Sample records for based wound dressings

  1. In Vivo Performance of Chitosan/Soy-Based Membranes as Wound-Dressing Devices for Acute Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Tírcia C.; Höring, Bernhard; Reise, Kathrin; Marques, Alexandra P.; Silva, Simone S.; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Mano, João F.; Castro, António G.; van Griensven, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    Wound management represents a major clinical challenge on what concerns healing enhancement and pain control. The selection of an appropriate dressing plays an important role in both recovery and esthetic appearance of the regenerated tissue. Despite the wide range of available dressings, the progress in the wound care market relies on the increasing interest in using natural-based biomedical products. Herein, a rat wound-dressing model of partial-thickness skin wounds was used to study newly developed chitosan/soy (cht/soy)-based membranes as wound-dressing materials. Healing and repair of nondressed, cht/soy membrane-dressed, and Epigard®-dressed wounds were followed macroscopically and histologically for 1 and 2 weeks. cht/soy membranes performed better than the controls, promoting a faster wound repair. Re-epithelialization, observed 1 week after wounding, was followed by cornification of the outermost epidermal layer at the second week of dressing, indicating repair of the wounded tissue. The use of this rodent model, although in impaired healing conditions, may enclose some drawbacks regarding the inevitable wound contraction. Moreover, being the main purpose the evaluation of cht/soy-based membranes' performance in the absence of growth factors, the choice of a clinically relevant positive control was limited to a polymeric mesh, without any growth factor influencing skin healing/repair, Epigard. These new cht/soy membranes possess the desired features regarding healing/repair stimulation, ease of handling, and final esthetic appearance—thus, valuable properties for wound dressings. PMID:23083058

  2. In vivo performance of chitosan/soy-based membranes as wound-dressing devices for acute skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Santos, Tírcia C; Höring, Bernhard; Reise, Kathrin; Marques, Alexandra P; Silva, Simone S; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Mano, João F; Castro, António G; Reis, Rui L; van Griensven, Martijn

    2013-04-01

    Wound management represents a major clinical challenge on what concerns healing enhancement and pain control. The selection of an appropriate dressing plays an important role in both recovery and esthetic appearance of the regenerated tissue. Despite the wide range of available dressings, the progress in the wound care market relies on the increasing interest in using natural-based biomedical products. Herein, a rat wound-dressing model of partial-thickness skin wounds was used to study newly developed chitosan/soy (cht/soy)-based membranes as wound-dressing materials. Healing and repair of nondressed, cht/soy membrane-dressed, and Epigard(®)-dressed wounds were followed macroscopically and histologically for 1 and 2 weeks. cht/soy membranes performed better than the controls, promoting a faster wound repair. Re-epithelialization, observed 1 week after wounding, was followed by cornification of the outermost epidermal layer at the second week of dressing, indicating repair of the wounded tissue. The use of this rodent model, although in impaired healing conditions, may enclose some drawbacks regarding the inevitable wound contraction. Moreover, being the main purpose the evaluation of cht/soy-based membranes' performance in the absence of growth factors, the choice of a clinically relevant positive control was limited to a polymeric mesh, without any growth factor influencing skin healing/repair, Epigard. These new cht/soy membranes possess the desired features regarding healing/repair stimulation, ease of handling, and final esthetic appearance-thus, valuable properties for wound dressings. PMID:23083058

  3. Wound dressings and topical agents.

    PubMed

    Higgins, K R; Ashry, H R

    1995-01-01

    Topical treatment of wounds is an important aspect of wound care, although secondary to surgical and systemic care. Dressing materials come in many forms to suit wound types and preferences. No hard evidence exists to place any one approach above another. All wounds deserve individualized attention and care plans. Likewise, a plethora of solutions exist to augment dressing materials in cleansing, antibiosis, and débridement. Traditional agents, including hydrogen peroxide, Dakin's solution, and povidone-iodine, are more tissue toxic than their common usage would indicate. We prefer frequent dressing changes with natural fiber gauze and nontoxic solutions such as saline. The scalpel, curette, and rongeur are, in our experience, much preferred to enzymatic agents when débridement is needed. We encourage scrutiny of commercial products based on clinical merit and effectiveness as documented in the medical literature. Platelet derived growth factors are an effective adjunct to wound healing and are primarily indicated when the condition of patients and their wounds has otherwise been optimized. PMID:7720031

  4. Wound Healing and the Dressing*

    PubMed Central

    Scales, John T.

    1963-01-01

    The evolution of surgical dressings is traced from 1600 b.c. to a.d. 1944. The availability of an increasing variety of man-made fibres and films from 1944 onwards has stimulated work on wound dressings, and some of the more important contributions, both clinical and experimental, are discussed. The functions of a wound dressing and the properties which the ideal wound dressing should possess are given. The necessity for both histological and clinical evaluation of wound dressings in animals and in man is stressed. Wound dressings are the most commonly used therapeutic agents, but there is no means whereby their performance can be assessed. An attempt should be made either nationally or internationally to establish a standard method of assessing the performance of wound dressings. For this it is necessary to have an internationally agreed standard dressing which could be used as a reference or control dressing in all animal and human work. The only animal with skin morphologically similar to that of man is the domestic pig. Three types of wounds could be used: (1) partial-thickness wounds; (2) full-thickness excisions; and (3) third-degree burns. The development of standard techniques for the assessment of the efficiency of wound dressings would be of considerable benefit to the research worker, the medical profession, the patient, and the surgical dressings industry. PMID:13976490

  5. Preparation and characterization of antimicrobial wound dressings based on silver, gellan, PVA and borax.

    PubMed

    Cencetti, C; Bellini, D; Pavesio, A; Senigaglia, D; Passariello, C; Virga, A; Matricardi, P

    2012-10-15

    Silver-loaded dressings are designed to provide the same antimicrobial activity of topical silver, with the advantages of a sustained silver release and a reduced number of dressing changes. Moreover, such type of dressing must provide a moist environment, avoiding fiber shedding, dehydration and adherence to the wound site. Here we describe the preparation of a novel silver-loaded dressing based on a Gellan/Hyaff(®) (Ge-H) non woven, treated with a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/borax system capable to enhance the entrapment of silver in the dressing and to modulate its release. The new hydrophilic non woven dressings show enhanced water uptake capability and slow dehydration rates. A sustained silver release is also achieved. The antibacterial activity was confirmed on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:22939352

  6. Dressings and Products in Pediatric Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    King, Alice; Stellar, Judith J.; Blevins, Anne; Shah, Kara Noelle

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The increasing complexity of medical and surgical care provided to pediatric patients has resulted in a population at significant risk for complications such as pressure ulcers, nonhealing surgical wounds, and moisture-associated skin damage. Wound care practices for neonatal and pediatric patients, including the choice of specific dressings or other wound care products, are currently based on a combination of provider experience and preference and a small number of published clinical guidelines based on expert opinion; rigorous evidence-based clinical guidelines for wound management in these populations is lacking. Recent Advances: Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of wound healing have contributed to an ever-increasing number of specialized wound care products, most of which are predominantly marketed to adult patients and that have not been evaluated for safety and efficacy in the neonatal and pediatric populations. This review aims to discuss the available data on the use of both more traditional wound care products and newer wound care technologies in these populations, including medical-grade honey, nanocrystalline silver, and soft silicone-based adhesive technology. Critical Issues: Evidence-based wound care practices and demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and appropriate utilization of available wound care dressings and products in the neonatal and pediatric populations should be established to address specific concerns regarding wound management in these populations. Future Directions: The creation and implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of common wounds in the neonatal and pediatric populations is essential. In addition to an evaluation of currently marketed wound care dressings and products used in the adult population, newer wound care technologies should also be evaluated for use in neonates and children. In addition, further investigation of the specific pathophysiology of wound healing in neonates and children is indicated to promote the development of wound care dressings and products with specific applications in these populations. PMID:24761363

  7. Honey: A Biologic Wound Dressing.

    PubMed

    Molan, Peter; Rhodes, Tanya

    2015-06-01

    Honey has been used as a wound dressing for thousands of years, but only in more recent times has a scientific explanation become available for its effectiveness. It is now realized that honey is a biologic wound dressing with multiple bioactivities that work in concert to expedite the healing process. The physical properties of honey also expedite the healing process: its acidity increases the release of oxygen from hemoglobin thereby making the wound environment less favorable for the activity of destructive proteases, and the high osmolarity of honey draws fluid out of the wound bed to create an outflow of lymph as occurs with negative pressure wound therapy. Honey has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, but there is much variation in potency between different honeys. There are 2 types of antibacterial activity. In most honeys the activity is due to hydrogen peroxide, but much of this is inactivated by the enzyme catalase that is present in blood, serum, and wound tissues. In manuka honey, the activity is due to methylglyoxal which is not inactivated. The manuka honey used in wound-care products can withstand dilution with substantial amounts of wound exudate and still maintain enough activity to inhibit the growth of bacteria. There is good evidence for honey also having bioactivities that stimulate the immune response (thus promoting the growth of tissues for wound repair), suppress inflammation, and bring about rapid autolytic debridement. There is clinical evidence for these actions, and research is providing scientific explanations for them. PMID:26061489

  8. Preparation and characterization of novel antibacterial castor oil-based polyurethane membranes for wound dressing application.

    PubMed

    Yari, Abbas; Yeganeh, Hamid; Bakhshi, Hadi; Gharibi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of novel antibacterial and cytocompatible polyurethane membranes as occlusive dressing, which can provide moist and sterile environment over mild exudative wounds is considered in this work. In this regard, an epoxy-terminated polyurethane (EPU) prepolymer based on castor oil and glycidyltriethylammonium chloride (GTEAC) as a reactive bactericidal agent were synthesized. Polyurethane membranes were prepared through cocuring of EPU and different content of GTEAC with 1,4-butane diamine. The physical and mechanical properties, as well as cytocompatibility and antibacterial performance of prepared membranes were studied. Depending on their chemical formulations, the equilibrium water absorption and water vapor transmission rate values of the membranes were in ranges of 3-85% and 53-154g m(-2) day(-1), respectively. Therefore, these transparent membranes can maintain for a long period the moist environment over the wounds with low exudates. Detailed cytotoxicity analysis of samples against mouse L929 fibroblast and MCA-3D keratinocyte cells showed good level of cytocompatibility of membranes after purification via extraction of residual unreacted GTEAC moieties. The antibacterial activity of the membranes against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was also studied. The membrane containing 50% GTEAC exhibited an effective antibacterial activity, while showed acceptable cytocompatibility and therefore, can be applied as an antibacterial occlusive wound dressing. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 102A: 84-96, 2014. PMID:23606508

  9. Gelam (Melaleuca spp.) Honey-Based Hydrogel as Burn Wound Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Zohdi, Rozaini; Abu Bakar Zakaria, Zuki; Yusof, Norimah; Mohamed Mustapha, Noordin; Abdullah, Muhammad Nazrul Hakim

    2012-01-01

    A novel cross-linked honey hydrogel dressing was developed by incorporating Malaysian honey into hydrogel dressing formulation, cross-linked and sterilized using electron beam irradiation (25?kGy). In this study, the physical properties of the prepared honey hydrogel and its wound healing efficacy on deep partial thickness burn wounds in rats were assessed. Skin samples were taken at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after burn for histopathological and molecular evaluations. Application of honey hydrogel dressings significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) wound closure and accelerated the rate of re-epithelialization as compared to control hydrogel and OpSite film dressing. A significant decrease in inflammatory response was observed in honey hydrogel treated wounds as early as 7 days after burn (P < 0.05). Semiquantitative analysis using RT-PCR revealed that treatment with honey hydrogel significantly (P < 0.05) suppressed the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, IL-1?, and IL-6). The present study substantiates the potential efficacy of honey hydrogel dressings in accelerating burn wound healing. PMID:21941590

  10. Collagen-based wound dressings for the treatment of diabetes-related foot ulcers: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Crystal; Wrobel, James S; MacEachern, Mark P; Boles, Blaise R

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot ulcers are a major source of morbidity, limb loss, and mortality. A prolonged inflammatory response, extracellular matrix degradation irregularities, and increased bacteria presence have all been hypothesized as major contributing factors in the delayed healing of diabetic wounds. Collagen components such as fibroblast and keratinocytes are fundamental to the process of wound healing and skin formation. Wound dressings that contain collagen products create a biological scaffold matrix that supports the regulation of extracellular components and promotes wound healing. Methods A systematic review of studies reporting collagen wound dressings used in the treatment of Diabetic foot ulcers was conducted. Comprehensive searches were run in Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Science to capture citations pertaining to the use of collagen wound dressings in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. The searches were limited to human studies reported in English. Results Using our search strategy, 26 papers were discussed, and included 13 randomized designs, twelve prospective cohorts, and one retrospective cohort, representing 2386 patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Our design was not a formal meta-analysis. In those studies where complete epithelialization, 58% of collagen-treated wounds completely healed (weighted mean 67%). Only 23% of studies reported control group healing with 29% healing (weighted mean 11%) described for controls. Conclusion Collagen-based wound dressings can be an effective tool in the healing of diabetic foot wounds. The current studies show an overall increase in healing rates despite limitations in study designs. This study suggests that future works focus on biofilms and extracellular regulation, and include high risk patients. PMID:23357897

  11. [Moist wound treatment with ointment dressings in surface skin defects].

    PubMed

    Petres, J

    1988-01-01

    The advantages of moist wound treatment by means of ointment gauze dressing are based on the following attributes of the marked tulle gras preparations: --easy to handle; storage without problem --the gauze dressings can be modeled easily even on difficult body contoures (for example in the face) --the gauze dressing can be changed easily --Synthetic tulle gras dressings do not fray so that no residues remain in the wound. Therefore the danger of adhesion with the wound can be minimized. --There is no congestion of secretions undermath the gauze dressing. --undisturbed healing: a presupposing factor for optimal cosmetic and therapeutic result. --Minimal danger of contact dermatitis by using paraffin gauze dressing without antiseptic additives. PMID:3073599

  12. Polyhexamethylene biguanide dressings in wound management.

    PubMed

    Fumarola, Sian

    This article describes wound management using polyhexamethylene biguanide dressings in two patients experiencing multiple comorbidities. Wound bed debridement and bioburden management were important factors in achieving positive results in terms of promoting wound healing and reducing infection and malodour. PMID:21894678

  13. In vitro investigations of a novel wound dressing concept based on biodegradable polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottmar, Markus; Richter, Michael; Mäder, Xenia; Grieder, Kathrin; Nuss, Katja; Karol, Agnieszka; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Zimmermann, Erika; Buser, Stephan; Dobmann, Andreas; Blume, Jessica; Bruinink, Arie

    2015-06-01

    Non-healing and partially healing wounds are an important problem not only for the patient but also for the public health care system. Current treatment solutions are far from optimal regarding the chosen material properties as well as price and source. Biodegradable polyurethane (PUR) scaffolds have shown great promise for in vivo tissue engineering approaches, but accomplishment of the goal of scaffold degradation and new tissue formation developing in parallel has not been observed so far in skin wound repair. In this study, the mechanical properties and degradation behavior as well as the biocompatibility of a low-cost synthetic, pathogen-free, biocompatible and biodegradable extracellular matrix mimicking a PUR scaffold was evaluated in vitro. The novel PUR scaffolds were found to meet all the requirements for optimal scaffolds and wound dressings. These three-dimensional scaffolds are soft, highly porous, and form-stable and can be easily cut into any shape desired. All the material formulations investigated were found to be nontoxic. One formulation was able to be defined that supported both good fibroblast cell attachment and cell proliferation to colonize the scaffold. Tunable biodegradation velocity of the materials could be observed, and the results additionally indicated that calcium plays a crucial role in PUR degradation. Our results suggest that the PUR materials evaluated in this study are promising candidates for next-generation wound treatment systems and support the concept of using foam scaffolds for improved in vivo tissue engineering and regeneration.

  14. Efficacy of a new multifunctional surfactant-based biomaterial dressing with 1% silver sulphadiazine in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Zölß, Christoph; Cech, Jürgen D

    2014-09-01

    Chronic wounds represent a large and growing segment of health care and add considerably to human suffering and economic burden as populations age. More effective materials, especially those promoting ease of use and economy, are needed to treat this increasing number of patients. A case series conducted at a European outpatient tertiary wound centre used a novel surfactant-based biomaterial dressing containing 1% silver sulphadiazine on 226 chronic wound patients with various aetiologies. Eighty-eight patients had been undergoing standard of care treatment at the facility, while the remainder (n?=?138) began treatment with the surfactant-based biomaterial dressing on enrollment. A total of 73% of the first group healed or showed improvement, with 60% healing by a median of 17?weeks after beginning treatment, and 86% of the group of new enrollees healed or showed improvement, with 73% healing within a median of 12?weeks of beginning treatment with the new product. Patient and clinician reports showed improved compliance, reduced pain and a favourable side-effect profile. Limited economic analysis showed markedly reduced treatment costs compared with standard of care. Further research is recommended. PMID:25196441

  15. Alginate/chitosan based bi-layer composite membrane as potential sustained-release wound dressing containing ciprofloxacin hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Dong, Yang; Song, Aihua; Yin, Ran; Li, Sanming

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this research were to develop and evaluate a novel ciprofloxacin hydrochloride loaded bi-layer composite membrane based on alginate and chitosan. In vitro antimicrobial activity, drug permeation study, morphology, cytotoxicity, primary skin irritation and in vivo pharmacodynamics were investigated. Results showed that the membranes could inhibit the growth of microorganisms for longer than 7 days. And there was no significant decrease in the metabolic activity of the Hacat fibroblasts cells were treated with the membranes. No edema and erythema were observed after administration of membranes on the rabbit skin after 14 days. Moreover, the results of pharmacodynamics showed that the membranes were more effective in improving the wound healing process. In conclusion, a novel bi-layer composite membrane was developed and results suggested that it could be exploited as sustained-release wound dressings.

  16. Medicare Payment: Surgical Dressings and Topical Wound Care Products

    PubMed Central

    Schaum, Kathleen D.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare patients' access to surgical dressings and topical wound care products is greatly influenced by the Medicare payment system that exists in each site of care. Qualified healthcare professionals should consider these payment systems, as well as the medical necessity for surgical dressings and topical wound care products. Scientists and manufacturers should also consider these payment systems, in addition to the Food and Drug Administration requirements for clearance or approval, when they are developing new surgical dressings and topical wound care products. Due to the importance of the Medicare payment systems, this article reviews the Medicare payment systems in acute care hospitals, long-term acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, home health agencies, durable medical equipment suppliers, hospital-based outpatient wound care departments, and qualified healthcare professional offices. PMID:25126477

  17. Development and in vitro evaluation of lipid nanoparticle-based dressings for topical treatment of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Gainza, G; Chu, W S; Guy, R H; Pedraz, J L; Hernandez, R M; Delgado-Charro, B; Igartua, M

    2015-07-25

    This research addresses the development and in vitro evaluation of lipid nanoparticle (NP)-based dressings to optimize the delivery of human recombinant epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) for the topical treatment of chronic wounds. The systems investigated were rhEGF-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (rhEGF-SLN) and rhEGF-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (rhEGF-NLC) formulated in wound dressings comprising either semi-solid hydrogels or fibrin-based solid scaffolds. Following detailed characterisation of the NP, in vitro diffusion cell experiments (coupled with dermatopharmacokinetic measurements), together with confocal microscopic imaging, conducted on both intact skin samples, and those from which the barrier (the stratum corneum) had been removed, revealed that (a) the particles remained essentially superficially located for at least up to 48h post-application, (b) rhEGF released on the surface of intact skin was unable to penetrate to the deeper, viable layers, and (c) sustained release of growth factor from the NP "drug reservoirs" into barrier-compromised skin was observed. There were no significant differences between the in vitro performance of rhEGF-SLN and rhEGF-NLC, irrespective of the formulation employed. It is concluded that, because of their potentially longer-term stability, the fibrin-based scaffolds may be the most suitable approach to formulate rhEGF-loaded lipid nanoparticles. PMID:26043822

  18. Modified wound dressing with phyto-nanostructured coating to prevent staphylococcal and pseudomonal biofilm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, Ion; Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Ficai, Anton; Anghel, Alina Georgiana; Maganu, Maria; Laz?r, Veronica; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports a newly fabricated nanophyto-modified wound dressing with microbicidal and anti-adherence properties. Nanofluid-based magnetite doped with eugenol or limonene was used to fabricate modified wound dressings. Nanostructure coated materials were characterized by TEM, XRD, and FT-IR. For the quantitative measurement of biofilm-embedded microbial cells, a culture-based method for viable cell count was used. The optimized textile dressing samples proved to be more resistant to staphylococcal and pseudomonal colonization and biofilm formation compared to the uncoated controls. The functionalized surfaces for wound dressing seems to be a very useful tool for the prevention of wound microbial contamination on viable tissues.

  19. A Comparative Study of Colostrum Dressing Versus Conventional Dressing in Deep Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Ashok Y.; Gupta, Vaibhav; Pednekar, Akshay S.; Mahna, Abhishek; Patankar, Ritvij; Shaikh, Ashar; Nagur, Basavraj

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Deep wounds are extending deeper, across deep fascia into muscles or deeper structures. Understanding of nutrition, immunology, psychological issues, the physiology and the metabolic interactions require for optimal treatment of deep wounds. Wound dressing plays one of the important roles in wound healing. Newer type of wound dressings - Biological dressings like colostrum powder, collagen granules create the physiological interface between the wound surface and environment which is impermeable to bacteria. Aim: To compare the efficacy and safety of colostrum dressing and conventional dressing in deep wounds. Materials and Methods: Data was collected from all patients with deep wounds (stage II-IV), admitted during the period of April 2013 to March 2014, considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: Less number of dressings, short healing time, rapid healing and decrease pain seen in colostrum dressing group compared to conventional dressing group. Conclusion: Colostrum powder dressings are safe, promoter of wound healing, more patient compliance in terms of less pain, less number of dressing required. This treatment though found to be more expensive than conventional dressings; results indicate that colostrum powder dressings may be used as an adjunct in management of deep wound. PMID:26023589

  20. Formulation of Novel Layered Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose Film Wound Dressings with Ibuprofen for Alleviating Wound Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vinklárková, Lenka; Vetchý, David; Bernatonien?, Jurga

    2015-01-01

    Effective assessment and management of wound pain can facilitate both improvements in healing rates and overall quality of life. From a pharmacological perspective, topical application of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the form of film wound dressings may be a good choice. Thus, the aim of this work was to develop novel layered film wound dressings containing ibuprofen based on partially substituted fibrous sodium carboxymethylcellulose (nonwoven textile Hcel NaT). To this end, an innovative solvent casting method using a sequential coating technique has been applied. The concentration of ibuprofen which was incorporated as an acetone solution or as a suspension in a sodium carboxymethylcellulose dispersion was 0.5?mg/cm2 and 1.0?mg/cm2 of film. Results showed that developed films had adequate mechanical and swelling properties and an advantageous acidic surface pH for wound application. An in vitro drug release study implied that layered films retained the drug for a longer period of time and thus could minimize the frequency of changing the dressing. Films with suspended ibuprofen demonstrated higher drug content uniformity and superior in vitro drug release characteristics in comparison with ibuprofen incorporation as an acetone solution. Prepared films could be potential wound dressings for the effective treatment of wound pain in low exuding wounds. PMID:26090454

  1. Formulation of Novel Layered Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose Film Wound Dressings with Ibuprofen for Alleviating Wound Pain.

    PubMed

    Vinklárková, Lenka; Masteiková, Ruta; Vetchý, David; Doležel, Petr; Bernatonien?, Jurga

    2015-01-01

    Effective assessment and management of wound pain can facilitate both improvements in healing rates and overall quality of life. From a pharmacological perspective, topical application of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the form of film wound dressings may be a good choice. Thus, the aim of this work was to develop novel layered film wound dressings containing ibuprofen based on partially substituted fibrous sodium carboxymethylcellulose (nonwoven textile Hcel NaT). To this end, an innovative solvent casting method using a sequential coating technique has been applied. The concentration of ibuprofen which was incorporated as an acetone solution or as a suspension in a sodium carboxymethylcellulose dispersion was 0.5?mg/cm(2) and 1.0?mg/cm(2) of film. Results showed that developed films had adequate mechanical and swelling properties and an advantageous acidic surface pH for wound application. An in vitro drug release study implied that layered films retained the drug for a longer period of time and thus could minimize the frequency of changing the dressing. Films with suspended ibuprofen demonstrated higher drug content uniformity and superior in vitro drug release characteristics in comparison with ibuprofen incorporation as an acetone solution. Prepared films could be potential wound dressings for the effective treatment of wound pain in low exuding wounds. PMID:26090454

  2. A vapour-permeable film dressing used on superficial wounds.

    PubMed

    Meuleneire, Frans

    2014-08-12

    Films are an extremely versatile dressing type that can be effectively used in the treatment of many superficial wounds, such as skin grafts, surgical wounds and superficial burns; they provide an optimal moist environment to promote healing, act as a barrier to bacteria, and afford protection from urine and faecal contamination. Unfortunately, many film dressings are difficult to handle and use traditional adhesives, which can cause trauma to the wound and surrounding skin, as well as increased wound pain at dressing removal. Mepitel® Film is a new, easy-to-use wound dressing designed with Safetac® technology that helps to minimise dressing-related trauma and pain and assist undisturbed wound healing. This article presents case studies that examine Mepitel Film's use on a variety of wounds, and reviews the findings of research that was undertaken to evaluate the benefits of using this recently developed dressing. PMID:25117599

  3. Removal of adhesive wound dressing and its effects on the stratum corneum of the skin: comparison of eight different adhesive wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hajime; Imai, Ryutaro; Ahmatjan, Niyaz; Ida, Yukiko; Gondo, Masahide; Shibata, Dai; Wanatabe, Katsueki

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, adhesive wound dressings have been increasingly applied postoperatively because of their ease of use as they can be kept in place without having to cut and apply surgical tapes and they can cover a wound securely. However, if a wound dressing strongly adheres to the wound, a large amount of stratum corneum is removed from the newly formed epithelium or healthy periwound skin. Various types of adhesives are used on adhesive wound dressings and the extent of skin damage depends on how much an adhesive sticks to the wound or skin surface. We quantitatively determined and compared the amount of stratum corneum removed by eight different wound dressings including polyurethane foam using acrylic adhesive, silicone-based adhesive dressing, composite hydrocolloid and self-adhesive polyurethane foam in healthy volunteers. The results showed that wound dressings with silicone adhesive and self-adhesive polyurethane foam removed less stratum corneum, whereas composite hydrocolloid and polyurethane foam using acrylic adhesive removed more stratum corneum. PMID:22883604

  4. Comparison of silver nylon wound dressing and silver sulfadiazine in partial burn wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Abedini, Fereydoon; Ahmadi, Abdollah; Yavari, Akram; Hosseini, Vahid; Mousavi, Sarah

    2013-10-01

    The study aims to perform a comparative assessment of two types of burn wound treatment. To do the assessment, patients with partial thickness burn wounds with total body surface area <40% were simple randomised to treat with nanocrystalline silver nylon wound dressing or silver sulfadiazine cream. Efficacy of treatment, use of analgesics, number of wound dressing change, wound infection and final hospitalisation cost were evaluated. The study showed silver nylon wound dressing significantly reduced length of hospital stay, analgesic use, wound infection and inflammation compared with silver sulfadiazine. PMID:22734483

  5. Fabrication and characterization of ovalbumin films for wound dressing applications.

    PubMed

    Shojaee, Mozhgan; Navaee, Fatemeh; Jalili-Firoozinezhad, Sasan; Faturechi, Rahim; Majidi, Mohammad; Bonakdar, Shahin

    2015-03-01

    A great number of people suffer from burning injuries all around the world each year. Applying an appropriate wound dressing can promote new tissue formation, prevent losing water and inhibit invasion of infectious organisms. In this study, egg white with a long standing history, as a homemade remedy, was fabricated as a wound dressing for burn injuries. For this reason, ovalbumin films were cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-3-dimethyl aminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) with different concentrations (1, 5 and 10mM) using three concentrations of ethanol. Physical-chemical characterizations including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas transmission rate (GTR), tensile mechanical tests, water uptake and degradation rate were performed on the samples. The sample with 5mM crosslinking agent at 70% ethanol was considered as the optimized one with 417kPa of ultimate tensile strength, 64% elongation at break and 230% water uptake. In addition, biological evaluations conducted by MTT and live/dead assay indicated no sign of cyto-toxicity for all the samples. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the fibroblast cells were well spread on the sample with the formation of filopodia. In conclusion, modified ovalbumin can be applied as the base material for fabrication of wound dressing and skin care products. PMID:25579909

  6. Burn wound dressing with human amniotic membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, B.

    1979-01-01

    The use of amniotic membrane as a biological dressing for thermal injury is simple and cheap and has been found to be superior to allograft and xenograft. The membrane prevents heat and water loss from the wound surface and acts as a barrier against bacterial contamination, thus aiding the healing process and reducing morbidity. Another clinically significant and important property of the membrane is its ability to offer marked relief from pain. Over a period of 30 months amniotic membrane was used to treat 15 cases of burn in a small hospital, with uniformly satisfactory results. The practical aspects of this method of treatment can easily be adopted by any hospital regardless of its available facilities. PMID:496235

  7. Modified wound dressing with phyto-nanostructured coating to prevent staphylococcal and pseudomonal biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a newly fabricated nanophyto-modified wound dressing with microbicidal and anti-adherence properties. Nanofluid-based magnetite doped with eugenol or limonene was used to fabricate modified wound dressings. Nanostructure coated materials were characterized by TEM, XRD, and FT-IR. For the quantitative measurement of biofilm-embedded microbial cells, a culture-based method for viable cell count was used. The optimized textile dressing samples proved to be more resistant to staphylococcal and pseudomonal colonization and biofilm formation compared to the uncoated controls. The functionalized surfaces for wound dressing seems to be a very useful tool for the prevention of wound microbial contamination on viable tissues. PMID:23272823

  8. Compatibility of a protein topical gel with wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Ji, Junyan A; Borisov, Oleg; Ingham, Erika; Ling, Victor; Wang, Y John

    2009-02-01

    The compatibility between several dressing materials and a recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) topical methylcellulose gel formulation was investigated. The dressings being studied were Adaptic, Non-stick Dressing, Conformant 2, Opsite and Tegapore. The criteria to select a compatible dressing include protein stability, absence of leachables from the dressing, and ability to retain gel on wound. An LC-MS method with sample treatment using cellulase was developed to determine protein oxidation in gel formulations. Results showed that rhVEGF was significantly oxidized by Adaptic dressing in 24 h. Protein oxidation was likely due to the peroxides, as determined by FOX assay, released into the protein solution from the dressing. Furthermore, Adaptic dressing caused protein adsorption loss, formation of high MW protein adducts, and released leachables as determined by RP-HPLC, LC-MS, and SEC. No protein oxidation or loss was observed after exposure to the other four alternative dressings. However, unknown leachables were detected in the presence of Opsite and Non-stick Dressing. The pore sizes of the Conformant 2 and Non-stick dressings were too large to hold the topical gel within the wound area, making them unsuitable for patient use. No rhVEGF bioactivity loss was observed in the presence of Tegapore. In conclusion, Tegapore was considered suitable for the rhVEGF topical gel. PMID:18623201

  9. Effects and mechanisms of a microcurrent dressing on skin wound healing: a review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Hu, Zong-Qian; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    The variety of wound types has resulted in a wide range of wound dressings, with new products frequently being introduced to target different aspects of the wound healing process. The ideal wound dressing should achieve rapid healing at a reasonable cost, with minimal inconvenience to the patient. Microcurrent dressing, a novel wound dressing with inherent electric activity, can generate low-level microcurrents at the device-wound contact surface in the presence of moisture and can provide an advanced wound healing solution for managing wounds. This article offers a review of the effects and mechanisms of the microcurrent dressing on the healing of skin wounds. PMID:26000170

  10. Natural and synthetic polymers for wounds and burns dressing.

    PubMed

    Mogo?anu, George Dan; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2014-03-25

    In the last years, health care professionals faced with an increasing number of patients suffering from wounds and burns difficult to treat and heal. During the wound healing process, the dressing protects the injury and contributes to the recovery of dermal and epidermal tissues. Because their biocompatibility, biodegradability and similarity to macromolecules recognized by the human body, some natural polymers such as polysaccharides (alginates, chitin, chitosan, heparin, chondroitin), proteoglycans and proteins (collagen, gelatin, fibrin, keratin, silk fibroin, eggshell membrane) are extensively used in wounds and burns management. Obtained by electrospinning technique, some synthetic polymers like biomimetic extracellular matrix micro/nanoscale fibers based on polyglycolic acid, polylactic acid, polyacrylic acid, poly-?-caprolactone, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol, exhibit in vivo and in vitro wound healing properties and enhance re-epithelialization. They provide an optimal microenvironment for cell proliferation, migration and differentiation, due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, peculiar structure and good mechanical properties. Thus, synthetic polymers are used also in regenerative medicine for cartilage, bone, vascular, nerve and ligament repair and restoration. Biocompatible with fibroblasts and keratinocytes, tissue engineered skin is indicated for regeneration and remodeling of human epidermis and wound healing improving the treatment of severe skin defects or partial-thickness burn injuries. PMID:24368109

  11. Topical Agents and Dressings for Pilonidal Sinus Wound Healing by Secondary Intention: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin Y; Kwong, Enid Wai-Yung; Jimenez, Carolina; Bishop, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Pilonidal disease (PD) is a chronic and debilitating condition. The overall aim of the scoping review is to map and summarize a wide range of evidence to examine which topical agent or dressing is effective in promoting pilonidal wound healing by secondary intention. Review of this cumulative body of evidence will inform care and guide dressing selection for PD related wounds and delineate future research priorities based on identified knowledge gaps and clinical practice issues. Overall, there is some evidence to suggest that topical applications of hydrogel, silver, honey, zinc, selected foam materials, negative pressure wound therapy, platelet rich plasma, and plant extracts may promote wound healing. Topical treatment using polyhexamethylene biguanide and silver may be beneficial in reducing bacterial burden. Finally, silver, honey, and hydrocolloid dressings may help alleviate wound related pain. However, evidence remains insufficient in light of methodological limitations and biases of the studies. PMID:26054992

  12. Comparative Study of Antibacterial Effects and Bacterial Retentivity of Wound Dressings

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Toshihiro; Hosokawa, Ko; Kubo, Tateki

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: We are often confused on selecting a suitable wound dressing for the treatment of infected wounds from huge number of available wound dressings. Then, to help clinicians easily select a wound dressing, we compared the antibacterial effects and bacterial retentivity (ie, potency of keeping absorbed bacteria inside wound dressings and preventing them from leaking out) of wound dressings. Methods: Five wound dressings with antibacterial constituents were compared to research antibacterial effects against nonpathogenic Escherichia coli using an in vitro model. The 5 other wound dressings with no antibacterial constituent were compared to research bacterial retentivity. The relative amount of E coli was determined using cell proliferation reagent WST-1 (11644807001, Roche Applied Science, United States) with time. Results: The results have shown that the antibacterial effects and bacterial retentivity differed among various wound dressings. Silver ions quickly exerted a very strong antibacterial effect, and hydrofibers had a high potency of bacterial retentivity by gelling the absorbed bacteria in wound dressings. Conclusions: The present study indicated the differences of antibacterial strength, time of onset and duration of the antibacterial effect, and bacterial retentivity between each wound dressing. Clinicians should use appropriate wound dressings according the wound condition in consideration of the different characteristics of wound dressings. The present results are helpful for clinicians to select appropriate wound dressing. PMID:23372860

  13. Chitosan-based electrospun nanofibrous mats, hydrogels and cast films: novel anti-bacterial wound dressing matrices.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Sohail; Yar, Muhammad; Siddiqi, Saadat Anwar; Mahmood, Nasir; Rauf, Abdul; Qureshi, Zafar-ul-Ahsan; Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh; Afzaal, Shahida

    2015-03-01

    The development of highly efficient anti-bacterial wound dressings was carried out. For this purpose nanofibrous mats, hydrogels and films were synthesized from chitosan, poly(vinyl alcohol) and hydroxyapatite. The physical/chemical interactions of the synthesized materials were evaluated by FTIR. The morphology, structure; average diameter and pore size of the materials were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The hydrogels showed a greater degree of swelling as compared to nanofibrous mats and films in phosphate buffer saline solution of pH 7.4. The in vitro drug release studies showed a burst release during the initial period of 4 h and then a sustained release profile was observed in the next upcoming 20 h. The lyophilized hydrogels showed a more slow release as compared to nanofibrous mats and films. Antibacterial potential of drug released solutions collected after 24 h of time interval was determined and all composite matrices showed good to moderate activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains respectively. To determine the cytotoxicity, cell culture was performed for various cefixime loaded substrates by using neutral red dye uptake assay and all the matrices were found to be non-toxic. PMID:25716023

  14. Development of a continuous finishing chemistry process for manufacture of a phosphorylated cotton chronic wound dressing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A phosphorylated form of cotton gauze for treatment of chronic wounds was designed to improve the wound dressing’s capacity to remove harmful proteases from the wound and facilitate healing. Development of the fabric finishing chemistry of the wound dressing with a process suitable for textile mill...

  15. In vivo wound-healing effects of novel benzalkonium chloride-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung Giu; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Jang, Sun Woo; Son, Mi-Won; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Dong-Wuk; Li, Dong Xun; Kim, Jong Oh; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-05-01

    Preclinical Research The purpose of this study was to evaluate the wound-healing effects of a novel benzalkonium chloride (BC)-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing (HCD). A BC-loaded HCD was prepared with various constituents using a hot melting method, and its mechanical properties and antimicrobial activities were assessed. The in vivo wound healings of the BC-loaded HCD in various would models were evaluated in rats compared with a commercial wound dressing, Duoderm™. This BC-loaded HCD gave better skin adhesion, swelling, mechanical strength, and flexibility compared with the commercial wound dressing. It showed excellent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, as compared with the commercial wound dressing, it showed more improved wound healings and tissue restoration effect on the excision, infection, and abrasion wounds in rats. Thus, this novel BC-loaded HCD would be an excellent alternative to the commercial wound dressing for treatment of various wounds. Drug Dev Res 73 : 157-165, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25959289

  16. Situating wound management: technoscience, dressings and 'other' skins.

    PubMed

    Rudge, T

    1999-09-01

    This paper addresses the notion of wound care as a technology of skin and other skins imbued with the combined power of technology and science. It presents the discourses of wound care evident in the accounts of patients and nurses concerning this care, and discussions about wounds in wound care interest groups, journals, and advertising material about wound care products. The discussion focuses on wounds and wound dressings as effects immanent in the power relations of discourses of wound care. These effects colour and influence nurses' responses to wounds and wound care products. Moreover, the discourses that portray these practices are evidence of the complex articulation between technoscience and gender. Nurses and patients are fascinated by wound technoscience and lured towards it by its potential for mastery and control over wounds. Such seductions are evident in the texts of nurses, patients, and pharmaceutical advertisements for wound care products. Finally, the ways that these representations are used to talk about and market wound care products are shown as exemplifying the finer points of wound management as a nursing technoscience. PMID:10795270

  17. Healing Efficacy of an EGF Impregnated Triple Gel Based Wound Dressing: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Khanbanha, Najmeh; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Taheri, Azade; Talaie, Fatemeh; Mahbod, Mirgholamreza

    2014-01-01

    To accomplish an ideal wound healing process which promotes healthy tissue growth with less scaring, a novel gel based topical drug delivery system composed of 3 different polymers chitosan, dextran sulfate, and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (CDP) was prepared. The physicochemical properties of the prepared gels were investigated in vitro. Gels showed a maximum swelling ratio of 50 ± 1.95 times of dried gel in PBS at pH 7.4. The swelling ratios increase in acidic and alkaline pH to 55.3 ± 1.75 and 65.5 ± 2.42, respectively. In the rheological test, prepared gels revealed viscoelastic properties and a small linear viscoelastic region of 0.166%. In vivo wound healing promoting activities of CDP gels containing 20??g/mL EGF were evaluated on surgically induced dermal wounds in rats using pathologic examination. The application of CDP gel with incorporated EGF significantly reduced the defect on the rat's skin and enhanced epithelial healing compared with the topical application of the EGF-free CDP gel. The results clearly substantiate the beneficial effects of the topical application of CDP containing EGF in the acceleration of healthy wound healing process with less scarring. PMID:25110681

  18. Nanocrystalline silver dressings in wound management: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Joy; Wood, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the properties of nanocrystalline silver products (Acticoat™) and their applications and examines available evidence supporting their use in wound management. Acticoat utilizes nanotechnology to release nanocrystalline silver crystals. Acticoat releases 30 times less silver cations than silversulfadiazine cream or 0.5% silver nitrate solution but more of the silver released (by Acticoat). Silver-impregnated slow-release dressings release minute concentrations of silver which are quickly bound up by the chloride in the wound exudate. While extrapolations from in vitro and animal studies are cautious, evidence from these studies suggests Acticoat is: effective against most common strains of wound pathogens; can be used as a protective covering over skin grafts; has a broader antibiotic spectrum activity; and is toxic to keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Animal studies suggest a role for nanocrystalline silver in altering wound inflammatory events and facilitation of the early phase of wound healing. Quality human clinical trials into nanocrystalline silver are few. However, evidence suggests using Acticoat in wound management is cost effective, reduces wound infection, decreases the frequency of dressing changes and pain levels, decreases matrix metalloproteinase activity, wound exudate and bioburden levels, and promotes wound healing in chronic wounds. Although there is no in vivo evidence to suggest nanocrystalline silver is toxic to human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, there is in vitro evidence to suggest so; thus these dressings should be used cautiously over epithelializing and proliferating wounds. Future clinical research, preferably randomized controlled trials into nanocrystalline silver technology, may provide clinicians a better understanding of its applications in wound management. PMID:17722278

  19. Investigation of lysine acrylate containing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogels as wound dressings in normal and infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Larson, Jeffery C; Drapala, Pawel W; Pérez-Luna, Víctor H; Kang-Mieler, Jennifer J; Brey, Eric M

    2012-04-01

    The design of materials for cutaneous wound dressings has advanced from passive wound covers to bioactive materials that promote skin regeneration and prevent infection. Crosslinked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based hydrogels have been investigated for a number of biomedical applications. While these materials can be used for drug delivery, limited cell interactions restrict their biological activity. In this article, acryoyl-lysine (A-Lys) was incorporated into poly(ethylene glycol) crosslinked PNIPAAm to enhance biological activity. A-Lys could be incorporated into the hydrogels to improve cellular interaction in vitro, while maintaining swelling properties and thermoresponsive behavior. Polyhexamethylene biguanide, an antimicrobial agent, could be encapsulated and released from the hydrogels and resulted in decreased bacteria counts within 2 hours. Two in vivo animal wound models were used to evaluate the hydrogel wound dressing. First, application of the hydrogels to a rodent cutaneous wound healing model resulted in significant increase in healing rate when compared with controls. Moreover, the hydrogels were also able to decrease bacteria levels in an infected wound model. These results suggest that PNIPAAm hydrogels containing A-Lys are promising wound dressings due to their ability to promote healing and deliver active antimicrobial drugs to inhibit infection. PMID:22121043

  20. Influencing dressing choice and supporting wound management using remote 'tele-wound care'.

    PubMed

    King, Brenda

    2014-06-01

    This article describes a local involvement in a project to evaluate a remote system of wound management, incorporating the use of digital and mobile technology. It outlines how this involvement influenced the current system of 'tele wound care' (remote wound management) in a large community organisation. The system allows remote wound assessment, management advice and ongoing monitoring of wounds to ensure that the dressing choice remains appropriate and that timely wound care support can be provided to community nurses, practice nurses and GPs. PMID:24912832

  1. Concept mapping the change of a surgical wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Johns, Paula

    2003-08-01

    Changing a surgical wound dressing is a traditional nursing task that incorporates many areas of nursing knowledge. This article describes the construction of a concept map to sort the subjective, objective and constructed knowledge required to perform this task with optimal wound healing the goal. Critical thinking is used to select and exclude information. The use of concept maps as a tool to synthesise knowledge is discussed as is how the chosen concept incorporates the art and science of nursing care. The concept map displays the wholistic assessment of the client and use of nursing knowledge to determine and promote wound healing. PMID:14649517

  2. Enhancing pressure ulcer prevention using wound dressings: what are the modes of action?

    PubMed

    Call, Evan; Pedersen, Justin; Bill, Brian; Black, Joyce; Alves, Paulo; Brindle, C Tod; Dealey, Carol; Santamaria, Nick; Clark, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Recent clinical research has generated interest in the use of sacral wound dressings as preventive devices for patients at risk of ulceration. This study was conducted to identify the modes of action through which dressings can add to pressure ulcer prevention, for example, shear and friction force redistribution and pressure distribution. Bench testing was performed using nine commercially available dressings. The use of dressings can reduce the amplitude of shear stress and friction reaching the skin of patients at risk. They can also effectively redirect these forces to wider areas which minimises the mechanical loads upon skeletal prominences. Dressings can redistribute pressure based upon their effective Poisson ratio and larger deflection areas, providing greater load redistribution. PMID:23905962

  3. The efficacy of adhesives in the application of wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, G R; Selak, L; Salo, S; Balle, M R

    1989-01-01

    The use of adhesive preparations to reinforce surgical tapes and to secure dressings to the skin is standard practice. BioBrane is a biosynthetic membrane for use in dressing clean, well-debrided wounds, particularly partial-thickness burns and skin graft donor sites. The close and undisturbed contact of this material with the wound surface is important during the first 2 days after its application to achieve adherence. This has prompted a study to test the relative anchoring strength of four methods of securing the dressing to the normal skin around the wound: 1/2-inch (1.27-cm) Steri-Strips only; Mastisol, a mastic compound, with and without 1/2-inch Steri-Strips; and compound tincture of benzoin, USP, in combination with 1/2-inch Steri-Strips. The results obtained with a tension of 1.1 pounds/square inch (0.5 kg/6.5 cm2) were not conclusive as to the superiority of any one method. However, with a tension of 2.2 pounds/square inch (1 kg/6.5 cm2), the combination of mastic compound and 1/2-inch Steri-Strips provided the strongest adhesion. This type of application should also prove useful when other types of surgical dressings must be anchored in place. PMID:2745498

  4. An active wound dressing for controlled convective mass transfer with the wound bed.

    PubMed

    Cabodi, Mario; Cross, Valerie L; Qu, Zheng; Havenstrite, Karen L; Schwartz, Suzanne; Stroock, Abraham D

    2007-07-01

    Conventional wound dressings-gauze, plastic films, foams, and gels-do not allow for spatial and temporal control of the soluble chemistry within the wound bed, and are thus limited to a passive role in wound healing. Here, we present an active wound dressing (AWD) designed to control convective mass transfer with the wound bed; this mass transfer provides a means to tailor and monitor the chemical state of a wound and, potentially, to aid the healing process. We form this AWD as a bilayer of porous poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) and silicone; the pHEMA acts as the interface with the wound bed, and a layer of silicone provides a vapor barrier and a support for connecting to external reservoirs and pumps. We measure the convective permeability of the pHEMA sponge, and use this value to design a device with a spatially uniform flow profile. We quantify the global coefficient of mass transfer of the AWD on a dissolvable synthetic surface, and compare it to existing theories of mass transfer in porous media. We also operate the AWD on model wound beds made of calcium alginate gel to demonstrate extraction and delivery of low molecular weight solutes and a model protein. Using this system, we demonstrate both uniform mass transfer over the entire wound bed and patterned mass transfer in three spatially distinct regions. Finally, we discuss opportunities and challenges for the clinical application of this design of an AWD. PMID:17106898

  5. Urgosorb dressing: management of acute and chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jenny; Chaloner, Donna

    This article illustrates the outcomes of a 10-patient prospective case study series. The aim of the study was to evaluate the use of Urgosorb in the management of acute and chronic wounds. (Urgosorb is a dressing comprising calcium alginate fibres and hydrocolloid, and is recommended for sloughy and granulating wounds with moderate to high levels of exudate.) Parameters assessed were the effectiveness of exudate management and integrity of surrounding tissue, ease of removal, patient comfort, effectiveness of odour control and observation for any adverse reactions. Data were collected over a period of 6 weeks with weekly evaluations. Healing was not included in the study objectives as it was recognized this would be difficult on a range of highly variable wounds. Although healing was not assessed, 50% of the wounds did heal during the study period. Dressing removal was considered easy in the majority of cases, and patients experienced none, or only mild discomfort. Levels if exudate were well managed and there were no reports of any adverse events. PMID:16144073

  6. Interaction and effectiveness of antimicrobials along with healing-promoting agents in a novel biocellulose wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Napavichayanun, Supamas; Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Pienpinijtham, Prompong; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2015-10-01

    An ideal wound dressing should keep the wound moist, allow oxygen permeation, adsorb wound exudate, accelerate re-epithelialization for wound closure, reduce pain and healing time, and prevent infection. Our novel biocellulose-based wound dressing was composed of three components: 1) biocellulose (BC), intended to create a moist and oxygen-permeated environment with exudate adsorption; 2) silk sericin (SS) known for its enhancement of collagen type I production, which is critical for re-epithelialization; and 3) the antiseptic polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB). To deliver an effective BC wound dressing, the interactions between the components (PHMB vs. SS) needed to be thoroughly analyzed. In this study, we investigated important parameters such as the loading sequence, loading concentration, and loading amount of the active compounds to ensure that the BC wound dressing could provide both antimicrobial activity and promote collagen production during healing. The loading sequence of SS and PHMB into BC was critical to maintain PHMB antimicrobial activity; silk sericin needed to be loaded before PHMB to avoid any negative impacts. The minimum PHMB concentration was 0.3% w/v for effective elimination of all tested bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). The amounts of SS and PHMB in BC were optimized to ensure that the dressings released the optimal amounts of both SS to enhance fibroblast collagen production and PHMB for effective antimicrobial activity. PMID:26117743

  7. Multispecies biofilm in an artificial wound bed--A novel model for in vitro assessment of solid antimicrobial dressings.

    PubMed

    Kucera, J; Sojka, M; Pavlik, V; Szuszkiewicz, K; Velebny, V; Klein, P

    2014-08-01

    Wound infections represent a major problem, particularly in patients with chronic wounds. Bacteria in the wound exist mainly in the form of biofilms and are thus resistant to most antibiotics and antimicrobials. A simple and cost-effective in vitro model of chronic wound biofilms applied for testing treatments and solid devices, especially wound dressings, is presented in this work. The method is based on the well-established Lubbock chronic wound biofilm transferred onto an artificial agar wound bed. The biofilm formed by four bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was stable for up to 48h post-transplant. The applicability of the model was evaluated by testing two common iodine wound treatments. These observations indicate that this method enables assessing the effects of treatments on established resilient wound biofilms and is clinically highly relevant. PMID:24880129

  8. Comparison of a liquid and a powder insecticidal dressing to aid healing and prevent flystrike of mulesing wounds in lambs.

    PubMed

    Pearse, B H; Peucker, S K

    1991-05-01

    A proprietary insecticidal mulesing powder containing diazinon and an experimental liquid dressing based on eucalyptus oil, naphthalene, cresylic acid and chlorfenvinphos in a carrier of liquid hydrocarbons and petroleum oil were compared for their ability to promote wound healing and reduce the incidence of fly strike in freshly mulesed lambs. Throughout the trial period of 4 weeks, fly trapping confirmed the presence of Lucilia cuprina in the paddock where the ewes and lambs were grazing At inspection one month after mulesing, no deaths had occurred since mulesing and no lambs showed evidence of cutaneous myiasis, although a number of their dams (with 8 months wool) were struck. At 4 weeks after mulesing, the wounds of the lambs treated with the experimental liquid dressing showed better healing than those treated with the powder dressing. It was concluded that both mulesing preparations were effective in inhibiting flystrike, but the liquid dressing promoted faster wound healing than did the powder. PMID:1883292

  9. Development and in vitro evaluation of chitosan-polysaccharides composite wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Wittaya-areekul, Sakchai; Prahsarn, Chureerat

    2006-04-26

    This study focuses on the design and evaluation of chitosan-based films intended for wound dressing application. Films of chitosan and their blends with cornstarch and dextran were developed to improve the films' physical strength. Polypropylene glycol at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% (w/v) was added to improve the films' flexibility. Some properties required for successful wound dressing, such as liquid adsorption, vapor and oxygen penetration, bioadhesiveness, and film elasticity, were examined. Chitosan films showed the highest liquid adsorption and the adsorption tended to decrease with addition of cornstarch and dextran. Moisture vapor and oxygen were found to be able to penetrate through all film formulations, and those films with cornstarch and dextran showed increased penetration rates through the films. The bioadhesiveness test using a pig gut model did not show significantly different bioadhesive properties with the addition of cornstarch and dextran. The film elasticity of the formulation containing only chitosan exhibited the lowest elongation of the film at a force of 2N, but increased with the addition of cornstarch and dextran, respectively. In conclusion, the design and development of chitosan as a wound dressing can be improved by the addition of cornstarch or dextran, and propylene glycol to obtain the films with optimal properties for wound management. PMID:16488564

  10. Chitosan/polyurethane blended fiber sheets containing silver sulfadiazine for use as an antimicrobial wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jin; Heo, Dong Nyoung; Moon, Ji-Hoi; Park, Ha Na; Ko, Wan-Kyu; Bae, Min Soo; Lee, Jung Bok; Park, Se Woong; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Chang Hoon; Jung, Bock-Young; Kwon, Il Keun

    2014-10-01

    Electrospun chitosan (CTS) nanofibers have been well known for use as a wound dressing in the biomedical field. Nevertheless, fatal bacterial infections are still a serious problem when CTS nanofibers are used for wound treatment. In this study, we designed a novel wound dressing based on blending the chitosan with polyurethane (CTS/PU) containing silver sulfadiazine (AgSD) in order to enhance both antibacterial activity and mechanical strength. This fiber sheet was produced using the electrospinning (ELSP) technique. The CTS/PU containing AgSD fiber sheet was characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The physicochemical properties of the CTS/PU/AgSD fiber sheets were also characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The electrospun fibers were morphologically characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For an in vitro evaluation, the CTS/PU/AgSD fiber sheets were tested for their antibacterial activity against gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The results indicate that CTS/PU/AgSD fiber sheets have strong antimicrobial activity as displayed by inhibition of bacterial growth and prevention of infection during the healing process. These results indicate that this material would be good for use as a wound dressing material. PMID:25942814

  11. Human Neutrophil Elastase and Collagenase Sequestration with Phosphorylated Cotton Wound Dressings.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The design and preparation of wound dressings that redress the proteolytic imbalance in chronic wounds has become an important goal of wound healing and medical materials science. Recent studies have demonstrated that chronic wounds contain high levels of tissue and cytokine destroying proteases inc...

  12. Silver treatments and silver-impregnated dressings for the healing of leg wounds and ulcers: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Carter, Marissa J; Tingley-Kelley, Kimberly; Warriner, Robert A

    2010-10-01

    Previous systematic reviews of silver-impregnated dressings have been contradictory regarding the healing of leg wounds/ulcers. Our systematic review was restricted to randomized controlled trials. Cochrane Library, Scopus, and MEDLINE databases were searched using the term "silver" in combination with "wound" or "ulcer" (and plural versions) without date/language restriction. Study quality was assessed and meta-analysis conducted for complete wound healing, wound size reduction, and healing rates. Overall study quality was fair with most studies having some bias. Evidence for wound healing using individual studies was poor. Meta-analyses found strong evidence for wound healing based on wound size reduction but no evidence based on complete wound-healing or healing rates. Although our results provide some evidence that silver-impregnated dressings improve the short-term healing of wounds and ulcers, long-term effects remain unclear. Clinical trial data with longer follow-up times are needed to address these issues. PMID:20471135

  13. Electrospun polyurethane-dextran nanofiber mats loaded with Estradiol for post-menopausal wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Unnithan, Afeesh Rajan; Sasikala, Arathyram Ramachandra Kurup; Murugesan, Priya; Gurusamy, Malarvizhi; Wu, Dongmei; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2015-06-01

    Post-menopausal wound care management is a substantial burden on health services, since there are an increased number of elderly populations linked with age-related delayed wound healing. The controlled estrogen replacement can accelerate healing of acute cutaneous wounds, linked to its potent anti-inflammatory activity. The electrospinning technique can be used to introduce the desired therapeutic agents to the nanofiber matrix. So here we introduce a new material for wound tissue dressing, in which a polyurethane-dextran composite nanofibrous wound dressing material loaded with ?-estradiol was obtained through electrospinning. Dextran can promote neovascularization and skin regeneration in chronic wounds. This study involves the characterization of these nanofibers and analysis of cell growth and proliferation to determine the efficiency of tissue regeneration on these biocomposite polymer nanofibrous scaffolds and to study the possibility of using it as a potential wound dressing material in the in vivo models. PMID:25748849

  14. Impact of silver-containing wound dressings on bacterial biofilm viability and susceptibility to antibiotics during prolonged treatment.

    PubMed

    Kostenko, Victoria; Lyczak, Jeffrey; Turner, Katherine; Martinuzzi, Robert John

    2010-12-01

    The long-term antimicrobial efficacy of silver dressings against bacterial biofilms was investigated in a 7-day treatment in vitro model where the protein-rich medium was refreshed daily in order to mimic the conditions found in a wound bed. The use of plate-to-plate transfer assays demonstrated measurable differences in the effectiveness of several silver dressings on the viability of biofilm bacteria and their susceptibility to antibiotics. Whereas after the first day of treatment, all dressings used resulted in a significant reduction in the number of viable cells in the biofilms and disruption of the biofilm colonies, during prolonged treatment, the efficacy of dressings with hydrophilic base materials diminished with daily transfers, and bacterial populations recovered. For dressings with hydrophobic base materials, the level of efficacy correlated with the silver species loaded. Biofilm bacteria, which survived the initial silver treatment, were susceptible to tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, in contrast to untreated biofilms, which were highly tolerant to the same antibiotics. This acquired susceptibility was unaffected by the longevity of pretreatment with the silver dressings but depended on the dressing used. The antimicrobial efficacy of the dressings correlated with the type of the dressing base material and silver species loaded. PMID:20855737

  15. Design, Preparation and Assessment of Carbohydrate-Crosslinked Cotton Gauzes as Functional Wound Dressings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report both mono and polysaccharides on cotton wound dressing fibers as functional agents designed for a specific mode of action in chronic or burn wounds. Previously, carbohydrates as found in honey, sucrose and dextran have been used for their wound healing properties and have been either appl...

  16. Access to wound dressings for patients living with epidermolysis bullosa - an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Louise J

    2014-10-01

    Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) is a rare genetic skin disorder characterised by fragility and blistering of skin and mucous membranes. Skin can blister and shear away from minimal friction, trauma and every day activities. The disease causes a wide range of complications but wound care is the major challenge to severe EB, and good wound care is an essential part of wound management. The goal of wound care was to choose a product that protects the fragile skin, limits friction, decreases pain and promotes healing. However, access to wound dressings for those people living with EB is challenging. This article discusses the availability of EB dressings in a number of countries around the world and also describes an innovative National Epidermolysis Bullosa Dressings Scheme (NEBDS) in Australia, which aims to improve the quality of life of people with EB, by reducing the financial burden associated with the provision of dressings accordingly. PMID:23174001

  17. A Wireless Electroceutical Dressing Lowers Cost of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghatak, Piya Das; Schlanger, Richard; Ganesh, Kasturi; Lambert, Lynn; Gordillo, Gayle M.; Martinsek, Patsy; Roy, Sashwati

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To test whether the use of a wireless electroceutical dressing (WED) (Procellera®) in conjunction with a 5-day negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) may reduce the number of dressing changes required per week with this therapy. Approach: At the Ohio State University Comprehensive Wound Center, chronic wound patients (n=30) undergoing NPWT were randomized into two arms following consent as approved by the institutional review board. The control arm received standard of care NPWT, where the dressing change was performed thrice a week. The test arm received the same care except that the WED was added as an interface layer and dressing change was limited to twice a week. Results: A reduced cost of care was achieved using the WED in conjunction with NPWT. Despite fewer dressing changes in wounds dressed with the WED, closure outcomes were comparable with no overt signs of any wound complication, including infection. The cost of NPWT care during the week was significantly lower (from $2918 to $2346) in the WED-treated group compared with patients in the control arm. Innovation: This work introduces a novel technology platform involving a WED, which may be used in conjunction with NPWT. If used as such, NPWT is effective in decreasing the frequency of dressing change and lowering the cost of care. Conclusion: This work points toward the benefit of using the WED combined with NPWT. A larger clinical trial investigating the cost-effectiveness of WED in wound care is warranted. PMID:26005596

  18. Evidence-Based Care of Acute Wounds: A Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ubbink, Dirk T.; Brölmann, Fleur E.; Go, Peter M. N. Y. H.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Large variation and many controversies exist regarding the treatment of, and care for, acute wounds, especially regarding wound cleansing, pain relief, dressing choice, patient instructions, and organizational aspects. Recent Advances: A multidisciplinary team developed evidence-based guidelines for the Netherlands using the AGREE-II and GRADE instruments. A working group, consisting of 17 representatives from all professional societies involved in wound care, tackled five controversial issues in acute-wound care, as provided by any caregiver throughout the whole chain of care. Critical Issues: The guidelines contain 38 recommendations, based on best available evidence, additional expert considerations, and patient experiences. In summary, primarily closed wounds need no cleansing; acute open wounds are best cleansed with lukewarm (drinkable) water; apply the WHO pain ladder to choose analgesics against continuous wound pain; use lidocaine or prilocaine infiltration anesthesia for wound manipulations or closure; primarily closed wounds may not require coverage with a dressing; use simple dressings for open wounds; and give your patient clear instructions about how to handle the wound. Future Directions: These evidence-based guidelines on acute wound care may help achieve a more uniform policy to treat acute wounds in all settings and an improved effectiveness and quality of wound care. PMID:26005594

  19. [Effect of polysorb on adhesion of a gauze dressing to the wound surface].

    PubMed

    Sander, S V; Bondarchuk, O I; Pentiuk, A A

    1992-01-01

    Under the influence of polysorb in its application, adhesion of a gauze dressing to the wound surface reduces 3-fold. The in vitro investigations have shown that polysorb had a stimulating effect on fibrinolysis. PMID:1564857

  20. Physical and biological assessments of the innovative bilayered wound dressing made of silk and gelatin for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Hasatsri, Sukhontha; Yamdech, Rungnapha; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2015-04-01

    The physical and biological assessments of the innovative bilayered wound dressing made of silk and gelatin that we have developed previously were performed to evaluate its efficacy for clinical applications. The absorption ability and dehydration rate of the dressing were assessed using the split-thickness skin graft and leg ulcer wound bed models. The bioactivities of the bilayered wound dressing were evaluated. The bilayered dressing showed continuous absorption rate of wound exudate, providing the suitability for the wound with extended inflammation phase. The dehydration rate of the bilayered dressing was comparable to the commercially available dressing of which the moisture maintenance capability is claimed. The bilayered dressing showed good conformability, as can be seen by the homogeneous distribution pattern of bromophenol blue absorbed. In terms of biological activities, the bilayered dressing was less toxic to skin cells than the commercially available dressing. The bilayered dressing was also shown to promote cell migration and collagen production due to the bioactive protein components. We here concluded that the superior properties of the bilayered dressing over the commercially available dressing were the conformability and biological activities to accelerate the wound healing, while the other properties were comparable to those of commercially available dressing. The data obtained in this study would be very useful for the further evaluation of the bilayered dressing in clinical trial. PMID:25391444

  1. Enhancing repair of full-thickness excisional wounds in a murine model: Impact of tissue-engineered biological dressings featuring human differentiated adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Morissette Martin, Pascal; Maux, Amandine; Laterreur, Véronique; Mayrand, Dominique; L Gagné, Valérie; Moulin, Véronique J; Fradette, Julie

    2015-08-01

    Promotion of skin repair for acute or chronic wounds through the use of tissue-engineered products is an active field of research. This study evaluates the effects mediated by tissue-engineered biological dressings containing human in vitro-differentiated adipocytes and adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs). Re-epithelialization, granulation tissue formation and neovascularization of full-thickness cutaneous wounds were specifically assessed using a murine model featuring a fluorescent epidermis. In comparison with wounds that did not receive an adipocyte-containing biological dressing, treated wounds displayed a slight but significantly faster wound closure based on macroscopic observations over 18days. Non-invasive imaging of GFP-expressing keratinocytes determined that the kinetics of re-epithelialization were similar for both groups. Treated wounds featured thicker granulation tissues (1.7-fold, P<0.0001) enriched in collagens (1.3-fold, P<0.0104). In addition, wound cryosections labeled for detection of CD31-expressing cells indicated a 2.2-fold (P<0.0002) increased neovascularization for the treated wounds at the time of terminal biopsy. This is in accordance with the secretion of pro-angiogenic factors detected in media conditioned by the dressings. Taken together, these results establish that a new type of engineered substitutes featuring a mixture of adipocytes and ASCs can promote cutaneous healing when applied as temporary dressings, suggesting their potential relevance for chronic wound management studies. PMID:25934321

  2. Electron beam crosslinked PEO and PEO/PVA hydrogels for wound dressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, F.; Zhanshan, Y.; Isobe, K.; Shinozaki, K.; Makuuchi, K.

    1999-06-01

    In order to prepare polyethylene oxide (PEO) hydrogel for wound dressing, different molecular weight PEO and PEO/poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA blend hydrogels were obtained with electron beam irradiation. Gel formation of PEO in aqueous solution was saturated at 40 kGy and the achieved gel fraction was 60-70%. The PEO hydrogel obtained was very fragile, hence PVA was added at 10-30% to give toughness to the PEO hydrogel. The PEO/PVA hydrogel blend showed satisfactory properties for wound dressing. To evaluate the healing effect of PEO/PVA hydrogel blend for dressing, the hydrogel covered a wound formed on the back of marmots. Healing under the wet environment of the hydrogel dressing had some advantages compared with that of gauze dressing which gives a dry environment: (1) the healing rate is faster, (2) easier to change the dressing, i.e. the hydrogel can be peeled off without any damage to the regenerated surface, and (3) no dressing material remains on the wound.

  3. A comparison of three primary non-adherent dressings applied to hand surgery wounds.

    PubMed

    Terrill, P J; Varughese, G

    2000-09-01

    This study reports the results of a prospective randomised controlled trial that compared three non-adherent wound dressings applied to hand surgery wounds. Paraffin-impregnated gauze (Jelonet) was compared with a cellulose, acetate fibre dressing coated with a petrolatum emulsion (Adaptic) and a polyamide net dressing impregnated with silicone gel (Mepitel). The dressings were assessed for their ease of application and removal, pain on removal and wound appearance. Results from 99 patients were available for analysis. Adaptic was significantly easier to remove (p < 0.01), required less soaking (p < 0.05), was less painful to remove (p < 0.05) and caused less wound maceration (p < 0.05) than Jelonet, but was significantly more difficult to apply (p < 0.05). Mepitel was also easier to remove but this did not reach statistical significance. It was also more difficult to apply than Jelonet (p < 0.05). We recommend that Adaptic should be used routinely as the non-adherent dressing for incisions or traumatic wounds on the hand. The slight increased difficulty in applying the dressing is outweighed by the major advantages associated with its removal. PMID:11933363

  4. Effects of dressing type on 3D tissue microdeformations during negative pressure wound therapy: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, R; Zhao, Y; Kieswetter, K; Haridas, B

    2009-03-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy, also referred to as vacuum-assisted closure negative pressure wound therapy (VAC NPWT), delivered to various dermal wounds is believed to influence the formation of granulation tissue via the mechanism of microdeformational signals. In recent years, numerous experimental investigations have been initiated to study the cause-effect relationships between the mechanical signals and the transduction pathways that result in improved granulation response. To accurately quantify the tissue microdeformations during therapy, a new three-dimensional finite element model has been developed and is described in this paper. This model is used to study the effect of dressing type and subatmospheric pressure level on the variations in the microdeformational strain fields in a model dermal wound bed. Three-dimensional geometric models representing typical control volumes of NPWT dressings were generated using micro-CT scanning of VAC GranuFoam, a reticulated open-cell polyurethane foam (ROCF), and a gauze dressing (constructed from USP Class VII gauze). Using a nonlinear hyperfoam constitutive model for the wound bed, simulated tissue microdeformations were generated using the foam and gauze dressing models at equivalent negative pressures. The model results showed that foam produces significantly greater strain than gauze in the tissue model at all pressures and in all metrics (p<0.0001 for all but epsilon(vol) at -50 mm Hg and -100 mm Hg where p<0.05). Specifically, it was demonstrated in this current work that the ROCF dressing produces higher levels of tissue microdeformation than gauze at all levels of subatmospheric pressure. This observation is consistent across all of the strain invariants assessed, i.e., epsilon(vol), epsilon(dist), the minimum and maximum principal strains, and the maximum shear strain. The distribution of the microdeformations and strain appears as a repeating mosaic beneath the foam dressing, whereas the gauze dressings appear to produce an irregular distribution of strains in the wound surface. Strain predictions from the developed computational model results agree well with those predicted from prior two-dimensional experimental and computational studies of foam-based NPWT (Saxena, V., et al., 2004, "Vacuum-assisted closure: Microdeformations of Wounds and Cell Proliferation," Plast. Reconstr. Surg., 114(5), pp. 1086-1096). In conjunction with experimental in vitro and in vivo studies, the developed model can now be extended into more detailed investigations into the mechanobiological underpinnings of VAC NPWT and can help to further develop and optimize this treatment modality for the treatment of challenging patient wounds. PMID:19154071

  5. Research on a novel poly (vinyl alcohol)/lysine/vanillin wound dressing: Biocompatibility, bioactivity and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gang; A, Ruhan; Ge, Heng; Wang, Lin; Liu, Meili; Wang, Binbin; Su, Haisheng; Yan, Ming; Xi, Yuan; Fan, Yubo

    2014-12-01

    Burn wound dressings have played significant roles in daily clinical practice. An "ideal" burn wound dressing is non-adhesion, absorbency and antimicrobial activity. However, such a dressing is currently not available. A novel composite hydrogel was based on poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) containing lysine (Lys) and vanillin (V) using freezing-thawing method. The properties of this hydrogel were characterized by environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), tensile testing, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and water vapour transmission rate (WVTR). Then the antibacterial activity of PVA/Lys/V composite hydrogel was examined by bacteriolytic plate. In vivo experiment, a burn rat model was used to evaluate the histological analysis of this hydrogel. In results, the Schiff base formed in the three-phase system. It improved the tensile strength and crystallization of the PVA/Lys/V composite hydrogel. Meanwhile, this hydrogel showed excellent bactericidal activities to both gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) and gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus) due to the Schiff base. And the antibacterial activity toward gram-negative bacteria was better than another. On Day 7, 95-100% of the surface areas of PVA/Lys/V composite treated burns were covered with regenerating epidermis. And the new tissue and capillary vessel formed around the wounds after treatment. Therefore, it is suggested that treatment with PVA/Lys/V composite hydrogel will be effective also in patients with burns and other skin wounds. PMID:24953436

  6. Role of natural polysaccharides in radiation formation of PVA hydrogel wound dressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Lalit

    2007-02-01

    Radiation processed PVA-polysaccharides hydrogels have been observed to be suitable for producing transparent, flexible, mechanically strong, biocompatible, effective and economical hydrogel dressings. The dressings were formed in single stage irradiation process achieving gel formation and sterilization at 25-30 kGy gamma radiation dose. No synthetic plasticizers and additives were used. Different formulations containing poly-vinylalcohol (PVA) and polysaccharides selected from combinations of agar and carrageenan were used to make the dressings. The selected polysaccharides themselves form thermo-reversible gels and degrade on irradiation. Using concentration of polysaccharides as low as 0.5-2% resulted in increase of tensile strength from 45 g/cm 2 to 411 g/cm 2, elongation from 30% to 410% and water uptake from 25% to 157% with respect to PVA gel without polysaccharides. Besides improving mechanical strength, agar contributes more to elongation and carrageenan to mechanical strength of the gel dressing. PVA formulations containing the polysaccharides show significantly different pre-gel viscosities behaviour. Increasing the concentration of agar in the formulation to about 2% converts the sheet gel to paste gel useful for filling wound cavities. The results indicate that pre irradiation network structure of the formulation plays an important role in determining mechanical properties of the irradiated gel dressing. Formulations containing 7-9% PVA, 0.5-1.5% carrageenan and 0.5-1% agar gave highly effective usable hydrogel dressings. Scanning electron micrographs show highly porous structure of the gel. Clinical trials of wound dressing on human patients established safety and efficacy of the dressing. The dressing has been observed to be useful in treating burns, non-healing ulcers of diabetes, leprosy and other external wounds. The dressings are now being marketed in India under different brand names.

  7. Polymeric Multilayers that Localize the Release of Chlorhexidine from Biologic Wound Dressings

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ankit; Nelson, Tyler B.; Kierski, Patricia R.; Schurr, Michael J.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Czuprynski, Charles J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2012-01-01

    Biologic wound dressings contain animal-derived components and are susceptible to high infection rates. To address this issue, we report an approach that permits incorporation of non-toxic levels of the small-molecule antiseptic ‘chlorhexidine’ into biologic dressings. The approach relies on the fabrication of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEMs) films containing poly(allylaminehydrochloride) (PAH), poly(acrylicacid) (PAA), and chlorhexidine acetate (CX) on elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sheets. The PEMs (20-100 nm thick) are subsequently stamped onto the wound-contact surface of a synthetic biologic dressing, Biobrane, which contains collagen peptides. Chlorhexidine loading in the PEMs was tailored by tuning the number of (CX/PAA) bilayers deposited, providing burst release of up to 0.98±0.06 ?g/cm2 of CX over 24 h, followed by zero order release of 0.35±0.04 ?g/cm2/day for another week. Although the CX concentrations released were below the reported in vitro cytotoxicity limit (5 ?g/mL over 24 h) for human dermal fibroblasts, they killed 4 log10 counts of pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus in solution. The CX/PEMs could be stamped onto Biobrane with high efficiency to provide CX release kinetics and in-vitro antibacterial activity similar to that on PDMS stamps. In a full-thickness ‘splinted’ dermal wound-model in normal wild-type mice, the CX-functionalized Biobrane showed no decrease in either its adherence to the wound-bed or wound-closure rate over 14 days. The murine wounds topically inoculated with ~105 CFU/cm2 of S. aureus and treated with CX-functionalized Biobrane demonstrated a 3 log10 decrease in the wound's bacterial burden within 3 days, compared to persistent bacterial colonization found in wounds treated with unmodified Biobrane (n=10 mice, p<0.005). Overall, this study presents a promising approach to prevent bacterial colonization in wounds under biologic dressings. PMID:22784602

  8. An in vitro test of the efficacy of an anti-biofilm wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Said, Jawal; Walker, Michael; Parsons, David; Stapleton, Paul; Beezer, Anthony E; Gaisford, Simon

    2014-10-20

    Broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents, such as silver, are increasingly being formulated into medicated wound dressings in order to control colonization of wounds by opportunistic pathogens. Medicated wound dressings have been shown in-vitro to be effective against planktonic cultures, but in-vivo bacteria are likely to be present in biofilms, which makes their control and eradication more challenging. Recently, a functional wound dressing (AQUACEL(®) Ag+ Extra™ (AAg + E)) has been developed that in addition to silver contains two agents (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and benzethonium chloride (BC)) designed to disrupt biofilms. Here, the efficacy of AAg + E is demonstrated using a biofilm model developed in an isothermal microcalorimeter. The biofilm was seen to remain viable in the presence of unmedicated dressing, silver-containing dressing or silver nitrate solution. In the presence of AAg + E, however, the biofilm was eradicated. Control experiments showed that neither EDTA nor BC alone had a bactericidal effect, which means it is the synergistic action of EDTA and BC disrupting the biofilm with silver being bactericidal that leads to the product's efficacy. PMID:25151435

  9. Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dianna B. Roberts; Elizabeth L. Travis

    1995-01-01

    To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect.

  10. Dynamics of silver nanoparticle release from wound dressings revealed via in situ nanoscale imaging.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, R David; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Staymates, Matthew E

    2014-11-01

    The use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in textiles for enhanced anti-microbial properties has led to concern about their release and impact on both human and environmental health. Here a novel method for in situ visualization of AgNP release from silver-impregnated wound dressings is introduced. By combining an environmental scanning electron microscope, a gaseous analytical detector and a peltier cooling stage, this technique provides near-instantaneous nanoscale characterization of interactions between individual water droplets and AgNPs. We show that dressings with different silver application methods have very distinct AgNP release dynamics. Specifically, water condensation on dressings with AgNP deposited directly on the fiber surface resulted in substantial and rapid AgNP release. By comparison, AgNP release from wound dressing with nanoparticles grown, not deposited, from the fiber surface was either much slower or negligible. Our methodology complements standard bulk techniques for studying of silver release from fabrics by providing dynamic nanoscale information about mechanisms governing AgNP release from individual fibers. Thus coupling these nano and macro-scale methods can provide insight into how the wound dressing fabrication could be engineered to optimize AgNP release for different applications. PMID:25011499

  11. Flexible and microporous chitosan hydrogel/nano ZnO composite bandages for wound dressing: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P T Sudheesh; Lakshmanan, Vinoth-Kumar; Anilkumar, T V; Ramya, C; Reshmi, P; Unnikrishnan, A G; Nair, Shantikumar V; Jayakumar, R

    2012-05-01

    Current wound dressings have disadvantages such as less flexibility, poor mechanical strength, lack of porosity, and a tendency for dressings to adhere onto the wound surface; in addition, a majority of the dressings did not possess antibacterial activity. Hydrogel-based wound dressings would be helpful to provide a cooling sensation and a moisture environment, as well as act as a barrier to microbes. To overcome these hassles, we have developed flexible and microporous chitosan hydrogel/nano zinc oxide composite bandages (CZBs) via the incorporation of zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) into chitosan hydrogel. The prepared nanocomposite bandages were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, swelling, degradation, blood clotting, antibacterial, cytocompatibility, cell attachment on the material, and cell infiltration into the composite bandages were evaluated. The nanocomposite bandage showed enhanced swelling, blood clotting, and antibacterial activity. Cytocompatibility of the composite bandage has been analyzed in normal human dermal fibroblast cells. Cell attachment and infiltration studies showed that the cells were found attached to the nanocomposite bandages and penetrated into the interior. Furthermore, the in vivo evaluations in Sprague-Dawley rats revealed that these nanocomposite bandages enhanced the wound healing and helped for faster re-epithelialization and collagen deposition. The obtained data strongly encourage the use of these composite bandages for burn wounds, chronic wounds, and diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:22489770

  12. Effect of Periodontal Dressing on Wound Healing and Patient Satisfaction Following Periodontal Flap Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soheilifar, Sara; Bidgoli, Mohsen; Faradmal, Javad; Soheilifar, Sanaz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: It has been claimed that periodontal dressing reduces the risk of wound infection, bleeding and granulation tissue formation and improves tissue healing. This study sought to assess the effect of periodontal dressing on wound healing and patient satisfaction following periodontal flap surgery. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 33 patients presenting to Hamadan University, School of Dentistry in 2012 whose treatment plan included two periodontal surgical procedures on both quadrants of the maxilla or mandible. The variables evaluated were severity of pain, bleeding, facial swelling and ease of nutrition experienced by patient during the first 3 days after surgery and inflammation, granulation tissue formation and gingival color at 7 and 14 days. Obtained data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 and R software and chi-square and t-tests. Results: The mean (±SD) pain score was 1.73±1.153 and 2.79±1.933 in surgical sites with and without periodontal dressing, respectively and this difference was statistically significant (P=0.005). No significant difference was noted between sites with and without periodontal dressing in terms of swelling, bleeding, gingival consistency, granulation tissue formation, gingival color and ease of nutrition (P>0.05). Conclusion: According to the results of the present study, patients did not experience more bleeding, facial swelling or nutritional problems without periodontal dressing; however, the level of pain experienced was lower after surgeries with the use of periodontal dressing.

  13. CICATRIZATION OF WOUNDS : IX. INFLUENCE ON THE HEALING OF WOUNDS OF VARIATIONS IN THE OSMOTIC TENSION OF THE DRESSING.

    PubMed

    Carrel, A; Du Noüy, P L; Carrel, A

    1917-08-01

    In the study of the action of non-antiseptic substances on the rate of cicatrization, the chief obstacle encountered is the facility with which wounds become reinfected under an aseptic dressing. At the beginning of Experiment 1 the wound was sterile. It was subjected to flushing with distilled water for 2 hours, then to flushing with 30 per cent sodium chloride solution for another 2 hours. During that time no special precaution was taken to sterilize the wound and the dressing was left intact until the following morning. It was then found that the wound contained from 30 to 50 bacteria per field. The following day, after the wound had been subjected to the same treatment, the number of bacteria had increased to 50 and 100 per field, and as an immediate consequence the surface of the wound increased from 12 to 12.6 sq. cm. in 2 days. The wound was then dressed antiseptically and was found to be sterile 3 days later. Reinfection again took place the following day in spite of antiseptic dressing with chloramine paste 4 parts per 1,000, which was applied for 20 hours. In Experiment 2 similar results were observed. After 2 days of flushing with distilled water, the number of bacteria had increased to 50 per field. The wound was thereupon sterilized, but new reinfection ensued a few days later. Another wound on the same patient became reinfected under the same conditions after 1 day of sterile dressing. In none of the patients could the wounds be kept in a sterile condition throughout the whole experiment. It was impossible to maintain the sterility of a wound under aseptic dressing. Dakin's solution was therefore injected every 4 hours, or less often, according to the degree of infection, or chloramine paste was applied during the night. If there were 3 or 4 bacteria per field, the experiment was discontinued in order that the wound might be sterilized again. The cicatrization and bacteriological curves of Experiment 4 show that by the application of chloramine paste a wound may be maintained in an appropriately bacteriological condition for carrying out an experiment. Nevertheless, in spite of the antiseptic precautions taken, it was necessary to interrupt this experiment on two occasions, on December 13 to 15 and on December 18 to 22, in order that a complete sterilization of the wound might be effected. When the sterilization was performed as soon as the bacteria were discovered, little retardation occurred in the process of cicatrization. Moreover, the reinfection from the skin was often due to fine bacilli which have but mild retarding action on the rate of healing. The use of at least six flushings in 2 hours with Dakin's solution or of 12 hours' dressing with chloramine paste 10 parts per 1,000, was necessary to keep the wound in a condition of surgical asepsis. The action of distilled water was studied in Experiments 1, 2, and 3. In Experiment 1 the wound was subjected to flushing with distilled water first for 2 hours, then 4 hours, and later for 8 hours per day. The wound was maintained in a condition of mild infection. No marked modification, either acceleration or retardation, was noted in the rate of repair during the period that the treatment was applied. From November 21 to 25 the wound was almost clean and the observed curve remained parallel to the calculated curve, showing that distilled water did not retard the rate of healing. In Experiment 2 the wound was subjected to uninterrupted flushing with distilled water, first for 2 and 8 hours, then for 24 hours. It was continued from November 24 to 30; viz., for 112 hours out of 120, without the occurrence of any marked modification of the course of healing. The bacteriological curve showed that from November 22 to 27 inclusive the wound was kept aseptic. The slight retardation which occurred afterwards was probably brought about by the infection. In Experiment 3 the wound was subjected to flushing with distilled water, first for 2, then for 4, 6, and 8 hours, a total of 20 hours in 4 days. From November 21 to 24 the wound remained surgically aseptic. No modif

  14. Electrospinning polyvinylidene fluoride fibrous membranes containing anti-bacterial drugs used as wound dressing.

    PubMed

    He, Ting; Wang, Jingnan; Huang, Peilin; Zeng, Baozhen; Li, Haihong; Cao, Qingyun; Zhang, Shiying; Luo, Zhuo; Deng, David Y B; Zhang, Hongwu; Zhou, Wuyi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesis drug-loaded fibrous membrane scaffolds for potential applications as wound dressing. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) fibrous membranes were loaded with enrofloxacin (Enro) drugs by using an electrospinning process, and their mechanical strength, drug release profile and anti-bacterial properties were evaluated. Enro drug-loaded PVDF membranes exhibited good elasticity, flexibility and excellent mechanical strength. The electrospinning Enro/PVDF membranes showed a burst drug release in the initial 12h, followed by sustained release for the next 3 days, which was an essential property for antibiotic drugs applied for wound healing. The drug-loaded PVDF fibrous membranes displayed excellent anti-bacterial activity toward Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The results suggest that electrospinning PVDF membrane scaffolds loaded with drugs can be used as wound dressing. PMID:25936562

  15. Protease Inhibition by Oleic Acid Transfer From Chronic Wound Dressings to Albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J. V.; Howley, Phyllis; Davis, Rachel M.; Mashchak, Andrew D.; Goheen, Steven C.

    2007-08-01

    High elastase and cathepsin G activities have been observed in chronic wounds. These levels can inhibit healing through degradation of growth factors, cytokines, and extracellular matrix proteins. Oleic acid (18:1) is a non-toxic elastase inhibitor with some potential for redressing the imbalance of elastase activity found in chronic wounds. Cotton wound dressing material was characterized as a transfer carrier for affinity uptake of 18:1 by albumin under conditions mimicking chronic wounds. 18:1-treated cotton was examined for its ability to bind and release the fatty acid in the presence of albumin. The mechanism of 18:1 uptake from cotton and binding by albumin was examined with both intact dressings and cotton fiber-designed chromatography. Raman spectra of the albumin-18:1 complexes under liquid-liquid equilibrium conditions revealed fully saturated albumin-18:1 complexes with a 1:1 weight ratio of albumin:18:1. Cotton chromatography under liquid-solid equilibrium conditions revealed oleic acid transfer from cotton to albumin at 27 mole equivalents of 18:1 per mole albumin. Cotton was contrasted with hydrogel, and hydrocolloid wound dressing for its comparative ability to lower elastase activity. Each dressing material evaluated was found to release 18:1 in the presence of albumin with significant inhibition of elastase activity. The 18:1-formulated wound dressings lowered elastase activity in a dose dependent manner in the order cotton gauze > hydrogel > hydrocolloid. In contrast the cationic serine protease Cathepsin G was inihibited by 18:1 within a narrow range of 18:1-cotton formulations. Four per cent Albumin solutions were most effective in binding cotton bound-18:1. However, 2% albumin was sufficient to transfer quantities of 18:1 necessary to achieve a significant elastase-lowering effect. Formulations with 128 mg 18:1/g cotton gauze had equivalent elastase lowering with 1 - 4% albumin. 18:1 bound to cotton wound dressings may have promise in the selective lowering of cationic serine protease activity useful in topical application for chronic inflammatory pathogenesis.

  16. Mechanical properties and in vivo healing evaluation of a novel Centella asiatica-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung Giu; Kim, Kyung Soo; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Kim, Dong Wuk; Jang, Sun Woo; Son, Mi-Won; Kim, Young Hun; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-07-25

    To develop a novel sodium alginate based Centella asiatica (CA)-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing (HCD) providing excellent mechanical properties and improved wound healing, numerous CA-loaded HCDs were prepared with various ingredients using the hot melting method. The effect of sodium alginate, styrene-isoprene-styrene copolymer (SIS) and petroleum hydrocarbon resin (PHR) on the mechanical properties of CA-loaded HCDs was investigated. The effect of disintegrants on swelling and drug release was assessed. Moreover, the in vivo wound healing potentials of the selected CA-loaded HCD in various wound models such as abrasion, excision and infection were evaluated in comparison with the commercial product. Polyisobutylene and SIS hardly affected the mechanical properties, but PHR improved the tensile strength and elongation at break. Disintegrants such as croscarmellose sodium, sodium starch glycolate and crospovidone improved the swelling ratio of the CA-loaded HCD. Furthermore, the CA-loaded HCD without croscarmellose sodium poorly released the drug, but that with 2% croscarmellose sodium showed about 27% drug release in 24h. In particular, the CA-loaded HCD composed of CA/polyisobutylene/SIS/PHR/liquid paraffin/sodium alginate/croscarmellose sodium at the weight ratio of 1/8/25/25/12/27/2 furnished excellent mechanical properties and drug release. As compared with the commercial product, it offered improved healing effects in excision, infection and abrasion type wounds in rats. Thus, this novel CA-loaded HCD could be a potential candidate for the treatment of various wounds. PMID:26024819

  17. Papain incorporated chitin dressings for wound debridement sterilized by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Rita

    2012-11-01

    Wound debridement is essential for the removal of necrotic or nonviable tissue from the wound surface to create an environment conducive to healing. Nonsurgical enzymatic debridement is an attractive method due to its effectiveness and ease of use. Papain is a proteolytic enzyme derived from the fruit of Carica papaya and is capable of breaking down a variety of necrotic tissue substrates. The present study was focused on the use of gamma radiation for sterilization of papain dressing with wound debriding activity. Membranes with papain were prepared using 0.5% chitin in lithium chloride/dimethylacetamide solvent and sterilized by gamma radiation. Fluid absorption capacity of chitin-papain membranes without glycerol was 14.30±6.57% in 6 h. Incorporation of glycerol resulted in significant (p<0.001) increase in the absorption capacity. Moisture vapour transmission rate of the membranes was 4285.77±455.61 g/m2/24 h at 24 h. Gamma irradiation at 25 kGy was found suitable for sterilization of the dressings. Infrared (IR) spectral scanning has shown that papain was stable on gamma irradiation at 25-35 kGy. The irradiated chitin-papain membranes were impermeable to different bacterial strains and also exhibited strong bactericidal action against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The fluid handling characteristics and the antimicrobial properties of chitin-papain membranes sterilized by gamma radiation were found suitable for use as wound dressing with debriding activity.

  18. ???????Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Controlled Saline Instillation (NPWTi): Dressing Properties and Granulation Response In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Lessing, Chris; Slack, Paul; Hong, K Z; Kilpadi, Deepak; McNulty, Amy

    2011-10-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) with reticulated open-cell foam (ROCF) dressings (ROCF G, V.A.C.® GranuFoamTM Dress- ing, KCI USA, Inc, San Antonio, TX) creates a healing environment that removes wound exudates, reduces edema, and promotes perfusion and granulation tissue formation. Controlled instillation of saline dur- ing NPWT (NPWTi) may further enhance healing by facilitating auto- matic and contained volumetric wound irrigation and cleansing. A new ROCF dressing (ROCF-V, V.A.C. VeraFloTM Dressing, KCI USA, Inc, San Antonio, TX) has been developed for use with NPWTi; benchtop and in vivo tests compared the properties and performance of both ROCF-G and ROCF-V. Pore size and density (contributors to microdeformation) are similar for both ROCF-G and ROCF-V, while mechanical testing demonstrates ROCF-V is stronger than ROCF-G under both tensile and tear loading. ROCF-V surface energy is higher than ROCF-G, making ROCF-V less hydrophobic. Under wet conditions ROCF-V wicks more fluid and shows less pressure drop than ROCF-G, suggesting ROCF-V may be better suited for NPWTi. After 7 days of therapy in a porcine full-thickness excisional wound model, NPWTi with ROCF-V resulted in a 43% increase (P < 0.05) in granulation tissue thickness compared to NPWT with ROCF-G. These data suggest NPWTi with ROCF-V creates a wound healing environment that provides enhanced granulation tissue formation compared to standard NPWT with ROCF-G. ?. PMID:25881108

  19. Bacterial cellulose membrane produced by Acetobacter sp. A10 for burn wound dressing applications.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Moon Hwa; Kim, Ji Eun; Go, Jun; Koh, Eun Kyoung; Song, Sung Hwa; Son, Hong Joo; Kim, Hye Sung; Yun, Young Hyun; Jung, Young Jin; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2015-05-20

    Bacteria cellulose membranes (BCM) are used for wound dressings, bone grafts, tissue engineering, artificial vessels, and dental implants because of their high tensile strength, crystallinity and water holding ability. In this study, the effects of BCM application for 15 days on healing of burn wounds were investigated based on evaluation of skin regeneration and angiogenesis in burn injury skin of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. BCM showed a randomly organized fibrils network, 12.13 MPa tensile strength, 12.53% strain, 17.63% crystallinity, 90.2% gel fraction and 112.14 g × m(2)/h highest water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) although their swelling ratio was enhanced to 350% within 24h. In SD rats with burned skin, the skin severity score was lower in the BCM treated group than the gauze (GZ) group at all time points, while the epidermis and dermis thickness and number of blood vessels was greater in the BCM treated group. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the number of infiltrated mast cells and in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) expression was observed in the BCM treated group at day 10 and 15. Moreover, a significant high level in collagen expression was observed in the BCM treated group at day 5 compared with GZ treated group, while low level was detected in the same group at day 10 and 15. However, the level of metabolic enzymes representing liver and kidney toxicity in the serum of BCM treated rats was maintained at levels consistent with GZ treated rats. Overall, BCM may accelerate the process of wound healing in burn injury skin of SD rats through regulation of angiogenesis and connective tissue formation as well as not induce any specific toxicity against the liver and kidney. PMID:25817683

  20. Evaluation of an oxygen-diffusion dressing for accelerated healing of donor-site wounds.

    PubMed

    Lairet, Kimberly F; Baer, David; Leas, Michelle L; Renz, Evan M; Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2014-01-01

    Accelerating the healing process and reducing pain during healing are beneficial for the following reasons: faster return to work, lower risk of wound infection, improved quality of life, and possibly reduced need for analgesia. This clinical study assessed the effectiveness of a new oxygen-diffusion dressing (OxyBand; Oxyband Technologies, St. Louis, MO) compared with standard Xeroform gauze dressings (Convidien, Mansfield, MA), in the care of skin-graft donor sites in burn patients. Time to healing was the primary endpoint, and pain scores and cosmetic outcome were also assessed. This was a prospective, randomized, controlled study of burn patients undergoing harvesting of two donor sites. Patients were followed at predetermined time points for 30 to 45 days to determine the time to reepithelialization, cosmetic appearance, and pain. Subjects were adult burn patients with less than 30% TBSA burns admitted to the burn center, who required excision and grafting. Twenty patients were enrolled, of whom 17 completed the study. Average age was 35 years. Average burn size was 9.2% TBSA. Patients underwent harvesting of split-thickness skin grafts with one donor wound dressed with OxyBand and the other dressed in Xeroform gauze. Wounds were inspected and photographed on postoperative days 4 and 8, and then every 2 days until the donor wounds were healed. Pain scores at each site were also collected at these visits (rated by patients on a scale from 0 to 10). Mean time to wound healing for OxyBand was 9.3 ± 1.7 days; for Xeroform, 12.4 ± 2.7 days (P < .001). Pain scores were lower (P < .01) at the OxyBand site compared with the Xeroform site at all time points during postoperative days 4 to 12. There was no difference in the cosmetic outcome of the wounds at 30 to 45 days postoperatively. This study revealed a decrease in the time to healing and in pain at donor sites dressed with an oxygen-diffusion dressing. PMID:23877142

  1. The effect of tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) on wound healing using a dressing model.

    PubMed

    Chin, Karen B; Cordell, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    Numerous studies have shown the promising antibacterial effects of Melaleuca alternifolia, or tea tree essential oil. The study detailed here replicates in humans a 2004 in vitro study that used a dressing model over Petri dishes to determine the antimicrobial effects of the fumes of tea tree essential oil. The current study used the same dressing model with patients who had wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus. Ten participants volunteered for the quasi-experimental study, and four of the 10 were used as matched participants to compare wound healing times between conventional treatment alone and conventional treatment plus fumes of tea tree essential oil. The results demonstrated decreased healing time in all but one of the participants treated with tea tree oil. The differences between the matched participants were striking. The results of this small investigational study indicate that additional study is warranted. PMID:23848210

  2. Preparation of a Silk Fibroin Spongy Wound Dressing and Its Therapeutic Efficiency in Skin Defects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sijia Min; Xin Gao; Chunmao Han; Yu Chen; Mingying Yang; Liangjun Zhu; Haiping Zhang; Lin Liu; Juming Yao

    2012-01-01

    A novel silk fibroin spongy wound dressing (SFSD) incorporated with nano-Ag particles was prepared by coagulating with 1.25–5.0% (v\\/v) poly(ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether) (PGDE). The mechanical properties, moisture permeability and hygroscopicity of SFSD, and the nano-Ag release behavior from SFSD were evaluated. The results showed that the soft SFSD had satisfying tensile strength and flexibility, as well as excellent moisture

  3. Poly(vinyl alcohol)/cellulose nanowhiskers nanocomposite hydrogels for potential wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jimena S; Ludueña, Leandro N; Ponce, Alejandra; Alvarez, Vera A

    2014-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/cellulose nanowhisker (CNW) nanocomposite hydrogels to be used for wound dressing were obtained by freezing-thawing technique and characterized by means of morphological, physical, thermal, mechanical, barrier and antimicrobial properties. First, cellulose nanowhiskers were obtained by the acid hydrolysis of commercial crystalline microcellulose (MCC) and characterized by its size, shape, morphological, structural and thermal properties. Then, PVA/CNW nanocomposites with several CNW contents (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7wt.%) were obtained. Morphological, thermal, chemical and physical characterization of the PVA/CNW nanocomposite hydrogels was carried out. It was found that the addition of CNW to the hydrogel allows controlling the pore morphology of the samples. On the other hand, the transparency of the samples was maintained, the thermal stability was increased, the mechanical properties were improved and the water vapor transmission rate was in the range of wound dressing applications after CNW incorporation inside the PVA hydrogel matrix. The evaluation of microbial penetration showed that the prepared hydrogels can be considered as a good barrier against different microorganisms. All obtained results indicate that the PVA/CNW materials are promising to be used as wound dressing. PMID:24268233

  4. Pilot scale-up and shelf stability of hydrogel wound dressings obtained by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Dulce María; Rodríguez, Yanet; Correa, Hector; Moreno, Ailed; Carrizales, Lila

    2012-08-01

    This study is aimed of producing pilot batches of hydrogel wound dressings by gamma radiation and evaluating their shelf stability. Six batches of 3L capacity were prepared based on poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), agar and polyethylene glycol and they were dispensed in polyester trays, covered with polyester films and sealed in two types of materials: polyethylene bags and vacuum polyethylene bags. Dressings were formed in a single step process for the hydrogel formation and sterilization at 25-30 kGy gamma radiation dose in a JS-9500 Gamma Irradiator (Nordion, Canada). The six batches were initially physicochemical characterized in terms of dimensions and appearance, gel fraction, morphology analysis, hydrogel strength, moisture retention capability and swelling capacity. They were kept under two storage conditions: room temperature (T: 30±2 °C/RH: 70± 5%) and refrigerated temperature (T: 5±3 °C) during 24 months and sterility test was performed. The appearance of membranes was transparent, clear, uncut and flexible; the gel fraction of batches was higher than 75% and the hydrogel surface showed a porous structure. There was a slow decrease of the compression rate 20% until 7 h and about 70% at 24 h. Moisture retention capability in 5 h was similar for all the batches, about 40% and 60% at 37 °C and at room temperature respectively. The swelling of hydrogels in acidic media was strong and in alkaline media the weight variation remains almost stable until 24 h and then there is a loss of weight. The six batches remained sterile during the stability study in the conditions tested. The pilot batches were consistent from batch to batch and remained stable during 24 months.

  5. Alginate Hydrogels Coated with Chitosan for Wound Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Straccia, Maria Cristina; Gomez d’Ayala, Giovanna; Romano, Ida; Oliva, Adriana; Laurienzo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a coating of chitosan onto alginate hydrogels was realized using the water-soluble hydrochloride form of chitosan (CH-Cl), with the dual purpose of imparting antibacterial activity and delaying the release of hydrophilic molecules from the alginate matrix. Alginate hydrogels with different calcium contents were prepared by the internal setting method and coated by immersion in a CH-Cl solution. Structural analysis by cryo-scanning electron microscopy was carried out to highlight morphological alterations due to the coating layer. Tests in vitro with human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) were assessed to check the absence of toxicity of CH-Cl. Swelling, stability in physiological solution and release characteristics using rhodamine B as the hydrophilic model drug were compared to those of relative uncoated hydrogels. Finally, antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli was tested. Results show that alginate hydrogels coated with chitosan hydrochloride described here can be proposed as a novel medicated dressing by associating intrinsic antimicrobial activity with improved sustained release characteristics. PMID:25969981

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of novel absorptive and antibacterial polyurethane membranes as wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Yari, Abbas; Yeganeh, Hamid; Bakhshi, Hadi

    2012-09-01

    Preparation and evaluation of new polyurethane membranes for wound dressing application was considered in this work. The membranes were prepared through amine curing reaction of epoxy-terminated polyurethane prepolymers and an antibacterial epoxy-functional quaternary ammonium compound (glycidyltriehtylammonium chloride, GTEACl. To render the prepared membranes to be highly absorptive of wound exudates, poly (ethylene glycol) polyols were introduced into the polyurethane networks. Evaluation of biocompatibity via both MTT assay and direct contact with two different cell lines (fibroblast and epidermal keratinocytes) reveled that membranes with appropriate loading of GTEACl showed proper biocompatibility. Promising antibacterial activity of the prepared membranes against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria was confirmed by both agar diffusion and shaking flask methods. The membranes with balanced crosslink density and ionic groups' concentration possessed appropriate hydrophilicity and water vapor transmission rate; therefore, they could prevent the accumulation of exudates and decrease the surface inflammation in the wounded area. PMID:22639152

  7. Novel soy protein wound dressings with controlled antibiotic release: mechanical and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Peles, Zachi; Zilberman, Meital

    2012-01-01

    Naturally derived materials are becoming widely used in the biomedical field. Soy protein has advantages over various types of natural proteins employed for biomedical applications due to its low price, non-animal origin and relatively long storage time and stability. In the current study soy protein isolate (SPI) was investigated as a matrix for wound dressing applications. The antibiotic drug gentamicin was incorporated into the matrix for local controlled release and, thus, protection against bacterial infection. Homogeneous yellowish films were cast from aqueous solutions. After cross-linking they combined high tensile strength and Young's modulus with the desired ductility. The plasticizer type, cross-linking agent and method of cross-linking were found to strongly affect the tensile properties of the SPI films. Selected SPI films were tested for relevant physical properties and the gentamicin release profile. The cross-linking method affected the degree of water uptake and the weight loss profile. The water vapor transmission rate of the films was in the desired range for wound dressings (?2300 g m(-2) day(-1)) and was not affected by the cross-linking method. The gentamicin release profile exhibited a moderate burst effect followed by a decreasing release rate which was maintained for at least 4 weeks. Diffusion was the dominant release mechanism of gentamicin from cross-linked SPI films. Appropriate selection of the process parameters yielded SPI wound dressings with the desired mechanical and physical properties and drug release behavior to protect against bacterial infection. These unique structures are thus potentially useful as burn and ulcer dressings. PMID:21911084

  8. Antimicrobial electrospun nanofibers of cellulose acetate and polyester urethane composite for wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Lin, Tong; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Zhiguang; Huang, Chen; Yao, Gang; Jiang, Linlin; Tang, Yanwei; Wang, Xungai

    2012-08-01

    In this study, a series of nanofibrous membranes were prepared from cellulose acetate (CA) and polyester urethane (PEU) using coelectrospinning or blend-electrospinning. The drug release, in vitro antimicrobial activity and in vivo wound healing performance of the nanofiber membranes were evaluated for use as wound dressings. To prevent common clinical infections, an antimicrobial agent, polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) was incorporated into the electrospun fibers. The presence of CA in the nanofiber membrane improved its hydrophilicity and permeability to air and moisture. CA fibers became slightly swollen upon contacting with liquid phase. CA not only increased the liquid uptake but also created a moist environment for the wound, which accelerated wound recovery. PHMB release dynamics of the membranes was controlled by the structure and component ratios of the membranes. The lower ratio of CA: PEU helped to preserve the physical and thermal properties of the membranes, and also reduced the burst release effectively and slowed down diffusion of PHMB during in vitro tests. The controlled-diffusion membranes exerted long-term antimicrobial effect for wound healing. PMID:22692845

  9. Nanospray technology for an in situ gelling nanoparticulate powder as a wound dressing.

    PubMed

    De Cicco, Felicetta; Porta, Amalia; Sansone, Francesca; Aquino, Rita P; Del Gaudio, Pasquale

    2014-10-01

    In the current study the feasibility of the novel nano spray drying technique for the production of stable nanoparticulate dry powder, able to gel when administered locally on a wound, is explored. Gentamicin sulphate (GS) was loaded into alginate/pectin nanoparticles as highly soluble (hygroscopic) model drug with wide range antibacterial agent for wound dressing. The influence of process variables, mainly spray mesh size and feed concentration, on particle size and morphology, powder wound fluid uptake ability and gelling rate, as well as hydrogel water vapour transmission at wound site were studied. Particles morphology was spherical with few exceptions as slightly corrugated particles when the larger nozzle was used. Production of spherical nanoparticles (d50 ? 350 nm) in good yield (82-92%) required 4 ?m spray mesh whereas 7 ?m mesh produced larger wrinkled particles. Nano spray-dried particles showed high encapsulation efficiency (? 80%), good flowability, high fluid uptake, fast gel formation (15 min) and proper adhesiveness to fill the wound site and to remove easily the formulation after use. Moreover, moisture transmission of the in situ formed hydrogel was between 95 and 90 g/m(2)/h, an optimum range to avoid wound dehydration or occlusion phenomena. Release of the encapsulated GS, monitored as permeation rate using Franz cells in simulated wound fluid (SWF) was related to particle size and gelling rate. Sustained permeation profiles were obtained achieving total permeation of the drug between 3 and 6 days. However, all nano spray-dried formulations presented a burst effect, suitable to prevent infection spreading at the beginning of the therapy. Antimicrobial tests against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed stronger and prolonged antimicrobial effect of the nanoparticles compared to pure GS both shortly after administration and over time (till 12 days). PMID:24979533

  10. Polysaccharides and Cellulose in the Design of Wound Healing Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic Wound Dressings that Sequester Harmful Proteases: Traditionally the use of carbohydrate-based wound dressings including cotton, xerogels, charcoal cloth, alginates, chitosan and hydrogels, have afforded properties such as absorbency, ease of application and removal, bacterial protection, flu...

  11. Wound closure after split-thickness skin grafting is accelerated with the use of continuous direct anodal microcurrent applied to silver nylon wound contact dressings.

    PubMed

    Huckfeldt, Roger; Flick, A Bart; Mikkelson, Debbie; Lowe, Cindy; Finley, Phillip J

    2007-01-01

    Wound healing after graft closure of excised burn wounds is a critical factor in the recovery process after thermal injury. Processes that speed time to stable wound closure should lead to improved outcomes, shorter lengths of hospital stays, and decreased complications. A randomized clinical trial to test the ability of continuous direct anodal microcurrent application to silver nylon wound contact dressings was designed. Time for wound closure after split-thickness skin grafting was observed. Thirty patients with full-thickness thermal burns were randomized into two groups. The control group received postoperative dressing care using moistened silver nylon fabric covered with gauze after tangential burn wound excision and split-thickness skin grafting. The study group received an identical protocol with the addition of continuous direct anodal microcurrent application. Time to 95% wound closure was measured using digital photography. The digital photographs were evaluated by a burn surgeon blinded to the patient's randomization. An independent t-test was used to analyze the data. The study group experienced a 36% reduction in time to wound closure (mean of 4.6 days) as compared to the control group (mean of 7.2 days). This was statistically significant at a P value of <.05. The use of continuous direct anodal microcurrent decreased time to wound closure after split-thickness skin grafting. PMID:17667128

  12. Antimicrobial efficacy of a novel silver hydrogel dressing compared to two common silver burn wound dressings: Acticoat™ and PolyMem Silver(®).

    PubMed

    Boonkaew, Benjawan; Kempf, Margit; Kimble, Roy; Supaphol, Pitt; Cuttle, Leila

    2014-02-01

    A novel burn wound hydrogel dressing has been previously developed which is composed of 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid sodium salt with silver nanoparticles. This study compared the antimicrobial efficacy of this novel dressing to two commercially available silver dressings; Acticoat™ and PolyMem Silver(®). Three different antimicrobial tests were used: disc diffusion, broth culture, and the Live/Dead(®) Baclight™ bacterial viability assay. Burn wound pathogens (P. aeruginosa, MSSA, A. baumannii and C. albicans) and antibiotic resistant strains (MRSA and VRE) were tested. All three antimicrobial tests indicated that Acticoat™ was the most effective antimicrobial agent, with inhibition zone lengths of 13.9-18.4mm. It reduced the microbial inocula below the limit of detection (10(2)CFU/ml) and reduced viability by 99% within 4h. PolyMem Silver(®) had no zone of inhibition for most tested micro-organisms, and it also showed poor antimicrobial activity in the broth culture and Live/Dead(®) Baclight™ assays. Alarmingly, it appeared to promote the growth of VRE. The silver hydrogel reduced most of the tested microbial inocula below the detection limit and decreased bacterial viability by 94-99% after 24h exposure. These results support the possibility of using this novel silver hydrogel as a burn wound dressing in the future. PMID:23790588

  13. Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.B.; Travis, E.L. [Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-07-15

    To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect. Male C3H mice received graded single doses of gamma radiation ranging from 30 to 47.5 Gy to the right leg. In most experiments, the gel was applied daily beginning immediately after irradiation. Dose-response curves were obtained by plotting the percentage of mice that reached or exceeded a given peak skin reaction as a function of dose. Curves were fitted by logit analysis and ED{sub 50} values, and 95% confidence limits were obtained. The average peak skin reactions of the wound dressing gel-treated mice were lower than those of the untreated mice at all radiation doses tested. The ED{sub 50} values for skin reactions of 2.0-2.75 were approximately 7 Gy higher in the wound dressing gel-treated mice. The average peak skin reactions and the ED{sub 50} values for mice treated with personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment were similar to irradiated control values. Reduction in the percentage of mice with skin reactions of 2.5 or more was greatest in the groups that received wound dressing gel for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. There was no effect if gel was applied only before irradiation or beginning 1 week after irradiation. Wound dressing gel, but not personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment, reduces acute radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice if applied daily for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Novel copper (II) alginate hydrogels and their potential for use as anti-bacterial wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Klinkajon, Wimonwan; Supaphol, Pitt

    2014-08-01

    The incorporation of a metal ion, with antimicrobial activity, into an alginate dressing is an attractive approach to minimize infection in a wound. In this work, copper (II) cross-linked alginate hydrogels were successfully prepared using a two-step cross-linking procedure. In the first step, solid alginate films were prepared using a solvent-casting method from soft gels of alginate solutions that had been lightly cross-linked using a copper (II) (Cu(2+)) sulfate solution. In the second step, the films were further cross-linked in a corresponding Cu(2+) sulfate solution using a dipping method to further improve their dimensional stability. Alginate solution (at 2%w/v) and Cu(2+) sulfate solution (at 2%w/v) in acetate buffer at a low pH provided soft films with excellent swelling behavior. An increase in either Cu(2+) ion concentration or cross-linking time led to hydrogels with more densely-cross-linked networks that limited water absorption. The hydrogels clearly showed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis and Streptococcus pyogenes, which was proportional to the Cu(2+) ion concentration. Blood coagulation studies showed that the tested copper (II) cross-linked alginate hydrogels had a tendency to coagulate fibrin, and possibly had an effect on pro-thrombotic coagulation and platelet activation. Conclusively, the prepared films are likely candidates as antibacterial wound dressings. PMID:25029588

  15. Wet to dry dressing changes

    MedlinePLUS

    Dressing changes; Wound care - dressing change ... Your doctor or nurse may ask you to change your dressing at home. By placing a wet ( ... nurse will tell you how often you should change your dressing at home. As the wound heals, ...

  16. GNPs-CS/KGM as Hemostatic First Aid Wound Dressing with Antibiotic Effect: In Vitro and In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Youbei; Li, Fei; Li, Wei; Wu, Hong; Ren, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Ideal wound dressing materials should create a good healing environment, with immediate hemostatic effects and antimicrobial activity. In this study, chitosan/konjac glucomannan (CS/KGM) films embedded with gentamicin-loaded poly(dex-GMA/AAc) nanoparticles (giving GNP-CS/KGM films) were prepared as novel wound dressings. The results revealed that the modified CS/KGM films could be used as effective wound dressings and had significant hemostatic effects. With their microporous structure, the films could effectively absorb water from blood and trap blood cells. The gentamicinloaded poly(dex-GMA/AAc) nanoparticles (GNPs) also further promoted blood clotting, with their favorable water uptake capacity. Thus, the GNP-CS/KGM films had wound healing and synergistic effects that helped to stop bleeding from injuries, and also showed good antibiotic abilities by addition of gentamicin to the NPs. These GNPCS/KGM films can be considered as promising novel biodegradable and biocompatible wound dressings with hemostatic capabilities and antibiotic effects for treatment of external bleeding injuries. PMID:23874402

  17. Positively and Negatively Charged Ionic Modifications to Cellulose Assessed as Cotton-Based Protease-Lowering and Haemostatic Wound Agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent developments in cellulose wound dressings targeted to different stages of wound healing have been based on structural and charge modifications that function to modulate events in the complex inflammatory and hemostatic phases of wound healing. Hemostasis and inflammation comprise two overlapp...

  18. A study on the ability of quaternary ammonium groups attached to a polyurethane foam wound dressing to inhibit bacterial attachment and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phat L; Hamood, Abdul N; de Souza, Anselm; Schultz, Gregory; Liesenfeld, Bernd; Mehta, Dilip; Reid, Ted W

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection of acute and chronic wounds impedes wound healing significantly. Part of this impediment is the ability of bacterial pathogens to grow in wound dressings. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of a polyurethane (PU) foam wound dressings coated with poly diallyl-dimethylammonium chloride (pDADMAC-PU) to inhibit the growth and biofilm development by three main wound pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii, within the wound dressing. pDADMAC-PU inhibited the growth of all three pathogens. Time-kill curves were conducted both with and without serum to determine the killing kinetic of pDADMAC-PU. pDADMAC-PU killed S.?aureus, A.?baumannii, and P.?aeruginosa. The effect of pDADMAC-PU on biofilm development was analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. Quantitative analysis, colony-forming unit assay, revealed that pDADMAC-PU dressing produced more than eight log reduction in biofilm formation by each pathogen. Visualization of the biofilms by either confocal laser scanning microscopy or scanning electron microscopy confirmed these findings. In addition, it was found that the pDADMAC-PU-treated foam totally inhibited migration of bacteria through the foam for all three bacterial strains. These results suggest that pDADMAC-PU is an effective wound dressing that inhibits the growth of wound pathogens both within the wound and in the wound dressing. PMID:25469865

  19. Gentian Violet and Methylene Blue Polyvinyl Alcohol Foam Antibacterial Dressing as a Viable Form of Autolytic Debridement in the Wound Bed.

    PubMed

    Applewhite, Andrew Joseph; Attar, Paul; Liden, Brock; Stevenson, Quyen

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this article is to describe the results of a comparative porcine study that evaluated the effectiveness of a gentian violet and methylene blue (GV/MB) polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) antibacterial foam dressing in debriding eschar. The authors performed an in vivo, preclinical study on eschar-covered porcine wounds. Two clinical case studies are also included. Test products, GV/MB antibacterial foam dressing, collagenase ointment, collagenase ointment plus GV/MB antibacterial foam dressing, medical-grade honey, and moist gauze dressing (control), were applied to porcine wounds using a split-back study design. The percent of eschar removal and wound closure were measured and recorded at time points up to 14 days. Statistically significant reduction in eschar was observed with GV/MB dressing and with GV/MB dressing with collagenase. By day 14, the wounds with GV/MB dressing alone and GV/MB dressing with collagenase had eschar covering less than 25% of the wound bed area compared with collagenase alone, medical grade honey, or moist gauze control, which showed eschar still covering over 75% of the wound bed area. Autolytic debridement activity of GV/MB foam dressings was evident in the porcine eschar study, as well as in the cases described. PMID:26054993

  20. Efficacy of silver-loaded nanofiber dressings in Candida albicans-contaminated full-skin thickness rat burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Ciloglu, N Sinem; Mert, A Irem; Do?an, Zarife; Demir, Ali; Cevan, Simin; Aksaray, Sebahat; Tercan, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In this experimental study, the effects of nanofiber dressings containing different forms of silver on full-thickness rat burn contaminated with Candida albicans was analyzed. A full-thickness skin burn was formed on a total of 32 Sprague-Dawley rats. After the burn wound was seeded with a 10 colony-forming units/ml standard strain of Candida albicans ATCC90028, the animals were divided into four groups. The effects of topical silver sulfadiazine and two recently designed nanofiber dressings containing nanosilver and silversulfadiazine as active materials were compared with the control group. There was a significant difference in the Candida growth on the burn eschar tissue among the groups. The difference for Candida growth in the burn eschar between the control group and the 1% silver sulfadiazine-containing nanofiber dressing group was statistically significant (P< 0.01). Silver sulfadiazine-containing nanofiber dressing was the most effective agent in the treatment of Candida albicans-contaminated burn wounds. Because of their regenerative potential, silver-loaded nanofiber dressings could be a good alternative for infected burn wounds. PMID:25118002

  1. Effect of discarded keratin-based biocomposite hydrogels on the wound healing process in vivo.

    PubMed

    Park, Mira; Shin, Hye Kyoung; Kim, Byoung-Suhk; Kim, Myung Jin; Kim, In-Shik; Park, Byung-Yong; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2015-10-01

    Biocompatible keratin-based hydrogels prepared by electron beam irradiation (EBI) were examined in wound healing. As the EBI dose increased to 60kGy, the tensile strength of the hydrogels increased, while the percentage of elongation of the hydrogels decreased. After 7days, the dehydrated wool-based hydrogels show the highest mechanical properties (the % elongation of 1341 and the tensile strength of 6030g/cm(2) at an EBI dose of 30kGy). Excision wound models were used to evaluate the effects of human hair-based hydrogels and wool-based hydrogels on various phases of healing. On post-wounding days 7 and 14, wounds treated with either human hair-based or wool-based hydrogels were greatly reduced in size compared to wounds that received other treatments, although the hydrocolloid wound dressing-treated wound also showed a pronounced reduction in size compared to an open wound as measured by a histological assay. On the 14th postoperative day, the cellular appearances were similar in the hydrocolloid wound dressing and wool-based hydrogel-treated wounds, and collagen fibers were substituted with fibroblasts and mixed with fibroblasts in the dermis. Furthermore, the wound treated with a human hair-based hydrogel showed almost complete epithelial regeneration, with the maturation of immature connective tissue and hair follicles and formation of a sebaceous gland. PMID:26117742

  2. Management of a Dehisced Hand Wound Using Hydrogen Peroxide, Electrical Stimulation, Silver-containing Dressings, and Compression: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kehua; Krug, Kenneth; Brogan, Michael S

    2015-07-01

    Wound dehiscence is the separation of a wound along surgical sutures. A 57-year-old, otherwise healthy mechanic presented with a large open wound of >1 month duration on his left hand. His wound had dehisced after treatment that involved cleansing, surgical sutures, and oral antibiotics. He presented with a 5.0 cm x 0.7 cm x 0.3 cm lesion through the palmar creases of the hand with edema around the fourth and fifth digits and a callous formation around the distal portion of the wound. The wound had scant serosanguinous drainage and some induration at the periwound area, as well as a moderate foul odor. Tendons were not affected, but function was limited, the hand was painful, and the patient had been unable to work. Treatment was initiated with twice-a-week immersion of the hand in hydrogen peroxide diluted with water subjected to high-voltage pulsed current electric stimulation (HVPC). The wound was dressed with silver-containing dressings secured with stretch gauze and a compression garment. The wound was completely closed after 9 visits (35 days). No functional limitations of the hand or fingers, no cosmetic defect, and no wound recurrence were noted 9 months after healing. Although uncommon, dehisced wounds, especially in certain anatomical locations such as the hand, can be difficult to heal and may cause long-term problems with functioning. The treatment combination facilitated expedient healing of this dehisced hand wound. Research is needed to help elucidate the observations from this case study. PMID:26185974

  3. Electrospun chitosan/sericin composite nanofibers with antibacterial property as potential wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rui; Li, Xiang; Sun, Bolun; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Dawei; Tang, Zhaohui; Chen, Xuesi; Wang, Ce

    2014-07-01

    Chitosan and sericin are natural and low cost biomaterials. Both biomaterials displayed good compatibility to human tissues and antibacterial properties for biomedical application. In this study, we have successfully fabricated chitosan/sericin composite nanofibers by electrospinning. The obtained composite nanofibers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) studies. The composite nanofibers had good morphology with diameter between 240nm and 380nm. In vitro methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays demonstrated that the chitosan/sericin composite nanofibers were biocompatible and could promote the cell proliferation. Furthermore, the composite nanofibers showed good bactericidal activity against both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Thus, the chitosan/sericin composite nanofibers are promising for wound dressing applications. PMID:24769088

  4. Investigation into the potential use of Poly (vinyl alcohol)/Methylglyoxal fibres as antibacterial wound dressing components

    E-print Network

    Bulman, Sophie E L; Tronci, Giuseppe; Russell, Stephen J; Carr, Chris

    2015-01-01

    As problems of antibiotic resistance increase, a continuing need for effective bioactive wound dressings is anticipated for the treatment of infected chronic wounds. Naturally derived antibacterial agents, such as Manuka honey, consist of a mixture of compounds, more than one of which can influence antimicrobial potency. The non-peroxide bacteriostatic properties of Manuka honey have been previously linked to the presence of methylglyoxal (MGO). The incorporation of MGO as a functional antibacterial additive during fibre production was explored as a potential route for manufacturing wound dressing components. Synthetic MGO and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were fabricated into webs of sub-micron fibres by means of electrostatic spinning of an aqueous spinning solution. Composite fabrics were also produced by direct deposition of the PVA-MGO fibres onto a preformed spunbonded nonwoven substrate. Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR) spectros...

  5. Hybrid wound dressings with controlled release of antibiotics: Structure-release profile effects and in vivo study in a guinea pig burn model.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Meital; Egozi, Dana; Shemesh, Maoz; Keren, Aviad; Mazor, Eytan; Baranes-Zeevi, Maya; Goldstein, Nyra; Berdicevsky, Israela; Gilhar, Amos; Ullmann, Yehuda

    2015-08-01

    Over the last decades, wound dressings have evolved from a crude traditional gauze dressing to tissue-engineered scaffolds. Many types of wound dressing formats are commercially available or have been investigated. We developed and studied hybrid bilayer wound dressings which combine a drug-loaded porous poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) top layer with a spongy collagen sublayer. Such a structure is very promising because it combines the advantageous properties of both layers. The antibiotic drug gentamicin was incorporated into the top layer for preventing and/or defeating infections. In this study, we examined the effect of the top layer's structure on the gentamicin release profile and on the resulting in vivo wound healing. The latter was tested on a guinea pig burn model, compared to the neutral non-adherent dressing material Melolin® (Smith & Nephew) and Aquacel® Ag (ConvaTec). The release kinetics of gentamicin from the various studied formulations exhibited burst release values between 8% and 38%, followed by a drug elution rate that decreased with time and lasted for at least 7weeks. The hybrid dressing, with relatively slow gentamicin release, enabled the highest degree of wound healing (28%), which is at least double that obtained by the other dressing formats (8-12%). It resulted in the lowest degree of wound contraction and a relatively low amount of inflammatory cells compared to the controls. This dressing was found to be superior to hybrid wound dressings with fast gentamicin release and to the neat hybrid dressing without drug release. Since this dressing exhibited promising results and does not require frequent bandage changes, it offers a potentially valuable concept for treating large infected burns. PMID:25922303

  6. Non-healing foot ulcers in diabetic patients: general and local interfering conditions and management options with advanced wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Uccioli, Luigi; Izzo, Valentina; Meloni, Marco; Vainieri, Erika; Ruotolo, Valeria; Giurato, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Medical knowledge about wound management has improved as recent studies have investigated the healing process and its biochemical background. Despite this, foot ulcers remain an important clinical problem, often resulting in costly, prolonged treatment. A non-healing ulcer is also a strong risk factor for major amputation. Many factors can interfere with wound healing, including the patient's general health status (i.e., nutritional condition indicated by albumin levels) or drugs such as steroids that can interfere with normal healing. Diabetic complications (i.e., renal insufficiency) may delay healing and account for higher amputation rates observed in diabetic patients under dialysis treatment. Wound environment (e.g., presence of neuropathy, ischaemia, and infection) may significantly influence healing by interfering with the physiological healing cascade and adding local release of factors that may worsen the wound. The timely and well-orchestrated release of factors regulating the healing process, observed in acute wounds, is impaired in non-healing wounds that are blocked in a chronic inflammatory phase without progressing to healing. This chronic phase is characterised by elevated protease activity (EPA) of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and serine proteases (e.g., human neutrophil elastase) that interfere with collagen synthesis, as well as growth factor release and action. EPA (mainly MMP 9, MMP-8 and elastase) and inflammatory factors present in the wound bed (such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNFa) account for the catabolic state of non-healing ulcers. The availability of wound dressings that modulate EPA has added new therapeutic options for treating non-healing ulcers. The literature confirms advantages obtained by reducing protease activity in the wound bed, with better outcomes achieved by using these dressings compared with traditional ones. New technologies also allow a physician to know the status of the wound bed environment, particularly EPA, in a clinical setting. These may be helpful in guiding a clinician's options in treating very difficult-to-heal ulcers. PMID:25853647

  7. 3D Bioprinting of Carboxymethylated-Periodate Oxidized Nanocellulose Constructs for Wound Dressing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gethin, David T.; Syverud, Kristin; Hill, Katja E.; Thomas, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Nanocellulose has a variety of advantages, which make the material most suitable for use in biomedical devices such as wound dressings. The material is strong, allows for production of transparent films, provides a moist wound healing environment, and can form elastic gels with bioresponsive characteristics. In this study, we explore the application of nanocellulose as a bioink for modifying film surfaces by a bioprinting process. Two different nanocelluloses were used, prepared with TEMPO mediated oxidation and a combination of carboxymethylation and periodate oxidation. The combination of carboxymethylation and periodate oxidation produced a homogeneous material with short nanofibrils, having widths <20?nm and lengths <200?nm. The small dimensions of the nanofibrils reduced the viscosity of the nanocellulose, thus yielding a material with good rheological properties for use as a bioink. The nanocellulose bioink was thus used for printing 3D porous structures, which is exemplified in this study. We also demonstrated that both nanocelluloses did not support bacterial growth, which is an interesting property of these novel materials. PMID:26090461

  8. 3D Bioprinting of Carboxymethylated-Periodate Oxidized Nanocellulose Constructs for Wound Dressing Applications.

    PubMed

    Rees, Adam; Powell, Lydia C; Chinga-Carrasco, Gary; Gethin, David T; Syverud, Kristin; Hill, Katja E; Thomas, David W

    2015-01-01

    Nanocellulose has a variety of advantages, which make the material most suitable for use in biomedical devices such as wound dressings. The material is strong, allows for production of transparent films, provides a moist wound healing environment, and can form elastic gels with bioresponsive characteristics. In this study, we explore the application of nanocellulose as a bioink for modifying film surfaces by a bioprinting process. Two different nanocelluloses were used, prepared with TEMPO mediated oxidation and a combination of carboxymethylation and periodate oxidation. The combination of carboxymethylation and periodate oxidation produced a homogeneous material with short nanofibrils, having widths <20?nm and lengths <200?nm. The small dimensions of the nanofibrils reduced the viscosity of the nanocellulose, thus yielding a material with good rheological properties for use as a bioink. The nanocellulose bioink was thus used for printing 3D porous structures, which is exemplified in this study. We also demonstrated that both nanocelluloses did not support bacterial growth, which is an interesting property of these novel materials. PMID:26090461

  9. 2,3-Dihydroxybenzoic Acid-Containing Nanofiber Wound Dressings Inhibit Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ahire, Jayesh J.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms in wounds, which often leads to chronic infections that are difficult to treat with antibiotics. Free iron enhances biofilm formation, delays wound healing, and may even be responsible for persistent inflammation, increased connective tissue destruction, and lipid peroxidation. Exposure of P. aeruginosa Xen 5 to the iron chelator 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), electrospun into a nanofiber blend of poly(d,l-lactide) (PDLLA) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), referred to as DF, for 8 h decreased biofilm formation by approximately 75%. This was shown by a drastic decline in cell numbers, from 7.1 log10 CFU/ml to 4.8 log10 CFU/ml when biofilms were exposed to DF in the presence of 2.0 mM FeCl3 6H2O. A similar decline in cell numbers was recorded in the presence of 3.0 mM FeCl3 6H2O and DF. The cells were more mobile in the presence of DHBA, supporting the observation of less biofilm formation at lower iron concentrations. DHBA at MIC levels (1.5 mg/ml) inhibited the growth of strain Xen 5 for at least 24 h. Our findings indicate that DHBA electrospun into nanofibers inhibits cell growth for at least 4 h, which is equivalent to the time required for all DHBA to diffuse from DF. This is the first indication that DF can be developed into a wound dressing to treat topical infections caused by P. aeruginosa. PMID:24449781

  10. Wound bed preparation 2014 update: management of critical colonization with a gentian violet and methylene blue absorbent antibacterial dressing and elevated levels of matrix metalloproteases with an ovine collagen extracellular matrix dressing.

    PubMed

    Sibbald, R Gary; Ovington, Liza G; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Goodman, Laurie; Elliott, James A

    2014-03-01

    Wound bed preparation (WBP) is a paradigm for holistic patient care that includes treatment of the cause along with patient-centered concerns before optimizing the components of local wound care (debridement, infection/inflammation, moisture balance, and, when required, the edge effect). This review incorporates a methylene blue and gentian violet bound foam dressing for critical colonization and an ovine collagen extracellular matrix dressing for reduction of elevated levels of matrix metalloproteases into the WBP paradigm. PMID:24521847

  11. Occlusive Dressings and the Healing of Standardized Abrasions

    PubMed Central

    Beam, Joel W

    2008-01-01

    Context: Acute skin trauma during sport participation, resulting in partial-thickness abrasions, is common. The limited investigations focusing on the acute wound environment and dressing techniques and the subsequent lack of evidence-based standards complicate clinical wound care decisions. Objective: To examine the effects of occlusive dressings on healing of standardized, partial-thickness abrasions. Design: Controlled, counterbalanced, repeated-measures design. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen healthy women (n ?=? 10) and men (n ?=? 6). Intervention(s): Four standardized, partial-thickness abrasions were inflicted. Film, hydrogel, and hydrocolloid occlusive dressings and no dressing (control) were applied. Participants returned on postwound days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14 for digital imaging. Wound healing time was measured by change in wound contraction (cm2) and change in wound color (chromatic red) and luminance in red, green, and blue color values. Main Outcome Measure(s): Wound contraction, color (chromatic red), and luminance. Results: A day-by-dressing interaction was found for wound contraction, color, and luminance. Post hoc testing indicated that the film and hydrocolloid dressings produced greater wound contraction than the hydrogel and no dressing on days 7 and 10. Film, hydrogel, and hydrocolloid dressings also resulted in greater wound contraction than the control on day 14. Hydrocolloid dressings produced smaller measures of color and greater measures of luminance than no dressing on day 7. Film, hydrogel, and hydrocolloid dressings also resulted in smaller measures of color and greater measures of luminance compared with no dressing on days 10 and 14. Conclusions: When compared with the control (no dressing), the film, hydrogel, and hydrocolloid occlusive dressings were associated with a faster healing rate of partial-thickness abrasions across time measured by wound contraction, color, and luminance. Overall, these data indicate that occlusive dressings were more effective in healing than no dressing was. PMID:19030138

  12. [Patient's comfort during cicatrization and wound protection process due to the use of Nobecutan plastic dressing administered by an aerosol].

    PubMed

    Rubio, Aguilera M; Trigoso, Casero S; Hernández, Núñez M

    2009-11-01

    This report received the 2009 Nobecutan Nursing Prize. Born to Protect. This is a study which proposes to evaluate the comfort level patients perceive when they apply the Nobecutan transparent dressing administered by an aerosol. Dressing composition: plastic composed by a 4% acrylic co-polymer, 42.98% ethyl acetate, Tetramethylthiuram disulfide 0,02% and dimethyl 53%. Characteristics: *Micro-porous, prevents maceration of the skin. *Impervious to water and micro-organisms. *Easy to use as a aerosol which upon spraying an area, forms a thin film which permits transparency over a wound and therefore constant visual control; plus this film prevents allergic reactions. PMID:20069954

  13. Fabrication of a novel poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate)/ nanoscale bioactive glass composite film with potential as a multifunctional wound dressing

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Ranjana; Keshavarz, Tajalli; Roy, Ipsita [Department of Molecular and Applied Biosciences, University of Westminster, London W1W 6UW (United Kingdom); Boccaccini, Aldo R. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen, Nuremberg Cauestr. 6. 91058 (Germany); Knowles, Jonathan C.; Salih, Vehid; Mordon, Nicola [Division of Biomterials and Tissue Engineering, UCL Eastman Dental Institute, London WCIX 8LD (United Kingdom); Locke, Ian C.; Gordge, Michael P. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Lifesciences, University of Westminster, London W1W 6UW (United Kingdom); McCormick, Aine [Haemophilia Reference Centre, St. Thomas' Hospital, Lambeth Palace Road, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-02

    Fabrication of a composite scaffold of nanobioglass (n-BG) 45S5 and poly(3-hydroxyocatnoate), P(3HO) was studied for the first time with the aim of developing a novel, multifunctional wound dressing. The incorporation of n-BG accelerated blood clotting time and its incorporation in the polymer matrix enhanced the wettability, surface roughness and bio-compatibility of the scaffold.

  14. Sericin-carboxymethyl cellulose porous matrices as cellular wound dressing material.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Sunita; Kundu, S C

    2014-06-01

    In this study, porous three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel matrices are fabricated composed of silk cocoon protein sericin of non-mulberry silkworm Antheraea mylitta and carboxymethyl cellulose. The matrices are prepared via freeze-drying technique followed by dual cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and aluminum chloride. The microstructure of the hydrogel matrices is assessed using scanning electron microscopy and biophysical characterization are carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The transforming growth factor ?1 release from the cross-linked matrices as a growth factor is evaluated by immunosorbent assay. Live dead assay and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay show no cytotoxicity of blended matrices toward human keratinocytes. The matrices support the cell attachment and proliferation of human keratinocytes as observed through scanning electron microscope and confocal images. Gelatin zymography demonstrates the low levels of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and insignificant amount of MMP-9 in the culture media of cell seeded matrices. Low inflammatory response of the matrices is indicated through tumor necrosis factor alpha release assay. The results indicate that the fabricated matrices constitute 3D cell-interactive environment for tissue engineering applications and its potential use as a future cellular biological wound dressing material. PMID:23853114

  15. [Preparation and clinical application of polyvinyl alcohol/drug-loaded chitosan microsphere composite wound dressing].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuju; Lin, Zhidan; Chen, Wenbin; Song, Ying; Li, Zhizhong

    2011-04-01

    In order to prepare and apply the polyvinyl alcohol/drug-loaded chitosan microspheres composite wound dressing, we first prepared chitosan microspheres by emulsion cross-linking method, and then added chitosan microspheres into the reactants during the acetalization of polyvinyl alcohol and formaldehyde. We further studied the morphology, water absorption, swelling degree, mechanical properties and in vitro release of the sponge with different amount of chitosan microspheres. The results showed that polyvinyl alcohol/drug-loaded chitosan composite sponge has porous structure with connectionism. Increasing the amount of chitosan microspheres would make the apertures smaller, so that the water absorption and the swelling of sponge decreased, but the tensile strength and compressive strength increased. With the increase of the amount of chitosan microspheres, the drug absorption of cefradine and the release rate increase, and the release time become longer. With the results of toxicity grade of 0 to 1, this type of composite sponge is non-toxic and meets the requirement of biocompatibility. The observation of rabbit nasal cavity after surgical operation suggested that polyvinyl acetal sponge modified with the chitosan has antiphlogistic, hemostatic and non-adherent characteristic, and can promote the healing and recovering of the nasalmucosa. After using this composite material, best growing surroundings for patients' granulation tissue were provided. Exposed bone and tendon were covered well with granulation tissue. PMID:21604506

  16. Mechanical properties and in vitro characterization of polyvinyl alcohol-nano-silver hydrogel wound dressings

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, R. N.; Rouzé, R.; Quilty, B.; Alves, G. G.; Soares, G. D. A.; Thiré, R. M. S. M.; McGuinness, G. B.

    2014-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogels are materials for potential use in burn healing. Silver nanoparticles can be synthesized within PVA hydrogels giving antimicrobial hydrogels. Hydrogels have to be swollen prior to their application, and the common medium available for that in hospitals is saline solution, but the hydrogel could also take up some of the wound's fluid. This work developed gamma-irradiated PVA/nano-Ag hydrogels for potential use in burn dressing applications. Silver nitrate (AgNO3) was used as nano-Ag precursor agent. Saline solution, phosphate-buffered solution (PBS) pH 7.4 and solution pH 4.0 were used as swelling media. Microstructural evaluation revealed an effect of the nanoparticles on PVA crystallization. The swelling of the PVA-Ag samples in solution pH 4.0 was low, as was their silver delivery, compared with the equivalent samples swollen in the other media. The highest swelling and silver delivery were related to samples prepared with 0.50% AgNO3, and they also presented lower strength in PBS pH 7.4 and solution pH 4.0. Both PVA-Ag samples were also non-toxic and presented antimicrobial activity, confirming that 0.25% AgNO3 concentration is sufficient to establish an antimicrobial effect. Both PVA-Ag samples presented suitable mechanical and swelling properties in all media, representative of potential burn site conditions. PMID:24501677

  17. Recent Developments in Topical Wound Therapy: Impact of Antimicrobiological Changes and Rebalancing the Wound Milieu

    PubMed Central

    Erfurt-Berge, Cornelia; Renner, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Wound therapy improves every year by developing new wound treatment options or by advancing already existing wound materials, for example, adding self-releasing analgesic drugs or growth factors to wound dressings, or by binding and inactivating excessive proteases. Also new dressing materials based on silk fibers and enhanced methods to reduce bacterial burden, for example, cold argon plasma, might help to fasten wound healing. PMID:24829919

  18. A novel poly(?-glutamic acid)/silk-sericin hydrogel for wound dressing: Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lu; Yang, Ning; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Li; Tao, Lei; Wei, Yen; Liu, Hui; Luo, Ying

    2015-03-01

    A novel multifunctional poly(?-glutamic acid)/silk sericin (?-PGA/SS) hydrogel has been developed and used as wound dressing. The physical and chemical properties of the ?-PGA/SS gels were systemically investigated. Furthermore, these ?-PGA/SS gels have been found to promote the L929 fibroblast cells proliferate, and in the in vivo study, significant stimulatory effects were also observed on granulation and capillary formation on day 9 in H-2-treated wounds, indicating that this new complex hydrogel could maintain a moist healing environment, protect the wound from bacterial infection, absorb excess exudates, and promote cell proliferation to reconstruct damaged tissue. Considering the simple preparation process and excellent biological property, this ?-PGA/SS hydrogel might have a wide range of applications in biomedical and clinical areas. PMID:25579954

  19. Preliminary characterization of genipin-cross-linked silk sericin/poly(vinyl alcohol) films as two-dimensional wound dressings for the healing of superficial wounds.

    PubMed

    Siritientong, Tippawan; Ratanavaraporn, Juthamas; Srichana, Teerapol; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2013-01-01

    The genipin-cross-linked silk sericin/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) films were developed aiming to be applied as two-dimensional wound dressings for the treatment of superficial wounds. The effects of genipin cross-linking concentration on the physical and biological properties of the films were investigated. The genipin-cross-linked silk sericin/PVA films showed the increased surface density, tensile strength, and percentage of elongation, but decreased percentage of light transmission, water vapor transmission rate, and water swelling, compared to the non-cross-linked films. This explained that the cross-linking bonds between genipin and silk sericin would reduce the mobility of molecular chains within the films, resulting in the more rigid molecular structure. Silk sericin was released from the genipin-cross-linked films in a sustained manner. In addition, either L929 mouse fibroblast or HaCat keratinocyte cells showed high percentage of viability when cultured on the silk sericin/PVA films cross-linked with 0.075 and 0.1%?w/v genipin. The in vivo safety test performed according to ISO 10993-6 confirmed that the genipin-cross-linked silk sericin/PVA films were safe for the medical usages. The efficacy of the films for the treatment of superficial skin wounds will be further investigated in vivo and clinically. The genipin-cross-linked silk sericin/PVA films would be promising choices of two-dimensional wound dressings for the treatment of superficial wounds. PMID:24106722

  20. In situ forming antibacterial dextran blend hydrogel for wound dressing: SAA technology vs. spray drying.

    PubMed

    De Cicco, Felicetta; Reverchon, Ernesto; Adami, Renata; Auriemma, Giulia; Russo, Paola; Calabrese, Elena C; Porta, Amalia; Aquino, Rita P; Del Gaudio, Pasquale

    2014-01-30

    This study focuses on designing microparticulate carriers based on high-mannuronic alginate and amidated pectin blend loaded with gentamicin sulphate able to move rapidly from dry to soft hydrogel. Supercritical assisted atomization was used to produce microparticles in form of dry powder and characteristics were compared with those obtained by spray-drying. Particles with very high encapsulation efficiency (approximately 100%) and small diameter (less than 2 ?m) showed good flowability and high fluid uptake enabling wound site filling and limiting bacterial proliferation. Moisture transmission of the in situ formed hydrogel was about 95 g/m(2)h, ideal to avoid wound dehydration or occlusion phenomena. All formulations presented a burst effect, suitable to prevent infection spreading at the beginning of the therapy, followed by prolonged release (4-10 days) related to drug/polymers ratio. Antimicrobial tests showed stronger effect than pure GS over time (up-to 24 days) and the ability to degrade preformed biofilms, essential to properly treat infected wounds. PMID:24299894

  1. Evaluation of human amniotic membrane as a wound dressing for split-thickness skin-graft donor sites.

    PubMed

    Loeffelbein, Denys J; Rohleder, Nils H; Eddicks, Matthias; Baumann, Claudia M; Stoeckelhuber, Mechthild; Wolff, Klaus-D; Drecoll, Enken; Steinstraesser, Lars; Hennerbichler, Simone; Kesting, Marco R

    2014-01-01

    Human amniotic membrane (HAM) has been used as a biomaterial in various surgical procedures and exceeds some qualities of common materials. We evaluated HAM as wound dressing for split-thickness skin-graft (STSG) donor sites in a swine model (Part A) and a clinical trial (Part B). Part A: STSG donor sites in 4 piglets were treated with HAM or a clinically used conventional polyurethane (PU) foil (n = 8 each). Biopsies were taken on days 5, 7, 10, 20, 40, and 60 and investigated immunohistochemically for alpha-smooth muscle actin (?SMA: wound contraction marker), von Willebrand factor (vWF: angiogenesis), Ki-67 (cell proliferation), and laminin (basement membrane integrity). Part B: STSG donor sites in 45 adult patients (16 female/29 male) were treated with HAM covered by PU foam, solely by PU foam, or PU foil/paraffin gauze (n = 15 each). Part A revealed no difference in the rate of wound closure between groups. HAM showed improved esthetic results and inhibitory effects on cicatrization. Angioneogenesis was reduced, and basement membrane formation was accelerated in HAM group. Part B: no difference in re-epithelialization/infection rate was found. HAM caused less ichor exudation and less pruritus. HAM has no relevant advantage over conventional dressings but might be a cost-effective alternative. PMID:25003117

  2. Advantages of collagen based biological dressings in the management of superficial and superficial partial thickness burns in children.

    PubMed

    Mathangi Ramakrishnan, K; Babu, M; Mathivanan; Jayaraman, V; Shankar, J

    2013-06-30

    Collagen based dressings for acute burn wound management have been extensively used in India, particularly in the city of Chennai. Due to the high levels of humidity in our city, closed dressings become infected and treatment with topical antimicrobials, like Silver Sulfadiazine cream, quickly become desiccated. Collagen membrane dressings were manufactured by the biomaterial laboratory of the Central Leather Research Institute (CLRI), Government of India in Chennai, and then the process was patented. Collagen was extracted from bovine skin and Achilles tendons, and then reconstituted. This was used on burn wounds as dressings after clearance from the Institutional Review Board and Ethics Committees of the Hospital and CLRI. Continued research in this field to enable resulted in the design of silver sulphadiazine loaded alginate microspheres which were embedded in the reconstituted collagen. Controlled delivery of silver sulphadiazine. This collagen membrane was used in chronic infected burns. Low molecular weight heparin was given subcutaneously to improve wound healing in burn injuries and collagen membrane dressings were also applied. After several trials the process technology was patented. The advantages and disadvantages of the collagen membrane cover is elaborated in a group of 487 pediatric burn patients. The trial was conducted at the burn unit of Kanchi Kamakoti Childs Trust Hospital (KKCTH) in Chennai, India. PMID:24133405

  3. Development and characterization of a novel, antimicrobial, sterile hydrogel dressing for burn wounds: single-step production with gamma irradiation creates silver nanoparticles and radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Boonkaew, Benjawan; Barber, Philip M; Rengpipat, Sirirat; Supaphol, Pitt; Kempf, Margit; He, Jibao; John, Vijay T; Cuttle, Leila

    2014-10-01

    Patients with burn wounds are susceptible to wound infection and sepsis. This research introduces a novel burn wound dressing that contains silver nanoparticles (SNPs) to treat infection in a 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid sodium salt (AMPS-Na(+) ) hydrogel. Silver nitrate was dissolved in AMPS-Na(+) solution and then exposed to gamma irradiation to form SNP-infused hydrogels. The gamma irradiation results in a cross-linked polymeric network of sterile hydrogel dressing and a reduction of silver ions to form SNPs infused in the hydrogel in a one-step process. About 80% of the total silver was released from the hydrogels after 72 h immersion in simulated body fluid solution; therefore, they could be used on wounds for up to 3 days. All the hydrogels were found to be nontoxic to normal human dermal fibroblast cells. The silver-loaded hydrogels had good inhibitory action against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Results from a pilot study on a porcine burn model showed that the 5-mM silver hydrogel was efficient at preventing bacterial colonization of wounds, and the results were comparable to the commercially available silver dressings (Acticoat(TM) , PolyMem Silver(®) ). These results support its use as a potential burn wound dressing. PMID:25079080

  4. Comparative study of the microvascular blood flow in the intestinal wall, wound contraction and fluid evacuation during negative pressure wound therapy in laparostomy using the V.A.C. abdominal dressing and the ABThera open abdomen negative pressure therapy system.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin; Hlebowicz, Joanna; Ingemansson, Richard

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to compare the changes in microvascular blood flow in the small intestinal wall, wound contraction and fluid evacuation, using the established V.A.C. abdominal dressing (VAC dressing) and a new abdominal dressing, the ABThera open abdomen negative pressure therapy system (ABThera dressing), in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Midline incisions were made in 12 pigs that were subjected to treatment with NPWT using the VAC or ABThera dressing. The microvascular blood flow in the intestinal wall was measured before and after the application of topical negative pressures of ?50, ?75 and ?125mmHg using laser Doppler velocimetry. Wound contraction and fluid evacuation were also measured. Baseline blood flow was defined as 100% in all settings. The blood flow was significantly reduced to 64·6±6·7% (P <0·05) after the application of ?50mmHg using the VAC dressing, and to 65·3±9·6% (P <0·05) after the application of ?50mmHg using the ABThera dressing. The blood flow was significantly reduced to 39·6±6·7% (P <0·05) after the application of ?125mmHg using VAC and to 40·5±6·2% (P <0·05) after the application of ?125mmHg using ABThera. No significant difference in reduction in blood flow could be observed between the two groups. The ABThera system afforded significantly better fluid evacuation from the wound, better drainage of the abdomen and better wound contraction than the VAC dressing. PMID:23517436

  5. Mechanical and biocompatible characterization of a cross-linked collagen-hyaluronic acid wound dressing

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, James F; Ritter, Gregg; Finger, Isaac; Sankar, Dhyana; Reddy, Joseph D; Talton, James D; Nataraj, Chandra; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Cobb, Ronald R

    2013-01-01

    Collagen scaffolds have been widely employed as a dermal equivalent to induce fibroblast infiltrations and dermal regeneration in the treatment of chronic wounds and diabetic foot ulcers. Cross-linking methods have been developed to address the disadvantages of the rapid degradation associated with collagen-based scaffolds. To eliminate the potential drawbacks associated with glutaraldehyde cross-linking, methods using a water soluble carbodiimide have been developed. In the present study, the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) hyaluronic acid (HA), was covalently attached to an equine tendon derived collagen scaffold using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) to create ntSPONGE™. The HA was shown to be homogeneously distributed throughout the collagen matrix. In vitro analyses of the scaffold indicated that the cross-linking enhanced the biological stability by decreasing the enzymatic degradation and increasing the thermal denaturation temperature. The material was shown to support the attachment and proliferation of mouse L929 fibroblast cells. In addition, the cross-linking decreased the resorption rate of the collagen as measured in an intramuscular implant model in rabbits. The material was also shown to be biocompatible in a variety of in vitro and in vivo assays. These results indicate that this cross-linked collagen-HA scaffold, ntSPONGE™, has the potential for use in chronic wound healing. PMID:23896569

  6. Management of split-thickness donor sites with synthetic wound dressings: results of a comparative clinical study.

    PubMed

    Markl, Peter; Prantl, Lukas; Schreml, Stephan; Babilas, Philipp; Landthaler, Michael; Schwarze, Hardy

    2010-11-01

    This prospective, randomized, single-blinded, clinical study aimed at evaluating 3 different synthetic wound dressings for treating split-thickness skin graft donor sites. Seventy-seven patients were randomly assigned to 3 study groups: Suprathel, Biatain-Ibu, Mepitel. Wounds were inspected daily until complete reepithelization. Ease of care, treatment costs, and scar development after a 6 months follow-up were evaluated. Suprathel showed significant (P ? 0.001) pain reduction after 24 hours but increasing pain scores on the 5th day of treatment. Biatain-Ibu showed significant pain relief immediately after application and during the entire treatment period (P < 0.05). Mepitel did not show any significant pain reduction. No differences were seen with regard to healing time, quality of reepithelization, and scar development. Biatain-Ibu had the lowest overall treatment costs (P ? 0.001). The investigated materials did not differ with regard to quality and acceleration of the healing process, but Biatain-Ibu seems to be the most appropriate dressing material in terms of cost-effectiveness. PMID:20841998

  7. A bilayer composite composed of TiO2-incorporated electrospun chitosan membrane and human extracellular matrix sheet as a wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Woo, Chang Hee; Choi, Young Chan; Choi, Ji Suk; Lee, Hee Young; Cho, Yong Woo

    2015-09-01

    We designed bilayer composites composed of an upper layer of titanium dioxide (TiO2)-incorporated chitosan membrane and a sub-layer of human adipose-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) sheet as a wound dressing for full-thickness wound healing. The dense and fibrous top layer, which aims to protect the wound from bacterial infection, was prepared by electrospinning of chitosan solution followed by immersion in TiO2 solution. The sponge-like sub-layer, which aims to promote new tissue regeneration, was prepared with acellular ECM derived from human adipose tissue. Using a modified drop plate method, there was a 33.9 and 69.6% reduction in viable Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus on the bilayer composite, respectively. In an in vivo experiment using rats, the bilayer composites exhibited good biocompatibility and provided proper physicochemical and compositional cues at the wound site. Changes in wound size and histological examination of full-thickness wounds showed that the bilayer composites induced faster regeneration of granulation tissue and epidermis with less scar formation, than control wounds. Overall results suggest that the TiO2-incorporated chitosan/ECM bilayer composite can be a suitable candidate as a wound dressing, with an excellent inhibition of bacterial penetration and wound healing acceleration effects. PMID:26096447

  8. Efficacy of papain-based wound cleanser in promoting wound regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ajlia, S A S H; Majid, F A A; Suvik, A; Effendy, M A W; Nouri, H Serati

    2010-06-15

    A new invention, papain-based wound cleanser is formulated by incorporating papain, a proteolytic enzyme extracted from Carica papaya into the formulation. This cleanser is invented to simplify the methods in wound management by combining wound cleansing and wound debridement using a single formulation. This study describes the preparation and preclinical study of papain-based wound cleanser in accelerating wound healing. In this study, papain-based wound cleanser was used to treat wound incision on Sprague-Dawley rats while distilled water and Betadine were used as negative and positive control. Twenty-seven clinically healthy white rats were randomly divided into three groups and treated accordingly until the 21st day post-incision. Wound reduction rates and histological analysis were obtained to asses the healing pattern. Rats treated with papain-based wound cleanser showed a progressive wound healing based on the wound reduction rates and histological analysis when compared with rats treated with distilled water and Betadine. Better collagen deposition and presence of skin organelles in rats treated with papain-based wound cleanser demonstrated its efficacy in promoting wound healing. In addition to its wound healing effect, papain-based wound cleanser is also integrated with antibacterial properties which make it a complete package for wound management. However, further studies should be carried out to ensure its safety for human usage. PMID:21061910

  9. Biocompatibility Evaluation of a New Hydrogel Dressing Based on Polyvinylpyrrolidone/Polyethylene Glycol

    PubMed Central

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Roveimiab, Ziba; Shahhosseini, Gholamreza; Khataminezhad, Mohammadreza; Zafari, Mandana; Majdi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The composition of the dressings is based on polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and agar. The electron beam irradiation technique has been used to prepare hydrogel wound dressings. The in vitro biocompatibility of the hydrogel was investigated by check samples (hydrocolloid Comfeel), antibacterial test (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia Coli k12), anti fungal test (Candida Albicans) and cytotoxicity test (Fibroblast L929). Results have shown cell attachment characteristics and nontoxicity of all samples. Antibacterial testing also showed that the antibacterial effect of the hydrogel sample to the check sample increased to 30%. Also, investigation of antifungal analysis did not show any trace of fungi growth on the surface of the hydrogel, whereas antifungal effect did not observe on the surface of the check sample. Finally, this hydrogel sample showed a good in vitro biocompatibility. PMID:21860588

  10. Combining xanthan and chitosan membranes to multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells as bioactive dressings for dermo-epidermal wounds.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Márcia Z; Caliari-Oliveira, Carolina; Mizukami, Amanda; Swiech, Kamilla; Covas, Dimas T; Donadi, Eduardo A; Oliva-Neto, Pedro; Moraes, Ângela M

    2015-03-01

    The association between tridimensional scaffolds to cells of interest has provided excellent perspectives for obtaining viable complex tissues in vitro, such as skin, resulting in impressive advances in the field of tissue engineering applied to regenerative therapies. The use of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the treatment of dermo-epidermal wounds is particularly promising due to several relevant properties of these cells, such as high capacity of proliferation in culture, potential of differentiation in multiple skin cell types, important paracrine and immunomodulatory effects, among others. Membranes of chitosan complexed with xanthan may be potentially useful as scaffolds for multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells, given that they present suitable physico-chemical characteristics and have adequate tridimensional structure for the adhesion, growth, and maintenance of cell function. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to assess the applicability of bioactive dressings associating dense and porous chitosan-xanthan membranes to multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for the treatment of skin wounds. The membranes showed to be non-mutagenic and allowed efficient adhesion and proliferation of the mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro. In vivo assays performed with mesenchymal stromal cells grown on the surface of the dense membranes showed acceleration of wound healing in Wistar rats, thus indicating that the use of this cell-scaffold association for tissue engineering purposes is feasible and attractive. PMID:25281644

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PS3 and Citrobacter freundii Strain SA79 Obtained from a Wound Dressing-Associated Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Sirwan; Rout, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    Two isolates, one from the genus Pseudomonas and the second from Citrobacter, were isolated from a wound dressing-associated biofilm. Following whole-genome sequencing, the two isolates presented genes encoding for resistance to antibiotics and those involved in exopolysaccharide production. PMID:26044421

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PS3 and Citrobacter freundii Strain SA79 Obtained from a Wound Dressing-Associated Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Sirwan; Rout, Simon P; Humphreys, Paul N

    2015-01-01

    Two isolates, one from the genus Pseudomonas and the second from Citrobacter, were isolated from a wound dressing-associated biofilm. Following whole-genome sequencing, the two isolates presented genes encoding for resistance to antibiotics and those involved in exopolysaccharide production. PMID:26044421

  13. All-natural composite wound dressing films of essential oils encapsulated in sodium alginate with antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis; Rizzello, Loris; Scurr, David J; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Bayer, Ilker S; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2014-03-25

    We present natural polymeric composite films made of essential oils (EOs) dispersed in sodium alginate (NaAlg) matrix, with remarkable anti-microbial and anti-fungal properties. Namely, elicriso italic, chamomile blue, cinnamon, lavender, tea tree, peppermint, eucalyptus, lemongrass and lemon oils were encapsulated in the films as potential active substances. Glycerol was used to induce plasticity and surfactants were added to improve the dispersion of EOs in the NaAlg matrix. The topography, chemical composition, mechanical properties, and humidity resistance of the films are presented analytically. Antimicrobial tests were conducted on films containing different percentages of EOs against Escherichia coli bacteria and Candida albicans fungi, and the films were characterized as effective or not. Such diverse types of essential oil-fortified alginate films can find many applications mainly as disposable wound dressings but also in food packaging, medical device protection and disinfection, and indoor air quality improvement materials, to name a few. PMID:24211443

  14. Composite electrospun nanomembranes of fish scale collagen peptides/chito-oligosaccharides: antibacterial properties and potential for wound dressing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Chen-lu; Zhang, Qun; Li, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the antibacterial properties and the biocompatibility of composite electrospun nanofibrous membranes (NFMs) with low-molecular-weight fish scale collagen peptides (FSCP) and chito-oligosaccharide (COS), to determine their potential for use as wound dressings. Methods: Low-molecular-weight FSCP were combined with COS to prepare nanofibers by electrospinning, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was used for enhancing fiber-forming ability. Transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope methods were used to observe bacterial adhesion and the bacterial cell membrane. Fibroblast cell viability was determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Results: The best FSCP/COS mass ratio for electrospinning was 2:1, and the nanofibers had small dimensions ranging from 50 to 100 nm. The NFM showed good antibacterial activities against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. The antibacterial activity against S. aureus was higher than against E. coli. The pili and adhesive fimbriae of E. coli promoted bacterial adhesion to the NFM surfaces, and S. aureus biofilms aided S. aureus adhesion on the surface of NFMs. Damage to the bacterial cell membrane indicates that the NFMs could lead to the release of intracellular materials, particularly with S. aureus. In addition, FSCP/COS NFM rapidly increased the permeability of the outer membranes of E. coli. The electrospun NFM with FSCP and COS had good biocompatibility in vitro and supported proliferation of human skin fibroblasts. Conclusion: FSCP are superior to mammalian collagen, and have feasibility and potency for wound dressings. FSCP/COS NFMs had good anti-bactericidal activity that improved with increased COS, and showed good biocompatibility in vitro and supported the proliferation of fibroblasts. PMID:21556341

  15. Use of wound dressings to enhance prevention of pressure ulcers caused by medical devices.

    PubMed

    Black, Joyce; Alves, Paulo; Brindle, Christopher Tod; Dealey, Carol; Santamaria, Nick; Call, Evan; Clark, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Medical device related pressure ulcers (MDR PUs) are defined as pressure injuries associated with the use of devices applied for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes wherein the PU that develops has the same configuration as the device. Many institutions have reduced the incidence of traditional PUs (sacral, buttock and heel) and therefore the significance of MDR PU has become more apparent. The highest risk of MDR PU has been reported to be patients with impaired sensory perception, such as neuropathy, and an impaired ability for the patient to communicate discomfort, for example, oral intubation, language barriers, unconsciousness or non-verbal state. Patients in critical care units typify the high-risk patient and they often require more devices for monitoring and therapeutic purposes. An expert panel met to review the evidence on the prevention of MDR PUs and arrived at these conclusions: (i) consider applying dressings that demonstrate pressure redistribution and absorb moisture from body areas in contact with medical devices, tubing and fixators, (ii) in addition to dressings applied beneath medical devices, continue to lift and/or move the medical device to examine the skin beneath it and reposition for pressure relief and (iii) when simple repositioning does not relieve pressure, it is important not to create more pressure by placing dressings beneath tight devices. PMID:23809279

  16. Development of lamellar gel phase emulsion containing marigold oil (Calendula officinalis) as a potential modern wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Okuma, C H; Andrade, T A M; Caetano, G F; Finci, L I; Maciel, N R; Topan, J F; Cefali, L C; Polizello, A C M; Carlo, T; Rogerio, A P; Spadaro, A C C; Isaac, V L B; Frade, M A C; Rocha-Filho, P A

    2015-04-25

    Appropriate therapeutics for wound treatments can be achieved by studying the pathophysiology of tissue repair. Here we develop formulations of lamellar gel phase (LGP) emulsions containing marigold (Calendula officinalis) oil, evaluating their stability and activity on experimental wound healing in rats. LGP emulsions were developed and evaluated based on a phase ternary diagram to select the best LGP emulsion, having a good amount of anisotropic structure and stability. The selected LGP formulation was analyzed according to the intrinsic and accelerated physical stability at different temperatures. In addition, in vitro and in vivo studies were carried out on wound healing rats as a model. The LGP emulsion (15.0% marigold oil; 10.0% of blend surfactants and 75.0% of purified water [w/w/w]) demonstrated good stability and high viscosity, suggesting longer contact of the formulation with the wound. No cytotoxic activity (50-1000 ?g/mL) was observed in marigold oil. In the wound healing rat model, the LGP (15 mg/mL) showed an increase in the leukocyte recruitment to the wound at least on days 2 and 7, but reduced leukocyte recruitment after 14 and 21 days, as compared to the control. Additionally, collagen production was reduced in the LGP emulsion on days 2 and 7 and further accelerated the process of re-epithelialization of the wound itself. The methodology utilized in the present study has produced a potentially useful formulation for a stable LGP emulsion-containing marigold, which was able to improve the wound healing process. PMID:25684193

  17. Wound care in venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mosti, G

    2013-03-01

    Wound dressings: ulcer dressings should create and maintain a moist environment on the ulcer surface. It has been shown that in an ulcer with a hard crust and desiccated bed, the healing process is significantly slowed and sometimes completely blocked so favouring infection, inflammation and pain. In contrast a moist environment promotes autolytic debridement, angiogenesis and the more rapid formation of granulation tissue, favours keratinocytes migration and accelerates healing of wounds. Apart from these common characteristics, wound dressings are completely different in other aspects and must be used according to the ulcer stage. In necrotic ulcers, autolytic debridement by means of hydrogel and hydrocolloids or with enzymatic paste is preferred. In case of largely exuding wounds alginate or hydrofibre are indicated. When bleeding occurs alginate is indicated due to its haemostatic power. Where ulcers are covered by granulation tissue, polyurethane foams are preferred. When infection coexists antiseptics are necessary: dressing containing silver or iodine with large antibacterial spectrum have proved to be very effective. In the epithelization stage polyurethane films or membranes, thin hydrocolloids or collagen based dressings are very useful to favour advancement of the healing wound edge. Despite these considerations, a Cochrane review failed to find advantages for any dressing type compared with low-adherent dressings applied beneath compression. Surgical debridement and grafting of wounds, negative wound pressure treatment: surgical and hydrosurgical debridement are indicated in large, necrotic and infected wounds as these treatments are able to get rid of necrotic, infected tissue very quickly in a single surgical session, thereby significantly accelerating wound bed preparation and healing time. Negative wound pressure treatment creating a negative pressure on ulcer bed is able to favour granulation tissue and shorten healing time. In case of hard-to-heal leg ulcers such as large, deep, infected and long-lasting venous ulcers, sharp debridement and skin grafting may favour and shorten ulcer healing. PMID:23482540

  18. Electrospun antibacterial polyurethane-cellulose acetate-zein composite mats for wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Unnithan, Afeesh Rajan; Gnanasekaran, Gopalsamy; Sathishkumar, Yesupatham; Lee, Yang Soo; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2014-02-15

    In this study, an antibacterial electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds with diameters around 400-700 nm were prepared by physically blending polyurethane (PU) with two biopolymers such as cellulose acetate (CA) and zein. Here, PU was used as the foundation polymer, was blended with CA and zein to achieve desirable properties such as better hydrophilicity, excellent cell attachment, proliferation and blood clotting ability. To prevent common clinical infections, an antimicrobial agent, streptomycin sulfate was incorporated into the electrospun fibers and its antimicrobial ability against the gram negative and gram positive bacteria were examined. The interaction between fibroblasts and the PU-CA and PU-CA-zein-drug scaffolds such as viability, proliferation, and attachment were characterized. PU-CA-zein-drug composite nanoscaffold showed enhanced blood clotting ability in comparison with pristine PU nanofibers. The presence of CA and zein in the nanofiber membrane improved its hydrophilicity, bioactivity and created a moist environment for the wound, which can accelerate wound recovery. PMID:24507360

  19. A randomized, controlled, double-blind prospective trial with a Lipido-Colloid Technology-Nano-OligoSaccharide Factor wound dressing in the local management of venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Meaume, Sylvie; Truchetet, François; Cambazard, Frédéric; Lok, Catherine; Debure, Clélia; Dalac, Sophie; Lazareth, Isabelle; Sigal, Michèle-Léa; Sauvadet, Anne; Bohbot, Serge; Dompmartin, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are the most prevalent chronic wounds in western countries with a heavy socioeconomic impact. Compression therapy is the etiologic treatment of VLU but until now no wound dressing has been shown to be more effective than another. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a new dressing in the management of VLU. Adult patients presenting a noninfected VLU and receiving effective compression therapy were enrolled in this randomized, controlled, double-blind trial. The VLUs were assessed every 2 weeks for 8 weeks. The primary study outcome was the relative Wound Area Reduction (WAR, in %), and the secondary objectives were absolute WAR, healing rate, and percentage of wounds with >40% surface area reduction. One hundred eighty-seven patients were randomly allocated to treatment groups. Median WAR was 58.3% in the Lipido-Colloid Technology-Nano-OligoSaccharide Factor (TLC-NOSF) dressing group (test group) and 31.6% in the TLC dressing group (control group) (difference: -26.7%; 95% confidence interval: -38.3 to -15.1%; p = 0.002). All other efficacy outcomes were also significant in favor of the TLC-NOSF dressing group. Clinical outcomes for patients treated with the new dressing are superior to those patients treated with the TLC dressing (without NOSF compound), suggesting a strong promotion of the VLU healing process. PMID:22681551

  20. A multicentre clinical evaluation of Cuticell Contact silicone wound contact layer in daily practice.

    PubMed

    Suess-Burghart, Anja; Zomer, Karin; Schwanke, Dorte

    2015-06-01

    Objective To evaluate clinically the performance of Cuticell Contact, a silicone-based primary contact wound dressing. Background Primary contact dressings that allow removal of exudate while protecting the wound bed during dressing changes are a key tool in wound management. Silicone dressings are of particular interest owing to their excellent conformability, pain-free dressing changes, and low toxicity. Cuticell Contact is a silicone-based wound dressing thought to provide these desirable benefits. Method In this evaluation, 38 patients with 40 wounds of a variety of aetiologies and anatomical locations managed with Cuticell Contact and secondary dressings were observed in 8 centres across Germany and the Netherlands. The observation period ranged from 2-42 days (mean 21 days, median 18 days). At the end of the observation, Cuticell Contact was evaluated for permeability to exudate, nonadherence to the wound bed, pain at dressing change, and overall performance. The condition of the wound bed, wound surface area, and levels of exudate were recorded at baseline, at each dressing change, and at the end of the evaluation, along with the condition of the wound edge and peri-wound skin. Results Wounds managed with Cuticell Contact showed improvement in the wound bed as evidenced by an increase in wounds with complete granulation from 12.5% (n=40) to 26.5% (n=34), and wounds with partial or complete epithelialisation from 35% to 82.4%. Cuticell Contact was assessed at the end of the evaluation as nonadherent to the wound in 91.2% of cases (n=34), and 93.3% of dressing changes (n=104) were deemed pain free. Wound surface area decreased by a mean of 19.9%. Cuticell Contact was rated satisfactory for permeability to wound exudate in 82.4% of responses and overall satisfaction with the dressing performance was also 82.4%. Conclusion Cuticell Contact is a soft silicone dressing that is easy to use, efficacious in supporting wound healing through protecting the wound bed, and facilitates atraumatic dressing changes. PMID:26052993

  1. The effect of a self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffold (peptide) when used as a wound dressing for the treatment of deep second degree burns in rats.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hui; Chen, Liyan; Ye, Zhaoyang; Wang, Songtao; Zhao, Xiaojun

    2009-05-01

    RADARADARADARADA (RADA16-I) peptide, consisting of 16 alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic (also alternating negative and positive charges) amino acids, forms extremely stable beta-pleated sheet structure and then self-assembles into nanofibers to produce high-order interwoven nanofiber scaffold hydrogel. To investigate its therapeutic effects, a burn model of partial thickness-deep dermal injury (the deep second degree burns) was performed at the dorsal skin of female Sprague-Dawley rats with an electrical scalding machine. The wounds treated with either RADA16-I or control materials were carefully examined at morphological, histological and cellular levels. We found that RADA16-I can advance the time of eschar appearance and the time of eschar disappearance both by 3-5 days, and speed up wound contraction by 20-30% compared with contrast groups (chitosan, poly(DL)-lactic acid (PDLA), collagen I and the blank) without obvious edema. Immunohistochemical studies showed that both FGF and EGF were obviously expressed in nascent tissue such as epidermis and glands when wounds were treated with the RADA16-I after injury. When peptide stock solution was diluted from 10 to 0.17 mg/mL, atomic force microscopy (AFM) observation showed that the shape of peptide nanofibers changed from the globular-pieces-clustered filaments with 4.8 +/- 0.38 nm in height, 61.6 +/- 6.10 nm in width and 708 +/- 80.2 nm in length, to general filaments with 1.4 +/- 0.36 nm, 17.5 +/- 1.13 nm and 1108 +/- 184 nm. The nanofiber surface porosity gradually decreased from 49-70% to 12-28%. These characteristics contribute to wound healing by offering an "ideal dressing" moist healing microenvironment and a nanofiber 3D scaffold. These results suggest that the self-assembling peptide might be a promising wound dressing with being simple, effective, and affordable. PMID:18837444

  2. A green salt-leaching technique to produce sericin/PVA/glycerin scaffolds with distinguished characteristics for wound-dressing applications.

    PubMed

    Aramwit, Pornanong; Ratanavaraporn, Juthamas; Ekgasit, Sanong; Tongsakul, Duangta; Bang, Nipaporn

    2015-05-01

    Sericin/PVA/glycerin scaffolds could be fabricated using the freeze-drying technique; they showed good physical and biological properties and can be applied as wound dressings. However, freeze-drying is an energy- and time-consuming process with a high associated cost. In this study, an alternative, solvent-free, energy- and time-saving, low-cost salt-leaching technique is introduced as a green technology to produce sericin/PVA/glycerin scaffolds. We found that sericin/PVA/glycerin scaffolds were successfully fabricated without any crosslinking using a salt-leaching technique. The salt-leached sericin/PVA/glycerin scaffolds had a porous structure with pore interconnectivity. The sericin in the salt-leached scaffolds had a crystallinity that was as high as that of the freeze-dried scaffolds. Compared to the freeze-dried scaffolds with the same composition, the salt-leached sericin/PVA/glycerin scaffolds has larger pores, a lower Young's modulus, and faster rates of biodegradation and sericin release. When cultured with L929 mouse fibroblast cells, a higher number of cells were found in the salt-leached scaffolds. Furthermore, the salt-leached scaffolds were less adhesive to the wound, which would reduce pain upon removal. Therefore, salt-leached sericin/PVA/glycerin scaffolds with distinguished characteristics were introduced as another choice of wound dressing, and their production process was simpler, more energy efficient, and saved time and money compared to the freeze-dried scaffolds. PMID:25175958

  3. Gauze Packing of Open Surgical Wounds: Empirical or Evidence-Based Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Dinah, F; Adhikari, A

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Most surgical wounds are closed primarily, but some are allowed to heal by secondary intention. This usually involves repeated packing and dressing of the raw wound surfaces. Although the long-term care of such wounds has devolved to the care of nurses in the community or out-patient setting, the initial wound dressing or cavity packing is done by the surgeon in the operating theatre. Many surgeons are unaware of the growth of the discipline of wound care, and still use traditional soaked gauze for dressing and packing open surgical wounds and cavities. RESULTS This review summarises the some of the modern alternatives available and the evidence – or the lack of it – for their use in both the acute and chronic setting. PMID:16460637

  4. Use of gauze-based negative pressure wound therapy in a pediatric burn patient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles M. Psoinos; Ronald A. Ignotz; Janice F. Lalikos; Gary Fudem; Paul Savoie; Raymond M. Dunn

    2009-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is described as it is used in the treatment of an infant burn victim. This case highlights the ability and techniques used to maintain an airtight dressing seal in the perirectal region. Use of this dressing type post–skin grafting allowed for 100% graft adhesion and no bacterial contamination despite close proximity to the rectum. Favorable

  5. The clinical effects of hyaluronic acid ester nasal dressing (merogel) on intranasal wound healing after functional endoscopic sinus surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Sean Miller; David L Steward; Thomas A Tami; Michael J Sillars; Allen M Seiden; Mona Shete; Christopher Paskowski; Jeff Welge

    2003-01-01

    ObjectivesWe sought to determine the efficacy of MeroGel, an absorbable hyaluronic acid nasal dressing (HA) in reducing synechia after functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) compared with Merocel, a nonabsorbable packing (NAP) requiring removal.

  6. Electrical Stimulation Technologies for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Luther C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the physiological bases for using exogenously applied electric field (EF) energy to enhance wound healing with conductive electrical stimulation (ES) devices. Approach: To describe the types of electrical currents that have been reported to enhance chronic wound-healing rate and closure. Results: Commercial ES devices that generate direct current (DC), and mono and biphasic pulsed current waveforms represent the principal ES technologies which are reported to enhance wound healing. Innovation: Wafer-thin, disposable ES technologies (wound dressings) that utilize mini or micro-batteries to deliver low-level DC for wound healing and antibacterial wound-treatment purposes are commercially available. Microfluidic wound-healing chips are currently being used with greater accuracy to investigate the EF effects on cellular electrotaxis. Conclusion: Numerous clinical trials described in subsequent sections of this issue have demonstrated that ES used adjunctively with standard wound care (SWC), enhances wound healing rate faster than SWC alone. PMID:24761348

  7. Assessment of the effectiveness of silver-coated dressing, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%), citric acid (3%), and silver sulfadiazine (1%) for topical antibacterial effects against the multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting full-skin thickness burn wounds on rats.

    PubMed

    Yabanoglu, Hakan; Basaran, Ozgur; Aydogan, Cem; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Karakayali, Feza; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four different topical antimicrobial dressings on a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated full-thickness burn wound rat model. A total of 40 adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The control group (group 1), silver sulfadiazine (1%) group 2, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%) group 3, citric acid (3%) group 4, and silver-coated dressing group 5 were compared to assess the antibacterial effects of a daily application to a 30% full-skin thickness burn wound seeded 10 minutes earlier with 10(8) CFU (colony forming unit)/0.5 mL of a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain. Five groups (1 control group and 4 treatment groups) were compared. The administration of third-degree burns to all rats was confirmed based on histopathologic data. The tissue cultures from groups 2 and 5 exhibited significant differences compared to those of the other 3 groups, whereas no significant differences were observed between groups 1, 3, and 4. The effectiveness of the treatments was as follows: 1% silver sulfadiazine > silver-coated dressing > 3% citric acid > 0.5% chlorhexidine acetate > control group. Our results supported the efficacy of topical therapy by silver sulfadiazine and silver-coated dressing on infections caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp. PMID:24229034

  8. Assessment of the Effectiveness of Silver-Coated Dressing, Chlorhexidine Acetate (0.5%), Citric Acid (3%), and Silver Sulfadiazine (1%) for Topical Antibacterial Effects Against the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infecting Full-Skin Thickness Burn Wounds on Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yabanoglu, Hakan; Basaran, Ozgur; Aydogan, Cem; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Karakayali, Feza; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four different topical antimicrobial dressings on a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated full-thickness burn wound rat model. A total of 40 adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The control group (group 1), silver sulfadiazine (1%) group 2, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%) group 3, citric acid (3%) group 4, and silver-coated dressing group 5 were compared to assess the antibacterial effects of a daily application to a 30% full-skin thickness burn wound seeded 10 minutes earlier with 108 CFU (colony forming unit)/0.5 mL of a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain. Five groups (1 control group and 4 treatment groups) were compared. The administration of third-degree burns to all rats was confirmed based on histopathologic data. The tissue cultures from groups 2 and 5 exhibited significant differences compared to those of the other 3 groups, whereas no significant differences were observed between groups 1, 3, and 4. The effectiveness of the treatments was as follows: 1% silver sulfadiazine > silver-coated dressing > 3% citric acid > 0.5% chlorhexidine acetate > control group. Our results supported the efficacy of topical therapy by silver sulfadiazine and silver-coated dressing on infections caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp. PMID:24229034

  9. Surgical Wound Case Studies With the Versatile 1 Wound Vacuum System for Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Penny E. Campbell; Phyllis A. Bonham

    2006-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy consists of a wound dressing, a drainage tube inserted into the dressing, an occlusive trans- parent film, and a connection to a vacuum source that supplies the negative pressure. A new product called the Versatile 1 Wound Vacuum System (BlueSky Medical, La Costa, Calif) is available for negative pressure wound therapy. This article de- scribes the

  10. Wound care centers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... multiple types of dressings as your wound heals. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy Depending on the type of wound, your doctor may recommend hyperbaric oxygen therapy . Oxygen is important for healing. During this treatment, ...

  11. Vitamin E and wound healing: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Rachel

    2014-08-14

    Vitamin E has been demonstrated to modulate cellular signalling, gene expression and affect wounds infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), thus influencing wound healing. This evidence-based review aimed to identify and evaluate current research assessing the properties of vitamin E in relation to wound healing, through its role as an antioxidant and its influence on connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), MRSA and gene transcription. Literature dated from 1996 to 2012, published in English, involving either animals or adult humans with an acute or chronic wound were included. The databases that contained relevant articles were narrowed down to four, and a total of 33 identified studies were included. The literature review revealed that there is a significant dearth of robust studies establishing the effects of vitamin E on wound healing, and further research is clearly warranted. PMID:25124164

  12. Wound healing efficacy of a chitosan-based film-forming gel containing tyrothricin in various rat wound models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Young; Jun, Joon-Ho; Kim, Sang-Joon; Hwang, Kyu-Mok; Choi, Sung Rak; Han, Sang Duk; Son, Mi-Won; Park, Eun-Seok

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the healing effects of a chitosan-based, film-forming gel containing tyrothricin (TYR) in various rat wound models, including burn, abrasion, incision, and excision models. After solidification, the chitosan film layer successfully covered and protected a variety of wounds. Wound size was measured at predetermined timepoints after wound induction, and the effects of the film-forming gel were compared with negative (no treatment) and positive control groups (commercially available sodium fusidate ointment and TYR gel). In burn, abrasion and excision wound models, the film-forming gel enabled significantly better healing from 1 to 6 days after wound induction, compared with the negative control. Importantly, the film-forming gel also enabled significantly better healing compared with the positive control treatments. In the incision wound model, the breaking strength of wound strips from the group treated with the film-forming gel was significantly increased compared with both the negative and positive control groups. Histological studies revealed advanced granulation tissue formation and epithelialization in wounds treated with the film-forming gel. We hypothesize that the superior healing effects of the film-forming gel are due to wound occlusion, conferred by the chitosan film. Our data suggest that this film-forming gel may be useful in treating various wounds, including burn, abrasion, incision and excision wounds. PMID:24715576

  13. Investigating the role of charge on cotton materials designed to intervene in the hemostatic and inflammatory stages of wound healing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent developments in cellulose wound dressings targeted to different stages of wound healing have been based on structural and charge modifications that function to modulate events in the complex inflammatory and haemostatic phases of wound healing. Hemostasis and inflammation comprise two overlap...

  14. The clinical and cost effectiveness of bee honey dressing in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Moghazy; M. E. Shams; O. A. Adly; A. H. Abbas; M. A. El-Badawy; D. M. Elsakka; S. A. Hassan; W. S. Abdelmohsen; O. S. Ali; B. A. Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Honey is known, since antiquity, as an effective wound dressing. Emergence of resistant strains and the financial burden of modern dressings, have revived honey as cost-effective dressing particularly in developing countries. Its suitability for all stages of wound healing suggests its clinical effectiveness in diabetic foot wound infections.Thirty infected diabetic foot wounds were randomly selected from patients presenting to Surgery

  15. Vacuum Assisted Closure- utilization as home based therapy in the management of complex diabetic extremity wounds

    PubMed Central

    Hafeez, Kamran; Haroon-ur-Rashid; Kaim Khani, Ghulam Mustafa; Kumar, Darshan; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Vacuum assisted closure is a reported technique to manage complex wounds. We have utilized this technique by using simple locally available material in the management of our patients on outpatient basis. The objective of this study is to present our experience. Methods: This study was conducted from June 2011 to June 2013 at Dow University Hospital and Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. There were 38 patients managed with vacuum assisted closure. Mean age was 56±7.8 years. Twenty three patients presented with necrotizing fasciitis and 15 patients with gangrene. Lower limbs were involved in majority of the patients. Debridement or amputations were done. Vacuum dressing was changed twice weekly in outpatient department. Wounds were closed secondarily if possible or covered with split thickness skin graft in another admission. Results: All the wounds were successfully granulated at the end of vacuum therapy. Mean hospital stay was 7.5 days. Vacuum dressing was applied for a mean of 20 days. There was reduction in the size of the wound. Thirteen patients underwent secondary closure of the wound under local anesthesia, 18 patients required coverage with split thickness skin graft and 7 patients healed with secondary intention. Conclusion: Vacuum assisted closure appeared to be an effective method to manage complex diabetic wounds requiring sterile wound environment. PMID:25878622

  16. Image-based Dress-up System Jong-Chul Yoon

    E-print Network

    Lee, In-Kwon

    according to user input model and garment image. A previous 3D scanner-based virtual dress-up system has step, our method automatically deforms the garment image corresponding to model's body. In this step, we use the As-Rigid-As-Possible shape manipulation method [8] to deform the garment im- age

  17. Collagen-Based Biomaterials for Wound Healing Sayani Chattopadhyay,1

    E-print Network

    Raines, Ronald T.

    Review Collagen-Based Biomaterials for Wound Healing Sayani Chattopadhyay,1 Ronald T. Raines1,2 1: With its wide distribution in soft and hard connective tissues, collagen is the most abundant of animal pro- teins. In vitro, natural collagen can be formed into highly organized, three-dimensional scaffolds

  18. Negative pressure wound therapy: Evidence-based treatment for complex diabetic foot wounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer J. Suess; Paul J. Kim; John S. Steinberg

    2006-01-01

    Negative pressure therapy is a novel technology used for the promotion of wound healing and has emerged as the standard care\\u000a in the management of problem wounds. Negative pressure wound therapy has been met with rapid clinical success and widespread\\u000a acceptance. The literature is replete with case series, small trials, and noncomparative studies; however, there are few prospective,\\u000a randomized, human

  19. Non-adenine based purines accelerate wound healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shucui Jiang; Caleb C. J. Zavitz; Jian Wang; Amit Saraf; Robert Zielinski; James D. Ramsbottom; Patrizia Ballerini; Iolanda D’Alimonte; Silvia Romano; Gemma Fischione; Ugo Traversa; Eva S. Werstiuk; Michel P. Rathbone

    2006-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex sequence of cellular and molecular processes that involves multiple cell types and biochemical\\u000a mediators. Several growth factors have been identified that regulate tissue repair, including the neurotrophin nerve growth\\u000a factor (NGF). As non-adenine based purines (NABPs) are known to promote cell proliferation and the release of growth factors,\\u000a we investigated whether NABPs had an effect

  20. Effective healing of diabetic skin wounds by using nonviral gene therapy based on minicircle vascular

    E-print Network

    Park, Jong-Sang

    is urgently required for diabetic patients suffering a threat of limb amputations. Various growth factors haveEffective healing of diabetic skin wounds by using nonviral gene therapy based on minicircle subcutaneously into the skin wounds of diabetic mice. Results Actively proliferating cells in wound tissue were

  1. Quantifying the sources of Salmonella on dressed carcasses of pigs based on serovar distribution.

    PubMed

    Smid, J H; van Hoek, A H A M; Aarts, H J M; Havelaar, A H; Heres, L; de Jonge, R; Pielaat, A

    2014-04-01

    Salmonella serotyping data, qualitatively described by van Hoek et al. (2012), were used to quantify potential sources of Salmonella in a Dutch pig slaughterhouse. Statistical tests to compare per-day Salmonella prevalence and serotyping data from multiple points in the chain were used to find transmission pathways. A statistical model based on serotyping data was developed to attribute Salmonella on dressed carcasses to the most likely source. Approximately two-third of dressed carcasses carrying Salmonella on the medial surface had been contaminated by house flora. For carcasses carrying Salmonella on the distal surface, transient Salmonella from incoming pigs was a more important source. The relevance of the different sources of Salmonella varied within and between sampling days. Results were compared to those of another modeling approach, in which Salmonella concentration data from the same samples were used (Smid et al., 2012). They mostly agreed. The approach chosen by an individual slaughterhouse depends on the data that are collected. PMID:24398002

  2. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy – A Review of its Uses in Orthopaedic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Putnis, Sven; Khan, Wasim S; Wong, James M.-L

    2014-01-01

    The use of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) for complex and large wounds has increased in popularity over the past decade. Modern NPWT systems consisting of an open pore foam sponge, adhesive dressing and a vacuum pump producing negative pressure have been used as an adjunct to surgical debridement to treat tissue defects around open fractures and chronic, contaminated wounds. Other uses include supporting skin grafts and protecting wounds at risk of breaking down. This review outlines the current and emerging indications for negative pressure wound therapy in Orthopaedic trauma and the existing preclinical and clinical evidence base for its use. PMID:25067967

  3. An open, prospective, randomized pilot investigation evaluating pain with the use of a soft silicone wound contact layer vs bridal veil and staples on split thickness skin grafts as a primary dressing.

    PubMed

    Patton, Mary Lou; Mullins, Robert Fred; Smith, David; Korentager, Richard

    2013-01-01

    An open, prospective, randomized, pilot investigation was implemented to evaluate the pain, cost-effectiveness, ease of use, tolerance, efficacy, and safety of a soft silicone wound contact layer (Mepitel One) vs Bridal Veil and staples used on split thickness skin grafts in the treatment of deep partial or full-thickness thermal burns. Individuals aged between 18 and 70 years with deep partial or full-thickness thermal burns (1-25% TBSA) were randomized into two groups and treated for 14 days or until greater than 95% graft take was achieved, whichever occurred first. Data were obtained and analyzed on pain experienced before, during, and after dressing removal. Secondary considerations included the overall cost (direct), graft take and healing, the ease of product use, overall experience of the dressing, and adverse events. A total of 43 subjects were recruited. There were no significant differences in burn area profiles within the groups. The pain level during dressing removal was significant between the groups (P = .0118) with the removal of Mepitel One being less painful. The staff costs were lower in the group of patients treated with Mepitel One (P = .0064) as reflected in the shorter time required for dressing removal (P = .0005), with Mepitel One taking on average less than a quarter of the time to remove. There was no significant difference in healing between the two groups, with 99.0% of the Mepitel One group and 93.1% of the Bridal Veil and staples group showing greater than 95% graft take at post-op day 7 (+/-1) (P = .2373). Clinicians reported that the soft silicone dressing was easier to use, more conformable, and demonstrated better ability to stay in place, compared with the Bridal Veil and staples regime. Both treatments were well tolerated, with no serious adverse events in either treatment group. Mepitel One was at least as effective in the treatment of patients as the standard care (Bridal Veil and staples). In addition, the group of patients treated with the soft silicone dressing demonstrated decreased pain and lower costs associated with treatment. PMID:23817002

  4. 150 patient experiences with a soft silicone foam dressing.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Sharon Dawn

    2015-06-24

    Pain, malodour and exudate from acute and chronic wounds can be catastrophic to the patient. Excessive exudate results in significant tissue damage to the wound bed and surrounding skin, reduces quality of life, and often requires costly specialist service input. Effective wound assessment and management including appropriate dressing choice is, therefore, paramount to ensure wound healing can take place in a timely manner. This observational evaluation explores 150 ward-based patients who presented with acute and chronic exuding wounds; it examines and evaluates the proposed benefits of the Cutimed(®) Siltec foam dressing range over a 4-month period in an acute hospital setting. The outcomes of the evaluation were exudate management, maceration reduction, atraumatic application and removal, non-adherence and patient experience. The evaluation highlights not only an overall positive improvement in exudate management and maceration reduction, non-adherence, atraumatic application and removal but also emphasises the importance of a positive patient experience in the wound-care journey. PMID:26110984

  5. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile Nastuta, Andrei; Topala, Ionut; Grigoras, Constantin; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe

    2011-03-01

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  6. Dressed spin of He3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esler, A.; Peng, J. C.; Chandler, D.; Howell, D.; Lamoreaux, S. K.; Liu, C. Y.; Torgerson, J. R.

    2007-11-01

    We report a measurement of dressed spin effects of polarized He3 atoms from a cold atomic source traversing a region of a constant magnetic field B0 and a transverse oscillatory dressing field Bdcos?dt. The observed effects are compared with a numerical simulation using the Bloch equation as well as a calculation based on the dressed atom formalism. An application of the dressed spin of He3 for a proposed neutron electric dipole moment measurement is also discussed.

  7. Hand burn management: minimising pain and trauma at dressing change.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jacky; Mason, Sally

    The aim of wound management in hand burn injuries is to restore function and prevent problem scars, so a key consideration in wound healing is the removal of dressings without causing pain and further trauma as well as preserving function. Conventionally, wound dressings such as paraffin gauze were used for burn injuries, but this led to pain and trauma on removal, as well as drying out. This study looks at the use of Mepitel® One on hand burns; this dressing incorporates all the benefits of Mepitel, however, it only has Safetac technology on the wound contact side, allowing easy handling and application. PMID:24225512

  8. [Useful wound management at home].

    PubMed

    Mizuhara, Akihiro; Taguchi, Akemi; Sato, Mikako; Shindo, Kazuko

    2014-12-01

    In wound care, close observation of the quantity and nature of exudate from a wound, and selection of appropriate dressing and/or medication are crucial. Care should be taken to prevent wounds with excessive exudate from becoming too moist. Furthermore, wound care at home must be easy, which is achievable through the use of readily available materials and medications. 1 ) A wound with little to moderate exudate should be treated using wrap therapy with perforated polyethylene sheets. This therapy can be used to treat pressure ulcers, wounds, wounds with slough, and burns. 2 ) An 18-gauge needle can be used to perforate wounds with little exudate, such as mild pressure ulcers or wounds with slough, and polyurethane film can then be applied. 3 ) Polyurethane film should be applied to blisters, pressure ulcers, or similar skin injuries with little exudate. 4 ) A hydrocolloid dressing should be used on wounds with light exudate. 5 ) An ointment containing steroids should be applied to critically colonized wounds. 6 ) Melolin dressings, Moiskin Pads, or a disposable diaper should be used to manage wounds with heavy exudate. PMID:25595088

  9. Cost-Effective Use of Silver Dressings for the Treatment of Hard-to-Heal Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Jemec, Gregor B. E.; Kerihuel, Jean Charles; Ousey, Karen; Lauemøller, Sanne Lise; Leaper, David John

    2014-01-01

    Aim To estimate the cost-effectiveness of silver dressings using a health economic model based on time-to-wound-healing in hard-to-heal chronic venous leg ulcers (VLUs). Background Chronic venous ulceration affects 1–3% of the adult population and typically has a protracted course of healing, resulting in considerable costs to the healthcare system. The pathogenesis of VLUs includes excessive and prolonged inflammation which is often related to critical colonisation and early infection. The use of silver dressings to control this bioburden and improve wound healing rates remains controversial. Methods A decision tree was constructed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of treatment with silver compared with non-silver dressings for four weeks in a primary care setting. The outcomes: ‘Healed ulcer’, ‘Healing ulcer’ or ‘No improvement’ were developed, reflecting the relative reduction in ulcer area from baseline to four weeks of treatment. A data set from a recent meta-analysis, based on four RCTs, was applied to the model. Results Treatment with silver dressings for an initial four weeks was found to give a total cost saving (£141.57) compared with treatment with non-silver dressings. In addition, patients treated with silver dressings had a faster wound closure compared with those who had been treated with non-silver dressings. Conclusion The use of silver dressings improves healing time and can lead to overall cost savings. These results can be used to guide healthcare decision makers in evaluating the economic aspects of treatment with silver dressings in hard-to-heal chronic VLUs. PMID:24945381

  10. Microstructure, rheological and wound healing properties of collagen-based gel from cuttlefish skin.

    PubMed

    Jridi, Mourad; Bardaa, Sana; Moalla, Dorsaf; Rebaii, Tarak; Souissi, Nabil; Sahnoun, Zouheir; Nasri, Moncef

    2015-06-01

    Collagen-based biomaterials are of the utmost importance for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The aims of the present investigation were to evaluate structural and rheological properties of collagen-based gel obtained from cuttlefish skin, and to investigate its ability to enhance wound healing. Scanning electron microscopy of resulted gel showed a dense fibrillar microstructure with high interconnection network with a smaller pore size. In addition, the rheological characterization of collagen gel showed an excellent reversibility, when subjected to a temperature variation. Moreover, in the wound-healing study, topical application of collagen based gel increased significantly the percentage of wound closure over a period of 12 days, when compared to the untreated and CICAFLORA(®)-treated groups. Wound-healing activity of collagen gel was confirmed by histopathology study. Thus, cuttlefish collagen based gel might be useful as a wound healing agent. PMID:25796451

  11. Wound healing in urology.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment. PMID:25500273

  12. Dressings as an adjunct to pressure ulcer prevention: consensus panel recommendations.

    PubMed

    Black, Joyce; Clark, Michael; Dealey, Carol; Brindle, Christopher T; Alves, Paulo; Santamaria, Nick; Call, Evan

    2015-08-01

    The formulation of recommendations on the use of wound dressings in pressure ulcer prevention was undertaken by a group of experts in pressure ulcer prevention and treatment from Australia, Portugal, UK and USA. After review of literature, they concluded that there is adequate evidence to recommend the use of five-layer silicone bordered dressings (Mepilex Border Sacrum(®) and 3 layer Mepilex Heel(®) dressings by Mölnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden) for pressure ulcer prevention in the sacrum, buttocks and heels in high-risk patients, those in Emergency Department (ED), intensive care unit (ICU) and operating room (OR). Literature on which this recommendation is based includes one prospective randomised control trial, three cohort studies and two case series. Recommendations for dressing use in patients at high risk for pressure injury and shear injury were also provided. PMID:24588955

  13. Structure and characteristics of community-based multidisciplinary wound care teams in Ontario: An environmental scan.

    PubMed

    Abrahamyan, Lusine; Wong, Josephine; Pham, Ba'; Trubiani, Gina; Carcone, Steven; Mitsakakis, Nicholas; Rosen, Laura; Rac, Valeria E; Krahn, Murray

    2015-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team approach is an essential component of evidence-based wound management in the community. The objective of this study was to identify and describe community-based multidisciplinary wound care teams in Ontario. For the study, a working definition of a multidisciplinary wound care team was developed, and a two-phase field evaluation was conducted. In phase I, a systematic survey with three search strategies (environmental scan) was conducted to identify all multidisciplinary wound care teams in Ontario. In phase II, the team leads were surveyed about the service models of the teams. We identified 49 wound care teams in Ontario. The highest ratio of Ontario seniors to wound team within each Ontario health planning region was 82,358:1; the lowest ratio was 14,151:1. Forty-four teams (90%) participated in the survey. The majority of teams existed for at least 5 years, were established as hospital outpatient clinics, and served patients with chronic wounds. Teams were heterogeneous in on-site capacity of specialized diagnostic testing and wound treatment, team size, and patient volume. Seventy-seven percent of teams had members from three or more disciplines. Several teams lacked essential disciplines. More research is needed to identify optimal service models leading to improved patient outcomes. PMID:25421743

  14. A comparative study of silicone net dressing and paraffin gauze dressing in skin-grafted sites.

    PubMed

    Platt, A J; Phipps, A; Judkins, K

    1996-11-01

    This prospective randomized study has compared paraffin gauze dressing (n = 19) with silicone net dressing (Mepitel, n = 19) applied as the first layer to newly grafted burn wounds. At the first postoperative dressing visual analogue pain scores were greater in the paraffin gauze group (mean 4.4) than in the silicone net group (mean 1.4, P < 0.01). All patients in the paraffin gauze group experienced some degree of pain on dressing removal, whereas 53 per cent of patients in the silicone net group experienced no pain. Overall graft take was similar in both groups, (silicone net mean 95.7 per cent; paraffin gauze mean 94.3 per cent). Dressings were harder to remove in the paraffin gauze group as assessed by a simple scoring system (P < 0.001). In conclusion silicone net dressing confers advantages over conventional paraffin gauze, especially in reducing patient discomfort during dressing changes. PMID:8909755

  15. An overview of neonatal and pediatric wound care knowledge and considerations.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona Mylene

    2007-06-01

    Despite significant technological advances in the care of premature neonates and chronically ill children, the knowledge and evidence base for the management of this population's wound care lag far behind its adult counterpart. Updating antiquated care regimens is an uphill battle. This review of the literature seeks to illuminate key anatomical/structural differences in neonatal skin with particular attention paid to percutaneous absorption and tolerance of adhesives. The article also presents anatomically and physiologically based recommendations for the selection of prevention and treatment modalities, including specific dressing types, appropriate dressing change and securement procedures, and pain management. Commonly encountered wound types (epidermal stripping; surgical wounds; extravasation and thermal injuries; chemical burns; pressure ulcers; diaper dermatitis; and wounds secondary to congenital conditions) are discussed. Opportunities for research abound and are considered. PMID:17586871

  16. Longstanding pigmentary changes in paediatric scalds dressed with a non-adherent siliconised dressing.

    PubMed

    Williams, G; Withey, S; Walker, C C

    2001-03-01

    The non-adherent siliconised dressing Mepitel is excellent for burns, especially in children. It provides a moist wound environment, promotes wound healing and is easy and relatively painless to use. However, surgeons should be aware that in black children its use has been associated with pigmentation abnormalities. PMID:11226664

  17. Failure assessment of aluminum liner based filament-wound hybrid riser subjected to internal hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikshit, Vishwesh; Seng, Ong Lin; Maheshwari, Muneesh; Asundi, A.

    2015-03-01

    The present study describes the burst behavior of aluminum liner based prototype filament-wound hybrid riser under internal hydrostatic pressure. The main objective of present study is to developed an internal pressure test rig set-up for filament-wound hybrid riser and investigate the failure modes of filament-wound hybrid riser under internal hydrostatic burst pressure loading. The prototype filament-wound hybrid riser used for burst test consists of an internal aluminum liner and outer composite layer. The carbon-epoxy composites as part of the filament-wound hybrid risers were manufactured with [±55o] lay-up pattern with total composite layer thickness of 1.6 mm using a CNC filament-winding machine. The burst test was monitored by video camera which helps to analyze the failure mechanism of the fractured filament-wound hybrid riser. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor was used to monitor and record the strain changes during burst test of prototype filament-wound hybrid riser. This study shows good improvements in burst strength of filament-wound hybrid riser compared to the monolithic metallic riser. Since, strain measurement using FBG sensors has been testified as a reliable method, we aim to further understand in detail using this technique.

  18. Burn wound: How it differs from other wounds?

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Management of burn injury has always been the domain of burn specialists. Since ancient time, local and systemic remedies have been advised for burn wound dressing and burn scar prevention. Management of burn wound inflicted by the different physical and chemical agents require different regimes which are poles apart from the regimes used for any of the other traumatic wounds. In extensive burn, because of increased capillary permeability, there is extensive loss of plasma leading to shock while whole blood loss is the cause of shock in other acute wounds. Even though the burn wounds are sterile in the beginning in comparison to most of other wounds, yet, the death in extensive burns is mainly because of wound infection and septicemia, because of the immunocompromised status of the burn patients. Eschar and blister are specific for burn wounds requiring a specific treatment protocol. Antimicrobial creams and other dressing agents used for traumatic wounds are ineffective in deep burns with eschar. The subeschar plane harbours the micro-organisms and many of these agents are not able to penetrate the eschar. Even after complete epithelisation of burn wound, remodelling phase is prolonged. It may take years for scar maturation in burns. This article emphasizes on how the pathophysiology, healing and management of a burn wound is different from that of other wounds. PMID:23162236

  19. Mepitel One: a wound contact layer with Safetac technology.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Simon

    This article examines the use of Mepitel One, a wound contact layer that promotes wound healing by using the clinical benefits of Safetac technology. A wide range of clinical evidence shows that dressings with Safetac prevent trauma, minimise wound pain and associated psychological stress, while facilitating undisturbed wound healing. Mepitel One has been developed as a highly transparent wound contact layer with Safetac on the wound contact surface alone; this makes it easy to apply without sticking to gloves, and allows it to be used with a choice of secondary dressings. The dressing can stay in place for up to 14 days and allows examination of the wound without removal. The clinical evidence reviewed here shows that Mepitel One is a versatile option for use on a wide range of wound types to promote undisturbed healing and minimise pain at dressing changes. PMID:23469510

  20. Clinical experiences of using a silver hydroalginate dressing in Austria, Switzerland and Germany.

    PubMed

    Kammerlander, G; Afarideh, R; Baumgartner, A; Berger, M; Fischelmayer, K; Hirschberger, G; Hangler, W; Huber, A; Kramml, M; Locherer, E; Scandella, C; Süss-Burkhard, A; Wipplinger, P

    2008-09-01

    This retrospective study, which involved patients with a range of colonised or infected wounds from 12 central European wound-care centres, found that this dressing combated infection, reduced pain and promoted healing. PMID:18833896

  1. The Evidence-Based Principles of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Trauma & Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    A, Novak; Khan, Wasim S; J, Palmer

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a popular treatment for the management of both acute and chronic wounds. Its use in trauma and orthopedics is diverse and includes the acute traumatic setting as well as chronic troublesome wounds associated with pressure sores and diabetic foot surgery. Efforts have been made to provide an evidence base to guide its use however this has been limited by a lack of good quality evidence. The following review article explores the available evidence and describes future developments for its use in trauma and orthopaedic practice. PMID:25067971

  2. Wound Healing Activity of Topical Application Forms Based on Ayurveda

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Hema Sharma; Mitra, Shankar Kumar; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2011-01-01

    The traditional Indian medicine—Ayurveda, describes various herbs, fats, oils and minerals with anti-aging as well as wound healing properties. With aging, numerous changes occur in skin, including decrease in tissue cell regeneration, decrease in collagen content, loss of skin elasticity and mechanical strength. We prepared five topical anti-aging formulations using cow ghee, flax seed oil, Phyllanthus emblica fruits, Shorea robusta resin, Yashada bhasma as study materials. For preliminary efficacy evaluation of the anti-aging activity we chose excision and incision wound healing animal models and studied the parameters including wound contraction, collagen content and skin breaking strength which in turn is indicative of the tissue cell regeneration capacity, collagenation capacity and mechanical strength of skin. The group treated with the formulations containing Yashada bhasma along with Shorea robusta resin and flax seed oil showed significantly better wound contraction (P?

  3. Metalloproteinases and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Matthew P.; Martins, Vera L.C.; O'Toole, Edel A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are present in both acute and chronic wounds. They play a pivotal role, with their inhibitors, in regulating extracellular matrix degradation and deposition that is essential for wound reepithelialization. The excess protease activity can lead to a chronic nonhealing wound. The timed expression and activation of MMPs in response to wounding are vital for successful wound healing. MMPs are grouped into eight families and display extensive homology within these families. This homology leads in part to the initial failure of MMP inhibitors in clinical trials and the development of alternative methods for modulating the MMP activity. MMP-knockout mouse models display altered wound healing responses, but these are often subtle phenotypic changes indicating the overlapping MMP substrate specificity and inter-MMP compensation. Recent Advances: Recent research has identified several new MMP modulators, including photodynamic therapy, protease-absorbing dressing, microRNA regulation, signaling molecules, and peptides. Critical Issues: Wound healing requires the controlled activity of MMPs at all stages of the wound healing process. The loss of MMP regulation is a characteristic of chronic wounds and contributes to the failure to heal. Future Directions: Further research into how MMPs are regulated should allow the development of novel treatments for wound healing. PMID:25945285

  4. Evaluation of the effect of the structure of bacterial cellulose on full thickness skin wound repair on a microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Wang, Shiwen; Huang, Rong; Huang, Zhuo; Hu, Binfeng; Zheng, Wenfu; Yang, Guang; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a kind of nanobiomaterial for tissue engineering. How the nanoscale structure of BC affects skin wound repair is unexplored. Here, the hierarchical structure of BC films and their different effects on skin wound healing were studied both in vitro and in vivo. The bottom side of the BC film had a larger pore size, and a looser and rougher structure than that of the top side. By using a microfluidics-based in vitro wound healing model, we revealed that the bottom side of the BC film can better promote the migration of cells to facilitate wound healing. Furthermore, the full-thickness skin wounds on Wistar rats demonstrated that, compared with gauze and the top side of the BC film, the wound covered by the bottom side of the BC film showed faster recovery rate and less inflammatory response. The results indicate that the platform based on the microfluidic chip provide a rapid, reliable, and repeatable method for wound dressing screening. As an excellent biomaterial for wound healing, the BC film displays different properties on different sides, which not only provides a method to optimize the biocompatibility of wound dressings but also paves a new way to building heterogeneous BC-based biomaterials for complex tissue engineering. PMID:25629225

  5. Novel peptidoglycan-based diagnostic devices for detection of wound infection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Hasmann; Eva Wehrschuetz-Sigl; Gertraud Kanzler; Ulrike Gewessler; Elisabeth Hulla; Konstantin P. Schneider; Barbara Binder; Michael Schintler; Georg M. Guebitz

    2011-01-01

    Detection of wound infection is based on evaluation of the well-known signs of inflammation like rubor (redness), calor (heat), tumor (swelling), and dolor (pain) by medical doctors and\\/or time-consuming procedures requiring special machinery. There is currently no rapid diagnostic device available for the indication of wound infection, which would especially be helpful in home care of chronic ulcer patients. In

  6. Wound Healing & Management Node Taxonomy 30th September 2011

    E-print Network

    Wound Healing & Management Node Taxonomy ­ 30th September 2011 JBI/AWMA Wound Healing and Management Node Taxonomy Topics for Evidence Summaries and Recommended Practice Category Topic 1. Wound & Management Node Taxonomy ­ 30th September 2011 10. Antiseptic Dressings Cadexomer iodine (IodosorbTM) Wound

  7. Direct procurement of wound management products.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Trevor

    2014-03-01

    This article describes a collaborative project between Bedfordshire Community Health Services and Primary Care Trusts/Clinical Commissioning Groups to improve provision of dressings to nurses for the patients they treat. Commissioners have facilitated a transformational approach and encouraged development of efficient systems of increased cost-effectiveness rather than a transactional approach based on opportunistic cost improvement plans. Reconfiguration to direct procurement from GP prescribing has reduced wastage, released nurse time from processes to spend on clinical contact time with patients, increased efficiency, and reduced prescription workload for GPs, all without adverse effects on expenditure. Establishing a wound care products formulary placed control under the nurses treating patients and facilitated decision-making based on cost-effectiveness in clinical use. Nurses now manage 60% of expenditure in the local community health economy, and this is increasing. Relationships with the dressings manufacturing industry have also changed in a positive, constructive direction. PMID:24642737

  8. Gunshot Wound Contamination with Squirrel Tissue: Wound Care Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Maerz, Porter W.; Falgiani, Tricia B.; Hoelle, Robyn M.

    2014-01-01

    While report of animal bites contaminating wounds is reported commonly, direct wound contamination with squirrel flesh has never been reported in the literature. The patient suffered an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound that drove squirrel flesh and buck shot deep within his right buttock. This case outlines his hospital course and wound treatment. The patient was treated with ten days of broad spectrum antibiotics, extensive debridement of the wound in the operating room, and further treatment of the wound with a vacuum dressing system. While squirrel tissue and buckshot had to be removed from the wound on day six of the hospital stay, the patient remained afebrile without signs or symptoms of systemic illness. PMID:24851187

  9. Simplified Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Pediatric Hand Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kasukurthi, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is commonly used as a bolster for skin grafts. The technique offers the benefit of negative pressure as well as reduced dressing changes. Skin grafting of the hand provides a unique challenge, and currently, the only commercially available NPWT hand dressings are adult-sized, precluding their use in small children. We present our custom NPWT “mitten” technique for use with skin grafts on the pediatric hand. PMID:19562417

  10. Simplified Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Pediatric Hand Wounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rahul Kasukurthi; Gregory H. Borschel

    2010-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is commonly used as a bolster for skin grafts. The technique offers the benefit of\\u000a negative pressure as well as reduced dressing changes. Skin grafting of the hand provides a unique challenge, and currently,\\u000a the only commercially available NPWT hand dressings are adult-sized, precluding their use in small children. We present our\\u000a custom NPWT “mitten”

  11. Factors associated with positive outcomes in 131 patients treated with gauze-based negative pressure wound therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raymond Dunn; Theresa Hurd; P. Chadwick; Julien Cote; John Cockwill; Trevor Mole; Jennifer Smith

    2011-01-01

    Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is commonly used in many surgical specialties to improve wound management and healing outcomes. This study reports the ability of gauze-based NPWT to address several treatment goals commonly defined at the onset of therapy. A prospective, multi-center, non-comparative clinical investigation was carried out using gauze-based NPWT in chronic and acute wounds. 131 patients including traumatic,

  12. A Dendritic Thioester Hydrogel Based on Thiol-Thioester Exchange as a Dissolvable Sealant System for Wound Closure

    PubMed Central

    Ghobril, Cynthia; Charoen, Kristie; Rodriguez, Edward K.; Nazarian, Ara; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    A dissolvable dendritic thioester hydrogel based on thiol-thioester exchange for wound closure is reported. The hydrogel sealant adheres strongly to tissues, closes an ex vivo vein puncture, and withstands high pressures placed on a wound. The hydrogel sealant can be completely washed off upon exposure to thiolates based on thiol-thioester exchange and allow gradual wound re-exposure during definitive surgical care. PMID:24282150

  13. Role of polymeric biomaterials as wound healing agents.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Priyanka; Soni, Sandeep; Mittal, Gaurav; Bhatnagar, Aseem

    2014-09-01

    In uncontrolled hemorrhage, the main cause of death on the battlefield and in accidents, half of the deaths are caused by severe blood loss. Polymeric biomaterials have great potential in the control of severe hemorrhage from trauma, which is the second leading cause of death in the civilian community following central nervous system injuries. The intent of this article is to provide a review on currently available biopolymers used as wound dressing agents and to describe their best use as it relates to the condition and type of the wound (acute, chronic, superficial, and full thickness) and the phases of the wound healing process. These biopolymers are beneficial in tissue engineering as scaffolds, hydrogels, and films. Different types of wound dressings based on biopolymers are available in the market, with various physical, chemical, and biological properties. The use of biopolymers as a hemostatic agent depends on its biocompatibility, biodegradability, nonimmunogenicity, and optimal mechanical property. This review summarizes different biopolymers, their physiological characters, and their use as wound healing agents along with biomedical applications. PMID:25056991

  14. A prospective randomized trial comparing silver sulfadiazine cream with a water-soluble polyantimicrobial gel in partial-thickness burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Black, Jonathan S; Drake, David B

    2015-01-01

    The lipid base of silver sulfadiazine (SSD) makes removal of the product painful for the patient and difficult for the physician to accurately assess particularly in partial-thickness burn injuries. As an alternative, a water-soluble antimicrobial gel is used at the University of Virginia. We present a prospective, randomized comparison of these two therapies using pain with dressing changes and time to perform dressing changes as our primary endpoints. Adult inpatients with partial-thickness burn wounds were randomized to begin therapy with either SSD cream or the water-soluble burn wound gel (BWG), and then therapies were alternated daily. Pain assessments, time to complete dressing care, total narcotic medication administered, and the number of personnel required for dressing changes were recorded. Eight patients were enrolled resulting in 13 pairs (26 points) of data comparison between the two therapies. Four of the eight enrolled patients (50%) refused to continue receiving SSD because of pain associated with dressing changes and voluntarily withdrew from the study. The amount of time to perform dressing changes was an average of 79 nurse-minutes longer for SSD. A 6.08 greater morphine equivalent was delivered to those having BWG removed.A water-soluble polyantimicrobial gel was superior to SSD in the parameters measured as exhibited by our patient dropout rate and differential time to perform dressing care. Limiting the time to perform dressing care will reduce the cumulative pain experience, improve patient satisfaction, and reduce the resources to deliver care. PMID:25730540

  15. Filament wound data base development, revision 1, appendix A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, R. Scott; Braddock, William F.

    1985-01-01

    Data are presented in tabular form for the High Performance Nozzle Increments, Filament Wound Case (FWC) Systems Tunnel Increments, Steel Case Systems Tunnel Increments, FWC Stiffener Rings Increments, Steel Case Stiffener Rings Increments, FWC External Tank (ET) Attach Ring Increments, Steel Case ET Attach Ring Increments, and Data Tape 8. The High Performance Nozzle are also presented in graphical form. The tabular data consist of six-component force and moment coefficients as they vary with angle of attack at a specific Mach number and roll angle. The six coefficients are normal force, pitching moment, side force, yawing moment, axial force, and rolling moment. The graphical data for the High Performance Nozzle Increments consist of a plot of a coefficient increment as a function of angle of attack at a specific Mach number and at a roll angle of 0 deg.

  16. Fournier's Gangrene: Conventional Dressings versus Dressings with Dakin's Solution

    PubMed Central

    Altunoluk, Bülent; Resim, Sefa; Efe, Erkan; Eren, Mustafa; Benlioglu, Can; Kankilic, Nazim; Baykan, Halit

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Fournier's gangrene is a fulminant and destructive inflammation of the scrotum, penis, and perineum. The objective of this study was to compare 2 different approaches to wound management after aggressive surgical debridement. Methods. Data from 14 patients with Fournier's gangrene were retrospectively collected (2005–2011). Once the patients were stabilized following surgery, they were treated with either daily antiseptic (povidone iodine) dressings (group I, n = 6) or dressings with dakin's solution (sodium hypochloride) (group II, n = 8). Results. The mean age of the patients was 68.2 ± 7.8 (55–75) years in group I and 66.9 ± 10.2 (51–79) years in group II. Length of hospital stay was 13 ± 3.5 (7–16) days in group I and 8.9 ± 3.0 (4–12) days in group II (P < 0.05). The number and rate of mortality was 1/6 (16.7%) in group I, and 1/8 (12.5%) in group II. Conclusions. The hospitalization time can be reduced with the use of dakin's solution for the dressings in the treatment of FG. Also, dressings with dakin's solution seems to have favorable effects on morbidity and mortality. Consequently dakin's solution may alter the treatment of this disastrous disease by reducing cost, morbidity and mortality. PMID:22567424

  17. Fournier's Gangrene: Conventional Dressings versus Dressings with Dakin's Solution.

    PubMed

    Altunoluk, Bülent; Resim, Sefa; Efe, Erkan; Eren, Mustafa; Benlioglu, Can; Kankilic, Nazim; Baykan, Halit

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Fournier's gangrene is a fulminant and destructive inflammation of the scrotum, penis, and perineum. The objective of this study was to compare 2 different approaches to wound management after aggressive surgical debridement. Methods. Data from 14 patients with Fournier's gangrene were retrospectively collected (2005-2011). Once the patients were stabilized following surgery, they were treated with either daily antiseptic (povidone iodine) dressings (group I, n = 6) or dressings with dakin's solution (sodium hypochloride) (group II, n = 8). Results. The mean age of the patients was 68.2 ± 7.8 (55-75) years in group I and 66.9 ± 10.2 (51-79) years in group II. Length of hospital stay was 13 ± 3.5 (7-16) days in group I and 8.9 ± 3.0 (4-12) days in group II (P < 0.05). The number and rate of mortality was 1/6 (16.7%) in group I, and 1/8 (12.5%) in group II. Conclusions. The hospitalization time can be reduced with the use of dakin's solution for the dressings in the treatment of FG. Also, dressings with dakin's solution seems to have favorable effects on morbidity and mortality. Consequently dakin's solution may alter the treatment of this disastrous disease by reducing cost, morbidity and mortality. PMID:22567424

  18. Carotid artery-sygmoid sinus fistula: a rare complication of gunshot wound on the base of the cranium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ricardo Vieira Botelho; Paulo Cesar Romero; Rita Valeria Machado Coelho; Emilio Afonso França Fontoura

    1999-01-01

    Vascular lesions without clinical manifestation may occur in cranial-facial wounds produced by bullets that course the base\\u000a of the cranium. This work describes a rare kind of vascular complication in cranial-facial gunshot wound. The authors present\\u000a the case of a patient, the victim of a cranium-maxillary gunshot wound. Carotid angiography revealed a carotid-sygmoid sinus\\u000a fistula that filled the sygmoid and

  19. ???Disaster management, triage-based wound care, and patient safety: reflections on practice following an earthquake.

    PubMed

    Ennis, William J

    2010-11-01

    ??Triage is the process of prioritizing patient care based on need and available resources. Clinicians in wound clinics triage daily because time and resources never seem to be sufficient. The triage concept is taken to an extreme when a disaster strikes--the clinical goal of patient care transforms from the individual patient to providing the greatest good for the greatest number of patients. Situational awareness of system resources is of paramount importance in a disaster. Planning for surge capacity while simultaneously attending to patients who require immediate attention is a must. The recent earthquake in Haiti provided an opportunity to test those skill sets. Scores of clinicians volunteered their time and expertise, elevating wound care to the status of a clinical division. The experience of providing quality wound care despite a myriad of situational limitations suggests that busy wound clinics can learn valuable lessons from the realm of disaster management. The rate of under- and over-triage in wound clinics can be reduced by utilizing commonly collected outcomes and operational data. Patient safety improves when the hierarchy is flattened, communication is open, checklists are used, debriefings are held, and teamwork is encouraged. Reflecting on the working conditions in Haiti, it is clear that patients and clinicians benefit when success is measured by patient outcomes instead of individual accomplishments. PMID:21131698

  20. [Clinical evaluation of hydrocolloidal dressing in 147 patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Mitsugu; Tsukui, H; Ishii, H; Yokoyama, S; Koh, E

    2005-07-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that a moist environment plays an important role in wound healing. Karayahesive, one type of hydrocolloidal dressing, contains natural karaya gum as a hydrophilic gel. We applied hydrocolloidal dressing to operative wounds in 147 patients who underwent cardiovascular surgery from April 2001 through August 2002 to evaluate its clinical usefulness. The dressing was kept on the wounds for 7 days after operation, but was immediately switched to conventional dressing with gauze if there was any problem. A total of 144 patients (98%) had no wound chest infections. Good wound healing was obtained with only 1 dressing, removed 7 days after operation, in 128 patients (87%). In 19 patients (13%), the hydrocolloidal dressing was switched to conventional dressing. In 13 of these patients the hydrocolloidal dressing dissolved naturally or exudation occurred; clinically, there were no local problems; however, 3 patients had infection, 2 had fat necrosis, and 1 had burn injury caused by electrocautery. No patients had skin problems caused by this dressing. We conclude that hydrocolloidal dressing can be used safely and effectively in patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery and reduce the workload of healthcare workers. PMID:16004337

  1. Use of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam for lower extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Andrew N

    2008-01-01

    The use of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by V.A.C.(R) Therapy (KCI, San Antonio, TX) has been a valuable adjunct in the treatment of complex lower-extremity injuries. The use of NPWT/ROCF for lower extremity traumatic wounds is based on mechanical effects on the surrounding tissues, biological effects at the cellular level, and simplification of wound care for nursing personnel. For patients with compartment syndrome, risk of secondary infection and need for skin grafting to achieve soft-tissue coverage may theoretically be reduced. For traumatic wounds, dressing care may be simplified and healing encouraged. For surgical incisions, risk of secondary wound dehiscence and infection may be lowered. PMID:19034161

  2. Chitosan/arginine-chitosan polymer blends for assembly of nanofibrous membranes for wound regeneration.

    PubMed

    Antunes, B P; Moreira, A F; Gaspar, V M; Correia, I J

    2015-10-01

    Frequently, skin is subjected to damaging events, such as deep cuts, burns or ulcers, which may compromise the integrity of this organ. To overcome such lesions, different strategies have been employed. Among them, wound dressings aimed to re-establish skin native properties and decreased patient pain have been pursued for a long time. Herein, an electrospun membrane comprised by deacetylated/arginine modified chitosan (CH-A) was produced to be used as a wound dressing. The obtained results showed that the membrane has a highly hydrophilic and porous three-dimensional nanofibrous network similar to that found in human native extracellular matrix. In vitro data indicate that human fibroblasts adhere and proliferate in contact with membranes, thus corroborating their biocompatibility. This nanofiber-based biomaterial also demonstrated bactericidal activity for two bacterial strains. In vivo application of CH-A nanofibers in full thickness wounds resulted in an improved tissue regeneration and faster wound closure, when compared to non-modified membranes. Such findings support the suitability of using this membrane as a wound dressing in a near future. PMID:26076606

  3. An evaluation of a silicone adhesive shaped heel dressing.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    Tissue breakdown is complex and involves many factors. Pressure ulcer development in the heels is subject to extrinsic factors such as pressure, shear, friction and moisture. The heels are the most common sites for friction and shear damage, which can lead to blistering, skin erosion and tissue breakdown (Grey et al, 2006). To address the issues of wounds that are painful on dressing removal and friable skin, Smith & Nephew has introduced a soft silicone adhesive dressing to its Allevyn dressing range. Silicone does not adhere to wounded areas and can be removed gently without trauma to the periwound area. This paper discusses the findings of a 20-patient multi-site evaluation examining the performance and acceptability of Allevyn Gentle Border Heel dressing in the management of heel wounds. PMID:20335927

  4. The analgesic effect of odour and music upon dressing change.

    PubMed

    Kane, F M A; Brodie, E E; Coull, A; Coyne, L; Howd, A; Milne, A; Niven, C C; Robbins, R

    Vascular wounds may require frequent dressing changes over a long period of time, often involving pain, which may not be adequately controlled with conventional analgesia. Complementary analgesia may be beneficial as an adjunctive therapy. This pilot study presented eight patients with two odour therapies, lavender and lemon, two music therapies, relaxing and preferred music and a control condition, during vascular wound dressing changes. Although the therapies did not reduce the pain intensity during the dressing change there was a significant reduction in pain intensity for the lavender therapy and a reduction in pain intensity for the relaxing music therapy after the dressing change. This supports the use of these complementary therapies, which are inexpensive, easy to administer and have no known side effects, as adjunctive analgesia in this patient population. Earlier administration before dressing change may enhance these effects. Further research is required to ascertain why certain complementary therapies are more effective than others at relieving pain. PMID:15573017

  5. A new silicone rubber dressing used as a temporary dressing before delayed split skin grafting. A prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Dahlstrøm, K K

    1995-12-01

    In cases of split skin grafting after wide local excision of malignant melanoma or other tumours, the graft is often delayed for one or two days to reduce bleeding underneath it. Paraffin gauze and an absorbent dressing may be used as a temporary dressing before the application of the skin graft. Paraffin gauze, however, has the disadvantage that it often adheres to the wound bed making removal time-consuming and causing pain and bleeding. A new, fine-mesh polyamide netting covered with silicone (Mepitel, Mölnlycke) was therefore tested in a randomised prospective study with paraffin gauze as the control. There were significant differences between the two groups in terms of the adherence of the dressing, the time needed to remove the dressing, pain, and bleeding. Mepitel was superior to paraffin gauze because it adhered less to the wound bed, the time needed to remove the dressing was shorter, and it caused less pain and less bleeding. PMID:8771259

  6. Evaluation of Six Split-thickness Skin Graft Donor-site Dressing Materials in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Masella, Pamela C.; Balent, Eric M.; Carlson, Terri L.; Lee, Karen W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous dressings for split-thickness skin graft donor sites are commercially available with no conclusive evidence-based consensus regarding the optimal dressing choice. This study was conducted to identify which of 5 commonly used materials promotes wound healing most effectively for use on split-thickness donor sites in comparison with our standard dressing, Xeroform (petrolatum gauze). Methods: Twenty-four partial-thickness wounds were created on the backs of 4 pigs using a dermatome. Wounds (n = 4 per dressing type per pig) were treated with Xeroform, Opsite (polyurethane film), Kaltostat ( calcium sodium alginate), DuoDERM (hydrocolloid), Aquacel (hydrofiber), and Mepilex (silicone foam). Full-thickness skin samples were excised at 3 or 5 days and evaluated histologically for reepithelialization and inflammation. Comparisons also included incidence of infection, ease of use, and cost analyses. Results: DuoDERM elicited the greatest percent reepithelialization (81%) and Mepilex the lowest (33%) after 3 days (P = 0.004). All dressings demonstrated complete reepithelialization except Mepilex (85%) at 5 days. There were no infections and inflammation was mild among all treatments. Mepilex was easiest to use, whereas Aquacel, Kaltostat, and Opsite were most difficult (P = 0.03). Xeroform was most cost-effective and Aquacel most expensive. Combined scoring revealed DuoDERM = Xeroform > Opsite = Mepilex > Kaltostat > Aquacel. Conclusions: DuoDERM and Xeroform were most effective overall. DuoDERM tended to outperform all dressings in reepithelialization at 3 days, while Xeroform was least expensive, easy to use, and demonstrated rapid reepithelialization. These findings suggest that Xeroform may be preferred for use on large donor-site areas. DuoDERM may be more appropriate for small donor sites when healing time is a priority. PMID:25289278

  7. Evidence-based recommendations for the use of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in traumatic wounds and reconstructive surgery: Steps towards an international consensus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Runkel; E. Krug; L. Berg; C. Lee; D. Hudson; H. Birke-Sorensen; M. Depoorter; R. Dunn; S. Jeffery; F. Duteille; A. Bruhin; C. Caravaggi; M. Chariker; C. Dowsett; F. Ferreira; J. M. Francos Martínez; G. Grudzien; S. Ichioka; R. Ingemansson; M. Malmsjo; P. Rome; S. Vig; R. Martin; J. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has become widely adopted over the last 15 years and over 1000 peer reviewed publications are available describing its use. Despite this, there remains uncertainty regarding several aspects of usage. In order to respond to this gap a global expert panel was convened to develop evidence-based recommendations describing the use of NPWT. In this paper

  8. Nonsilver treatment vs. silver sulfadiazine in treatment of partial-thickness burn wounds in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rashaan, Zjir M; Krijnen, Pieta; Klamer, Rachel R M; Schipper, Inger B; Dekkers, Olaf M; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2014-01-01

    The evidence for application of silver-containing dressings and topicals in the treatment of partial-thickness burns in pediatric patients is largely based on clinical trials involving adult patients despite the important differences between the skin of children and adults. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed of all randomized controlled trials comparing nonsilver treatment with silver-containing dressings and silver topical agents in children with partial-thickness burns in the acute stage. Endpoints were wound healing, grafting, infection, pain, number of dressing changes, length of hospital stay, and scarring. Seven randomized controlled trials were included involving 473 participants. All trials used silver sulfadiazine as control in comparison with five different nonsilver treatments. Most trials were of moderate quality with high risk of bias. Use of nonsilver treatment led to shorter wound healing time (weighted mean difference: -3.43 days, 95% confidence interval: -4.78, -2.07), less dressing changes (weighted mean difference: -19.89 dressing changes, 95% confidence interval: -38.12, -1.66), and shorter length of hospital stay (weighted mean difference: -2.07 days, 95% confidence interval: -2.63, -1.50) compared with silver sulfadiazine treatment, but no difference in the incidence of wound infection or grafting was found. In conclusion, nonsilver treatment may be preferred over silver sulfadiazine, but high-quality randomized controlled trials are needed to validly confirm the effectiveness of silver containing preparations, in particular silver-containing dressings, above nonsilver treatments. PMID:24899251

  9. Antimicrobial and in vitro wound healing properties of novel clay based bionanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Mishra, R K; Ramasamy, K; Lim, S M; Ismail, M F; Majeed, A B A

    2014-08-01

    The present study investigates the development of methyl cellulose (MC)-sodium alginate (SA)-montmorillonite (MMT) clay based bionanocomposite films with interesting wound healing properties. The differential scanning calorimetry analysis of the composite films revealed presence of single glass transition temperature (Tg) confirming the miscible nature of the ternary blended films. The increase in MMT ratio in the composite films reduced the mobility of biopolymer chains (MC/SA) which increased the Tg of the film. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that dispersion of clay (MMT) at nano level significantly delayed the weight loss that correlated with higher thermal stability of the composite films. It was observed that the developed films were able to exhibit antimicrobial activity against four typical pathogenic bacteria found in the presence of wound. The developed films were able to significantly inhibit (10 mg/ml) the growth of Enterococcus faecium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In vitro scratch assay indicated potential wound closure activities of MC-2-4 bionanocomposite films at their respective highest subtoxic doses. In conclusion, these ternary bionanocomposite films were found to be promising systems for wound healing applications. PMID:24831081

  10. Efficient SVM classifier based on color and texture region features for wound tissue images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wannous, Hazem; Lucas, Yves; Treuillet, Sylvie

    2008-03-01

    This work is part of the ESCALE project dedicated to the design of a complete 3D and color wound assessment tool using a simple hand held digital camera. The first part was concerned with the computation of a 3D model for wound measurements using uncalibrated vision techniques. This article presents the second part, which deals with color classification of wound tissues, a prior step before combining shape and color analysis in a single tool for real tissue surface measurements. We have adopted an original approach based on unsupervised segmentation prior to classification, to improve the robustness of the labelling stage. A database of different tissue types is first built; a simple but efficient color correction method is applied to reduce color shifts due to uncontrolled lighting conditions. A ground truth is provided by the fusion of several clinicians manual labellings. Then, color and texture tissue descriptors are extracted from tissue regions of the images database, for the learning stage of an SVM region classifier with the aid of a ground truth resulting from. The output of this classifier provides a prediction model, later used to label the segmented regions of the database. Finally, we apply unsupervised color region segmentation on wound images and classify the tissue regions. Compared to the ground truth, the result of automatic segmentation driven classification provides an overlap score, (66 % to 88%) of tissue regions higher than that obtained by clinicians.

  11. Dressing-related trauma: clinical sequelae and resource utilization in a UK setting

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Bruce; Pilling, Claire; Chadwick, Paul; Butcher, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    Background Dressings are the mainstay of wound care management; however, adherence of the dressing to the wound or periwound skin is common and can lead to dressing-related pain and trauma. Dressing-related trauma is recognized as a clinical and economic burden to patients and health care providers. This study was conducted to garner expert opinion on clinical sequelae and resource use associated with dressing-related trauma in a UK setting. Methods This was an exploratory study with two phases: qualitative pilot interviews with six wound care specialists to explore dressing-related trauma concepts, sequelae, and resource utilization; and online quantitative research with 30 wound care specialists to validate and quantify the concepts, sequelae, and resource utilization explored in the first phase of the study. Data were collected on mean health care professional time, material costs, pharmaceutical costs, and inpatient management per sequela occurrence until resolution. Data were analyzed to give total costs per sequela and concept occurrence. Results The results demonstrate that dressing-related trauma is a clinically relevant concept. The main types of dressing-related trauma concepts included skin reactions, adherence to the wound, skin stripping, maceration, drying, and plugging of the wound. These were the foundation for a number of clinical sequelae, including wound enlargement, increased exudate, bleeding, infection, pain, itching/excoriation, edema, dermatitis, inflammation, and anxiety. Mean total costs range from £56 to £175 for the complete onward management of each occurrence of the six main concepts. Conclusion These results provide insight into the hidden costs of dressing-related trauma in a UK setting. This research successfully conceptualized dressing-related trauma, identified associated clinical sequelae, and quantified resource utilization associated with a typical occurrence of each trauma concept. Further research is warranted into dressing-related trauma and the associated costs. PMID:24855382

  12. Debrisoft is a wound debridement product, not a wound dressing.

    PubMed

    Browning, Alex

    2014-05-13

    In your April 2 edition (News) you highlighted the recent publication of NICE guidance on the Debrisoft monofilament debridement pad, which has the potential to save the NHS about £15 million a year. PMID:24802464

  13. The effect of a honey based gel and silver sulphadiazine on bacterial infections of in vitro burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Boekema, B K H L; Pool, L; Ulrich, M M W

    2013-06-01

    Bacterial contamination remains a constant threat in burn wound care. Topical treatments to combat contaminations have good bactericidal effects but can have detrimental effects for the healing process. Treatments with for example silver can increase healing times. Honey based products can be a good alternative as it is antibacterial and patient-friendly. We evaluated the bactericidal and cytotoxic effects of a honey based gel and silver sulphadiazine in a human burn wound model with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After adding 10(5)colony forming units of P. aeruginosa, topical treatments were applied on the burn wound models. After 2, 12, 24, 28 and 70 h, bacteria were dislodged and counted by plating dilutions. Cytotoxic effects were evaluated histologically in samples of burn wound models treated topically for 3 weeks, without bacteria. L-Mesitran Soft significantly reduced the bacterial load (5-log reduction) up to 24h but did not completely eliminate bacteria from the burn wounds. After Flammazine(®) treatment, only a few colony forming units were observed at all time points. In contrast, re-epithelialization was significantly reduced after application of Flammazine(®) compared to L-Mesitran Soft or control. This in vitro model of burn wound infection can be used to evaluate topical treatments. L-Mesitran Soft is a good alternative for treating burn wounds but the slightly lower bactericidal activity in the burn wound model warrants a higher frequency of application. PMID:23036845

  14. An Improved Flexible Telemetry System to Autonomously Monitor Sub-Bandage Pressure and Wound Moisture

    PubMed Central

    Mehmood, Nasir; Hariz, Alex; Templeton, Sue; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an improved mobile-based telemetric dual mode sensing system to monitor pressure and moisture levels in compression bandages and dressings used for chronic wound management. The system is fabricated on a 0.2 mm thick flexible printed circuit material, and is capable of sensing pressure and moisture at two locations simultaneously within a compression bandage and wound dressing. The sensors are calibrated to sense both parameters accurately, and the data are then transmitted wirelessly to a receiver connected to a mobile device. An error-correction algorithm is developed to compensate the degradation in measurement quality due to battery power drop over time. An Android application is also implemented to automatically receive, process, and display the sensed wound parameters. The performance of the sensing system is first validated on a mannequin limb using a compression bandage and wound dressings, and then tested on a healthy volunteer to acquire real-time performance parameters. The results obtained here suggest that this dual mode sensor can perform reliably when placed on a human limb. PMID:25412216

  15. [Hydro-colloidal dressings which release hydro-active silver].

    PubMed

    Serra, N; Torres, O G; Romo, M I; Llovera, J M; Vigil-Escalera, L J; Soto, M A; González-Parra, S

    2005-02-01

    The study presented is a multicentric, prospective, open and comparative study designed with the objective of evaluating the performance of an antibacterial hydrocolloid dressing with hydroactivated silver (Comfeel Plata), when used to activate the healing process in wounds with high bacterial load, clinical signs of infection or malodour. Additionally, once the wound bed was appropriately prepared, a comparison in terms of efficacy was made between, on the one hand, continued treatment with the antibacterial hydrocolloid dressing, and, on the other hand, continued treatment with other dressings specifically designed for the proliferative phase of healing. Included into this study were 43 patients with chronic ulcers who were divided into two parallel treatment groups: In one group, Comfeel Plata (Coloplast AIS) was used until complete wound healing or for a maximum of 10-12 weeks, and in the second group Comfeel Plata (Coloplast A/S) was used until a clean wound bed was obtained and until the wound showed signs of positive evolution, at which moment the treatment was continued until complete healing or for a maximum of 10-12 weeks with dressings without silver designed especially for the proliferative phase of healing [Alione, Comfeel or Biatain (Coloplast AIS)]. The results obtained from the various study parameters indicate that the use of Comfeel Plata in the treatment of infected or colonized wounds prepares the wound bed and facilitates more rapid healing, and that the use of Comfeel Plata effectively reduces pain and malodour. The results indicate that once a clean wound bed is obtained, the use of a dressing without silver specifically for the proliferative phase will facilitate healing. PMID:15816217

  16. Topical antimicrobial toolkit for wound infection.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin Y; Alam, Tarik; Marin, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Increased bacterial burden and formation of biofilm has been recognized as one of the key factors contributing to delayed wound healing. There is a toolbox of topical antimicrobial wound dressings that incorporate silver, iodine, polyhexamethylene biguanide, methylene blue/gentian violet, and honey. This article reviews a diverse range of evidence to discuss the advantages and disadvantage of topical antimicrobial dressings. Discussion will provide guidance on when and how to use topical antimicrobial dressings to achieve optimal outcomes and cost-effective wound care. Chronic wounds do not follow a predictable and expected healing trajectory, and they may persist for months or years due to underlying disease processes, recurrent injury, and comorbidities.1 With an aging population and increased prevalence of chronic diseases, the majority of wounds are refractory to healing, placing a significant burden on the health system and individual patients. Bacterial burden and biofilm have been recognized as key factors contributing to persistent inflammation, tissue destruction, delayed wound healing, and other serious complications (especially in individuals who are frail and immune-compromised).2 It has been demonstrated that when bacterial growth reaches a critical threshold of 105 bacteria per gram of tissue, bacterial toxins can cause tissue damage in the superficial wound compartment, delaying healing.2 In the literature, this phenomenon is referred to as critical colonization, increased bacterial burden, superficial infection, or localized infection. According to a recent review, over 50% of chronic wounds exhibit signs and symptoms that are consistent with localized infection.3. PMID:25433174

  17. Skin tissue engineering for the infected wound site: biodegradable PLA nanofibers and a novel approach for silver ion release evaluated in a 3D coculture system of keratinocytes and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2014-10-01

    Wound infection presents a challenging and growing problem. With the increased prevalence and growth of multidrug-resistant bacteria, there is a mounting need to reduce and eliminate wound infections using methodologies that limit the ability of bacteria to evolve into further drug-resistant strains. A well-known strategy for combating bacterial infection and preventing wound sepsis is through the delivery of silver ions to the wound site. High surface area silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) allowing extensive silver ion release have therefore been explored in different wound dressings and/or skin substitutes. However, it has been recently shown that AgNPs can penetrate into the stratum corneum of skin or diffuse into the cellular plasma membrane, and may interfere with a variety of cellular mechanisms. The goal of this study was to introduce and evaluate a new type of high surface area metallic silver in the form of highly porous silver microparticles (AgMPs). Polylactic acid (PLA) nanofibers were successfully loaded with either highly porous AgMPs or AgNPs and the antimicrobial efficacy and cytotoxicity of the two silver-based wound dressings were assessed and compared. To better mimic the physiological environment in vivo where both human cells and bacteria are present, a novel coculture system combining human epidermal keratinocytes and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was designed to simultaneously evaluate human skin cell cytotoxicity with antimicrobial efficacy in a three-dimensional environment. We found that highly porous AgMPs could be successfully incorporated in nanofibrous wound dressings, and exhibited comparable antimicrobial efficacy and cytotoxicity to AgNPs. Further, PLA nanofibers containing highly porous AgMPs exhibited steady silver ion release, at a greater rate of release, than nanofibers containing AgNPs. The replacement of AgNPs with the newly introduced AgMPs overcomes concerns regarding the use of nanoparticles and holds great promise as skin substitutes or wound dressings for infected wound sites. PMID:24494739

  18. The role of Mepitel silicone net dressings in the management of fingertip injuries in children.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, D A; Mehdi, S Y; Eadie, P A

    1999-12-01

    Forty-five children with isolated fingertip injuries were randomized for treatment with either Mepitel silicone net dressings or paraffin gauze dressings. Over a 4 week period, the objective adherence of the dressing, and the perceived level of stress caused to the child by the dressing change were scored by linear analogue scales. The wounds were also assessed for the progress of healing and presence of infection. Twenty children received Mepitel dressings and 25 had paraffin gauze dressings. There was no difference in duration of healing or complication rates between the two groups. Statistically lower scores were seen for the Mepitel group for the first 3 weeks in both adherence and stress scores. These results suggest that silicone net dressings may be a less adherent and less painful method of dressing fingertip injuries in children. PMID:10672813

  19. Advances in Wound Healing: A Review of Current Wound Healing Products

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Patrick S.; Evans, Gregory R. D.

    2012-01-01

    Successful wound care involves optimizing patient local and systemic conditions in conjunction with an ideal wound healing environment. Many different products have been developed to influence this wound environment to provide a pathogen-free, protected, and moist area for healing to occur. Newer products are currently being used to replace or augment various substrates in the wound healing cascade. This review of the current state of the art in wound-healing products looks at the latest applications of silver in microbial prophylaxis and treatment, including issues involving resistance and side effects, the latest uses of negative pressure wound devices, advanced dressings and skin substitutes, biologic wound products including growth factor applications, and hyperbaric oxygen as an adjunct in wound healing. With the abundance of available products, the goal is to find the most appropriate modality or combination of modalities to optimize healing. PMID:22567251

  20. Effect of chitosan acetate bandage on wound healing in infected and noninfected wounds in mice

    PubMed Central

    Burkatovskaya, Marina; Castano, Ana P.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    HemCon® bandage is an engineered chitosan acetate preparation designed as a hemostatic dressing, and is under investigation as a topical antimicrobial dressing. We studied its effects on healing of excisional wounds that were or were not infected with Staphylococcus aureus, in normal mice or mice previously pretreated with cyclophosphamide (CY). CY significantly suppressed wound healing in both the early and later stages, while S. aureus alone significantly stimulated wound healing in the early stages by preventing the initial wound expansion. CY plus S. aureus showed an advantage in early stages by preventing expansion, but a significant slowing of wound healing in later stages. In order to study the conflicting clamping and stimulating effects of chitosan acetate bandage on normal wounds, we removed the bandage from wounds at times after application ranging from 1 hour to 9 days. Three days application gave the earliest wound closure, and all application times gave a faster healing slope after removal compared with control wounds. Chitosan acetate bandage reduced the number of inflammatory cells in the wound at days 2 and 4, and had an overall beneficial effect on wound healing especially during the early period where its antimicrobial effect is most important. PMID:18471261

  1. Dressing the electromagnetic nucleon current

    SciTech Connect

    Haberzettl, H. [Center for Nuclear Studies, Department of Physics, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Huang, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Nakayama, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Institut fuer Kernphysik and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    A field-theory-based approach to pion photoproduction off the nucleon is used to derive a microscopically consistent formulation of the fully dressed electromagnetic nucleon current in an effective Lagrangian formalism. It is shown how the rigorous implementation of local gauge invariance at all levels of the reaction dynamics provides equations that lend themselves to practically manageable truncations of the underlying nonlinearities of the problem. The requirement of consistency also suggests a novel way of treating the pion photoproduction problem. Guided by a phenomenological implementation of gauge invariance for the truncated equations that has proved successful for pion photoproduction, an expression for the fully dressed nucleon current is given that satisfies the Ward-Takahashi identity for a fully dressed nucleon propagator as a matter of course. Possible applications include meson photo- and electroproduction processes, bremsstrahlung, Compton scattering, and ee{sup '} processes off nucleons.

  2. Development of a Device for Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Based on ARM9 Embedded System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Haijun Niu; Haoming Tian; Chongze Chang; Deyu Li; Yubo Fan

    2011-01-01

    As an adjunct in the treatment of wounds, topical Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is a common method of wound disposal and has been used in both civilian and military. NPWT instrument is a kind of new medical equipment made for NPWT. In order to improve the performance of the present NPWT devices, this study designed an intelligent NPWT instrument

  3. Fetal fibroblasts and keratinocytes with immunosuppressive properties for allogeneic cell-based wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Zuliani, Thomas; Saiagh, Soraya; Knol, Anne-Chantal; Esbelin, Julie; Dréno, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Fetal skin heals rapidly without scar formation early in gestation, conferring to fetal skin cells a high and unique potential for tissue regeneration and scar management. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using fetal fibroblasts and keratinocytes to stimulate wound repair and regeneration for further allogeneic cell-based therapy development. From a single fetal skin sample, two clinical batches of keratinocytes and fibroblasts were manufactured and characterized. Tolerogenic properties of the fetal cells were investigated by allogeneic PBMC proliferation tests. In addition, the potential advantage of fibroblasts/keratinocytes co-application for wound healing stimulation has been examined in co-culture experiments with in vitro scratch assays and a multiplex cytokines array system. Based on keratin 14 and prolyl-4-hydroxylase expression analyses, purity of both clinical batches was found to be above 98% and neither melanocytes nor Langerhans cells could be detected. Both cell types demonstrated strong immunosuppressive properties as shown by the dramatic decrease in allogeneic PBMC proliferation when co-cultured with fibroblasts and/or keratinocytes. We further showed that the indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) activity is required for the immunoregulatory activity of fetal skin cells. Co-cultures experiments have also revealed that fibroblasts-keratinocytes interactions strongly enhanced fetal cells secretion of HGF, GM-CSF, IL-8 and to a lesser extent VEGF-A. Accordingly, in the in vitro scratch assays the fetal fibroblasts and keratinocytes co-culture accelerated the scratch closure compared to fibroblast or keratinocyte mono-cultures. In conclusion, our data suggest that the combination of fetal keratinocytes and fibroblasts could be of particular interest for the development of a new allogeneic skin substitute with immunomodulatory activity, acting as a reservoir for wound healing growth factors. PMID:23894651

  4. Standard abdominal wound edge protection with surgical dressings vs coverage with a sterile circular polyethylene drape for prevention of surgical site infections (BaFO): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Postoperative surgical site infections cause substantial morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, costs and even mortality and remain one of the most frequent surgical complications. Approximately 14% to 30% of all patients undergoing elective open abdominal surgery are affected and methods to reduce surgical site infection rates warrant further investigation and evaluation in randomized controlled trials. Methods/design To investigate whether the application of a circular plastic wound protector reduces the rate of surgical site infections in general and visceral surgical patients that undergo midline or transverse laparotomy by 50%. BaFO is a randomized, controlled, patient-blinded and observer-blinded multicenter clinical trial with two parallel surgical groups. The primary outcome measure will be the rate of surgical site infections within 45?days postoperative assessed according to the definition of the Center for Disease Control. Statistical analysis of the primary endpoint will be based on the intention-to-treat population. The global level of significance is set at 5% (2 sided) and sample size (n?=?258 per group) is determined to assure a power of 80% with a planned interim analysis for the primary endpoint after the inclusion of 340 patients. Discussion The BaFO trial will explore if the rate of surgical site infections can be reduced by a single, simple, inexpensive intervention in patients undergoing open elective abdominal surgery. Its pragmatic design guarantees high external validity and clinical relevance. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01181206. Date of registration: 11 August 2010; date of first patient randomized: 8 September 2010 PMID:22587425

  5. Wound Care Management: Proper Protocol Differs From Athletic Trainers' Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    As research techniques in wound care management improve, treatment protocols for the care of wounds must also change to ensure safe and optimal healing. In this study, I surveyed current practices of athletic trainers regarding the care of athletic wounds and compared the findings to current literature. I contacted 501 athletic trainers, including all NATA curricular undergraduate directors. Overall response rate was 58%; 78% of the athletic trainers from the curricular schools responded. Wet-to-dry, irrigation, and soaks were the three most common methods used to debride and cleanse a wound. Povidone-iodine (Betadine) and hydrogen peroxide were the two most popular cleansing agents. Conventional gauze was the primary dressing used by 67% of the athletic trainers, while 20% of those surveyed used occlusive dressings. Although povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide are commonly used, both are toxic to cells involved in the wound-healing process and delay healing. Research indicates that the best method of cleansing and debriding a wound is to irrigate it with saline. Occlusive dressings have a lower infection rate, are viral barriers, and are associated with faster wound healing and less pain than gauze dressings. Athletic trainers need to assess their wound care protocols so that they give the best possible care to their athletes. PMID:16558365

  6. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy in patients with large postoperative wounds complicated by multiple fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Borejsza-Wysocki, Maciej; Meissner, Wiktor; Malinger, Stanis?aw; Szmeja, Jacek; Ko?ci?ski, Tomasz; Ratajczak, Andrzej; Drews, Micha?

    2011-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a widely acknowledged method for chronic and traumatic wound healing. The feasibility of VAC therapy used for the treatment of intestinal fistulas is still a subject of debate. Complex postoperative wounds pose significant therapeutic problems, especially when there are several fistula openings in the wound area and other sites, usually at the site of previous drains. This paper describes the treatment of three patients in a critical condition, with complex postoperative wounds complicated by multiple fistulas. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy was based on effective drainage of the biggest fistula opening and ensuring conditions promoting the healing process of other fistulas and the wound. A considerable improvement in general condition and wound healing was noted within 2-4 weeks and both the number of fistulas and the volume of excreted contents decreased. After 5-7 weeks a significant improvement in wound healing was observed in all patients. Once the general condition of all patients was considered satisfactory (2-6 months), they underwent surgery aimed at restoration of the digestive tract continuity.In our opinion, VAC therapy used for the treatment of postoperative wounds with multiple fistulas in the wound area and other sites should aim mainly at the improvement of patients’ general condition, limitation of the number of fistulas as well as accelerated wound healing. This may lead to formation of one stoma-type fistula, which can be dressed and cared for by patients until the continuity of the digestive tract has been surgically restored. PMID:23255975

  7. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy in patients with large postoperative wounds complicated by multiple fistulas.

    PubMed

    Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Borejsza-Wysocki, Maciej; Meissner, Wiktor; Malinger, Stanis?aw; Szmeja, Jacek; Ko?ci?ski, Tomasz; Ratajczak, Andrzej; Drews, Micha?

    2011-09-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a widely acknowledged method for chronic and traumatic wound healing. The feasibility of VAC therapy used for the treatment of intestinal fistulas is still a subject of debate. Complex postoperative wounds pose significant therapeutic problems, especially when there are several fistula openings in the wound area and other sites, usually at the site of previous drains. This paper describes the treatment of three patients in a critical condition, with complex postoperative wounds complicated by multiple fistulas. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy was based on effective drainage of the biggest fistula opening and ensuring conditions promoting the healing process of other fistulas and the wound. A considerable improvement in general condition and wound healing was noted within 2-4 weeks and both the number of fistulas and the volume of excreted contents decreased. After 5-7 weeks a significant improvement in wound healing was observed in all patients. Once the general condition of all patients was considered satisfactory (2-6 months), they underwent surgery aimed at restoration of the digestive tract continuity.In our opinion, VAC therapy used for the treatment of postoperative wounds with multiple fistulas in the wound area and other sites should aim mainly at the improvement of patients' general condition, limitation of the number of fistulas as well as accelerated wound healing. This may lead to formation of one stoma-type fistula, which can be dressed and cared for by patients until the continuity of the digestive tract has been surgically restored. PMID:23255975

  8. The Effect of Camellia sinensis on Wound Healing Potential in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Kanthimathi, M. S.; Sanusi, Junedah

    2013-01-01

    Camellia sinensis (tea) is reported to have health benefits, including the building of healthy skin. This study evaluated the effects of topical application of Camellia sinensis extract on the rate of wound closure and the histology of wound area. A uniform area of 2.00?cm in diameter was excised from the neck of adult male Sprague Dawley rats. The animals were topically treated with 0.2?mL of vehicle (CMC), Intrasite gel (positive control), or 200 and 400?mg/mL of extract. Wounds dressed with the extract and Intrasite gel healed significantly earlier than those with vehicle. Histological analysis of the wound area after 10 days showed that wounds dressed with the extract had less scar width when compared to the control. The tissue contained less inflammatory cells and more collagen and angiogenesis, compared to wounds dressed with vehicle. In this study, Camellia sinensis showed high potential in wound healing activity. PMID:23864889

  9. Grooming and Dressing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... person’s nails clean and trimmed. Dressing People with Alzheimer’s disease often need more time to dress. It can be hard for them to choose their clothes. They might wear the wrong clothing for the season. They also might wear colors that don’t go together or forget to ...

  10. Prospective, double-blinded, randomised controlled trial assessing the effect of an Octenidine-based hydrogel on bacterial colonisation and epithelialization of skin graft wounds in burn patients

    PubMed Central

    W, Eisenbeiß; F, Siemers; G, Amtsberg; P, Hinz; B, Hartmann; T, Kohlmann; A, Ekkernkamp; U, Albrecht; O, Assadian; A, Kramer

    2012-01-01

    Background: Moist wound treatment improves healing of skin graft donor site wounds. Microbial colonised wounds represent an increased risk of wound infection; while antimicrobially active, topical antiseptics may impair epithelialization. Objectives: The aim of this prospective randomised controlled clinical trial was to examine the influence of an Octenidine-dihydrochloride (OCT) hydrogel on bacterial colonisation and epithelialization of skin graft donor sites. Methods: The study was designed as a randomised, double-blinded, controlled clinical trial. Skin graft donor sites from a total of 61 patients were covered either with 0.05% OCT (n=31) or an OCT-free placebo wound hydrogel (n=30). Potential interaction with wound healing was assessed by measuring the time until 100% re-epithelialization. In addition, microbial wound colonisation was quantitatively determined in all skin graft donor sites. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the time for complete epithelialization of skin graft donor sites in the OCT and the placebo group (7.3±0.2 vs. 6.9±0.2 days; p=0.236). Microbial wound colonisation was significantly lower in the OCT group than in the placebo group (p=0.014). Conclusions: The OCT-based hydrogel showed no delay in wound epithelialization and demonstrated a significantly lower bacterial colonisation of skin graft donor site wounds. PMID:23071904

  11. Analysis of Effective Interconnectivity of DegraPol-foams Designed for Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincent Milleret; Anne Greet Bittermann; Dieter Mayer; Heike Hall

    2009-01-01

    Many wounds heal slowly and are difficult to manage. Therefore Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) was developed where polymer foams are applied and a defined negative pressure removes wound fluid, reduces bacterial burden and increases the formation of granulation tissue. Although NPWT is used successfully, its mechanisms are not well understood. In particular, different NPWT dressings were never compared. Here

  12. 'Potato peel dressing': a novel adjunctive in the management of necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, K S; Bhandage, Supriya; Kamat, Shishir

    2015-03-01

    Management of necrotizing fasciitis, a rare and potentially fatal, polymicrobial disease comprises of aggressive debridement, intravenous antibiotics and application of various adjunctives. So far adjunctives like hyperbaric oxygen therapy, intravenous immunoglobulins, vacuum assisted or foam dressing, and guided tissue regeneration with amniotic dressing have been put to use. Each of these adjunctives has faced criticism for their shortcomings. Potato peel has been used as a dressing for chronic wounds but there is no literature available on its application over wounds afflicted with necrotizing fasciitis. Owing to various medicinal properties of potato peel and its use as a dressing in other medical conditions, same was used as an adjunctive in the present case. Here we present a case of cervical necrotizing fasciitis of dentogenous origin, treated by mainstay surgical treatment with debridement, drainage in combination with broad spectrum antibiotics and a novel adjunctive, 'potato peel dressing', which has shown promising results. PMID:25848140

  13. The prevalence, aetiology and management of wounds in a community care area in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Skerritt, Louise; Moore, Zena

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to establish the prevalence and aetiology of wounds, allowing an insight into the management of wound care, the use of dressings and the nursing time allocated to the provision of wound care in a community setting in Ireland. A cross-sectional survey was used, with data collected on all clients in the community who received treatment from public health nurses or community registered general nurses for wound care over a 1-week period in April 2013. A 98.9% response rate was realised, and 188 people were identified as having wounds, equating to a crude prevalence of 5% of the active community nursing caseload. A total of 60% (n=112) had leg ulcers, 22% (n=42) had pressure ulcers, 16% (n=30) had an acute wound (surgical or traumatic wounds), 1% (n=2) had a diabetic foot wound and a further 1% (n=2) had wounds of other aetiologies. The mean duration of wounds was 5.41 months. A total of 18% of wounds were identified as infected; however, 60% (n=112) of wounds had antimicrobial products in use as either a primary or secondary dressing. The study established that there is a significant prevalence of wounds in this community care area. There was absence of a clinical diagnosis in many cases, and evidence of inappropriate dressing use, risking an increase in costs and a decrease in good clinical outcomes. It also highlighted the importance of ongoing education and auditing in the provision of wound care. PMID:24912830

  14. Effect of Acticoat(®) and Cutinova Hydro(®) on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ar?can, Mustafa; Hatipoglu, Fatih; Uyaroglu, Aysen; Ozdemir, Ozgur; Ozkan, Kadircan

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the effects of the wound-covering materials, Acticoat(®) and Cutinova Hydro(®) , on wound healing have been studied in rabbit models with open and tissue-lost wounds with full-thickness flank excisions. Rabbits were used as subjects with three groups of four rabbits each, and trial periods of 7, 14 and 21{\\uns}days. Four circular wounds, of 1.5 cm diameter were made two on the right (one of them control) and two on the left (one of them control) of the dorsal sides of the abdomen. Acticoat(®) and Cutinova Hydro(®) were applied on the wounds with suture for a period of 21 days and one each placed on the right and left sides as control with gauze. Biopsy specimens were taken from the animals at the end of the research period to check the length of the epithelium, epithelial thickness, size of wounds, wound granulation tissue formation and histopathological evaluation for clarity. The Acticoat(®) group showed better healing and scar formation compared to the Cutinova Hydro(®) group by macroscopic examination. Epithelial wound length and clarity in terms of statistical difference occurred on day 21 (P <0.05); while the length of the wound epithelium decreased patency, epithelial thickness on days~7, 14 and 21, showed no statistical differences (P >0.05). As a result, the Acticoat(®) wound dressing was determined as a more reliable for the early wound healing. This study has shown the short-term clinical benefits of hydroactive, polyurethane dressings in the management of acute wounds. However, longer periods of wound healing procedure should be planned for reliable and safe results of wound dressing. It has also been concluded that microbiological analyses should be included for more robust and reliable comparisons. PMID:22682153

  15. Comparison of three different dressings for partial thickness burns in children: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the paediatric population, pain and distress associated with burn injuries during wound care procedures remain a constant challenge. Although silver dressings are the gold standard for burn care in Australasia, very few high-level trials have been conducted that compare silver dressings to determine which will provide the best level of care clinically. Therefore, for paediatric patients in particular, identifying silver dressings that are associated with lower levels of pain and rapid wound re-epithelialisation is imperative. This study will determine whether there is a difference in time to re-epithelialisation and pain and distress experienced during wound care procedures among Acticoat™, Acticoat™ combined with Mepitel™ and Mepilex Ag™ dressings for acute, paediatric partial thickness burns. Methods/Design Children aged 0 to 15 years with an acute partial thickness (superficial partial to deep partial thickness inclusive) burn injury and a burn total body surface area of ?10% will be eligible for the trial. Patients will be randomised to one of the three dressing groups: (1) Acticoat™ or (2) Acticoat™ combined with Mepitel™ or (3) Mepilex Ag™. A minimum of 28 participants will be recruited for each treatment group. Primary measures of pain, distress and healing will be repeated at each dressing change until complete wound re-epithelialisation occurs or skin grafting is required. Additional data collected will include infection status at each dressing change, physical function, scar outcome and scar management requirements, cost effectiveness of each dressing and staff perspectives of the dressings. Discussion The results of this study will determine the effects of three commonly used silver and silicone burn dressing combinations on the rate of wound re-epithelialisation and pain experienced during dressing procedures in acute, paediatric partial thickness burn injuries. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613000105741 PMID:24274190

  16. The palliative management of fungating malignant wounds.

    PubMed

    Grocott, P

    2000-01-01

    This study focused on the palliative management of fungating malignant wounds and individual experiences of living with such a wound. Dressings were evaluated for the ability to contain these wounds and reduce their impact on daily life. The project extended to collaboration with industry for the development and evaluation of dressings designed to meet patient needs. A longitudinal multiple case study design was adopted. The methodology evolved through three principal phases: quasi-experimental design; emergent collaborative design; and emergent theory-driven evaluation. The radical departure from the initial approach was in response to the methodological problems encountered in a study of individuals with uncontrolled disease. A non-probability sampling plan was adopted, mainly because of the lack of homogeneity in the patient population; 45 participants were included. The length of time patients remained in the study depended on how long they lived. This ranged from a few days to more than two years. A sampling plan was, however, adopted for the data collection. The study had a dual focus: methodology, and the generation of explanations for dressing performance and the management of fungating wounds. The methodological aspect included development of the Teler system as a method of measuring dressing performance against goals of optimal practice in fungating wound management. The second component was a system of reasoning developed as an analytical strategy for abstracting general issues from individual case study data in order to construct explanations. Theory was used to generalize beyond the individual cases. Two forms of explanation for fungating wound management were constructed. These included explanations of individual experiences of living with such a wound and knowledge of the elements of fungating wound management. The impact on the individual was explained in terms of the stigma attached to public disability and a revulsion in society for uncontrolled body fluids. A pivotal relationship emerged between exudate and other wound management problems, including psychosocial aspects. A final critical explanation was developed for the qualification of the theory of moist wound healing to explain the phenomenon of exudate management in fungating and, possibly, other exuding chronic wounds. PMID:10827661

  17. Magnetite nanoparticles for functionalized textile dressing to prevent fungal biofilms development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, Ion; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Anghel, Alina Georgiana; Ficai, Anton; Saviuc, Crina; Grumezescu, Valentina; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the potential of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to improve the antibiofilm properties of textile dressing, tested in vitro against monospecific Candida albicans biofilms. Functionalized magnetite (Fe3O4/C18), with an average size not exceeding 20 nm, has been synthesized by precipitation of ferric and ferrous salts in aqueous solution of oleic acid (C18) and NaOH. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and differential thermal analysis coupled with thermo gravimetric analysis were used as characterization methods for the synthesized Fe3O4/C18. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the architecture of the fungal biofilm developed on the functionalized textile dressing samples and culture-based methods for the quantitative assay of the biofilm-embedded yeast cells. The optimized textile dressing samples proved to be more resistant to C. albicans colonization, as compared to the uncoated ones; these functionalized surfaces-based approaches are very useful in the prevention of wound microbial contamination and subsequent biofilm development on viable tissues or implanted devices.

  18. Magnetite nanoparticles for functionalized textile dressing to prevent fungal biofilms development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the potential of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to improve the antibiofilm properties of textile dressing, tested in vitro against monospecific Candida albicans biofilms. Functionalized magnetite (Fe3O4/C18), with an average size not exceeding 20?nm, has been synthesized by precipitation of ferric and ferrous salts in aqueous solution of oleic acid (C18) and NaOH. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and differential thermal analysis coupled with thermo gravimetric analysis were used as characterization methods for the synthesized Fe3O4/C18. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the architecture of the fungal biofilm developed on the functionalized textile dressing samples and culture-based methods for the quantitative assay of the biofilm-embedded yeast cells. The optimized textile dressing samples proved to be more resistant to C. albicans colonization, as compared to the uncoated ones; these functionalized surfaces-based approaches are very useful in the prevention of wound microbial contamination and subsequent biofilm development on viable tissues or implanted devices. PMID:22950367

  19. Quantitative wound healing measurement and monitoring system based on an innovative 3D imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Steven; Yang, Arthur; Yin, Gongjie; Wen, James

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we report a novel three-dimensional (3D) wound imaging system (hardware and software) under development at Technest Inc. System design is aimed to perform accurate 3D measurement and modeling of a wound and track its healing status over time. Accurate measurement and tracking of wound healing enables physicians to assess, document, improve, and individualize the treatment plan given to each wound patient. In current wound care practices, physicians often visually inspect or roughly measure the wound to evaluate the healing status. This is not an optimal practice since human vision lacks precision and consistency. In addition, quantifying slow or subtle changes through perception is very difficult. As a result, an instrument that quantifies both skin color and geometric shape variations would be particularly useful in helping clinicians to assess healing status and judge the effect of hyperemia, hematoma, local inflammation, secondary infection, and tissue necrosis. Once fully developed, our 3D imaging system will have several unique advantages over traditional methods for monitoring wound care: (a) Non-contact measurement; (b) Fast and easy to use; (c) up to 50 micron measurement accuracy; (d) 2D/3D Quantitative measurements;(e) A handheld device; and (f) Reasonable cost (< $1,000).

  20. Dress Codes for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phay, Robert E.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews Second Circuit Court of Appeals decision upholding right of school boards to adopt "reasonable" regulations governing teacher dress or hairstyle. Case offers the most exhaustive judicial examination of the issue to date. (Author/PKP)

  1. Gauze-based negative pressure wound therapy: a valid method to manage pyoderma gangrenosum.

    PubMed

    Fraccalvieri, Marco; Fierro, Maria Teresa; Salomone, Marco; Fava, Paolo; Zingarelli, Enrico M; Cavaliere, Giovanni; Bernengo, Maria G; Bruschi, Stefano

    2014-04-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an uncommon ulcerative, non-infective chronic inflammatory skin disorder of unknown aetiology. Systemic therapies are necessary to control the associated medical diseases, and, due to the inflammatory nature of PG, topical or systemic immunosuppressant agents are effective, but wound healing is usually slow. Negative wound pressure therapy (NPWT) has become an important tool for the management of complex skin ulcers, and usage in PG has been recently described in the literature: we present four cases of classic PG in which NPWT in association with systemic therapy achieved wound healing and a drastic pain reduction. PMID:22891652

  2. Wound construction.

    PubMed

    Trichonas, George; Kaiser, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Wound construction is critical in microincision vitrectomy surgery. The three main steps in constructing a proper wound include displacing the conjunctiva away from the sclera, flattening the sclera on insertion, and angling the incision. Each one of these steps helps create wounds that will not leak. Misaligning the conjunctiva from the scleral hole prevents a vitreous wick from extending external to the conjunctiva. Flattening the sclera on trocar insertion provides a longer wound cord length, which is less likely to leak, and angling the incision has been proven to seal better in both anterior and posterior segment incisions. When you make an angled incision, you initially insert the blade at a 30° angle (at least). This will make the wound more stable because it is less likely to cause internal disruption of the wound edges. These three basic steps are simple, but very important to follow when constructing a microincision wound in order to limit postoperative complications including wound leakage, gas leak, hypotony, and endophthalmitis. PMID:25196754

  3. The effect of different biologic and biosynthetic wound covers on keratinocyte growth, stratification and differentiation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mestak, Ondrej

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare, by means of in vitro cultivation technique, five marketed brands of wound covers used in the treatment of burns and other skin defects (Biobrane®, Suprathel®, Veloderm®, Xe-Derma®, and Xenoderm®) for their ability to stimulate the keratinocyte growth, stratification, and differentiation. In three independent experiments, human keratinocytes were grown on the tested covers in organotypic cultures by the 3T3 feeder layer technique. Vertical paraffin sections of the wound covers with keratinocytes were processed using hematoxylin–eosin staining and immunostaining for involucrin. Keratinocyte populations on the dressings were assessed for (1) number of keratinocyte strata (primary variable), (2) quantitative growth, (3) thickness of the keratinocyte layer, and (4) cell differentiation. The Xe-Derma wound cover provided the best support to keratinocyte proliferation and stratification, with the number of keratinocyte strata significantly (p?dressings. The results of this in vitro study show that the brands based on porcine dermal matrix possess the strongest effect on keratinocyte proliferation and stratification. The distinctive position of Xe-Derma may be related to its composition, where natural dermal fibers form a smooth surface, similar to the basement membrane. Furthermore, the results indicate that in vitro evaluation of effects on epithelial growth may accelerate the development of new bio-engineering-based wound covers. PMID:25383177

  4. The effect of different biologic and biosynthetic wound covers on keratinocyte growth, stratification and differentiation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mestak, Ondrej

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare, by means of in vitro cultivation technique, five marketed brands of wound covers used in the treatment of burns and other skin defects (Biobrane®, Suprathel®, Veloderm®, Xe-Derma®, and Xenoderm®) for their ability to stimulate the keratinocyte growth, stratification, and differentiation. In three independent experiments, human keratinocytes were grown on the tested covers in organotypic cultures by the 3T3 feeder layer technique. Vertical paraffin sections of the wound covers with keratinocytes were processed using hematoxylin–eosin staining and immunostaining for involucrin. Keratinocyte populations on the dressings were assessed for (1) number of keratinocyte strata (primary variable), (2) quantitative growth, (3) thickness of the keratinocyte layer, and (4) cell differentiation. The Xe-Derma wound cover provided the best support to keratinocyte proliferation and stratification, with the number of keratinocyte strata significantly (p?dressings. The results of this in vitro study show that the brands based on porcine dermal matrix possess the strongest effect on keratinocyte proliferation and stratification. The distinctive position of Xe-Derma may be related to its composition, where natural dermal fibers form a smooth surface, similar to the basement membrane. Furthermore, the results indicate that in vitro evaluation of effects on epithelial growth may accelerate the development of new bio-engineering-based wound covers.

  5. The design, characteristics, and application of polyurethane dressings using the electrospinning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampeerapappun, Piyaporn

    In general, a dressing is used to protect and help heal wounds. There are several types of dressings on the market such as hydrocolloid, hydrogel, and medicated dressings. One technique for making a dressing is electrospinning, which is a very simple procedure used to produce fibers. Due to much smaller fiber-diameters than produced with the conventional technique, the fibers from electrospinning have unique properties: high porosity and high surface areas, which are advantageous for wound healing. In this research, the fibers were electrospun using polyurethane, TecophilicRTM or TecoflexRTM, with various additives. First, multilayer transdermal electrospun dressings, four and five-layers, were developed that allowed for the controlled release of nitric oxide (NO) from a NO2 -/ascorbic acid system encapsulated in polymer nanofibers. The amount of NO released from each wound dressing was investigated. Both the four and five-layer dressings were tested for morphology of fibers, water absorption, nitrite distribution, NO release profile after sterilization by gamma radiation, and stability. In the case of the four-layer transdermal dressing, the dressing was tested in diabetic, periodontal, and cutaneous leishmaniasis patients. Furthermore, the color change of dressing was investigated. TecophilicRTM was also spun with an antimicrobial agent, which was added to the TecophilicRTM solution to electrospin an antimicrobial dressing. The morphology of fibers was tested using an optical microscope and the water absorption, uniformity, and percent extraction of dressing were also determined. In addition, the efficiency of the antimicrobial agent in the dressing was determined according to SN 195920-1994 and ASTM 2149-01. Another NO-releasing dressing was developed employing the NO donor molecules, sodium salt of linear polyethylenimine NONOates (LPEINO-Na) and calcium salt of linear polyethylenimine NONOates (LPEINO-Ca), which were electrospun with TecophilicRTM. The NO release profiles for the LPEINO fibers were generated using a nitric oxide analyzer (NOA) and distribution of the particles in the dressing was examined. Moreover, the amount of NO released after patch storage for 1 and 2 months was determined.

  6. Use of topical povidone-iodine dressings in the management of mycotic rhinitis in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A Hotston

    2003-07-01

    Three dogs with mycotic rhinitis were treated with a proprietary wound dressing product intended to produce a sustained release of povidone-iodine. All of the dogs had been refractory to other treatments. One dog had extensive soft tissue involvement, including extension into the orbital tissues, and another had evidence of involvement of the supporting bones of the nose. In all cases, the affected nasal cavity and/or frontal sinus was exposed via a dorsal approach and partial turbinectomy was performed. The wound dressing was applied and retained with a 'tie-over' dressing. The dressing was replaced every 48 to 72 hours until all exposed tissue was covered by healthy granulation tissue, at which time the rhinotomy was closed by soft tissue reconstruction. There was no evidence of recurrence of the fungal infection at follow-up times of up to 20 months postsurgery. PMID:12866932

  7. Gentle foam dressings: interim results of an evaluation of the Allevyn range.

    PubMed

    Grothier, Lorraine

    An understanding of how wounds heal is vital to any practitioner involved in wound management, and an understanding of how dressings function and perform while on a patient's wound is important in the decision-making process of dressing selection. This article outlines the interim results of an international multi-centre clinical in-market evaluation, and demonstrates the benefits to the patient of using the Allevyn Gentle range of dressings (Smith & Nephew). These include excellent exudate management, comfort and conformability. These results were supported by the findings that clinicians rated the performance of Allevyn Gentle at 97.3% for the indication treated, while 100% felt that Allevyn Gentle Border was easy to apply. PMID:19525902

  8. Delayed Wound Healing in Diabetic (db/db) Mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Challenge – A Model for the Study of Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ge; Hochwalt, Phillip C.; Usui, Marcia L.; Underwood, Robert A.; Singh, Pradeep K.; James, Garth A.; Stewart, Philip S.; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a major clinical problem that leads to considerable morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that an important factor in the failure of chronic wounds to heal was the presence of microbial biofilm resistant to antibiotics and protected from host defenses. A major difficulty in studying chronic wounds is the absence of suitable animal models. The goal of this study was to create a reproducible chronic wound model in diabetic mice by application of bacterial biofilm. Six millimeter punch biopsy wounds were created on the dorsal surface of diabetic (db/db) mice, subsequently challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) biofilms two days post-wounding, and covered with semi-occlusive dressings for two weeks. Most of the control wounds were epithelialized by 28 days post-wounding. In contrast, none of biofilm challenged wounds were closed. Histological analysis showed extensive inflammatory cell infiltration, tissue necrosis and epidermal hyperplasia adjacent to challenged wounds- all indicators of an inflammatory non-healing wound. Quantitative cultures and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the majority of bacteria were in the scab above the wound bed rather than in the wound tissue. The model was reproducible, allowed localized cutaneous wound infections without high mortality and demonstrated delayed wound healing following biofilm challenge. This model may provide an approach to study the role of microbial biofilms in chronic wounds as well as the effect of specific biofilm therapy on wound healing. PMID:20731798

  9. Silver and Alginates: Role in Wound Healing and Biofilm Control

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Steven L.; McCarty, Sara M.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds are known to be a significant issue globally. Of concern in wounds are the numbers and types of residing microorganisms and the ability of the host's immune system to control their proliferation. Wound healing is impeded by colonizing microorganisms growing within the biofilm phenotypic state. In this state microorganisms are recalcitrant to routinely impeded by used antimicrobial interventions. Recent advances: Silver has been reported to demonstrate efficacy on planktonic microorganisms both within the in vitro and in vivo environments. However, when silver is incorporated into a wound dressing, its antimicrobial efficacy on biofilms within the in vivo environment remains contentious. Critical Issues: Unequivocal evidence of the efficacy of silver, and wound dressings containing silver, on biofilms in clinical situations is lacking. This is principally due to the deficiency of definite biofilm definitions, markers, and evidence in the chronic wound environment. Future Direction: Research studies demonstrating antimicrobial efficacy on in vitro biofilms can be used to generate data and information appropriate for extrapolation and applicability to the in vivo environment. It is very important that inventors of antimicrobial wound dressings ensure efficacy against both planktonic and sessile microorganisms, within the in vitro and in vivo environments. PMID:26155383

  10. Assessment of patients' wound-related pain experiences in University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Obilor, Helen N; Adejumo, Prisca O; Ilesanmi, Rose E

    2014-08-14

    This study was necessitated by the international recognition of wound-related pain (WRP) as a must-address issue and patient-centred concerns. The aim of this study was to assess patients' WRP experiences at rest and in relation to dressing change. This descriptive study utilised a WRP questionnaire which incorporated a visual analogue scale of 0-10 for data collection. A total of 109 patients participated in this study; 95·4% of the participants experienced wound pain at rest and during performance of activities of daily living, which were moderate (47·1%) and severe (30·8%) in intensity. Also, 91·7% of the participants experienced wound dressing change-related pain, mostly as moderate (47·0%) and severe (28·0%) pain. The major factors that worsened WRP experiences were touch/handling, change in position/movement, wound cleansing, removal of dressings and usage of honey as a dressing agent, while the use of analgesic and brief rest between dressing change were considered the major strategies that can relieve WRP. WRP experiences have been reported by patients at rest, during performance of activities of daily living and at wound dressing change. A need to incorporate WRP assessment has been observed, which is vital in improving wound care outcome. PMID:25123165

  11. Dressing according to the weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Holland

    2011-04-06

    What should I wear so that I am comfortable outside? Get this Organizer 1. Go here Song for Telling the weather 2. Then here The weather today is? 3. Next play this Dressing Teddy Bear Game 4. Then play this game Dressing for the seasons! 5. Last play this game Dressing Caillou ...

  12. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Joseph Andrew; Underdown, Mary Jane; Clark, William Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Nutrition is one of the most basic of medical issues and is often ignored as a problem in the management of our chronic wound patients. Unfortunately, malnutrition is widespread in our geriatric patients even in nursing homes in developed countries. Attention to basic nutrition and providing appropriate supplements may assist in the healing of our chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Recent research has revealed the epidemiology of malnutrition in developed countries, the similarities to malnutrition in developing countries, and some of the physiologic and sociologic causes for this problem. More information is now available on the biochemical effects of nutrient deficiency and supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients. In some cases, administration of isolated nutrients beyond recommended amounts for healthy individuals may have a pharmacologic effect to help wounds heal. Critical Issues: Much of the knowledge of the nutritional support of chronic wounds is based on information that has been obtained from trauma management. Due to the demographic differences of the patients and differences in the physiology of acute and chronic wounds, it is not logical to assume that all aspects of nutritional support are identical in these patient groups. Before providing specific nutritional supplements, appropriate assessments of patient general nutritional status and the reasons for malnutrition must be obtained or specific nutrient supplementation will not be utilized. Future Directions: Future research must concentrate on the biochemical and physiologic differences of the acute and chronic wounds and the interaction with specific supplements, such as antioxidants, vitamin A, and vitamin D. PMID:25371850

  13. Infection in conflict wounded

    PubMed Central

    Eardley, W. G. P.; Brown, K. V.; Bonner, T. J.; Green, A. D.; Clasper, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

  14. Terpenoid-Based Defenses in Conifers: cDNA Cloning, Characterization, and Functional Expression of Wound-Inducible (E)-alpha -bisabolene Synthase from Grand fir (Abies grandis)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorg Bohlmann; John Crock; Reinhard Jetter; Rodney Croteau

    1998-01-01

    (E)-alpha -Bisabolene synthase is one of two wound-inducible sesquiterpene synthases of grand fir (Abies grandis), and the olefin product of this cyclization reaction is considered to be the precursor in Abies species of todomatuic acid, juvabione, and related insect juvenile hormone mimics. A cDNA encoding (E)-alpha -bisabolene synthase was isolated from a wound-induced grand fir stem library by a PCR-based

  15. A comprehensive evidence-based review on the role of topicals and dressings in the management of skin scarring.

    PubMed

    Sidgwick, G P; McGeorge, D; Bayat, A

    2015-08-01

    Wound healing after dermal injury is an imperfect process, inevitably leading to scar formation as the skin re-establishes its integrity. The resulting scars have different characteristics to normal skin, ranging from fine-line asymptomatic scars to problematic scarring including hypertrophic and keloid scars. Scars appear as a different colour to the surrounding skin and can be flat, stretched, depressed or raised, manifesting a range of symptoms including inflammation, erythema, dryness and pruritus, which can result in significant psychosocial impact on patients and their quality of life. In this paper, a comprehensive literature review coupled with an analysis of levels of evidence (LOE) for each published treatment type was conducted. Topical treatments identified include imiquimod, mitomycin C and plant extracts such as onion extract, green tea, Aloe vera, vitamin E and D, applied to healing wounds, mature scar tissue or fibrotic scars following revision surgery, or in combination with other more established treatments such as steroid injections and silicone. In total, 39 articles were included, involving 1703 patients. There was limited clinical evidence to support their efficacy; the majority of articles (n = 23) were ranked as category 4 LOE, being of limited quality with individual flaws, including low patient numbers, poor randomisation, blinding, and short follow-up periods. As trials were performed in different settings, they were difficult to compare. In conclusion, there is an unmet clinical need for effective solutions to skin scarring, more robust long-term randomised trials and a consensus on a standardised treatment regime to address all aspects of scarring. PMID:26044054

  16. "Who Wore the Pants?" Dress, Gender, and Power, 1850-1914.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennet, Paul W.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a study of historical documents focusing on the complex relationship between dress, gender, and power in North America in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Examines social rules governing dress and appearance, providing examples of how people dressed to comply with social expectations. Loosely based on a Smithsonian…

  17. In vitro study of improved wound-healing effect of bioactive borate-based glass nano-/micro-fibers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingbo; Chen, Sisi; Shi, Honglan; Xiao, Hai; Ma, Yinfa

    2015-10-01

    Because of the promising wound-healing capability, bioactive glasses have been considered as one of the next generation hard- and soft-tissue regeneration materials. The lack of understanding of the substantial mechanisms, however, indicates the need for further study on cell-glass interactions to better interpret the rehabilitation capability. In the present work, three bioactive glass nano-/micro-fibers, silicate-based 45S5, borate-based 13-93B3 and 1605 (additionally doped with copper oxide and zinc oxide), were firstly compared for their in vitro soaking/conversion rate. The results of elemental monitoring and electron microscopic characterization demonstrated that quicker ion releasing and glass conversion occurred in borate-based fibers than that of silicate-based one. This result was also reflected by the formation speed of hydroxyapatite (HA). This process was further correlated with original boron content and surrounding rheological condition. We showed that an optimal fiber pre-soaking time (or an ideal dynamic flow rate) should exist to stimulate the best cell proliferation and migration ability. Moreover, 13-93B3 and 1605 fibers showed different glass conversion and biocompatibility properties as well, indicating that trace amount variation in composition can also influence fiber's bioactivity. In sum, our in vitro rheological module closely simulated in vivo niche environment and proved a potentially improved wound-healing effect by borate-based glass fibers, and the results shall cast light on future improvement in bioactive glass fabrication. PMID:26117744

  18. Corneal Epithelial Wound Healing Promoted by Verbascoside-Based Liposomal Eyedrops

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosone, Luigi; Guerra, Germano; Cinelli, Mariapia; Filippelli, Mariaelena; Mosca, Monica; Vizzarri, Francesco; Giorgio, Dario; Costagliola, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    Different liposomal formulations were prepared to identify those capable of forming eyedrops for corneal diseases. Liposomes with neutral or slightly positive surface charge interact very well with the cornea. Then these formulations were loaded with verbascoside to heal a burn of corneal epithelium induced by alkali. The cornea surface affected involved in wound was monitored as a function of time. Experimental results were modeled by balance equation between the rate of healing, due to the flow of phenylpropanoid, and growth of the wound. The results indicate a latency time of only three hours and furthermore the corneal epithelium heals in 48 hours. Thus, the topical administration of verbascoside appears to reduce the action time of cells, as verified by histochemical and immunofluorescence assays. PMID:25165705

  19. Comparative Clinical Study of Bactigras and Telfa AMD for Skin Graft Donor-Site Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Muangman, Pornprom; Nitimonton, Sooksan; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2011-01-01

    The Bactigras® paraffin tulle coated with chlorhexidine is normally used for the treatment of donor-site wounds in burn patients who received split-thickness skin grafts in several centers. It has some disadvantages, such as adhesion to wound surfaces and pain from the irritation caused by this dressing. The Telfa AMD®, a non-adherent wound dressing which consists of absorbent cotton fibers impregnated with polyhexamethylene biguanide enclosed in a sleeve of thermoplastic polymers, is a new option for donor-site wound care which causes less adherence to the wound. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical efficacy of these two dressings for the management of donor-site wounds. Thirty-two patients who received split-thickness skin grafts by donor site harvesting from the thigh were enrolled in this study and randomized into two groups receiving either the Bactigras® or the Telfa AMD® wound treatment. Re-epithelialization, pain, infection and cost-effectiveness analyses were compared between both groups. The results showed that there was no significant difference in age, area of donor sites or length of hospital stays between the groups (p > 0.05). However, the day of re-epithelialization (?90%) was significantly shorter in patients treated with the Telfa AMD® compared to the Bactigras® group (14.00 ± 3.05 vs. 9.25 ± 1.88 days for Bactigras® and Telfa AMD® groups, respectively, p < 0.001). The average pain score was also significantly lower in the Telfa AMD® group (1.57 ± 0.55 vs. 4.70 ± 1.16, p < 0.001). There was no difference in the cost of treatment between the groups (4.64 ± 1.97 vs. 5.72 ± 2.54 USD, p = 0.19). This study indicated that the Telfa AMD® was an effective dressing for the treatment of donor-site wounds. PMID:21954342

  20. Split-Thickness Skin Grafts Remain the Gold Standard for the Closure of Large Acute and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Simman, Richard; Phavixay, Laemthong

    2012-01-01

    Healing large chronic and acute wounds is a challenging task for wound care providers. It requires numerous visits and frequent dressing changes and often involves expensive therapeutic modalities. Our primary and ultimate goal is to heal these wounds as quickly as possible. In a prepared wound bed, covered with granulation tissue and free of infection, skin graft is the gold standard procedure to achieve this goal. One should keep in mind that not all patients are good candidates for surgery. PMID:24525612

  1. Topical negative pressure for the treatment of neonatal post-sternotomy wound dehiscence

    PubMed Central

    Hardwicke, J; Richards, H; Jagadeesan, J; Jones, T; Lester, R

    2012-01-01

    The use of topical negative pressure (TNP) dressings for sternal wound dehiscence or mediastinitis in the neonatal population is rare. The majority of case reports have focused on wound healing as an endpoint and have not discussed the physiological advantage that TNP dressings may impart with regard to sternal stabilisation, improved respiratory function and early weaning from mechanical ventilation. We present a case of the use of TNP in neonatal post-sternotomy wound dehiscence and mediastinitis, from a UK perspective, with an emphasis on wound healing and physiological optimisation. As well as an improvement in sternal wound healing due to the local effects of the TNP system, serial arterial blood gas analysis revealed a significant improvement in systemic physiological parameters, including a reduction in pCO2 in the period (days 20–31) after application of TNP (p<0.0001) compared to the period before where simple occlusive dressings were applied. Hydrogen ion concentration also significantly reduced in this period (p=0.0058). The use of the TNP system in association with systemic antibiotics successfully treated the mediastinitis. A sealed, controlled wound environment also allowed ease of nursing and an expedited return to care by the parents. We would recommend the consideration of TNP dressings in similar cases of neonatal and paediatric sternal wound dehiscence. Not only do we observe the local effects of improved wound healing, the systemic effects of improved lung function are also valuable in the early management of such complex cases. PMID:22524922

  2. Effect of silk fibroin nanofibers containing silver sulfadiazine on wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Lim; Kim, Min Hee; Jung, Ju-Young; Min, Byung Moo; Park, Won Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the promising applications of silk fibroin (SF) in biomedical engineering is its use as a scaffolding material for skin regeneration. The purpose of this study was to determine the wound healing effect of SF nanofibrous matrices containing silver sulfadiazine (SSD) wound dressings. Methods An SF nanofibrous matrix containing SSD was prepared by electrospinning. The cell attachment and spreading of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) and normal human epidermal fibroblasts (NHEF) to SF nanofibers containing three different concentrations of SSD contents (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 wt%) were determined. In addition, a rat wound model was used in this study to determine the wound healing effect of SF nanofibers containing SSD compared with that of Acticoat™, a commercially available wound dressing. Results The number of NHEK and NHEF attached to SF nanofibers containing SSD decreased when the concentration of SSD increased. The number of attached NHEF cells was lower than that of attached NHEK cells. The SF matrix with 1.0 wt% SSD produced faster wound healing than Acticoat, although 1.0 wt% SSD inhibited the attachment of epidermal cells to SF nanofibers in vitro. Conclusion The cytotoxic effects of SF nanofibers with SSD should be considered in the development of silver-release dressings for wound healing through its antimicrobial activity. It is challenging to design wound dressings that maximize antimicrobial activity and minimize cellular toxicity. PMID:25484581

  3. Design, Preparation and Activity of Cotton Gauze for Use in Chronic Wound Research

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J. V.; Yager, Dorne; Bopp, Alvin; Diegelmann, Robert F.; Goheen, Steven C.; Cohen, I. K.

    2001-01-01

    We consider the rational design and chemical modification of cotton gauze, which is used widely in chronic wounds, to improve wound dressing fibers for application to chronic wound healing. Cotton gauze may be tailored to more effectively enhance the biochemistry of wound healing. The presence of elevated levels of elastase in non-healing wounds has been associated with the degradation of important growth factors and fibronectin necessary for wound healing. In the healing wound a balance of elastase and antiproteases precludes degradation of beneficial proteins from taking place. Cotton gauze modified to release elastase inhibitors or selectively functionalized to sequester elastase provides a dressing that decreases high levels of destructive elastase in the chronic wounds. Three approaches have been taken to explore the potential of fiber-inhibitors useful in chronic wounds: 1) Formulation of inhibitors on the dressing; 2) Synthesis of elastase recognition sequences on cotton cellulose; and 3) Data presented here on carboxymethylating, and oxidizing textile finishes of cotton gauze to remove elastase from the wound.

  4. Microarray-based characterization of differential gene expression during vocal fold wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Welham, Nathan V; Ling, Changying; Dawson, John A; Kendziorski, Christina; Thibeault, Susan L; Yamashita, Masaru

    2015-03-01

    The vocal fold (VF) mucosa confers elegant biomechanical function for voice production but is susceptible to scar formation following injury. Current understanding of VF wound healing is hindered by a paucity of data and is therefore often generalized from research conducted in skin and other mucosal systems. Here, using a previously validated rat injury model, expression microarray technology and an empirical Bayes analysis approach, we generated a VF-specific transcriptome dataset to better capture the system-level complexity of wound healing in this specialized tissue. We measured differential gene expression at 3, 14 and 60 days post-injury compared to experimentally naïve controls, pursued functional enrichment analyses to refine and add greater biological definition to the previously proposed temporal phases of VF wound healing, and validated the expression and localization of a subset of previously unidentified repair- and regeneration-related genes at the protein level. Our microarray dataset is a resource for the wider research community and has the potential to stimulate new hypotheses and avenues of investigation, improve biological and mechanistic insight, and accelerate the identification of novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25592437

  5. V.A.C. Therapy in the management of paediatric wounds: clinical review and experience.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona; Amjad, Ibrahim; Bookout, Kim; Fleck, Tatjana; Gabriel, Allen; Kaufman, David; McCord, Shannon Stone; Moores, Donald C; Olutoye, Oluyinka O; Salazar, Jorge D; Song, David H; Teich, Steven; Gupta, Subhas

    2009-08-01

    Usage of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the management of acute and chronic wounds has grown exponentially in the past decade. Hundreds of studies have been published regarding outcomes and methods of therapy used for adult wounds. This treatment is increasingly being used to manage difficult-to-treat paediatric wounds arising from congenital defects, trauma, infection, tumour, burns, pressure ulceration and postsurgical complications in children, although relatively few studies have been aimed at this population. Given the anatomical and physiological differences between adults and children, a multidisciplinary expert advisory panel was convened to determine appropriate use of NPWT with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by Vacuum Assisted Closure (V.A.C. Therapy, KCI Licensing, Inc., San Antonio, TX) for the treatment of paediatric wounds. The primary objectives of the expert advisory panel were to exchange state-of-practice information on paediatric wound care, review the published data regarding the use of NPWT/ROCF in paediatric wounds, evaluate the strength of the existing data and establish guidelines on best practices with NPWT/ROCF for the paediatric population. The proposed paediatrics-specific clinical practice guidelines are meant to provide practitioners an evidence base from which decisions could be made regarding the safe and efficacious selection of pressure settings, foam type, dressing change frequency and use of interposing contact layer selections. The guidelines reflect the state of knowledge on effective and appropriate wound care at the time of publication. They are the result of consensus reached by expert advisory panel members based on their individual clinical and published experiences related to the use of NPWT/ROCF in treating paediatric wounds. Best practices are described herein for novice and advanced users of NPWT/ROCF. Recommendations by the expert panel may not be appropriate for use in all circumstances. Decisions to adopt any particular recommendation must be made by the collaborating medical team, including the surgeon and wound care specialist based on available resources, individual patient circumstances and experience with the V.A.C. Therapy System. PMID:19614789

  6. Dressed Quarks and PROTON’S Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin-Hua; Wong, Chun Wa; Chu, Keh-Cheng

    The effect on the proton spin of mixing gluon and sea quark configurations is studied in a perturbative treatment based on the MIT bag model. As little as 29% of the proton spin is found to remain as the intrinsic spin of quarks when they are “dressed” by gluons.

  7. The Effect of Nano-Scale Topography on Keratinocyte Phenotype and Wound Healing Following Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Suzanne M.; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Wood, Fiona M.; Fear, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic modulation of tissue response is an important consideration in the design and manufacture of a biomaterial. In developing new tissue therapies for skin, all levels of architecture, including the nanoscale need to be considered. Here we show that keratinocyte phenotype is affected by nanoscale changes in topography with cell morphology, proliferation, and migration influenced by the pore size in anodic aluminum oxide membranes. A membrane with a pore size of 300?nm, which enhanced cell phenotype in vitro, was used as a dressing to cover a partial thickness burn injury in the pig. Wounds dressed with the membrane showed evidence of advanced healing with significantly less organizing granulation tissue and more mature epidermal layers than control wounds dressed with a standard burns dressing. The results demonstrate the importance of nanoscale topography in modulating keratinocyte phenotype and skin wound healing. PMID:21988618

  8. [New directions of research related to chronic wound healing].

    PubMed

    Rusak, Agnieszka; Rybak, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Optimal nutrition, immunological state and psychological condition play an important role in the process of chronic wound healing. Infections caused by pathogens resistant to commonly used antibiotics additionally complicate and disturb regeneration of wounds. As part of the treatment, modern wound dressings are used, for example designed on the basis of alginates, dextranomers, hydrogels, hydrofiber, polyurethanes foams, hydrocolloids and liquids for wound debridement such us 0.9% NaCl, the PWE liquid, Ringer's liquid, octenidine. Owing to their features, treatment in accordance with TIME concept could be realized, because they provide moisture wound bed, protection against contamination, gas exchange, protection of wound edges and infection control. Repairing process in chronic wounds is dependent on blood flow in tissues, which may be insufficient. The result is a permanent hypoxia. Natural occurring antioxidants are becoming more crucial in chronic wound treatment. They decrease oxygen radical concentration, increase angiogenesis, reduce inflammatory response, stimulate fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation, possess antibacterial properties against chemotherapeutic resistant strains. There are a lot of antioxidants in honey, papaya fruit (Carrica papaia L.), transgenic flax (Linum usitatissimum), and in orange oil (Citrus sinensis), stem of acanthus (Acanthus ebracteatus), leafs of tea (Camellia sinensis). Application of biologically active, natural derived compounds is nowadays a direction of intense in vitro and in vivo research focused on the chronic wound treatment. Results suggest beneficial influence of antioxidant on wound repairing process. Clinical research are needed to state effective influence of natural compound in the chronic wound treatment. PMID:24377187

  9. Lasers and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, A J

    1993-10-01

    The advances in laser surgery over the past decade have been remarkable and have significantly altered the management of a host of dermatologic disorders. This article focuses on the CO2 laser as a cutting and vaporization tool and reviews the features that distinguish CO2 laser-induced wounds from those created by a scalpel. Tissue welding, wound management after skin treatment with the visible light lasers based on the principle of selective photothermolysis, as well as the controversial field of low-energy laser therapy (biostimulation) are also addressed. PMID:8222362

  10. Bridal veil nylon: the trellis effect in rapid wound healing.

    PubMed

    Mangus, D J

    1978-11-01

    Commercially available bridal veil nylon (BVN) in 2.0-3,0-, and 4.0-mm hexagonal mesh is being used as a sterile dressing for burns and many surgical problems. BVN appears to promote more rapid reepithelialization of granulating burn wounds than other dressings. I suggest that the BVN mesh provides a "trellis effect", acting as a supporting structure across which, or over which, epithelium will grow more rapidly than it would without the dressing. Photographic studies illustrating this effect are included. BVN also allows us to secure recent skin grafts, and it appears to be an ideal dressing for recent hair plug transfers. It is possible to examine wounds directly and to clean them with whatever technique is indicated, including hydrotherapy and Hubbard tank regimen, and yet not to disrupt underlying structures such as skin grafts and hair plugs. A major advantage of this dressing is that it minimizes painful removal of Kling and Kurlex type dressings. Photographs demonstrate the use of BVN, which is quite inexpensive and can be gas-autoclaved in any hospital facility. PMID:747313

  11. PHMB: an effective antimicrobial in wound bioburden management.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Martyn

    The effective management of bacterial bioburden is an essential element of wound care. Recent years have seen the increased use of topical antimicrobial dressings to control colonisation and infection, yet there is concern that some may inhibit wound healing and may have systemic sequelae (World Union of Wound Healing Societies (WUWHS), 2008). This article focuses on the safety and effectiveness of PHMB, an antimicrobial compound that is relatively underused in the UK, and argues that it is an effective option for the management of bacterial colonisation and infection. PMID:22875372

  12. Antimicrobial dressing efficacy against mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm on porcine skin explants.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Priscilla L; Yang, Qingping; Davis, Stephen; Sampson, Edith M; Azeke, John I; Hamad, Afifa; Schultz, Gregory S

    2015-08-01

    An ex vivo porcine skin explant biofilm model that preserves key properties of biofilm attached to skin at different levels of maturity (0-3 days) was used to assess the efficacy of commercially available antimicrobial dressings and topical treatments. Assays were also performed on the subpopulation of antibiotic tolerant biofilm generated by 24 hours of pre-treatment with gentamicin (120× minimal inhibitory concentration) prior to agent exposure. Five types of antimicrobial agents (iodine, silver, polyhexamethylene biguanide, honey and ethanol) and four types of moisture dressings (cotton gauze, sodium carboxymethylcellulose fibre, calcium alginate fibre and cadexomer beads) were assessed. Time-release silver gel and cadexomer iodine dressings were the most effective in reducing mature biofilm [between 5 and 7 logarithmic (log) of 7-log total], whereas all other dressing formulations reduced biofilm between 0·3 and 2 log in 24 or 72 hours with a single exposure. Similar results were found after 24-hour exposure to silver release dressings using an in vivo pig burn wound model, demonstrating correlation between the ex vivo and in vivo models. Results of this study indicate that commonly used microbicidal wound dressings vary widely in their ability to kill mature biofilm and the efficacy is influenced by time of exposure, number of applications, moisture level and agent formulation (sustained release). PMID:24028432

  13. Direct current force sensing device based on compressive spring, permanent magnet, and coil-wound magnetostrictive/piezoelectric laminate.

    PubMed

    Leung, Chung Ming; Or, Siu Wing; Ho, S L

    2013-12-01

    A force sensing device capable of sensing dc (or static) compressive forces is developed based on a NAS106N stainless steel compressive spring, a sintered NdFeB permanent magnet, and a coil-wound Tb(0.3)Dy(0.7)Fe(1.92)/Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 magnetostrictive?piezoelectric laminate. The dc compressive force sensing in the device is evaluated theoretically and experimentally and is found to originate from a unique force-induced, position-dependent, current-driven dc magnetoelectric effect. The sensitivity of the device can be increased by increasing the spring constant of the compressive spring, the size of the permanent magnet, and/or the driving current for the coil-wound laminate. Devices of low-force (20 N) and high-force (200 N) types, showing high output voltages of 262 and 128 mV peak, respectively, are demonstrated at a low driving current of 100 mA peak by using different combinations of compressive spring and permanent magnet. PMID:24387458

  14. Ionic polymeric micelles based on chitosan and fatty acids and intended for wound healing. Comparison of linoleic and oleic acid.

    PubMed

    Bonferoni, M C; Sandri, G; Dellera, E; Rossi, S; Ferrari, F; Mori, M; Caramella, C

    2014-05-01

    Chitosan is well known for its positive properties in wound healing. Also unsaturated fatty acids are described as able to accelerate tissue repairing mechanisms. In this work hydrophobically modified chitosan was obtained by ionic interaction with either oleic or linoleic acid. In aqueous environment self-assembling into nanoparticles occurred. The presence of hydrophobic domains, similar to those present in polymeric micelles, was demonstrated by changes in pyrene spectra. Both oleate and linoleate derivatives showed mucoadhesion behaviour. Cytotoxicity tests on human dermal fibroblasts demonstrated good biocompatibility of especially oleate derivatives. Clarithromycin, a poorly soluble model drug proposed for use in infected wounds was successfully encapsulated in both oleic and linoleic based polymeric micelles. The ionic structure of the carriers is responsible for their loosening at neutral pH and in the presence of salts. This behaviour should impair parenteral administration of the systems, but can be useful for topical delivery where the micelle components, chitosan and fatty acid, can play a positive role in dermal regeneration and tissue repairing. PMID:24384070

  15. Medical Honey for Wound Care—Still the ‘Latest Resort’?

    PubMed Central

    Traynor, Kirsten; Santos, Kai; Blaser, Gisela; Bode, Udo; Molan, Peter

    2009-01-01

    While the ancient Egyptians and Greeks used honey for wound care, and a broad spectrum of wounds are treated all over the world with natural unprocessed honeys from different sources, Medihoney™ has been one of the first medically certified honeys licensed as a medical product for professional wound care in Europe and Australia. Our experience with medical honey in wound care refers only to this product. In this review, we put our clinical experience into a broader perspective to comment on the use of medical honey in wound care. More prospective randomized studies on a wider range of types of wounds are needed to confirm the safety and efficacy of medical honey in wound care. Nonetheless, the current evidence confirming the antibacterial properties and additional beneficial effects of medical honey on wound healing should encourage other wound care professionals to use CE-certified honey dressings with standardized antibacterial activity, such as Medihoney™ products, as an alternative treatment approach in wounds of different natures. PMID:18955301

  16. 12. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, SHOWING DRESSING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, SHOWING DRESSING FROM AND WORK/CHAMBER ROOM - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  17. Potential activity of aqueous extract of culinary-medicinal Lion's Mane mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (Bull.: Fr.) Pers. (Aphyllophoromycetideae) in accelerating wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Fard, Atieh Abdollahi; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary; Wong, Kah-Hui; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Ismail, Salmah

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of topical application of aqueous extract of Hericium erinaceus fruiting bodies (HEFB) on the rate of wound healing enclosure and histology of the healed wound. Five groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were experimentally wounded in the posterior neck area. A uniform wound area of 2.00 cm in diameter, using a circular stamp, was excised from the nape of the dorsal neck of all rats with the aid of a round seal. The animal groups were topically treated, respectively, with 0.2 mL each of sterilized distilled water (sdH2O); Intrasite gel; and 20, 30, and 40 mg/mL HEFB. Macroscopically, those rats whose wounds were dressed with HEFB and those in the Intrasite gel-treated group healed earlier than those treated with sdH2O. Histological analysis of healed wounds dressed with HEFB showed less scar width at wound enclosure and the healed wound contained fewer macrophages and more collagen with angiogenesis, compared to wounds dressed with sdH2O. In conclusion, wounds dressed with HEFB significantly enhanced the acceleration of wound healing enclosure in rats. PMID:22135902

  18. Accelerated healing of complex open pilonidal wounds using MatriStem extracellular matrix xenograft: nine cases

    PubMed Central

    Sasse, Kent C.; Brandt, Jared; Lim, Dionne C.; Ackerman, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Complex open pilonidal wounds represent a challenging wound healing problem. Nine cases of complex open pilonidal wounds are described. Each of them was treated at the time of primary wide excision with placement of xenograft extracellular matrix material derived from urinary bladder (MatriStem, ACell Corporation). The patients left the xenograft material and dressings intact and returned to our clinic at weekly intervals for inspection of the wounds. All of the cases of complex open pilonidal wounds healed without infection and without requiring re-operation. The average time to healing in this series was 7 weeks. Treatment of complex open pilonidal wounds with MatriStem extracellular matrix derived from urinary bladder in this fashion results in favorable wound healing of complex open pilonidal wounds. PMID:24964433

  19. Silver nanoparticle-embedded poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) hydrogel dressing: gamma-ray synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Khampieng, Thitikan; Brikshavana, Pasakorn; Supaphol, Pitt

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticle (nAg)-embedded poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) hydrogels, to be used as antibacterial wound dressings, were prepared by ?-irradiation at various doses: 25, 35, and 45?kGy. The formation and characteristics of the silver nanoparticles were investigated with a UV-vis spectrophotometer, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray. The hydrogels were characterized for physical and biological properties. Based on the antibacterial determination, the 1 and 5?mM nAg-embedded PVP hydrogels were effective, with 99.99% bactericidal activity at 12 and 6?h, respectively. The indirect cytotoxicity evaluation based on 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay indicated that both the neat and the nAg-embedded PVP hydrogels were non-toxic to mouse fibroblasts (L929). The 5?mM nAg-embedded PVP hydrogels not only provided a clean, moist environment for wound healing, but also effectively prevented bacterial infection and enhanced wound recovery. PMID:24754348

  20. Wound Care in Buruli Ulcer Disease in Ghana and Benin

    PubMed Central

    Velding, Kristien; Klis, Sandor-Adrian; Abass, Kabiru M.; Tuah, Wilson; Stienstra, Ymkje; van der Werf, Tjip

    2014-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a disease affecting the skin, subcutaneous fat, and bone tissues. Wound care is important in the prevention of disabilities. Awareness of current wound care practices in BU-endemic regions is necessary for future wound care interventions. Thirty-one health care workers in Ghana and Benin were interviewed with a semi-structured interview, complemented by structural observations. Quantitative data were analyzed through t tests and one-way analysis of variance, and qualitative data through descriptive statistics. There appeared to be a general understanding of wound assessment. A large variety of different topical antiseptics was reported to be used, pressure irrigation was never reported. Gauze was the main dressing type and a moist environment was preferred, but could not be maintained. Bleeding and pain were observed frequently. Standard of wound care differed importantly between health care personnel and between institutions and adherence to World Health Organization guidelines was low. PMID:24914002

  1. Tourniquet Release Prior to Dressing Application Reduces Blistering Following Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Heller, Snir; Chen, Antonia; Restrepo, Camilo; Albert, Emily; Hozack, William J

    2015-07-01

    Skin blisters occur in up to 20% of patients after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Tourniquet release results in a limb volume increase of 10%. We hypothesized that releasing tourniquet before application of circumferential dressing will decrease blister formation. A prospective study was conducted on 135 consecutive primary TKAs. The tourniquet was released immediately after wound closure to allow for re-perfusion and then a dressing was applied. These patients were compared to a historical cohort of 200 primary TKAs, where the tourniquet was released after application of dressing. There was a significant difference in the incidence of blisters between the two groups [Late 7.5% (15/200) vs early release 2.2% (3/135) P=0.028]. Releasing the tourniquet prior to dressing application has reduced the incidence of blistering following TKA. PMID:25770863

  2. Incisional negative pressure wound therapy for high-risk wounds.

    PubMed

    Horch, Raymund E

    2015-04-01

    With an ageing population and a growing number of people with obesity and/or undergoing advanced cancer therapies, there is an increasing risk of surgical site complications including surgical site infections (SSIs). Postoperative shifting of large mobilised tissue flaps, such as in abdominoplasties, remains a dreaded complication, particularly following massive weight loss. Besides negative implications for the patient, surgical site complications result in an economic burden due to prolonged and repeated wound treatments. Preventative tools to reduce SSIs are needed. In selected patients at high risk of SSI and/or wound breakdown, use of incisional NPWT has been shown to actively manage clean, closed surgical incisions. This article contains a review of scientific and clinical research relevant to incisional NPWT use over surgical incisions, with particular emphasis on the common problem of wound breakdown and SSI following body-contouring surgery in post-bariatric patients. Although there are a growing number of studies describing use of incisional NPWT in a variety of applications, including vascular, cardiac and orthopaedic, a literature search revealed few studies regarding incisional NPWT use post body-contouring surgery. In a clinical study of seroma formation, less seroma and haematoma formation was reported in post-bariatric patients who received incisional NPWT, versus the control, following body-contouring surgery. In another study of widely applied external NPWT wound dressings over the ventral and lateral trunk following post-bariatric abdominal dermolipectomy, results showed a significant reduction in exudate formation, earlier drain removal, and decreased length of hospitalisation, compared with conventional treatment. Additional controlled studies are needed to validate the clinical impact of incisional NPWT following body-contouring surgery, and to determine proper recommendations for its use. PMID:25853645

  3. Surgical wound care - closed

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the wound. Do not use soaps, lotions, powders, cosmetics, or any other skin care products on your ... around the incision: More redness More pain Swelling Bleeding The wound is larger or deeper The wound ...

  4. Effective Delivery of Doxycycline and Epidermal Growth Factor for Expedited Healing of Chronic Wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Abhilash

    The problems and high medical costs associated with chronic wounds necessitate an economical bioactive wound dressing. A new strategy was investigated to inhibit MMP-9 proteases and to release epidermal growth factor (EGF) to enhance healing. Doxycycline (DOX) and EGF were encapsulated on polyacrylic acid modified polyurethane film (PAA-PU) using Layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly. The number of bilayers tuned the concentration of DOX and EGF released over time with over 94% bioactivity of EGF retained over 4 days. A simple wound model in which MMP-9 proteases were added to cell culture containing fibroblast cells demonstrated that DOX inhibited the proteases providing a protective environment for the released EGF to stimulate cell migration and proliferation at a faster healing rate. In the presence of DOX, only small amounts of the highly bioactive EGF are sufficient to close the wound. Results show that this is new and promising bioactive dressing for effective wound management.

  5. Cytotoxicity and immunogenicity of SACCHACHITIN and its mechanism of action on skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Hung, W S; Fang, C L; Su, C H; Lai, W F; Chang, Y C; Tsai, Y H

    2001-07-01

    SACCHACHITIN membrane, a weavable skin substitute made from the residual fruiting body of Ganoderma tsugae, has been demonstrated to promote skin wound healing. Prior to its clinical application, it is critical to learn more about any possible cytotoxicity, immunogenicity, or allergy response, and at least some of its mechanism(s) of action(s). In the present studies, it has been found that SACCHACHITIN suspension at less than 0.05% shows no cytotoxicity to the primary culture of rat fibroblasts. However, at higher concentrations (> or = 0.1%), it does reduce the growth of fibroblasts, based on MTT assays. This might be caused by positive charges on chitin molecules that are too strong, and may be harmful to the cell membrane. SACCHACHITIN showed no immunogenicity after it was inoculated into rats three times; however, the unmodified, purified rabbit type I and type II collagens did. Subcutaneous injection of SACCHACHITIN suspension into rats showed no gross allergic responses on skin. Nevertheless, it did cause local acute inflammation, as observed by histological investigation. This is similar to what occurred in the wound site covered with SACCHACHITIN membrane. The chemotactic effect of SACCHACHITIN was exhibited in both intact and wounded skin tissues. This may be one of the initial beneficial effects of SACCHACHITIN membrane to wound healing. The rapid acute inflammatory process was followed by the appearance of angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation, which occurred earlier than it normally would. Coverage of the wound area with SACCHACHITIN membrane also induced an earlier formation of scar tissue to replace the granulation tissue. A 1.5 x 1.5 cm(2) wound area covered by SACCHACHITIN completely healed by 21 days, while that covered with cotton gauze did not. Therefore, SACCHACHITIN is a safe biomaterial for use as a wound dressing for skin healing. Its promoting action for wound healing might be due to its chemotactic effect for inflammatory cells. This, in turn, may facilitate subsequent angiogenesis, granulation tissue formation, and faster new tissue formation, leading to faster wound healing. PMID:11309795

  6. A prospective randomised clinical and histological study of superficial burn wound healing with honey and silver sulfadiazine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Subrahmanyam

    1998-01-01

    Histological and clinical studies of wound healing have been made on comparable fresh partial thickness burns with honey dressing or silver sulfadiazine (SSD) in two groups of 25 randomly allocated patients. Of the wounds treated with honey 84 per cent showed satisfactory epithelialization by the 7th day, and in 100 per cent of the patients by the 21st day. In

  7. Evaluation of an antimicrobial silver foam dressing for use with V.A.C. therapy: morphological, mechanical, and antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Payne, Joanna L; Ambrosio, Archel M

    2009-04-01

    The V.A.C. Therapy System (KCI, San Antonio, TX) is an integrated wound management system that creates an environment that promotes wound healing. V.A.C. GranuFoam Silver dressing (S-ROCF) is a reticulated, open-celled polyurethane foam having a pore size range of 400-600 microm. The foam is coated with silver to impart antimicrobial properties throughout the dressing. The morphological and key mechanical properties including tensile strength, ultimate elongation, tear strength, and compression resistance of this dressing were compared to the original V.A.C. GranuFoam dressing (ROCF), which is also a reticulated, open-celled polyurethane foam, and were found to be comparable. Furthermore, the antimicrobial property of S-ROCF was evaluated in vitro for efficacy against pathogens commonly found in clinical settings, including Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. S-ROCF was found to be effective during antimicrobial testing with a 99.99% reduction in colony forming units, and remained effective after 72 h of simulated V.A.C. Therapy. The antimicrobial and mechanical characteristics of the foam were unaffected by aging as demonstrated through an accelerated aging process. The V.A.C. GranuFoam Silver dressing is a specialized antimicrobial dressing for use with the V.A.C. Therapy System that exhibits morphological and mechanical properties comparable to the V.A.C. GranuFoam dressing and provides the added benefit of antimicrobial efficacy. PMID:19274724

  8. Negative pressure wound therapy in acute, contaminated wounds: documenting its safety and efficacy to support current global practice.

    PubMed

    Shweiki, Ehyal; Gallagher, Kathy E

    2013-02-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is in widespread use and its role in wound care is expanding worldwide. It is estimated that 300 million acute wounds are treated globally each year. Currently, sporadic data exist to support NPWT in acutely contaminated wounds. Despite lack of data, use of negative pressure wound therapy in such cases is increasing across the globe. We retrospectively reviewed 86 consecutive patients, totalling 97 contaminated wounds. All wounds were Class IV based on US Center for Disease Control criteria. Sepsis criteria were present in 78/86 (91%) of patients. All patients were managed with NPWT. Wound type, degree of tissue destruction, presence of infection, wound dimension, timing of initial NPWT, type and timing of wound closure and patient comorbidities were recorded. Outcome endpoints included durability of wound closure and death. Wound location was 41/97 (42%) in the torso; 56/97 (58%) at the extremities. Tissue necrosis was present in 84/97 (87%) of wounds. Infection was present in 86/97 (89%) of wounds. Average wound size was 619 cm(2) when square surface area measured; 786 cm(3) when volume measurements taken. Mean time to wound closure was 17 days, median 10 days and mode 6 days. Durability of wound closure 73/79 (92%). Deaths were noted in 6/86 (7%) of patients. No deaths appeared related to NPWT. Contemporary NPWT related acute wound care is expanding empirically, in quantity and scope across the globe. However, several areas of concern are known regarding this contemporary use of NPWT in acute wounds. Thus, it is important to assess the safety and efficacy of such expanded empiric NPWT practice. Based on our findings with NPWT in the largest known patient cohort of this type, NPWT appears safe and effective in managing acute, contaminated wounds including patients meeting sepsis criteria. These findings provide evidence-based support for current worldwide empiric NPWT-related acute wound care. PMID:22420782

  9. Wound care guidelines and formulary for community nurses.

    PubMed

    Baeyens, T A

    2000-03-01

    Community nursing is experiencing significant change as a result of developments such as improved technology, care in the community and earlier discharge of patients from hospital. Because of this, increasingly complex clinical care is required in the community, and it has been noted that community nurses are 'under considerable pressure' and show 'evidence of high stress and low morale'. Wound care is one area in which community nurses constantly battle to keep abreast of continual change. Growing product availability and diversity of use, changes in dressing techniques and the ever-increasing costs associated with wound care mean decision-making in wound care is often a complex task. In the Grampian region, a handbook of evidence-based practice guidelines with a product formulary was developed and distributed to all community nurses. The handbook was designed to ease the decision-making process by evaluating evidence-based practice and local preferences to recommend and guide nurses towards effective clinical practice and cost efficiency. All grades of district nurse in the region have been issued with their own copy of the handbook. It is presented in an A5 ring-binder format to make it easy to carry and to facilitate updating using loose-leaf inserts. The use of logos, extra information boxes and colour coding makes it easy for users to find specific areas of interest in the handbook. The success of the handbook has led to debate on the potential for development of a similar resource for use by practice nurses and in local community hospitals. PMID:11933290

  10. Antibiotic eluting clay mineral (Laponite®) for wound healing application: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ghadiri, M; Chrzanowski, W; Rohanizadeh, R

    2014-11-01

    Different materials in form of sponge, hydrogel and film have been developed and formulated for treating and dressing burn wounds. In this study, the potential of Laponite, a gel forming clay, in combination with an antimicrobial agent (mafenide), as a wound dressing material was tested in vitro. Laponite/mafenide (Lap/Maf) hydrogel was formulated in three different ratios of Lap/Maf 1:1, 1:2, 1:3. Laponite/mafenide/alginate (Lap/Maf/Alg) film was also formulated by combining Lap/Maf gel (1:1) with alginate. Intercalation rate of mafenide into the layers of Laponite nanoparticles and physico-chemical properties, including wound dressing characteristics of materials were studied using various analytical methods. Furthermore, the degradation of materials and the release profile of mafenide were investigated in simulated wound exudates fluid and antibacterial effectiveness of the eluted mafenide was tested on a range of bacterial species. The cytotoxicity of materials was also evaluated in skin fibroblast culture. The results showed that mafenide molecules were intercalated between the nano-sized layers of Laponite. The eluted mafenide showed active antibacterial effects against all three tested bacteria. All intercalated mafenide released from Lap/Maf 1:1 and 1:2 gel formulations and nearly 80% release from 1:3 formulation during test period. No significant difference was observed in release profile of mafenide between Lap/Maf/Alg film and Lap/Maf formulations. Wound dressing tests on Lap/Maf/Alg film showed it is a breathable dressing and has capacity to absorb wound exudates. The study showed that prepared Lap/Maf composite has the potential to be used as an antibiotic eluting gel or film for wound healing application. Additionally, Laponite has shown benefits in wound healing processes by releasing Mg(2+) ions and thereby reducing the cytotoxic effect of mafenide on fibroblast cells. PMID:25027303

  11. Physics of Wound Healing I: Energy Considerations

    E-print Network

    Apell, S Peter; Papazoglou, Elisabeth S; Pizziconi, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process with many components and interrelated processes on a microscopic level. This paper addresses a macroscopic view on wound healing based on an energy conservation argument coupled with a general scaling of the metabolic rate with body mass M as M^{\\gamma} where 0 wound healing rate peaks at a value determined by {\\gamma} alone, suggesting a concept of wound acceleration to monitor the status of a wound. 2) We find that the time-scale for wound healing is a factor 1/(1 -{\\gamma}) longer than the average internal timescale for producing new material filling the wound cavity in corresondence with that it usually takes weeks rather than days to heal a wound. 3) The model gives a prediction for the maximum wound mass which can be generated in terms of measurable quantities related to wound status. We compare our model predictions to experimental results for a range of different wound conditions (healthy, lean, diabetic and obses...

  12. The Healing Effect of Licorice on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infected Burn Wounds in Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tanideh, Nader; Rokhsari, Pedram; Mehrabani, Davood; Mohammadi Samani, Soleiman; Sabet Sarvestani, Fatemeh; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad; Koohi Hosseinabadi, Omid; Shamsian, Shahram; Ahmadi, Nasrollah

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Burn is still one of the most devastating injuries in emergency medicine while improvements in wound healing knowledge and technology have resulted into development of new dressings. This study was undertaken to evaluate the healing effect of licorice in Pseudomonas aeruginosa infected burn wounds of experimental rat model. METHODS One hundred and twenty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to 4 equal groups. Group A received silver sulfadiazine ointment, Group B received 10% licorice extract and Group C was considered as control group and received gel base as the base of medication. Group D did not receive any medication and just underwent burn injury. A standard 3rd degree burn wound was produced by a hot plate with similar size about 20% of total body surface area (TBSA) and at identical temperature. After 24 h of burn production, 108 colony forming units (CFU) of toxigenic strains of P. aeruginosa (PA 103) were inoculated subcutaneously into the burnt area. After 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of therapy, the animals were sacrificed and burn areas were macroscopically examined and histologically evaluated. RESULTS Decrease in size of the burn wounds, in inflammation and re-epithelialization were poor in groups B-D. Infection to P. aeruginosa was still visible in groups B-D but was absent in Group A. The mean histological score, tensile strength, maximum stress, yield strength and stiffness in groups B-D were lower compared with Group A. CONCLUSION Licorice extract in 10% concentration was shown not to be effective in healing of P. aeruginosa infected burn wounds. PMID:25489532

  13. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Put on a pair of clean gloves. Gently peel off the old dressing and Biopatch. Throw away ... grid side up and the split ends touching. Peel the backing from the clear plastic bandage (Tegaderm ...

  14. siRNA-based spherical nucleic acids reverse impaired wound healing in diabetic mice by ganglioside GM3 synthase knockdown.

    PubMed

    Randeria, Pratik S; Seeger, Mark A; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Wilson, Heather; Shipp, Desmond; Mirkin, Chad A; Paller, Amy S

    2015-05-01

    Spherical nucleic acid (SNA) gold nanoparticle conjugates (13-nm-diameter gold cores functionalized with densely packed and highly oriented nucleic acids) dispersed in Aquaphor have been shown to penetrate the epidermal barrier of both intact mouse and human skin, enter keratinocytes, and efficiently down-regulate gene targets. ganglioside-monosialic acid 3 synthase (GM3S) is a known target that is overexpressed in diabetic mice and responsible for causing insulin resistance and impeding wound healing. GM3S SNAs increase keratinocyte migration and proliferation as well as insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) receptor activation under both normo- and hyperglycemic conditions. The topical application of GM3S SNAs (50 nM) to splinted 6-mm-diameter full-thickness wounds in diet-induced obese diabetic mice decreases local GM3S expression by >80% at the wound edge through an siRNA pathway and fully heals wounds clinically and histologically within 12 d, whereas control-treated wounds are only 50% closed. Granulation tissue area, vascularity, and IGF1 and EGF receptor phosphorylation are increased in GM3S SNA-treated wounds. These data capitalize on the unique ability of SNAs to naturally penetrate the skin and enter keratinocytes without the need for transfection agents. Moreover, the data further validate GM3 as a mediator of the delayed wound healing in type 2 diabetes and support regional GM3 depletion as a promising therapeutic direction. PMID:25902507

  15. New advances in instillation therapy in wounds at risk for compromised healing.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Allen; Kahn, Kevin M

    2014-03-01

    Combined use of adjunctive negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and instillation of topical wound solutions and suspensions (NPWTi) has proven to be an effective next-generation NPWT technique for wounds at risk for compromised healing. Fluid instillation has been shown to enhance exudate and debris removal, provide regular cleansing of the wound bed, and add moisture to the wound. Positive results have been demonstrated with NPWTi in assisting healing of stalled wounds and treating painful wounds as well as wounds at high risk for amputation. NPWTi has been used instead of conventional NPWT in wounds with thick exudate and slough content, acute traumatic wounds, wounds acutely debrided due to infected soft tissue, large areas of post-debrided exposed bone, and cases of critical bacterial colonization. Instilled solutions have included topical solutions such as saline, topical wound cleansers, and antiseptics. While various systems that combine instillation or irrigation with NPWT have been commercialized during the past decade, until very recently these have been relatively cumbersome to use and limited in their ability to regulate solution volume delivery. Recent advances in NPWTi technology (V.A.C. VeraFlo™ Therapy, KCI, San Antonio, TX) include automated volumetrically controlled delivery of fluids and upgraded foam dressing technology to provide better control and delivery of solutions to the wound bed. This article describes the latest NPWTi technology and provides recommendations for successful application of NPWTi in an effort to inform clinicians about product decision-making and practice. PMID:24700215

  16. Poly (3-hydroxyalkanoates)-co-(6-hydroxyhexanoate) hydrogel promotes angiogenesis and collagen deposition during cutaneous wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Gumel, Ahmad Mohammed; Razaif-Mazinah, Mohd Rafais Mohd; Anis, Siti Nor Syairah; Annuar, Mohamad Suffian Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Wound management and healing in several physiological or pathological conditions, particularly when comorbidities are involved, usually proves to be difficult. This presents complications leading to socio-economic and public health burdens. The accelerative wound healing potential of biocompatible poly(3-hydroxyalkanoates)-co-(6-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHA-PCL) composite hydrogel is reported herein. The biosynthesized PHA-PCL macromer was cross-linked with PEGMA to give a hydrogel. Twenty-four rats weighing 200-250?g each were randomly assigned to four groups of six rats. Rats in group I (negative control) were dressed with sterilized gum acacia paste in 10% normal saline while PEGMA-alone hydrogel (PH) was used to dress group II (secondary control) rats. Group III rats were dressed with PHAs-PCL cross-linked PEGMA hydrogel (PPH). For the positive control (group IV), the rats were dressed with Intrasite(®) gel. Biochemical, histomorphometric and immunohistomorphometric analyses revealed a significant difference in area closure and re-epithelialization on days 7 and 14 in PPH or Intrasite(®) gel groups compared to gum acacia or PEGMA-alone groups. Furthermore, wounds dressed with PPH or Intrasite(®) gel showed evident collagen deposition, enhanced fibrosis and extensively organized angiogenesis on day 14 compared to the negative control group. While improvement in wound healing of the PH dressed group could be observed, there was no significant difference between the negative control group and the PH dressed group in any of the tests. The findings suggested that topical application of PPH accelerated the rats' wound healing process by improving angiogenesis attributed to the increased microvessel density (MVD) and expressions of VEGF-A in tissue samples. Thus, PPH has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of cutaneous wounds in rats, and could be a potential novel agent in the management and acceleration of wound healing in humans and animals. PMID:26154416

  17. The wound hormone jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J.K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant tissues are highly vulnerable to injury by herbivores, pathogens, mechanical stress, and other environmental insults. Optimal plant fitness in the face of these threats relies on complex signal transduction networks that link damage-associated signals to appropriate changes in metabolism, growth, and development. Many of these wound-induced adaptive responses are triggered by de novo synthesis of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Recent studies provide evidence that JA mediates systemic wound responses through distinct cell autonomous and nonautonomous pathways. In both pathways, bioactive JAs are recognized by an F-box protein-based receptor system that couples hormone binding to ubiquitin-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins. These results provide a new framework for understanding how plants recognize and respond to tissue injury. PMID:19695649

  18. Fixation of skin grafts with a new silicone rubber dressing (Mepitel).

    PubMed

    Vloemans, A F; Kreis, R W

    1994-03-01

    A new silicone rubber dressing material, Mepitel was tested as an alternative to SurfaSoft and staples or sutures and a vaseline gauze for the fixation of 45 split skin grafts in 38 children. Almost all grafts took completely. No graft was lost because of inadequate fixation. The main advantage over fixing the graft with SurfaSoft combined with staples, or a vaseline gauze combined with sutures, is that the removal of the dressing is painless, and neither the graft nor the wound is disturbed. PMID:8029657

  19. Unprecedented Silver Resistance in Clinically Isolated Enterobacteriaceae: Major Implications for Burn and Wound Management.

    PubMed

    Finley, Phillip J; Norton, Rhy; Austin, Cindy; Mitchell, Amber; Zank, Sara; Durham, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Increased utilization of inorganic silver as an adjunctive to many medical devices has raised concerns of emergent silver resistance in clinical bacteria. Although the molecular basis for silver resistance has been previously characterized, to date, significant phenotypic expression of these genes in clinical settings is yet to be observed. Here, we identified the first strains of clinical bacteria expressing silver resistance at a level that could significantly impact wound care and the use of silver-based dressings. Screening of 859 clinical isolates confirmed 31 harbored at least 1 silver resistance gene. Despite the presence of these genes, MIC testing revealed most of the bacteria displayed little or no increase in resistance to ionic silver (200 to 300 ?M Ag(+)). However, 2 isolates (Klebsiella pneumonia and Enterobacter cloacae) were capable of robust growth at exceedingly high silver concentrations, with MIC values reaching 5,500 ?M Ag(+). DNA sequencing of these two strains revealed the presence of genes homologous to known genetic determinants of heavy metal resistance. Darkening of the bacteria's pigment was observed after exposure to high silver concentrations. Scanning electron microscopy images showed the presence of silver nanoparticles embedded in the extracellular polymeric substance of both isolates. This finding suggested that the isolates may neutralize ionic silver via reduction to elemental silver. Antimicrobial testing revealed both organisms to be completely resistant to many commercially available silver-impregnated burn and wound dressings. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence of clinical bacteria capable of expressing silver resistance at levels that could significantly impact wound management. PMID:26014954

  20. Wound bed preparation for ischemic diabetic foot ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaoxin; Lv, Lei; Guan, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to evaluate the effect of allograft skin on wound angiogenesis and wound bed preparation of ischemic diabetic foot ulcer. Methods: A total of 60 cases of patients with diabetic foot ulcer were randomly divided into the experimental group (n = 30) and the control group (n = 30). After debridement, in the experimental group, allograft skin was used to cover the wound while in the control group, vaseline and gauze was used to cover the wound. The wound was opened and dressed at 3, 5, 7, 14 days after operation and the growth condition of the granulation tissue was observed and recorded. Results: The wound bed preparation time of the experimental group was 14.37 ± 1.06 days, compared with the control group 25.99 ± 4.03 days, there was statistically significant difference (t = 14.78, P < 0.0001). The mean cure time of the experimental group was 32 ± 1.93 days and this time was significantly shortened than the control group 39.73 ± 2.55 days (t = 12.521, P < 0.01). Conclusions: Allogeneic skin has a protective effect on the wound and could promote vascularization of ischemic diabetic foot ulcer and shorten the wound bed preparation time and treatment cycle. PMID:25785072

  1. Honey in modern wound care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, L; Heyneman, A; Hoeksema, H; Verbelen, J; Monstrey, S

    2013-12-01

    Honey, known for centuries as a topical treatment for a wide range of wounds, has recently known a revival in modern wound care. The objective of this systematic review is to evaluate the available evidence and the role of honey in contemporary wound care. The search strategy was developed in the databases PubMed and ISI Web of Science. Fifty-five studies of any design, evaluating the use of honey in human burns, ulcers and other wounds, written in English, French, German or Dutch were eligible for inclusion. In all three wound categories honey seems to be a dressing with wound healing stimulating properties. In burns there is also evidence for its antibacterial capacity. In general, honey is also been mentioned to have deodorizing, debridement, anti-inflammatory and wound pain reducing properties, although the evidence for these properties is rather limited. Many of the included studies have methodological problems, and the quality of certain studies is low, making it difficult to formulate conclusive guidelines. This review reveals several gaps in the research of honey in modern wound care, and recommendations are suggested for future research. PMID:23896128

  2. Low-cost uncalibrated video-based tool for tridimensional reconstruction oriented to assessment of chronic wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Leslie; Treuillet, Sylvie; Valencia, Braulio; Llanos, Alejandro; Castañeda, Benjamín.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a major problem worldwide which mainly affects to the geriatric population or patients with limited mobility. In tropical countries, Cutaneous Leishmaniasis(CL)s is also a cause for chronic wounds,being endemic in Peru in the 75% of the country. Therefore, the monitoring of these wounds represents a big challenge due to the remote location of the patients. This papers aims to develop a low-cost user-friendly technique to obtain a 3D reconstruction for chronic wounds oriented to clinical monitoring and assessment. The video is taken using a commercial hand-held video camera without the need of a rig. The algorithm has been specially designed for skin wounds which have certain characteristics in texture where techniques used in regular SFM applications with undefined edges wouldn't work. In addition, the technique has been developed using open source libraries. The 3D cloud point estimated allows the computation of metrics as volume, depth, superficial area which recently have been used by CL specialists showing good results in clinical assessment. Initial results in cork phantoms and CL wounds show an average distance error of less than 1mm when compared against models obtained with a industrial 3D laser scanner.

  3. Reduction in Wound Bioburden using a Silver-Loaded Dissolvable Microfilm Construct

    PubMed Central

    Herron, Maggie; Agarwal, Ankit; Kierski, Patricia R.; Calderon, Diego F.; Teixeira, Leandro B. C.; Schurr, Michael J.; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Silver is a widely used antimicrobial agent, yet when impregnated in macroscopic dressings, it stains wounds, can lead to tissue toxicity and can inhibit healing. Recently, we reported that polymeric nanofilms containing silver nanoparticles exhibit antimicrobial activity at loadings and release rates of silver that are 100x lower than conventional dressings. Here we report fabrication of composite microfilm constructs that provide a facile way to transfer the silver-loaded polymeric nanofilms onto wounds in vivo. The construct is fabricated from a silver nanoparticle-loaded polymeric nanofilm that is laminated with a micrometer-thick soluble film of polyvinylalcohol (PVA). When placed on a moist wound, the PVA dissolves, leaving the silver-loaded nanofilm immobilized on the wound-bed. In vitro, the immobilized nanofilms release <1 ?g cm?2/day of silver over 30 days from skin-dermis and they kill 5 log10 CFUs of Staphylococcus aureus in 24 h. In mice, wounds inoculated with 105 CFU S. aureus presented up to 3 log10 less bacterial burden when treated with silver/nanofilms for 3 days, as compared to unmodified wounds. In uncontaminated wounds, silver/nanofilms allow normal and complete wound closure by re-epithelialization. We conclude that dissolvable microfilm constructs may overcome key limitations associated with current uses of silver in wound healing. PMID:24523027

  4. Living in dressings and bandages: findings from workshops with people with Epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Grocott, Patricia; Blackwell, Rebecca; Weir, Heather; Pillay, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited disorder causing extensive, painful skin blistering and wounds. Currently, there is no cure and the focus of care is on the clinical management of the skin and other affected body systems, together with supportive care to individuals and families. The wound care for Epidermolysis bullosa (WEB) project is a collaboration with adults with EB, carers, clinical nurse specialists, a designer and manufacturers to develop novel products for EB wound care. This article reports the findings from workshops with adults with EB, their carers and clinical nurse specialists, together with observations of dressing changes. A cluster of significant limitations were revealed in the performance of wound care products, designed to cover a single wound, when they are used to cover extensive and whole body wounds. A working hypothesis for EB wound care was developed from the findings, together with design concepts and new products for EB wound care. In addition, a model of user engagement in medical device development and evaluation has been tested. PMID:22487531

  5. Pharmaceutical properties of a low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose (L-HPC) hydrogel as a novel external dressing.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Atsushi; Nakayama, Sachie; Uehara, Mami; Mori, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Mai; Aiba, Tetsuya; Kurosaki, Yuji

    2014-12-30

    Controlling the moisture balance between exudates and their transpiration from the surface of wounded skin is important for healing. Low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose (L-HPC) hydrogel sheets (HGSs) possessing high water retention and water vapor transmission properties were prepared by neutralizing the highly viscous alkaline liquid of 7-10% L-HPC. Glycerol-impregnated L-HPC hydrogel sheets (L-HPC G-HGSs) were obtained by exchanging aqueous liquid in L-HPC HGSs. The physical characteristics required for wound dressings, i.e., mechanical strength, adhesive strength, and water retention properties, as well as the water vapor transmission (WVT) properties of L-HPC HGSs and L-HPC G-HGSs were evaluated. The mechanical strengths of L-HPC HGSs were enhanced with increases in the L-HPC content. The impregnation of glycerol in L-HPC HGSs yielded a significantly elasticated sheet. The adhesive strengths of L-HPC HGSs were significantly lower than those of commercial medical dressings. Water retention in L-HPC HGSs after being stored for 2h at 37°C was approximately 50%. The WVT rate of 7% L-HPC HGS was approximately 40g/m(2)/h, which was markedly higher than that of silicone gel type medical dressings. In conclusion, L-HPC HGSs are promising dressings that maintain an adequate moisture balance by transpiring excessive wound exudates with less damage to the healing wound. PMID:25455783

  6. A wearable stimulation bandage for electrotherapy studies in a rat ischemic wound model.

    PubMed

    Howe, Daniel S; Dunning, Jeremy L; Henzel, Mary K; Graebert, Jennifer K; Bogie, Kath M

    2011-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of electro-therapy in the treatment of chronic wounds is currently debated, and a in-vivo evaluation of stimulation parameters will provide the statistical evidence needed to direct clinical guidelines. A low-cost, wearable electrical stimulation bandage has been developed for use with an established rat ischemic wound model. The bandage consists of a user-programmable stimulator PCB and a plastic bandage with two hydrogel electrodes. The battery-powered bandage may be used for up to seven days between dressing changes, and the stimulator may be reused. The microcontroller-based stimulator uses a boost converter circuit to generate pulses up to 90 V from a 3 V coin cell battery. Consistent operation of the boost converter over the wide input and output voltage ranges is achieved using voltage feedforward and soft-start techniques implemented in firmware. The bandages are laser-cut to shape, and electrical traces are applied using stencils and conductive nickel paint. Both the PCB and electrical traces are encapsulated to protect the animal. The device has been successfully demonstrated using the rat ischemic wound model for a period of seven days, and clinical experiments are ongoing. PMID:22254308

  7. Continued-fraction analysis of dressed systems: Application to periodically driven optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanon-Willette, Thomas; de Clercq, Emeric; Arimondo, Ennio

    2013-02-01

    Radio-frequency quantum engineering of spins is based on the dressing by a nonresonant electromagnetic field. Radio-frequency dressing occurs also for the motion of particles, electrons, or ultracold atoms, within a periodic spatial potential. The dressing, producing a renormalization and also a freeze of the system energy, is described by different approaches: dressed atom, magnetic resonance semiclassical treatment, and continued-fraction solution of the Schrödinger equation. A comparison between these solutions points out that the semiclassical treatment, to be denoted as the S solution, represents the most convenient tool to evaluate the tunneling renormalization of ultracold atoms.

  8. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  9. Development of an evidence-based protocol for care of pilonidal sinus wounds healing by secondary intent using a modified Reactive Delphi procedure. Part 2: methodology, analysis and results.

    PubMed

    Harris, Connie L; Holloway, Samantha

    2012-04-01

    This is the second part of the article based on the thesis work for a Masters of Science in Wound Healing and Tissue Repair, Cardiff University, to develop an evidence-based protocol for the care of pilonidal sinus wounds (PSWs) healing by secondary intent, using a modified Reactive Delphi process. The sample included surgeons, clinic physicians, nurses and enterostomal therapy nurses experienced in the care of these wounds. Item generation involved an extensive review of the literature to identify key aspects of evidence-based wound care essential to wound healing, infected wounds and pilonidal wounds healing by secondary intent and drawing on clinical experience. The participants responded via an electronic Delphi website, using a 4-point Likert rating scale and a ranking system. Comments were invited. Feedback was provided to the participants at the end of each round, that included comments, consensus scores, content validity index and additional information that provided rationale and references, or minor revision if requested. This project successfully achieved the objectives, which were to identify the areas of care that negatively or positively influences healing of postoperative PSWs and to inform, educate and broaden the considerations regarding these factors for health care professionals. PMID:22296455

  10. The safety, efficacy, and tolerability of a novel silicone gel dressing following dermatological surgery.

    PubMed

    Sandhofer, Matthias; Schauer, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Silicone gel has for many years had a primary role in the treatment and prevention of abnormal scars, in the form of hypertrophic scars and keloids after epithelialization. The authors report preliminary findings on the use of a new, medical-grade, film-forming silicone gel dressing approved for use on open wounds and injured skin as monotherapy and in combination with other treatments prior to re-epithelialization. An observational study involving 105 patients examined the silicone gel's effectiveness in promoting accelerated epithelialization, reducing the inflammatory response and in the prevention of scarring. The study was conducted on a range of dermatological surgical interventions. The authors' observations confirmed silicone's role in promoting accelerated wound healing, scar prevention, and the utility of this new film-forming silicone dressing when used in combination with various other treatment modalities. PMID:23346665

  11. Bacterial Growth Kinetics under a Novel Flexible Methacrylate Dressing Serving as a Drug Delivery Vehicle for Antiseptics

    PubMed Central

    Forstner, Christina; Leitgeb, Johannes; Schuster, Rupert; Dosch, Verena; Kramer, Axel; Cutting, Keith F.; Leaper, David J.; Assadian, Ojan

    2013-01-01

    A flexible methacrylate powder dressing (Altrazeal®) transforms into a wound contour conforming matrix once in contact with wound exudate. We hypothesised that it may also serve as a drug delivery vehicle for antiseptics. The antimicrobial efficacy and influence on bacterial growth kinetics in combination with three antiseptics was investigated in an in vitro porcine wound model. Standardized in vitro wounds were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; ATCC 33591) and divided into six groups: no dressing (negative control), methacrylate dressing alone, and combinations with application of 0.02% Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB), 0.4% PHMB, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine, 7.7 mg/mL Povidone-iodine (PVP-iodine), and 0.1% Octenidine-dihydrochloride (OCT) + 2% phenoxyethanol. Bacterial load per gram tissue was measured over five days. The highest reduction was observed with PVP-iodine at 24 h to log10 1.43 cfu/g, followed by OCT at 48 h to log10 2.41 cfu/g. Whilst 0.02% PHMB resulted in a stable bacterial load over 120 h to log10 4.00 cfu/g over 120 h, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine inhibited growth during the first 48 h, with slightly increasing bacterial numbers up to log10 5.38 cfu/g at 120 h. These results indicate that this flexible methacrylate dressing can be loaded with various antiseptics serving as drug delivery system. Depending on the selected combination, an individually shaped and controlled antibacterial effect may be achieved using the same type of wound dressing. PMID:23698780

  12. Bacterial Growth Kinetics under a Novel Flexible Methacrylate Dressing Serving as a Drug Delivery Vehicle for Antiseptics.

    PubMed

    Forstner, Christina; Leitgeb, Johannes; Schuster, Rupert; Dosch, Verena; Kramer, Axel; Cutting, Keith F; Leaper, David J; Assadian, Ojan

    2013-01-01

    A flexible methacrylate powder dressing (Altrazeal®) transforms into a wound contour conforming matrix once in contact with wound exudate. We hypothesised that it may also serve as a drug delivery vehicle for antiseptics. The antimicrobial efficacy and influence on bacterial growth kinetics in combination with three antiseptics was investigated in an in vitro porcine wound model. Standardized in vitro wounds were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; ATCC 33591) and divided into six groups: no dressing (negative control), methacrylate dressing alone, and combinations with application of 0.02% Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB), 0.4% PHMB, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine, 7.7 mg/mL Povidone-iodine (PVP-iodine), and 0.1% Octenidine-dihydrochloride (OCT) + 2% phenoxyethanol. Bacterial load per gram tissue was measured over five days. The highest reduction was observed with PVP-iodine at 24 h to log10 1.43 cfu/g, followed by OCT at 48 h to log10 2.41 cfu/g. Whilst 0.02% PHMB resulted in a stable bacterial load over 120 h to log10 4.00 cfu/g over 120 h, 0.1% PHMB + 0.1% betaine inhibited growth during the first 48 h, with slightly increasing bacterial numbers up to log10 5.38 cfu/g at 120 h. These results indicate that this flexible methacrylate dressing can be loaded with various antiseptics serving as drug delivery system. Depending on the selected combination, an individually shaped and controlled antibacterial effect may be achieved using the same type of wound dressing. PMID:23698780

  13. The impact of stress at dressing change in patients with burns: a review of the literature on pain and itching.

    PubMed

    Upton, Dominic; Andrews, Abbye

    2014-03-01

    Burn wounds can be particularly painful and stressful for patients, particularly during dressing change and other aspects of wound care. Research into other types of wounds has demonstrated that stress and pain at dressing change are closely linked and related to healing, since high levels of stress and pain are associated with a longer length of time for a wound to heal. Additionally, there is some evidence to suggest a similar relationship between stress and itching. This article presents a review of the literature into stress, pain, and itching in patients with burns. The review demonstrates the importance of dressing change management with these patients. Furthermore, suggestions are made for areas of research that are yet to be explored, as such research, and the findings that emerge, could have important implications for clinical practice when working with people with burns. The common focus of such studies should be the aim of minimizing stress and discomfort for people with burns and other wounds so as to improve patient well being and treatment outcomes. PMID:25860332

  14. Managing biofilm by using dressings.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    2015-06-01

    Biofilm is a thin layer containing masses of microorganisms; it has a gelatinous protective cover that is capable of attaching to virtually any surface. A wound provides the perfect medium for the growth of bacteria. In a wound, the organisms in the biofilm can obtain nutrients more easily than when they live on their own, and they are protected from many of the insults of daily life. This article will focus on these microorganisms and their ability to protect the colony against all attempts to remove it and the problems biofilm creates within a wound. PMID:26052989

  15. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gastrointestinal system, or respiratory system — fluids and other contaminants could get into the wound and cause infection. ... sure there are no remaining bacteria or other contaminants, they will stitch or close the wound. Sometimes, ...

  16. Gunshot wounds - aftercare

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 11(9):546-551. Leong M, Phillips LG. Wound Healing. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery . 19th ed. ... Of Gunshot Wounds To The Limbs: A Review. The Internet Journal ...

  17. Diabetic Wound Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or a brace, specialized castings, or use a wheelchair or crutches. These devices will reduce the pressure ... location, pressure on the wound from walking or standing, swelling, circulation, blood glucose levels, wound care, and ...

  18. Dressings of the Nailbed following Nail Avulsion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. F. DOVE; J. P. SLOAN; T. J. MOULDER; A. BARKER

    1988-01-01

    Dressings of the raw nailbed tend to adhere and to be difficult and painful to remove. We have compared three types of dressing: polyurethane sponge, paraffin-gauze and replacement of the finger-nail. Assessment of adherence and pain showed that replacement of the nail had significant advantages over the other dressings.

  19. School Dress Codes and Uniform Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Wendell

    2002-01-01

    Opinions abound on what students should wear to class. Some see student dress as a safety issue; others see it as a student-rights issue. The issue of dress codes and uniform policies has been tackled in the classroom, the boardroom, and the courtroom. This Policy Report examines the whole fabric of the debate on dress codes and uniform policies…

  20. Vacuum Assisted Closure Therapy versus Standard Wound Therapy for Open Musculoskeletal Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Kushagra; Chauhan, Vijendra D.; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Chauhan, Neena; Rajan, Manu; Agrawal, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Background. This study was performed to evaluate the results of vacuum assisted wound therapy in patients with open musculoskeletal injuries. Study Design and Setting. Prospective, randomized, and interventional at tertiary care hospital, from 2011 to 2012. Materials and Methods. 30 patients of open musculoskeletal injuries underwent randomized trial of vacuum assisted closure therapy versus standard wound therapy around the upper limb and lower limb. Mean patient age was 39 ± 18 years (range, 18 to 76 years). Necrotic tissues were debrided before applying VAC therapy. Dressings were changed every 3 or 4 days. For standard wound therapy, debridement followed by daily dressings was done. Data Management and Statistical Analysis. The results obtained were subjected to statistical analysis. Results. The size of soft tissue defects reduced more than 5?mm to 25?mm after VAC (mean decrease of 26.66%), whereas in standard wound therapy, reduction in wound size was less than 5?mm. A free flap was needed to cover exposed bone and tendon in one case in standard wound therapy group. No major complication occurred that was directly attributable to treatment. Conclusion. Vacuum assisted wound therapy was found to facilitate the rapid formation of healthy granulation tissue on open wounds in the upper limb and lower limb, thus to shorten healing time and minimize secondary soft tissue defect coverage procedures. PMID:23878741

  1. Using negative pressure wound therapy following surgery for complex pilonidal disease: a case series.

    PubMed

    Bendewald, Frank P; Cima, Robert R; Metcalf, Dan R; Hassan, Imran

    2007-05-01

    Complex pilonidal disease, an uncommon manifestation of an anorectal condition, is characterized by chronic or recurrent abscesses with extensive, branching sinus tracts. Definitive treatment requires wide excision of all involved tissue followed by secondary intention healing or reconstructive surgery. All treatment options have unique advantages and disadvantages. Following recent reports that negative pressure wound therapy after surgery for complex pilonidal disease may be a useful alternative to moist saline dressing treatments, five patients (three men and two women, median age 21 years [range: 16 to 63 years]) with complex pilonidal disease (symptom duration range 6 months to 30 years) were treated on an outpatient basis. Following wide excision under general anesthesia, a portable negative pressure wound therapy device was applied. Mean wound defect size after excision was 11 cm x 4 cm x 5 cm, or 205 cm(3) (range 90 cm(3) to 410 cm(3)). Negative pressure wound therapy was used for an average of 6 weeks (range 4 to 9 weeks) and mean time to complete epithelialization was 12 weeks (range 9 to 22 weeks), including use of moist saline dressings post negative pressure wound therapy. Treatment was discontinued in one patient due to skin irritation. No other complications were observed. Long-term follow-up is required to assess the risk of recurrent pilonidal disease or wound failure following negative pressure wound therapy. Additional studies of negative pressure wound therapy in the management of pilonidal disease are warranted. PMID:17551174

  2. Negative pressure wound therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL KIRBY

    2010-01-01

    D iabetic foot disease is a major global burden. Foot ulcers frequently develop complications and become chronic, representing a considerable challenge as these are typically very difficult to treat. New therapies are needed to address these wounds and there is an increasing focus on negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). This technique has been shown to accelerate wound healing and although

  3. Negative pressure wound therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Kirby

    2007-01-01

    iabetic foot disease is a major global burden. Foot ulcers frequently develop complications and become chronic, representing a considerable challenge as these are typically very difficult to treat. New therapies are needed to address these wounds and there is an increasing focus on negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). This technique has been shown to accelerate wound healing and although its

  4. Tacky but refined: a "slick" technique for dressings that hold better.

    PubMed

    Carrington, P R

    2000-10-01

    For decades benzoin has been used to enhance the "stickiness" of the skin for improved adherence complementing the protective and functional aspects of well-constructed surgical bandages/dressings. The fully adherent and longer-lasting pressure dressing is both aesthetically pleasing to the patient (and surgeon) and, at the same time, functions to decrease seroma or hematoma formation, enhances antisepsis by blocking transient bacterial contamination, and inhibits traumatic sabotage of surgical wounds due to patient overactivity or inadvertent collision with a door jam, car door, table leg, or grandchild, etc. Also, when the bandage looks good, the patient realizes the operation was a success (at least aesthetically). Although simple, our additional steps of deoiling the skin with acetone, followed by multiple compress/release cycles of gauze to the Mastisol area reaps benefits to the patient and surgeon both in function (adherence) and in the production of a truly "dressy" beautiful and long-lasting dressing. In this way, the dressing "bed" is not only more receptive to one's aesthetically pleasing bandage, but is more tacky, yet refined. This same technique can be utilized prior to application of adhesive strips to healing wounds after sutures have been removed, allowing them to "stay on" longer with potentially better cosmesis and less spreading of the scar. PMID:11050495

  5. Methoxyflurane analgesia for burns dressings

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Kathleen J.

    1972-01-01

    The requirements for analgesia for burns dressings are discussed. Methoxyflurane has proved satisfactory in a clinical trial, and can be administered by one of two types of vaporizer. The possibility of nephrotoxicity due to methoxyflurane has not been eliminated. PMID:5024149

  6. Biofilms and Wounds: An Identification Algorithm and Potential Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Steven L.; Vuotto, Claudia; Donelli, Gianfranco; Lipsky, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: The presence of a “pathogenic” or “highly virulent” biofilm is a fundamental risk factor that prevents a chronic wound from healing and increases the risk of the wound becoming clinically infected. There is presently no unequivocal gold standard method available for clinicians to confirm the presence of biofilms in a wound. Thus, to help support clinician practice, we devised an algorithm intended to demonstrate evidence of the presence of a biofilm in a wound to assist with wound management. Recent Advances: A variety of histological and microscopic methods applied to tissue biopsies are currently the most informative techniques available for demonstrating the presence of generic (not classified as pathogenic or commensal) biofilms and the effect they are having in promoting inflammation and downregulating cellular functions. Critical Issues: Even as we rely on microscopic techniques to visualize biofilms, they are entities which are patchy and dispersed rather than confluent, particularly on biotic surfaces. Consequently, detection of biofilms by microscopic techniques alone can lead to frequent false-negative results. Furthermore, visual identification using the naked eye of a pathogenic biofilm on a macroscopic level on the wound will not be possible, unlike with biofilms on abiotic surfaces. Future Direction: Lacking specific biomarkers to demonstrate microscopic, nonconfluent, virulent biofilms in wounds, the present focus on biofilm research should be placed on changing clinical practice. This is best done by utilizing an anti-biofilm toolbox approach, rather than speculating on unscientific approaches to identifying biofilms, with or without staining, in wounds with the naked eye. The approach to controlling biofilm should include initial wound cleansing, periodic debridement, followed by the application of appropriate antimicrobial wound dressings. This approach appears to be effective in removing pathogenic biofilms. PMID:26155381

  7. Optimized polymeric film-based nitric oxide delivery inhibits bacterial growth in a mouse burn wound model.

    PubMed

    Brisbois, Elizabeth J; Bayliss, Jill; Wu, Jianfeng; Major, Terry C; Xi, Chuanwu; Wang, Stewart C; Bartlett, Robert H; Handa, Hitesh; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2014-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has many biological roles (e.g. antimicrobial agent, promoter of angiogenesis, prevention of platelet activation) that make NO releasing materials desirable for a variety of biomedical applications. Localized NO release can be achieved from biomedical grade polymers doped with diazeniumdiolated dibutylhexanediamine (DBHD/N2O2) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). In this study, the optimization of this chemistry to create film/patches that can be used to decrease microbial infection at wound sites is examined. Two polyurethanes with different water uptakes (Tecoflex SG-80A (6.2±0.7wt.%) and Tecophilic SP-60D-20 (22.5±1.1wt.%)) were doped with 25wt.% DBHD/N2O2 and 10wt.% of PLGA with various hydrolysis rates. Films prepared with the polymer that has the higher water uptake (SP-60D-20) were found to have higher NO release and for a longer duration than the polyurethane with the lower water uptake (SG-80A). The more hydrophilic polymer enhances the hydrolysis rate of the PLGA additive, thereby providing a more acidic environment that increases the rate of NO release from the NO donor. The optimal NO releasing and control SG-80A patches were then applied to scald burn wounds that were infected with Acinetobacter baumannii. The NO released from these patches applied to the wounds is shown to significantly reduce the A. baumannii infection after 24h (?4 log reduction). The NO release patches are also able to reduce the level of transforming growth factor-? in comparison to controls, which can enhance re-epithelialization, decrease scarring and reduce migration of bacteria. The combined DBHD/N2O2 and PLGA-doped polymer patches, which could be replaced periodically throughout the wound healing process, demonstrate the potential to reduce risk of bacterial infection and promote the overall wound healing process. PMID:24980058

  8. [Principles of wound treatment].

    PubMed

    Bruhin, A; Metzger, J

    2007-09-01

    New techniques and devices have revolutionized the treatment of wounds during the last years. For the treatment of wounds we have nowadays a great variety of new gadgets, tools and methods. Complex wounds require specific skills, given the fact that a great number of different promising methods are on the market to enable an optimal wound management. Well educated "wound experts" are required to overcome the problems of very complicated and chronic wound problems. The importance of an interdisciplinary team increases while facing the problems of special wound disorders such as a diabetic food, food ulcers or the problems of open abdomen in case of severe peritonitis. In this overview the main principles of modern wound treatment are outlined. The aim of this article is to present a good summary of wound judgement and treatment for the practioner. Increasingly important is it to point out the situation of complexe wounds which should be judgded and treated with the help of a "wound expert". PMID:18075140

  9. Biofilm in wound care.

    PubMed

    Rajpaul, Kumal

    2015-03-01

    A biofilm can be described as a microbial colony encased in a polysaccharide matrix which can become attached to a wound surface. This can affect the healing potential of chronic wounds due to the production of destructive enzymes and toxins which can promote a chronic inflammatory state within the wound. Biofilms can be polymicrobial and can result in delayed wound healing and chronic wound infection resistant to antibiotics, leading to prolonged hospitalisation for some patients. There appears to be a correlation between biofilms and non-healing in chronic wounds. It is suggested that biofilms are a major player in the chronicity of wounds. They are a complex concept to diagnose and management needs to be multifactorial. PMID:25757387

  10. [Experimental stab wound].

    PubMed

    Hirt, Miroslav; Vorel, František; Zelený, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Stab wounds caused by knives and daggers are usually of different appearances. The knife wound has one edge sharp while the second one is blunt. The wound caused by blow of dagger has both edges sharp. The forensic expert must very often decide whether the knife or dagger was used. The aim of this experimental work was to show how a single-edged knife penetrates the skin and causes the wound typical for the double-edged dagger. The fact was verified. The wound typical for dagger can be found if the knife is used only according to the scheme. The forensic expert can say that a one cutting edge knife was used if the one edge of wound is squared and the other one is sharp. If the both of them are sharp, forensic expert must be very careful in his decision.Key words: stab wounds - knife - dagger - forensic expertise. PMID:25671417

  11. The efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy on chemotherapeutic extravasation ulcers: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Isc?, Evren; Canter, Halil I.; Dadac?, Mehmet; At?lla, Pergin; Cakar, Ayse N.; Kec?k, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Context: The extravasation of the chemotherapeutic agents is not an unusual phenomenon. Necrosis of the skin and underlying structures has been reported, depending on the cytotoxicity of the extravasating drug. Despite the presence of some antidotes, such wounds tend to enlarge with time and are likely to resist the treatment. Aims: The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) on extravasation ulcers. Settings and Design: Animals were separated into two groups; conventional dressing group and NPWT group. Materials and Methods: Extravasation necrosis was established by intradermal doxorubicin injection. Following the debridement of the necrotic areas, one group of animals was treated with the conventional dressing while NPWT was applied to the other group. The wound areas were measured, and then biopsies were taken on the 3rd, 7th and 14th days after the debridement. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS 11.5 for Windows was used. Two-way ANOVA test was used to compare wound areas between groups. Willcoxon sign test with Bonferroni correction was used to compare histological scores between groups. Chi-square test with Bonferroni correction was used to compare histological scores within the group between the days. Results: There is no significant difference in terms of inflammatory cell count, neovascularisation, granulation tissue formation between the groups. Contrary to these results wound areas at the end of the treatment were smaller in the NPWT group compared with the dressing group. Conclusion: There is the superiority of NPWT over conventional dressing in chemotherapeutic extravasation wounds as well as the wound area is concerned, but it is not proven histologically. PMID:25593426

  12. Pain and trauma in negative pressure wound therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Upton, Dominic; Andrews, Abbye

    2015-02-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is considered an effective wound treatment, but there are a number of issues that need to be addressed for improvements to be made. This review aimed to explore the literature relating to the pain and skin trauma that may be experienced during NPWT. A literature search was carried out using the following databases: Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, PsychINFO, MEDLINE and PsyARTICLES. A total of 30 articles were reviewed. Studies reported varying levels of pain in patients undergoing NPWT, with certain treatment factors affecting the level of pain, such as the NPWT system and the dressing/filler used. Similarly, although there is much less research exploring NPWT-related trauma, findings suggest that dressing and filler type may impact on whether trauma occurs. However, further research needs to consider the different stages of NPWT and how pain and trauma can be minimised during the whole procedure. As both pain and skin trauma impact on the patient's well-being and on wound healing, it is essential that research further explores the factors that may affect the experience of pain and trauma, so as to inform developments in wound care. PMID:23489350

  13. Nanofeatured silk fibroin membranes for dermal wound healing applications.

    PubMed

    Karahalilo?lu, Zeynep; Ercan, Batur; Denkba?, Emir B; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    As an effort to create the next generation of improved skin graft materials, in this study, we modified the surfaces of a previously investigated material, silk fibroin, using a NaOH alkaline treatment to obtain a biologically inspired nanofeatured surface morphology. Such surfaces were characterized for roughness, energy, and chemistry. In addition, keratinocyte (skin-forming cells) adhesion and proliferation on such nanofeatured silk fibroin wound dressings were studied in an initial attempt to determine the promotion of an epidermal cover on the wound bed to form a new epidermal barrier. Dermal fibroblast adhesion and proliferation were also studied to assess the ability of nanostructured silk fibroin to replace damaged dermal tissue in chronic wounds (i.e., for diabetic foot ulcers). Results demonstrated for the first time that keratinocyte and fibroblast cell density was greater on nanofeatured silk fibroin membranes compared with non-treated silk fibroin surfaces. The enhancement in cellular functions was correlated with an increase in silk surface nanotopography, wettability and change in chemistry after NaOH treatment. Due to the present promising results, the newly developed nanofeatured silk fibroin membranes are exciting alternative skin graft materials which should be further studied for various skin patch and wound dressing applications. PMID:24616219

  14. Acute wound management: revisiting the approach to assessment, irrigation, and closure considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ayello, Elizabeth A.; Woo, Kevin; Nitzki-George, Diane; Sibbald, R. Gary

    2010-01-01

    Background As millions of emergency department (ED) visits each year include wound care, emergency care providers must remain experts in acute wound management. The variety of acute wounds presenting to the ED challenge the physician to select the most appropriate management to facilitate healing. A complete wound history along with anatomic and specific medical considerations for each patient provides the basis of decision making for wound management. It is essential to apply an evidence?based approach and consider each wound individually in order to create the optimal conditions for wound healing. Aims A comprehensive evidence?based approach to acute wound management is an essential skill set for any emergency physician or acute care practitioner. This review provides an overview of current evidence and addresses frequent pitfalls. Methods A systematic review of the literature for acute wound management was performed. Results A structured MEDLINE search was performed regarding acute wound management including established wound care guidelines. The data obtained provided the framework for evidence?based recommendations and current best practices for wound care. Conclusion Acute wound management varies based on the wound location and characteristics. No single approach can be applied to all wounds; however, a systematic approach to acute wound care integrated with current best practices provides the framework for exceptional wound management. PMID:21373312

  15. Enoxaparin-Induced DRESS Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ronceray, Sophie; Dinulescu, Monica; Le Gall, François; Polard, Elisabeth; Dupuy, Alain; Adamski, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight heparins are widely used for the prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, they can induce adverse skin reactions. The most common reactions are delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions at injection sites. Rare systemic reactions have been reported. We report, to our knowledge, the first case of a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome (DRESS) due to enoxaparin which belongs to the low-molecular-weight heparins class. PMID:23185158

  16. Beneficial effects of Ankaferd Blood Stopper on dermal wound healing: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Akalin, Cagri; Kuru, Serdar; Barlas, Aziz Mutlu; Kismet, Kemal; Kaptanoglu, Bugra; Demir, Aydin; Astarci, Hesna Muzeyyen; Ustun, Huseyin; Ertas, Ertugrul

    2014-02-01

    Ankaferd Blood Stopper(®) (ABS) is a folkloric medicinal plant extract used as a haemostatic agent in traditional Turkish medicine. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of ABS on the healing of dermal wounds in a rat model. Twenty Wistar albino rats were divided into two groups. Standard full-thickness skin defects were created on the back of the rats. In the control group (group 1), dressings moisturised with saline were changed daily. In the study group (group 2), the wounds were cleaned daily with saline, Ankaferd solution was applied, then the wounds were covered with moisturised dressings. The contraction percentage of wound areas were calculated on the 3rd, 7th, 10th and 14th days using a planimetric programme. On day 14, the wound areas were excised for histopathological examination, inflammatory scoring and evaluation of collagen deposition. The study group was superior to the control group in terms of inflammatory scoring, type I/type III collagen ratio and wound contraction rates. ABS(®) may be used effectively and safely on full-thickness wounds as a natural product. PMID:22943603

  17. The influence of Chinese dress on Western fashion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marilyn Delong; Juanjuan Wu; Mingxin Bao

    2005-01-01

    Purpose – The objective was to provide research-based insights from two groups of respondents as to their perceptions, preferences and desire to purchase Chinese – influenced Western dress. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Ten images of models in designer clothing were selected that varied in degree of Chinese influence. College students from a US and a Chinese university, numbering 55 and 56 respectively,

  18. Ultrashort peptide nanofibrous hydrogels for the acceleration of healing of burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Loo, Yihua; Wong, Yong-Chiat; Cai, Elijah Z; Ang, Chuan-Han; Raju, Ashvin; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Koh, Alvin G; Zhou, Hui J; Lim, Thiam-Chye; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2014-06-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for wound dressings to treat partial thickness burns that damage the epidermis and dermis. An ideal dressing needs to prevent infection, maintain skin hydration to facilitate debridement of the necrotic tissue, and provide cues to enhance tissue regeneration. We developed a class of 'smart' peptide hydrogels, which fulfill these criteria. Our ultrashort aliphatic peptides have an innate tendency to self-assemble into helical fibers, forming biomimetic hydrogel scaffolds which are non-immunogenic and non-cytotoxic. These nanofibrous hydrogels accelerated wound closure in a rat model for partial thickness burns. Two peptide hydrogel candidates demonstrate earlier onset and completion of autolytic debridement, compared to Mepitel(®), a silicone-coated polyamide net used as standard-of-care. They also promote epithelial and dermal regeneration in the absence of exogenous growth factors, achieving 86.2% and 92.9% wound closure respectively, after 14 days. In comparison, only 62.8% of the burnt area is healed for wounds dressed with Mepitel(®). Since the rate of wound closure is inversely correlated with hypertrophic scar formation and infection risks, our peptide hydrogel technology fills a niche neglected by current treatment options. The regenerative properties can be further enhanced by incorporation of bioactive moieties such as growth factors and cytokines. PMID:24636214

  19. In Vitro Models in Biocompatibility Assessment for Biomedical-Grade Chitosan Derivatives in Wound Management

    PubMed Central

    Keong, Lim Chin; Halim, Ahmad Sukari

    2009-01-01

    One of the ultimate goals of wound healing research is to find effective healing techniques that utilize the regeneration of similar tissues. This involves the modification of various wound dressing biomaterials for proper wound management. The biopolymer chitosan (?-1,4-D-glucosamine) has natural biocompatibility and biodegradability that render it suitable for wound management. By definition, a biocompatible biomaterial does not have toxic or injurious effects on biological systems. Chemical and physical modifications of chitosan influence its biocompatibility and biodegradability to an uncertain degree. Hence, the modified biomedical-grade of chitosan derivatives should be pre-examined in vitro in order to produce high-quality, biocompatible dressings. In vitro toxicity examinations are more favorable than those performed in vivo, as the results are more reproducible and predictive. In this paper, basic in vitro tools were used to evaluate cellular and molecular responses with regard to the biocompatibility of biomedical-grade chitosan. Three paramount experimental parameters of biocompatibility in vitro namely cytocompatibility, genotoxicity and skin pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, were generally reviewed for biomedical-grade chitosan as wound dressing. PMID:19399250

  20. Wound healing and antibacterial properties of methanolic extract of Pupalia lappacea Juss in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wound healing is a natural process that enables tissue repair after an injury. To shorten its duration and minimize associated complications, wounds are treated with medications. Currently there is a growing interest in the use of alternative wound dressing agents such as plant extracts. One plant used traditionally in wound treatment is Pupalia lappacea. In view of its use in wound care, we investigated the wound healing activities of 80% methanolic leave extract of Pupalia lappacea using excision, incision and dead space wound models. Also its effects on three common wound contaminants were investigated. Methods Excision wounds were created, contaminated with microbes and treated with ointments (10% and 20% w/w) prepared from Pupalia lappacea. Incision and dead space wounds were also created in rats which were subsequently dosed orally with the extract. The wound healing activities of Pupalia lappacea ointment on excision wound was assessed by rates of wound contraction and epithelialization as well as its antibacterial effects. The effects of Pupalia lappacea on incision and dead-space wounds were determined by the wound breaking strengths and weights of the granuloma tissues formed, respectively. Results Pupalia. lappacea ointments significantly (p?wound healing with 20% ointment having the highest percentage wound contraction and rate of epithelialization. At 4, 7 and 14 days post treatment, mean total viable bacterial count of excision wounds of the extract treated groups were significantly (p?Wound breaking strengths and weights of granuloma tissues formed in the extract treated groups were significantly (p?wound healing and antibacterial activities. These findings validate the use of this plant in traditional medicine for treatment of wounds. PMID:24886368

  1. Chryseobacterium in burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Kienzle, N; Muller, M; Pegg, S

    2001-03-01

    Chryseobacteria are gram negative organisms, formerly known as Flavobacteria, which rarely cause infections of burn wounds. This article documents three cases of Chryseobacterium infection in burn wounds and adds to the other two cases that have been reported in English literature. Two patients died, with one of the deaths linked to a Chryseobacteria bacteraemia. In two patients, there was an associated history of first aid treatment with untreated water. Patients whose burn wounds are suspected to be infected with Chryseobacterium require wound excision and coverage in combination with antibiotic therapy such as ciprofloxacin, vancomycin and rifampicin. PMID:11226658

  2. Telemedicine for wound management

    PubMed Central

    Chittoria, Ravi K.

    2012-01-01

    The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a number of difficult issues when caring for chronic wound patients because their conditions are time consuming and high risk, represent an unprofitable part of care practice and raise issues of liability. Telemedicine enhances communication with the surgical wound care specialist. Digital image for skin lesions is a safe, accurate and cost-effective referral pathway. The two basic modes of telemedicine applications, store and forward (asynchronous transfer) and real-time transmission (synchronous transfer, e.g. video conference), are utilized in the wound care setting. Telemedicine technology in the hands of an experienced physician can streamline management of a problem wound. Although there is always an element of anxiety related to technical change, the evolution of wound care telemedicine technology has demonstrated a predictable maturation process. PMID:23162242

  3. Pathology case of the month. Swamp-related wound infection. Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Donthamsetty, Supriya; Figueroa, Julio; Barbeau, James; McGoey, Robin

    2013-01-01

    A 38 year-old woman with no significant past medical history was brought to the emergency department following a motor vehicle rollover and submersion into swampy waters alongside a Louisiana interstate. In addition to multiple blunt force injuries, she suffered a laceration injury over the right lower extremity, which initially required irrigation and sterile dressing. On hospital day two, the wound became grossly infected. The wound was swabbed for culture and Gram stain, and the patient was empirically started on intravenous Piperacillin/tazobactam. Results from the Gram stain showed few white blood cells and numerous Gram negative rods. The following day, the wound continued to drain purulent material but with a stable zone of erythema. The wound was drained and debrided. On hospital day four, the blood agar plate, previously inoculated with the wound culture, grew the colonies shown in the below photograph. PMID:25073265

  4. Impact of Mucorales and Other Invasive Molds on Clinical Outcomes of Polymicrobial Traumatic Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Warkentien, Tyler E; Shaikh, Faraz; Weintrob, Amy C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley A; Ganesan, Anuradha; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2015-07-01

    Combat trauma wounds with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are often polymicrobial with fungal and bacterial growth, but the impact of the wound microbiology on clinical outcomes is uncertain. Our objectives were to compare the microbiological features between IFI and non-IFI wounds and evaluate whether clinical outcomes differed among IFI wounds based upon mold type. Data from U.S. military personnel injured in Afghanistan with IFI wounds were examined. Controls were matched by the pattern/severity of injury, including blood transfusion requirements. Wound closure timing was compared between IFI and non-IFI control wounds (with/without bacterial infections). IFI wound closure was also assessed according to mold species isolation. Eighty-two IFI wounds and 136 non-IFI wounds (63 with skin and soft tissue infections [SSTIs] and 73 without) were examined. The time to wound closure was longer for the IFI wounds (median, 16 days) than for the non-IFI controls with/without SSTIs (medians, 12 and 9 days, respectively; P < 0.001). The growth of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative rods was reported among 35% and 41% of the IFI and non-IFI wounds with SSTIs, respectively. Among the IFI wounds, times to wound closure were significantly longer for wounds with Mucorales growth than for wounds with non-Mucorales growth (median, 17 days versus 13 days; P < 0.01). When wounds with Mucorales and Aspergillus spp. growth were compared, there was no significant difference in wound closure timing. Trauma wounds with SSTIs were often polymicrobial, yet the presence of invasive molds (predominant types: order Mucorales, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp.) significantly prolonged the time to wound closure. Overall, the times to wound closure were longest for the IFI wounds with Mucorales growth. PMID:25972413

  5. Dynamics of Dressed Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadkarni, Suhita; Jung, Peter

    2003-03-01

    Typically neurons are modeled in an isolated environment, either on the basis of ionic conductances (Hodgkin-Huxley Type), or empirically (Integrate and Fire Type). A neuron in its natural environment, however, is surrounded by a mass of glial cells, most numerous of which are the astrocytes. It has been discovered recently that there exists a bi-directional pathway of communication between neurons and synaptic astrocytes. This two way coupling can mediate calcium based excitability in synaptic astrocytes which in turn may modulate synaptic plasticity of the neurons. Therefore the astrocytic environment of a neuron may play an active role in information processing in the brain. We present a mathematical exploration of these phenomena. Our results include the possibility of self-sustained oscillations in tissues with over expressed metabotropic glutamate receptors, a characteristic of epilepsy.

  6. Angiogenesis in Wound Healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcia G. Tonnesen; Xiaodong Feng; Richard A. F. Clark

    2000-01-01

    During wound healing, angiogenic capillary sprouts invade the fibrin\\/fibronectin-rich wound clot and within a few days organize into a microvascular network throughout the granulation tissue. As collagen accumulates in the granulation tissue to produce scar, the density of blood vessels diminishes. A dynamic interaction occurs among endothelial cells, angiogenic cytokines, such as FGF, VEGF, TGF-?, angiopoietin, and mast cell tryptase,

  7. Wound-Periderm Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Idit Ginzberg

    Herbivores, and particularly chewing insects, cause substantial damage to the plant. In addition to lost tissue, there are great concerns of pathogen invasion and water loss at the site of the attack. One of the plant’s defense strategies is the formation of wound periderm at the boundaries of the invaded or damaged region to isolate it from non-wounded healthy tissue.

  8. Terpenoid-based defenses in conifers: cDNA cloning, characterization, and functional expression of wound-inducible (E)-alpha-bisabolene synthase from grand fir (Abies grandis).

    PubMed

    Bohlmann, J; Crock, J; Jetter, R; Croteau, R

    1998-06-01

    (E)-alpha-Bisabolene synthase is one of two wound-inducible sesquiterpene synthases of grand fir (Abies grandis), and the olefin product of this cyclization reaction is considered to be the precursor in Abies species of todomatuic acid, juvabione, and related insect juvenile hormone mimics. A cDNA encoding (E)-alpha-bisabolene synthase was isolated from a wound-induced grand fir stem library by a PCR-based strategy and was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to produce (E)-alpha-bisabolene as the sole product from farnesyl diphosphate. The expressed synthase has a deduced size of 93.8 kDa and a pI of 5. 03, exhibits other properties typical of sesquiterpene synthases, and resembles in sequence other terpenoid synthases with the exception of a large amino-terminal insertion corresponding to Pro81-Val296. Biosynthetically prepared (E)-alpha-[3H]bisabolene was converted to todomatuic acid in induced grand fir cells, and the time course of appearance of bisabolene synthase mRNA was shown by Northern hybridization to lag behind that of mRNAs responsible for production of induced oleoresin monoterpenes. These results suggest that induced (E)-alpha-bisabolene biosynthesis constitutes part of a defense response targeted to insect herbivores, and possibly fungal pathogens, that is distinct from induced oleoresin monoterpene production. PMID:9618485

  9. Student Dress Codes Using Zero Tolerance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essex, Nathan L.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author focuses on the issue involving zero tolerance in the Texas district whether the dress code policy is reasonable. In a small Texas school district, over 700 students were suspended in a single month for violating a zero-tolerance dress code policy. This suspension, which attracted national attention and threats of…

  10. How does xanthan stabilise salad dressing?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Parker; Paul A. Gunning; Kim Ng; Margaret M. Robins

    1995-01-01

    The creaming behaviour of model pourable salad dressings has been studied over a wide range of xanthan and oil phase concentrations. They were produced by mixing a colloidally stable emulsion with xanthan solutions. The model dressings were completely flocculated by depletion at all xanthan concentrations >0.1 g\\/l. Creaming behaviour was in three phases: an initial delay phase, followed by more

  11. The many colours of 'the dress'.

    PubMed

    Gegenfurtner, Karl R; Bloj, Marina; Toscani, Matteo

    2015-06-29

    There has been an intense discussion among the public about the colour of a dress, shown in a picture posted originally on Tumblr (http://swiked.tumblr.com/post/112073818575/guys-please-help-me-is-this-dress-white-and; accessed on 10:56 am GMT on Tue 24 Mar 2015). Some people argue that they see a white dress with golden lace, while others describe the dress as blue with black lace. Here we show that the question "what colour is the dress?" has more than two answers. In fact, there is a continuum of colour percepts across different observers. We measured colour matches on a calibrated screen for two groups of observers who had reported different percepts of the dress. Surprisingly, differences between the two groups arose mainly from differences in lightness, rather than chromaticity of the colours they adjusted to match the dress. We speculate that the ambiguity arises in the case of this particular image because the distribution of colours within the dress closely matches the distribution of natural daylights. This makes it more difficult to disambiguate illumination changes from those in reflectance. PMID:25981790

  12. Dress Codes: We Forget Our Own Advice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberger, Morris J.

    1970-01-01

    Eccentric dress on the part of adolescents should not be treated as a moral issue. The conflict between youth and adults over school dress codes is but another variation of the conflict between the needs and rights of the individual as opposed to those of a larger society. (CK)

  13. Harnessing the Electric Spark of Life to Cure Skin Wounds.

    PubMed

    Martin-Granados, Cristina; McCaig, Colin D

    2014-02-01

    Significance: Skin wounds cause great distress and are a huge economic burden, particularly with an increasingly aging population that heals poorly. There is an urgent need for better therapies that improve repair. Intracellular signaling pathways that regulate wound repair are activated by growth factors, hormones, and cytokines released at the wound. In addition, endogenous electric fields (EFs) are generated by epithelia in response to injury and are an important cue that coordinates cell behavior at wounds. Electrical stimulation (ES), therefore, holds the potential to be effective therapeutically in treating wounds. Recent Advances: ES of wounds is an old idea based on observations of the natural occurrence of EF at wound sites. However, it is now receiving increasing attention, because (1) the underpinning mechanisms are being clarified; (2) devices that measure skin wound currents are in place; and (3) medical devices that apply EF to poorly healing wounds are in clinical use with promising results. Critical Issues: Several signaling proteins transduce the EF influence to cells. However, a bigger picture of the EF-proteome is needed in order to understand this complex process and target it in a controlled manner. Future Directions: Dissecting the signaling pathways driving electrical wound healing will allow further identification of key molecular switches that control the cellular response to EFs. These findings herald the development of a new concept, the use of hydrogel electrodes impregnated with small molecules that target signaling pathways to explore the potential of dual electric-pharmacological therapies to repair wounds. PMID:24761353

  14. Surgical site infections following colorectal cancer surgery: a randomized prospective trial comparing common and advanced antimicrobial dressing containing ionic silver

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An antimicrobial dressing containing ionic silver was found effective in reducing surgical-site infection in a preliminary study of colorectal cancer elective surgery. We decided to test this finding in a randomized, double-blind trial. Methods Adults undergoing elective colorectal cancer surgery at two university-affiliated hospitals were randomly assigned to have the surgical incision dressed with Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber dressing or a common dressing. To blind the patient and the nursing and medical staff to the nature of the dressing used, scrub nurses covered Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber with a common wound dressing in the experimental arm, whereas a double common dressing was applied to patients of control group. The primary end-point of the study was the occurrence of any surgical-site infection within 30?days of surgery. Results A total of 112 patients (58 in the experimental arm and 54 in the control group) qualified for primary end-point analysis. The characteristics of the patient population and their surgical procedures were similar. The overall rate of surgical-site infection was lower in the experimental group (11.1% center 1, 17.5% center 2; overall 15.5%) than in controls (14.3% center 1, 24.2% center 2, overall 20.4%), but the observed difference was not statistically significant (P?=?0.451), even with respect to surgical-site infection grade 1 (superficial) versus grades 2 and 3, or grade 1 and 2 versus grade 3. Conclusions This randomized trial did not confirm a statistically significant superiority of Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber dressing in reducing surgical-site infection after elective colorectal cancer surgery. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00981110 PMID:22621779

  15. Integrins in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, Leeni; Heino, Jyrki; Häkkinen, Lari; Larjava, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Regulation of cell adhesions during tissue repair is fundamentally important for cell migration, proliferation, and protein production. All cells interact with extracellular matrix proteins with cell surface integrin receptors that convey signals from the environment into the nucleus, regulating gene expression and cell behavior. Integrins also interact with a variety of other proteins, such as growth factors, their receptors, and proteolytic enzymes. Re-epithelialization and granulation tissue formation are crucially dependent on the temporospatial function of multiple integrins. This review explains how integrins function in wound repair. Recent Advances: Certain integrins can activate latent transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-?1) that modulates wound inflammation and granulation tissue formation. Dysregulation of TGF-?1 function is associated with scarring and fibrotic disorders. Therefore, these integrins represent targets for therapeutic intervention in fibrosis. Critical Issues: Integrins have multifaceted functions and extensive crosstalk with other cell surface receptors and molecules. Moreover, in aberrant healing, integrins may assume different functions, further increasing the complexity of their functionality. Discovering and understanding the role that integrins play in wound healing provides an opportunity to identify the mechanisms for medical conditions, such as excessive scarring, chronic wounds, and even cancer. Future Directions: Integrin functions in acute and chronic wounds should be further addressed in models better mimicking human wounds. Application of any products in acute or chronic wounds will potentially alter integrin functions that need to be carefully considered in the design. PMID:25493210

  16. Chronic Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Kasturi; Sinha, Mithun; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Multispecies microbial biofilms may contribute to wound chronicity by derailing the inherent reparative process of the host tissue. In the biofilm form, bacteria are encased within an extracellular polymeric substance and become recalcitrant to antimicrobials and host defenses. For biofilms of relevance to human health, there are two primary contributing factors: the microbial species involved and host response which, in turn, shapes microbial processes over time. This progressive interaction between microbial species and the host is an iterative process that helps evolve an acute-phase infection to a pathogenic chronic biofilm. Thus, long-term wound infection studies are needed to understand the longitudinal cascade of events that culminate into a pathogenic wound biofilm. Recent Advances: Our laboratory has recently published the first long-term (2 month) study of polymicrobial wound biofilm infection in a translationally valuable porcine wound model. Critical Issues: It is widely recognized that the porcine system represents the most translationally valuable approach to experimentally model human skin wounds. A meaningful experimental biofilm model must be in vivo, include mixed species of clinically relevant microbes, and be studied longitudinally long term. Cross-validation of such experimental findings with findings from biofilm-infected patient wounds is critically important. Future Directions: Additional value may be added to the experimental system described above by studying pigs with underlying health complications (e.g., metabolic syndrome), as is typically seen in patient populations. PMID:26155380

  17. Effects of negative pressure wound therapy on cellular energetics in fibroblasts grown in a provisional wound (fibrin) matrix.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Amy K; Schmidt, Marisa; Feeley, Teri; Villanueva, Patricia; Kieswetter, Kris

    2009-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) using reticulated open cell foam dressing (ROCF) is effective for treatment of recalcitrant wounds; however, the effects of this therapy on cellular metabolism remain to be elucidated. The effect of two different subatmospheric pressure applications on the cell energetics of human fibroblasts grown in a 3D fibrin matrix was studied using two different pressure-manifolding materials, an ROCF or gauze under suction (GUS). It was found that levels of cytochrome c oxidase, energy charge, and adenosine triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate were significantly increased following the application of NPWT using ROCF vs. GUS (p<0.05). Increases in these parameters likely reflect an improved energetic status. In addition, levels of transforming growth factor-beta and platelet-derived growth factor (alpha and beta isoforms) were significantly increased (80 and 53%, respectively; p<0.05) over static control cultures following treatment with NPWT using ROCF but not following GUS. These growth factors are known to be important during wound healing. Clearly, both the material used as the dressing to manifold the subatmospheric pressure and the pressure used have a dramatic effect on cellular response. PMID:19320887

  18. Antimicrobial emulsion (coating) based on biopolymer containing neem (Melia azardichta) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) extract for wound covering.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, J H; Radhika, M

    2006-01-01

    Polymeric bio-adhesives emulsion which is biodegradable and non-toxic containing antimicrobial agents can play an important role in preventing infection in wound covering and coating for surgical implants. Therefore a bioadhesive polymer was synthesized by semi-Interpenetrating Network process using blend of shellac, casein and polyvinyl alcohol and Maleic anhydride (MA) as reactive compatibilizer. The synthesized polymer was mixed with neem and turmeric extract and homogenized using an emulsifier. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was used to measure the molecular miscibility of biopolymer components and emulsion constituents. Stability of emulsion (coating) was measured by keeping property and accelerated stability test. Antimicrobial properties were evaluated for human pathogenic organisms namely E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and Salmonella typhimurium using well diffusion assay. The results indicate that stability, miscibility and antimicrobial properties of bioadhesive was satisfactory, however further in vivo studies are required to ascertain suitability of emulsion (coating) for biomedical use. PMID:17075168

  19. An innovative removable rigid dressing technique for below-the-knee amputation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Keagy, R D; Krick, H J; Stratigos, J S; Betts, H B

    1979-07-01

    The below-the-knee removable rigid dressing is a below-the-knee plaster cast held by a suspension stockinette to a supracondylar plastic cuff. It has proved to be an effective method for postoperative, pre-prosthetic, and prosthetic care of below-the-knee amputees. Being removable, it permits frequent observation and progressive shrinkage of the stump (by adding socks), and eliminates the need of elastic stump bandaging. In addition, it still maintains the advantages of immobilization of soft tissue (to reduce pain and facilitate wound healing) and prevention of trauma to the stump as does the conventional rigid dressing. It has significantly reduced the incidence of pre-tibial skin breakdown and distal edema, produced fast stump shrinkage, and shortened time to ambulatory discharge with a temporary prosthesis by ninety days. PMID:457715

  20. Noncontact, Low-Frequency Ultrasound Therapy Enhances Neovascularization and Wound Healing in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Maan, Zeshaan N.; Januszyk, Michael; Rennert, Robert C.; Duscher, Dominik; Rodrigues, Melanie; Fujiwara, Toshihiro; Whitmore, Natalie Ho Arnetha; Hu, Michael S.; Longaker, Michael T.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic wounds are a major source of morbidity for patients and represent a significant health burden. Implementing noninvasive techniques that accelerate healing of these wounds would provide great benefit. Ultrasound appears to be an effective modality for the treatment of chronic wounds in humans. MIST Therapy is a noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound treatment delivered through a saline mist. A variety of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the efficacy of ultrasound therapy, but the underlying molecular and cellular pathways impacted by this technique remain unclear. The in vivo effect of noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound was therefore examined in a humanized excisional wound model. Methods The treatment group received noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound therapy three times per week, whereas the control group received a standard dressing change. Wounds were photographed at regular intervals to calculate healing kinetics. Wound tissue was harvested and processed for histology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results The MIST group demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing, with 17.3 days to wound closure compared with 24 days in the controls (p < 0.05). This improvement became evident by day 9, with healing evidenced by significantly decreased mean wound area relative to original size (68 percent versus 80 percent; p < 0.01). Expression of markers of neovascularization (stromal cell-derived factor 1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and CD31) was also increased in the wound beds of noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound–treated mice compared with controls. Conclusion Noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound treatment improves neo-vascularization and wound closure rates in excisional wounds for diabetic mice, likely because of the stimulated release of angiogenic factors. PMID:25158717

  1. Etiology of contaminated wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sudmann, R.H.

    1992-03-01

    The US Department of Energy reports of events that occurred in the chemical processing 200 Areas of the Hanford Site during the period from 1972 through 1986 were reviewed to identify the causes of contaminated wounds. Contaminated wounds were reported in 19 events involving 20 workers. The causal agents (high risk operations) and the root causes were characterized. Emergency actions taken and their efficacy were noted. The 19 wound events were compared with 17 events with the potential for inhalation. It was found that the wound events involve a single worker and frequently result in an internal contamination and its resulting dose. Inhalation events involve groups of workers and rarely resulted in detectable internal contamination. The difference is attributed to anticipation of an inhalation event and use of respiratory protection and continuous air monitors to mitigate its effects.

  2. Etiology of contaminated wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sudmann, R.H.

    1992-01-16

    The US Department of Energy reports of events that occurred in the chemical processing 200 Areas of the Hanford Site during the period from 1972 through 1986 were reviewed to identify the causes of contaminated wounds. Contaminated wounds were reported in 19 events involving 20 workers. The causal agents (high risk operations) and the root causes were characterized. Emergency actions taken and their efficacy were noted. The 19 wound events were compared with 17 events with the potential for inhalation. It was found that the wound events involve a single worker and frequently result in an internal contamination and its resulting dose. Inhalation events involve groups of workers and rarely resulted in detectable internal contamination. The difference is attributed to anticipation of an inhalation event and use of respiratory protection and continuous air monitors to mitigate its effects.

  3. Providing cost-effective treatment of hard-to-heal wounds in the community through use of NPWT.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Jane

    2015-06-01

    Objective The treatment of non-healing wounds accounts for a high proportion of wound care costs. Advanced technology treatments, such as negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), could be cost-effective if they result in faster healing. The objective of this study is to assess the effect on healing and the cost-effectiveness of a single-use NPWT (i.e PICO by Smith & Nephew) when used on hard-to-heal wounds in a community setting. Method This was a cohort case study in which wounds were treated with NWPT for 2 weeks. Wounds were assessed every 2-4 weeks to a healed state. The weekly cost of treatment prior to intervention, that is, the products used and nurse time, were compared with treatment costs associated with NWPT and after a return to standard treatment. Results The study included 9 patients with leg ulcers or pressure ulcers that had been slow healing or non-healing for at least 6 weeks. While treated with NPWT, the average weekly reduction in wound size was 21%. The wound size achieved with NPWT was reached on average 10 weeks earlier than predicted. The increased healing rate continued after PICO stopped and 5 wounds healed on average 8 weeks later. Frequency of dressing changes fell from 4 times weekly at baseline to 2 times a week with NPWT and to 1.8 after NPWT stopped. Weekly cost of treatment with NPWT was, on average, 1.6 times higher than the baseline, but fell to 3 times less when NPWT stopped owing to the reduction in dressing changes. The amount of change in healing rate was considerably higher than the increase in costs associated with NPWT. Conclusion NWPT is a cost-effective treatment for hard-to-heal wounds. Wounds decreased in size and healed more quickly under NWPT treatment than under standard treatment. Additional NPWT costs can be quickly offset by faster healing and a shortened treatment period. PMID:26052990

  4. Prevena™, negative pressure wound therapy applied to closed Pfannenstiel incisions at time of caesarean section in patients deemed at high risk for wound infection.

    PubMed

    Anglim, B; O'Connor, H; Daly, S

    2015-04-01

    The aim of our retrospective study is to report on our experience using the Prevena™ wound system in obese patients undergoing caesarean section delivery. A total of 26 cases were identified from July 2012 to October 2013. The median BMI of these women was 45.3 kg/m(2). Elective caesarean sections were performed in 20 women (77%). There were four cases (15%) of superficial dehiscence. Factors associated with wound breakdown were wound infection (p = 0.03), increasing BMI (p < 0.001) and emergency LSCS (p = 0.04). In a logistic regression model the presence of infection was the only factor which remained associated with wound breakdown. Wound disruption is a major cause of morbidity following caesarean section in morbidly obese patients. The wound complication rate in our experience was low with the Prevena™ dressing with no cases of sheath dehiscence, and no patient required a second operation. The presence of infection is the most important factor in wound breakdown and should be the focus for management protocols. PMID:25383909

  5. Dress and Appearance Codes in Public Secondary School Handbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbon, Beth; Workman, Jane E.

    2000-01-01

    Analyzed and compared dress and appearance codes from 154 secondary school handbooks. Unacceptable dress and appearance was listed more frequently that acceptable or required dress; concerns about health, safety, and modesty were reflected; and 80 percent included a statement that dress should not be disruptive to the educational process.…

  6. Combined nitric oxide-releasing poly(vinyl alcohol) film/F127 hydrogel for accelerating wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schanuel, Fernanda Seabra; Raggio Santos, Karen Slis; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; de Oliveira, Marcelo G

    2015-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) releasing biomaterials represent a potential strategy for use as active wound dressings capable of accelerating wound healing. Topical NO-releasing poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) films and Pluronic F127 hydrogels (F127) have already exhibited effective skin vasodilation and wound healing actions. In this study, we functionalized PVA films with SNO groups via esterification with a mixture of mercaptosucinic acid (MSA) and thiolactic acid (TLA) followed by S-nitrosation of the SH moieties. These films were combined with an underlying layer of poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide), i.e., PEO-PPO-PEO (Pluronic F127) hydrogel and used for the topical treatment of skin lesions in an animal model. The mixed esterification of PVA with MSA and TLA led to chemically crosslinked PVA-SNO films with a high swelling capacity capable of spontaneously releasing NO. Real time NO-release measurements revealed that the hydrogel layer reduces the initial NO burst from the PVA-SNO films. We demonstrate that the combination of PVA-SNO films with F127 hydrogel accelerates wound contraction, decreases wound gap and cellular density and accelerates the inflammatory phase of the lesion. These results were reflected in an increase in myofibroblastic differentiation and collagen type III expression in the cicatricial tissue. Therefore, PVA-SNO films combined with F127 hydrogel may represent a new approach for active wound dressings capable of accelerating wound healing. PMID:25907598

  7. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Giles T. S.; Mills, Stuart J.; Cowin, Allison J.; Smith, Louise E.

    2015-01-01

    Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials.

  8. Microfluidic Wound Bandage: Localized Oxygen Modulation of Collagen Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Joe F.; Brennan, Martin; Merchant, Zameer; Chen, Lin; Guo, Shujuan; Eddington, David T.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Restoring tissue oxygenation has the potential to improve poorly healing wounds with impaired microvasculature. Compared to more established wound therapy using hyperbaric oxygen chambers, topical oxygen therapy has lower cost and better patient comfort, although topical devices have provided inconsistent results. To provide controlled topical oxygen while minimizing moisture loss, a major issue for topical oxygen, we’ve devised a novel wound bandage based on microfluidic diffusion delivery of oxygen. In addition to modulating oxygen from 0–100% in 60s rise time, the microfluidic oxygen bandage provides a conformal seal around the wound. When 100% oxygen is delivered, it penetrates wound tissues as measured in agar phantom and in vivo wounds. Using this microfluidic bandage, we applied the oxygen modulation to 8 mm excisional wounds prepared on diabetic mice. Treatment with the microfluidic bandage demonstrated improved collagen maturity in the wound bed, although only marginal differences were observed in total collagen, microvasculature, and external closure rates. Our results show that proper topical oxygen can improve wound parameters underneath the surface. Because of the ease of fabrication, the oxygen bandage represents an economical yet practical method for oxygen wound research. PMID:23438079

  9. Photobiomodulatory effects of He-Ne laser on excision wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Satish B. S.; Kumar, Pramod; Rao, Lakshmi; Mahato, Krishna K.

    2011-03-01

    Presently, great importance has been given to Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) with the intent of promoting wound healing process. The present study was aimed to investigate the promotive effect of LLLT on full thickness excision wounds in Swiss albino mice using optical fiber probe based light device. Circular wounds of diameter 15 mm were illuminated with single exposure of various laser doses 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 10 J/cm2 along with appropriate controls. Further, an optimal dose of 2 J/cm2 was applied to excision wounds at different post-wounding treatment schedules (0, 24 h and 48 h) to explicate the relations between treatment schedule and its tissue regeneration potential. Wound area, mean wound healing time along with hydroxyproline and glucosamine levels from wound ground tissue was assessed to evaluate the resultant photobiostimulatory outcome. Histological analysis was performed on day 10 of post-wounding. A significant increase in hydroxyproline (P< 0.001) and glucosamine levels (P< 0.01) were observed in 2 J/cm2 irradiation group, which was also substantiated by histological findings. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the immediate irradiation of 2 J/cm2 dose following wounding hasten the healing process compared to the unilluminated control.

  10. Negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam in children: an overview.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Dhruti; Amling, June; Brandoli, Cinzia; Tosi, Laura L

    2008-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of a comprehensive review of the literature on the use of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by V.A.C.(R) Therapy (KCI, San Antonio, TX) in pediatric patients. A review of the literature revealed 20 articles that discussed the use of NPWT/ROCF in exclusively pediatric patients. Nine articles were retrospective reviews, and 11 were case studies. This review discusses the insights from these articles. This review discusses the versatility of NPWT/ROCF for use with pediatric patients with infected wounds; full-thickness burns; open fractures; large soft tissue wounds; surgical wounds of the chest, abdomen, and spine; pilonidal disease; and pressure ulcers. NPWT/ROCF has been used in children as young as a few weeks of age, and in children with comorbidities such as congenital heart disease, immunosuppression, and spina bifida. Wound healing in children can be delayed by impaired perfusion, infection, edema, and poor nutrition. Clinical considerations for using NPWT/ROCF in children can include differences in healing due to higher granulation rates requiring more frequent dressing changes, poor nutritional status, small size, and low weight. With pediatric patients, there is no consensus on foam (white or black) selection, optimum amount of negative pressure, frequency of NPWT/ROCF dressing changes, and interposing contact layer selection. Randomized prospective studies are needed to make recommendations for safe and efficacious clinical practice. Research regarding the effects of dressing types, adjunctive treatment, and wound healing in neonates and children is needed. PMID:19034165

  11. The effects of cancer and cancer therapies on wound healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    McCaw

    1989-01-01

    Based on experimental evidence in rodents, most of the antineoplastic agents will affect wound healing. With most of the agents, this impairment is not sufficient to produce increased morbidity based on the clinical reports in humans. Radiation therapy appears to inhibit healing in both experimental animals and during clinical trials. In spite of this, it is reported that wounds in

  12. Evidence for Clinical Use of Honey in Wound Healing as an Anti-bacterial, Anti-inflammatory Anti-oxidant and Anti-viral Agent: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoobi, Reza; Kazerouni, Afshin; kazerouni, Ory

    2013-01-01

    Context To provide an updated review of published literature on the anti-oxidant, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties of honey. Evidence Acquisition CINAHL, BioMed Central, Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase data bases and reference lists were used to find randomized controlled trials and review articles. Randomized controlled trials using honey with a comparator were reviewed, along with published review articles to determine the relative benefits of tropical honey. These methods were undertaken by three reviewers. Results Honey has anti-oxidant, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. It can be used as a wound dressing to promote rapid and improved healing. These effects are due to honey’s anti-bacterial action, secondary to its high acidity, osmotic effect, anti-oxidant content and hydrogen peroxide content. The use of honey leads to improved wound healing in acute cases, pain relief in burn patients and decreased inflammatory response in such patients. However, it has proven to be ineffective in chronic leg ulcers. Overall, studies have been done in favor of the use of honey in medicine. Conclusions Honey has almost equal or slightly superior effects when compared with conventional treatments for acute wounds and superficial partial thickness burns. More randomized controlled trials with significant statistical power comparing different kinds of honey, are required in order to create a strong body of evidence towards definite recommendations for medical use. There is biological plausibility. PMID:24624197

  13. Use of Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Closed Median Sternal Incisions after Cardiothoracic Surgery: Clinical Evidence and Consensus Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Markou, Thanasie; Ingemansson, Richard; Rotering, Heinrich; Hartman, Jean M.; van Valen, Richard; Brunott, Maaike; Segers, Patrique

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a concept introduced initially to assist in the treatment of chronic open wounds. Recently, there has been growing interest in using the technique on closed incisions after surgery to prevent potentially severe surgical site infections and other wound complications in high-risk patients. Negative pressure wound therapy uses a negative pressure unit and specific dressings that help to hold the incision edges together, redistribute lateral tension, reduce edema, stimulate perfusion, and protect the surgical site from external infectious sources. Randomized, controlled studies of negative pressure wound therapy for closed incisions in orthopedic settings (which also is a clean surgical procedure in absence of an open fracture) have shown the technology can reduce the risk of wound infection, wound dehiscence, and seroma, and there is accumulating evidence that it also improves wound outcomes after cardiothoracic surgery. Identifying at-risk individuals for whom prophylactic use of negative pressure wound therapy would be most cost-effective remains a challenge; however, several risk-stratification systems have been proposed and should be evaluated more fully. The recent availability of a single-use, closed incision management system offers surgeons a convenient and practical means of delivering negative pressure wound therapy to their high-risk patients, with excellent wound outcomes reported to date. Although larger, randomized, controlled studies will help to clarify the precise role and benefits of such a system in cardiothoracic surgery, limited initial evidence from clinical studies and from the authors’ own experiences appears promising. In light of the growing interest in this technology among cardiothoracic surgeons, a consensus meeting, which was attended by a group of international experts, was held to review existing evidence for negative pressure wound therapy in the prevention of wound complications after surgery and to provide recommendations on the optimal use of negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery. PMID:25280449

  14. Use of incisional negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery: clinical evidence and consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dohmen, Pascal M; Markou, Thanasie; Ingemansson, Richard; Rotering, Heinrich; Hartman, Jean M; van Valen, Richard; Brunott, Maaike; Segers, Patrique

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a concept introduced initially to assist in the treatment of chronic open wounds. Recently, there has been growing interest in using the technique on closed incisions after surgery to prevent potentially severe surgical site infections and other wound complications in high-risk patients. Negative pressure wound therapy uses a negative pressure unit and specific dressings that help to hold the incision edges together, redistribute lateral tension, reduce edema, stimulate perfusion, and protect the surgical site from external infectious sources. Randomized, controlled studies of negative pressure wound therapy for closed incisions in orthopedic settings (which also is a clean surgical procedure in absence of an open fracture) have shown the technology can reduce the risk of wound infection, wound dehiscence, and seroma, and there is accumulating evidence that it also improves wound outcomes after cardiothoracic surgery. Identifying at-risk individuals for whom prophylactic use of negative pressure wound therapy would be most cost-effective remains a challenge; however, several risk-stratification systems have been proposed and should be evaluated more fully. The recent availability of a single-use, closed incision management system offers surgeons a convenient and practical means of delivering negative pressure wound therapy to their high-risk patients, with excellent wound outcomes reported to date. Although larger, randomized, controlled studies will help to clarify the precise role and benefits of such a system in cardiothoracic surgery, limited initial evidence from clinical studies and from the authors' own experiences appears promising. In light of the growing interest in this technology among cardiothoracic surgeons, a consensus meeting, which was attended by a group of international experts, was held to review existing evidence for negative pressure wound therapy in the prevention of wound complications after surgery and to provide recommendations on the optimal use of negative pressure wound therapy on closed median sternal incisions after cardiothoracic surgery. PMID:25280449

  15. DRESS syndrome: à propos de trois observations

    PubMed Central

    Chebbi, Wafa; Souissi, Jihed; Chelli, Jihène; Larbi, Fatma; Zantour, Baha; Habib Sfar, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Le syndrome d'hypersensibilité médicamenteuse ou Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) est une toxidermie rare mais sévère. Nous rapportons trois observations de DRESS syndromes secondaires à la prise de carbamazipine dans deux cas et de salazopyrine dans un cas. Le délai moyen entre la prise médicamenteuse et la survenue du DRESS syndrome était de six semaines. Le médicament incriminé était arrêté d'une façon définitive dans tous les cas. Une corticothérapie par voie générale était instaurée chez tous les patients devant l'atteinte hépatique sévère. L’évolution était favorable avec disparation des lésions cutanées et normalisation du bilan hépatique. Le diagnostic du syndrome DRESS doit être évoqué devant un tableau associant une éruption fébrile et des signes systémiques faisant suite à une prise médicamenteuse. La précocité du diagnostic est fondamentale pour l'arrêt définitif des médicaments suspects. Le traitement n'est pas bien codifié mais repose actuellement sur la corticothérapie générale. PMID:25810802

  16. [Cost-effectiveness of a TLC-NOSF polyurethane foam dressing].

    PubMed

    Arroyo Ana, Abejón; Alvarez Vázquez, Juan Carlos; Blasco García, Carmen; Bermejo Martínez, Mariano; López Casanova, Pablo; Cuesta Cuesta, Juan José; De Haro Fernández, Francisco; Mateo Marín, Emilia; Segovia Gómez, Teresa; Villar Rojas, Antonio Erasto

    2012-11-01

    Chronic wounds represent a drain on the Spanish health system, nowdays is necessary an optimization of the resources used and that is for this that is necessary justify the use of the products over others through cost-effective studies for to show the economic benefit to professionals and the life quality of patient. This article compares the use of a new technology for format polyurethane foam, TLC-NOSF, with the most commonly used products for treating wounds. This comparison is made using a cost-effectiveness model (Markov Model). The results demonstrate that treatment with polyurethane foam dressing with TLC-NOSF are cost-effective versus treatments with polyurethane foams most commonly used in Spain. PMID:23330329

  17. Preclinical Models of Wound Healing: Is Man the Model? Proceedings of the Wound Healing Society Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Gordillo, Gayle M.; Bernatchez, Stephanie F.; Diegelmann, Robert; Di Pietro, Luisa A.; Eriksson, Elof; Hinz, Boris; Hopf, Harriet W.; Kirsner, Robert; Liu, Paul; Parnell, Laura K.S.; Sandusky, George E.; Sen, Chandan K.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Volk, Susan W.; Baird, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance A review of therapeutic effects in preclinical and clinical studies suggests that concordance between large animal (pig=78%), small laboratory animal (53%) and in vitro (57%) results with those observed in humans is only partial. Pig models of wound healing provide major advantages over other animal models. Since the vast majority of wound-healing research is done in rodents and in vitro, the low concordance rate is a significant impediment to research that will have any clinical impact. Critical Issues To generate clinically relevant experimental data, hypothesis generation should begin, or at least involve human wound tissue samples. Such tissue could be used to test a predetermined hypothesis generated based on, say, murine data. Alternatively, such tissue could be analyzed using high-throughput cell biology techniques (e.g., genomics, proteomics, or metabolomics) to identify novel mechanisms involved in human wounds. Once the hypothesis has been formulated and confirmed using human samples, identification of these same mechanisms in animals represents a valid approach that could be used for more in-depth investigations and experimental manipulations not feasible with humans. Future Directions This consensus statement issued by the Wound Healing Society symposium strongly encourages all wound researchers to involve human wound tissue validation studies to make their animal and cell biology studies more translationally and clinically significant. PMID:24527316

  18. Radio-frequency dressed lattices for ultracold alkali atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinuco-León, German A.; Garraway, Barry M.

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold atomic gases in periodic potentials are powerful platforms for exploring quantum physics in regimes dominated by many-body effects as well as for developing applications that benefit from quantum mechanical effects. Further advances face a range of challenges including the realization of potentials with lattice constants smaller than optical wavelengths as well as creating schemes for effective addressing and manipulation of single sites. In this paper we propose a dressed-based scheme for creating periodic potential landscapes for ultracold alkali atoms with the capability of overcoming such difficulties. The dressed approach has the advantage of operating in a low-frequency regime where decoherence and heating effects due to spontaneous emission do not take place. These results highlight the possibilities of atom-chip technology in the future development of quantum simulations and quantum technologies, and provide a realistic scheme for starting such an exploration.

  19. Evaluation of in-vivo wound healing activity of Hypericum patulum (Family: Hypericaceae) leaf extract on different wound model in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pulok K. Mukherjee; Rob Verpoorte; B. Suresh

    2000-01-01

    The methanol extract of Hypericum patulum Thumb. leaves were investigated for the evaluation of their wound healing potential on different experimental models of wounds in rats. The methanol extract of leaves (HPM), in the form of an ointment with two different concentrations (5% and 10% w\\/w ointment of leaf extract in simple ointment base) was evaluated for wound healing potential

  20. Wound infections after transplant nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Kohlberg, W I; Tellis, V A; Bhat, D J; Driscoll, B; Veith, F J

    1980-05-01

    Wound infections after transplant nephrectomy were analyzed retrospectively. When prophylactic antibiotics were not used, 20% of the closed nephrectomy wounds became infected. Eighty-one percent of the infections were due to staphylococcal organisms. Wounds containing a preexisting focus of infection or those reoperated on more than once within a month prior to nephrectomy are at such high risk for infection that these wounds should be left open for secondary healing. With the use of prophylactic cefazolin sodium, in the immediate preoperative and postoperative period, no wound infections have occurred in 18 closed transplant nephrectomy wounds. PMID:6990895

  1. Antibiotic-eluting bioresorbable composite fibers for wound healing applications: Microstructure, drug delivery and mechanical properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan J. Elsner; Meital Zilberman

    2009-01-01

    Novel antibiotic-eluting composite fibers designed for use as basic wound dressing elements were developed and studied. These structures were composed of a polyglyconate core and a porous poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) shell loaded with one of three antibiotic drugs: mafenide acetate, gentamicin sulphate and ceftazidime pentahydrate. The shell was prepared by the freeze-drying of inverted emulsions. The fiber investigation focused on the

  2. Observations of ? /4 structure in a low-loss radio-frequency-dressed optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundblad, N.; Ansari, S.; Guo, Y.; Moan, E.

    2014-11-01

    We load a Bose-Einstein condensate into a one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice altered through the use of radio-frequency (rf) dressing. The rf resonantly couples the three levels of the 87Rb F =1 manifold and combines with a spin-dependent "bare" optical lattice to result in adiabatic potentials of variable shape, depth, and spatial frequency content. We choose dressing parameters such that the altered lattice is stable over lifetimes exceeding tens of ms at higher depths than in previous work. We observe significant differences between the BEC momentum distributions of the dressed lattice as compared to the bare lattice, and find general agreement with a 1D band-structure calculation informed by the dressing parameters. Previous work using such lattices was limited by very shallow dressed lattices and strong Landau-Zener tunneling loss between adiabatic potentials, equivalent to failure of the adiabatic criterion. In this work we operate with significantly stronger rf coupling (increasing the avoided-crossing gap between adiabatic potentials), observing dressed lifetimes of interest for optical lattice-based analog solid-state physics.

  3. Therapy of chronic wounds with water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA)

    PubMed Central

    von Felbert, Verena; Schumann, Hauke; Mercer, James B.; Strasser, Wolfgang; Daeschlein, Georg; Hoffmann, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    The central portion of chronic wounds is often hypoxic and relatively hypothermic, representing a deficient energy supply of the tissue, which impedes wound healing or even makes it impossible. Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) is a special form of heat radiation with a high tissue penetration and a low thermal load to the skin surface. wIRA produces a therapeutically usable field of heat and increases temperature, oxygen partial pressure and perfusion of the tissue. These three factors are decisive for a sufficient tissue supply with energy and oxygen and consequently as well for wound healing, especially in chronic wounds, and infection defense. wIRA acts both by thermal and thermic as well as by non-thermal and non-thermic effects. wIRA can advance wound healing or improve an impaired wound healing process and can especially enable wound healing in non-healing chronic wounds. wIRA can considerably alleviate the pain and diminish wound exudation and inflammation and can show positive immunomodulatory effects. In a prospective, randomized, controlled study of 40 patients with chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs irradiation with wIRA and visible light (VIS) accelerated the wound healing process (on average 18 vs. 42 days until complete wound closure, residual ulcer area after 42 days 0.4 cm² vs. 2.8 cm²) and led to a reduction of the required dose of pain medication in comparison to the control group of patients treated with the same standard care (wound cleansing, wound dressing with antibacterial gauze, and compression garment therapy) without the concomitant irradiation. Another prospective study of 10 patients with non-healing chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs included extensive thermographic investigation. Therapy with wIRA(+VIS) resulted in a complete or almost complete wound healing in 7 patients and a marked reduction of the ulcer size in another 2 of the 10 patients, a clear reduction of pain and required dose of pain medication, and a normalization of the thermographic image. In a current prospective, randomized, controlled, blinded study patients with non-healing chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs are treated with compression garment therapy, wound cleansing, wound dressings and 30 minutes irradiation five times per week over 9 weeks. A preliminary analysis of the first 23 patients of this study has shown in the group with wIRA(+VIS) compared to a control group with VIS an advanced wound healing, an improved granulation and in the later phase of treatment a decrease of the bacterial burden. Some case reports have demonstrated that wIRA can also be used for mixed arterial-venous ulcers or arterial ulcers, if irradiation intensity is chosen appropriately low and if irradiation is monitored carefully. wIRA can be used concerning decubital ulcers both in a preventive and in a therapeutic indication. wIRA can improve the resorption of topically applied substances also on wounds. An irradiation with VIS and wIRA presumably acts with endogenous protoporphyrin IX (or protoporphyrin IX of bacteria) virtually similar as a mild photodynamic therapy (endogenous PDT-like effect). This could lead to improved cell regeneration and wound healing and to antibacterial effects. In conclusion, these results indicate that wIRA generally should be considered for the treatment of chronic wounds. PMID:20204086

  4. Application of Eleutherine americana crude extract in homemade salad dressing.

    PubMed

    Ifesan, Beatrice Olawumi; Siripongvutikorn, Sunisa; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2009-03-01

    Crude extract from the herb Eleutherine americana was investigated for its antistaphylococcal activity both in vitro and in a food system. The extract activity against Staphylococcus aureus was better during incubation at 35 degrees C than at 10 and 4 degrees C. The extract exhibited excellent stability in response to heat and pH treatments. The extract was incorporated into homemade salad dressing and evaluated for its antibacterial, physical, chemical, and sensory properties. A more than 1-log reduction in S. aureus counts was observed compared with the control. Examination of lipid oxidation revealed that the extract could retard the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in the salad dressing. The magnitude of the storage changes were minimal, and there were no significant differences in the appearance, color, taste, and overall acceptability ranking between samples supplemented with E. americana extract and the control samples. Based on all sensory attributes, the sensory evaluation from 0 to 16 days indicated that products with each extract concentration were acceptable. The extract from E. americana is a promising novel additive that can be used to improve the quality and safety of homemade salad dressing. PMID:19343958

  5. The effect of regional block over pain levels during vacuum-assisted wound closure.

    PubMed

    Findikcioglu, Kemal; Sezgin, Billur; Kaya, Basar; Ozkose, Zerrin; Ayhan, Suhan

    2014-02-01

    Despite being a wound treatment method with a broad spectrum of indications, vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAWC) can be a painful treatment modality which may even result with patient unwillingness for the continuation of treatment. A prospective study was undertaken to determine the effect of regional pain blocks (RPB) for patients who wanted to abandon treatment due to pain after the first application. Patients were asked to score their pain using a visual analogue scale for two different time frames (i) during dressing changes and (ii) while daytime treatment. This evaluation was carried out for conventional wound dressings, VAWC before RPB and finally for VAWC after RPB. The pain experienced with blocks was significantly lesser than conventional and VAWC dressing changes that were applied without pain blocks. Also, the pain was significantly lesser under pain blocks for daytime treatment. For patients with refractory pain where VAWC would prove to be of most benefit, RPB can be discussed with the patient and used. This study has shown that effective pain control can be obtained through regional blocks for patients with excruciating pain undergoing VAWC treatment. PMID:22883639

  6. Novel multifunctional platforms for potential treatment of cutaneous wounds: development and in vitro characterization.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Beatrice; Di Sabatino, Marcello; Calonghi, Natalia; Rodriguez, Lorenzo; Passerini, Nadia

    2013-01-20

    An original formulative/manufacturing approach for the development of a multi-composite wound dressing able to control the release of a water soluble API (lidocaine HCl) for several days was evaluated. The prepared multi-composite wound dressing is a microstructured spongy matrix, which embeds solid lipid microparticles (SLMs). The matrices were obtained by freeze drying of polyelectrolyte complexes made up two biopolymers: three different chitosan to alginate weight ratios (1:1, 3:1 and 1:3) were studied. The drug-loaded matrices were investigated as regards water uptake ability, swelling, drug loading, morphology and release profiles. SLMs were prepared at two different drug loadings (5% and 25%, w/w) by the spray congealing technology and were then incorporated in the spongy matrices. The characterization of the SLMs evidenced their spherical shape, mean dimensions lower than 20 ?m, controlled release and the modification of the drug crystalline state. Comparing the release profiles of the SLMs-loaded sponges, the matrices with 1:3 chitosan/alginate ratio displayed a sustained release profile with the lower burst effect. Then hyaluronan and cysteine were embedded into the matrix to enhance the wound healing properties of the dressing. The final multi-composite platform was able to promote the growth of fibroblasts maintaining its prolonged release characteristic. PMID:22692075

  7. Macrophage phagocytosis of wound neutrophils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adriana J. Meszaros; Jonathan S. Reichner; Jorge E. Albina

    Abstract: Resolution of acute inflammation is thought to require the recognition and phagocyto- sis of apoptotic neutrophils (PMN) through receptor- ligand interactions with macrophages,(Mf). This hypothesis was tested in rat wounds by quantifying apoptosis in freshly harvested and aged-in-culture PMN taken from wounds 1?3 days after injury and by using these wound PMN as phagocytic targets for wound, immune-activated peritoneal,

  8. Comparison of a sealed, polymer foam biodegradable temporizing matrix against Integra® dermal regeneration template in a porcine wound model.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John Edward; Dearman, Bronwyn Louise

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and optimize the first stage of a proposed two-stage skin graft replacement strategy. This entails creation of a material that can be applied immediately after burn excision to "temporize" the wound bed, become integrated as a "neodermis," resist contraction and infection, and provide the grounding for the second stage (an autologous, cultured composite skin). Four 8 × 8 cm wounds were generated in six pigs to assess and compare wound contraction using Integra® dermal regeneration template, a biodegradable temporizing polymer matrix (sealed and unsealed), and a secondary intention wound. All dressings were contiguous. Infection resulted in early spontaneous delamination of the Integra® marring the long-term comparison. The wounds treated with the sealed polymer thus contracted significantly less than the wounds treated with Integra® over the 28 days. Histologically, a thick layer of scar developed superficial to the Integra®, unsealed polymer, and in the secondary intention wounds when compared with the sealed polymer, where such a scar layer was characteristically minimal. No clinical signs of infection were observed for any polymer-treated wound. Once the Integra® silicone layer delaminated, wound contraction was aggressive. Optimization of the biodegradable sealing membrane is imminent, and the second stage of composite skin development is under way. PMID:22002205

  9. Community health nursing, wound care, and…ethics?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sue Ellen Bell

    2003-01-01

    Because of changing demographics and other factors, patients receiving care for wounds, ostomies, or incontinence are being referred in increasing numbers to community health nursing organizations for initial or continued care. As home-based wound care becomes big business, little discussion is being focused on the moral and ethical issues likely to arise in the high-tech home setting. Progressively more complex

  10. How a wound resource team saved expenses and improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bedell, Barbara; Bradley, Marianne; Pupiales, Magdalena

    2003-06-01

    The authors describe how the Visiting Nurse Service of New York developed an interdisciplinary wound resource team, based on the need to integrate new wound care research and products and prepare for PPS. Outlining the change process, the reader can learn the dynamics, benefits, and outcomes of effective team collaboration that could be replicated in any agency. PMID:12802110

  11. [Pneumonia in wounded].

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Iu V; Kharitonov, M A; Sadykov, R R; Shelukhin, V A; Ga?duk, S V; Bogomolov, A B; Ivanov, V V; Dobrovol'skaia, L M

    2015-02-01

    Pneumonia is one of the common complications of wounds of any localization. Therapists are involved into the treatment of lung lesions in wounded in the ICU, in the surgical and if the patient arrives "on follow-up care,"--in the medical ward. The article analyzes the main statistical indicators reflecting the prevalence and clinical and pathogenetic characteristics of lung pathology in wounded during the Great Patriotic War, during the fighting Soviet troops in the Republic of Afghanistan, the 1st and 2nd Chechen campaign. Pneumonia as a manifestation of traumatic disease can occur in two ways. Primary pneumonia is in close connection with the pathogenetic traumatic injury. Secondary lung lesions complicate the injury at a later date and are due to the introduction of a nosocomial infection process flora. We describe the clinical picture of pneumonia in the affected, the basic pathogenesis, principles of therapy. Successful treatment of lung pathology in wounded depends on the performance of a complex of activities involving a wide range of doctors of various specialties. PMID:25920173

  12. Wound Repair and Regeneration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Reinke; H. Sorg

    2012-01-01

    The skin is the biggest organ of the human being and has many functions. Therefore, the healing of a skin wound displays an extraordinary mechanism of cascading cellular functions which is unique in nature. As healing and regeneration processes take place in all parts of the human body, this review focuses on the healing processes of the skin and highlights

  13. Healing Invisible Wounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual abuse, war,…

  14. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  15. The effectiveness of hydrocolloid dressings versus other dressings in the healing of pressure ulcers in adults and older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Pott, Franciele Soares; Meier, Marineli Joaquim; Stocco, Janislei Giseli Dorociak; Crozeta, Karla; Ribas, Janyne Dayane

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the effectiveness of hydrocolloids in the healing of pressure ulcers in adult and older adult patients. Method systematic review with meta-analysis, based on the recommendations of the Cochrane Handbook. The search was undertaken in the databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Cochrane Database, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science and the Scientific Electronic Library Online. Results 646 primary studies were identified, 69 were evaluated and nine were selected, referring to the use of the hydrocolloid dressing in healing; of these, four studies allowed meta-analysis. There was no statistically significant difference between the hydrocolloid group and the foams group (p value=0.84; Odds Ratio 1.06, CI 95% 0.61-1.86). A slight superiority of the polyurethane dressings was observed in relation to the hydrocolloid dressings. Conclusion the evidence is not sufficient to affirm whether the efficacy of hydrocolloid dressings is superior to that of other dressings. It is suggested that clinical randomized trials be undertaken so as to ascertain the efficacy of this intervention in the healing of pressure ulcers, in relation to other treatments. PMID:25029065

  16. Retained glass foreign bodies in wounds: Predictive value of wound characteristics, patient perception, and wound exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark T Steele; Luan V Tran; William A Watson; Robert L Muelleman

    1998-01-01

    A convenience sample of 164 adult patients with 185 glass-caused wounds who presented to an emergency department (ED) and consented to a radiograph was prospectively studied. The purpose was to determine the characteristics of wounds at high risk for foreign body (FB) and the predictive value of patient FB sensation and probing wound exploration for FB retention. Retained glass was

  17. Nanolayered siRNA dressing for sustained localized knockdown.

    PubMed

    Castleberry, Steven; Wang, Mary; Hammond, Paula T

    2013-06-25

    The success of RNA interference (RNAi) in medicine relies on the development of technology capable of successfully delivering it to tissues of interest. Significant research has focused on the difficult task of systemic delivery of RNAi; however its local delivery could be a more easily realized approach. Localized delivery is of particular interest for many medical applications, including the treatment of localized diseases, the modulation of cellular response to implants or tissue engineering constructs, and the management of wound healing and regenerative medicine. In this work we present an ultrathin electrostatically assembled coating for localized and sustained delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA). This film was applied to a commercially available woven nylon dressing commonly used for surgical applications and was demonstrated to sustain significant knockdown of protein expression in multiple cell types for more than one week in vitro. Significantly, this coating can be easily applied to a medically relevant device and requires no externally delivered transfection agents for effective delivery of siRNA. These results present promising opportunities for the localized administration of RNAi. PMID:23672676

  18. Nutritional support for wound healing.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Douglas; Miller, Alan L

    2003-11-01

    Healing of wounds, whether from accidental injury or surgical intervention, involves the activity of an intricate network of blood cells, tissue types, cytokines, and growth factors. This results in increased cellular activity, which causes an intensified metabolic demand for nutrients. Nutritional deficiencies can impede wound healing, and several nutritional factors required for wound repair may improve healing time and wound outcome. Vitamin A is required for epithelial and bone formation, cellular differentiation, and immune function. Vitamin C is necessary for collagen formation, proper immune function, and as a tissue antioxidant. Vitamin E is the major lipid-soluble antioxidant in the skin; however, the effect of vitamin E on surgical wounds is inconclusive. Bromelain reduces edema, bruising, pain, and healing time following trauma and surgical procedures. Glucosamine appears to be the rate-limiting substrate for hyaluronic acid production in the wound. Adequate dietary protein is absolutely essential for proper wound healing, and tissue levels of the amino acids arginine and glutamine may influence wound repair and immune function. The botanical medicines Centella asiatica and Aloe vera have been used for decades, both topically and internally, to enhance wound repair, and scientific studies are now beginning to validate efficacy and explore mechanisms of action for these botanicals. To promote wound healing in the shortest time possible, with minimal pain, discomfort, and scarring to the patient, it is important to explore nutritional and botanical influences on wound outcome. PMID:14653765

  19. The effect of active ingredient-containing chitosan/polycaprolactone nonwoven mat on wound healing: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Bai, Meng-Yi; Chou, Tz-Chong; Tsai, Jie-Chang; Yu, Wen-Chun

    2014-07-01

    The use of an electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) nonwoven mat that is coated with a layer of chitosan (CS) containing active ingredient [tea tree oil (TTO)] represents an effective strategy for producing functional dressings. CS-coated porous PCL nonwoven mat (CS3/PCLNM) with various concentrations of active ingredients were produced and investigated. In vitro, active ingredient-containing CS3/PCLNM is effective in inhibiting the formation of nitrite and the growth of Staphylococcus aureus. Both active ingredient TTO and CS have been proven to reach their maximum amount of releases within 24 h of contact with water-based environment. In vivo, full-thickness skin removal (1.2 cm × 1.2 cm) was performed on the back of the C57BL6/J mice in noninfected and infected animal models. Four groups of functional dressings were tested in this work including Tegderm™, PCLNM, CS3/PCLNM, and 100 ?L TTO-CS3/PCLNM. After 7 days post-treatment, the bacterial levels were found to be significantly lower in both CS3/PCLNM and 100 ?L TTO-CS3/PCLNM-treated groups than in the control group (81.6 ± 18.1% and 93.7 ± 9.57% of reductions in the bacterial load in the pus relative to the control group, respectively). Additionally, based on the histological analyses, the 100 ?L TTO-CS3/PCLNM-treated group outperformed all other groups in wound healing. PMID:23946270

  20. Improved pressure sore healing with hydrocolloid dressings.

    PubMed

    Gorse, G J; Messner, R L

    1987-06-01

    We prospectively followed inpatients receiving treatment for pressure sores to identify the better of two local treatment regimens. Twenty-seven patients with 76 pressure sores received treatment with hydrocolloid dressings (HCDs) and 25 patients with 52 pressure sores received treatment with Dakin's solution (chloramine-T)-soaked wet-to-dry dressings. Thirty-eight (73%) patients initially had severe nutritional depletion. The mean serum albumin value of the pressure sore treatment groups was lower than that of an age-matched group without pressure sores. In the HCD group, 66 (86.8%) pressure sores improved compared with 36 (69.2%) pressure sores in the wet-to-dry dressings group. The HCD regimen was more efficacious even in a subgroup of patients who received inadequate nutritional support during treatment. Adequate nutritional intake during the study was associated with better healing in both local treatment groups. PMID:3555355

  1. Extending optical filaments using auxiliary dress beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew; Heinrich, Matthias; Kolesik, Miroslav; Christodoulides, Demetrios

    2015-05-01

    Dressed optical filaments offer a way to greatly protract an optical filament’s natural length while at the same time mitigating nonlinear losses and unwanted multifilamentation effects. In this article, we first theoretically reexamine the quasi-linear propagation dynamics of a standard Gaussian-ring wavefront and then proceed to explore several optical dress beam arrangements of equal-energy. The purpose of this study is to numerically simulate configurations which more economically utilize the finite amount of energy available for filament prolongation. In general, we find that parameters such as beam width and inward radial chirp, when adjusted in unison, play an important role in extending a filament whereas the spatial distribution of power in the optical dress only affects the characteristic intensity fluctuations seen during refocusing cycles.

  2. A new mouse model for wound healing in hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guangwei; Mashausi, Dhahiri Saidi; Negi, Hema; Li, Dongsheng; Li, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a new mouse model for wound healing studies on hemophilia A. Methods: Total 54 male mice with different genotypes including wild-type nude mice, heterozygous mice (FVIII-/-/Nu) and FVIII deficient mice (FVIII-/-) were generated and verified by PCR. Mice were subjected to wound healing research by making a 5 mm-thickness wound on mice skin and applying recombinant human epidermal growth factor (EGF, 10 ?g/g) ointment, FVIII ointment (30 IU) or the ointment base to heal the wounds. Furthermore, keratinocytes were isolated from these newborn mice and subjected to migration assay by stimulation of EGF (ng/ml), insulin (10 ?M) or vehicle. Results: A new hemophilic mouse model (FVIII-/-/Nu) was constructed successfully after genotyping verified by PCR. Compared to FVIII-/- mice, FVIII-/-/Nu and Nu mice showed greater degree of wound contraction and loss of the crust. Topical treatment with EGF exhibited faster wound healing than FVIII and ointment base. Insulin treatment showed more increased migration distance than treated with EGF or vehicle. FVIII-/-/Nu mice showed greater migration than FVIII-/- and Nu mice. Conclusions: A new mouse model (FVIII-/-/Nu) for wound healing in hemophilia A was constructed, and topical treatment of insulin may be a better therapy than EGF for healing wounds in hemophilia A.

  3. Biochemical Association of Metabolic Profile and Microbiome in Chronic Pressure Ulcer Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Ammons, Mary Cloud B.; Morrissey, Kathryn; Tripet, Brian P.; Van Leuven, James T.; Han, Anne; Lazarus, Gerald S.; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; Stewart, Philip S.; James, Garth A.; Copié, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds contribute significantly to the suffering of patients with co-morbidities in the clinical population with mild to severely compromised immune systems. Normal wound healing proceeds through a well-described process. However, in chronic wounds this process seems to become dysregulated at the transition between resolution of inflammation and re-epithelialization. Bioburden in the form of colonizing bacteria is a major contributor to the delayed headlining in chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers. However how the microbiome influences the wound metabolic landscape is unknown. Here, we have used a Systems Biology approach to determine the biochemical associations between the taxonomic and metabolomic profiles of wounds colonized by bacteria. Pressure ulcer biopsies were harvested from primary chronic wounds and bisected into top and bottom sections prior to analysis of microbiome by pyrosequencing and analysis of metabolome using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Bacterial taxonomy revealed that wounds were colonized predominantly by three main phyla, but differed significantly at the genus level. While taxonomic profiles demonstrated significant variability between wounds, metabolic profiles shared significant similarity based on the depth of the wound biopsy. Biochemical association between taxonomy and metabolic landscape indicated significant wound-to-wound similarity in metabolite enrichment sets and metabolic pathway impacts, especially with regard to amino acid metabolism. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a statistically robust correlation between bacterial colonization and metabolic landscape within the chronic wound environment. PMID:25978400

  4. Identifying wound prevalence using the Mobile Wound Care program.

    PubMed

    Walker, Judi; Cullen, Marianne; Chambers, Helen; Mitchell, Eleanor; Steers, Nicole; Khalil, Hanan

    2014-06-01

    Measuring the prevalence of wounds within health care systems is a challenging and complex undertaking. This is often compounded by the clinicians' training, the availability of the required data to collect, incomplete documentation and lack of reporting of this type of data across the various health care settings. To date, there is little published data on wound prevalence across regions or states. This study aims to identify the number and types of wounds treated in the Gippsland area using the Mobile Wound Care (MWC™) program. The MWC program has enabled clinicians in Gippsland to collect data on wounds managed by district nurses from four health services. The main outcomes measured were patient characteristics, wound characteristics and treatment characteristics of wounds in Gippsland. These data create several clinical and research opportunities. The identification of predominant wound aetiologies in Gippsland provides a basis on which to determine a regional wound prospective and the impact of the regional epidemiology. Training that incorporates best practice guidelines can be tailored to the most prevalent wound types. Clinical pathways that encompass the Australian and New Zealand clinical practice guidelines for the management of venous leg ulcers can be introduced and the clinical and economical outcomes can be quantitatively measured. The MWC allows healing times (days) to be benchmarked both regionally and against established literature, for example, venous leg ulcers. PMID:23848943

  5. Wound Microbiology and Associated Approaches to Wound Management

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, P. G.; Duerden, B. I.; Armstrong, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of dermal wounds are colonized with aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms that originate predominantly from mucosal surfaces such as those of the oral cavity and gut. The role and significance of microorganisms in wound healing has been debated for many years. While some experts consider the microbial density to be critical in predicting wound healing and infection, others consider the types of microorganisms to be of greater importance. However, these and other factors such as microbial synergy, the host immune response, and the quality of tissue must be considered collectively in assessing the probability of infection. Debate also exists regarding the value of wound sampling, the types of wounds that should be sampled, and the sampling technique required to generate the most meaningful data. In the laboratory, consideration must be given to the relevance of culturing polymicrobial specimens, the value in identifying one or more microorganisms, and the microorganisms that should be assayed for antibiotic susceptibility. Although appropriate systemic antibiotics are essential for the treatment of deteriorating, clinically infected wounds, debate exists regarding the relevance and use of antibiotics (systemic or topical) and antiseptics (topical) in the treatment of nonhealing wounds that have no clinical signs of infection. In providing a detailed analysis of wound microbiology, together with current opinion and controversies regarding wound assessment and treatment, this review has attempted to capture and address microbiological aspects that are critical to the successful management of microorganisms in wounds. PMID:11292638

  6. The Running Barbed Tie-over Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Kenneth M.; Kennedy, Ann-Marie; Kelly, Jack L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Barbed suture technology is becoming increasingly popular in plastic surgery and is now being used in body contouring surgery and facial rejuvenation. We describe the novel application of a barbed suture as a running tie-over dressing for skin grafts. The barbs act as anchors in the skin, so constant tensioning of the suture is not required. The bidirectional nature of the suture prevents any slippage, and the barbs even act as a grip on the underlying wool dressing. Furthermore, the method described is both quick and simple to learn and would be useful for the sole operator. PMID:25289330

  7. 40 CFR 94.907 - Engine dressing exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine dressing exemption. 94.907 Section...EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exclusion and Exemption Provisions § 94.907 Engine dressing exemption. (a) General...

  8. 40 CFR 94.907 - Engine dressing exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine dressing exemption. 94.907 Section...EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exclusion and Exemption Provisions § 94.907 Engine dressing exemption. (a) General...

  9. 40 CFR 94.907 - Engine dressing exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine dressing exemption. 94.907 Section...EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exclusion and Exemption Provisions § 94.907 Engine dressing exemption. (a) General...

  10. 40 CFR 94.907 - Engine dressing exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine dressing exemption. 94.907 Section...EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exclusion and Exemption Provisions § 94.907 Engine dressing exemption. (a) General...

  11. [Criteria for the determination of the distance of a gunshot from limited-range firearms based on the morphological characteristics of the wound and the results of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Svetlolobov, D Iu; Luzanova, I S; Demidov, I V; Zorin, Iu V; Sonis, M A; Likhachev, A S

    2013-01-01

    We have developed the criteria allowing to determine the distance of a gunshot from limited-range firearms (an IZh-79-9TGM pistol with the elastic bullet cartridges) based on the morphological characteristics of the wound and the results of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The method has been developed for the quantitative determination of barium, lead, and antimony in the targets depending on the gunshot distance. PMID:24428050

  12. Our Wounded Braves 

    E-print Network

    Mitchell, E. [author

    2012-03-05

    returned to pasture. Dehiscence occurred in one or both ulnar incisions of all foals from 2 to 5 days after surgery. All wounds healed within 2 weeks with stall rest, daily cleansing, and systemic antibiotics (procaine penicillin G, 22, 000 U/kg BID... of the distal aspect of the semilunar notch healed with the best results (70% sound), and olecranon fractures affecting the proximal aspect of the semilunar notch healed with the poorest results (0% sound). Reasons for euthanasia were 1 musculoskeletal...

  13. Effect of periodontal dressings on human gingiva fibroblasts in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Eber, R.M.; Shuler, C.F.; Buchanan, W.; Beck, F.M.; Horton, J.E. (Ohio State Univ. College of Dentistry, Columbus (USA))

    1989-08-01

    In vitro cytotoxicity studies of periodontal dressings have not generally produced a result consistent with in vivo observations. These prior in vitro studies have not used human intraoral cell lines. We tested the effects of two eugenol containing and two non-eugenol periodontal dressings on cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) (ATCC No. 1292). Replicate HGF cultures grown in microtiter plates were exposed to stock, 1:4 and 1:16 dilutions of extracts made from each of the four periodontal dressings. The HGF cultures were pulse labelled with tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) after 24, 48, and 72 hours. Incorporations of the labelled thymidine were measured using liquid scintillation counting and expressed as counts per minute. The results showed that undiluted extracts from all four periodontal dressings totally inhibited 3HTdR uptake (P less than 0.05). The 1:4 dilution of eugenol dressings inhibited 3HTdR uptake significantly more than non-eugenol dressings (P less than 0.05). Interestingly, at 72 hours the 1:16 dilution of the non-eugenol dressings caused significantly increased 3HTdR uptake which was not observed with the eugenol dressings. The present results suggest that the use of a human fibroblastic cell line for testing the effects of periodontal dressings may provide information about the relative biological effects of these dressings. Using this cell line, we have found that eugenol dressings inhibit fibroblast proliferation to a greater extent than non-eugenol dressings.

  14. Rationale for Student Dress Codes: A Review of School Handbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeburg, Elizabeth W.; Workman, Jane E.; Lentz-Hees, Elizabeth S.

    2004-01-01

    Through dress codes, schools establish rules governing student appearance. This study examined stated rationales for dress and appearance codes in secondary school handbooks; 182 handbooks were received. Of 150 handbooks containing a rationale, 117 related dress and appearance regulations to students' right to a non-disruptive educational…

  15. Charge polarization (dressed electrostatic interaction) effects in dusty (complex) crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Kourakis; P. K. Shukla; B. Farokhi

    The influence of dust charge polarization (dressing) on lattice vibrations is investigated. Both one-dimensional (1D) and hexagonal (2D) monolayer configurations are considered. It is shown that dressed interactions lead to a reduction (increase) in the frequency of lattice vibrations, as regards longitudinal (transverse) degrees of freedom. The possibility of a new crystal instability (melting) entirely due to the dressing effect

  16. Treatment Options to Manage Wound Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Curtis E.; Kennedy, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bioburden is an accepted barrier to chronic wound healing. Defining the significance, phenotype, clinical classification, and treatment guidelines has been historically lacking of evidence and based on paradigms that do not represent the scientific or clinical reality. The Problem Chronic wound bioburden is typically abundant, polymicrobial, and extremely diverse. These microbes naturally adopt biofilm phenotypes, which are quite often viable but not culturable, thereby going undetected. The failures of culture-based detection have led to abandonment of routine bioburden evaluation and aggressive treatment or, worse, to assume bioburden is not a significant barrier. Predictably, treatment regimens to address biofilm phenotypes lagged behind our diagnostic tools and understanding. Basic/Clinical Science Advances Microbial DNA-based diagnostic tools and treatment regimens have emerged, which provide and leverage objective information, resulting in a dramatic impact on outcomes. Relevance to Clinical Care Modern medicine demands decisions based on objective evidence. The diagnostic and treatment protocols reviewed herein empower clinicians to practice modern medicine with regard to bioburden, with DNA level certainty. Conclusion Bioburden is a significant barrier to healing for all chronic wounds. Molecular diagnostics provide the first objective means of assessing wound bioburden. The accuracy and comprehensive data from such diagnostic methodologies provide clinicians with the ability to employ patient-specific treatment options, targeted to each patient's microbial wound census. Based on current outcomes data, the most effective therapeutic options are topical (TPL) antibiofilm agents (ABF) combined with TPL antibiotics (ABX). In specific patients, systemic ABX and selective biocides are also appropriate, but not exclusive of ABF combined with TPL ABX. PMID:24527291

  17. Validation of a Novel Murine Wound Model of Acinetobacter baumannii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mitchell G.; Black, Chad C.; Pavlicek, Rebecca L.; Honnold, Cary L.; Wise, Matthew C.; Alamneh, Yonas A.; Moon, Jay K.; Kessler, Jennifer L.; Si, Yuanzheng; Williams, Robert; Yildirim, Suleyman; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Green, Romanza K.; Hall, Eric R.; Palys, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Patients recovering from traumatic injuries or surgery often require weeks to months of hospitalization, increasing the risk for wound and surgical site infections caused by ESKAPE pathogens, which include A. baumannii (the ESKAPE pathogens are Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species). As new therapies are being developed to counter A. baumannii infections, animal models are also needed to evaluate potential treatments. Here, we present an excisional, murine wound model in which a diminutive inoculum of a clinically relevant, multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolate can proliferate, form biofilms, and be effectively treated with antibiotics. The model requires a temporary, cyclophosphamide-induced neutropenia to establish an infection that can persist. A 6-mm-diameter, full-thickness wound was created in the skin overlying the thoracic spine, and after the wound bed was inoculated, it was covered with a dressing for 7 days. Uninoculated control wounds healed within 13 days, whereas infected, placebo-treated wounds remained unclosed beyond 21 days. Treated and untreated wounds were assessed with multiple quantitative and qualitative techniques that included gross pathology, weight loss and recovery, wound closure, bacterial burden, 16S rRNA community profiling, histopathology, peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization, and scanning electron microscopy assessment of biofilms. The range of differences that we are able to identify with these measures in antibiotic- versus placebo-treated animals provides a clear window within which novel antimicrobial therapies can be assessed. The model can be used to evaluate antimicrobials for their ability to reduce specific pathogen loads in wounded tissues and clear biofilms. Ultimately, the mouse model approach allows for highly powered studies and serves as an initial multifaceted in vivo assessment prior to testing in larger animals. PMID:24342634

  18. Business Dress for Women Corporate Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Linda S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a study designed (1) to determine any underlying considerations governing the perceptions of professional people as to the appropriateness of specific types of garment styles for female business dress and (2) to determine if a difference exists in the perceptions of appropriateness of garment styles by sex. (CT)

  19. Student Dress Codes and Uniforms. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Howard

    2009-01-01

    According to an Education Commission of the States "Policy Report", research on the effects of dress code and school uniform policies is inconclusive and mixed. Some researchers find positive effects; others claim no effects or only perceived effects. While no state has legislatively mandated the wearing of school uniforms, 28 states and the…

  20. Accuracy concerns in crush dressed form grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the crushing operation for crush dressed form grinding is given. The implications of rolling vs sliding contact, and the role of loose grit on the accuracy of the parts and the wear on the roll is discussed. Several examples are detailed.

  1. "Posh Music Should Equal Posh Dress": An Investigation into the Concert Dress and Physical Appearance of Female Soloists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Noola K.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of concert dress and physical appearance on perceptions of female classical soloists' musical abilities over a range of genres. Four female violinists were recorded playing three pieces, in four styles of dress of varying formality. Each combination of performer, piece and dress was recorded twice, once as the…

  2. Pediatric burn wound impetigo after grafting.

    PubMed

    Aikins, Kimberly; Prasad, Narayan; Menon, Seema; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-01-01

    Modern burn care techniques have reduced the risk of infection of the acute burn wound, resulting in more rapid healing and a lower incidence of graft loss. Secondary breakdown may still occur. The loss of epithelium in association with multifocal superficial abscesses and ulceration has been termed burns impetigo. This may result in considerable morbidity and require prolonged treatment. The events preceding development, the impact on the patient, and the ideal treatment appear unclear and poorly reported. In 5 years, between 2006 and 2011, 406 pediatric burns were treated with skin grafts, with 7% developing burns impetigo. Time to resolution ranged from 5 to 241 days: the mean time to complete healing was greatest with conservative management (96 days), followed by antibacterial dressings (37 days), oral antibiotics (36 days), topical steroids (16 days), and oral antibiotics in combination with topical steroids (13.5 days). Burns impetigo resulted in significant morbidity, requiring multiple visits to the treatment center and prolonged symptoms. Delay in diagnosis and treatment resulted in worse outcomes. Prompt consideration of burns impetigo should occur when postgraft patients present with suggestive clinical signs and treatment with oral antibiotics plus topical steroids should be considered. PMID:24823337

  3. Wound Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Graham, John S.; Chilcott, Robert P.; Rice, Paul; Milner, Stephen M.; Hurst, Charles G.; Maliner, Beverly I.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating chemical warfare agent that primarily affects the eyes, skin, and airways. Sulfur mustard injuries can take several months to heal, necessitate lengthy hospitalizations, and result in significant cosmetic and/or functional deficits. Historically, blister aspiration and/or deroofing (epidermal removal), physical debridement, irrigation, topical antibiotics, and sterile dressings have been the main courses of action in the medical management of cutaneous sulfur mustard injuries. Current treatment strategy consists of symptomatic management and is designed to relieve symptoms, prevent infections, and promote healing. There are currently no standardized or optimized methods of casualty management that prevent or minimize deficits and provide for speedy wound healing. Several laboratories are actively searching for improved therapies for cutaneous vesicant injury, with the aim of returning damaged skin to optimal appearance and normal function in the shortest time. Improved treatment will result in a better cosmetic and functional outcome for the patient, and will enable the casualty to return to normal activities sooner. This editorial gives brief overviews of sulfur mustard use, its toxicity, concepts for medical countermeasures, current treatments, and strategies for the development of improved therapies. PMID:16921406

  4. It's not just a wound...

    PubMed

    Russell, Barbara J

    2005-04-01

    An ongoing challenge in wound management is a belief that wounds are temporary, routine, and merely physical. However, wounds can be very complex ethically which, in turn, necessitates careful and sensitive attention by practitioners. Five clinical cases are analyzed in terms of their ethical and legal implications. More specifically, concepts such as informed consent, surrogate decision-making, compliance, intimacy, embodiment, stigma, and bodily memory are examined. Following the conceptual analyses are recommendations for responsive clinical practice. PMID:16089062

  5. Improvement of Human Keratinocyte Migration by a Redox Active Bioelectric Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Jaideep; Das Ghatak, Piya; Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Sequin, Emily K.; Bellman, Karen; Dickinson, Bryan C.; Suri, Prerna; Subramaniam, Vish V.; Chang, Christopher J.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2014-01-01

    Exogenous application of an electric field can direct cell migration and improve wound healing; however clinical application of the therapy remains elusive due to lack of a suitable device and hence, limitations in understanding the molecular mechanisms. Here we report on a novel FDA approved redox-active Ag/Zn bioelectric dressing (BED) which generates electric fields. To develop a mechanistic understanding of how the BED may potentially influence wound re-epithelialization, we direct emphasis on understanding the influence of BED on human keratinocyte cell migration. Mapping of the electrical field generated by BED led to the observation that BED increases keratinocyte migration by three mechanisms: (i) generating hydrogen peroxide, known to be a potent driver of redox signaling, (ii) phosphorylation of redox-sensitive IGF1R directly implicated in cell migration, and (iii) reduction of protein thiols and increase in integrin?v expression, both of which are known to be drivers of cell migration. BED also increased keratinocyte mitochondrial membrane potential consistent with its ability to fuel an energy demanding migration process. Electric fields generated by a Ag/Zn BED can cross-talk with keratinocytes via redox-dependent processes improving keratinocyte migration, a critical event in wound re-epithelialization. PMID:24595050

  6. Facilitating positive outcomes in older adults with wounds.

    PubMed

    Stotts, Nancy A; Hopf, Harriet W

    2005-06-01

    Older people with wounds are not the same as younger people with wounds. Older people experience biologic differences in wound healing that result in delayed healing, increased wound infection, and a greater incidence of dehiscence. Clinicians need to assess the risk of dehiscence in the older population, looking for serous drainage from the incision line and the absence of a palpable healing ridge. It is critical to recognize that older persons' presentation of wound infection is atypical. More subtle signs such as alteration in cognitive status and changes in function may indicate the presence of infection. The clinician who cares for older persons must be an exquisite detective when such changes occur to identify the source of the problem. As part of the normal trajectory of aging, older persons experience sensory loss and so may require accommodation when explanations are given to them about their wound and their wound care choices. Health care providers must consider hearing and vision changes that occur in older adults and tailor their explanations and teaching so that the message reaches the older adult and is successfully processed. Older persons have a higher incidence of cognitive changes and functional decline than do their younger counterparts, and these changes need to be assessed before a plan of care is developed to care for the older person with a wound. Limited data are available to help the clinician know the cognitive and functional level that is critical for older persons to understand their wound care choices, perform their own wound care, and to make choices about who will provide the care if they are unable to perform self-care. These seemingly basic issues raise questions for clinicians as we strive to provide evidence-based care to this ever-increasing population of older Americans. PMID:15924894

  7. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in the management of infected abdominal wounds containing mesh: an analysis of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona Mylene; Gabriel, Allen

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical outcomes of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) using reticulated open-cell foam (ROCF) in the adjunctive management of abdominal wounds with exposed and known infected synthetic mesh. A non randomised, retrospective review of medical records for 21 consecutive patients with infected abdominal wounds treated with NPWT was conducted. All abdominal wounds contained exposed synthetic mesh [composite, polypropylene (PP), or knitted polyglactin 910 (PG) mesh]. Demographic and bacteriological data, wound history, pre-NPWT and comparative post-NPWT, operative procedures and complications, hospital length of stay (LOS) and wound healing outcomes were all analysed. Primary endpoints measured were (1) hospital LOS prior to initiation of NPWT, (2) total time on NPWT, (3) hospital LOS from NPWT initiation to discharge and (4) wound closure status at discharge. A total of 21 patients with abdominal wounds with exposed, infected mesh were treated with NPWT. Aetiology of the wounds was ventral hernia repair (n = 11) and acute abdominal wall defect (n = 10). Prior to NPWT initiation, the mean hospital LOS for the composite, PP and PG meshes were 76 days (range: 21-171 days), 51 days (range: 32-62 days) and 19 days (range: 12-39 days), respectively. The mean hospital LOS following initiation of NPWT for wounds with exposed composite, PP and PG mesh were 28, 31 and 32 days, respectively. Eighteen of the 21 wounds (86%) reached full closure after a mean time of 26 days of NPWT and a mean hospital LOS of 30 days postinitiation of NPWT. Three wounds, all with composite mesh left in situ, did not reach full closure, although all exhibited decreased wound dimensions, granulating beds and decreased surface area exposure of mesh. During NPWT/ROCF, one hypoalbuminemic patient with exposed PP mesh developed an enterocutaneous fistula over a prior enterotomy site. This patient subsequently underwent total mesh extraction, takedown of the fistula and PP mesh replacement followed by reinstitution of NPWT and flap closure. In addition to appropriate systemic antibiotics and nutritional optimisation, the adjunctive use of NPWT resulted in successful closure of 86% of infected abdominal wounds with exposed prosthetic mesh. Patient hospital LOS (except those with PG mesh), operative procedures and readmissions were decreased during NPWT compared with treatment prior to NPWT. Future multi-site prospective, controlled studies would provide a strong evidence base from which treatment decisions could be made in the management of these challenging and costly cases. PMID:21176107

  8. CICATRIZATION OF WOUNDS : VI. BACTERIOLOGICAL ASEPSIS OF A WOUND.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A

    1917-07-01

    Of twenty infected cases treated with Dakin's solution or chloramine paste, seven were bacteriologically sterile. This proves that, in general, 35 per cent of the cases thus treated become bacteriologically aseptic. This degree of asepsis is not necessary in order to suture the wound, the absence of bacteria in films being sufficient. Complete sterilization of wounds, can, therefore, now be accomplished. PMID:19868138

  9. Biodegradable Gelatin Microcarriers Facilitate Re-Epithelialization of Human Cutaneous Wounds - An In Vitro Study in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Lönnqvist, Susanna; Rakar, Jonathan; Briheim, Kristina; Kratz, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to use a suspended tridimensional matrix as scaffolding for re-epithelialization of in vitro cutaneous wounds was investigated with the aid of a human in vitro wound healing model based on viable full thickness skin. Macroporous gelatin microcarriers, CultiSpher-S, were applied to in vitro wounds and cultured for 21 days. Tissue sections showed incorporation of wound edge keratinocytes into the microcarriers and thicker neoepidermis in wounds treated with microcarriers. Thickness of the neoepidermis was measured digitally, using immunohistochemical staining of keratins as epithelial demarcation. Air-lifting of wounds enhanced stratification in control wounds as well as wounds with CultiSpher-S. Immunohistochemical staining revealed expression of keratin 5, keratin 10, and laminin 5 in the neoepidermal component. We conclude that the CultiSpher-S microcarriers can function as tissue guiding scaffold for re-epithelialization of cutaneous wounds. PMID:26061630

  10. A Plutonium-Contaminated Wound, 1985, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Doran M. Christensen, DO, REAC /TS Associate Director and Staff Physician Eugene H. Carbaugh, CHP, Staff Scientist, Internal Dosimetry Manager, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

    2012-02-02

    A hand injury occurred at a U.S. facility in 1985 involving a pointed shaft (similar to a meat thermometer) that a worker was using to remove scrap solid plutonium from a plastic bottle. The worker punctured his right index finger on the palm side at the metacarpal-phalangeal joint. The wound was not through-and- through, although it was deep. The puncture wound resulted in deposition of ~48 kBq of alpha activity from the weapons-grade plutonium mixture with a nominal 12 to 1 Pu-alpha to {sup 241}Am-alpha ratio. This case clearly showed that DTPA was very effective for decorporation of plutonium and americium. The case is a model for management of wounds contaminated with transuranics: (1) a team approach for dealing with all of the issues surrounding the incident, including the psychological, (2) early surgical intervention for foreign-body removal, (3) wound irrigation with DTPA solution, and (4) early and prolonged DTPA administration based upon bioassay and in vivo dosimetry.

  11. Controlling the magnetic field sensitivity of atomic clock states by microwave dressing

    E-print Network

    Sárkány, L; Hattermann, H; Fortágh, J

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate control of the differential Zeeman shift between clock states of ultracold rubidium atoms by means of non-resonant microwave dressing. Using the dc-field dependence of the microwave detuning, we suppress the first and second order differential Zeeman shift in magnetically trapped $^{87}$Rb atoms. By dressing the state pair 5S$_{1/2} F= 1, m_F = -1$ and $F= 2, m_F = 1$, a residual frequency spread of clock frequency is insensitive to fluctuations both in the magnetic field and the dressing Rabi frequency. The technique is compatible with chip-based cold atom systems and allows the creation of clock and qubit states with reduced sensitivity to magnetic field noise.

  12. 3D strain measurement in soft tissue: Demonstration of a novel inverse finite element model algorithm on MicroCT images of a tissue phantom exposed to negative pressure wound therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Wilkes; Y. Zhao; K. Cunningham; K. Kieswetter; B. Haridas

    2009-01-01

    This study describes a novel system for acquiring the 3D strain field in soft tissue at sub-millimeter spatial resolution during negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Recent research in advanced wound treatment modalities theorizes that microdeformations induced by the application of sub-atmospheric (negative) pressure through V.A.C.® GranuFoam® Dressing, a reticulated open-cell polyurethane foam (ROCF), is instrumental in regulating the mechanobiology of granulation tissue

  13. Collaboration improves outcomes: cross county, joint acute and primary care, working party to select a super absorbent dressing.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Kim; Florence, Lorraine; Godar, Sue; Guy, Heidi; Tilbe, Helen

    2012-11-01

    This abstract highlights the work undertaken by the Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Tissue Viability Nurses Forum (BHTVNF) to select a super absorbent dressing for local formularies. A range of super absorbent dressings was selected to be included in the evaluation based on their accessibility via FP10 or NHS Supply chain. Dressings were evaluated in the hospital setting, community setting and leg ulcer clinics. Table top evaluations were also undertaken. Performance of dressings both clinically and via table top were considered along with costs. It was interesting to find out that hospital patients had different needs to community patients and as such three recommendations were made. The acute sector has added one super absorbent which is different from the community selected one. The community has also selected a lower performing super absorbent which the acute sector has not chosen. PMID:23022095

  14. Maxillofacial gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Maurin, Olga; de Régloix, Stanislas; Dubourdieu, Stéphane; Lefort, Hugues; Boizat, Stéphane; Houze, Benoit; Culoma, Jennifer; Burlaton, Guillaume; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-06-01

    The majority of maxillofacial gunshot wounds are caused by suicide attempts. Young men are affected most often. When the lower one-third of the face is involved, airway patency (1.6% of the cases) and hemorrhage control (1.9% of the cases) are the two most urgent complications to monitor and prevent. Spinal fractures are observed with 10% of maxillary injuries and in 20% of orbital injuries. Actions to treat the facial gunshot victim need to be performed, keeping in mind spine immobilization until radiographic imaging is complete and any required spinal stabilization accomplished. Patients should be transported to a trauma center equipped to deal with maxillofacial and neurosurgery because 40% require emergency surgery. The mortality rate of maxillofacial injuries shortly after arrival at a hospital varies from 2.8% to 11.0%. Complications such as hemiparesis or cranial nerve paralysis occur in 20% of survivors. This case has been reported on a victim of four gunshot injuries. One of the gunshots was to the left mandibular ramus and became lodged in the C4 vertebral bone. Maurin O , de Régloix S , Dubourdieu S , Lefort H , Boizat S , Houze B , Culoma J , Burlaton G , Tourtier JP . Maxillofacial gunshot wounds. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2015;30(3):1 4. PMID:25868553

  15. WOUND HEALING AND COLLAGEN FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Russell; Everett, Newton B.; Tyler, Ruth

    1970-01-01

    Healing skin wounds were studied in a series of parabiotic rats. The femurs of one parabiont of each pair were shielded whilst both animals were given 800 r from a Co60 source. The animals were wounded 3 days after irradiation. Each animal with partially shielded marrow was then given tritiated thymidine intraperitoneally daily while the cross-circulation was arrested by clamping. After the thymidine-3H had cleared the blood, the clamp was released. Animals were sacrificed, and wounds were prepared for radioautography 1, 2, and 6 days after wounding. In the wounds of the shielded animals thymidine-3H was observed in epidermis, endothelium, leukocytes, fibroblasts, and mast cells. Only neutrophilic leukocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes were labeled, as determined by light and electron microscope radioautography, in the wounds of each nonshielded parabiont. None of the many fibroblasts present were found to contain label in the wounds of the nonshielded parabionts through the 6 day period. These observations provide further evidence that wound fibroblasts do not arise from hematogenous precursors and, therefore, must arise from adjacent connective tissue cells. PMID:5415241

  16. Skin Substitutes and Wound Healing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. A. Auger; D. Lacroix; L. Germain

    2009-01-01

    Medical science has vastly improved on the means and methods available for the treatment of wounds in the clinic. The production and use of various types of skin substitutes has led to dramatic improvements in the odds of survival for severely burned patients, but they have also shown promise for many other applications, including cases involving chronic wounds that are

  17. Electrical Stimulation Therapy and Wound Healing: Where Are We Now?

    PubMed Central

    Isseroff, R. Rivkah; Dahle, Sara E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Healing chronic wounds is an ongoing challenge for clinicians and poses a serious public health burden. Electrical stimulation (ES), broadly defined as the application of electrical current via electrodes placed on the skin adjacent to or directly within the wound, has been proposed as a therapeutic modality over a century ago, and recent advances in understanding the biology of electrical phenomena in the skin have rekindled an interest in this modality. The Problem Despite evidence that has shown ES to be effective for wound healing, it has been slow to gain acceptance in the United States. Also, there has been no consensus in terms of standardization of parameters to devise a systematic protocol for implementation of this technology. Basic/Clinical Science Advances The epidermis maintains a “skin battery” that generates an endogenous electric field and current flow when wounded. Experimental models have demonstrated that most of the cell types within the wound can sense an electric field in the range of that endogenously generated in the wound, and respond with a variety of biological and functional responses that can contribute to healing. Multiple animal wound models have demonstrated enhancement of a number of parameters of healing when ES is exogenously supplied. Clinical Care Relevance Clinical trials have investigated the efficacy of multiple forms of ES for improving healing in a wide variety of human chronic wounds. In 2002 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved reimbursement for use of ES in a clinical setting for certain chronic wounds. Conclusion There remain many voids in our knowledge base: clinical evidence is limited by deficiencies in the design of many of the trials, a multiplicity of ES application modes and waveforms used in trials prevent selection of an optimal modality, and lack of uniformity in reporting ES dosages leave us not much advanced from our clinical knowledge base a decade ago. PMID:24527312

  18. (Super-)renormalizably dressed black holes

    E-print Network

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Méndez-Zavaleta, Julio A

    2015-01-01

    Black holes supported by self-interacting conformal scalar fields can be considered as renormalizably dressed since the conformal potential is nothing but the top power-counting renormalizable self-interaction in the relevant dimension. On the other hand, potentials defined by powers which are lower than the conformal one are also phenomenologically relevant since they are in fact super-renormalizable. In this work we provide a new map that allows to build black holes dressed with all the (super-)renormalizable contributions starting from known conformal seeds. We explicitly construct several new examples of these solutions in dimensions $D=3$ and $D=4$, including not only stationary configurations but also time-dependent ones.

  19. (Super-)renormalizably dressed black holes

    E-print Network

    Eloy Ayón-Beato; Mokhtar Hassaïne; Julio A. Méndez-Zavaleta

    2015-06-07

    Black holes supported by self-interacting conformal scalar fields can be considered as renormalizably dressed since the conformal potential is nothing but the top power-counting renormalizable self-interaction in the relevant dimension. On the other hand, potentials defined by powers which are lower than the conformal one are also phenomenologically relevant since they are in fact super-renormalizable. In this work we provide a new map that allows to build black holes dressed with all the (super-)renormalizable contributions starting from known conformal seeds. We explicitly construct several new examples of these solutions in dimensions $D=3$ and $D=4$, including not only stationary configurations but also time-dependent ones.

  20. Inductively guided circuits for ultracold dressed atoms

    PubMed Central

    Sinuco-León, German A.; Burrows, Kathryn A.; Arnold, Aidan S.; Garraway, Barry M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in optics, atomic physics and material science has paved the way to study quantum effects in ultracold atomic alkali gases confined to non-trivial geometries. Multiply connected traps for cold atoms can be prepared by combining inhomogeneous distributions of DC and radio-frequency electromagnetic fields with optical fields that require complex systems for frequency control and stabilization. Here we propose a flexible and robust scheme that creates closed quasi-one-dimensional guides for ultracold atoms through the ‘dressing’ of hyperfine sublevels of the atomic ground state, where the dressing field is spatially modulated by inductive effects over a micro-engineered conducting loop. Remarkably, for commonly used atomic species (for example, 7Li and 87Rb), the guide operation relies entirely on controlling static and low-frequency fields in the regimes of radio-frequency and microwave frequencies. This novel trapping scheme can be implemented with current technology for micro-fabrication and electronic control. PMID:25348163

  1. Efficacy of Dressing with Absorbent Foam versus Dressing with Gauze in Prevention of Tracheostomy Site Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinegad, Mehdi; Lashkarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Ghahreman, Minoo; Shabani, Mohammad; Mokhtare, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Background Tracheostomy site infection can cause numerous problems. Absorbent foam dressing may be able to prevent proliferation of infectious microorganisms by absorbing the tracheostomy stoma exudate. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of absorbent foam with gauze dressing for prevention of tracheostomy site infection. Materials and Methods In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, 80 patients (18 to 60 years) hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) due to severe head injury were randomly divided into two groups and early tracheostomy was done for them during the first 2 days. In the first group, gauze was used as tracheostomy site dressing, while in the second, absorbent foam, was placed. Tracheostomy site was checked daily for any sign of infection and samples were taken from the stoma for culture in case of presence of any sign of infection. Results Of a total of 80, 11 had tracheostomy site infection (13.75%), including 7 (17.5%) in the gauze group and 4 (10%) in the foam group. The difference in this regard between the two groups was not significant (P=0.051). Also, the dominant strains in the culture of gauze group were hospital-acquired Gram-negative bacteria (particularly Acinetobacter), while in the foam group, Gram-positives and more commonly Staphylococcus epidermidis were found. Conclusion Absorbent foam dressing is not superior to gauze dressings for prevention of tracheostomy site infection. PMID:25506371

  2. Dressing the Thanksgiving Turkey: Using Measurement?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Myrna Mitchell

    2013-11-15

    This blog post presents a Thanksgiving activity that engages learners as they practice measuring with nonstandard units and comparing lengths. Learners use unifix cubes to measure the heights of four turkeys then compare and arrange them in order from shortest to tallest. The last part of the activity has students measuring Tom Turkey to determine which clothing he should be dressed in for dinner. The lesson plan and all student worksheets can be downloaded to a PDF.

  3. Anti-biofilm properties of wound dressing incorporating nonrelease polycationic antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Atar-Froyman, Livnat; Sharon, Anat; Weiss, Ervin I; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Kesler-Shvero, Dana; Domb, Abraham J; Pilo, Raphael; Beyth, Nurit

    2015-04-01

    Polycationic nanoparticles show biocompatible, broad-spectrum bactericidal properties in vitro and in vivo when incorporated in denture lining material post-maxillectomy in head and neck cancer patients. In the present study, the synthesized Crosslinked quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine nanoparticles were found to have a strong bactericidal activity against a wide variety of microorganisms rapidly killing bacterial cells when incorporated at small concentrations into soft lining materials without compromising mechanical and biocompatibility properties. This appears advantageous over conventional released antimicrobials with regard to in vivo efficacy and safety, and may provide a convenient platform for the development of non-released antimicrobials. This is a crucial issue when it comes to giving an answer to the serious and life-threatening problems of contaminations in immunocompromised patients such as orofacial cancer patient. PMID:25678123

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Poly(vinyl alcohol) Membranes with Quaternary Ammonium Groups for Wound Dressing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kuo-Yu Chen; Yu-Sheng Lin; Chun-Hsu Yao; Ming-Hsien Li; Jui-Che Lin

    2010-01-01

    2-[(acryloyloxy)ethyl]Trimethylammonium chloride (AETMAC) was grafted onto poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) as a redox initiator. A series of graft co-polymer (PVA-g-PAETMAC) membranes with different contents of AETMAC were prepared with a casting method. The incorporation of AETMAC into PVA chains was confirmed by element analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The effects of grafting on the thermal

  5. Novel atmospheric plasma enhanced chitosan nanofiber/gauze composite wound dressings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electrospun chitosan nanofibers were deposited onto atmospheric plasma treated cotton gauze to create a novel composite bandage with higher adhesion, better handling properties, enhanced bioactivity, and moisture management. Plasma treatment of the gauze substrate was performed to improve the durabi...

  6. Chitosancellulose composite for wound dressing material. Part 2. Antimicrobial activity, blood absorption ability, and biocompatibility

    E-print Network

    Reid, Scott A.

    2013; revised 1 December 2013; accepted 17 December 2013 Published online 00 Month 2013 in Wiley Online drug carrier.1­9 These unique properties of CS work in concert to synergistically influence three is known to have the ability to deliver drugs. CS has the capability to encapsulate, stabilize, and de

  7. Wound healing activity of Sida cordifolia Linn. in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Rajesh S.; Chaurasiya, Pradeep K.; Rajak, Harish; Singour, Pradeep K.; Toppo, Fedelic Ashish; Jain, Ankit

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The present study provides a scientific evaluation for the wound healing potential of ethanolic (EtOH) extract of Sida cordifolia Linn. (SCL) plant. Materials and Methods: Excision, incision and burn wounds were inflicted upon three groups of six rats each. Group I was assigned as control (ointment base). Group II was treated with 10% EtOH extract ointment. Group III was treated with standard silver sulfadiazine (0.01%) cream. The parameters observed were percentage of wound contraction, epithelialization period, hydroxyproline content, tensile strength including histopathological studies. Result: It was noted that the effect produced by the ethanolic extract of SCL ointment showed significant (P < 0.01) healing in all wound models when compared with the control group. All parameters such as wound contraction, epithelialization period, hydroxyproline content, tensile strength and histopathological studies showed significant (P < 0.01) changes when compared with the control. Conclusion: The ethanolic extract ointment of SCL effectively stimulates wound contraction; increases tensile strength of excision, incision and burn wounds. PMID:24130382

  8. The Effect of Magnetic Fields on Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Steven L; Concannon, Matthew J; Yee, Gloria J

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Magnets are purported to aid wound healing despite a paucity of scientific evidence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of static magnetic fields on cutaneous wound healing in an animal model. The literature was reviewed to explore the historical and scientific basis of magnet therapy and to define its current role in the evidence-based practice of plastic surgery. Methods: Standardized wounds were created on the backs of 33 Sprague-Dawley rats, which were divided into 3 groups with either a 23 gauss magnet (group 1), a sham magnet (group 2), or nothing (group 3) positioned over the wound. The rate of wound closure by secondary intention was compared between the groups. Literature review was conducted through searches of PubMed and Ovid databases for articles pertinent to magnets and wound healing. Results: Wounds in the magnet group healed in an average of 15.3 days, significantly faster than those in either the sham group (20.9 days, P = .006) or control group (20.3 days, P < .0001). There was no statistically significant difference between the sham and control groups (P = .45). Conclusions: An externally applied, low-power, static magnetic field increases the rate of secondary healing. Review of the literature reveals conflicting evidence regarding the use of magnetic energy to aid the healing of bone, tendon, and skin. Level I studies are lacking and difficult to execute but are needed to define conclusively the role of magnets in clinical practice. PMID:18725953

  9. Hyperspectral characterization of an in vitro wound model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeberg, Lise L.; Hegstad, Janne-Lise; Paluchowski, Lukasz; Milani?, Matija; Pukstad, Brita S.

    2014-03-01

    Wound healing is a complex process not fully understood. There is a need of better methods to evaluate the different stages of healing, and optical characterization is a promising tool in this respect. In this study hyperspectral imaging was employed to characterize an in vitro wound model. The wound model was established by first cutting circular patches of human abdominal skin using an 8mm punch biopsy tool, and then creating dermal wounds in the center of the skin patches using a 5mm tool. The wounds were incubated in medium with 10% serum and antibiotics. Hyperspectral images were collected every three days using a push broom hyper spectral camera (Hyspex VNIR1600). The camera had a spectral resolution of 3.7 nm and was fitted with a close up lens giving a FOV of 2.5 cm and a spatial resolution of 29 micrometer. Samples for histology were collected throughout the measurement period, which was 21 days in total. Data were processed in ENVI and Matlab. A successful classification based on hyperspectral imaging of the implemented model is presented. It was not possible to see the healing zone in the in vitro model with the naked eye without dying. The hyperspectral results showed that newly formed epithelium could be imaged without any additional contrast agents or dyes. It was also possible to detect non-viable tissue. In vitro wound models and hyperspectral imaging can thus be employed to gain further insight in the complicated process of healing in different kinds of wounds.

  10. Efficacy of common decontamination methods for cleaning contaminated wounds.

    PubMed

    Mannis, Daniel; Brandl, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    Emergency preparedness and response for work with hazardous materials, including radiological materials, necessarily have to involve injuries sustained by the workers. Removing radionuclide contamination from wounds in tissue is essential to minimizing the intake of radiological materials and the internal dose to the individual. This study compares the efficacy of common decontamination methods for removal of Co from contaminated wounds inflicted in pig tissue. The decontamination procedures investigated include a commercially available, non-prescription, surfactant-based, non-ionic wound cleanser spray; a physiologic saline solution spray; and a physiologic saline solution pour. Three different types of wounds are examined: smooth incision, jagged cut, and blunt force trauma wounds. The cleanser and saline sprays are more effective at decontaminating all three wounds than the saline pour. Within the statistical limitations of the study, the difference between the cleanser spray and the saline spray is not significant. However, the cleanser spray successfully decontaminates the wound to a lower mean value. The most noticeable impact in the decontamination process appears to be due to the spray pressure employed with the cleanser and saline sprays. PMID:25551653

  11. Antigen Presentation by MHC-Dressed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs) process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide–MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI) and/or MHC class II (MHCII) from neighboring cells through a process of cell–cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide–MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC. PMID:25601867

  12. Antigen Presentation by MHC-Dressed Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs) process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide-MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI) and/or MHC class II (MHCII) from neighboring cells through a process of cell-cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide-MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC. PMID:25601867

  13. Wound Repair By Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abergel, R. Patrick; Lyons, Richard F.; Glassberg, Edward; Saperia, David; White, Rodney A.; Lask, Gary; Dwyer, Richard M.; Uitto, Jouni

    1986-08-01

    In this study, we have developed a concept of wound closure by laser welding and studied the wound healing process. In the first set of experiments, six-millimeter long, full-thickness incisions were made in the skin on the back of hairless mice. Control wounds were closed with interrupted 5-0 prolene suture. The experimental wounds were approximated and closed by laser welding using a Nd:YAG (1.06 ?m) laser. Selected wounds were excised for histopathology, transmission electron microscopy, tensile strength determination and assay of type I collagen specific messenger-RNA. The laser welded wounds demonstrated rapid healing with good cosmetic results. The tensile strength was identical both for laser welded and sutured wounds at 7, 16, and 21 days. A significant increase of type I collagen specific mRNA was noted in both specimens at 4, 10 and 16 days, but a higher level was recorded in the sutured specimens at day 16 (2652 vs. 911 U/pg total RNA). We further initiated a comparative study to identify the laser which would be most suitable for skin welding. For this purpose argon, Nd:YAG (1.06 ?m and 1.32 ?m) and CO2 lasers were used to weld skin. Wound healing, tensile strength and collagen analyses were performed. The results indicated that both argon and Nd:YAG (1.32 ?m) lasers achieved the most effective closure. These results suggest that laser welding provides an efficient method for closing skin wounds. The laser welding has clear advantages over conventional suturing techniques, being sterile, non-tactile, not requiring introduction of foreign materials into the wound, and providing improved cosmetic results.

  14. The Veil and Urban Space in Istanbul: women' s dress, mobility and Islamic knowledge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANNA J. SECOR

    The issue of veiling marks an ideological fault line in urban Turkey. Based on focus groups conducted with migrant women to Istanbul in the spring of 1999, this article aims to show how veiling, as a form of dress, is a spatial practice that gains its signié cance through women' s urban mobility and their construction of Islamic understandings in

  15. Dressing approach to the nonvanishing boundary value problem for the AKNS hierarchy

    E-print Network

    J. F. Gomes; Guilherme S. França; A. H. Zimerman

    2012-02-10

    We propose an approach to the nonvanishing boundary value problem for integrable hierarchies based on the dressing method. Then we apply the method to the AKNS hierarchy. The solutions are found by introducing appropriate vertex operators that takes into account the boundary conditions.

  16. Do silver-impregnated dressings limit infections after lumbar laminectomy with instrumented fusion?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nancy E. Epstein

    Background: Silver has been used to reduce infection for centuries. This study retrospectively analyzed whether the introduction of silver-impregnated dressing (SD; Silverlon, Argentum Medical, LLC, Lakefront, GA) rather than RD (iodine- or alcohol-based swab and dry 4 × 4 gauze) would reduce the risk of superficial or deep infection after lumbar laminectomy with instrumented fusion. Methods: The first 128 patients

  17. Protein hydrophobic dressing on seeds aiming at the delay of undesirable germination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Odilio Benedito Garrido Assis; Ariane Maria Leoni

    2009-01-01

    Polymer seed-coatings have been largely tested as an alternative method for preventing diseases and have the potential to be used to control undesirable germination and thereby increasing seed storage. Amongst these, the protein-based coatings can be applied with advantage of forming stable biodegradable and hydrophobic films. Due to their chemical structure, protein dressings act as efficient barriers for water uptake,

  18. Comics, robots, fashion and programming: outlining the concept of actDresses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ylva Fernaeus; Mattias Jacobsson

    2009-01-01

    This paper concerns the design of physical languages for controlling and programming robotic consumer products. For this purpose we explore basic theories of semiotics represented in the two separate fields of comics and fashion, and how these could be used as resources in the development of new physical languages. Based on these theories, the design concept of actDresses is defined,

  19. Application of a drainage film reduces fibroblast ingrowth into large-pored polyurethane foam during negative-pressure wound therapy in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Cornelia; Springer, Steffen; Abel, Martin; Wesarg, Falko; Ruth, Peter; Hipler, Uta-Christina

    2013-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is an advantageous treatment option in wound management to promote healing and reduce the risk of complications. NPWT is mainly carried out using open-cell polyurethane (PU) foams that stimulate granulation tissue formation. However, growth of wound bed tissue into foam material, leading to disruption of newly formed tissue upon dressing removal, has been observed. Consequently, it would be of clinical interest to preserve the positive effects of open-cell PU foams while avoiding cellular ingrowth. The study presented analyzed effects of NPWT using large-pored PU foam, fine-pored PU foam, and the combination of large-pored foam with drainage film on human dermal fibroblasts grown in a collagen matrix. The results showed no difference between the dressings in stimulating cellular migration during NPWT. However, when NPWT was applied using a large-pored PU foam, the fibroblasts continued to migrate into the dressing. This led to significant breaches in the cell layers upon removal of the samples after vacuum treatment. In contrast, cell migration stopped at the collagen matrix edge when fine-pored PU foam was used, as well as with the combination of PU foam and drainage film. In conclusion, placing a drainage film between collagen matrix and the large-pored PU foam dressing reduced the ingrowth of cells into the foam significantly. Moreover, positive effects on cellular migration were not affected, and the effect of the foam on tissue surface roughness in vitro was also reduced. PMID:23937617

  20. Antimicrobial efficacy and wound-healing property of a topical ointment containing nitric-oxide-loaded zeolites

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Utku K.; Bhattacharyya, Aparna; Samuels, Joshua; Sedlak, Jason; Trikha, Ritika; Barbee, Kenneth A.; Weingarten, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Topical delivery of nitric oxide (NO) through a wound dressing has the potential to reduce wound infections and improve healing of acute and chronic wounds. This study characterized the antibacterial efficacy of an ointment containing NO-loaded, zinc-exchanged zeolite A that releases NO upon contact with water. The release rate of NO from the ointment was measured using a chemiluminescence detection system. Minimum bactericidal concentration assays were performed using five common wound pathogens, including Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii), Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus epidermidis and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) and a fungus (Candida albicans). The time dependence of antimicrobial activity was characterized by performing log-reduction assays at four time points after 1–8 h ointment exposure. The cytotoxicity of the ointment after 24 h was assessed using cultured 3T3 fibroblast cells. Minimum microbicidal concentrations (MMCs) for bacterial organisms (5×107 c.f.u.) ranged from 50 to 100 mg ointment (ml media)?1; the MMC for C. albicans (5×104 c.f.u.) was 50 mg ointment (ml media)?1. Five to eight log reductions in bacterial viability and three log reductions in fungal viability were observed after 8 h exposure to NO–zeolite ointment compared with untreated organisms. Fibroblasts remained viable after 24 h exposure to the same concentration of NO–zeolite ointment as was used in antimicrobial tests. In parallel studies, full-thickness cutaneous wounds on Zucker obese rats healed faster than wounds treated with a control ointment. These data indicate that ointment containing NO-loaded zeolites could potentially be used as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial wound-healing dressing. PMID:24196133

  1. Wound bed preparation: ultrasonic-assisted debridement.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Gillian; Pinnuck, Loreto

    Wound bed preparation is essential for the healing of wounds. The TIME framework (tissue, infection/inflammation, moisture balance, edge of wound) for wound bed preparation shows the importance of debridement in the treatment of chronic wounds. Debridement involves the removal of devitalised tissue from the wound bed. It also facilitates the removal of biofilms-complex microbial communities that are known to contribute to delayed wound healing and chronicity of wounds. Ultrasonic-assisted wound debridement (UAWD) is a lesser known debridement method that uses low-frequency ultrasound waves. There is evidence to show that the three clinical effects of atraumatic selective tissue debridement, wound stimulatory effects and antibacterial activity facilitate early healing of wounds, reducing the cost to the healthcare system and improving the patient's quality of life. PMID:23587975

  2. ???The consistent delivery of negative pressure to wounds using reticulated, open cell foam and regulated pressure feedback?????????????????.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Amy; Spranger, Ian; Courage, James; Green, Jeff; Wilkes, Robert; Rycerz, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    ???????Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is used to manage wounds and promote wound healing. The most common form of NPWT utilizes reticulated, open cell foam (ROCF). Pressure is transferred to the wound by ROCF using T.R.A.C.™ Technology (regulated pressure feedback [RPF]) creating an environment that promotes healing. This study examines the effectiveness of ROCF versus gauze in inducing macrostrain and investigates the ability of NPWT/ROCF/RPF to consistently deliver negative pressure to the wound, compensating for constantly changing wound fluid characteristics. In an in-vitro model, ROCF induced significantly greater macrostrain than gauze demonstrating a 57% decrease in dressing surface area following negative pressure application. The decrease measured with gauze under suction (GUS) was insignificant. The NPWT/ROCF/RPF system consistently delivered negative pressure to the wound when compared to GUS or ROCF without RPF. Further, with the negative pressure source elevated 36 in (90 cm) above surrogate wounds, GUS demonstrated a 7- to 10-fold pressure drop when compared to NPWT/ROCF/RPF. Systems without RPF are limited because they cannot sense or measure pressure delivered at the wound. In situations where pressure drop occurs, neither the clinician nor patient would necessarily know that suboptimal pressure was being delivered to the wound. Therefore, a system with ROCF and RPF capability that effectively monitors and maintains the NPWT environment plays a crucial role in the optimal induction of macrostrain and microstrain. The ability of the NPWT/ROCF/RPF system to monitor and maintain controlled, consistent delivery of negative pressure would seem important to achieve desired clinical outcomes. PMID:25902176

  3. The Healing Effect of Nettle Extract on Second Degree Burn Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Hosein; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Iranpour, Maryam; Khodarahmi, Ali; Baghaee, Mehrdad; Pedram, Mir Sepehr; Saleh, Sahar; Araghi, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Numerous studies were carried out to develop more sophisticated dressings to expedite healing processes and diminish the bacterial burden in burn wounds. This study assessed the healing effect of nettle extract on second degree burns wound in rats in comparison with silver sulfadiazine and vaseline. METHODS Forty rats were randomly assigned to four equal groups. A deep second-degree burn was created on the back of each rat using a standard burning procedure. The burns were dressed daily with nettle extract in group 1, silver sulfadiazine in group 2, vaseline in group 3 and without any medication in group 4 as control group. The response to treatment was assessed by digital photography during the treatment until day 42. Histological scoring was undertaken for scar tissue samples on days 10 and 42. RESULTS A statistically significant difference was observed in group 1 compared with other groups regarding 4 scoring parameters after 10 days. A statistically significant difference was seen for fibrosis parameter after 42 days. In terms of difference of wound surface area, maximal healing was noticed at the same time in nettle group and minimal repair in the control group. CONCLUSION Our findings showed maximal rate of healing in the nettle group. So it may be a suitable substitute for silver sulfadiazine and vaseline when available. PMID:25606473

  4. Topical phenytoin in the treatment of split-thickness skin autograft donor sites: a comparative study with polyurethane membrane drape and conventional dressing.

    PubMed

    Yadav, J K; Singhvi, A M; Kumar, N; Garg, S

    1993-08-01

    The effectiveness of topical phenytoin as a wound healing agent was compared with that of OpSite (Smith & Nephew) and a conventional topical antibiotic dressing (Soframycin, Roussel) in a controlled study of 60 patients with partial-thickness skin autograft donor sites on the lower extremities. Mean time to complete healing (complete epithelialization) was 6.2 +/- 1.6 days in the phenytoin-treated group (30 patients), compared to 8.6 +/- 2.2 days with OpSite (15 patients), and 12.6 +/- 3.4 days in the 15 Soframycin-treated patients. The differences between the treatment groups were significant at P < 0.001. Mean pain scores were also lower in the phenytoin-treated group, 0.40 +/- 0.55 vs. 0.66 +/- 0.60 with OpSite (P < 0.05) and 1.4 +/- 0.50 with the conventional dressing (P < 0.001). Both phenytoin and OpSite were superior to the Soframycin dressing with respect to bacterial contamination and wound infection as measured by Gram stains of wound smears, swab and aspirate (OpSite) cultures, and clinical assessments (P < 0.001) carried out on the fifth day of treatment. No local or systemic adverse effects of the three agents used were noted. Phenytoin appears to be an effective, low-cost and safe method for the treatment of partial-thickness skin graft donor sites, comparing very favourably with, and in some aspects superior to, occlusive dressings. Further clinical use and evaluation of topical phenytoin are merited. PMID:8357478

  5. Development of an integrated surface stimulation device for systematic evaluation of wound electrotherapy.

    PubMed

    Howe, D S; Dunning, J; Zorman, C; Garverick, S L; Bogie, K M

    2015-02-01

    Ideally, all chronic wounds would be prevented as they can become life threatening complications. The concept that a wound produces a 'current of injury' due to the discontinuity in the electrical field of intact skin provides the basis for the concept that electrical stimulation (ES) may provide an effective treatment for chronic wounds. The optimal stimulation waveform parameters are unknown, limiting the reliability of achieving a successful clinical therapeutic outcome. In order to gain a more thorough understanding of ES for chronic wound therapy, systematic evaluation using a valid in vivo model is required. The focus of the current paper is development of the flexible modular surface stimulation (MSS) device by our group. This device can be programed to deliver a variety of clinically relevant stimulation paradigms and is essential to facilitate systematic in vivo studies. The MSS version 2.0 for small animal use provides all components of a single-channel, programmable current-controlled ES system within a lightweight, flexible, independently-powered portable device. Benchtop testing and validation indicates that custom electronics and control algorithms support the generation of high-voltage, low duty-cycle current pulses in a power-efficient manner, extending battery life and allowing ES therapy to be delivered for up to 7 days without needing to replace or disturb the wound dressing. PMID:25274162

  6. In Vitro Antimicrobial Effectiveness of 5 Catheter Insertion-Site Dressings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shubhangi Bhende; Stephen Rothenburger

    Polyurethane foam dressing impregnated with chlorhexidine gluconate was compared with 4 silver dressings for antimicrobial effi- cacy. Efficacy of antimicrobial dressings was evaluated using zone of inhibition assay against 7 clinically relevant bacteria and yeast. The test was carried out for up to 7 consecutive days by transferring the dressings daily. Microbiocidal activity exhibited by different dressings within the zone

  7. Bacterial Strain Diversity Within Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Rare bacterial taxa (taxa of low relative frequency) are numerous and ubiquitous in virtually any sample—including wound samples. In addition, even the high-frequency genera and species contain multiple strains. These strains, individually, are each only a small fraction of the total bacterial population. Against the view that wounds contain relatively few kinds of bacteria, this newly recognized diversity implies a relatively high rate of migration into the wound and the potential for diversification during infection. Understanding the biological and medical importance of these numerous taxa is an important new element of wound microbiology. Recent Advances: Only recently have these numerous strains been discovered; the technology to detect, identify, and characterize them is still in its infancy. Multiple strains of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria have been found in a single wound. In the few cases studied, the distribution of the bacteria suggests microhabitats and biological interactions. Critical Issues: The distribution of the strains, their phenotypic diversity, and their interactions are still largely uncharacterized. The technologies to investigate this level of genomic detail are still developing and have not been largely deployed to investigate wounds. Future Directions: As advanced metagenomics, single-cell genomics, and advanced microscopy develop, the study of wound microbiology will better address the complex interplay of numerous individually rare strains with both the host and each other. PMID:25566411

  8. Prospective randomized controlled trial comparing two methods of securing skin grafts using negative pressure wound therapy: vacuum-assisted closure and gauze suction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trang Q; Franczyk, Mieczyslawa; Lee, Justine C; Greives, Matthew R; O'Connor, Annemarie; Gottlieb, Lawrence J

    2015-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has revolutionized the management of complicated wounds and has contributed an additional modality for securing split thickness skin grafts (STSG). The standard for NPWT is the vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) device. The authors' institution has accumulated experience using standard gauze sealed with an occlusive dressing and wall suction (GSUC) as their primary mode for NPWT. The authors report a randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy of the GSUC vs the VAC in securing STSG. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial was conducted in 157 wounds in 104 patients requiring STSG from August 2009 to July 2012. All wounds were randomized to VAC or GSUC treatment and assessed for skin graft adherence/take. At postoperative day 4 or 5, NPWT was discontinued, and the size of the graft and any nonadherent areas were measured and recorded. Concomitant comorbidities, wound location, etiology, study failures, and reoperative rates were also reviewed. In all, 77 and 80 wounds were randomized to the GSUC and VAC study arms. Patient demographics were similar between both groups in terms of age, sex, comorbidities, etiology, and wound location. In all, 64 of 80 wounds in the GSUC group and 60 of 77 wounds in the VAC group had full take of the skin graft by postoperative day 4 or 5 (P = .80). The mean percent take in the GSUC group was 96.12% vs 96.21% in the VAC arm (P = .98). The use of NPWT in securing STSG is a useful method to promote adherence and healing. This study demonstrates that a low-cost, readily accessible system utilizing gauze dressings and wall suction (GSUC) results in comparable skin graft take in comparison to the VAC device. PMID:25162948

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of a Transparent Antimicrobial Dressing for Managing Central Venous and Arterial Catheters in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Bernatchez, Stéphanie F.; Ruckly, Stéphane; Timsit, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Objective To model the cost-effectiveness impact of routine use of an antimicrobial chlorhexidine gluconate-containing securement dressing compared to non-antimicrobial transparent dressings for the protection of central vascular lines in intensive care unit patients. Design This study uses a novel health economic model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of using the chlorhexidine gluconate dressing versus transparent dressings in a French intensive care unit scenario. The 30-day time non-homogeneous markovian model comprises eight health states. The probabilities of events derive from a multicentre (12 French intensive care units) randomized controlled trial. 1,000 Monte Carlo simulations of 1,000 patients per dressing strategy are used for probabilistic sensitivity analysis and 95% confidence intervals calculations. The outcome is the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections avoided. Costs of intensive care unit stay are based on a recent French multicentre study and the cost-effectiveness criterion is the cost per catheter-related bloodstream infections avoided. The incremental net monetary benefit per patient is also estimated. Patients 1000 patients per group simulated based on the source randomized controlled trial involving 1,879 adults expected to require intravascular catheterization for 48 hours. Intervention Chlorhexidine Gluconate-containing securement dressing compared to non-antimicrobial transparent dressings. Results The chlorhexidine gluconate dressing prevents 11.8 infections /1,000 patients (95% confidence interval: [3.85; 19.64]) with a number needed to treat of 85 patients. The mean cost difference per patient of €141 is not statistically significant (95% confidence interval: [€-975; €1,258]). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is of €12,046 per catheter-related bloodstream infection prevented, and the incremental net monetary benefit per patient is of €344.88. Conclusions According to the base case scenario, the chlorhexidine gluconate dressing is more cost-effective than the reference dressing. Trial Registration This model is based on the data from the RCT registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01189682). PMID:26086783

  10. The vacuum-assisted closure system for the treatment of deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatjana M Fleck; Michael Fleck; Reinhard Moidl; Martin Czerny; Rupert Koller; Pietro Giovanoli; Michael J Hiesmayer; Daniel Zimpfer; Ernst Wolner; Martin Grabenwoger

    2002-01-01

    BackgroundThe VAC system (vacuum-assisted wound closure) is a noninvasive active therapy to promote healing in difficult wounds that fail to respond to established treatment modalities. The system is based on the application of negative pressure by controlled suction to the wound surface. The method was introduced into clinical practice in 1996. Since then, numerous studies proved the effectiveness of the

  11. Surgical Soft Tissue Closure of Severe Diabetic Foot Infections: A Combination of Biologics, Negative Pressure Wound Therapy and Skin Grafting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Crystal L. Ramanujam; Thomas Zgonis

    Creative surgical strategies are often warranted for long term closure of diabetic foot wounds. This article provides a case report demonstrating the successive use of negative pressure wound therapy, advanced biologics, and split thickness skin grafting for healing of an extensive surgical wound. While the success of these therapies is enticing, their utilization should be based on careful patient selection

  12. The holistic management of chronic wound pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claire Acton

    Pain is a frequent symptom of patients with chronic wounds and contributes to suffering and reduced quality of life. Wound care professionals need to understand the potential causes and mechanisms of pain that are experienced by a patient with a chronic wound and provide the most appropriate interventions. A previous article published in Wounds UK considered the deleterious effect on

  13. Use of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Abdominal Wounds: A Review of Recent Literature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evan T. Excell

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is used extensively in the acute and chronic wound care arena of health care. It has become a standard of care for many types of wounds from non-healing diabetic foot ulcers and burns to traumatic and surgical wounds. Recently attention has been paid to using this system for the treatment of catastrophic abdominal wounds.

  14. Laminins: Roles and Utility in Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Valentina; Troughton, Lee D.; Hamill, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Laminins are complex extracellular macromolecules that are major players in the control of a variety of core cell processes, including regulating rates of cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Laminins, and related extracellular matrix components, have essential roles in tissue homeostasis; however, during wound healing, the same proteins are critical players in re-epithelialization and angiogenesis. Understanding how these proteins influence cell behavior in these different conditions holds great potential in identifying new strategies to enhance normal wound closure or to treat chronic/nonhealing wounds. Recent Advances: Laminin-derived bioactive peptides and, more recently, laminin-peptide conjugated scaffolds, have been designed to improve tissue regeneration after injuries. These peptides have been shown to be effective in decreasing inflammation and granulation tissue, and in promoting re-epithelialization, angiogenesis, and cell migration. Critical Issues: Although there is now a wealth of knowledge concerning laminin form and function, there are still areas of some controversy. These include the relative contribution of two laminin-based adhesive devices (focal contacts and hemidesmosomes) to the re-epithelialization process, the impact and implications of laminin proteolytic processing, and the importance of laminin polymer formation on cell behavior. In addition, the roles in wound healing of the laminin-related proteins, netrins, and LaNts are still to be fully defined. Future Directions: The future of laminin-based therapeutics potentially lies in the bioengineering of specific substrates to support laminin deposition for ex vivo expansion of autologous cells for graft formation and transplantation. Significant recent advances suggest that this goal is within sight. PMID:25945287

  15. Sexy Dressing Revisited: Does Target Dress Play a Part in Sexual Harassment Cases?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theresa M. Beiner

    2007-01-01

    Feminists have been debating what constitutes appropriate female attire since the beginning of the feminist movement in the United States.2 Since the early 1990s, when Naomi Wolf's book The Beauty Myth3 was released, feminists, law professors, and popular culture critics have tried to understand women's dress in the present day. In spite of years of criticism of these beliefs, the

  16. Factors Associated with Shooting Accuracy and Wounding Rate of Four Managed Wild Deer Species in the UK, Based on Anonymous Field Records from Deer Stalkers

    PubMed Central

    Aebischer, Nicholas J.; Wheatley, Christopher J.; Rose, Hugh R.

    2014-01-01

    The amount of wounding during routine culling is an important factor in the welfare of wild deer. Little information exists on factors determining shooting accuracy and wounding rates under field conditions in the UK. In this study, 102 anonymous stalkers collected data on the outcomes and circumstances of 2281 shots. Using hot-deck imputation and generalised linear mixed modelling, we related the probability that a shot hit its target, and the probability that the shot killed the deer if it was hit, to 28 variables describing the circumstances of the shot. Overall, 96% of deer were hit, of which 93% were killed outright. A reduced probability of hitting the target was associated with an uncomfortable firing position, too little time available, shooting off elbows or freehand, taking the head or upper neck as point of aim, a heavily obscured target, a distant target, shooting at females, lack of shooting practice and a basic (or no) stalker qualification. An increase in the likelihood of wounding was associated with an uncomfortable firing position, shooting with insufficient time, a distant target (only when time was not sufficient), a bullet weight below 75 grains, a target concealed in thicket or on the move and an area rarely stalked. To maximise stalking success and deer welfare, we recommend that stalkers ensure a comfortable firing position, use a gun rest, aim at the chest, use bullets heavier than 75 grains, avoid taking a rushed shot, shoot a distant animal only if there is plenty of time, fire only when the target is stationary, avoid shooting at an obscured animal, take care when the ground is unfamiliar, and do shooting practice at least once a month. The high miss rate of basic-level stalkers suggests that training should include additional firing practice under realistic shooting conditions. PMID:25334012

  17. Economics of pressure-ulcer care: review of the literature on modern versus traditional dressings.

    PubMed

    San Miguel, L; Torra i Bou, J E; Verdú Soriano, J

    2007-01-01

    Published evidence suggests that some of the benefits of modern dressings--longer wear times and less frequent dressing changes--make them more cost-effective than traditional gauze dressings in pressure ulcer management. PMID:17334139

  18. Wound disinfection with ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G J; Bannister, G C; Leeming, J P

    1995-06-01

    Bacteria were counted concurrently in the air and wounds during the first 20 min of total joint arthroplasty procedures in two theatres: a conventional plenum ventilated theatre with ultraviolet C (UVC) tubes installed and a filtered vertical laminar flow theatre. Four theatre environments were tested: conventional theatre and clothing; conventional theatre with UVC protective clothing, with UVC set to produce 100 or 300 microW cm-2 s-1 irradiation; and filtered vertical laminar flow air with staff wearing cuffed cotton/polyester clothing. When used, the UVC was activated 10 min after starting an operation to assess the effect of UVC clothing alone, and of UVC radiation on bacteria already present in the wound. Compared with conventional theatres, UVC clothing reduced air counts by 38%, UVC at 100 microW cm-2 s-1 by 81%, at 300 microW cm-2 s-1 by 91%, and laminar flow by 92%. Wounds counts fell correspondingly by 66% with UVC clothing, 87% with UVC at 100 microW cm-2 s-1 and 92% both with UVC at 300 microW cm-2 s-1 and laminar flow. In conventional and laminar flow theatres air and wound counts correlated closely but in UVC theatres wound counts were lower than levels expected from prevailing air counts suggesting that UVC kills bacteria in wounds as well as in air. PMID:7673693

  19. Application of orange essential oil as an antistaphylococcal agent in a dressing model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is the pathogen most often and prevalently involved in skin and soft tissue infections. In recent decades outbreaks of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) have created major problems for skin therapy, and burn and wound care units. Topical antimicrobials are most important component of wound infection therapy. Alternative therapies are being sought for treatment of MRSA and one area of interest is the use of essential oils. With the increasing interest in the use and application of natural products, we screened the potential application of terpeneless cold pressed Valencia orange oil (CPV) for topical therapy against MRSA using an in vitro dressing model and skin keratinocyte cell culture model. Methods The inhibitory effect of CPV was determined by disc diffusion vapor assay for MRSA and vancomycin intermediate-resistant S. aureus (VISA) strains. Antistaphylococcal effect of CPV in an in vitro dressing model was tested on S. aureus inoculated tryptic soya agar plate. Bactericidal effect of CPV on MRSA and VISA infected keratinocyte cells was examined by enumeration of extra- and intra-cellular bacterial cells at different treatment time points. Cytotoxic effects on human skin cells was tested by adding CPV to the keratinocyte (HEK001) cells grown in serum free KSFM media, and observed by phase-contrast microscope. Results CPV vapour effectively inhibited the MRSA and VISA strains in both disc diffusion vapour assay and in vitro dressing model. Compared to untreated control addition of 0.1% CPV to MRSA infected keratinocyte decreased the viable MRSA cells by 2 log CFU/mL in 1 h and in VISA strain 3 log CFU/mL reduction was observed in 1 h. After 3 h viable S. aureus cells were not detected in the 0.2% CPV treatment. Bactericidal concentration of CPV did not show any cytotoxic effect on the human skin keratinocyte cells in vitro. Conclusions At lower concentration addition of CPV to keratinocytes infected with MRSA and VISA rapidly killed the bacterial cells without causing any toxic effect to the keratinocytes. Therefore, the results of this study warrant further in vivo study to evaluate the potential of CPV as a topical antistaphylococcal agent. PMID:22894560

  20. A randomized, controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy of pressure ulcers via a novel polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Marcus James Dermot; Driver, Sara; Coghlan, Patrick; Greenwood, John Edward

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the study were (1) to look for any local, clinically apparent response, within and around a debrided wound, to a novel biocompatible polyurethane foam during repeated, short-term implantation, and (2) to assess the material's efficacy as a negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) interface compared with a widely used, commercially available foam. Twenty pressure ulcers in 18 patients underwent surgical debridement, then randomization to receive novel treatment or control foam as the wound interface for NPWT. Dressing changes every 2-3 days allowed qualitative wound assessment and quantitative measurement to compare outcomes. No adverse reaction was observed in any patient receiving the new foam. The new "novel foam" performed as a NPWT interface as effectively as the control "standard foam." In deep wounds, the new foam was easier to remove, fragmented less, and showed less retention than the control foam. No marginal in-growth occurred, making removal less traumatic and reducing bleeding from cavity wall granulations. The results support previous large animal studies, and independent ISO10993 testing, that the new foam is safe and biocompatible. Its efficacy as an NPWT interface, nontraumatic removal with low fragmentation and retention rate, favors the new material, especially in deep cavity wounds. PMID:24635170

  1. Sol-gel processed mupirocin silica microspheres loaded collagen scaffold: a synergistic bio-composite for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Sathiamurthi; Ramadass, Satiesh kumar; Madhan, Balaraman

    2014-02-14

    Development of a bio-composite using synergistic combination is a promising strategy to address various pathological manifestations of acute and chronic wounds. In the present work, we have combined three materials viz., mupirocin as an antimicrobial drug, sol-gel processed silica microsphere as drug carrier for sustained delivery of drug and collagen, an established wound healer as scaffold. The mupirocin-loaded silica microspheres (Mu-SM) and Mu-SM loaded collagen scaffold were characterized for surface morphology, entrapment efficiency and distribution homogeneity, in vitro drug release, water uptake capacity, cell proliferation and antibacterial activity. In vivo wound healing efficacy of the bio-composite was experimented using full thickness excision wound model in Wistar albino rats. The Mu-SM incorporated collagen scaffold showed good in vitro characteristics in terms of better water uptake, sustained drug availability and antimicrobial activity. The wound closure analysis revealed that the complete epithelialisation was observed at 14.2 ± 0.44 days for Mu-SM loaded collagen, whereas this was 17.4 ± 0.44 days and 20.6 ± 0.54 days for collagen and control groups, respectively. Consequently, the synergistic strategy of combining mupirocin-loaded silica microspheres and collagen as a Mu-SM loaded collagen dressing material would be an ideal biomaterial for the treatment of surface wounds, burns and foot ulcers. PMID:24514452

  2. Ultraviolet Radiation in Wound Care: Sterilization and Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Asheesh; Avci, Pinar; Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Significance Wound care is an important area of medicine considering the increasing age of the population who may have diverse comorbidities. Light-based technology comprises a varied set of modalities of increasing relevance to wound care. While low-level laser (or light) therapy and photodynamic therapy both have wide applications in wound care, this review will concentrate on the use of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Recent Advances UVC (200–280?nm) is highly antimicrobial and can be directly applied to acute wound infections to kill pathogens without unacceptable damage to host tissue. UVC is already widely applied for sterilization of inanimate objects. UVB (280–315?nm) has been directly applied to the wounded tissue to stimulate wound healing, and has been widely used as extracorporeal UV radiation of blood to stimulate the immune system. UVA (315–400?nm) has distinct effects on cell signaling, but has not yet been widely applied to wound care. Critical Issues Penetration of UV light into tissue is limited and optical technology may be employed to extend this limit. UVC and UVB can damage DNA in host cells and this risk must be balanced against beneficial effects. Chronic exposure to UV can be carcinogenic and this must be considered in planning treatments. Future Directions New high-technology UV sources, such as light-emitting diodes, lasers, and microwave-generated UV plasma are becoming available for biomedical applications. Further study of cellular signaling that occurs after UV exposure of tissue will allow the benefits in wound healing to be better defined. PMID:24527357

  3. Robust quantum logic in neutral atoms via adiabatic Rydberg dressing

    E-print Network

    Tyler Keating; Robert L. Cook; Aaron Hankin; Yuan-Yu Jau; Grant W. Biedermann; Ivan H. Deutsch

    2015-02-23

    We study a scheme for implementing a controlled-Z (CZ) gate between two neutral-atom qubits based on the Rydberg blockade mechanism in a manner that is robust to errors caused by atomic motion. By employing adiabatic dressing of the ground electronic state, we can protect the gate from decoherence due to random phase errors that typically arise because of atomic thermal motion. In addition, the adiabatic protocol allows for a Doppler-free configuration that involves counterpropagating lasers in a $\\sigma_+/\\sigma_-$ orthogonal polarization geometry that further reduces motional errors due to Doppler shifts. The residual motional error is dominated by dipole-dipole forces acting on doubly-excited Rydberg atoms when the blockade is imperfect. For reasonable parameters, with qubits encoded into the clock states of $^{133}$Cs, we predict that our protocol could produce a CZ gate in $<10$ $\\mu$s with error probability on the order of $10^{-3}$.

  4. Noninvasive imaging technologies for cutaneous wound assessment: A review.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dereck W; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Prindeze, Nicholas J; Moffatt, Lauren T; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2015-03-01

    The ability to phenotype wounds for the purposes of assessing severity, healing potential and treatment is an important function of evidence-based medicine. A variety of optical technologies are currently in development for noninvasive wound assessment. To varying extents, these optical technologies have the potential to supplement traditional clinical wound evaluation and research, by providing detailed information regarding skin components imperceptible to visual inspection. These assessments are achieved through quantitative optical analysis of tissue characteristics including blood flow, collagen remodeling, hemoglobin content, inflammation, temperature, vascular structure, and water content. Technologies that have, to this date, been applied to wound assessment include: near infrared imaging, thermal imaging, optical coherence tomography, orthogonal polarization spectral imaging, fluorescence imaging, laser Doppler imaging, microscopy, spatial frequency domain imaging, photoacoustic detection, and spectral/hyperspectral imaging. We present a review of the technologies in use or development for these purposes with three aims: (1) providing basic explanations of imaging technology concepts, (2) reviewing the wound imaging literature, and (3) providing insight into areas for further application and exploration. Noninvasive imaging is a promising advancement in wound assessment and all technologies require further validation. PMID:25832563

  5. Penetrating chest wound: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Rourke, L. L.; McKenzie, F. N.; Heimbecker, R. O.

    1977-01-01

    An unusual penetrating chest injury was caused by a ball-point pen. Because of apparent penetration of the heart, preparations were made for an emergency open-heart procedure before emergency thoracotomy was undertaken, with the pen still in situ. The pen had bruised the epicardium but had not penetrated the pericardial sac. After removal of the pen, the wound was closed and a chest tube left in place. Recovery, apart from minor degrees of basal atelectasis, pleural effusion and wound infection, was uneventful. The outcome was consistent with that associated with current aggressive management of penetrating chest injuries. Management is based on three approaches. The primary one is intercostal thoracostomy tube drainage and fluid and blood replacement. In cases of massive hemorrhage or air leak, thoracotomy is necessary. The third approach is to prevent post-traumatic pulmonary insufficiency by using fine, high-efficiency filters during blood transfusion, avoiding excessive administration of intravenous fluids, performing tracheostomy after prolonged endotracheal intubation, and using a volume respirator with positive end-expiratory pressure. The average mortality for penetrating wounds of the heart is 25%. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:856432

  6. ???????Using science to advance wound care practice: lessons from the literature.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Laura L; Baine, William B

    2012-09-01

    Wound care professionals can improve clinical, patient-oriented wound outcomes and do so cost-effectively by using scientific evidence to meet patient and wound care goals and needs. A review of the literature was conducted to define evidence-based wound management, describe the potential of science to improve outcomes in wound care, and summarize strategies, tactics, and tools for wound care providers and recipients to utilize science to their mutual benefit. In addition, changes in the availability of randomized and nonrandomized and clinical and preclinical evidence during the past 50 years were examined using MEDLINE database searches of English-language publications, combining the search terms wound, ulcer, or burn limited by the terms randomized or clinical for each decade since 1960. The number of published, nonrandomized wound studies has increased exponentially during the last five decades but, more recently, evidence from randomized controlled trials also has become available. Moreover, while many questions remain unanswered, a substantial number of publications have shown the use of available evidence-based guidelines and wound care strategies improves outcomes of care while saving time and money. The application of science-based wound care in clinical practice is increasing slowly; expensive techniques supported by limited or inconsistent evidence are still in use and add to wound care costs without certainty they improve outcomes. The literature provides compelling evidence that patients with a wide variety of diagnoses benefit when opinion-based care is replaced by clinical wisdom applied on a substrate of best available evidence. Patients with wounds deserve no less. PMID:22933698

  7. Effects of the blended fibroin/aloe gel film on wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Inpanya, Paichit; Faikrua, Atchariya; Ounaroon, Anan; Sittichokechaiwut, Anuphan; Viyoch, Jarupa

    2012-06-01

    Delayed healing remains a major clinical problem and here we have sought to develop an improved dressing film comprising 1.95% w/v fibroin and 0.05% w/v aloe gel extract. The tensile strength of dry film was 21.1 ± 0.5 MPa and broke at 1.1 ± 0.2% elongation; corresponding values for wet film were 18.3 ± 1.3 MPa and 1.9 ± 0.1%. The film maintained its shape upon water immersion and the swelling ratio of the dry film was 0.8 ± 0.1 while the water uptake was 43.7 ± 2.6%. After 28 days of incubation in phosphate buffered saline (1 M, pH 7.4, 37 °C), the weight of film was reduced by 6.7 ± 1.1% and the tensile strength and elongation at breaking point (dry state) were 15.4 ± 0.6 MPa and 1.5 ± 0.2%, respectively. Compared to aloe-free fibroin film (2.0% fibroin extract only), the blended film enhanced the attachment and proliferation of skin fibroblasts. The bFGF immunofluorescence of fibroblasts cultured on the blended film appeared greater than those cultured on tissue culture plate or on aloe-free fibroin film while ?-smooth muscle actin was maintained. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, the wounds dressed with the blended film were smaller (p <0.05) by day 7 after wounding, compared to untreated diabetic wounds. Histology of repaired diabetic wounds showed the fibroblast distribution and collagen fiber organization to be similar to wounds in normal rats, and this was matched by enhanced hydroxyproline content. Thus, such accelerated wound healing by the blended fibroin/aloe gel films may find application in treatment of diabetic non-healing skin ulcers. PMID:22418946

  8. Techniques for applying belt dressing. Technical progress report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Doyak

    1977-01-01

    In response to the growing number of accidents involved in applying belt dressing to increase friction coefficient, the Bureau of Mines with the assistance of the Mining Enforcement and Safety Administration has been seeking a safer method for applying belt dressing to machinery requiring belt drive. Existing procedures consist of aerosol-can and swab-type applications; both methods have proved hazardous. Between

  9. Ethnic Identity: Its Relationship to Ethnic and Contemporary Dress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith C. Forney; Nancy J. Rabolt

    1986-01-01

    An ethnic identity is reflected through intrinsic and extrinsic traits which also may be associated with other ethnic behaviors. This study investigated ethnic identity as it relates to traditional ethnic dress patterns, and use of ethnic reference persons and ethnic market sources as information on contemporary dress. A sample of 117 students identifying with one of seven ethnic heritages was

  10. Use of Microwave Dressing Fields to Enhance Rydberg Atom Interactions

    E-print Network

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Use of Microwave Dressing Fields to Enhance Rydberg Atom Interactions by Joseph A. Petrus Presented;Abstract A microwave dressing field was used to induce resonant energy transfer in translationally cold 43d5/2 + 43d5/2 45p3/2 + 41f5/2,7/2 was enhanced due to the induced degeneracy of the initial

  11. Moral Crisis in Higher Institutions and the Dress Code Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayokun, K. O.; Adedeji, S. O.; Oyebade, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviewed the case of indecent dressing among the youth of today especially on the universities campuses, which has forced the authorities of those institutions to enact dress codes to stem the tide and restore high moral standards, integrity and decency. Whether this bid was successful or not was another thing which was a function of…

  12. Influence of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy on Tissue Oxygenation of the Foot

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Yoo-Seok; Lee, Ye-Na; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Background Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is believed to accelerate wound healing by altering wound microvascular blood flow. Although many studies using laser Doppler have found that NPWT increases perfusion, recent work using other modalities has demonstrated that perfusion is reduced. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of NPWT on tissue oxygenation of the foot, which is the most sensitive region of the body to ischemia. Methods Transcutaneous partial pressure of oxygen (TcpO2) was used to determine perfusion beneath NPWT dressings of 10 healthy feet. The sensor was placed on the tarso-metatarsal area of the foot and the NPWT dressing was placed above the sensor. TcpO2 was measured until it reached a steady plateau state. The readings obtained at the suction-on period were compared with the initial baseline (pre-suction) readings. Results TcpO2 decreased significantly immediately after applying NPWT, but gradually increased over time until reaching a steady plateau state. The decrease in TcpO2 from baseline to the steady state was 2.9 to 13.9 mm Hg (mean, 9.3±3.6 mm Hg; 13.5±5.8%; P<0.01). All feet reached a plateau within 20 to 65 minutes after suction was applied. Conclusions NPWT significantly decrease tissue oxygenation of the foot by 2.9 to 13.9 mm Hg. NPWT should be used with caution on feet that do not have adequate tissue oxygenation for wound healing. PMID:25396178

  13. An investigation and characterization on alginate hydogel dressing loaded with metronidazole prepared by combined inotropic gelation and freeze-thawing cycles for controlled release.

    PubMed

    Sarheed, Omar; Rasool, Bazigha K Abdul; Abu-Gharbieh, Eman; Aziz, Uday Sajad

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of combined Ca(2+) cross-linking and freeze-thawing cycle method on metronidazole (model drug) drug release and prepare a wound film dressing with improved swelling property. The hydrogel films were prepared with sodium alginate (SA) using the freeze-thawing method alone or in combination with ionotropic gelation with CaCl2. The gel properties such as morphology, swelling, film thickness, and content uniformity and in vitro dissolution profiles using Franz diffusion cell were investigated. The cross-linking process was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In vitro protein adsorption test, in vivo wound-healing test, and histopathology were also performed. The hydrogel (F2) composed of 6% sodium alginate and 1% metronidazole prepared by combined Ca(2+) cross-linking and freeze-thawing cycles showed good swelling. This will help to provide moist environment at the wound site. With the in vivo wound-healing and histological studies, F2 was found to improve the wound-healing effect compared with the hydrogel without the drug, and the conventional product. PMID:25425388

  14. Cost-effectiveness comparison between topical silver sulfadiazine and enclosed silver dressing for partial-thickness burn treatment.

    PubMed

    Sheckter, Clifford C; Van Vliet, Michael M; Krishnan, Naveen M; Garner, Warren L

    2014-01-01

    The standard treatment of partial-thickness burns includes topical silver products such as silver sulfadiazine (SSD) cream and enclosed dressings including silver-impregnated foam (Mepilex Ag; Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden) and silver-laden sheets (Aquacel Ag; ConvaTec, Skillman, NJ). The current state of health care is limited by resources, with an emphasis on evidence-based outcomes and cost-effective treatments. This study includes a decision analysis with an incremental cost-utility ratio comparing enclosed silver dressings with SSD in partial-thickness burn patients with TBSA less than 20%. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to identify clinically relevant health states in partial-thickness burn patients. These health states include successful healing, infection, and noninfected delayed healing requiring either surgery or conservative management. The probabilities of these health states were combined with Medicare CPT reimbursement codes (cost) and patient-derived utilities to fit into the decision model. Utilities were obtained using a visual analog scale during patient interviews. Expected cost and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated using the roll-back method. The incremental cost-utility ratio for enclosed silver dressing relative to SSD was $40,167.99/QALY. One-way sensitivity analysis of complication rates confirmed robustness of the model. Assuming a maximum willingness to pay $50,000/QALY, the complication rate for SSD must be 22% or higher for enclosed silver dressing to be cost effective. By varying complication rates for SSD and enclosed silver dressings, the two-way sensitivity analysis demonstrated the cost effectiveness of using enclosed silver dressing at the majority of complication rates for both treatment modalities. Enclosed silver dressings are a cost-effective means of treating partial thickness burns. PMID:24121806

  15. Effect of a topical formulation containing Calophyllum brasiliense Camb. extract on cutaneous wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Lordani, T V A; Brenzan, M A; Cortez, L E R; Lordani, C R F; Honda, P A; Lonardoni, M V C; Cortez, D A G

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the wound healing effects of topical application of an emulsion containing the HPLC-standardised extract from Calophyllum brasiliense Cambess (Clusiaceae) leaves in rats. The macroscopic analysis demonstrated that the wounds treated with the C. brasiliense emulsion healed earlier than the wounds treated with emulsion base and Dersani®. The percentage of wound healing in the group treated with the C. brasiliense emulsion was significantly higher than in the other groups at 7 and 14 days. On day 14, the animals treated with the C. brasiliense emulsion exhibited a 90.67% reduction of the wound areas. The histological evaluation revealed that on day 21, the group treated with the C. brasiliense emulsion exhibited a significant increase in fibroblasts compared with the other groups. Thus, the C. brasiliense emulsion had healing properties in the topical treatment of wounds and accelerated the healing process. PMID:25310798

  16. Design and production of gentamicin/dextrans microparticles by supercritical assisted atomisation for the treatment of wound bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Rita P; Auriemma, Giulia; Mencherini, Teresa; Russo, Paola; Porta, Amalia; Adami, Renata; Liparoti, Sara; Della Porta, Giovanna; Reverchon, Er