to be key uncertainty components in our current understanding of the Earth's atmosphere and radiation budget. The work presented here is focused on the quasi-permanent marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds over the southeastern Atlantic Ocean, which underlie a near-persistent smoke layer produced from extensive biomass burning throughout the southern African savanna during austral winter. The absorption of the above-cloud smoke layer, which increases with decreasing wavelength, can introduce biases into imager-based cloud optical and microphysical property retrievals of the underlying MBL clouds. This effect is more pronounced for cloud optical thickness retrievals, which are typically derived from the visible or near-IR wavelength channels (effective particle size retrievals are derived from short and mid-wave IR channels that are less affected by aerosol absorption). Here, a new method is introduced to simultaneously retrieve the above-cloud smoke aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the unbiased cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective radius (CER) using multiple spectral channels in the visible and near- and shortwave-IR. The technique has been applied to MODIS, and retrieval results and statistics, as well as comparisons with other A-Train sensors, are shown.

  16. Implications of cloud obscuration on ground-based laser systems for strategic defense. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Tavis, M.T.; Levinson, S.W.; Parker, K.M.

    1990-03-12

    The evolution and the current status of the Strategic Defense System Phase II Ground-Based Laser (GBL) System Concept is reviewed in this report. In particular, the impact of clouds on system configuration and site selection is discussed. By using current models of correlated probabilities of cloud-free line of sight and cloud-free arc (CFLOS4D and CFARC) for several ground stations with cloud realizations provided by the Boehm Saw Tooth generator, we have determined the number of ground sites required to achieve various levels of desired system weather availability. We briefly describe potential improvements in the models and discuss the necessity for using the Whole Sky Imager results now being generated to validate these models with empirical data, thereby lending further credibility to GBL System Concepts.

  17. A cloud-based approach for interoperable electronic health records (EHRs).

    PubMed

    Bahga, Arshdeep; Madisetti, Vijay K

    2013-09-01

    We present a cloud-based approach for the design of interoperable electronic health record (EHR) systems. Cloud computing environments provide several benefits to all the stakeholders in the healthcare ecosystem (patients, providers, payers, etc.). Lack of data interoperability standards and solutions has been a major obstacle in the exchange of healthcare data between different stakeholders. We propose an EHR system - cloud health information systems technology architecture (CHISTAR) that achieves semantic interoperability through the use of a generic design methodology which uses a reference model that defines a general purpose set of data structures and an archetype model that defines the clinical data attributes. CHISTAR application components are designed using the cloud component model approach that comprises of loosely coupled components that communicate asynchronously. In this paper, we describe the high-level design of CHISTAR and the approaches for semantic interoperability, data integration, and security. PMID:25055368

  18. Research of MPPT for photovoltaic generation based on two-dimensional cloud model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuping; Fan, Wei

    2013-03-01

    The cloud model is a mathematical representation to fuzziness and randomness in linguistic concepts. It represents a qualitative concept with expected value Ex, entropy En and hyper entropy He, and integrates the fuzziness and randomness of a linguistic concept in a unified way. This model is a new method for transformation between qualitative and quantitative in the knowledge. This paper is introduced MPPT (maximum power point tracking, MPPT) controller based two- dimensional cloud model through analysis of auto-optimization MPPT control of photovoltaic power system and combining theory of cloud model. Simulation result shows that the cloud controller is simple and easy, directly perceived through the senses, and has strong robustness, better control performance.

  19. Correlation based cloud-detection and an examination of the split-window method

    SciTech Connect

    Soelvsteen, C. [Royal Danish Administration of Navigation and Hydrography, Copenhagen (Denmark). Oceanographic Dept.

    1995-12-31

    Twenty-six daytime NOAA-11/AVHRR images covering the Danish waters are analyzed together with 99 cloud-free bulk temperature measurements. The images are cloud screened with a cloud-detection algorithm, which among other tests is based on a correlation test between channels 2, 4 and 4--5. This correlation test is capable of distinguishing cold water pixels from cloud pixels. According to the split-window hypothesis, the channel 4--5 brightness temperatures should increase, and the channel 4 brightness temperatures should decrease with the radiation path. These split-window assumptions are examined, and the channel 4--5 difference does not seem to carry significant information about the true sea surface temperature.

  20. Towards Composing Data Aware Systems Biology Workflows on Cloud Platforms: A MeDICi-based Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan; Yin, Jian; Kulkarni, Anand V.; Wynne, Adam S.

    2011-09-08

    Cloud computing is being increasingly adopted for deploying systems biology scientific workflows. Scientists developing these workflows use a wide variety of fragmented and competing data sets and computational tools of all scales to support their research. To this end, the synergy of client side workflow tools with cloud platforms is a promising approach to share and reuse data and workflows. In such systems, the location of data and computation is essential consideration in terms of quality of service for composing a scientific workflow across remote cloud platforms. In this paper, we describe a cloud-based workflow for genome annotation processing that is underpinned by MeDICi - a middleware designed for data intensive scientific applications. The workflow implementation incorporates an execution layer for exploiting data locality that routes the workflow requests to the processing steps that are colocated with the data. We demonstrate our approach by composing two workflowswith the MeDICi pipelines.

  1. Unified height systems after GOCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, Reiner; Gruber, Thomas; Sideris, Michael; Rangelova, Elena; Woodworth, Phil; Hughes, Chris; Ihde, Johannes; Liebsch, Gunter; Rülke, Axel; Gerlach, Christian; Haagmans, Roger

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of global height unification are twofold, (1) the realization of accurate geopotential numbers C together with their standard deviation ?(C) at a selected set of stations (datum points of national height systems, geodetic fundamental stations (IERS), primary tide gauges (PSMSL) and primary reference clocks (IERS)) and (2) the determination of height off-sets between all existing regional/national height systems and one global height reference. In the future the primary method of height determination will be GPS-levelling with very stringent requirements concerning the consistency of the positioning and the gravity potential difference part. Consistency is required in terms of the applied standards (ITRF, zero tide system, geodetic reference system). Geopotential differences will be based on a next generation geopotential model combining GOCE and GRACE and a best possible collection of global terrestrial and altimetric gravity and topographic data. Ultimately, the envisaged accuracy of height unification is about 10 cm2/s2 (or 1cm). At the moment, in well surveyed regions, an accuracy of about 40 to 60 cm2/s2 (or 4 to 6cm) is attainable. Objective One can be realized by straight forward computation of geopotential numbers C, i.e. geopotential differences relative to an adopted height reference. No adjustment is required for this. Objective Two, the unification of existing height systems is achieved by employing a least-squares adjustment based on the GBVP-approach. In order to attain a non-singular solution, this requires for each included datum zone at least one geo-referenced station per zone, i.e. its ellipsoidal height h and, in addition, the corresponding physical height H (geopotential number, normal height, orthometric height, etc.). Changes in geopotential numbers of consecutive realizations reflect (1) temporal changes of station heights, (2) improvements or changes of the applied geopotential (or geoid) model and (3) improvements of the adopted standards and methodology. This procedure will allow bringing all included stations into one and the same height datum. In sparsely surveyed regions of our planet the uncertainty of height off-sets may be at the level of 20 to 40cm (with extreme values up to 1m). In coastal regions, applying ocean levelling, these numbers may be improved. Ocean levelling is the combination of a "best" ocean topography model with either an altimetric mean sea surface or, at tide gauges, mean sea level as derived from a combination of tide gauge recording and GNSS positioning. The classical geoid definition and realization is operational at the level of a decimeter but poses significant theoretical and operational challenges at the sub-decimetre level.

  2. A New Trusted and Collaborative Agent Based Approach for Ensuring Cloud Security

    E-print Network

    Pal, Shantanu; Chaki, Nabendu; Sanyal, Sugata

    2011-01-01

    In order to determine the user's trust is a growing concern for ensuring privacy and security in a cloud computing environment. In cloud, user's data is stored in one or more remote server(s) which poses more security challenges for the system. One of the most important concerns is to protect user's sensitive information from other users and hackers that may cause data leakage in cloud storage. Having this security challenge in mind, this paper focuses on the development of a more secure cloud environment, to determine the trust of the service requesting authorities by using a novel VM (Virtual Machine) monitoring system. Moreover, this research aims towards proposing a new trusted and collaborative agent-based two-tier framework, titled WAY (Who Are You?), to protect cloud resources. The framework can be used to provide security in network, infrastructure, as well as data storage in a heterogeneous cloud platform. If the trust updating policy is based on network activities, then the framework can provide net...

  3. Automatic Atlas Based Electron Density and Structure Contouring for MRI-based Prostate Radiation Therapy on the Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, J. A.; Burdett, N.; Greer, P. B.; Sun, J.; Parker, J.; Pichler, P.; Stanwell, P.; Chandra, S.; Rivest-Hénault, D.; Ghose, S.; Salvado, O.; Fripp, J.

    2014-03-01

    Our group have been developing methods for MRI-alone prostate cancer radiation therapy treatment planning. To assist with clinical validation of the workflow we are investigating a cloud platform solution for research purposes. Benefits of cloud computing can include increased scalability, performance and extensibility while reducing total cost of ownership. In this paper we demonstrate the generation of DICOM-RT directories containing an automatic average atlas based electron density image and fast pelvic organ contouring from whole pelvis MR scans.

  4. Ground-based remote sensing of thin clouds in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Zhao, C.

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes a method for using interferometer measurements of downwelling thermal radiation to retrieve the properties of single-layer clouds. Cloud phase is determined from ratios of thermal emission in three "micro-windows" at 862.5 cm-1, 935.8 cm-1, and 988.4 cm-1 where absorption by water vapour is particularly small. Cloud microphysical and optical properties are retrieved from thermal emission in the first two of these micro-windows, constrained by the transmission through clouds of primarily stratospheric ozone emission at 1040 cm-1. Assuming a cloud does not approximate a blackbody, the estimated 95% confidence retrieval errors in effective radius re, visible optical depth ?, number concentration N, and water path WP are, respectively, 10%, 20%, 38% (55% for ice crystals), and 16%. Applied to data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement programme (ARM) North Slope of Alaska - Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA-AAO) site near Barrow, Alaska, retrievals show general agreement with both ground-based microwave radiometer measurements of liquid water path and a method that uses combined shortwave and microwave measurements to retrieve re, ? and N. Compared to other retrieval methods, advantages of this technique include its ability to characterise thin clouds year round, that water vapour is not a primary source of retrieval error, and that the retrievals of microphysical properties are only weakly sensitive to retrieved cloud phase. The primary limitation is the inapplicability to thicker clouds that radiate as blackbodies and that it relies on a fairly comprehensive suite of ground based measurements.

  5. Measuring heights to crown base and crown median with LiDAR in a mature, even-aged loblolly pine stand

    E-print Network

    Cao, Quang V.

    of vertical structure on plants and animals in the forest (Brokaw and Lent, 1999). Airborne laser scanning elements with airborne scanning LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) in a simple, even-aged standMeasuring heights to crown base and crown median with LiDAR in a mature, even-aged loblolly pine

  6. Research on Chinese Character Height Model of Guide Signs Based on 3D Technology and Information Processing Characteristics of Chinese Drivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huang Kai; Wang Heng; Tang Jianjuan

    2010-01-01

    Drivers are often not able to recognize the letter in time and sometimes it is a waste of money with too large letters in guide signs. In order to solve this problem, a new Chinese character height model for guide signs has been developed based on 3D technology and the apperceive characteristics of Chinese drivers. The model was built according

  7. The cloud radiative effect on the atmospheric energy budget and global mean precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, F. Hugo; Webb, Mark J.; Yoshimori, Masakazu; Yokohata, Tokuta

    2015-04-01

    This study seeks to explain the effects of cloud on changes in atmospheric radiative absorption that largely balance changes in global mean precipitation under climate change. The partial radiative perturbations (PRPs) due to changes in cloud and due to the effects of the pre-existing climatological cloud distribution on non-cloud changes, known as "cloud masking", are calculated when atmospheric CO2 concentration is doubled for the HadSM3 and MIROC models and for a large ensemble of parameter perturbed models based on HadSM3. Because the effect of cloud on changes in atmospheric shortwave absorption is almost negligible, longwave fluxes are analysed alone. We find that the net effects of cloud masking and cloud PRP on atmospheric absorption are both substantial. For the tropics, our results are reviewed in light of hypotheses put forward to explain cloud and radiative flux changes. We find that the major effects of clouds on radiation change are linked to known physical processes that are quite consistently simulated by models. Cloud top height changes are quite well described by the fixed anvil temperature hypothesis of Hartmann and Larson; cloud base heights change little, remaining near the same pressure. Changes in cloud geographical location and cloud amount are significant, but play a smaller role in driving radiative flux changes. Finally, because clouds are a large source of modelling uncertainty, we consider whether resolving errors in cloud simulation could reconcile modelled global mean precipitation trends of about 1-3 % with some estimates of observed trends of 7 % or more. This would require the radiative effect of clouds to change from one that increases atmospheric radiative absorption by about to one that decreases it by . Based on our results, this seems difficult to achieve within our current rationale for the tropics at least.

  8. Cloud-Dependent Surface Energy Budgets over the Ocean: Observation-Based and Reanalysis Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Fetzer, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Regional balance of the atmospheric energy budget provides a stringent constraint to evaluate datasets of global energy budgets. Previous studies indicated that satellite-based and reanalysis estimates describe different heating rates in the atmosphere. Compared to the satellite-based heating rates, reanalyses (European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast Interim, ERA-Interim, and Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications, MERRA) have larger heating in the tropical convective regimes and smaller cooling in the subtropical subsidence regimes. Many of these discrepancies originate in cloudy regions where different estimation methods give different energy budgets. In this study, we investigate how different components of the surface energy budget depend on cloud properties in the atmosphere. We will also examine the dependence of discrepancies between reanalysis and the satellite-based surface energy budgets on cloud properties. Different satellite-based estimates, including Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)-based surface shortwave and longwave heat fluxes, NASA Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment surface energy budget (SRB) shortwave and longwave radiative heat fluxes, Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Flux (GSSTF)'s sensible and latent heat fluxes, and the objectively-analyzed air-sea fluxes (OAFlux), are collocated with cloud property measurements of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). MODIS cloud optical depth (COD) and cloud top pressure (CTP) are used to identify cloud types. Different components of surface energy budgets from the satellite-based estimates and the discrepancies from their reanalysis counterparts will be presented as functions of COD and CTP for selected regions that represent tropical convective and subtropical subsidence regimes.

  9. Dual-FOV Raman and Doppler lidar studies of aerosol-cloud interactions: Simultaneous profiling of aerosols, warm-cloud properties, and vertical wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jörg; Ansmann, Albert; Bühl, Johannes; Baars, Holger; Wandinger, Ulla; Müller, Detlef; Malinka, Aleksey V.

    2014-05-01

    For the first time, colocated dual-field of view (dual-FOV) Raman lidar and Doppler lidar observations (case studies) of aerosol and cloud optical and microphysical properties below and within thin layered liquid water clouds are presented together with an updraft and downdraft characterization at cloud base. The goal of this work is to investigate the relationship between aerosol load close to cloud base and cloud characteristics of warm (purely liquid) clouds and the study of the influence of vertical motions and turbulent mixing on this relationship. We further use this opportunity to illustrate the applicability of the novel dual-FOV Raman lidar in this field of research. The dual-FOV lidar combines the well-established multiwavelength Raman lidar technique for aerosol retrievals and the multiple-scattering Raman lidar technique for profiling of the single-scattering extinction coefficient, effective radius, number concentration of the cloud droplets, and liquid water content. Key findings of our 3 year observations are presented in several case studies of optically thin altocumulus layers occurring in the lower free troposphere between 2.5 and 4 km height over Leipzig, Germany, during clean and polluted situations. For the clouds that we observed, the most direct link between aerosol proxy (particle extinction coefficient) and cloud proxy (cloud droplet number concentration) was found at cloud base during updraft periods. Above cloud base, additional processes resulting from turbulent mixing and entrainment of dry air make it difficult to determine the direct impact of aerosols on cloud processes.

  10. Space-Filling Curve Based Point Clouds Index Jun Wang and Jie Shan

    E-print Network

    Shan, Jie

    and ground-based laser scanning, is currently a widely used remote sensing technology for fast acquisition}@purdue.edu Abstract Managing large volume points clouds data generated from laser scanner is a challenging problem of the existing management methods, this paper presents a method to manage lidar data in databases based

  11. GEOSHUFFLE: LOCATION-AWARE, CONTENT-BASED MUSIC BROWSING USING SELF-ORGANIZING TAG CLOUDS

    E-print Network

    Tzanetakis, George

    GEOSHUFFLE: LOCATION-AWARE, CONTENT-BASED MUSIC BROWSING USING SELF-ORGANIZING TAG CLOUDS Scott these smartphones are also used as portable music players. In this paper we describe GeoShuffle ­ a prototype system for content-based music browsing and exploration that tar- gets such devices. One of the most interesting

  12. Sustainability Data and Analytics in Cloud-Based M2M Systems

    E-print Network

    Dustdar, Schahram

    for sustainability governance. Based on that we present techniques for supporting M2M data and process integration. We present a cloud-based data analytics system for sustainability governance that includes a Platform. Dustdar e-mail: dustdar@dsg.tuwien.ac.at N. Bessis and C. Dobre (eds.), Big Data and Internet of Things

  13. Characterization of mid-latitude cirrus cloud with airborne and ground-based lidar measurements during ML_CIRRUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Silke; Forster, Linda; Wirth, Martin; Schäfler, Andreas; Freudenthaler, Volker; Fix, Andreas; Mayer, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Cirrus clouds have a large impact on the Earth's climate and radiation budget, but their microphysical and radiative properties are still insufficiently understood. As these parameters are difficult to measure, our knowledge of the radiative effect of cirrus clouds is mainly based on theoretical simulations. But these simulations use idealized cloud structure and microphysics, as well as radiative transfer approximations. To improve our knowledge of mid-latitude cirrus clouds, measurements onboard the German research aircraft HALO were performed during the ML_CIRRUS campaign over Europe in March and April 2014. During ML_CIRRUS an extensive combination of in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation was used to study the microphysical, optical and radiative properties of cirrus clouds with respect to cirrus cloud formation and life time. During ML_CIRRUS the airborne water vapor differential absorption and high spectral resolution lidar WALES of DLR-Institute of Atmospheric Physics was operational onboard HALO to measure the 2-dimensional humidity distribution inside and outside of cirrus clouds as well as the cirrus clouds optical properties along the flight track. We will present first results of correlated analyses of the optical cirrus cloud properties and the relative humidity in- and outside the cloud, as well as on the distribution of relative humidity and optical properties within the cloud. In particular we investigate differences of the cirrus cloud properties with respect to cirrus cloud formation and life-time. Additionally, we will show first results of ground-based depolarization lidar measurements with the lidar system POLIS of Meteorological Institute of the LMU to study the optical properties of clouds considering different optical phenomena of the cirrus clouds.

  14. Dynamic resource allocation engine for cloud-based real-time video transcoding in mobile cloud computing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adedayo, Bada; Wang, Qi; Alcaraz Calero, Jose M.; Grecos, Christos

    2015-02-01

    The recent explosion in video-related Internet traffic has been driven by the widespread use of smart mobile devices, particularly smartphones with advanced cameras that are able to record high-quality videos. Although many of these devices offer the facility to record videos at different spatial and temporal resolutions, primarily with local storage considerations in mind, most users only ever use the highest quality settings. The vast majority of these devices are optimised for compressing the acquired video using a single built-in codec and have neither the computational resources nor battery reserves to transcode the video to alternative formats. This paper proposes a new low-complexity dynamic resource allocation engine for cloud-based video transcoding services that are both scalable and capable of being delivered in real-time. Firstly, through extensive experimentation, we establish resource requirement benchmarks for a wide range of transcoding tasks. The set of tasks investigated covers the most widely used input formats (encoder type, resolution, amount of motion and frame rate) associated with mobile devices and the most popular output formats derived from a comprehensive set of use cases, e.g. a mobile news reporter directly transmitting videos to the TV audience of various video format requirements, with minimal usage of resources both at the reporter's end and at the cloud infrastructure end for transcoding services.

  15. Accelerating and democratizing science through cloud-based services.

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I. (CLS-CI); ( MCS)

    2011-05-01

    Many businesses today save time and money, and increase their agility, by outsourcing mundane IT tasks to cloud providers. The author argues that similar methods can be used to overcome the complexities inherent in increasingly data-intensive, computational, and collaborative scientific research. He describes Globus Online, a system that he and his colleagues are developing to realize this vision. he scientific community today has unprecedented opportunities to effect transformational change in how individuals and teams engage in discovery. The driving force is a set of interrelated new capabilities that, when harnessed, can enable dramatic acceleration in the discovery process: greater availability of massive data, exponentially faster computers, ultra-high-speed networks, and deep interdisciplinary collaboration. The opportunity - and challenge - is to make these capabilities accessible not just to a few 'big science' projects but to every researcher at every level. Here, I argue that the key to seizing this opportunity is embracing software delivery methods that haven't been widely adopted in research, notably software as a service (SaaS) - a technology that forms an important part of what people refer to as the cloud. I also describe projects in the Computation Institute at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory that aim to realize this vision, focusing initially on data movement and management.

  16. TPM: cloud-based tele-PTSD monitor using multi-dimensional information.

    PubMed

    Xu, Roger; Mei, Gang; Zhang, Guangfan; Gao, Pan; Pepe, Aaron; Li, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    An automated system that can remotely and non-intrusively screen individuals at high risk for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and monitor their progress during treatment would be desired by many Veterans Affairs (VAs) as well as other PTSD treatment and research organizations. In this paper, we present an automated, cloud-based Tele-PTSD Monitor (TPM) system based on the fusion of multiple sources of information. The TPM system can be hosted in a cloud environment and accessed through landline or cell phones, or on the Internet through a web portal or mobile application (app). PMID:23400205

  17. Cloud Property Retrieval Products for Graciosa Island, Azores

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dong, Xiquan

    The motivation for developing this product was to use the Dong et al. 1998 method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties, such as cloud droplet effective radius, cloud droplets number concentration, and optical thickness. These retrieved properties have been used to validate the satellite retrieval, and evaluate the climate simulations and reanalyses. We had been using this method to retrieve cloud microphysical properties over ARM SGP and NSA sites. We also modified the method for the AMF at Shouxian, China and some IOPs, e.g. ARM IOP at SGP in March, 2000. The ARSCL data from ARM data archive over the SGP and NSA have been used to determine the cloud boundary and cloud phase. For these ARM permanent sites, the ARSCL data was developed based on MMCR measurements, however, there were no data available at the Azores field campaign. We followed the steps to generate this derived product and also include the MPLCMASK cloud retrievals to determine the most accurate cloud boundaries, including the thin cirrus clouds that WACR may under-detect. We use these as input to retrieve the cloud microphysical properties. Due to the different temporal resolutions of the derived cloud boundary heights product and the cloud properties product, we submit them as two separate netcdf files.

  18. Segmentation-Based Ground Points Detection from Mobile Laser Scanning Point Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, X.; Zhang, J.

    2015-06-01

    In most Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) applications, filtering is a necessary step. In this paper, a segmentation-based filtering method is proposed for MLS point cloud, where a segment rather than an individual point is the basic processing unit. Particularly, the MLS point cloud in some blocks are clustered into segments by a surface growing algorithm, then the object segments are detected and removed. A segment-based filtering method is employed to detect the ground segments. Two MLS point cloud datasets are used to evaluate the proposed method. Experiments indicate that, compared with the classic progressive TIN (Triangulated Irregular Network) densification algorithm, the proposed method is capable of reducing the omission error, the commission error and total error by 3.62%, 7.87% and 5.54% on average, respectively.

  19. Block-based cloud classification with statistical features and distribution of local texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Yu, C.-C.

    2015-03-01

    This work performs cloud classification on all-sky images. To deal with mixed cloud types in one image, we propose performing block division and block-based classification. In addition to classical statistical texture features, the proposed method incorporates local binary pattern, which extracts local texture features in the feature vector. The combined feature can effectively preserve global information as well as more discriminating local texture features of different cloud types. The experimental results have shown that applying the combined feature results in higher classification accuracy compared to using classical statistical texture features. In our experiments, it is also validated that using block-based classification outperforms classification on the entire images. Moreover, we report the classification accuracy using different classifiers including the k-nearest neighbor classifier, Bayesian classifier, and support vector machine.

  20. Temperature dependent electron effective mass and barrier height in HfO2 based metal/oxide/metal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kamel, F.

    2015-07-01

    Electrical measurements are realized on Cu/HfO2/Pt capacitors to extract the electron effective mass in HfO2 and the barrier height at the Cu/HfO2 interface. The dominant conduction mechanisms are found to be the Schottky emission at medium voltages and the Fowler–Nordheim tunneling at high voltages. Previous research has usually been carried out by assuming a constant value for either the electron effective mass in oxide or the interfacial potential barrier height to determine the other parameter. However, in contrast to that general practice, an iterative method was proposed in the present study to determine, at the same time, the electron effective mass in HfO2 and the barrier height at the Cu/HfO2 interface without making any prior assumption about their values. The temperature dependence of these two parameters was also studied in the 298–423?K range. It is found that they strongly vary with temperature. The effective mass decreases quadratically with temperature, while the barrier height increases linearly with temperature.

  1. Cloud microphysical background for the Israel-4 cloud seeding experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freud, Eyal; Koussevitzky, Hagai; Goren, Tom; Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The modest amount of rainfall in Israel occurs in winter storms that bring convective clouds from the Mediterranean Sea when the cold post frontal air interacts with its relatively warm surface. These clouds were seeded in the Israel-1 and Israel-2 cloud glaciogenic seeding experiments, which have shown statistically significant positive effect of added rainfall of at least 13% in northern Israel, whereas the Israel-3 experiment showed no added rainfall in the south. This was followed by operational seeding in the north since 1975. The lack of physical evidence for the causes of the positive effects in the north caused a lack of confidence in the statistical results and led to the Israel-4 randomized seeding experiment in northern Israel. This experiment started in the winter of 2013/14. The main difference from the previous experiments is the focus on the orographic clouds in the catchment of the Sea of Galilee. The decision to commence the experiment was partially based on evidence supporting the existence of seeding potential, which is reported here. Aircraft and satellite microphysical and dynamic measurements of the clouds document the critical roles of aerosols, especially sea spray, on cloud microstructure and precipitation forming processes. It was found that the convective clouds over sea and coastal areas are naturally seeded hygroscopically by sea spray and develop precipitation efficiently. The diminution of the large sea spray aerosols farther inland along with the increase in aerosol concentrations causes the clouds to develop precipitation more slowly. The short time available for the precipitation forming processes in super-cooled orographic clouds over the Golan Heights farthest inland represents the best glaciogenic seeding potential.

  2. Canonical Heights, Nef Divisors,

    E-print Network

    Silverman, Joseph H.

    Canonical Heights, Nef Divisors, and Arithmetic Degrees Joseph H. Silverman Brown University Joint, Taipei, Taiwan June 24­28, 2013 0 #12;Canonical Heights on Abelian Varieties 0 #12;Canonical Heights on Abelian Varieties 1 Canonical Heights on Abelian Varieties Let A/ ¯Q be an abelian variety. The (quadratic

  3. Evaluation of the Miklip Decadal Prediction System Using Satellite Based Cloud Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangehl, T.; Schroeder, M.; Stolzenberger, S.; Glowienka-Hense, R.; Mazurkiewicz, A.; Hense, A.

    2014-12-01

    The decadal hindcast simulations performed for the "Mittelfristige Klimaprognosen" (MiKlip, decadal climate predictions) project are evaluated using satellite-retrieved cloud parameters from the CM SAF cLoud, Albedo and RAdiation dataset from AVHRR data (CLARA-A1) provided by the Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) and from the International Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). The forecast quality of two sets of hindcasts, Baseline-1-LR and Baseline-0, which use different ocean anomaly initializations, is assessed. While Baseline-0 uses an ocean only initialization, Baseline-1-LR additionally uses full field initialization of atmospheric fields. Basic evaluation focuses on multi-year ensemble mean fields and cloud-type histograms utilizing satellite simulator output. Additionally, ensemble evaluation employing analysis of variance (ANOVA), analysis rank histograms (ARH) and a deterministic correlation score is performed. Satellite simulator output is available for a subset of the full hindcast ensembles only. Therefore, the raw model cloud cover is additionally used. The Baseline-1-LR hindcasts are closer to satellite data with respect to the simulated tropical/subtropical mean cloud cover pattern than the reference hindcasts (Baseline-0) emphasizing improvements of the initialisation procedure used for Baseline-1-LR when compared to Baseline-0. A slightly overestimated occurrence rate of optically thick cloud-types is analyzed for different experiments including hindcasts and simulations using realistic sea surface boundaries according to the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project. By contrast, the evaluation of cirrus and cirrostratus clouds is complicated by observational based uncertainties. Ensemble evaluation of the Baseline-1-LR hindcasts reveals potential predictability of the 2-5 lead year averaged total cloud cover for a large part of the tropical warm pool (TWP) region when regarding the full observational period. However, the hindcasts show only moderate positive correlations with the CLARA-A1 satellite retrieval for the TWP region which are hardly statistical significant. Evidence for predictability of the 2-5 lead year averaged total cloud cover is found for parts of the equatorial to mid-latitudinal North Atlantic.

  4. A Comparison of the Optical Pulse Characteristics of Intracloud and Cloud-to-Ground Lightning as Observed above Clouds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven J. Goodman; Hugh J. Christian; W. David Rust

    1988-01-01

    The time-resolved optical waveforms at 777.4 nm and electric-field changes produced by intracloud and cloud-to-ground lightning flashes were measured above clouds from a U2 airplane (flying at a height of 20 km) at the same time that ground-based measurements of lightning were obtained from a mobile laboratory and a regional lightning location network. The U2 optical pulse trains are examined

  5. HydroConnector: A tool for estimating stage height of ungaged river site based on standardized hydro web services and HPG model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Hojun; Kim, Dongsu; Seo, Yongwon

    2014-09-01

    Recently, River Information System that integrates a variety of riverine information has been widely developed driven by information technologies. In Korea, massive riverine data also have been incorporated into various specific River Information Systems, where such in-situ data and information system triggers new needs for active or real-time uses of them for numerical modeling or more advanced post-processing as a next step. Based on such new needs, the present study attempts to develop a software called HydroConnector that dynamically integrates river-based numerical modeling or post-processing with in-situ data based upon data searching technique using hydro web service built on top of a ODM-based database following a CUAHSI standard. It fundamentally differs from the conventional direct access to the database for acquiring a given period of dataset. Such a hydro web service and ODM-based database were built by utilizing existing real-time stream gaging data and they are dynamically connected with a HPG model that estimates stage height for a ungaged site. As a result, the newly developed HydroConnector is very intuitive for the user due to user-friendly GUI and facilitates modeling processes by automatically connecting remotely located data and a specific numerical model without further laborious data pre- and post-processing. In fact, HPG model consists of a pre-established diagram based on the simulated outputs from one-dimensional river models such as HEC-RAS operated for the possible flow conditions, and it is able to estimate the stage height for a ungaged site driven by the given downstream stage height and upstream flow discharge. The HydroConnector incorporates both the web service and the HPG model, which enables to make dynamic data pre-processing adjusted for the numerical model, and automatically operate the HPG model to finally provide the targeted ungaged stage height.

  6. The Roles of Cloud Drop Effective Radius and LWP in Determining Rain Properties in Marine Stratocumulus

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.

    2012-07-04

    Numerical simulations described in previous studies showed that adding cloud condensation nuclei to marine stratocumulus can prevent their breakup from closed into open cells. Additional analyses of the same simulations show that the suppression of rain is well described in terms of cloud drop effective radius (re). Rain is initiated when re near cloud top is around 12-14 um. Cloud water starts to get depleted when column-maximum rain intensity (Rmax) exceeds 0.1 mm h-1. This happens when cloud-top re reaches 14 um. Rmax is mostly less than 0.1 mm h-1 at re<14 um, regardless of the cloud water path, but increases rapidly when re exceeds 14 um. This is in agreement with recent aircraft observations and theoretical observations in convective clouds so that the mechanism is not limited to describing marine stratocumulus. These results support the hypothesis that the onset of significant precipitation is determined by the number of nucleated cloud drops and the height (H) above cloud base within the cloud that is required for cloud drops to reach re of 14 um. In turn, this can explain the conditions for initiation of significant drizzle and opening of closed cells providing the basis for a simple parameterization for GCMs that unifies the representation of both precipitating and non-precipitating clouds as well as the transition between them. Furthermore, satellite global observations of cloud depth (from base to top), and cloud top re can be used to derive and validate this parameterization.

  7. QoS-aware health monitoring system using cloud-based WBANs.

    PubMed

    Almashaqbeh, Ghada; Hayajneh, Thaier; Vasilakos, Athanasios V; Mohd, Bassam J

    2014-10-01

    Wireless Body Area Networks (WBANs) are amongst the best options for remote health monitoring. However, as standalone systems WBANs have many limitations due to the large amount of processed data, mobility of monitored users, and the network coverage area. Integrating WBANs with cloud computing provides effective solutions to these problems and promotes the performance of WBANs based systems. Accordingly, in this paper we propose a cloud-based real-time remote health monitoring system for tracking the health status of non-hospitalized patients while practicing their daily activities. Compared with existing cloud-based WBAN frameworks, we divide the cloud into local one, that includes the monitored users and local medical staff, and a global one that includes the outer world. The performance of the proposed framework is optimized by reducing congestion, interference, and data delivery delay while supporting users' mobility. Several novel techniques and algorithms are proposed to accomplish our objective. First, the concept of data classification and aggregation is utilized to avoid clogging the network with unnecessary data traffic. Second, a dynamic channel assignment policy is developed to distribute the WBANs associated with the users on the available frequency channels to manage interference. Third, a delay-aware routing metric is proposed to be used by the local cloud in its multi-hop communication to speed up the reporting process of the health-related data. Fourth, the delay-aware metric is further utilized by the association protocols used by the WBANs to connect with the local cloud. Finally, the system with all the proposed techniques and algorithms is evaluated using extensive ns-2 simulations. The simulation results show superior performance of the proposed architecture in optimizing the end-to-end delay, handling the increased interference levels, maximizing the network capacity, and tracking user's mobility. PMID:25123456

  8. Assessing and Correcting Topographic Effects on Forest Canopy Height Retrieval Using Airborne LiDAR Data

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhugeng; Zhao, Dan; Zeng, Yuan; Zhao, Yujin; Wu, Bingfang; Zhu, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Topography affects forest canopy height retrieval based on airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data a lot. This paper proposes a method for correcting deviations caused by topography based on individual tree crown segmentation. The point cloud of an individual tree was extracted according to crown boundaries of isolated individual trees from digital orthophoto maps (DOMs). Normalized canopy height was calculated by subtracting the elevation of centres of gravity from the elevation of point cloud. First, individual tree crown boundaries are obtained by carrying out segmentation on the DOM. Second, point clouds of the individual trees are extracted based on the boundaries. Third, precise DEM is derived from the point cloud which is classified by a multi-scale curvature classification algorithm. Finally, a height weighted correction method is applied to correct the topological effects. The method is applied to LiDAR data acquired in South China, and its effectiveness is tested using 41 field survey plots. The results show that the terrain impacts the canopy height of individual trees in that the downslope side of the tree trunk is elevated and the upslope side is depressed. This further affects the extraction of the location and crown of individual trees. A strong correlation was detected between the slope gradient and the proportions of returns with height differences more than 0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 m in the total returns, with coefficient of determination R2 of 0.83, 0.76, and 0.60 (n = 41), respectively. PMID:26016907

  9. Assessing and Correcting Topographic Effects on Forest Canopy Height Retrieval Using Airborne LiDAR Data.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhugeng; Zhao, Dan; Zeng, Yuan; Zhao, Yujin; Wu, Bingfang; Zhu, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Topography affects forest canopy height retrieval based on airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data a lot. This paper proposes a method for correcting deviations caused by topography based on individual tree crown segmentation. The point cloud of an individual tree was extracted according to crown boundaries of isolated individual trees from digital orthophoto maps (DOMs). Normalized canopy height was calculated by subtracting the elevation of centres of gravity from the elevation of point cloud. First, individual tree crown boundaries are obtained by carrying out segmentation on the DOM. Second, point clouds of the individual trees are extracted based on the boundaries. Third, precise DEM is derived from the point cloud which is classified by a multi-scale curvature classification algorithm. Finally, a height weighted correction method is applied to correct the topological effects. The method is applied to LiDAR data acquired in South China, and its effectiveness is tested using 41 field survey plots. The results show that the terrain impacts the canopy height of individual trees in that the downslope side of the tree trunk is elevated and the upslope side is depressed. This further affects the extraction of the location and crown of individual trees. A strong correlation was detected between the slope gradient and the proportions of returns with height differences more than 0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 m in the total returns, with coefficient of determination R2 of 0.83, 0.76, and 0.60 (n = 41), respectively. PMID:26016907

  10. A Secure Cloud-based NFC Mobile Payment Protocol Pardis Pourghomi.1

    E-print Network

    1 A Secure Cloud-based NFC Mobile Payment Protocol Pardis Pourghomi.1 Muhammad Qasim Saeed2 . Gheorghita Ghinea1 Abstract Near Field Communication (NFC) is one the most recent technologies in the area of application development and service delivery via mobile phone. NFC enables the mobile phone to act

  11. Virtual Resources Allocation for Workflow-Based Applications Distribution on a Cloud Infrastructure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tram Truong Huu; Johan Montagnat

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing infrastructures are providing resources on demand for tackling the needs of large-scale distributed applications. Determining the amount of resources to allocate for a given computation is a difficult problem though. This paper introduces and compares four automated resource allocation strategies relying on the expertise that can be captured in workflow-based applications. The evaluation of these strategies was carried

  12. Determination of xanthohumol in beer based on cloud point extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ligang Chen; Qi Zhao; Haiyan Jin; Xiaopan Zhang; Yang Xu; Aimin Yu; Hanqi Zhang; Lan Ding

    2010-01-01

    A method based on coupling of cloud point extraction (CPE) with high performance liquid chromatography separation and ultraviolet detection was developed for determination of xanthohumol in beer. The nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 was chosen as the extraction medium. The parameters affecting the CPE were evaluated and optimized. The highest extraction yield of xanthohumol was obtained with 2.5% of Triton X-114

  13. Spectrum Clouds: A Session Based Spectrum Trading System for Multi-hop Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-print Network

    Latchman, Haniph A.

    Spectrum Clouds: A Session Based Spectrum Trading System for Multi-hop Cognitive Radio Networks, Taiwan. Abstract--Spectrum trading creates more accessing opportu- nities for secondary users (SUs) and economically benefits the primary users (PUs). However, it is challenging to implement spectrum trading

  14. Volcanic Ash Cloud Retrieval by Ground-Based Microwave Weather Radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Silvio Marzano; Stefano Barbieri; Gianfranco Vulpiani; William I. Rose

    2006-01-01

    The potential of ground-based microwave weather radar systems for volcanic ash cloud detection and quantitative retrieval is evaluated. The relationship between radar reflectivity factor, ash concentration, and fall rate is statistically derived for various eruption regimes and ash sizes by applying a radar-reflectivity microphysical model. To quantitatively evaluate the ash detectability by weather radars, a sensitivity analysis is carried out

  15. Towards Self-Repairing Replication-Based Storage Systems Using Untrusted Clouds

    E-print Network

    Curtmola, Reza

    Towards Self-Repairing Replication-Based Storage Systems Using Untrusted Clouds Bo Chen, Reza Curtmola Department of Computer Science New Jersey Institute of Technology {bc47,crix}@njit.edu ABSTRACT Distributed storage systems store data redundantly at multiple servers which are geographically spread through

  16. FluidNet: A Flexible Cloud-based Radio Access Network for Small Cells

    E-print Network

    Krishnamurthy, Srikanth

    FluidNet: A Flexible Cloud-based Radio Access Network for Small Cells Karthikeyan Sundaresan NEC-RAN) have been proposed as a cost-efficient way of deploying small cells. Unlike conven- tional RANs, a C operation of BBUs and scalable deployment of light-weight RRHs as small cells. In this work, we argue

  17. Implementation of a Cloud-based Blood Pressure Data Management System.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Mu-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    Regular monitoring of blood pressure of a patient can improve hypertension diagnosis and treatment. The objective of this study is to design and implement a cloud computing based blood pressure data management system that allows patients, nurses, physicians, and researchers to access data through the Internet anytime, anywhere and via any device. PMID:25991282

  18. Exploring Architecture Options for a Federated, Cloud-based System Biology Knowledgebase

    SciTech Connect

    Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan; Yin, Jian

    2010-12-02

    This paper evaluates various cloud computing technologies and resources for building a system biology knowledge base system. This system will host a huge amount of data and contain a flexible sets of workflows to operate on these data. It will enable system biologist to share their data and algorithms to allow research results to be reproduced, shared, and reused across the system biology community.

  19. Token-Based Cloud Computing -- Secure Outsourcing of Data and Arbitrary Computations with Lower Latency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmad-Reza Sadeghi; Thomas Schneider; Marcel Winandy

    2010-01-01

    Secure outsourcing of computation to an untrusted (cloud) service provider is becoming more and more important. Pure cryptographic solutions based on fully homomorphic and verifiable encryption, recently proposed, are promising but suffer from very high latency. Other proposals perform the whole computation on tamper-proof hardware and usually suffer from the same problem. Trusted computing (TC) is another promising approach that

  20. Precise measurement of liquid petroleum tank volume based on data cloud analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jintao Wang; Ziyong Liu; Long Zhang; Ligong Guo; Xuesong Bao; Lin Tong

    2010-01-01

    Metal tanks are generally used for the measurement of liquid petroleum products for fiscal or custody transfer application. One tank volume precise measurement method based on data cloud analysis was studied, which was acquired by laser scanning principle. Method of distance measurement by laser phase shift and angular measurement by optical grating were applied to acquire coordinates of points in

  1. Parallel Based on Cloud Computing to Achieve Large Data Sets Clustering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heng Li; Dan Yang; WeiTao Fang

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a CPCluster Map Reduce algorithm to achieve parallelism in cloud computing platform for clustering large, high-dimensional datasets. The proposed Map Reduce paradigm based clustering algorithm improves the traditional cluster algorithm in a parallelized way. It is scalability and has a good acceleration capability, and by adding the compute nodes, speedup is achieved. Experimental results show that the

  2. Measured Characteristics of Distributed Cloud Computing Infrastructure for Message-based Collaboration Applications

    E-print Network

    Bloomington, IN 47408 USA Computer Science Department and Community Grids Laboratory, Indiana University 501 N, a message-based Web Conferencing system for synchronous, multipoint data collaboration, Voice-over IP communication, and Video- over IP conferencing traffics. Specifically, the Amazon EC2 Linux clouds in the U

  3. Towards a Smart City based on Cloud of Things Riccardo Petrolo, Valeria Loscr, Nathalie Mitton

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Towards a Smart City based on Cloud of Things Riccardo Petrolo, Valeria Loscrì, Nathalie Mitton firstname.lastname@inria.fr - Inria Lille-Nord Europe, France ABSTRACT Smart City represents one of the most promising and promi- nent Internet of Things (IoT) applications. In the last few years, smart city concept

  4. Radiograph-based study of gender-specific vertebral area gain in healthy children and adolescents as a function of age, height, and weight.

    PubMed

    Schober, H C; Kreutzer, H J; Terpe, R; Paschke, D; Andresen, R; Ludwig, K; Kundt, G

    2012-01-01

    This study reports gender-specific vertebral area gain data from children and adolescents. Vertebral area was measured on lateral and anteroposterior thoracic and lumbar spine radiographs from 100 female and 100 male subjects aged 7-28 yr. T9, T11, T12, L1, and L2 X-ray area calculation was based on calculation of the area of the geometric figure of a trapezoid whose 2 nonparallel sides were equal in length, taking account of the waisted shape of the vertebrae. Both the boys and girls of our study population showed statistically significant dependence (p<0.001) of vertebral area gain on chronologic age, height, and weight right through the end of puberty, and especially so up to age 15 yr. However, height and weight were clearly better predictors of lateral and anteroposterior vertebral area gain than was chronologic age. Once vertebral growth is complete by age 18 yr or so, the lateral vertebral areas of the male subjects-regardless of body weight and height-are, on average, 25% larger, and the anteroposterior areas up to 30% larger than those of their female counterparts. After adjusting for chronologic age, height, and weight however we did not find significant differences, between gender, in vertebral area of male and female subjects, neither among children younger than 11 yr nor adolescents ages of 12-14 yr and young adults older than 18 yr. PMID:22521540

  5. A Tag Cloud-Based Visualization for Geo-Referenced Text Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Hua, Y.-X.; Zhao, J.-X.; Wang, L.-N.; Wang, P.

    2013-11-01

    Large amounts of geo-referenced text information such as messages from microblog websites are continuously becoming more popular. In this paper, we introduce a new visualization method based on tag clouds for geo-referenced text information. We process large amounts of geo-referenced text, using several visual metaphors including tag clouds, for the exploration of information on maps, instead of using just conventional cartographic approaches. The results show that this method can be useful for presentation and exploration of such geo-referenced text information.

  6. A threshold-based cloud mask for the high-resolution visible channel of Meteosat Second Generation SEVIRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bley, S.; Deneke, H.

    2013-10-01

    A threshold-based cloud mask for the high-resolution visible (HRV) channel (1 × 1 km2) of the Meteosat SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) instrument is introduced and evaluated. It is based on operational EUMETSAT cloud mask for the low-resolution channels of SEVIRI (3 × 3 km2), which is used for the selection of suitable thresholds to ensure consistency with its results. The aim of using the HRV channel is to resolve small-scale cloud structures that cannot be detected by the low-resolution channels. We find that it is of advantage to apply thresholds relative to clear-sky reflectance composites, and to adapt the threshold regionally. Furthermore, the accuracy of the different spectral channels for thresholding and the suitability of the HRV channel are investigated for cloud detection. The case studies show different situations to demonstrate the behavior for various surface and cloud conditions. Overall, between 4 and 24% of cloudy low-resolution SEVIRI pixels are found to contain broken clouds in our test data set depending on considered region. Most of these broken pixels are classified as cloudy by EUMETSAT's cloud mask, which will likely result in an overestimate if the mask is used as an estimate of cloud fraction. The HRV cloud mask aims for small-scale convective sub-pixel clouds that are missed by the EUMETSAT cloud mask. The major limit of the HRV cloud mask is the minimum cloud optical thickness (COT) that can be detected. This threshold COT was found to be about 0.8 over ocean and 2 over land and is highly related to the albedo of the underlying surface.

  7. Registration of vehicle based panoramic image and LiDAR point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changjun; Cao, Liang; Xie, Hong; Zhuo, Xiangyu

    2013-10-01

    Higher quality surface information would be got when data from optical images and LiDAR were integrated, owing to the fact that optical images and LiDAR point cloud have unique characteristics that make them preferable in many applications. While most previous works focus on registration of pinhole perspective cameras to 2D or 3D LiDAR data. In this paper, a method for the registration of vehicle based panoramic image and LiDAR point cloud is proposed. Using the translation among panoramic image, single CCD image, laser scanner and Position and Orientation System (POS) along with the GPS/IMU data, precise co-registration between the panoramic image and the LiDAR point cloud in the world system is achieved. Results are presented under a real world data set collected by a new developed Mobile Mapping System (MMS) integrated with a high resolution panoramic camera, two laser scanners and a POS.

  8. New MISR Cloud Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-08-06

    ... (MISR) project and the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) announce the release of a new science data product, ... heights at 1.1 km resolution; and cross-track cloud motion components at 1.1 km resolution. Additional parameters include cloud masks and ...

  9. A Mobile Cloud-Based Parkinson’s Disease Assessment System for Home-Based Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Petitti, Diana B

    2015-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the most prevalent movement disorder of the central nervous system, and affects more than 6.3 million people in the world. The characteristic motor features include tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and impaired postural stability. Current therapy based on augmentation or replacement of dopamine is designed to improve patients’ motor performance but often leads to levodopa-induced adverse effects, such as dyskinesia and motor fluctuation. Clinicians must regularly monitor patients in order to identify these effects and other declines in motor function as soon as possible. Current clinical assessment for Parkinson’s is subjective and mostly conducted by brief observations made during patient visits. Changes in patients’ motor function between visits are hard to track and clinicians are not able to make the most informed decisions about the course of therapy without frequent visits. Frequent clinic visits increase the physical and economic burden on patients and their families. Objective In this project, we sought to design, develop, and evaluate a prototype mobile cloud-based mHealth app, “PD Dr”, which collects quantitative and objective information about PD and would enable home-based assessment and monitoring of major PD symptoms. Methods We designed and developed a mobile app on the Android platform to collect PD-related motion data using the smartphone 3D accelerometer and to send the data to a cloud service for storage, data processing, and PD symptoms severity estimation. To evaluate this system, data from the system were collected from 40 patients with PD and compared with experts’ rating on standardized rating scales. Results The evaluation showed that PD Dr could effectively capture important motion features that differentiate PD severity and identify critical symptoms. For hand resting tremor detection, the sensitivity was .77 and accuracy was .82. For gait difficulty detection, the sensitivity was .89 and accuracy was .81. In PD severity estimation, the captured motion features also demonstrated strong correlation with PD severity stage, hand resting tremor severity, and gait difficulty. The system is simple to use, user friendly, and economically affordable. Conclusions The key contribution of this study was building a mobile PD assessment and monitoring system to extend current PD assessment based in the clinic setting to the home-based environment. The results of this study proved feasibility and a promising future for utilizing mobile technology in PD management. PMID:25830687

  10. The Cloud-Based Integrated Data Viewer (IDV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Ward

    2015-04-01

    Maintaining software compatibility across new computing environments and the associated underlying hardware is a common problem for software engineers and scientific programmers. While there are a suite of tools and methodologies used in traditional software engineering environments to mitigate this issue, they are typically ignored by developers lacking a background in software engineering. The result is a large body of software which is simultaneously critical and difficult to maintain. Visualization software is particularly vulnerable to this problem, given the inherent dependency on particular graphics hardware and software API's. The advent of cloud computing has provided a solution to this problem, which was not previously practical on a large scale; Application Streaming. This technology allows a program to run entirely on a remote virtual machine while still allowing for interactivity and dynamic visualizations, with little-to-no re-engineering required. Through application streaming we are able to bring the same visualization to a desktop, a netbook, a smartphone, and the next generation of hardware, whatever it may be. Unidata has been able to harness Application Streaming to provide a tablet-compatible version of our visualization software, the Integrated Data Viewer (IDV). This work will examine the challenges associated with adapting the IDV to an application streaming platform, and include a brief discussion of the underlying technologies involved. We will also discuss the differences between local software and software-as-a-service.

  11. A Global View of Ice Generation in Supercooled Stratiform Altocumulus Clouds Based on CALIPSO and CloudSat Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Wang, Z.; Liu, D.

    2008-12-01

    Ice generation in atmospheric clouds is still poorly understood. Supercooled stratiform altocumulus (Ac) clouds represent a simple scenario to study ice generation in clouds. Because radar is more sensitive to large ice crystals than small water droplets in mixed-phase clouds, radar measurements provide a good indication of ice generation in supercooled stratiform Ac clouds. The first year CALIPSO (lidar) and CloudSat (radar) satellite data are analyzed to provide a global view of ice generation in supercooled stratiform Ac clouds. Two distinct ice formation zones, cloud top temperature (CTT) colder or warmer than -18 C, can be identified from the distributions of Ac occurrence in terms of CTT and layer maximum radar reflectivity factor (Zmax). For all latitude ranges, ice crystals are detectable in some of the stratiform Ac clouds when cloud top temperature colder than -10 C, and the Zmax of ice crystals increase with CTT decrease in an similar slope and reach the maximum value ~ -16 C. Ice generation in stratiform Ac with CTT colder than -18 C show significant latitude differences. The contrast of ice generation in these two zones indicate different dominate ice generation mechanisms among them. The ice occurrence and mean ice water path are proved as a function of CTT. Aerosol size and chemical compositions have great impacts on ice formation characteristics, and mineral dust is effective ice nuclei (IN). By separating stratiform Ac in the "dust bel" regions into dusty Ac (affected by dust) and non-dusty Ac, we found strong dust impacts on ice generation in stratiform Ac. For dusty Ac, ice are detected in all clouds when CTT reaches ~ -20 C.

  12. Cloud properties derived from two lidars over the ARM SGP site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, Martial; Morille, Yohann; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Flynn, Connor; Long, Charles N.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Newson, Rob K.

    2011-04-01

    Active remote sensors such as lidars or radars can be used with other data to quantify the cloud properties at regional scale and at global scale. Relative to radar, lidar remote sensing is sensitive to very thin and high clouds but has a significant limitation due to signal attenuation in the ability to precisely quantify the properties of clouds with a cloud optical thickness larger than 3. The cloud properties for all levels of clouds are derived and distributions of cloud base height (CBH), top height (CTH), physical cloud thickness (CT), and optical thickness (COT) from local statistics are compared. The goal of this study is (1) to establish a climatology of macrophysical and optical properties for all levels of clouds observed over the ARM SGP site and (2) to estimate the discrepancies between the two remote sensing systems (pulse energy, sampling, resolution, etc.). Our first results tend to show that the MPL, which are the primary ARM lidars, have a distinctly limited range within which all of these cloud properties are detectable, especially cloud top and cloud thickness, but this can include cloud base particularly during summer daytime period. According to the comparisons between RL and MPL, almost 50% of situations show a signal to noise ratio too low (smaller than 3) for the MPL in order to detect clouds higher than 7km during daytime period in summer. Consequently, the MPL-derived annual cycle of cirrus cloud base (top) altitude is biased low, especially for daylight periods, compared with those derived from the RL data, which detects cloud base ranging from 7.5 km in winter to 9.5 km in summer (and tops ranging from 8.6 to 10.5 km). The optically thickest cirrus clouds (COT > 0.3) reach 50% of the total population for the Raman lidar and only 20% for the Micropulse lidar due to the difference of pulse energy and the effect of solar irradiance contamination. A complementary study using the cloud fraction derived from the Micropulse lidar for clouds below 5 km and from the Raman lidar for cloud above 5 km allows for better estimation of the total cloud fraction between the ground and the top of the atmosphere. This study presents the diurnal cycle of cloud fraction for each season in comparisons with Long et al.'s (2006) cloud fraction calculation derived from radiative flux analysis.

  13. A combined spectral and object-based approach to transparent cloud removal in an operational setting for Landsat ETM+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watmough, Gary R.; Atkinson, Peter M.; Hutton, Craig W.

    2011-04-01

    The automated cloud cover assessment (ACCA) algorithm has provided automated estimates of cloud cover for the Landsat ETM+ mission since 2001. However, due to the lack of a band around 1.375 ?m, cloud edges and transparent clouds such as cirrus cannot be detected. Use of Landsat ETM+ imagery for terrestrial land analysis is further hampered by the relatively long revisit period due to a nadir only viewing sensor. In this study, the ACCA threshold parameters were altered to minimise omission errors in the cloud masks. Object-based analysis was used to reduce the commission errors from the extended cloud filters. The method resulted in the removal of optically thin cirrus cloud and cloud edges which are often missed by other methods in sub-tropical areas. Although not fully automated, the principles of the method developed here provide an opportunity for using otherwise sub-optimal or completely unusable Landsat ETM+ imagery for operational applications. Where specific images are required for particular research goals the method can be used to remove cloud and transparent cloud helping to reduce bias in subsequent land cover classifications.

  14. Cloud Distribution Statistics from LITE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, David M.

    1998-01-01

    The Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) mission has demonstrated the utility of spaceborne lidar in observing multilayer clouds and has provided a dataset showing the distribution of tropospheric clouds and aerosols. These unambiguous observations of the vertical distribution of clouds will allow improved verification of current cloud climatologies and GCM cloud parameterizations. Although there is now great interest in cloud profiling radar, operating in the mm-wave region, for the spacebased observation of cloud heights the results of the LITE mission have shown that satellite lidars can also make significant contributions in this area.

  15. Observer Interface Analysis for Standardization to a Cloud Based Real-Time Space Situational Awareness (SSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilers, J.

    2013-09-01

    The interface analysis from an observer of space objects makes a standard necessary. This standardized dataset serves as input for a cloud based service, which aimed for a near real-time Space Situational Awareness (SSA) system. The system contains all advantages of a cloud based solution, like redundancy, scalability and an easy way to distribute information. For the standard based on the interface analysis of the observer, the information can be separated in three parts. One part is the information about the observer e.g. a ground station. The next part is the information about the sensors that are used by the observer. And the last part is the data from the detected object. Backbone of the SSA System is the cloud based service which includes the consistency check for the observed objects, a database for the objects, the algorithms and analysis as well as the visualization of the results. This paper also provides an approximation of the needed computational power, data storage and a financial approach to deliver this service to a broad community. In this context cloud means, neither the user nor the observer has to think about the infrastructure of the calculation environment. The decision if the IT-infrastructure will be built by a conglomerate of different nations or rented on the marked should be based on an efficiency analysis. Also combinations are possible like starting on a rented cloud and then go to a private cloud owned by the government. One of the advantages of a cloud solution is the scalability. There are about 3000 satellites in space, 900 of them are active, and in total there are about ~17.000 detected space objects orbiting earth. But for the computation it is not a N(active) to N problem it is more N(active) to N(apo peri) quantity of N(all). Instead of 15.3 million possible collisions to calculate a computation of only approx. 2.3 million possible collisions must be done. In general, this Space Situational Awareness System can be used as a tool for satellite system owner for collision avoidance.

  16. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei spectra within maritime cumulus cloud droplets: Implications for mixing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twohy, Cynthia H.; Hudson, James G.

    1995-01-01

    In a cloud formed during adiabatic expansion, the droplet size distribution will be systematically related to the critical supersaturation of the cloud condensation nuclei (CNN), but this relationship can be complicated in entraining clouds. Useful information about cloud processes, such as mixing, can be obtained from direct measurements of the CNN involved in droplet nucleation. This was accomplished by interfacing two instruments for a series of flights in maritime cumulus clouds. One instrument, the counterflow virtual impactor, collected cloud droplets, and the nonvolatile residual nuclei of the droplets was then passed to a CCN spectrometer, which measured the critical supersaturation (S(sub c)) spectrum of the droplet nuclei. The measured S(sub c) spectra of the droplet nuclei were compared with the S(sub c) spectra of ambient aerosol particles in order to identify which CCN were actually incorporated into droplets and to determine when mixing processes were active at different cloud levels. The droplet nuclei nearly always exhibited lower median S(sub c)'s than the ambient aerosol, as expected since droplets nucleate perferentially on particles with lower critical supersaturations. Critical supersaturation spectra from nuclei of droplets near cloud base were similar to those predicted for cloud regions formed adiabatically, but spectra of droplet nuclei from middle cloud levels showed some evidence that mixing had occurred. Near cloud top, the greatest variation in the spectra of the droplet nuclei was observed, and nuclei with high S(sub c)'s were sometimes present even within relatively large droplets. This suggests that the extent of mixing increases with height in cumulus clouds and that inhomogeneous mixing may be important near cloud top. These promising initial results suggest improvements to the experimental technique that will permit more quantitative results in future experiments.

  17. A refined cloud parameterization based on double-Gaussian probability density functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, Ann Kristin; Seifert, Axel; Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2013-04-01

    The choice of the cloud parameterization in a large scale model like a numerical weather prediction model or a global circulation model is known to have a large impact on microphysical and radiative processes which in turn determine, e.g., the formation of precipitation or the energy balance. Cloud properties like cloud fraction and average liquid water in a large scale model grid box depend on the subgrid variability of temperature and moisture as characterized by their probability density function (PDF). Therefore PDF-based parameterizations of boundary layer clouds are often used in numerical weather prediction or global circulation models. In recent years closures using a 5-parameter double-Gaussian PDF have become increasingly popular because the double-Gaussian distribution can provide very accurate fits to observed or simulated empirical PDFs. Even if we assume that the first three moments of the subgrid PDF can be predicted in the large scale model, the number of parameters still has to be reduced from five to three, i.e., two closure equations are necessary. Considering cases of different cloud regimes, i.e., trade wind cumulus, stratocumulus and stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition, from large-eddy simulations as well as direct numerical simulations and observational data, a new parameterization based on double-Gaussian PDFs is proposed. A priori testing in large-eddy simulations suggests that the reduced 3-parameter double-Gaussian is an appropriate approximation, especially when the differences between stratocumulus and shallow convection are taken into account. In contrast to previous work, we do not find a perfectly anti-symmetric shape of negatively and positively skewed subgrid PDFs. Instead the PDFs differ in the shape of their tails, with the tail of a positively skewed PDF in a shallow cumulus regime being heavier than the tail of a negatively skewed PDF in a stratocumulus regime. This is consistent with the physical understanding that cloudy updrafts in shallow cumulus are more vigorous than non-cloudy downdrafts in stratocumulus. When taking this difference into account in the closure equations, the new parameterization is able to reproduce profiles of cloud fraction and average liquid water properly. Additionally, we show that the error of the parameterization is smallest for a horizontal resolution of 5 - 20 km and also depends on whether of not the cloud field self-organizes, e.g., in cloud clusters and mesoscale arcs.

  18. Study of Droplet Activation in Thin Clouds Using Ground-based Raman Lidar and Ancillary Remote Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio; Gumà Claramunt, Pilar; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Studies on global climate change show that the effects of aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) on the Earth's radiation balance and climate, also known as indirect aerosol effects, are the most uncertain among all the effects involving the atmospheric constituents and processes (Stocker et al., IPCC, 2013). Droplet activation is the most important and challenging process in the understanding of ACI. It represents the direct microphysical link between aerosols and clouds and it is probably the largest source of uncertainty in estimating indirect aerosol effects. An accurate estimation of aerosol-clouds microphysical and optical properties in proximity and within the cloud boundaries represents a good frame for the study of droplet activation. This can be obtained by using ground-based profiling remote sensing techniques. In this work, a methodology for the experimental investigation of droplet activation, based on ground-based multi-wavelength Raman lidar and Doppler radar technique, is presented. The study is focused on the observation of thin liquid water clouds, which are low or midlevel super-cooled clouds characterized by a liquid water path (LWP) lower than about 100 gm-2(Turner et al., 2007). These clouds are often optically thin, which means that ground-based Raman lidar allows the detection of the cloud top and of the cloud structure above. Broken clouds are primarily inspected to take advantage of their discontinuous structure using ground based remote sensing. Observations are performed simultaneously with multi-wavelength Raman lidars, a cloud Doppler radar and a microwave radiometer at CIAO (CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory: www.ciao.imaa.cnr.it), in Potenza, Southern Italy (40.60N, 15.72E, 760 m a.s.l.). A statistical study of the variability of optical properties and humidity in the transition from cloudy regions to cloud-free regions surrounding the clouds leads to the identification of threshold values for the optical properties, enabling the discrimination between clouds and cloudless regions. Furthermore, a statistical study of the Doppler radar moments allows to retrieve droplet size and vertical velocities close to the cloud base. First evidences of a correlation between updrafts and downdrafts and aerosol effective radius have been found.

  19. Characterizing a New Surface-Based Shortwave Cloud Retrieval Technique, Based on Transmitted Radiance for Soil and Vegetated Surface Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coddington, Odele; Pilewskie, Peter; Schmidt, K. Sebastian; McBride, Patrick J.; Vukicevic, Tomislava

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach using the GEneralized Nonlinear Retrieval Analysis (GENRA) tool and general inverse theory diagnostics including the maximum likelihood solution and the Shannon information content to investigate the performance of a new spectral technique for the retrieval of cloud optical properties from surface based transmittance measurements. The cumulative retrieval information over broad ranges in cloud optical thickness (tau), droplet effective radius (r(sub e)), and overhead sun angles is quantified under two conditions known to impact transmitted radiation; the variability in land surface albedo and atmospheric water vapor content. Our conclusions are: (1) the retrieved cloud properties are more sensitive to the natural variability in land surface albedo than to water vapor content; (2) the new spectral technique is more accurate (but still imprecise) than a standard approach, in particular for tau between 5 and 60 and r(sub e) less than approximately 20 nm; and (3) the retrieved cloud properties are dependent on sun angle for clouds of tau from 5 to 10 and r(sub e) less than 10 nm, with maximum sensitivity obtained for an overhead sun.

  20. Study of cloud properties and processes in the polar regions by combining satellite and ground-based remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Loknath

    Clouds in the polar regions play an important roles in the hydrologic cycle, the local radiative balance, and polar sea ice. However, harsh climatic conditions and perennial snow and ice cover limits the collection of cloud data from the surface as well as the effectiveness of cloud detection with satellite passive sensors. Therefore, there is a lack of reliable data on polar clouds and their properties. This study combines active and passive measurements from the NASA A-Train satellites to overcome these shortcomings and to provide a novel approach to study on polar clouds. Multi-year CloudSat and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) data are used to investigate the characteristics of tropospheric clouds and precipitation systems, and their effect on the occurrence and microphysical properties of polar stratospheric clouds in the Antarctic region, south of 60 °S. The lidar and radar data are collocated to derive a combined cloud mask to improve detection of cloud vertical structure. Polar stratospheric clouds were detected using CALIPSO attenuated lidar scattering ratios (ALSR) at a horizontal resolution of 20 km to achieve good signal-to-noise ratios to allow the detection of tenuous PSCs. Clouds in the Antarctic region exhibit distinct land-sea and seasonal variabilities. The mean annual cloud occurrence is ~ 50 % over the continent and ~ 85 % over the ocean. Over the ocean the mean occurrence is higher in summer (90 %) than in winter (70 %). Low-level clouds contribute to more than 60 % of the total clouds. However, due to the extensive snow cover and cold surfaces in winter these low-level cloud occurrences are smaller in winter (50 %) than in summer (65 %). For ice clouds, both the effective radius and ice water content are larger in summer than in winter. High-level and deep tropospheric clouds strongly affect polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) occurrence and their microphysical properties by providing additional cooling of the lower stratosphere, especially during late winter and early spring. 70 % of all PSCs and 80 % of ice PSCs are formed in connection with tropospheric cloud systems during September and October. Similarly, PSCs associated with tropospheric cloud systems have higher particle number concentration than PSCs not associated with tropospheric cloud systems. A novel stratiform mixed-phase cloud retrieval algorithm has been developed by combining CloudSat, CALIPSO and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements to address the large positive biases of the MODIS operational algorithm, which assumes a single liquid- or ice-phase in its retrieval for mixed-phase clouds. The algorithm is validated using collocated MODIS and ground-based measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) North Slope Alaska (NSA) site. Results indicate that the new mixed-phase algorithm reduces the positive LWP biases of the operational MODIS algorithm from 35 % and 68 % to 10 % and 22 % over the temperature ranges of -5 to -10 °C and -10 to -20 °C, respectively.

  1. A Comparison of Ground and Satellite Observations of Cloud Cover

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony J. Schreiner; David A. Unger; W. Paul Menzel; Gary P. Ellrod; Kathy I. Strabala; Jackson L. Pellet

    1993-01-01

    A processing scheme that determines cloud height and amount based on radiances from the Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) using a CO2 absorption technique has been installed on the National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service VAS Data Utilization Center computer system in Washington, D.C. The processed data will complement the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS). ASOS

  2. Probing Venus's cloud structure with Galileo NIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinspoon, D. H.; Pollack, J. B.; Sitton, B. R.; Carlson, R. W.; Kamp, L. W.; Baines, K. H.; Encrenaz, TH.; Taylor, F. W.

    1993-01-01

    The spectral image cubes obtained by the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on Galileo as it flew by Venus have been analyzed to constrain the vertical structure of the clouds, the nature of the aerosol particles, and the location and particle properties of the opacity variations responsible for high-contrast features observed in the near-infrared windows at 1.7 and 2.3 micrometers. A radiative transfer program was used to simulate mid-latitude curves of limb darkening at 3.7 micrometers. Best-fit models to these curves demonstrate that the upper clouds are dominated by mode 2 particles (r-bar = 1.0 micrometers), with a contribution of approximately 15% of opacity from mode 1 particles (r-bar = 0.3 micrometers). The low-latitude upper cloud is well represented by a dual scale-height model, with a particle scale height of approximately 1 km from an altitude of 61-63 km, and a scale height of approximately 6 km above this, up to the level where tau = 1 at approximately 71 km. This model also successfully simulates limb-darkening curves at 11.5 micrometers from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Infrared Radiometer. Successful simulations of correlation plots of 1.7 vs 2.3 micrometers intensities reveal that mode 3 particles (r-bar = 3.65 micrometers) represent the dominant source of opacity in the lower and middle clouds, and that variation in total cloud opacity reflects chiefly the addition and removal of mode 3 particles near the cloud base. We find that the full spectrum of brightnesses at 1.7 and 2.3 micrometers implies that the total cloud optical depth varies from approximately 25 to approximately 40.

  3. Stereoscopic Height and Wind Retrievals for Aerosol Plumes with the MISR INteractive eXplorer (MINX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D.L.; Garay, M.J.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Dunst, Ben A.

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument aboard the Terra satellite acquires imagery at 275-m resolution at nine angles ranging from 0deg (nadir) to 70deg off-nadir. This multi-angle capability facilitates the stereoscopic retrieval of heights and motion vectors for clouds and aerosol plumes. MISR's operational stereo product uses this capability to retrieve cloud heights and winds for every satellite orbit, yielding global coverage every nine days. The MISR INteractive eXplorer (MINX) visualization and analysis tool complements the operational stereo product by providing users the ability to retrieve heights and winds locally for detailed studies of smoke, dust and volcanic ash plumes, as well as clouds, at higher spatial resolution and with greater precision than is possible with the operational product or with other space-based, passive, remote sensing instruments. This ability to investigate plume geometry and dynamics is becoming increasingly important as climate and air quality studies require greater knowledge about the injection of aerosols and the location of clouds within the atmosphere. MINX incorporates features that allow users to customize their stereo retrievals for optimum results under varying aerosol and underlying surface conditions. This paper discusses the stereo retrieval algorithms and retrieval options in MINX, and provides appropriate examples to explain how the program can be used to achieve the best results.

  4. Airborne measurements of the impact of ground-based glaciogenic cloud seeding on orographic precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Qun; Geerts, Bart

    2013-07-01

    Data from in situ probes and a vertically-pointing mm-wave Doppler radar aboard a research aircraft are used to study the cloud microphysical effect of glaciogenic seeding of cold-season orographic clouds. A previous study (Geerts et al., 2010) has shown that radar reflectivity tends to be higher during seeding periods in a shallow layer above the ground downwind of ground-based silver iodide (AgI) nuclei generators. This finding is based on seven flights, conducted over a mountain in Wyoming (the Unites States), each with a no-seeding period followed by a seeding period. In order to assess this impact, geographically fixed flight tracks were flown over a target mountain, both upwind and downwind of the AgI generators. This paper examines data from the same flights for further evidence of the cloud seeding impact. Composite radar data show that the low-level reflectivity increase is best defined upwind of the mountain crest and downwind of the point where the cloud base intersects the terrain. The main argument that this increase can be attributed to AgI seeding is that it is confined to a shallow layer near the ground where the flow is turbulent. Yet during two flights when clouds were cumuliform and coherent updrafts to flight level were recorded by the radar, the seeding impact was evident in the flight-level updrafts (about 610 m above the mountain peak) as a significant increase in the ice crystal concentration in all size bins. The seeding effect appears short-lived as it is not apparent just downwind of the crest.

  5. Height and time characteristics of seasonal and diurnal variations in PMWE based on 1 year observations by the PANSY radar (69.0°S, 39.6°E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Takanori; Sato, Kaoru; Nakamura, Takuji; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Sato, Toru; Kohma, Masashi; Nishimura, Koji; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Tsuda, Takuo T.

    2015-04-01

    We report height and time variations in polar mesosphere winter echoes (PMWE) based on the Program of the Antarctic Syowa mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere/incoherent scatter (PANSY) radar observations. PMWE were identified for 110 days from March to September 2013. PMWE occurrence frequency increased abruptly in May when two solar proton events occurred. PMWE were also observed even during periods without any solar proton events, suggesting that a possible cause of the PMWE is ionization by energetic electron precipitations. The monthly mean PMWE characteristics showed that occurrence of PMWE were mainly restricted to sunlit time. This fact indicates that electrons detached from negatively charged particles play an important role. While PMWE below 72 km in altitude completely disappeared before sunset, it was detected above that altitude for a few hours even after sunset. This height dependence in the altitude range of 60-80 km can be explained qualitatively by empirical effective recombination rates.

  6. Cloud parcel modelling of CCN activation in megacity air based on observations from Beijing and Guangzhou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, H.; Reutter, P.; Trentmann, J.; Rose, D.; Gunthe, S.; Simmel, M.; Nowak, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Zhu, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    The other team members are P. Achtert (3), M. Hu (4), M. Shao (4), and Y.H. Zhang (4). The activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) determines the initial number of cloud droplets, and thus influences the evolution of the cloud and formation of precipitation. Characterizing the CCN activation process by parcel model studies with detailed cloud microphysics and dynamics provides useful information for parameterizing the activation process in meso-scale and global-scale models. During the CAREBEIJING 2006 campaign in Beijing and the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in Guangzhou, fast condensational growth of particles was frequently observed and the CCN size distribution was sometimes dominated by the growing nucleation mode (Aitken Mode) rather than by the accumulation mode. In this study we investigated the implications of the experimental findings using a cloud parcel model with detailed spectral cloud microphysics and with the ΰ-Köhler model approach for efficient and realistic description of the effective hygroscopicity and CCN activity of aerosol particles. The number of droplets formed at the cloud base was examined for a wide range of updraft velocities and aerosol particle number concentrations. Moreover, the impact of aerosol hygroscopicity, size distribution and giant CCN were also evaluated. References: Reutter, P., Trentmann, J., Su, H., Simmel M., Rose, D., Wernli, H., Andreae, M. O., and Pöschl, U.: Activation of aerosol particles as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) under smoky and pyro-convective conditions, manuscript in preparation, 2009 Rose, D., Gunthe, S. S., Mikhailov, E., Frank, G. P., Dusek, U., Andreae, M. O., and Pöschl, U.: Calibration and measurement uncertainties of a continuous-flow cloud condensation nuclei counter (DMT-CCNC): CCN activation of ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride aerosol particles in theory and experiment, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 1153-1179, 2008. Rose, D., Nowak, A., Achtert, P., Wiedensohler, A., Hu, M., Shao, M., Zhang, Y., Andreae, M. O., and Pöschl, U.: Cloud condensation nuclei in polluted air and biomass burning smoke near the mega-city Guangzhou, China - Part 1: Size-resolved measurements and implications for the modeling of aerosol particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 8, 17343-17392, 2008. Simmel, M. and Wurzler, S.: Condensation and activation in sectional cloud microphysical models., Atmospheric Research 80(2-3): 218-236., 2006. Wiedensohler, A., Cheng, Y. F., Nowak, A., Wehner, B., Achtert, P., Berghof, M., Birmili, W., Wu, Z. J., Hu, M., Zhu, T., Takegawa, N., Kita, K., Kondo, Y., Lou, S. R., Hofzumahaus, A., Holland, F., Wahner, A., Gunthe, S., Rose, D., and Pöschl, U.: Rapid Aerosol Particle Growth and Increase of Cloud Condensation Nucleus (CCN) Activity by Secondary Aerosol Formation: a Case Study for Regional Air Pollution in North Eastern China, J. Geophys. Res., submitted, 2008

  7. Validation of Local-Cloud Model Outputs With the GOES Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, E.

    2005-05-01

    Clouds (visible aggregations of minute droplets of water or tiny crystals of ice suspended in the air) affect the radiation budget of our planet by reflecting, absorbing and scattering solar radiation, and the re-emission of terrestrial radiation. They affect the weather and climate by positive or negative feedbacks. Many researchers have worked on the parameterization of clouds and their effects on the radiation budget. There is little information about ground-based approaches for continuous evaluation of cloud, such as cloud base height, cloud base temperature, and cloud coverage, at local and regional scales. This present article deals with the development of an algorithm for continuous (day and night) evaluation of cloud base temperature, cloud base height and percent of skies covered by cloud at local scale throughout the year. The Vaisala model CT-12K laser beam ceilometer is used at the Automated Surface Observing Systems (ASOS) to measure the cloud base height and report the sky conditions on an hourly basis or at shorter intervals. This laser ceilometer is a fixed-type whose transmitter and receiver point straight up at the cloud (if any) base. It is unable to measure clouds that are not above the sensor. To report cloudiness at the local scale, many of these type of ceilometers are needed. This is not a perfect method for cloud measurement. A single cloud hanging overhead the sensor will cause overcast readings, whereas, a hole in the clouds could cause a clear reading to be reported. To overcome this problem, we have set up a ventilated radiation station at Logan-Cache airport, Utah, U.S.A., since 1995, which is equipped with one of the above-mentioned ceilometers. This radiation station (composed of pyranometers, pyrgeometers and net radiometer) provides continuous measurements of incoming and outgoing shortwave and longwave radiation and the net radiation throughout the year. We have also measured the surface temperature and pressure, the 2-m air temperature and humidity, precipitation, and the 3-m wind and direction at this station. Having the air temperature, moisture, and the measured cloudless incoming longwave (atmospheric) radiation during 1999 through 2004, based upon the ASOS and the algorithm data, we found the appropriate formula (among four reported approaches) for computation of the cloudless-skies atmospheric emissivity. Considering the additional longwave radiation captured by the facing-up pyrgeometer during the cloudy skies, coming from the cloud in the wave band which the gaseous emission lacks (from 8-13 ìm), we developed an algorithm which provides the continuous 20-min cloud information (cloud base height, cloud base temperature, and percent of skies covered by cloud) over the Cache Valley during day and night throughout the year. The comparisons between the ASOS and the algorithm data during the period of 8-12 June, 2004 are reported in this article. The proposed algorithm is a promising approach for evaluation of the cloud base temperature, cloud base height, and percent of skies covered by cloud at the local scale throughout the year. It also reports the comparison between model outputs and GOES 10 satellite images.

  8. An Identity Based Key Exchange Protocol in Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molli, Venkateswara Rao; Tiwary, Omkar Nath

    2012-10-01

    Workflow systems often use delegation to enhance the flexibility of authorization; delegation transfers privileges among users across different administrative domains and facilitates information sharing. We present an independently verifiable delegation mechanism, where a delegation credential can be verified without the participation of domain administrators. This protocol, called role-based cascaded delegation (RBCD), supports simple and efficient cross-domain delegation of authority. RBCD enables a role member to create delegations based on the dynamic needs of collaboration; in the meantime, a delegation chain canbe verified by anyone without the participation of role administrators. We also propose the Measurable Risk Adaptive decentralized Role-based Delegation framework to address this problem. Describe an efficient realization of RBCD by using aggregate signatures, where the authentication information for an arbitrarily long role-based delegation chain is captured by one short signature of constant size. RBCD enables a role member to create delegations based on the need of collaboration; in the meantime anyone can verify a delegation chain without the participation of role administrators. The protocol is general and can be realized by any signature scheme. We have described a specific realization with a hierarchical certificate-based encryption scheme that gives delegation compact credentials.

  9. Cloud Computing

    E-print Network

    Mirashe, Shivaji P

    2010-01-01

    Computing as you know it is about to change, your applications and documents are going to move from the desktop into the cloud. I'm talking about cloud computing, where applications and files are hosted on a "cloud" consisting of thousands of computers and servers, all linked together and accessible via the Internet. With cloud computing, everything you do is now web based instead of being desktop based. You can access all your programs and documents from any computer that's connected to the Internet. How will cloud computing change the way you work? For one thing, you're no longer tied to a single computer. You can take your work anywhere because it's always accessible via the web. In addition, cloud computing facilitates group collaboration, as all group members can access the same programs and documents from wherever they happen to be located. Cloud computing might sound far-fetched, but chances are you're already using some cloud applications. If you're using a web-based email program, such as Gmail or Ho...

  10. Climatology of stratocumulus cloud morphologies: microphysical properties and radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhlbauer, A.; McCoy, I. L.; Wood, R.

    2014-07-01

    An artificial neural network cloud classification scheme is combined with A-train observations to characterize the physical properties and radiative effects of marine low clouds based on their morphology and type of mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) on a global scale. The cloud morphological categories are (i) organized closed MCC, (ii) organized open MCC and (iii) cellular but disorganized MCC. Global distributions of the frequency of occurrence of MCC types show clear regional signatures. Organized closed and open MCCs are most frequently found in subtropical regions and in midlatitude storm tracks of both hemispheres. Cellular but disorganized MCC are the predominant type of marine low clouds in regions with warmer sea surface temperature such as in the tropics and trade wind zones. All MCC types exhibit a pronounced seasonal cycle. The physical properties of MCCs such as cloud fraction, radar reflectivity, drizzle rates and cloud top heights as well as the radiative effects of MCCs are found highly variable and a function of the type of MCC. On a global scale, the cloud fraction is largest for closed MCC with mean cloud fractions of about 90%, whereas cloud fractions of open and cellular but disorganized MCC are only about 51% and 40%, respectively. Probability density functions (PDFs) of cloud fractions are heavily skewed and exhibit modest regional variability. PDFs of column maximum radar reflectivities and inferred cloud base drizzle rates indicate fundamental differences in the cloud and precipitation characteristics of different MCC types. Similarly, the radiative effects of MCCs differ substantially from each other in terms of shortwave reflectance and transmissivity. These differences highlight the importance of low-cloud morphologies and their associated cloudiness on the shortwave cloud forcing.

  11. Climatology of stratocumulus cloud morphologies: microphysical properties and radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhlbauer, A.; McCoy, I. L.; Wood, R.

    2014-03-01

    An artificial neural network cloud classification scheme is combined with A-Train observations to characterize the physical properties and radiative effects of marine low clouds based on their morphology and type of mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) on a global scale. The cloud morphological categories are (i) organized closed MCC, (ii) organized open MCC and (iii) cellular but disorganized MCC. Global distributions of the frequency of occurrence of MCC types show clear regional signatures. Organized closed and open MCCs are most frequently found in subtropical regions and in mid-latitude storm tracks of both hemispheres. Cellular but disorganized MCC are the predominant type of marine low clouds in regions with warmer sea surface temperature such as in the tropics and trade wind zones. All MCC types exhibit a pronounced seasonal cycle. The physical properties of MCCs such as cloud fraction, radar reflectivity, drizzle rates and cloud top heights as well as the radiative effects of MCCs are found highly variable and a function of the type of MCC. On a global scale, the cloud fraction is largest for closed MCC with mean cloud fractions of about 90% whereas cloud fractions of open and cellular but disorganized MCC are only about 51% and 40%, respectively. Probability density functions (PDFs) of cloud fractions are heavily skewed and exhibit modest regional variability. PDFs of column maximum radar reflectivities and inferred cloud base drizzle rates indicate fundamental differences in the cloud and precipitation characteristics of different MCC types. Similarly, the radiative effects of MCCs differ substantially from each other in terms of shortwave reflectance and transmissivity. These differences highlight the importance of low cloud morphologies and their associated cloudiness on the shortwave cloud forcing.

  12. Cirrus cloud properties derived from coincident GOES and lidar data during the 1986 FIRE Cirrus Intensive Field Observations (IFO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, Patrick; Alvarez, Jose M.; Young, David F.; Heck, Patrick W.; Sassen, Kenneth

    1990-01-01

    One of the main difficulties in detecting cirrus clouds and determining their correct altitude using satellite measurements is their nonblackness. In the present algorithm (Rossow et al., 1985) used by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), the cirrus cloud emissivity is estimated from the derived cloud reflectance using a theoretical model relating visible (VIS, 0.65 micron) optical depth to infrared (IR, 10.5 micron) emissivity. At this time, it is unknown how accurate this approach is or how the derived cloud altitude relates to the physical properties of the cloud. The First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) presents opportunities for determining how the observed radiances depend on the cloud properties. During the FIRE Cirrus Intensive Field Observations (IFO, see Starr, 1987), time series of cloud thickness, height, and relative optical densities were measured from several surface-based lidars. Cloud microphysics and radiances at various wavelengths were also measured simultaneously over these sites from aircraft at specific times during the IFO (October 19 to November 2, 1986). Satellite-observed radiances taken simultaneously can be matched with these data to determine their relationships to the cirrus characteristics. The first step is taken toward relating all of these variables to the satellite observations. Lidar-derived cloud heights are used to determine cloud temperatures which are used to estimate cloud emissivities from the satellite IR radiances. These results are then correlated to the observed VIS reflectances for various solar zenith angles.

  13. The Ophidia framework: toward cloud-based data analytics for climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Sandro; D'Anca, Alessandro; Elia, Donatello; Mancini, Marco; Mariello, Andrea; Mirto, Maria; Palazzo, Cosimo; Aloisio, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    The Ophidia project is a research effort on big data analytics facing scientific data analysis challenges in the climate change domain. It provides parallel (server-side) data analysis, an internal storage model and a hierarchical data organization to manage large amount of multidimensional scientific data. The Ophidia analytics platform provides several MPI-based parallel operators to manipulate large datasets (data cubes) and array-based primitives to perform data analysis on large arrays of scientific data. The most relevant data analytics use cases implemented in national and international projects target fire danger prevention (OFIDIA), interactions between climate change and biodiversity (EUBrazilCC), climate indicators and remote data analysis (CLIP-C), sea situational awareness (TESSA), large scale data analytics on CMIP5 data in NetCDF format, Climate and Forecast (CF) convention compliant (ExArch). Two use cases regarding the EU FP7 EUBrazil Cloud Connect and the INTERREG OFIDIA projects will be presented during the talk. In the former case (EUBrazilCC) the Ophidia framework is being extended to integrate scalable VM-based solutions for the management of large volumes of scientific data (both climate and satellite data) in a cloud-based environment to study how climate change affects biodiversity. In the latter one (OFIDIA) the data analytics framework is being exploited to provide operational support regarding processing chains devoted to fire danger prevention. To tackle the project challenges, data analytics workflows consisting of about 130 operators perform, among the others, parallel data analysis, metadata management, virtual file system tasks, maps generation, rolling of datasets, import/export of datasets in NetCDF format. Finally, the entire Ophidia software stack has been deployed at CMCC on 24-nodes (16-cores/node) of the Athena HPC cluster. Moreover, a cloud-based release tested with OpenNebula is also available and running in the private cloud infrastructure of the CMCC Supercomputing Centre.

  14. Toward a quantitative characterization of heterogeneous ice formation with lidar/radar: Comparison of CALIPSO/CloudSat with ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühl, J.; Ansmann, A.; Seifert, P.; Baars, H.; Engelmann, R.

    2013-08-01

    We analyze and compare the different sensitivities of aerosol/cloud lidar and 35-GHz cloud radar to detect ice formation in midlevel clouds in order to harmonize mixed phase cloud observations performed with lidar and radar. We found good agreement between spaceborne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO)/CloudSat and ground-based lidar/radar observations at Leipzig, Germany. However, large differences were found to a previous study with an 11-year cloud statistics solely based on lidar observations which is caused by significantly higher sensitivity of the cloud radar to detect ice crystals. By introducing a lidar detection threshold for the ice water content of 10-6kgm-3, we find that lidar and radar cloud statistics become increasingly similar.

  15. Study on Cloud Security Based on Trust Spanning Tree Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yingxu; Liu, Zenghui; Pan, Qiuyue; Liu, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Attacks executed on Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) expose the weakness of link layer protocols and put the higher layers in jeopardy. Although the problems have been studied for many years and various solutions have been proposed, many security issues remain. To enhance the security and credibility of layer-2 network, we propose a trust-based spanning tree protocol aiming at achieving a higher credibility of LAN switch with a simple and lightweight authentication mechanism. If correctly implemented in each trusted switch, the authentication of trust-based STP can guarantee the credibility of topology information that is announced to other switch in the LAN. To verify the enforcement of the trusted protocol, we present a new trust evaluation method of the STP using a specification-based state model. We implement a prototype of trust-based STP to investigate its practicality. Experiment shows that the trusted protocol can achieve security goals and effectively avoid STP attacks with a lower computation overhead and good convergence performance.

  16. Vertical Structures of Anvil Clouds of Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems Observed by CloudSat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, J.; Houze, R. A., Jr.; Heymsfield, A.

    2011-01-01

    A global study of the vertical structures of the clouds of tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) has been carried out with data from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar. Tropical MCSs are found to be dominated by cloud-top heights greater than 10 km. Secondary cloud layers sometimes occur in MCSs, but outside their primary raining cores. The secondary layers have tops at 6--8 and 1--3 km. High-topped clouds extend outward from raining cores of MCSs to form anvil clouds. Closest to the raining cores, the anvils tend to have broader distributions of reflectivity at all levels, with the modal values at higher reflectivity in their lower levels. Portions of anvil clouds far away from the raining core are thin and have narrow frequency distributions of reflectivity at all levels with overall weaker values. This difference likely reflects ice particle fallout and therefore cloud age. Reflectivity histograms of MCS anvil clouds vary little across the tropics, except that (i) in continental MCS anvils, broader distributions of reflectivity occur at the uppermost levels in the portions closest to active raining areas; (ii) the frequency of occurrence of stronger reflectivity in the upper part of anvils decreases faster with increasing distance in continental MCSs; and (iii) narrower-peaked ridges are prominent in reflectivity histograms of thick anvil clouds close to the raining areas of connected MCSs (superclusters). These global results are consistent with observations at ground sites and aircraft data. They present a comprehensive test dataset for models aiming to simulate process-based upper-level cloud structure around the tropics.

  17. Vertical Structures of Anvil Clouds of Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems Observed by CloudSat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hence, Deanna A.; Houze, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    A global study of the vertical structures of the clouds of tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) has been carried out with data from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar. Tropical MCSs are found to be dominated by cloud-top heights greater than 10 km. Secondary cloud layers sometimes occur in MCSs, but outside their primary raining cores. The secondary layers have tops at 6 8 and 1 3 km. High-topped clouds extend outward from raining cores of MCSs to form anvil clouds. Closest to the raining cores, the anvils tend to have broader distributions of reflectivity at all levels, with the modal values at higher reflectivity in their lower levels. Portions of anvil clouds far away from the raining core are thin and have narrow frequency distributions of reflectivity at all levels with overall weaker values. This difference likely reflects ice particle fallout and therefore cloud age. Reflectivity histograms of MCS anvil clouds vary little across the tropics, except that (i) in continental MCS anvils, broader distributions of reflectivity occur at the uppermost levels in the portions closest to active raining areas; (ii) the frequency of occurrence of stronger reflectivity in the upper part of anvils decreases faster with increasing distance in continental MCSs; and (iii) narrower-peaked ridges are prominent in reflectivity histograms of thick anvil clouds close to the raining areas of connected MCSs (superclusters). These global results are consistent with observations at ground sites and aircraft data. They present a comprehensive test dataset for models aiming to simulate process-based upper-level cloud structure around the tropics.

  18. Validation of a radiosonde-based cloud layer detection method against a ground-based remote sensing method at multiple ARM sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Li, Zhanqing; Chen, Hongbin; Cribb, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Cloud vertical structure is a key quantity in meteorological and climate studies, but it is also among the most difficult quantities to observe. In this study, we develop a long-term (10 years) radiosonde-based cloud profile product for the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP), Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites and a shorter-term product for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployed in Shouxian, Anhui Province, China (AMF-China). The AMF-China site was in operation from 14 May to 28 December 2008; the ARM sites have been collecting data for over 15 years. The Active Remote Sensing of Cloud (ARSCL) value-added product (VAP), which combines data from the 95-GHz W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) and/or the 35-GHz Millimeter Microwave Cloud Radar (MMCR), is used in this study to validate the radiosonde-based cloud layer retrieval method. The performance of the radiosonde-based cloud layer retrieval method applied to data from different climate regimes is evaluated. Overall, cloud layers derived from the ARSCL VAP and radiosonde data agree very well at the SGP and AMF-China sites. At the TWP and NSA sites, the radiosonde tends to detect more cloud layers in the upper troposphere.

  19. The Vertical Distribution of Thin Features Over the Arctic Analysed from CALIPSO Observations. Part 1; Optically Thin Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVasthale, Abhay; Tjernstrom, Michael; Karlsson, Karl-Goran; Thomas, Manu Anna; Jones, Colin; Sedlar, Joseph; Omar, Ali H.

    2011-01-01

    Clouds play a crucial role in the Arctic climate system. Therefore, it is essential to accurately and reliably quantify and understand cloud properties over the Arctic. It is also important to monitor and attribute changes in Arctic clouds. Here, we exploit the capability of the CALIPSO-CALIOP instrument and provide comprehensive statistics of tropospheric thin clouds, otherwise extremely difficult to monitor from passive satellite sensors.We use 4 yr of data (June 2006.May 2010) over the circumpolar Arctic, here defined as 67-82 deg. N, and characterize probability density functions of cloud base and top heights, geometrical thickness and zonal distribution of such cloud layers, separately for water and ice phases, and discuss seasonal variability of these properties. When computed for the entire study area, probability density functions of cloud base and top heights and geometrical thickness peak at 200-400, 1000-2000 and 400-800 m, respectively, for thin water clouds, while for ice clouds they peak at 6-8, 7-9 and 400-1000 m, respectively. In general, liquid clouds were often identified below 2 km during all seasons, whereas ice clouds were sensed throughout the majority of the upper troposphere and also, but to a smaller extent, below 2 km for all seasons.

  20. Smoke Soars to Stratospheric Heights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A new look at smoke from the Chisholm forest fire, which ignited on May 23, 2001 about 160 kilometers north of Edmonton in Alberta, Canada, provides confirming evidence that dense smoke can reach the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Scientists have postulated a link between fires in northern forests and the observed enhancements in stratospheric aerosols, but it is difficult to measure smoke aerosol heights directly. Here, height information for the Chisholm fire was retrieved using stereoscopic processing of data from multiple Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) cameras. These images were acquired on May 29, when the severity of the fire had begun to stabilize after a cold front and strong low-level winds caused rapid spread of flame and an eruption of large-scale convection on May 28. This dramatic event was studied in detail by M. Fromm and R. Servranckx, 'Transport of forest fire smoke above the tropopause by supercell convection,' Geophys. Res. Lett., vol. 30, no. 10 (2003).

    The two left-hand images are natural color views from MISR's nadir and 60o forward viewing cameras in which a pall of yellowish smoke is apparent both above the surface and above clouds in the top portion of the images. This area is near the junction of Canada's Keewatin region and Northwest Territory, and about 1200 km northward of the originalfire location. Lake Athabasca is at the lower left. The second panel from the right is MISR's standard stereo height product (derived from the nadir and the two 26o cameras), while the right-hand panel is a specially-generated product using MISR's 46o and 60o forward-pointing cameras. Because the smoke appears thicker at the oblique view angles, better areal coverage is obtained and the retrievals are less sensitive to the underlying cloud deck. The southern portion of the smoke cloud is at an altitude of about 3.5 km; however, the smoke further to the north has risen above the tropopause (which is at about 11 km altitude) and intruded into the lower stratosphere. These measurements indicate that smoke reaches heights of about 12-13 kilometers above sea level. The height fields pictured here are uncorrected for wind effects; wind-corrected heights (which have higher accuracy but sparser spatial coverage) for this smoke pall are about 0.5 km higher.

    The Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82o north and 82o south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbit 7695. The panels cover an area of 380 kilometers x 1137 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 36 to 43 within World Reference System-2 path 40.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  1. Water-Based Concurrent Training Improves Peak Oxygen Uptake, Rate of Force Development, Jump Height, and Neuromuscular Economy in Young Women.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Stephanie S; Alberton, Cristine L; Cadore, Eduardo L; Zaffari, Paula; Baroni, Bruno M; Lanferdini, Fábio J; Radaelli, Régis; Pantoja, Patrícia D; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo A; Wolf Schoenell, Maira C; Vaz, Marco A; Kruel, Luiz F M

    2015-07-01

    Pinto, SS, Alberton, CL, Cadore, EL, Zaffari, P, Baroni, BM, Lanferdini, FJ, Radaelli, R, Pantoja, PD, Peyré-Tartaruga, LA, Wolf Schoenell, MC, Vaz, MA, and Kruel, LFM. Water-based concurrent training improves peak oxygen uptake, rate of force development, jump height, and neuromuscular economy in young women. J Strength Cond Res 29(7): 1846-1854, 2015-The study investigated the effects of different intrasession exercise sequences on the cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular adaptations induced by water-based concurrent training in young subjects. Twenty-six healthy young women (25.1 ± 2.9 years) were placed into 2 water-based concurrent training groups: resistance before (RA, n = 13) or after (AR, n = 13) aerobic training. Subjects trained resistance and aerobic training during 12 weeks, 2 times per week performing both exercise types in the same training session. Peak oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak), rate of force development (RFD) obtained during an isometric peak torque knee extension protocol, jump height, and neuromuscular economy (normalized electromyography at 80% of pretraining knee extension isometric peak torque) in young women were determined. After training, there was a significant increase (p < 0.001) in both RA and AR in the V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak, with no differences between groups (7 vs. 5%). The maximal isometric knee extension RFD showed significant increases (p = 0.003) after training (RA: 19 vs. AR: 30%), and both groups presented similar gains. In addition, the countermovement jump height also increased (p = 0.034) after training (RA: 5% vs. AR: 6%), with no difference between groups. After training, there were significant improvements on vastus lateralis (p < 0.001) (RA: -13% vs. AR: -20%) and rectus femoris (p = 0.025) (RA: -17% vs. AR: -7%) neuromuscular economy, with no difference between groups. In conclusion, 12 weeks of water-based concurrent training improved the peak oxygen uptake, RFD, jump height, and neuromuscular economy in young women independent from the intrasession exercise sequence. PMID:25559906

  2. Tree height measurement protocol J Chave Page 1 Measuring tree height for tropical forest trees

    E-print Network

    Chave, Jérôme

    Tree height measurement protocol ­ J Chave Page 1 Measuring tree height for tropical forest trees Diversité Biologique Université Paul Sabatier 31000 Toulouse, France 1. Introduction Tree height is a fundamental geometrical variable for trees. Unfortunately, most measures are based on visual inspection

  3. Clouds, Wind and the Biogeography of Central American Cloud Forests: Remote Sensing, Atmospheric Modeling, and Walking in the Jungle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, R.; Nair, U. S.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud forests stand at the core of the complex of montane ecosystems that provide the backbone to the multinational Mesoamerican Biological Corridor, which seeks to protect a biodiversity conservation "hotspot" of global significance in an area of rapidly changing land use. Although cloud forests are generally defined by frequent and prolonged immersion in cloud, workers differ in their feelings about "frequent" and "prolonged", and quantitative assessments are rare. Here we focus on the dry season, in which the cloud and mist from orographic cloud plays a critical role in forest water relations, and discuss remote sensing of orographic clouds, and regional and atmospheric modeling at several scales to quantitatively examine the distribution of the atmospheric conditions that characterize cloud forests. Remote sensing using data from GOES reveals diurnal and longer scale patterns in the distribution of dry season orographic clouds in Central America at both regional and local scales. Data from MODIS, used to calculate the base height of orographic cloud banks, reveals not only the geographic distributon of cloud forest sites, but also striking regional variation in the frequency of montane immersion in orographic cloud. At a more local scale, wind is known to have striking effects on forest structure and species distribution in tropical montane ecosystems, both as a general mechanical stress and as the major agent of ecological disturbance. High resolution regional atmospheric modeling using CSU RAMS in the Monteverde cloud forests of Costa Rica provides quantitative information on the spatial distribution of canopy level winds, insight into the spatial structure and local dynamics of cloud forest communities. This information will be useful in not only in local conservation planning and the design of the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor, but also in assessments of the sensitivity of cloud forests to global and regional climate changes.

  4. Macrophysical properties of tropical cirrus clouds from the CALIPSO satellite and from ground-based micropulse and Raman lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, David M.; Turner, David D.

    2013-08-01

    Lidar observations of cirrus cloud macrophysical properties over the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Darwin, Australia, site are compared from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite, the ground-based ARM micropulse lidar (MPL), and the ARM Raman lidar (RL). Comparisons are made using the subset of profiles where the lidar beam is not fully attenuated. Daytime measurements using the RL are shown to be relatively unaffected by the solar background and are therefore suited for checking the validity of diurnal cycles. RL and CALIPSO cloud fraction profiles show good agreement while the MPL detects significantly less cirrus, particularly during the daytime. Both MPL and CALIPSO observations show that cirrus clouds occur less frequently during the day than at night at all altitudes. In contrast, the RL diurnal cycle is significantly different from zero only below about 11 km; where it is of opposite sign (i.e., more clouds during the daytime). For cirrus geometrical thickness, the MPL and CALIPSO observations agree well and both data sets have significantly thinner clouds during the daytime than the RL. From the examination of hourly MPL and RL cirrus cloud thickness and through the application of daytime detection limits to all CALIPSO data, we find that the decreased MPL and CALIPSO cloud thickness during the daytime is very likely a result of increased daytime noise. This study highlights the significant improvement the RL provides (compared to the MPL) in the ARM program's ability to observe tropical cirrus clouds and will help improve our understanding of these clouds. The RL also provides a valuable ground-based lidar data set for the evaluation of CALIPSO observations.

  5. Approach for Text Classification Based on the Similarity Measurement between Normal Cloud Models

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jin; Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The similarity between objects is the core research area of data mining. In order to reduce the interference of the uncertainty of nature language, a similarity measurement between normal cloud models is adopted to text classification research. On this basis, a novel text classifier based on cloud concept jumping up (CCJU-TC) is proposed. It can efficiently accomplish conversion between qualitative concept and quantitative data. Through the conversion from text set to text information table based on VSM model, the text qualitative concept, which is extraction from the same category, is jumping up as a whole category concept. According to the cloud similarity between the test text and each category concept, the test text is assigned to the most similar category. By the comparison among different text classifiers in different feature selection set, it fully proves that not only does CCJU-TC have a strong ability to adapt to the different text features, but also the classification performance is also better than the traditional classifiers. PMID:24711737

  6. Cloud-based hospital information system as a service for grassroots healthcare institutions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qin; Han, Xiong; Ma, Xi-Kun; Xue, Yi-Feng; Chen, Yi-Jun; Li, Jing-Song

    2014-09-01

    Grassroots healthcare institutions (GHIs) are the smallest administrative levels of medical institutions, where most patients access health services. The latest report from the National Bureau of Statistics of China showed that 96.04 % of 950,297 medical institutions in China were at the grassroots level in 2012, including county-level hospitals, township central hospitals, community health service centers, and rural clinics. In developing countries, these institutions are facing challenges involving a shortage of funds and talent, inconsistent medical standards, inefficient information sharing, and difficulties in management during the adoption of health information technologies (HIT). Because of the necessity and gravity for GHIs, our aim is to provide hospital information services for GHIs using Cloud computing technologies and service modes. In this medical scenario, the computing resources are pooled by means of a Cloud-based Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) to serve multiple GHIs, with different hospital information systems dynamically assigned and reassigned according to demand. This paper is concerned with establishing a Cloud-based Hospital Information Service Center to provide hospital information software as a service (HI-SaaS) with the aim of providing GHIs with an attractive and high-performance medical information service. Compared with individually establishing all hospital information systems, this approach is more cost-effective and affordable for GHIs and does not compromise HIT performance. PMID:25015761

  7. The NASA CloudSat Education Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumm, D. K.

    2006-05-01

    CloudSat, a NASA Earth System Science Pathfinder Mission, will launch into orbit the world's most advanced weather radar designed to measure properties of clouds that are essential for accurate understanding of Earth's weather and climate processes. Providing the first vertical profiles of global measurements of cloud thickness, height, water and ice content and a wide range of precipitation data linked to cloud development, CloudSat measurements will fill a critical gap in understanding how clouds affect climate. Any mission of this nature requires extensive ground-based reference data. The CloudSat Education Network provides the opportunity for schools around the world to partner with the CloudSat Science Team and the NASA-sponsored GLOBE Program. The Network will link together scientists, students, teachers, and their communities to give students meaningful, authentic and contemporary science education experiences. Student activities and learning outcomes are being developed to meet both general education outcomes and specific standards or objectives from school curricula. The main focus of the knowledge development component of the project is to help students better understand long-term climate change and the climatic processes that maintain the Earth's Energy balance. Student research with CloudSat/GLOBE data will be strongly encouraged. Scientists will receive research-quality data in support of the mission and in return will interact with teachers and their students to promote interest in science. Participation in the network throughout the duration of the project will be monitored and schools will be asked to maintain levels of participation in order to give CloudSat scientists a solid consistent base of data to support their research. The preferred base level of participation is the reporting of cloud, temperature and precipitation data according to modified GLOBE protocols approximately every 16 days coinciding with the CloudSat satellite overpass. The CloudSat Education Network when fully complete will contain 100-150 schools from target sites around the world. Countries interested in participating include Canada, Thailand, New Zealand, Australia, India, Cameroon, Croatia, Germany, Estonia, Switzerland, Dominican Republic, and the United States. Most already have participating CloudSat Education Network schools.

  8. Driver eye height measurement

    E-print Network

    Abrahamson, Anthony Daniel

    1978-01-01

    was establish d in the early sixties when passenger vehicles were styled differentl; than tnda; . The changing design of passenger cars has resulted in a considerable lowering in the eye heights of drivers between 1960 and 1978. The objective of this ress rch... of passenger cars now view the road from a height lower than 3. 75 ft but virtually none have driver eye heights less than 3. 25 ft (0. 99'tu). On t'nls basis it is recommended that a new driver eye height standard of 3. 25 ft (0. 99 m), or onc meter...

  9. New capabilities for space-based cloud and aerosols measurements: The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Palm, S. P.; Hart, W. D.; Nowottnick, E. P.; Vaughan, M.; Rodier, S. D.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Buchard-Marchant, V.

    2013-12-01

    Current uncertainties in cloud and aerosol properties limit our ability to accurately model the Earth's climate system and predict climate change. These limitations are due primarily to difficulties in adequately measuring aerosols and clouds on a global scale. NASA's A-Train satellites provide an unprecedented opportunity to address these uncertainties. In particular, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO) satellite provides vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties. The CALIOP lidar onboard CALIPSO has reached its seventh year of operation, well past its expected lifetime. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2016 or later. If the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational, there will be a gap in global lidar measurements. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), built at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a payload for the International Space Station (ISS), is set to launch in the summer of 2014. CATS is an elastic backscatter lidar with three wavelengths (1064, 532, 355 nm) and HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all three wavelengths. The ISS orbit is a 51 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of about 405 km. This orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three day repeat cycle. Thus, science applications of CATS include cloud and aerosol climate studies, air quality monitoring, and smoke/volcanic plume tracking. The primary science objectives of CATS include: continuing the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud vertical profile data record, providing near real time data to support operational applications such as air quality modeling, and advancing technology in support of future mission development using the HSRL channel. Furthermore, the vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties provided by CATS will complement current and future passive satellite sensors. In preparation for launch, simulations of the CATS lidar signal are produced using GEOS5 model data. An example of the simulated CATS attenuated total backscatter for the 532 nm parallel channel is shown in Figure 1 using the GEOS5 model forecast from 15 July 2009. The CATS simulations suggest the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and minumim detectable backscatter at 532 nm will be better than CALIPSO during nighttime and very similar during daytime operation. An overview of the CATS mission, science objectives and simulated data will be provided. Figure 1. Simulated CATS attenuated total backscatter for the 532 nm parallel channel using the GEOS5 model forecast data from 15 July 2009.

  10. Cloud detection by lidar extinction calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lentz, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    A new lidar method of measuring cloud ceiling height using the Klett solution to the lidar equation was developed. This simple technique will find cloud ceiling height for clouds that rangefinder-like lidars cannot theoretically detect. In addition, the noise signals that do not correspond to clouds removed by using the convergence of the Klett solution to discriminate between signal changes and broader signal changes due to clouds. Clouds above rain or light fog can be detected without error, and it is possible to discriminate against haze layers by the magnitude of their maximum extinction.

  11. A Cloud-Based Internet of Things Platform for Ambient Assisted Living

    PubMed Central

    Cubo, Javier; Nieto, Adrián; Pimentel, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    A common feature of ambient intelligence is that many objects are inter-connected and act in unison, which is also a challenge in the Internet of Things. There has been a shift in research towards integrating both concepts, considering the Internet of Things as representing the future of computing and communications. However, the efficient combination and management of heterogeneous things or devices in the ambient intelligence domain is still a tedious task, and it presents crucial challenges. Therefore, to appropriately manage the inter-connection of diverse devices in these systems requires: (1) specifying and efficiently implementing the devices (e.g., as services); (2) handling and verifying their heterogeneity and composition; and (3) standardizing and managing their data, so as to tackle large numbers of systems together, avoiding standalone applications on local servers. To overcome these challenges, this paper proposes a platform to manage the integration and behavior-aware orchestration of heterogeneous devices as services, stored and accessed via the cloud, with the following contributions: (i) we describe a lightweight model to specify the behavior of devices, to determine the order of the sequence of exchanged messages during the composition of devices; (ii) we define a common architecture using a service-oriented standard environment, to integrate heterogeneous devices by means of their interfaces, via a gateway, and to orchestrate them according to their behavior; (iii) we design a framework based on cloud computing technology, connecting the gateway in charge of acquiring the data from the devices with a cloud platform, to remotely access and monitor the data at run-time and react to emergency situations; and (iv) we implement and generate a novel cloud-based IoT platform of behavior-aware devices as services for ambient intelligence systems, validating the whole approach in real scenarios related to a specific ambient assisted living application. PMID:25093343

  12. A survey and analysis of cloud model-based security for computing secure cloud bursting and aggregation in renal environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pritesh Jain; Dheeraj Rane; Shyam Patidar

    2011-01-01

    Cloud Computing has emerged as a major information and communications technology trend and has been proved as a key technology for market development and analysis for the users of several field. The practice of computing across two or more data centers separated by the Internet is growing in popularity due to an explosion in scalable computing demands. However, one of

  13. Mobile fighting crime device based on information technology by police cloud computing toward pervasive investigations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ke-Ren Chen; Hung-Jen Tsai

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the pervasive investigation crime (PIC) system in which this cloud scenario integrates the emerging cloud computing and the radio identification (RFID) technology. This cloud device can give a wider cloud resource including 2G, 3G and 4G cell phone resource that it is suitable for investigator enables to detection a misdeed or suspected vehicle and associated

  14. A Newer User Authentication, File encryption and Distributed Server Based Cloud Computing security architecture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kawser Wazed Nafi; Tonny Shekha Kar; Sayed Anisul Hoque; M. M. A Hashem

    2012-01-01

    The cloud computing platform gives people the opportunity for sharing resources, services and information among the people of the whole world. In private cloud system, information is shared among the persons who are in that cloud. For this, security or personal information hiding process hampers. In this paper we have proposed new security architecture for cloud computing platform. This ensures

  15. Cloud Security with Virtualized Defense and Reputation-Based Trust Mangement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kai Hwang; S. Kulkareni; Yue Hu

    2009-01-01

    Internet clouds work as service factories built around Web-scale data centers. The elastic cloud resources and huge datasets processed are subject to security breaches, privacy abuses, and copyright violations. Provisioned cloud resources on-demand are especially vulnerable to cyber attacks. The cloud platforms built by Google, IBM, and Amazon all reveal this weaknesses. We propose a new approach to integrating virtual

  16. Toward dynamic and attribute based publication, discovery and selection for cloud computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrzej Goscinski; Michael Brock

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is an emerging paradigm where computing resources are offered over the Internet as scalable, on-demand (Web) services. While cloud vendors have concentrated their efforts on the improvement of performance, resource consumption and scalability, other cloud characteristics have been neglected. On the one hand cloud service providers face difficult problems of publishing services that expose resources, and on the

  17. Houses with Height Numbers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-09-21

    This applet allows students to freely build shapes by stacking cubes and "explore the relation between a building (house) consisting of cubes and the height numbers representing the height of the different parts of the building." This exercise helps students visualize and understand the concepts of volume and three-dimensional, measurable space.

  18. Ground based in situ measurements of arctic cloud microphysical and optical properties at Mount Zeppelin (Ny-Alesund Svalbard)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, Gwennolé; Jourdan, Olivier; Olofson, Frans; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Gourbeyre, Christophe; Febvre, Guy; Dupuy, Régis; Bernard, Christophe; Tunved, Peter; Ancellet, Gérard; Law, Kathy; Wobrock, Wolfram; Shcherbakov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    The high sensitivity of the polar regions to climate perturbation, due to complex feedback mechanisms existing in this region, was shown by many studies (Solomon et al., 2007; Verlinde et al., 2007; IPCC, 2007). In particular, climate simulations suggest that cloud feedback plays an important role in the arctic warming (Vavrus 2004; Hassol, 2005). Moreover, the high seasonal variability of arctic aerosol properties (Engwall et al., 2008; Tunveld et al., 2013) is expected to significantly impact the cloud properties during the winter-summer transition. Field measurements are needed for improved understanding and representation of cloud-aerosol interactions in climate models. Within the CLIMSLIP project (CLimate IMpacts of Short-LIved Pollutants and methane in the arctic), a two months (March-April 2012) ground-based cloud measurement campaign was performed at Mt Zeppelin station, Ny-Alesund, Svalbard. The experimental set-up comprised a wide variety of instruments. A CPI (Cloud Particle Imager) was used for the microphysical and morphological characterization of ice particles. Measurements of sized-resolved liquid cloud parameters were performed by the FSSP-100 (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe). The Nevzorov Probe measured the bulk properties (LWC and IWC) of clouds. The Polar Nephelometer (PN) was used to assess the single scattering properties of an ensemble of cloud particles. This cloud instrumentation combined with the aerosol properties (size distribution and total concentration) continuously measured at the station allowed us to study the variability of the microphysical and optical properties of low level Mixed Phase Clouds (MPC) as well as the aerosol-cloud interaction in the Arctic. Typical properties of MPC, snow precipitation and blowing snow will be presented. First results suggest that liquid water is ubiquitous in arctic low level clouds. Precipitations are characterized by large (typically 1 mm sized) stellar and pristine shape particles whereas blowing snow is typically composed of 250 µm irregular ice crystals. This dataset will be used to test physically based representations of the relationships between particle size, shape and optical properties and to investigate dominant microphysical processes occurring in MPC using detailed microphysical modeling. Moreover, carbon monoxide measurements allow us to compare polluted with clean cases. The cloud-aerosol interactions processes which take place during the transport of polluted air masses from mid-latitude to the Arctic is thus assessed.

  19. Inexpensive and Highly Reproducible Cloud-Based Variant Calling of 2,535 Human Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Shringarpure, Suyash S.; Carroll, Andrew; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2015-01-01

    Population scale sequencing of whole human genomes is becoming economically feasible; however, data management and analysis remains a formidable challenge for many research groups. Large sequencing studies, like the 1000 Genomes Project, have improved our understanding of human demography and the effect of rare genetic variation in disease. Variant calling on datasets of hundreds or thousands of genomes is time-consuming, expensive, and not easily reproducible given the myriad components of a variant calling pipeline. Here, we describe a cloud-based pipeline for joint variant calling in large samples using the Real Time Genomics population caller. We deployed the population caller on the Amazon cloud with the DNAnexus platform in order to achieve low-cost variant calling. Using our pipeline, we were able to identify 68.3 million variants in 2,535 samples from Phase 3 of the 1000 Genomes Project. By performing the variant calling in a parallel manner, the data was processed within 5 days at a compute cost of $7.33 per sample (a total cost of $18,590 for completed jobs and $21,805 for all jobs). Analysis of cost dependence and running time on the data size suggests that, given near linear scalability, cloud computing can be a cheap and efficient platform for analyzing even larger sequencing studies in the future. PMID:26110529

  20. Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Madduri, Ravi K; Sotomayor, Borja; Chard, Kyle; Lacinski, Lukasz; Dave, Utpal J; Li, Jianqiang; Liu, Chunchen; Foster, Ian T

    2014-01-01

    Due to the upcoming data deluge of genome data, the need for storing and processing large-scale genome data, easy access to biomedical analyses tools, efficient data sharing and retrieval has presented significant challenges. The variability in data volume results in variable computing and storage requirements, therefore biomedical researchers are pursuing more reliable, dynamic and convenient methods for conducting sequencing analyses. This paper proposes a Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses, which enables reliable and highly scalable execution of sequencing analyses workflows in a fully automated manner. Our platform extends the existing Galaxy workflow system by adding data management capabilities for transferring large quantities of data efficiently and reliably (via Globus Transfer), domain-specific analyses tools preconfigured for immediate use by researchers (via user-specific tools integration), automatic deployment on Cloud for on-demand resource allocation and pay-as-you-go pricing (via Globus Provision), a Cloud provisioning tool for auto-scaling (via HTCondor scheduler), and the support for validating the correctness of workflows (via semantic verification tools). Two bioinformatics workflow use cases as well as performance evaluation are presented to validate the feasibility of the proposed approach. PMID:24462600

  1. Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Madduri, Ravi K; Sotomayor, Borja; Chard, Kyle; Lacinski, Lukasz; Dave, Utpal J; Li, Jianqiang; Liu, Chunchen; Foster, Ian T

    2014-06-01

    Due to the upcoming data deluge of genome data, the need for storing and processing large-scale genome data, easy access to biomedical analyses tools, efficient data sharing and retrieval has presented significant challenges. The variability in data volume results in variable computing and storage requirements, therefore biomedical researchers are pursuing more reliable, dynamic and convenient methods for conducting sequencing analyses. This paper proposes a Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses, which enables reliable and highly scalable execution of sequencing analyses workflows in a fully automated manner. Our platform extends the existing Galaxy workflow system by adding data management capabilities for transferring large quantities of data efficiently and reliably (via Globus Transfer), domain-specific analyses tools preconfigured for immediate use by researchers (via user-specific tools integration), automatic deployment on Cloud for on-demand resource allocation and pay-as-you-go pricing (via Globus Provision), a Cloud provisioning tool for auto-scaling (via HTCondor scheduler), and the support for validating the correctness of workflows (via semantic verification tools). Two bioinformatics workflow use cases as well as performance evaluation are presented to validate the feasibility of the proposed approach. PMID:24462600

  2. Inexpensive and Highly Reproducible Cloud-Based Variant Calling of 2,535 Human Genomes.

    PubMed

    Shringarpure, Suyash S; Carroll, Andrew; De La Vega, Francisco M; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2015-01-01

    Population scale sequencing of whole human genomes is becoming economically feasible; however, data management and analysis remains a formidable challenge for many research groups. Large sequencing studies, like the 1000 Genomes Project, have improved our understanding of human demography and the effect of rare genetic variation in disease. Variant calling on datasets of hundreds or thousands of genomes is time-consuming, expensive, and not easily reproducible given the myriad components of a variant calling pipeline. Here, we describe a cloud-based pipeline for joint variant calling in large samples using the Real Time Genomics population caller. We deployed the population caller on the Amazon cloud with the DNAnexus platform in order to achieve low-cost variant calling. Using our pipeline, we were able to identify 68.3 million variants in 2,535 samples from Phase 3 of the 1000 Genomes Project. By performing the variant calling in a parallel manner, the data was processed within 5 days at a compute cost of $7.33 per sample (a total cost of $18,590 for completed jobs and $21,805 for all jobs). Analysis of cost dependence and running time on the data size suggests that, given near linear scalability, cloud computing can be a cheap and efficient platform for analyzing even larger sequencing studies in the future. PMID:26110529

  3. Pseudorandom Noise Code-Based Technique for Cloud and Aerosol Discrimination Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Prasad, Narasimha S.; Flood, Michael A.; Harrison, Fenton Wallace

    2011-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is working on a continuous wave (CW) laser based remote sensing scheme for the detection of CO2 and O2 from space based platforms suitable for ACTIVE SENSING OF CO2 EMISSIONS OVER NIGHTS, DAYS, AND SEASONS (ASCENDS) mission. ASCENDS is a future space-based mission to determine the global distribution of sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). A unique, multi-frequency, intensity modulated CW (IMCW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) operating at 1.57 micron for CO2 sensing has been developed. Effective aerosol and cloud discrimination techniques are being investigated in order to determine concentration values with accuracies less than 0.3%. In this paper, we discuss the demonstration of a PN code based technique for cloud and aerosol discrimination applications. The possibility of using maximum length (ML)-sequences for range and absorption measurements is investigated. A simple model for accomplishing this objective is formulated, Proof-of-concept experiments carried out using SONAR based LIDAR simulator that was built using simple audio hardware provided promising results for extension into optical wavelengths. Keywords: ASCENDS, CO2 sensing, O2 sensing, PN codes, CW lidar

  4. Cloud security technologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Igor Muttik; Chris Barton

    2009-01-01

    You may have heard a new term that started making rounds very recently – “cloud-based security”. In this paper we describe past and contemporary security technologies based on the knowledge provided from the servers in the Internet “cloud”. We discuss how cloud-based malware scanners can simbiotically coexist with traditional scanning technologies, what are the advantages and limitations of the new

  5. G-virial: Gravity-based structure analysis of molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Xing; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Menten, Karl; Megeath, Tom; Shi, Xun

    2015-06-01

    We present the G-virial method which aims to quantify (1) the importance of gravity in molecular clouds in the position-position-velocity (PPV) space; and (2) properties of the gas condensations in molecular clouds. Different from previous approaches that calculate the virial parameter for different regions, our new method takes gravitational interactions between all the voxels in 3D PPV data cubes into account, and generates maps of the importance of gravity. This map can be combined with the original data cube to derive relations such as the mass-radius relation. Our method is important for several reasons. First, it offers the ability to quantify the centrally condensed structures in the 3D PPV data cubes, and enables us to compare them in an uniform framework. Second, it allows us to understand the importance of gravity at different locations in the data cube, and provides a global picture of gravity in clouds. Third, it offers a robust approach to decomposing the data into different regions which are gravitationally coherent. To demonstrate the application of our method we identified regions from the Perseus and Ophiuchus molecular clouds, and analyzed their properties. We found an increase in the importance of gravity towards the centers of the individual molecular condensations. We also quantified the properties of the regions in terms of mass-radius and mass-velocity relations. Through evaluating the virial parameters based on the G-virial, we found that all our regions are almost gravitationally bound. Cluster-forming regions appear are more centrally condensed. Appendices and movie are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgAvailable at http://gxli.github.io/G-virial/

  6. Altimeter Height and Timing Bias Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Born; H. Hagar; M. Parke; J. Diamante; B. Douglas; C. Goad; C. Martin; B. Tapley; W. Townsend; R. Kolenkiewicz; J. Marsh; J. Whitehead

    1979-01-01

    The objective of the SEASAT-1 height calibration activity is to obtain values of the bias in the altimeter height measurement and time tag consistent with the 10 cm precision of the instrument. Based on analysis of altimeter and tracking data from four SEASAT passes over Bermuda, we find that a constant height bias of 0.12pm 0.05meters provides consistency with the

  7. Strengthen Cloud Computing Security with Federal Identity Management Using Hierarchical Identity-Based Cryptography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liang Yan; Chunming Rong; Gansen Zhao

    2009-01-01

    More and more companies begin to provide different kinds of cloud computing services for Internet users at the same time these\\u000a services also bring some security problems. Currently the majority of cloud computing systems provide digital identity for\\u000a users to access their services, this will bring some inconvenience for a hybrid cloud that includes multiple private clouds\\u000a and\\/or public clouds.

  8. Trends, interannual and seasonal variations of tropospheric CO, C2H6 and HCN columns measured from ground-based FTIR at Lauder and Arrival Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, G.; Wood, S. W.; Morgenstern, O.; Jones, N. B.; Robinson, J.; Smale, D.

    2012-02-01

    We analyse the carbon monoxide (CO), ethane (C2H6) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) partial columns (from the ground to 12 km) derived from measurements by ground-based solar Fourier Transform Spectroscopy at Lauder, New Zealand (45° S, 170° E) and at Arrival Heights, Antarctica (78° S, 167° E) from 1997 to 2009. Significant negative trends are calculated for all species at both locations: CO (-0.90 ± 0.31% yr-1) and C2H6 (-3.10 ± 1.07% yr-1) at Arrival Heights and CO (-0.87 ± 0.30% yr-1), C2H6 (-2.70 ± 0.94% yr-1) and HCN (-0.93 ± 0.32% yr-1) at Lauder. The uncertainties reflect the 95% confidence limits. The dominant seasonal trends of CO and C2H6 at Lauder, and to a lesser degree at Arrival Heights, occur in austral spring when the correlations between CO and C2H6 and between CO and HCN maximize. Tropospheric columns of all three species are characterised by minima in March-June and maxima from August to November; this season is the southern-hemisphere tropical and sub-tropical biomass burning period. A tropospheric chemistry-climate model is used to simulate CO and C2H6 columns for the period of 1997-2009 using interannually varying biomass burning emissions; the model simulated tropospheric columns of CO and C2H6 compare well with the measured partial columns of both species. However, the model does not re-produce the significant negative trends of observed CO and C2H6 partial columns at both locations. Weak negative trends are calculated from model data. The model sensitivity calculations indicate that long-range transport of biomass burning emissions from Southern Africa and South America dominate the seasonal cycles of CO and C2H6 at both Lauder and Arrival Heights. Interannual variability of these compounds at both locations is largely triggered by variations in biomass burning emissions associated with large-scale El Nino Southern Oscillation and prolonged biomass burning events, e.g. the Australian bush fires.

  9. A robust linear feature-based procedure for automated registration of point clouds.

    PubMed

    Poreba, Martyna; Goulette, François

    2015-01-01

    With the variety of measurement techniques available on the market today, fusing multi-source complementary information into one dataset is a matter of great interest. Target-based, point-based and feature-based methods are some of the approaches used to place data in a common reference frame by estimating its corresponding transformation parameters. This paper proposes a new linear feature-based method to perform accurate registration of point clouds, either in 2D or 3D. A two-step fast algorithm called Robust Line Matching and Registration (RLMR), which combines coarse and fine registration, was developed. The initial estimate is found from a triplet of conjugate line pairs, selected by a RANSAC algorithm. Then, this transformation is refined using an iterative optimization algorithm. Conjugates of linear features are identified with respect to a similarity metric representing a line-to-line distance. The efficiency and robustness to noise of the proposed method are evaluated and discussed. The algorithm is valid and ensures valuable results when pre-aligned point clouds with the same scale are used. The studies show that the matching accuracy is at least 99.5%. The transformation parameters are also estimated correctly. The error in rotation is better than 2.8% full scale, while the translation error is less than 12.7%. PMID:25594589

  10. An Autonomous Reliabilit Cloud Comput

    E-print Network

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    An Autonomous Reliabilit Ami Cloud Comput Department of Computing and Informa Abstract--Cloud computing paradigm allo based access to computing and storages s Internet. Since with advances of Cloud. Keywords- Cloud computing; SLA negotiat I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing has transferred the services

  11. Effects of Cloud Horizontal Inhomogeneity and Drizzle on Remote Sensing of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius: Case Studies Based on Large-eddy Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Feingold, Graham; Platnick, Steven; Pincus, Robert; Xue, Huiwen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates effects of drizzle and cloud horizontal inhomogeneity on cloud effective radius (re) retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). In order to identify the relative importance of various factors, we developed a MODIS cloud property retrieval simulator based on the combination of large-eddy simulations (LES) and radiative transfer computations. The case studies based on synthetic LES cloud fields indicate that at high spatial resolution (100 m) 3-D radiative transfer effects, such as illumination and shadowing, can induce significant differences between retrievals ofre based on reflectance at 2.1 m (re,2.1) and 3.7 m (re,3.7). It is also found that 3-D effects tend to have stronger impact onre,2.1 than re,3.7, leading to positive difference between the two (re,3.72.1) from illumination and negative re,3.72.1from shadowing. The cancellation of opposing 3-D effects leads to overall reasonable agreement betweenre,2.1 and re,3.7 at high spatial resolution as far as domain averages are concerned. At resolutions similar to MODIS, however, re,2.1 is systematically larger than re,3.7when averaged over the LES domain, with the difference exhibiting a threshold-like dependence on bothre,2.1and an index of the sub-pixel variability in reflectance (H), consistent with MODIS observations. In the LES cases studied, drizzle does not strongly impact reretrievals at either wavelength. It is also found that opposing 3-D radiative transfer effects partly cancel each other when cloud reflectance is aggregated from high spatial resolution to MODIS resolution, resulting in a weaker net impact of 3-D radiative effects onre retrievals. The large difference at MODIS resolution between re,3.7 and re,2.1 for highly inhomogeneous pixels with H 0.4 can be largely attributed to what we refer to as the plane-parallelrebias, which is attributable to the impact of sub-pixel level horizontal variability of cloud optical thickness onre retrievals and is greater for re,2.1 than re,3.7. These results suggest that there are substantial uncertainties attributable to 3-D radiative effects and plane-parallelre bias in the MODIS re,2.1retrievals for pixels with strong sub-pixel scale variability, and theH index can be used to identify these uncertainties.

  12. Vertical distribution of ozone and the variation of tropopause heights based on ozonesonde and satellite observations. [Contract title: Internal Wave Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liu, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of atmospheric ozone is nonuniform both in space and time. Local ozone concentration vary with altitude, latitude, longitude, and season. Two year ozonesonde data, January 1981 to December 1982, observed at four Canadian stations and 2.5 year backscattered ultraviolet experiment data on the Nimbus-4 satellite, April 1970 to August 1972, observed over five American stations were used to study the relationship between the total ozone, vertical height distribution of the ozone mixing ratio, vertical height distribution of half total ozone, and the local tropopause height. The results show that there is a postive correlation between total ozone in Dobson Units and the tropopause height in terms of atmospheric pressure. This result suggests that local intrusion of the statosphere into the troposphere, or the local decreasing of tropopause height could occur if there is a local increasing of total ozone. A comparison of the vertical height distribution of the ozone mixing ratio, the modified pressure height of half total ozone and the tropopause height shows that the pressure height of an ozone mixing ratio of 0.3 micrograms/g, and the modified pressure height of half total ozone are very well correlated with the tropopause pressure height.

  13. Ground-based SMART-COMMIT Measurements for Studying Aerosol and Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2008-01-01

    From radiometric principles, it is expected that the retrieved properties of extensive aerosols and clouds from reflected/emitted measurements by satellite (and/or aircraft) should be consistent with those retrieved from transmitted/emitted radiance observed at the surface. Although space-borne remote sensing observations cover large spatial domain, they are often plagued by contamination of surface signatures. Thus, ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing measurements, where signals come directly from atmospheric constituents, the sun, and/or the Earth-atmosphere interactions, provide additional information content for comparisons that confirm quantitatively the usefulness of the integrated surface, aircraft, and satellite data sets. The development and deployment of SMARTCOMMIT (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile facilities are aimed for the optimal utilization of collocated ground-based observations as constraints to yield higher fidelity satellite retrievals and to determine any sampling bias due to target conditions. To quantify the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system and the atmospheric processes, SMART-COMMIT instruments fall into three categories: flux radiometer, radiance sensor and in-situ probe. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of SMART-COMMIT in recent field campaigns (e.g., CRYSTAL-FACE, UAE 2, BASEASIA, NAMMA) that were designed and executed to study the compelling variability in temporal scale of both anthropogenic and natural aerosols (e.g., biomass-burning smoke, airborne dust) and cirrus clouds. We envision robust approaches in which well-collocated ground-based measurements and space-borne observations will greatly advance our knowledge of extensive aerosols and clouds.

  14. Exertion-based billing for cloud storage access Matthew Wachs , Lianghong Xu , Arkady Kanevsky, Gregory R. Ganger

    E-print Network

    Exertion-based billing for cloud storage access Matthew Wachs , Lianghong Xu , Arkady Kanevsky, rather than the exertion (i.e., effort/resources expended) to complete that work. But, the provider's cost is based on the exertion, and the exertion for a given amount of work can vary dramatically based

  15. The effects of cloud inhomogeneities upon radiative fluxes, and the supply of a cloud truth validation dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    The ASTER polar cloud mask algorithm is currently under development. Several classification techniques have been developed and implemented. The merits and accuracy of each are being examined. The classification techniques under investigation include fuzzy logic, hierarchical neural network, and a pairwise histogram comparison scheme based on sample histograms called the Paired Histogram Method. Scene adaptive methods also are being investigated as a means to improve classifier performance. The feature, arctan of Band 4 and Band 5, and the Band 2 vs. Band 4 feature space are key to separating frozen water (e.g., ice/snow, slush/wet ice, etc.) from cloud over frozen water, and land from cloud over land, respectively. A total of 82 Landsat TM circumpolar scenes are being used as a basis for algorithm development and testing. Numerous spectral features are being tested and include the 7 basic Landsat TM bands, in addition to ratios, differences, arctans, and normalized differences of each combination of bands. A technique for deriving cloud base and top height is developed. It uses 2-D cross correlation between a cloud edge and its corresponding shadow to determine the displacement of the cloud from its shadow. The height is then determined from this displacement, the solar zenith angle, and the sensor viewing angle.

  16. On the use of IR lidar and K(sub a)-band radar for observing cirrus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Kropfli, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    Advances in lidar and radar technology have potential for providing new and better information on climate significant parameters of cirrus. Consequently, the NOAA Wave Propagation Lab. is commencing CLARET (Cloud Lidar And Radar Exploratory Test) to evaluate the promise of these new capabilities. Parameters under study include cloud particle size distribution, height of cloud bases, tops, and multiple layers, and cloud dynamics revealed through measurement of vertical motions. The first phase of CLARET is planned for Sept. 1989. The CO2 coherent Doppler lidar and the sensitive K sub a band radar hold promise for providing valuable information on cirrus that is beyond the grasp of current visible lidars.

  17. Radar based remote sensing of cloud liquid water—application of various techniques—a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meywerk, J.; Quante, M.; Sievers, O.

    2005-05-01

    During the BALTEX BRIDGE Campaign (BBC) of CLIWA-NET, conducted at Cabauw, The Netherlands, from 1 August through 31 September 2001, cloud radar parameters like reflectivity, linear depolarization ratio and Doppler velocities have been observed using a 95 GHz cloud radar. These observations along with other remotely sensed parameters from the ground, have been used to derive the liquid water content of clouds which is one of the most important parameters to be known when the radiative transfer of clouds needs to be calculated. Simultaneously a multi-channel passive microwave radiometer and a lidar ceilometer have been operated close to the radar. While drizzle could be ruled out to have a significant impact on the return signal, corrections due to atmospheric absorption (gaseous) and attenuation due to clouds (mainly loss of signal due to absorption) had to be applied to the radar data. The corrections will be discussed in detail and have been applied to the radar reflectivity profiles before estimating cloud liquid water profiles. After the liquid water content profile has been calculated (for a fixed integrated liquid water path) the maximum in liquid water content of the cloud increased by about 14% and shifted upward within the cloud. The applied corrections bring the liquid water profile closer to adiabatic in the middle and upper part of the cloud. Examples of time series of corrected vertical profiles and average profiles are shown and are discussed. The ground based remotely sensed liquid water profiles show, on average, excellent agreement with simultaneously in situ measured liquid water content from aircraft measurements.

  18. vPresent: A cloud based 3D virtual presentation environment for interactive product customization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Xiaoming; Guo, Fei; He, Yifeng; Guan, Ling

    2013-09-01

    In modern society, many companies offer product customization services to their customers. There are two major issues in providing customized products. First, product manufacturers need to effectively present their products to the customers who may be located in any geographical area. Second, customers need to be able to provide their feedbacks on the product in real-time. However, the traditional presentation approaches cannot effectively convey sufficient information for the product or efficiently adjust product design according to customers' real-time feedbacks. In order to address these issues, we propose vPresent , a cloud based 3D virtual presentation environment, in this paper. In vPresent, the product expert can show the 3D virtual product to the remote customers and dynamically customize the product based on customers' feedbacks, while customers can provide their opinions in real time when they are viewing a vivid 3D visualization of the product. Since the proposed vPresent is a cloud based system, the customers are able to access the customized virtual products from anywhere at any time, via desktop, laptop, or even smart phone. The proposed vPresent is expected to effectively deliver 3D visual information to customers and provide an interactive design platform for the development of customized products.

  19. Interpretation of multi-wavelength-retrieved cloud droplet effective radii in terms of cloud vertical inhomogeneity based on water cloud simulations using a spectral-bin microphysics cloud model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, T. N.; Suzuki, K.; Nakajima, T. Y.; Matsumae, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Clouds play an import role in energy balance and climate changes of the Earth. IPCC AR4, however, pointed out that cloud feedback is still the large source of uncertainty in climate estimates. In the recent decade, the new satellites with the active instruments (e.g. Cloudsat) represented a new epoch in earth observations. The active remote sensing is powerful for illustrating the vertical structures of clouds, but the passive remote sensing from satellite images also contribute to better understating of cloud system. For instance, Nakajima et al. (2010a) and Suzuki et al. (2010) illustrated transition of cloud growth, from cloud droplet to drizzle to rain, using the combine analysis of the cloud droplet size retrieved from passive images (MODIS) and the reflectivity profiles from Cloudsat. Furthermore, EarthCARE that is a new satellite launched years later is composed of not only the active but also passive instruments for the combined analysis. On the other hands, the methods to retrieve the advanced information of cloud properties are also required because many imagers have been operated and are now planned (e.g. GCOM-C/SGLI), and have the advantages such as wide observation width and more observation channels. Cloud droplet effective radius (CDR) and cloud optical thickness (COT) can be retrieved using a non-water-absorbing band (e.g. 0.86?m) and a water-absorbing band (1.6, 2.1, 3.7?m) of imagers under the assumptions such as the log-normal droplet size distribution and the plane-parallel cloud structure. However, the differences between three retrieved CDRs using 1.6, 2.1 or 3.7?m (R16, R21 and R37) are found in the satellite observations. Several studies pointed out that vertical/horizontal inhomogeneity of cloud structure, difference of penetration depth of water-absorbing bands, multi-modal droplet distribution and/or 3-D radiative transfer effect cause the CDR differences. In other words, the advanced information of clouds may lie hidden in the differences. Nakajima et al. (2010b) investigated the impact of the differences sensitivities to particle size and the penetration depth in an attempt to explain the CDR differences found in by using a simple two-layer cloud model with the bi-modal size distribution functions. Their results showed the sensitivity differences between 1.6, 2.1 and 3.7?m bands to droplet sizes and their vertical stratification. In this study, we further investigate the impact of the vertical inhomogeneity structure including the drizzle by using a spectral-bin microphysics cloud model. We apply the 1-D radiative transfer computation to the numerical cloud fields generated by the cloud model, and retrieve the CDRs from the reflectances thus simulated at each band. We then compare the statistics of these retrieved CDRs with the CDRs obtained from MODIS observations and derive the sensitivity functions of the retrieved CDRs to the particle size and the optical depth from the sets of the droplet distribution functions predicted by the model and the retrieved CDRs. This study is an attempt to interpret the CDR differences in terms of the cloud vertical structure and the cloud particle growth processes.

  20. Channel Base Current Model for Negative Multiple Cloud-to-ground Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarotti, M. G.; Saba, M. M.; Pinto, O.; Lacerda, M.; Williams, E.

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 50% of all negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes have one single ground connection. For this type of flash, the current intensity at the channel base is modeled here as an electronic circuit with especial focus on the current cut-off process. The fundamental concept used is the current instability criteria proposed by Stan Heckman (1992). Considering the total channel resistance (R) and capacitance (C) and the thermodynamic (cooling) channel constant (tau), he hypothesizes that when RC > tau, the channel is unstable and the current cut-off (discrete stroke); and when RC < tau, the channel is stable and there is continuing current as long as there is charge available in the channel. Laboratory arc discharge data based on current measurements are used for R and tau as a function of current. In order to simulate this circuit, three processes were taken into account: (1) power source (lightning upper channel development inside the cloud), (2) electrical breakdown at the channel top (return-stroke initiation) and (3) channel base decay and cut-off (comparing tau, R and C). All processes have a correspondent circuit element/subsystem. The fundamental electronic elements are respectively: (1) a controlled current source as a function of charge density and cloud leader length and cross area; (2) a breakdown device (surge arrester) combined with a cut-off elapsed time-dependent resistance performing the resistive interrupted channel; and (3) a resistance in parallel with a capacitor in series with a switch controlled by a comparator RC versus tau. The primary objective of this modeling is to simulate the current waveform in time, representing the cut-off and transition to another subsequent return-stroke with realistic values for interstroke interval, continuing current and M-components amplitude and duration. Typical values for these parameters will be represented as well as distribution extreme values. These current waveforms will be compared with cloud-to-ground lightning current measurements in towers (e.g. San Salvatore, Gaisberg, Cachimbo).

  1. Opposite effects of absorbing aerosols on the retrievals of cloud optical depth from spaceborne and ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanqing; Zhao, Fengsheng; Liu, Jianjun; Jiang, Mengjiao; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Cribb, Maureen

    2014-05-01

    Absorbing aerosols above or within cloud layers have drawn much attention in recent years due to substantially enhanced absorption of solar radiation that may affect reflection at the top of the atmosphere. The retrieval of cloud properties is usually conducted without any regard to aerosols. This study illustrates that retrievals of cloud optical depth (?c) from spaceborne and ground-based sensors are both affected by such aerosols and lead to opposite biases. A ground-based retrieval algorithm is developed for the simultaneous retrieval of ?c and cloud droplet effective radius using spectral irradiance measurements from a multifilter rotating spectroradiometer and liquid water path (LWP) data from a microwave radiometer deployed in China. The algorithm is applied to data acquired from 17 May 2008 to 12 May 2009 at a heavily polluted site in the heart of the Yangtze delta region in China. The ground-based retrieval of cloud droplet effective radius increases with increasing LWP. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer retrievals tend to overestimate (underestimate) LWP when cloud LWP is less (greater) than about 200 g/m2. Model tests show strong sensitivities to the retrieval of ?c from ground and spaceborne sensors under varying absorption, loading, and vertical distribution conditions. For absorbing aerosol mixed with cloud, ?c tends to be underestimated from space, but overestimated from the ground, leading to very poor agreement between ground-based and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer retrievals. Their differences increase with increasing ?c. This finding suggests that in a turbid atmosphere with absorbing aerosols, the aerosol effect should be considered, or it would mislead any validation using satellite and ground-based retrievals.

  2. CONTRIBUTED Green Cloud Computing

    E-print Network

    Tucker, Rod

    CONTRIBUTED P A P E R Green Cloud Computing: Balancing Energy in Processing, Storage, and Transport to energy consumption and cloud computing seems to be an alternative to office-based computing. By Jayant computing is rapidly expanding as an alternative to conventional office-based computing. As cloud computing

  3. A Vegetation Classification of the Opunohu Valley (Moorea Island, French Polynesia) based on a Relative Canopy-Height Class Set Using AirSAR and MASTER Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, B.; Thomas, J.; Capolsini, P.

    2003-12-01

    This paper addresses the vegetation mapping and land use of Opunohu Valley (Moorea Island - French Polynesia) using JPL-AirSAR and MASTER (MODIS/ASTER simulator) images acquired during the PACRIM2 mission (Aug. 2000). These sensors are different but can be considered as complementary since MASTER is a 20 meters ground resolution multispectral imaging scanner with 50 channels distributed in the visible-shortwave infrared, mid infrared and thermal infrared, and AirSAR is a C-band (TOPSAR) and L-band (POLSAR), 5meters ground resolution radar sensor. Our main application field deals with the complex and fragile vegetation cover of south pacific volcanic islands. We presently focus on Opunohu Valley because of its highly representative diversity of vegetation and land cover (found in other polynesian volcanic islands), including different types of forests, coconut fields, grass fields, fern lands, urban zones, agricultural areas, etc... We first defined an original set of classes based on the relative canopy-height of vegetation, we then composed a well-suited RGB SAR-composite image in order to visually discriminate our vegetation classes. An interesting "pineapple fields" class (an important economic resource in Moorea island) proved to particularly discriminate from height-related "grass fields" class because of its structural properties, which lead to a particular signature on SAR images. Using a supervised maximum likelihood algorithm, two classification maps have been defined on both the AirSAR and the MASTER images, using aerial photographs as a ground truth training set. The vegetal species included in each class as well as the classification results are further discussed and the MASTER and AirSAR based classification maps are compared.

  4. A security-awareness virtual machine management scheme based on Chinese wall policy in cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Si; Gui, Xiaolin; Lin, Jiancai; Tian, Feng; Zhao, Jianqiang; Dai, Min

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing gets increasing attention for its capacity to leverage developers from infrastructure management tasks. However, recent works reveal that side channel attacks can lead to privacy leakage in the cloud. Enhancing isolation between users is an effective solution to eliminate the attack. In this paper, to eliminate side channel attacks, we investigate the isolation enhancement scheme from the aspect of virtual machine (VM) management. The security-awareness VMs management scheme (SVMS), a VMs isolation enhancement scheme to defend against side channel attacks, is proposed. First, we use the aggressive conflict of interest relation (ACIR) and aggressive in ally with relation (AIAR) to describe user constraint relations. Second, based on the Chinese wall policy, we put forward four isolation rules. Third, the VMs placement and migration algorithms are designed to enforce VMs isolation between the conflict users. Finally, based on the normal distribution, we conduct a series of experiments to evaluate SVMS. The experimental results show that SVMS is efficient in guaranteeing isolation between VMs owned by conflict users, while the resource utilization rate decreases but not by much. PMID:24688434

  5. A Cloud-Based Global Flood Disaster Community Cyber-Infrastructure: Development and Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, Zhanming; Hong, Yang; Khan, Sadiq; Gourley, Jonathan; Flamig, Zachary; Kirschbaum, Dalia; Tang, Guoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Flood disasters have significant impacts on the development of communities globally. This study describes a public cloud-based flood cyber-infrastructure (CyberFlood) that collects, organizes, visualizes, and manages several global flood databases for authorities and the public in real-time, providing location-based eventful visualization as well as statistical analysis and graphing capabilities. In order to expand and update the existing flood inventory, a crowdsourcing data collection methodology is employed for the public with smartphones or Internet to report new flood events, which is also intended to engage citizen-scientists so that they may become motivated and educated about the latest developments in satellite remote sensing and hydrologic modeling technologies. Our shared vision is to better serve the global water community with comprehensive flood information, aided by the state-of-the- art cloud computing and crowdsourcing technology. The CyberFlood presents an opportunity to eventually modernize the existing paradigm used to collect, manage, analyze, and visualize water-related disasters.

  6. Online Maps and Cloud-Supported Location-Based Services across a Manifold of Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröpfl, M.; Buchmüller, D.; Leberl, F.

    2012-07-01

    Online mapping, miniaturization of computing devices, the "cloud", Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and cell tower triangulation all coalesce into an entirely novel infrastructure for numerous innovative map applications. This impacts the planning of human activities, navigating and tracking these activities as they occur, and finally documenting their outcome for either a single user or a network of connected users in a larger context. In this paper, we provide an example of a simple geospatial application making use of this model, which we will use to explain the basic steps necessary to deploy an application involving a web service hosting geospatial information and a client software consuming the web service through an API. The application allows an insurance claim specialist to add claims to a cloud-based database including a claim location. A field agent then uses a smartphone application to query the database by proximity, and heads out to capture photographs as supporting documentation for the claim. Once the photos have been uploaded to the web service, a second web service for image matching is called in order to try and match the current photograph to previously submitted assets. Image matching is used as a pre-verification step to determine whether the coverage of the respective object is sufficient for the claim specialist to process the claim. The development of the application was based on Microsoft's® Bing Maps™, Windows Phone™, Silverlight™, Windows Azure™ and Visual Studio™, and was completed in approximately 30 labour hours split among two developers.

  7. Remote sensing of multilevel clouds during FIRE IFO 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, Bryan A.; Titlow, J.; Tovinkere, V.; Poellot, M.; Ackerman, T. P.; Alvarez, J.; Uttal, T.; Intrieri, J.

    1993-01-01

    An unresolved difficulty in the remote sensing of clouds concerns the inability of the cloud retrieval algorithms to adequately recognize and analyze scenes containing overlapping cloud layers. Most cloud retrieval schemes, such as that used by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) assume that each picture element (pixel) contains a single cloud layer. The current study begins to address the complexities of multilayered cloud property retrieval through the application of a modified multispectral, multiresolution (MSMR) method, first detailed in Baum et al. (1992), which merges 1.1 -km (at nadir) spectral data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) with 17.4-km (at nadir) High Resolution Infrared Radiometer Sounder (HIRS/2, henceforth HIRS). Both instruments are flown aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting platforms. An ideal case study for this investigation is provided by the NOAA-11 overpass at 20:48 UTC on November 28, 1991. At this time, a large-scale cirrostratus veil overlaid a low-level stratus deck over much of the IFO region. There were both surface lidar and radar observations of the clouds as well as University of North Dakota (UND) Citation aircraft measurements. The presence of overlapping cloud layers within a HIRS FOV is determined from colocated AVHRR spectral data through the use of a fuzzy logic expert system. Conventional algorithms such as spatial coherence and CO2 slicing are used to retrieve cloud pressure and height for each identified cloud layer. The results from the satellite cloud retrieval analysis are compared to results from both surface- and aircraft-based measurements.

  8. Real-time rendering of physically-based cloud simulations for university undergraduate research fellows

    E-print Network

    Walkington, Kevin Michael

    2013-02-22

    of cloud formation and existence on current commercially-available computers. One of the challenges associated with this simulation is its display onto a computer screen, often referred to as rendering. We will present a brief overview of existing cloud...

  9. Effect of aberration on height calibration in three-dimensional localization-based microscopy and particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2009-04-01

    Many single-particle tracking and localization-based superresolution imaging techniques use the width of a single lateral fluorescence image to estimate a molecule's axial position. This determination is often done by use of a calibration data set derived from a source adhered to a glass-water interface. However, for sources deeper in solution, aberrations will change the relationship between the image width and the axial position. We analyzed the depth-varying point spread function of a high numerical aperture objective near an index of refraction mismatch at the water-glass interface using an optical trap. In addition to the well-known focal shift, spherical aberrations cause up to 30% relative systematic error in axial position estimation. This effect is nonuniform in depth, and we find that, although molecules below the focal plane are correctly localized, molecules deeper than the focal plane are found to be lower than their actual positions. PMID:19340142

  10. Integrating Cloud-Based Strategies and Tools in Face-to-Face Training Sessions to Increase the Impact of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gradel, Kathleen; Edson, Alden J.

    2012-01-01

    This article is based on the premise that face-to-face training can be augmented with cloud-based technology tools, to potentially extend viable training supports as higher education staff and faculty implement new content/skills in their jobs and classrooms. There are significant benefits to harnessing cloud-based tools that can facilitate both…

  11. Forest canopy height estimation using ICESat/GLAS data and error factor analysis in Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masato; Saigusa, Nobuko; Oguma, Hiroyuki; Yamagata, Yoshiki

    2013-07-01

    Spaceborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) enables us to obtain information about vertical forest structure directly, and it has often been used to measure forest canopy height or above-ground biomass. However, little attention has been given to comparisons of the accuracy of the different estimation methods of canopy height or to the evaluation of the error factors in canopy height estimation. In this study, we tested three methods of estimating canopy height using the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) onboard NASA's Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), and evaluated several factors that affected accuracy. Our study areas were Tomakomai and Kushiro, two forested areas on Hokkaido in Japan. The accuracy of the canopy height estimates was verified by ground-based measurements. We also conducted a multivariate analysis using quantification theory type I (multiple-regression analysis of qualitative data) and identified the observation conditions that had a large influence on estimation accuracy. The method using the digital elevation model was the most accurate, with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 3.2 m. However, GLAS data with a low signal-to-noise ratio (?10.0) and that taken from September to October 2009 had to be excluded from the analysis because the estimation accuracy of canopy height was remarkably low. After these data were excluded, the multivariate analysis showed that surface slope had the greatest effect on estimation accuracy, and the accuracy dropped the most in steeply sloped areas. We developed a second model with two equations to estimate canopy height depending on the surface slope, which improved estimation accuracy (RMSE = 2.8 m). These results should prove useful and provide practical suggestions for estimating forest canopy height using spaceborne LiDAR.

  12. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud fieldmore »and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.« less

  13. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borque, Paloma [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada); Giangrande, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kollias, Pavlos [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  14. Performance assessment of a five-channel estimation-based ice cloud retrieval scheme for use over the global oceans

    E-print Network

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    -based scheme, designed from information content principles, uses a rigorous, state-dependent error analysis in the strict interpretation of small temporal or spatial trends found in existing cloud products. In MODIS properties. A virtual plethora of retrieval schemes based upon both passive and active spaceborne instruments

  15. ESTIMATING CLOUD PARAMETERS FOR NEROS I

    EPA Science Inventory

    GOES infrared and visible imagery were combined with surface and upper-air meteorological observations to determine cloud amounts and cloud-top heights over the NEROS grid for the periods 1200, 1500, and 1800 EDT, on 3, 4, and 13 August 1979. Cloud amounts were determined for cum...

  16. SLA-based virtual machine management for heterogeneous workloads in a cloud datacenter

    E-print Network

    Melbourne, University of

    Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems Laboratory, Department of Computing and Information Systems Keywords: Cloud computing Service Level Agreement Virtual machine migration Resource management a b s t r a c t Efficient provisioning of resources is a challenging problem in cloud computing environments due

  17. An approach for cloud resource scheduling based on Parallel Genetic Algorithm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhongni Zheng; Rui Wang; Hai Zhong; Xuejie Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Resource scheduling is a key process for clouds such as Infrastructure as a Service cloud. To make the most efficient use of the resources, we propose an optimized scheduling algorithm to achieve the optimization or sub-optimization for cloud scheduling problems. We investigate the possibility to place the Virtual Machines in a flexible way to improve the speed of finding the

  18. SLA-Based Resource Provisioning for Heterogeneous Workloads in a Virtualized Cloud

    E-print Network

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    hosted applications automatically is a challenging task. Cur- rent cloud datacenters hosts a wider range applications with different performance re- quirements. Currently, cloud datacenter providers either do Agreements) or resource usage patterns of applications, are not suitable for cloud computing envi- ronments

  19. An Effective Architecture for Automated Appliance Management System Applying Ontology-Based Cloud Discovery

    E-print Network

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    @student.unimelb.edu.au, gtsayed2@siswa.utm.my, raj@csse. unimelb.edu.au Abstract-- Cloud computing is a computing paradigm which Discovery Amir Vahid Dastjerdi1 , Sayed Gholam Hassan Tabatabaei2 , and Rajkumar Buyya1 1 Cloud Computing and Distributed Systems (CLOUDS) Laboratory, Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering

  20. The Research of Satellite Cloud Image Recognition Base on Variational Method and Texture Feature Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Shangguan; Yanling Hao; Zhizhong Lu; Peng Wu

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the development of satellite cloud image processing technology has become very quick; the research aspects concentrate on judge the cloud type and classify the cloud mainly. These image processing methods relate to the subject category like image processing and pattern recognition etc; it has become one of the fields of most quickly development in the research of satellite image

  1. Ground Based Remote Sensing Of Small Ice Crystals In Arctic Cirrus Clouds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Subhashree Mishra; David Mitchell; Daniel DeSlover; Greg McFarquhar

    ABSTRACT Measurement of small ice crystals (D < 60 ?m) remains an unsolved and controversial issue in the cloud physics community. Concentrations of small ice crystals are hard to measure due to shattering of crystals at probe inlets. However, these small ice crystals alter cirrus cloud radiative properties and may affect the cirrus cloud feedback in global climate models. To

  2. Service Level Agreement-Based Joint Application Environment Assignment and Resource Allocation in Cloud Computing Systems

    E-print Network

    Pedram, Massoud

    in Cloud Computing Systems Yanzhi Wang, Shuang Chen and Massoud Pedram Department of Electrical Engineering and storage. Resource allocation is one of the most important challenges in the cloud computing system algorithms by up to 65.7%. Keywords-cloud computing; application environment; resource allocation; assignment

  3. A cloud-based car parking middleware for IoT-based smart cities: design and implementation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhanlin; Ganchev, Ivan; O'Droma, Máirtín; Zhao, Li; Zhang, Xueji

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the generic concept of using cloud-based intelligent car parking services in smart cities as an important application of the Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm. This type of services will become an integral part of a generic IoT operational platform for smart cities due to its pure business-oriented features. A high-level view of the proposed middleware is outlined and the corresponding operational platform is illustrated. To demonstrate the provision of car parking services, based on the proposed middleware, a cloud-based intelligent car parking system for use within a university campus is described along with details of its design, implementation, and operation. A number of software solutions, including Kafka/Storm/Hbase clusters, OSGi web applications with distributed NoSQL, a rule engine, and mobile applications, are proposed to provide 'best' car parking service experience to mobile users, following the Always Best Connected and best Served (ABC&S) paradigm. PMID:25429416

  4. CranialCloud: A cloud-based architecture to support trans-institutional collaborative efforts in neuro-degenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    D’Haese, Pierre-Francois; Konrad, Peter E.; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Li, Rui; Prassad, Priyanka; Rodriguez, William; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Neurological diseases have a devastating impact on millions of individuals and their families. These diseases will continue to constitute a significant research focus for this century. The search for effective treatments and cures requires multiple teams of experts in clinical neurosciences, neuroradiology, engineering and industry. Hence, the need to communicate a large amount of information with accuracy and precision is more necessary than ever for this specialty. Method In this paper, we present a distributed system that supports this vision, which we call the CranialVault Cloud (CranialCloud). It consists in a network of nodes, each with the capability to store and process data, that share the same spatial normalization processes, thus guaranteeing a common reference space. We detail and justify design choices, the architecture and functionality of individual nodes, the way these nodes interact, and how the distributed system can be used to support inter-institutional research. Results We discuss the current state of the system that gathers data for more than 1,600 patients and how we envision it to grow. Conclusions We contend that the fastest way to find and develop promising treatments and cures is to permit teams of researchers to aggregate data, spatially normalize these data, and share them. The Cranialvault system is a system that supports this vision. PMID:25861055

  5. Personalized cloud-based bioinformatics services for research and education: use cases and the elasticHPC package

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bioinformatics services have been traditionally provided in the form of a web-server that is hosted at institutional infrastructure and serves multiple users. This model, however, is not flexible enough to cope with the increasing number of users, increasing data size, and new requirements in terms of speed and availability of service. The advent of cloud computing suggests a new service model that provides an efficient solution to these problems, based on the concepts of "resources-on-demand" and "pay-as-you-go". However, cloud computing has not yet been introduced within bioinformatics servers due to the lack of usage scenarios and software layers that address the requirements of the bioinformatics domain. Results In this paper, we provide different use case scenarios for providing cloud computing based services, considering both the technical and financial aspects of the cloud computing service model. These scenarios are for individual users seeking computational power as well as bioinformatics service providers aiming at provision of personalized bioinformatics services to their users. We also present elasticHPC, a software package and a library that facilitates the use of high performance cloud computing resources in general and the implementation of the suggested bioinformatics scenarios in particular. Concrete examples that demonstrate the suggested use case scenarios with whole bioinformatics servers and major sequence analysis tools like BLAST are presented. Experimental results with large datasets are also included to show the advantages of the cloud model. Conclusions Our use case scenarios and the elasticHPC package are steps towards the provision of cloud based bioinformatics services, which would help in overcoming the data challenge of recent biological research. All resources related to elasticHPC and its web-interface are available at http://www.elasticHPC.org. PMID:23281941

  6. Observing wind, aerosol particles, cloud and precipitation: Finland's new ground-based remote-sensing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsikko, A.; O'Connor, E. J.; Komppula, M.; Korhonen, K.; Pfüller, A.; Giannakaki, E.; Wood, C. R.; Bauer-Pfundstein, M.; Poikonen, A.; Karppinen, T.; Lonka, H.; Kurri, M.; Heinonen, J.; Moisseev, D.; Asmi, E.; Aaltonen, V.; Nordbo, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Lihavainen, H.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Laurila, T.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.

    2014-05-01

    The Finnish Meteorological Institute, in collaboration with the University of Helsinki, has established a new ground-based remote-sensing network in Finland. The network consists of five topographically, ecologically and climatically different sites distributed from southern to northern Finland. The main goal of the network is to monitor air pollution and boundary layer properties in near real time, with a Doppler lidar and ceilometer at each site. In addition to these operational tasks, two sites are members of the Aerosols, Clouds and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network (ACTRIS); a Ka band cloud radar at Sodankylä will provide cloud retrievals within CloudNet, and a multi-wavelength Raman lidar, PollyXT (POrtabLe Lidar sYstem eXTended), in Kuopio provides optical and microphysical aerosol properties through EARLINET (the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network). Three C-band weather radars are located in the Helsinki metropolitan area and are deployed for operational and research applications. We performed two inter-comparison campaigns to investigate the Doppler lidar performance, compare the backscatter signal and wind profiles, and to optimize the lidar sensitivity through adjusting the telescope focus length and data-integration time to ensure sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in low-aerosol-content environments. In terms of statistical characterization, the wind-profile comparison showed good agreement between different lidars. Initially, there was a discrepancy in the SNR and attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles which arose from an incorrectly reported telescope focus setting from one instrument, together with the need to calibrate. After diagnosing the true telescope focus length, calculating a new attenuated backscatter coefficient profile with the new telescope function and taking into account calibration, the resulting attenuated backscatter profiles all showed good agreement with each other. It was thought that harsh Finnish winters could pose problems, but, due to the built-in heating systems, low ambient temperatures had no, or only a minor, impact on the lidar operation - including scanning-head motion. However, accumulation of snow and ice on the lens has been observed, which can lead to the formation of a water/ice layer thus attenuating the signal inconsistently. Thus, care must be taken to ensure continuous snow removal.

  7. Application of deep convective cloud albedo observation to satellite-based study of the terrestrial atmosphere: monitoring the stability of spaceborne measurements and assessing absorption anomaly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yongxiang Hu; Bruce A. Wielicki; Ping Yang; B. Lin; D. F. Young

    2004-01-01

    An objective method is developed to monitor the stability of spaceborne instruments, aimed at distinguishing climate trend from instrument drift in satellite-based climate observation records. This method is based on four-years of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) broadband observations of deep convective cloud systems with cloud-top temperature lower than 205 K and with large optical depths. The

  8. GPU-Based Cloud Service for Smith-Waterman Algorithm Using Frequency Distance Filtration Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sheng-Ta; Hung, Che Lun

    2013-01-01

    As the conventional means of analyzing the similarity between a query sequence and database sequences, the Smith-Waterman algorithm is feasible for a database search owing to its high sensitivity. However, this algorithm is still quite time consuming. CUDA programming can improve computations efficiently by using the computational power of massive computing hardware as graphics processing units (GPUs). This work presents a novel Smith-Waterman algorithm with a frequency-based filtration method on GPUs rather than merely accelerating the comparisons yet expending computational resources to handle such unnecessary comparisons. A user friendly interface is also designed for potential cloud server applications with GPUs. Additionally, two data sets, H1N1 protein sequences (query sequence set) and human protein database (database set), are selected, followed by a comparison of CUDA-SW and CUDA-SW with the filtration method, referred to herein as CUDA-SWf. Experimental results indicate that reducing unnecessary sequence alignments can improve the computational time by up to 41%. Importantly, by using CUDA-SWf as a cloud service, this application can be accessed from any computing environment of a device with an Internet connection without time constraints. PMID:23653898

  9. Identifying Building Change Using High Resolution Point Clouds - AN Object-Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Plessis, S.

    2012-08-01

    High resolution point clouds provide excellent data sources for examining change over time in above-ground features such as buildings and trees. Of particular interest is the identification of illegal construction activity or damage incurred during earthquakes and other disasters. By using multi-date point cloud layers, these types of change can be efficiently identified and mapped. Such analysis is generally not as simple as differencing imagery from the two dates. Variations between the images can be caused by slight geometric mismatches between images from different acquisition dates, errors in the data returns, or natural differences caused by vegetation growth or wind direction. The factors can contribute to the detection of large amounts of inconsequential change throughout the area of interest, resulting in too many false positives for the analysis to be of any practical use. However, by conducting object-based analysis of the data - analysing meaningful objects rather than working point by point - software algorithms can be used to rapidly and accurately detect and map only the changes of interest to the customer.

  10. GPU-based cloud service for Smith-Waterman algorithm using frequency distance filtration scheme.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheng-Ta; Lin, Chun-Yuan; Hung, Che Lun

    2013-01-01

    As the conventional means of analyzing the similarity between a query sequence and database sequences, the Smith-Waterman algorithm is feasible for a database search owing to its high sensitivity. However, this algorithm is still quite time consuming. CUDA programming can improve computations efficiently by using the computational power of massive computing hardware as graphics processing units (GPUs). This work presents a novel Smith-Waterman algorithm with a frequency-based filtration method on GPUs rather than merely accelerating the comparisons yet expending computational resources to handle such unnecessary comparisons. A user friendly interface is also designed for potential cloud server applications with GPUs. Additionally, two data sets, H1N1 protein sequences (query sequence set) and human protein database (database set), are selected, followed by a comparison of CUDA-SW and CUDA-SW with the filtration method, referred to herein as CUDA-SWf. Experimental results indicate that reducing unnecessary sequence alignments can improve the computational time by up to 41%. Importantly, by using CUDA-SWf as a cloud service, this application can be accessed from any computing environment of a device with an Internet connection without time constraints. PMID:23653898

  11. Introduction of A Day/Night, Object-Based Quantitative Fog/Low Cloud Detection and Thickness Algorithm for GOES-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, C. G.; Pavolonis, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    The GOES-R fog/low cloud detection product is a day/night, object-based algorithm designed to quantitatively identify single layer clouds that produce Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) conditions, defined as having a cloud ceiling below 1000 ft (305 m) above ground level (AGL) or a visibility less than 3 miles. Surface visibility is not available for the GOES-R algorithm so the GOES-R fog product returns a probability that the cloud ceiling is below 1000 ft (305 m) AGL. At night, the 3.9 and 11 ?m channels are used for detection while during the day the 0.65, 3.9, and 11 ?m channels are required. The fog detection algorithm utilizes textural and spectral information, as well as the difference between the cloud radiative temperature and surface temperature. The GOES-R fog/low cloud product also produces an estimation of the fog/low cloud thickness where detected.

  12. Height unification using GOCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, R.

    2012-12-01

    With the gravity field and steady-state ocean circulation explorer (GOCE) (preferably combined with the gravity field and climate experiment (GRACE)) a new generation of geoid models will become available for use in height determination. These models will be globally consistent, accurate (<3 cm) and with a spatial resolution up to degree and order 200, when expressed in terms of a spherical harmonic expansion. GOCE is a mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). It is the first satellite equipped with a gravitational gradiometer, in the case of GOCE it measures the gradient components Vxx , Vyy, Vzzand Vxz. The GOCE gravitational sensor system comprises also a geodetic global positioning system (GPS)-receiver, three star sensors and ion-thrusters for drag compensation in flight direction. GOCE was launched in March 2009 and will fly till the end of 2013. Several gravity models have been derived from its data, their maximum degree is typically between 240 and 250. In summer 2012 a first re-processing of all level-1b data took place. One of the science objectives of GOCE is the unification of height systems. The existing height offsets among the datum zones can be determined by least-squares adjustment. This requires several precise geodetic reference points available in each height datum zone, physical heights from spirit levelling (plus gravimetry), the GOCE geoid and, in addition, short wavelength geoid refinement from terrestrial gravity anomalies. GOCE allows for important simplifications of the functional and stochastic part of the adjustment model. The future trend will be the direct determination of physical heights (orthometric as well as normal) from precise global navigation satellite system (GNSS)-positioning in combination with a next generation combined satellite-terrestrial high-resolution geoid model.

  13. A novel approach for the extraction of cloud motion vectors using airglow imager measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheesh Kumar, S.; Narayana Rao, T.; Taori, A.

    2015-03-01

    The paper explores the possibility of implementing an advanced photogrammetric technique, generally employed for satellite measurements, on airglow imager, a ground-based remote sensing instrument primarily used for upper atmospheric studies, measurements of clouds for the extraction of cloud motion vectors (CMVs). The major steps involved in the algorithm remain the same, including image processing for better visualization of target elements and noise removal, identification of target cloud, setting a proper search window for target cloud tracking, estimation of cloud height, and employing 2-D cross-correlation to estimate the CMVs. Nevertheless, the implementation strategy at each step differs from that of satellite, mainly to suit airglow imager measurements. For instance, climatology of horizontal winds at the measured site has been used to fix the search window for target cloud tracking. The cloud height is estimated very accurately, as required by the algorithm, using simultaneous collocated Lidar measurements. High-resolution, both in space and time (4 min), cloud imageries are employed to minimize the errors in retrieved CMVs. The derived winds are evaluated against MST radar-derived winds by considering it as a reference. A very good correspondence is seen between these two wind measurements, both showing similar wind variation. The agreement is also found to be good in the both zonal and meridional wind velocities with RMSEs < 2.4 m s-1. At the end, the strengths and limitations of the algorithm are discussed, with possible solutions, wherever required.

  14. CloudER: A Framework for Automatic Software Vulnerability Location and Patching in the Cloud

    E-print Network

    Xu, Dongyan

    University ABSTRACT In a virtualization-based cloud infrastructure, customers of the cloud deploy virtual, Automated Patch Generation, Software Security, Cloud Computing 1. INTRODUCTION Virtualization-based cloudCloudER: A Framework for Automatic Software Vulnerability Location and Patching in the Cloud Ping

  15. A Medical Cloud-Based Platform for Respiration Rate Measurement and Hierarchical Classification of Breath Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fekr, Atena Roshan; Janidarmian, Majid; Radecka, Katarzyna; Zilic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of human respiratory signals is crucial in cyberbiological systems. A disordered breathing pattern can be the first symptom of different physiological, mechanical, or psychological dysfunctions. Therefore, a real-time monitoring of the respiration patterns, as well as respiration rate is a critical need in medical applications. There are several methods for respiration rate measurement. However, despite their accuracy, these methods are expensive and could not be integrated in a body sensor network. In this work, we present a real-time cloud-based platform for both monitoring the respiration rate and breath pattern classification, remotely. The proposed system is designed particularly for patients with breathing problems (e.g., respiratory complications after surgery) or sleep disorders. Our system includes calibrated accelerometer sensor, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and cloud-computing model. We also suggest a procedure to improve the accuracy of respiration rate for patients at rest positions. The overall error in the respiration rate calculation is obtained 0.53% considering SPR-BTA spirometer as the reference. Five types of respiration disorders, Bradapnea, Tachypnea, Cheyn-stokes, Kaussmal, and Biot's breathing are classified based on hierarchical Support Vector Machine (SVM) with seven different features. We have evaluated the performance of the proposed classification while it is individualized to every subject (case 1) as well as considering all subjects (case 2). Since the selection of kernel function is a key factor to decide SVM's performance, in this paper three different kernel functions are evaluated. The experiments are conducted with 11 subjects and the average accuracy of 94.52% for case 1 and the accuracy of 81.29% for case 2 are achieved based on Radial Basis Function (RBF). Finally, a performance evaluation has been done for normal and impaired subjects considering sensitivity, specificity and G-mean parameters of different kernel functions. PMID:24961214

  16. A medical cloud-based platform for respiration rate measurement and hierarchical classification of breath disorders.

    PubMed

    Fekr, Atena Roshan; Janidarmian, Majid; Radecka, Katarzyna; Zilic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of human respiratory signals is crucial in cyberbiological systems. A disordered breathing pattern can be the first symptom of different physiological, mechanical, or psychological dysfunctions. Therefore, a real-time monitoring of the respiration patterns, as well as respiration rate is a critical need in medical applications. There are several methods for respiration rate measurement. However, despite their accuracy, these methods are expensive and could not be integrated in a body sensor network. In this work, we present a real-time cloud-based platform for both monitoring the respiration rate and breath pattern classification, remotely. The proposed system is designed particularly for patients with breathing problems (e.g., respiratory complications after surgery) or sleep disorders. Our system includes calibrated accelerometer sensor, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and cloud-computing model. We also suggest a procedure to improve the accuracy of respiration rate for patients at rest positions. The overall error in the respiration rate calculation is obtained 0.53% considering SPR-BTA spirometer as the reference. Five types of respiration disorders, Bradapnea, Tachypnea, Cheyn-stokes, Kaussmal, and Biot's breathing are classified based on hierarchical Support Vector Machine (SVM) with seven different features. We have evaluated the performance of the proposed classification while it is individualized to every subject (case 1) as well as considering all subjects (case 2). Since the selection of kernel function is a key factor to decide SVM's performance, in this paper three different kernel functions are evaluated. The experiments are conducted with 11 subjects and the average accuracy of 94.52% for case 1 and the accuracy of 81.29% for case 2 are achieved based on Radial Basis Function (RBF). Finally, a performance evaluation has been done for normal and impaired subjects considering sensitivity, specificity and G-mean parameters of different kernel functions. PMID:24961214

  17. Satellite-based remote sensing of cirrus clouds: hyperspectral radiative transfer modeling, analysis of uncertainties in in-situ cloud extinction measurements and intercomparison of cirrus retrievals from a-train instruments 

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Zhibo

    2009-05-15

    This dissertation consists of three parts, each devoted to a particular issue of significant importance for satellite-based remote sensing of cirrus clouds. In the first part, we develop and present a fast infrared radiative transfer model...

  18. Flood variability over 1871-2012 in Northern Québec: comparison of hydrological reconstructions based on tree-rings and on geopotential height field reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigode, Pierre; Brissette, François; Caya, Daniel; Nicault, Antoine; Perreault, Luc; Kuentz, Anna; Mathevet, Thibault; Gailhard, Joël

    2015-04-01

    For the next couple of decades, the impacts of climate change on hydrological extremes are likely to be masked by climate natural variability. Thus, a better understanding and quantification of natural climate variability on hydrological extremes would be helpful for short-term adaptation. However, studying natural variability requires long instrumental records, which are inexistant in remote regions such as Northern Québec. Different methods have been proposed to extend observed hydroclimatic time-series, based on other data sources such as tree rings or sedimentological datasets. For example, tree ring multi-proxies have been studied for the Caniapiscau Reservoir in Northern Québec (Canada), leading to the reconstruction of spring flood series (Boucher et al., 2011) and of annual and seasonal mean flow series (Nicault et al., 2014), for the last 150 years. Here, we apply a different reconstruction method on the same catchment, using historical reanalysis of geopotential height fields, to compare the flood series obtained and study the observed flood variability over the 1871-2012 period. The applied method, named ANATEM (Kuentz et al., 2013), aims firstly at producing climatic time series (temperature and precipitation) which are then used as inputs to one or several hydrological model previously calibrated in order to obtain streamflow time series. The climatic reconstruction is based on the analog method, using the link between atmospheric pressure situations and local climatic variables and thus requires (i) a geopotential height field reanalysis (here the NOAA reanalysis, available over the 1871-2012 period (Compo et al., 2011)), and (ii) the available observed temperature and precipitation time series (here available over the 1960-2012 period). The hypothesis of the analog method is that two different days having similar atmospheric circulations are expected to produce similar temperature and precipitation patterns. Using this hypothesis, the method generates daily climatic series over the entire period of availability of geopotential fields (here the 1872-2012 period) by re-sampling observed local data available on a shorter period (here the 1960-2012 period), based on similarity of geopotential height fields. Finally, a large ensemble of daily climatic series is generated by considering an ensemble of analog days. Then, four rainfall-runoff models (HSAMI, HMETS, MORDOR and GR4J) previously calibrated on the observed data are used to transform this ensemble of long climatic series into an ensemble of streamflow simulations. The obtained simulations are firstly compared with the available streamflow observations and secondly with the streamflow series generated with the tree-rings multi-proxies. Finally, the different long flood series produced will be used in a flood frequency framework in order to quantify the added value of such reconstruction methods for the estimation of flood quantile (here the 20-year return period flood). References: Boucher, É., Ouarda, T. B. M. J., Bégin, Y. & Nicault, A. (2011) Spring flood reconstruction from continuous and discrete tree ring series. Water Resources Research. 47(7), W07516. doi:10.1029/2010WR010131. Compo, G. P., Whitaker, J. S., Sardeshmukh, P. D., Matsui, N., Allan, R. J., Yin, X., Gleason, B. E., et al. (2011) The Twentieth Century Reanalysis Project. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society. 137(654), 1-28. doi:10.1002/qj.776. Kuentz, A., Mathevet, T., Gailhard, J., Perret, C. & Andréassian, V. (2013) Over 100 years of climatic and hydrologic variability of a Mediterranean and mountainous watershed: the Durance River. In Cold And Mountain Region Hydrological Systems under Climate Change: towards improved projections, Vol. 360 of IAHS Publication, pages 19-25. Presented at the IAHS-IAPSO-IASPEI Assembly, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2013. Nicault, A., Boucher, E., Bégin, C., Guiot, J., Marion, J., Perreault, L., Roy, R., Savard, M. M. & Bégin, Y. (2014) Hydrological reconstruction from tree-ring multi-proxies over the last two centuries at the

  19. Cloud computing security

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dongwan Shin; William R. Claycomb; Vincent E. Urias

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is a paradigm rapidly being embraced by government and industry as a solution for cost-savings, scalability, and collaboration. While a multitude of applications and services are available commercially for cloud-based solutions, research in this area has yet to fully embrace the full spectrum of potential challenges facing cloud computing. This tutorial aims to provide researchers with a fundamental

  20. Satellite Cloud Computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kamen Kanev; Nikolay N. Mirenkov

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a novel concept for satellite based cloud computing integrating virtualized information resources from satellites and from the Internet. We first discuss the role of satellites in the infrastructure of cloud computing. Second we focus on some practical aspects of cloud computing, considering different configurations for access to satellite channels. We follow with reporting on our