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Sample records for bases moleculares del

  1. Nucleic acid based molecular devices.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Yamuna; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2011-03-28

    In biology, nucleic acids are carriers of molecular information: DNA's base sequence stores and imparts genetic instructions, while RNA's sequence plays the role of a messenger and a regulator of gene expression. As biopolymers, nucleic acids also have exciting physicochemical properties, which can be rationally influenced by the base sequence in myriad ways. Consequently, in recent years nucleic acids have also become important building blocks for bottom-up nanotechnology: as molecules for the self-assembly of molecular nanostructures and also as a material for building machinelike nanodevices. In this Review we will cover the most important developments in this growing field of nucleic acid nanodevices. We also provide an overview of the biochemical and biophysical background of this field and the major "historical" influences that shaped its development. Particular emphasis is laid on DNA molecular motors, molecular robotics, molecular information processing, and applications of nucleic acid nanodevices in biology. PMID:21432950

  2. The R215W mutation in NBS1 impairs {gamma}-H2AX binding and affects DNA repair: molecular bases for the severe phenotype of 657del5/R215W Nijmegen breakage syndrome patients

    SciTech Connect

    Masi, Alessandra di Viganotti, Mara; Polticelli, Fabio; Ascenzi, Paolo; Tanzarella, Caterina; Antoccia, Antonio

    2008-05-09

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a genetic disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to ionising radiation. Compound heterozygous 657del5/R215W NBS patients display a clinical phenotype more severe than the majority of NBS patients homozygous for the 657del5 mutation. The NBS1 protein, mutated in NBS patients, contains a FHA/BRCT domain necessary for the DNA-double strand break (DSB) damage response. Recently, a second BRCT domain has been identified, however, its role is still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the R215W mutation in NBS1 impairs histone {gamma}-H2AX binding after induction of DNA damage, leading to a delay in DNA-DSB rejoining. Molecular modelling reveals that the 215 residue of NBS1 is located between the two BRCT domains, affecting their relative orientation that appears critical for {gamma}-H2AX binding. Present data represent the first evidence for the role of NBS1 tandem BRCT domains in {gamma}-H2AX recognition, and could explain the severe phenotype observed in 657del5/R215W NBS patients.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  4. Bioconjugate-Based Molecular Umbrellas

    PubMed Central

    Janout, Vaclav; Regen, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular umbrellas are “amphomorphic” compounds that can produce a hydrophobic or a hydrophilic exterior when exposed to a hydrophobic or hydrophilic microenvironment, respectively. Such molecules are composed of two or more facial amphiphiles that are connected to a central scaffold. Molecular umbrellas that have been synthesized to date, using bile acids as umbrella “walls”, polyamines such as spermidine and spermine as scaffold material, and L-lysine as “branches”, have been found capable of transporting certain hydrophilic peptides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides across liposomal membranes by passive diffusion. They have also have been shown to increase in the water solubility and hydrolytic stability of a hydrophobic drug, and to exhibit significant antiviral activity. The ability of a fluorescently-labeled molecular umbrella to readily enter live HeLa cells suggests that such conjugates could find use as drug carriers. PMID:19053303

  5. Niobate-based octahedral molecular sieves

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Nyman, May D.

    2006-10-17

    Niobate-based octahedral molecular sieves having significant activity for multivalent cations and a method for synthesizing such sieves are disclosed. The sieves have a net negatively charged octahedral framework, comprising niobium, oxygen, and octahedrally coordinated lower valence transition metals. The framework can be charge balanced by the occluded alkali cation from the synthesis method. The alkali cation can be exchanged for other contaminant metal ions. The ion-exchanged niobate-based octahedral molecular sieve can be backexchanged in acidic solutions to yield a solution concentrated in the contaminant metal. Alternatively, the ion-exchanged niobate-based octahedral molecular sieve can be thermally converted to a durable perovskite phase waste form.

  6. Niobate-based octahedral molecular sieves

    DOEpatents

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Nyman, May D.

    2003-07-22

    Niobate-based octahedral molecular sieves having significant activity for multivalent cations and a method for synthesizing such sieves are disclosed. The sieves have a net negatively charged octahedral framework, comprising niobium, oxygen, and octahedrally coordinated lower valence transition metals. The framework can be charge balanced by the occluded alkali cation from the synthesis method. The alkali cation can be exchanged for other contaminant metal ions. The ion-exchanged niobate-based octahedral molecular sieve can be backexchanged in acidic solutions to yield a solution concentrated in the contaminant metal. Alternatively, the ion-exchanged niobate-based octahedral molecular sieve can be thermally converted to a durable perovskite phase waste form.

  7. [Molecular bases of cancer immunology].

    PubMed

    Barrera-Rodríguez, R; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Madrid-Marina, V

    1995-01-01

    The immune system is a tight network of different types of cells and molecules. The coordinated action of these elements mounts a precise immune response against tumor cells. However, these cells present several escape mechanisms, leading to tumor progression. This paper shows several cellular and molecular events involved in the regulation of the immune response against tumor cells. The interaction of several molecules such as MHC, TcR, adhesins, tumor antigens and cytokines are discussed, as well as the most recent knowledge about escape mechanisms and immunotherapy. PMID:7502157

  8. FRET-based Molecular Tension Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gayrard, Charlène; Borghi, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Cells generate and experience mechanical forces that may shape tissues and regulate signaling pathways in a variety of physiological or pathological situations. How forces propagate and transduce signals at the molecular level is poorly understood. The advent of FRET-based Molecular Tension Microscopy now allows to achieve mechanical force measurements at a molecular scale with molecular specificity in situ, and thereby better understand the mechanical architecture of cells and tissues, and mechanotransduction pathways. In this review, we will first expose the basic principles of FRET-based MTM and its various incarnations. We will describe different ways of measuring FRET, their advantages and drawbacks. Then, throughout the range of proteins of interest, cells and organisms to which it has been applied, we will review the tests developed to validate the approach, how molecular tension was related to cell functions, and conclude with possible developments and offshoots. PMID:26210398

  9. Coordination-Cluster-Based Molecular Magnetic Refrigerants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaowei; Cheng, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Coordination polymers serving as molecular magnetic refrigerants have been attracting great interest. In particular, coordination cluster compounds that demonstrate their apparent advantages on cryogenic magnetic refrigerants have attracted more attention in the last five years. Herein, we mainly focus on depicting aspects of syntheses, structures, and magnetothermal properties of coordination clusters that serve as magnetic refrigerants on account of the magnetocaloric effect. The documented molecular magnetic refrigerants are classified into two primary categories according to the types of metal centers, namely, homo- and heterometallic clusters. Every section is further divided into several subgroups based on the metal nuclearity and their dimensionalities, including discrete molecular clusters and those with extended structures constructed from molecular clusters. The objective is to present a rough overview of recent progress in coordination-cluster-based molecular magnetic refrigerants and provide a tutorial for researchers who are interested in the field. PMID:27381662

  10. Ultrathin inorganic molecular nanowire based on polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenxin; Murayama, Toru; Sadakane, Masahiro; Ariga, Hiroko; Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Asakura, Kiyotaka; Ueda, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    The development of metal oxide-based molecular wires is important for fundamental research and potential practical applications. However, examples of these materials are rare. Here we report an all-inorganic transition metal oxide molecular wire prepared by disassembly of larger crystals. The wires are comprised of molybdenum(VI) with either tellurium(IV) or selenium(IV): {(NH4)2[XMo6O21]}n (X=tellurium(IV) or selenium(IV)). The ultrathin molecular nanowires with widths of 1.2 nm grow to micrometre-scale crystals and are characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis, Rietveld analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, thermal analysis and elemental analysis. The crystals can be disassembled into individual molecular wires through cation exchange and subsequent ultrasound treatment, as visualized by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The ultrathin molecular wire-based material exhibits high activity as an acid catalyst, and the band gap of the molecular wire-based crystal is tunable by heat treatment. PMID:26139011

  11. Ultrathin inorganic molecular nanowire based on polyoxometalates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenxin; Murayama, Toru; Sadakane, Masahiro; Ariga, Hiroko; Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Asakura, Kiyotaka; Ueda, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    The development of metal oxide-based molecular wires is important for fundamental research and potential practical applications. However, examples of these materials are rare. Here we report an all-inorganic transition metal oxide molecular wire prepared by disassembly of larger crystals. The wires are comprised of molybdenum(VI) with either tellurium(IV) or selenium(IV): {(NH4)2[XMo6O21]}n (X=tellurium(IV) or selenium(IV)). The ultrathin molecular nanowires with widths of 1.2 nm grow to micrometre-scale crystals and are characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis, Rietveld analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, thermal analysis and elemental analysis. The crystals can be disassembled into individual molecular wires through cation exchange and subsequent ultrasound treatment, as visualized by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The ultrathin molecular wire-based material exhibits high activity as an acid catalyst, and the band gap of the molecular wire-based crystal is tunable by heat treatment. PMID:26139011

  12. Bioassays Based on Molecular Nanomechanics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Majumdar, Arun

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that when specific biomolecular interactions are confined to one surface of a microcantilever beam, changes in intermolecular nanomechanical forces provide sufficient differential torque to bend the cantilever beam. This has been used to detect single base pair mismatches during DNA hybridization, as well as prostate specific antigen (PSA) at concentrations and conditions that are clinically relevant for prostate cancer diagnosis. Since cantilever motion originates from free energy change induced by specific biomolecular binding, this technique is now offering a common platform for label-free quantitative analysis of protein-protein binding, DNA hybridization DNA-protein interactions, and in general receptor-ligandmore » interactions. Current work is focused on developing “universal microarrays” of microcantilever beams for high-throughput multiplexed bioassays.« less

  13. Observaciones Fotometricas EN Bandas Moleculares del Cometa Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claria, J. J.; Sistero, R. F.; Lapasset, E.

    1987-05-01

    Results from narrow-band photoelectric photometry of comet Halley after its perihelion passage are presented. The mean atmospheric extinction coefficients determined at Bosque Alegre for six bands between 3600 and 5200 Å are consistent with those of the UBV and DD0 systems. The largest fluxes measured successively correspond to the molecules of C2 , CN, and C3 . The CN emission is typically 70% of the one C2, while the one of C3 is about 20% . The observations show that : (i) There is no detectable contribution of molecular ions CO+ during the period in consideration. (ii) Between March 15 and 22 of 1986 there is a decrease in the proportion of molecules of C2,CN,andC3, with respect to the presence of dust indicate by the continuum. Similar decreases, observed with a P = 6d.1 ± 0d.2, coincide with disconnection events detected from Bosque Alegre and other observatories. If they correspond to the frequency of passage of magnetic solar sectors by the comet, a solar "synodic" rotation Pc = 4P = 24d.4±0d.8, with respect to the comet, is deduced. This value is in excellent agreement with the mean value of the apparent solar rotation with respect to the comet.

  14. [Molecular based targets and endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, St; Ananiev, J; Ivanova, K; Velev, V; Todorova, M; Gulubova, M

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the rate of spread of endometrial carcinoma, especially in the postmenopausal period. Along with routine diagnostic methods, giving information on the location and progression of the disease, there are some morphological methods determining very accurately the correlations in the development of this type of cancer and his prognosis. Moreover--in recent years, the accumulated information about the molecular profile of this type of cancer made it possible to implement a number of new drugs against the so-called molecular therapy -'targets' in the neoplastic process. Significant proportion of cases show response rates, it is more hope in the development of more successful formulas and target -based therapy. In this review, we present and discuss the role of certain molecular markers as potential indicators of prognosis and development, as well as determining the target treatment of endometrial carcinoma. PMID:25909140

  15. Graph-based molecular alignment (GMA).

    PubMed

    Marialke, J; Körner, R; Tietze, S; Apostolakis, Joannis

    2007-01-01

    We describe a combined 2D/3D approach for the superposition of flexible chemical structures, which is based on recent progress in the efficient identification of common subgraphs and a gradient-based torsion space optimization algorithm. The simplicity of the approach is reflected in its generality and computational efficiency: the suggested approach neither requires precalculated statistics on the conformations of the molecules nor does it make simplifying assumptions on the topology of the molecules being compared. Furthermore, graph-based molecular alignment produces alignments that are consistent with the chemistry of the molecules as well as their general structure, as it depends on both the local connectivities between atoms and the overall topology of the molecules. We validate this approach on benchmark sets taken from the literature and show that it leads to good results compared to computationally and algorithmically more involved methods. The results suggest that, for most practical purposes, graph-based molecular alignment is a viable alternative to molecular field alignment with respect to structural superposition and leads to structures of comparable quality in a fraction of the time. PMID:17381175

  16. Photoswitchable gel assembly based on molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Harada, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The formation of effective and precise linkages in bottom-up or top-down processes is important for the development of self-assembled materials. Self-assembly through molecular recognition events is a powerful tool for producing functionalized materials. Photoresponsive molecular recognition systems can permit the creation of photoregulated self-assembled macroscopic objects. Here we demonstrate that macroscopic gel assembly can be highly regulated through photoisomerization of an azobenzene moiety that interacts differently with two host molecules. A photoregulated gel assembly system is developed using polyacrylamide-based hydrogels functionalized with azobenzene (guest) or cyclodextrin (host) moieties. Reversible adhesion and dissociation of the host gel from the guest gel may be controlled by photoirradiation. The differential affinities of α-cyclodextrin or β-cyclodextrin for the trans-azobenzene and cis-azobenzene are employed in the construction of a photoswitchable gel assembly system. PMID:22215078

  17. Photoswitchable gel assembly based on molecular recognition

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Harada, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The formation of effective and precise linkages in bottom-up or top-down processes is important for the development of self-assembled materials. Self-assembly through molecular recognition events is a powerful tool for producing functionalized materials. Photoresponsive molecular recognition systems can permit the creation of photoregulated self-assembled macroscopic objects. Here we demonstrate that macroscopic gel assembly can be highly regulated through photoisomerization of an azobenzene moiety that interacts differently with two host molecules. A photoregulated gel assembly system is developed using polyacrylamide-based hydrogels functionalized with azobenzene (guest) or cyclodextrin (host) moieties. Reversible adhesion and dissociation of the host gel from the guest gel may be controlled by photoirradiation. The differential affinities of α-cyclodextrin or β-cyclodextrin for the trans-azobenzene and cis-azobenzene are employed in the construction of a photoswitchable gel assembly system. PMID:22215078

  18. Molecular diagnostics: future probe-based strategies.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Peter; Cardy, Donald L N

    2004-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAATs) represent powerful tools in clinical microbiology, particularly in areas where traditional culture-based methods alone prove insufficient. A notable advantage is in reducing the time from taking samples to reporting results. This, and the specificity and sensitivity imparted by NAATs, can help to improve patient care. Both thermal and isothermal NAATs have been adapted to aid diagnosis in clinical laboratories. Current molecular diagnostic assays are generally high-tech, and are expensive to buy and perform. Easy-to-use NAATs are beginning to appear, not only facilitating acceptable throughput in clinical laboratories, but also allowing tests to move out of the laboratory, closer to the point of care. Demand for simpler, miniaturized equipment and assays, and the trend toward personalized medicine, is leading towards the development of fully integrated automation and home-use kits. The integration of diverse disciplines, such as genomics, molecular biology, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, microfabrication, and organic chemistry, is behind the emerging DNA microarray technology. Development of DNA microchips allows the simultaneous detection of potentially thousands of target sequences, not only favoring high throughput, but also the potential for genotyping patient subsets with respect to their response to particular drug types (pharmakogenomics). It is envisaged that the future of probe-based technologies will see the development of fully integrated assays and devices suitable for nonskilled users. PMID:15148419

  19. Molecular cloning of protein-based polymers.

    PubMed

    Mi, Lixin

    2006-07-01

    Protein-based biopolymers have become a promising class of materials for both biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, as they have well-defined molecular weights, monomer compositions, as well as tunable chemical, biological, and mechanical properties. Using standard molecular biology tools, it is possible to design and construct genes encoding artificial proteins or protein-based polymers containing multiple repeats of amino acid sequences. This article reviews some of the traditional methods used for constructing DNA duplexes encoding these repeat-containing genes, including monomer generation, concatemerization, iterative oligomerization, and seamless cloning. A facile and versatile method, called modules of degenerate codons (MDC), which uses PCR and codon degeneracy to overcome some of the disadvantages of traditional methods, is introduced. Re-engineering of the random coil spacer domain of a bioactive protein, WPT2-3R, is used to demonstrate the utility of the MDC method. MDC re-constructed coding sequences facilitate further manipulations, such as insertion, deletion, and swapping of various sequence modules. A summary of some promising emerging techniques for synthesizing repetitive sequence-containing artificial proteins is also provided. PMID:16827576

  20. Protein-based tumor molecular imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging discipline which plays critical roles in diagnosis and therapeutics. It visualizes and quantifies markers that are aberrantly expressed during the disease origin and development. Protein molecules remain to be one major class of imaging probes, and the option has been widely diversified due to the recent advances in protein engineering techniques. Antibodies are part of the immunosystem which interact with target antigens with high specificity and affinity. They have long been investigated as imaging probes and were coupled with imaging motifs such as radioisotopes for that purpose. However, the relatively large size of antibodies leads to a half-life that is too long for common imaging purposes. Besides, it may also cause a poor tissue penetration rate and thus compromise some medical applications. It is under this context that various engineered protein probes, essentially antibody fragments, protein scaffolds, and natural ligands have been developed. Compared to intact antibodies, they possess more compact size, shorter clearance time, and better tumor penetration. One major challenge of using protein probes in molecular imaging is the affected biological activity resulted from random labeling. Site-specific modification, however, allows conjugation happening in a stoichiometric fashion with little perturbation of protein activity. The present review will discuss protein-based probes with focus on their application and related site-specific conjugation strategies in tumor imaging. PMID:20232092

  1. Molecular Bases of Corneal Endothelial Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Schmedt, Thore; Silva, Mariana Mazzini; Ziaei, Alireza; Jurkunas, Ula

    2011-01-01

    The phrase “corneal endothelial dystrophies” embraces a group of bilateral corneal conditions that are characterized by a non-inflammatory and progressive degradation of corneal endothelium. Corneal endothelial cells exhibit a high pump site density and, along with barrier function, are responsible for maintaining the cornea in its natural state of relative dehydration. Gradual loss of endothelial cells leads to an insufficient water outflow, resulting in corneal edema and loss of vision. Since the pathologic mechanisms remain largely unknown, the only current treatment option is surgical transplantation when vision is severely impaired. In the past decade, important steps have been taken to understand how endothelial degeneration progresses on the molecular level. Studies of affected multigenerational families and sporadic cases identified genes and chromosomal loci, and revealed either Mendelian or complex disorder inheritance patterns. Mutations have been detected in genes that carry important structural, metabolic, cytoprotective, and regulatory functions in corneal endothelium. In addition to genetic predisposition, environmental factors like oxidative stress were found to be involved in the pathogenesis of endotheliopathies. This review summarizes and crosslinks the recent progress on deciphering the molecular bases of corneal endothelial dystrophies. PMID:21855542

  2. Fluorescence lifetime-based optical molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anand T N

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime is a powerful contrast mechanism for in vivo molecular imaging. In this chapter, we describe instrumentation and methods to optimally exploit lifetime contrast using a time domain fluorescence tomography system. The key features of the system are the use of point excitation in free-space using ultrashort laser pulses and non-contact detection using a gated, intensified CCD camera. The surface boundaries of the imaging volume are acquired using a photogrammetric camera integrated with the imaging system, and implemented in theoretical models of light propagation in biological tissue. The time domain data are optimally analyzed using a lifetime-based tomography approach, which is based on extracting a tomographic set of lifetimes and decay amplitudes from the long time decay portion of the time domain data. This approach improves the ability to locate in vivo targets with a resolution better than conventional optical methods. The application of time domain lifetime multiplexing and tomography are illustrated using phantoms and tumor bearing mouse model of breast adenocarcinoma. In the latter application, the time domain approach allows an improved detection of fluorescent protein signals from intact nude mice in the presence of background autofluorescence. This feature has potential applications for longitudinal pre-clinical evaluation of drug treatment response as well as to address fundamental questions related to tumor physiology and metastasis. PMID:21153381

  3. Molecular survey of hepatitis C virus in the touristic city of Mar del Plata, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Culasso, Andrés C A; Elizalde, Mercedes; Campos, Rodolfo H; Barbini, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    The global epidemiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) may be roughly described by two groups of genotypes: the worldwide distributed ones (subtypes 1a, 1b, 2a and 3a, among others) and the endemic ones (subtypes 4a, 5a, 6a, among others). Epidemiological and population dynamic studies of the worldwide distributed genotypes have shown that subtypes 1a and 3a are common among intravenous drug users (IDUs) and that they are also in expansion in some countries. The molecular survey of HCV provides some clues about the epidemiological status of the infections in a local scale and the phylogenetic and demographic reconstruction analyses complement this study by inferring whether the infections of certain subtypes are in a steady state or expanding. Here, a molecular survey of the HCV variants that circulate in the touristic city of Mar del Plata (Buenos Aires, Argentina) was performed in samples obtained from 42 patients. The subtypes detected were 1a (32 patients), 3a (8 patients) and 1b (2 patients). The demographic history of subtype 1a inferred using the sequence data showed an exponential growth in the 1990's. The period of viral expansion was delayed compared with that observed for the same genotype in other countries where the transmission was associated with IDUs. Also, the phylogeographic analysis of HCV-1a showed a statistically significant association between the location of the samples and the phylogeny, which may be the result of the local transmission of HCV in the city. The molecular analysis helped in the description of the complex epidemiological context of a touristic city, and pointed out that some sanitary measures should be taken in order to reduce the transmission of HCV (and maybe of HIV) among IDUs. PMID:23028605

  4. Affinity based and molecularly imprinted cryogels: Applications in biomacromolecule purification.

    PubMed

    Andaç, Müge; Galaev, Igor Yu; Denizli, Adil

    2016-05-15

    The publications in macro-molecularly imprinted polymers have increased drastically in recent years with the development of water-based polymer systems. The macroporous structure of cryogels has allowed the use of these materials within different applications, particularly in affinity purification and molecular imprinting based methods. Due to their high selectivity, specificity, efficient mass transfer and good reproducibility, molecularly imprinted cryogels (MICs) have become attractive for researchers in the separation and purification of proteins. In this review, the recent developments in affinity based cryogels and molecularly imprinted cryogels in protein purification are reviewed comprehensively. PMID:26454622

  5. Accurate Molecular Polarizabilities Based on Continuum Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholls, Anthony; Iftimie, Radu I.; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for representing the intramolecular polarizability as a continuum dielectric is introduced to account for molecular electronic polarization. It is shown, using a finite-difference solution to the Poisson equation, that the Electronic Polarization from Internal Continuum (EPIC) model yields accurate gas-phase molecular polarizability tensors for a test set of 98 challenging molecules composed of heteroaromatics, alkanes and diatomics. The electronic polarization originates from a high intramolecular dielectric that produces polarizabilities consistent with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and experimental values when surrounded by vacuum dielectric. In contrast to other approaches to model electronic polarization, this simple model avoids the polarizability catastrophe and accurately calculates molecular anisotropy with the use of very few fitted parameters and without resorting to auxiliary sites or anisotropic atomic centers. On average, the unsigned error in the average polarizability and anisotropy compared to B3LYP are 2% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between the polarizability components from B3LYP and this approach lead to a R2 of 0.990 and a slope of 0.999. Even the F2 anisotropy, shown to be a difficult case for existing polarizability models, can be reproduced within 2% error. In addition to providing new parameters for a rapid method directly applicable to the calculation of polarizabilities, this work extends the widely used Poisson equation to areas where accurate molecular polarizabilities matter. PMID:23646034

  6. Network-Based Models in Molecular Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Andreas

    Biological systems are characterized by a large number of diverse interactions. Interaction maps have been used to abstract those interactions at all biological scales ranging from food webs at the ecosystem level down to protein interaction networks at the molecular scale.

  7. A deoxyribozyme-based molecular automaton.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, Milan N; Stefanovic, Darko

    2003-09-01

    We describe a molecular automaton, called MAYA, which encodes a version of the game of tic-tac-toe and interactively competes against a human opponent. The automaton is a Boolean network of deoxyribozymes that incorporates 23 molecular-scale logic gates and one constitutively active deoxyribozyme arrayed in nine wells (3x3) corresponding to the game board. To make a move, MAYA carries out an analysis of the input oligonucleotide keyed to a particular move by the human opponent and indicates a move by fluorescence signaling in a response well. The cycle of human player input and automaton response continues until there is a draw or a victory for the automaton. The automaton cannot be defeated because it implements a perfect strategy. PMID:12923549

  8. Quantitative Molecular Thermochemistry Based on Path Integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Glaesemann, K R; Fried, L E

    2005-03-14

    The calculation of thermochemical data requires accurate molecular energies and heat capacities. Traditional methods rely upon the standard harmonic normal mode analysis to calculate the vibrational and rotational contributions. We utilize path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) for going beyond the harmonic analysis, to calculate the vibrational and rotational contributions to ab initio energies. This is an application and extension of a method previously developed in our group.

  9. Coal-based carbons with molecular sieve properties

    SciTech Connect

    El-Wakil, A.M.; Youssef, A.M.; Tollan, K.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves are used extensively in gas chromatography for the separation of permanent gases and light hydrocarbons. Carbon molecular sieves also find commercial application for the manufacture of pure hydrogen from hydrogen-rich gases such as coke-oven gas, and for the separation of air by the pressure-swing adsorption technique. The objective of this investigation was to prepare carbons from Maghara coal, recently available on the commercial market. Coal-based carbons, if they possess molecular sieve properties, are superior to molecular sieve carbons from agricultural by-products because they have more satisfactory mechanical properties.

  10. Molecular bases of plant resistance to arthropods.

    PubMed

    Smith, C Michael; Clement, Stephen L

    2012-01-01

    Arthropod-resistant crops provide significant ecological and economic benefits to global agriculture. Incompatible interactions involving resistant plants and avirulent pest arthropods are mediated by constitutively produced and arthropod-induced plant proteins and defense allelochemicals synthesized by resistance gene products. Cloning and molecular mapping have identified the Mi-1.2 and Vat arthropod resistance genes as CC-NBS-LRR (coiled coil-nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat) subfamily NBS-LRR resistance proteins, as well as several resistance gene analogs. Genetic linkage mapping has identified more than 100 plant resistance gene loci and linked molecular markers used in cultivar development. Rice and sorghum arthropod-resistant cultivars and, to a lesser extent, raspberry and wheat cultivars are components of integrated pest management (IPM) programs in Asia, Australia, Europe, and North America. Nevertheless, arthropod resistance in most food and fiber crops has not been integrated due primarily to the application of synthetic insecticides. Plant and arthropod genomics provide many opportunities to more efficiently develop arthropod-resistant plants, but integration of resistant cultivars into IPM programs will succeed only through interdisciplinary collaboration. PMID:21910639

  11. Inquiry-Based Learning of Molecular Phylogenetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campo, Daniel; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Reconstructing phylogenies from nucleotide sequences is a challenge for students because it strongly depends on evolutionary models and computer tools that are frequently updated. We present here an inquiry-based course aimed at learning how to trace a phylogeny based on sequences existing in public databases. Computer tools are freely available…

  12. The cell as the smallest DNA-based molecular computer.

    PubMed

    Ji, S

    1999-10-01

    The pioneering work of Adleman (1994) demonstrated that DNA molecules in test tubes can be manipulated to perform a certain type of mathematical computation. This has stimulated a theoretical interest in the possibility of constructing DNA-based molecular computers. To gauge the practicality of realizing such microscopic computers, it was thought necessary to learn as much as possible from the biology of the living cell--presently the only known DNA-based molecular computer in existence. Here the recently developed theoretical model of the living cell (the Bhopalator) and its associated theories (e.g. cell language), principles, laws and concepts (e.g. conformons, IDS's) are briefly reviewed and summarized in the form of a set of five laws of 'molecular semiotics' (synonyms include 'microsemiotics', 'cellular semiotics', or 'cytosemiotics') the study of signs mediating measurement, computation, and communication on the cellular and molecular levels. Hopefully, these laws will find practical applications in designing DNA-based computing systems. PMID:10636037

  13. Optimal separable bases and molecular collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, L W

    1997-12-01

    A new methodology is proposed for the efficient determination of Green`s functions and eigenstates for quantum systems of two or more dimensions. For a given Hamiltonian, the best possible separable approximation is obtained from the set of all Hilbert space operators. It is shown that this determination itself, as well as the solution of the resultant approximation, are problems of reduced dimensionality for most systems of physical interest. Moreover, the approximate eigenstates constitute the optimal separable basis, in the sense of self-consistent field theory. These distorted waves give rise to a Born series with optimized convergence properties. Analytical results are presented for an application of the method to the two-dimensional shifted harmonic oscillator system. The primary interest however, is quantum reactive scattering in molecular systems. For numerical calculations, the use of distorted waves corresponds to numerical preconditioning. The new methodology therefore gives rise to an optimized preconditioning scheme for the efficient calculation of reactive and inelastic scattering amplitudes, especially at intermediate energies. This scheme is particularly suited to discrete variable representations (DVR`s) and iterative sparse matrix methods commonly employed in such calculations. State to state and cumulative reactive scattering results obtained via the optimized preconditioner are presented for the two-dimensional collinear H + H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2} + H system. Computational time and memory requirements for this system are drastically reduced in comparison with other methods, and results are obtained for previously prohibitive energy regimes.

  14. Supramolecular polymers constructed by crown ether-based molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bo; Wang, Feng; Dong, Shengyi; Huang, Feihe

    2012-03-01

    Supramolecular polymers, polymeric systems beyond the molecule, have attracted more and more attention from scientists due to their applications in various fields, including stimuli-responsive materials, healable materials, and drug delivery. Due to their good selectivity and convenient enviro-responsiveness, crown ether-based molecular recognition motifs have been actively employed to fabricate supramolecular polymers with interesting properties and novel applications in recent years. In this tutorial review, we classify supramolecular polymers based on their differences in topology and cover recent advances in the marriage between crown ether-based molecular recognition and polymer science. PMID:22012256

  15. Screening for F508del as a first step in the molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis*,**

    PubMed Central

    Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia; Ribeiro, Maria Ângela Gonçalves de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Antônio Fernando; Ribeiro, José Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the relevance of screening for the F508del mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene as a first step in the genetic diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) by associating the genotype with various clinical variables. METHODS: We evaluated 180 CF patients regarding the F508del mutation. The clinical data were obtained from the medical records of the patients and from interviews with their parents or legal guardians. RESULTS: Of the 180 patients studied, 65 (36.1%) did not carry the F508del mutation (group 0 [G0]), 67 (37.2%) were F508del heterozygous (G1), and 48 (26.7%) were F508del homozygous (G2). All three groups showed associations with the clinical variables. Homozygosis was associated with younger patients, younger age at CF diagnosis, and younger age at the first isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), as well as with higher prevalence of pancreatic insufficiency (PI) and non-mucoid PA (NMPA) colonization. In comparison with G1+G2 patients, G0 patients were older; first experienced clinical symptoms, digestive disease, and pulmonary disease at an older age; were older at CF diagnosis and at first PA isolation; and had a lower prevalence of PI and meconium ileus, as well as of colonization by NMPA, mucoid PA, and Burkholderia cepacia. In G1 patients, values were intermediate for age at CF diagnosis; age at first PA isolation, first pulmonary symptoms, and first clinical manifestations; MPA colonization; and OR for PI. CONCLUSIONS: The identification of F508del in 63.9% of the patients studied showed that this can be a useful tool as a first step in the genetic diagnosis of CF. The F508del genotype was associated with clinical severity of the disease, especially with the variables related to CF onset. PMID:23857699

  16. Microfabricated cantilever-based detector for molecular beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachels, T.; Schäfer, R.

    1998-11-01

    A low cost detector for particles in molecular beam experiments is presented which can easily be mounted in a molecular beam apparatus. The detector is based on microfabricated cantilevers, which can be employed either as single sensors or as sensor arrays. The single cantilever technique has been used to measure the absolute number of atoms coming out of a pulsed laser vaporization cluster source. The particles are detected by the shift of the thermally excited resonance frequency of the cantilever due to the cluster deposition. We have determined with the single cantilever the ratio of neutral to ionized clusters and we have investigated the cluster generation at different source conditions. In addition to this, a microfabricated cantilever array has been used to measure molecular beam profiles, which opens new possibilities for molecular beam deflection experiments.

  17. Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorizadeh, Siamak

    2016-05-01

    Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density is performed to a number of chemical species, which show non-nuclear attractors (NNA) in their gradient maps of the electron density. It is found that NNAs are removed using this molecular partitioning and although the virial theorem is not valid for all of the basins obtained in the being used AIM, all of the atoms obtained using the new approach obey this theorem. A comparison is also made between some atomic topological parameters which are obtained from the new partitioning approach and those calculated based on the electron density partitioning.

  18. A clinically applicable molecular-based classification for endometrial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Talhouk, A; McConechy, M K; Leung, S; Li-Chang, H H; Kwon, J S; Melnyk, N; Yang, W; Senz, J; Boyd, N; Karnezis, A N; Huntsman, D G; Gilks, C B; McAlpine, J N

    2015-01-01

    Background: Classification of endometrial carcinomas (ECs) by morphologic features is inconsistent, and yields limited prognostic and predictive information. A new system for classification based on the molecular categories identified in The Cancer Genome Atlas is proposed. Methods: Genomic data from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) support classification of endometrial carcinomas into four prognostically significant subgroups; we used the TCGA data set to develop surrogate assays that could replicate the TCGA classification, but without the need for the labor-intensive and cost-prohibitive genomic methodology. Combinations of the most relevant assays were carried forward and tested on a new independent cohort of 152 endometrial carcinoma cases, and molecular vs clinical risk group stratification was compared. Results: Replication of TCGA survival curves was achieved with statistical significance using multiple different molecular classification models (16 total tested). Internal validation supported carrying forward a classifier based on the following components: mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry, POLE mutational analysis and p53 immunohistochemistry as a surrogate for ‘copy-number' status. The proposed molecular classifier was associated with clinical outcomes, as was stage, grade, lymph-vascular space invasion, nodal involvement and adjuvant treatment. In multivariable analysis both molecular classification and clinical risk groups were associated with outcomes, but differed greatly in composition of cases within each category, with half of POLE and mismatch repair loss subgroups residing within the clinically defined ‘high-risk' group. Combining the molecular classifier with clinicopathologic features or risk groups provided the highest C-index for discrimination of outcome survival curves. Conclusions: Molecular classification of ECs can be achieved using clinically applicable methods on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, and provides

  19. Induced base transistor fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.-Y.; Liu, W. C.; Jame, M. S.; Wang, Y. H.; Luryi, S.

    1986-09-01

    A novel three-terminal hot-electron device, the induced base transistor (IBT), has been fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy. Two-dimensional electron gas induced by the applied collector field in an undoped GaAs quantum well is used as the base of the IBT. The common-base current gain alpha has been achieved as high as 0.96 under a collector bias of 2.5 V and an emitter current of 3 mA.

  20. Plasmonic-Based Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy: Application to Molecular Binding

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Shaopeng; Shan, Xiaonan; Li, Jinghong; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-01-01

    Plasmonic-based electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (P-EIS) is developed to investigate molecular binding on surfaces. Its basic principle relies on the sensitive dependence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) signal on surface charge density, which is modulated by applying an AC potential to a SPR chip surface. The AC component of the SPR response gives the electrochemical impedance, and the DC component provides the conventional SPR detection. The plasmonic-based impedance measured over a range of frequency is in quantitative agreement with the conventional electrochemical impedance. Compared to the conventional SPR detection, P-EIS is sensitive to molecular binding taking place on the chip surface, and less sensitive to bulk refractive index changes or non-specific binding. Moreover, this new approach allows for simultaneous SPR and surface impedance analysis of molecular binding processes. PMID:22122514

  1. Inorganic nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Chul; Glaus, Charles; Chen, Jingyi; Welch, Michael J.; Xia, Younan

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles including semiconductor quantum dots, iron oxide nanoparticles, and gold nanoparticles have been developed as contrast agents for diagnostics by molecular imaging. Compared to traditional contrast agents, nanoparticles offer several advantages: their optical and magnetic properties can be tailored by engineering the composition, structure, size, and shape; their surfaces can be modified with ligands to target specific biomarkers of disease; the contrast enhancement provided can be equivalent to millions of molecular counterparts; and they can be integrated with a combination of different functions for multi-modal imaging. Here, we review recent advances in the development of contrast agents based on inorganic nanoparticles for molecular imaging, with a touch on contrast enhancement, surface modification, tissue targeting, clearance, and toxicity. As research efforts intensify, contrast agents based on inorganic nanoparticles that are highly sensitive, target-specific, and safe to use are expected to enter clinical applications in the near future. PMID:21074494

  2. Efficient Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Multiple Radical Center Systems Based on the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Hiroya; Schmidt, Michael W; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-10-16

    The fully analytic energy gradient has been developed and implemented for the restricted open-shell Hartree–Fock (ROHF) method based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) theory for systems that have multiple open-shell molecules. The accuracy of the analytic ROHF energy gradient is compared with the corresponding numerical gradient, illustrating the accuracy of the analytic gradient. The ROHF analytic gradient is used to perform molecular dynamics simulations of an unusual open-shell system, liquid oxygen, and mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen. These molecular dynamics simulations provide some insight about how triplet oxygen molecules interact with each other. Timings reveal that the method can calculate the energy gradient for a system containing 4000 atoms in only 6 h. Therefore, it is concluded that the FMO-ROHF method will be useful for investigating systems with multiple open shells.

  3. Molecular Recognition: Detection of Colorless Compounds Based on Color Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalafi, Lida; Kashani, Samira; Karimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which students measure the amount of cetirizine in allergy-treatment tablets based on molecular recognition. The basis of recognition is competition of cetirizine with phenolphthalein to form an inclusion complex with ß-cyclodextrin. Phenolphthalein is pinkish under basic condition, whereas it's complex form…

  4. Molecular Probe Data Base: a database on synthetic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, P; Aresu, O; Parodi, B; Manniello, A; Campi, G; Angelini, G; Romani, M; Iannotta, B; Rondanina, G; Ruzzon, T

    1993-01-01

    The Molecular Probe Data Base (MPDB) was designed to collect and make information on synthetic oligonucleotides available on-line. This paper briefly describes its purpose, contents and structure, forms and mode of data distribution. Particular emphasis is given to recent data extension and system enhancements that have been carried out in order to simplify access to MPDB for unskilled users. PMID:8332523

  5. Computer-Based Semantic Network in Molecular Biology: A Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callman, Joshua L.; And Others

    This paper analyzes the hardware and software features that would be desirable in a computer-based semantic network system for representing biology knowledge. It then describes in detail a prototype network of molecular biology knowledge that has been developed using Filevision software and a Macintosh computer. The prototype contains about 100…

  6. Intelligent DNA-based molecular diagnostics using linked genetic markers

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, D.K.; Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a knowledge-based system for molecular diagnostics, and its application to fully automated diagnosis of X-linked genetic disorders. Molecular diagnostic information is used in clinical practice for determining genetic risks, such as carrier determination and prenatal diagnosis. Initially, blood samples are obtained from related individuals, and PCR amplification is performed. Linkage-based molecular diagnosis then entails three data analysis steps. First, for every individual, the alleles (i.e., DNA composition) are determined at specified chromosomal locations. Second, the flow of genetic material among the individuals is established. Third, the probability that a given individual is either a carrier of the disease or affected by the disease is determined. The current practice is to perform each of these three steps manually, which is costly, time consuming, labor-intensive, and error-prone. As such, the knowledge-intensive data analysis and interpretation supersede the actual experimentation effort as the major bottleneck in molecular diagnostics. By examining the human problem solving for the task, we have designed and implemented a prototype knowledge-based system capable of fully automating linkage-based molecular diagnostics in X-linked genetic disorders, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Our system uses knowledge-based interpretation of gel electrophoresis images to determine individual DNA marker labels, a constraint satisfaction search for consistent genetic flow among individuals, and a blackboard-style problem solver for risk assessment. We describe the system`s successful diagnosis of DMD carrier and affected individuals from raw clinical data.

  7. Molecular Bases of Enantioselectivity of Haloalkane Dehalogenase DbjA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yukari; Natsume, Ryo; Prokop, Zbynek; Brezovsky, Jan; Chaloupkova, Radka; Damborsky, Jiri; Nagata, Yuji; Senda, Toshiya

    Enzymes are widely used for the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and food additives because they can catalyze high enantioselective transformations. In order to construct selective enzymes by protein engineering, it is important to understand the molecular basis of enzyme-substrate interactions that contribute to enantioselectivity. The haloalkane dehalogenase DbjA showed high enantioselectivity for two racemic mixtures: α-bromoesters and β-bromoalkanes. Thermodynamic analysis, protein crystallography, and computer simulations indicated that DbjA carries two bases for the enantiodiscrimination of each racemic mixture. This study helps us understand the molecular basis of the enantioselectivity and opens up new possibilities for constructing enantiospecific biocatalysts through protein engineering.

  8. A molecular shift register based on electron transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Josenelson; Beratan, David N.

    1988-01-01

    An electronic shift-register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. This device integrates designed electronic molecules onto a very large scale integrated (silicon microelectronic) substrate, providing an example of a 'molecular electronic device' that could actually be made. The design requirements for such a device and possible synthetic strategies are discussed. Devices along these lines should have lower energy usage and enhanced storage density.

  9. Molecular rectifiers: a new design based on asymmetric anchoring moieties.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, Colin; Ratner, Mark A

    2015-03-11

    The quest for a molecular rectifier is among the major challenges of molecular electronics. We introduce three simple rules to design an efficient rectifying molecule and demonstrate its functioning at the theoretical level, relying on the NEGF-DFT technique. The design rules notably require both the introduction of asymmetric anchoring moieties and a decoupling bridge. They lead to a new rectification mechanism based on the compression and control of the HOMO/LUMO gap by the electrode Fermi levels, arising from a pinning effect. Significant rectification ratios up to 2 orders of magnitude are theoretically predicted as the mechanism opposes resonant to nonresonant tunneling. PMID:25706442

  10. Microchip-based Devices for Molecular Diagnosis of Genetic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cheng; Fortina; Surrey; Kricka; Wilding

    1996-09-01

    Microchips, constructed with a variety of microfabrication technologies (photolithography, micropatterning, microjet printing, light-directed chemical synthesis, laser stereochemical etching, and microcontact printing) are being applied to molecular biology. The new microchip-based analytical devices promise to solve the analytical problems faced by many molecular biologists (eg, contamination, low throughput, and high cost). They may revolutionize molecular biology and its application in clinical medicine, forensic science, and environmental monitoring. A typical biochemical analysis involves three main steps: (1) sample preparation, (2) biochemical reaction, and (3) detection (either separation or hybridization may be involved) accompanied by data acquisition and interpretation. The construction of a miniturized analyzer will therefore necessarily entail the miniaturization and integration of all three of these processes. The literature related to the miniaturization of these three processes indicates that the greatest emphasis so far is on the investigation and development of methods for the detection of nucleic acid, followed by the optimization of a biochemical reaction, such as the polymerase chain reaction. The first step involving sample preparation has received little attention. In this review the state of the art of, microchip-based, miniaturized analytical processes (eg, sample preparation, biochemical reaction, and detection of products) are outlined and the applications of microchip-based devices in the molecular diagnosis of genetic diseases are discussed. PMID:10462559

  11. Gesture Interaction Browser-Based 3D Molecular Viewer.

    PubMed

    Virag, Ioan; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Crişan-Vida, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an open source system that allows the user to interact with a 3D molecular viewer using associated hand gestures for rotating, scaling and panning the rendered model. The novelty of this approach is that the entire application is browser-based and doesn't require installation of third party plug-ins or additional software components in order to visualize the supported chemical file formats. This kind of solution is suitable for instruction of users in less IT oriented environments, like medicine or chemistry. For rendering various molecular geometries our team used GLmol (a molecular viewer written in JavaScript). The interaction with the 3D models is made with Leap Motion controller that allows real-time tracking of the user's hand gestures. The first results confirmed that the resulting application leads to a better way of understanding various types of translational bioinformatics related problems in both biomedical research and education. PMID:27350455

  12. Optically induced transport through semiconductor-based molecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangqi; Fainberg, Boris D.; Seideman, Tamar

    2015-04-01

    A tight binding model is used to investigate photoinduced tunneling current through a molecular bridge coupled to two semiconductor electrodes. A quantum master equation is developed within a non-Markovian theory based on second-order perturbation theory with respect to the molecule-semiconductor electrode coupling. The spectral functions are generated using a one dimensional alternating bond model, and the coupling between the molecule and the electrodes is expressed through a corresponding correlation function. Since the molecular bridge orbitals are inside the bandgap between the conduction and valence bands, charge carrier tunneling is inhibited in the dark. Subject to the dipole interaction with the laser field, virtual molecular states are generated via the absorption and emission of photons, and new tunneling channels open. Interesting phenomena arising from memory are noted. Such a phenomenon could serve as a switch.

  13. An OR logic gate based on two molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Yang, Renqiang

    2012-03-01

    Design of elementary molecular logic gates is the key and the fundamental of performing complicated Boolean calculations. Herein, we report a strategy for constructing a DNA-based OR gate by using the mechanism of sequence recognition and the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In this system, the gate is entirely composed of a single strand of DNA (A, B and C) and the inputs are the molecular beacon probes (MB1 and MB2). Changes in fluorescence intensity confirm the realization of the OR logic operation and electrophoresis experiments verify these results. Our successful application of DNA to perform the binary operation represents that DNA can serve as an efficient biomaterial for designing molecular logic gates and devices. PMID:22278176

  14. Optically induced transport through semiconductor-based molecular electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guangqi; Seideman, Tamar; Fainberg, Boris D.

    2015-04-21

    A tight binding model is used to investigate photoinduced tunneling current through a molecular bridge coupled to two semiconductor electrodes. A quantum master equation is developed within a non-Markovian theory based on second-order perturbation theory with respect to the molecule-semiconductor electrode coupling. The spectral functions are generated using a one dimensional alternating bond model, and the coupling between the molecule and the electrodes is expressed through a corresponding correlation function. Since the molecular bridge orbitals are inside the bandgap between the conduction and valence bands, charge carrier tunneling is inhibited in the dark. Subject to the dipole interaction with the laser field, virtual molecular states are generated via the absorption and emission of photons, and new tunneling channels open. Interesting phenomena arising from memory are noted. Such a phenomenon could serve as a switch.

  15. Virtual Screening and Molecular Design Based on Hierarchical Qsar Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, Victor E.; Artemenko, A. G.; Muratov, Eugene N.; Polischuk, P. G.; Ognichenko, L. N.; Liahovsky, A. V.; Hromov, A. I.; Varlamova, E. V.

    This chapter is devoted to the hierarchical QSAR technology (HiT QSAR) based on simplex representation of molecular structure (SiRMS) and its application to different QSAR/QSPR tasks. The essence of this technology is a sequential solution (with the use of the information obtained on the previous steps) of the QSAR paradigm by a series of enhanced models based on molecular structure description (in a specific order from 1D to 4D). Actually, it's a system of permanently improved solutions. Different approaches for domain applicability estimation are implemented in HiT QSAR. In the SiRMS approach every molecule is represented as a system of different simplexes (tetratomic fragments with fixed composition, structure, chirality, and symmetry). The level of simplex descriptors detailed increases consecutively from the 1D to 4D representation of the molecular structure. The advantages of the approach presented are an ability to solve QSAR/QSPR tasks for mixtures of compounds, the absence of the "molecular alignment" problem, consideration of different physical-chemical properties of atoms (e.g., charge, lipophilicity), and the high adequacy and good interpretability of obtained models and clear ways for molecular design. The efficiency of HiT QSAR was demonstrated by its comparison with the most popular modern QSAR approaches on two representative examination sets. The examples of successful application of the HiT QSAR for various QSAR/QSPR investigations on the different levels (1D-4D) of the molecular structure description are also highlighted. The reliability of developed QSAR models as the predictive virtual screening tools and their ability to serve as the basis of directed drug design was validated by subsequent synthetic, biological, etc. experiments. The HiT QSAR is realized as the suite of computer programs termed the "HiT QSAR" software that so includes powerful statistical capabilities and a number of useful utilities.

  16. [Molecular bases of α-thalassemia in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Scheps, Karen G; Francipane, Liliana; Nash, Abigail; Cerrone, Gloria E; Copelli, Silvia B; Varela, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    The α-thalassemia is one of the most common hereditary disorders worldwide. Currently, molecular diagnostics is the only available tool to achieve an accurate diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular bases of these syndromes in our environment and to establish genotype-phenotype associations. Through a combination of different molecular techniques and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH),we were able to find α-thalassemic mutations in 145 of the 184 patients (78.8%) studied with hematological parameters compatible with α-thalassemia. Deletions of the α-globin genes resulted the major molecular cause of the disease, and the most frequent mutation was -α(3.7), found in homozygous and heterozygous genotypes. In patients with α° phenotypes, other prevalent mutations were( _MED) and (_CAL/CAMP). The description of a sub-telomeric deletion in a patient with α-thalassemia and mental retardation was also achieved. β-thalassemic mutations in heterozygous state were found in 7.6% of the patients, who presented α-thalassemic clinical features (microcytosis and Hb A₂levels below 3.5%). Hematologic profiles for the α+ and α° genotypes were established for adult and pediatric patients. Hopefully, this work will provide guidelines for the detection of possible α-thalassemic carriers. It also highlights the collaborative work of hematologists, the biochemical and molecular biology laboratory and genetists, in order to provide appropriate genetic counseling. PMID:25919868

  17. Molecular crowding-based imprinted monolithic column for capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Zong, Hai-Yan; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Zhao-Sheng; Huang, Yan-Ping

    2015-03-01

    Molecular crowding is a new approach to stabilizing binding sites and improving molecular recognition. In this work, the concept was applied to the preparation of imprinted monolithic columns for CEC. The imprinted monolithic column was synthesized using a mixture of d-zopiclone (d-ZOP)(template), methacrylic acid, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) (molecular crowding agent). The resulting PMMA-based imprinted capillary was able to separate ZOP enantiomers in CEC mode. The resolution of enantiomer separation achieved on the d-ZOP-imprinted monolithic column was up to 2.09. Some polymerization factors, such as template-monomer molar ratio, functional monomer-cross-linker molar ratio and the composition of the porogen, on the imprinting effect of resulting molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) monolithic column were systematically investigated. Chromatographic parameters, including pH values, the content of acetonitrile and the salt concentration on chiral separation were also studied. The results indicated the addition of PMMA resulted in MIPs with superior retention properties and excellent selectivity for d-ZOP, as compared to the MIPs prepared without addition of the crowding-inducing agent. The results revealed that molecular crowding is an effective method for the preparation of a highly efficient MIP stationary phase for chiral separation in CEC. PMID:25404035

  18. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Algieri, Catia; Drioli, Enrico; Guzzo, Laura; Donato, Laura

    2014-01-01

    An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template) was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported. PMID:25196110

  19. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-10-01

    Directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In this paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also result in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMPS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel®  Xeon Phi™ coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs. The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS.

  20. Graph-based interpretation of the molecular interstellar medium segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Ginsburg, A.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Hughes, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a generalization of the giant molecular cloud identification problem based on cluster analysis. The method we designed, SCIMES (Spectral Clustering for Interstellar Molecular Emission Segmentation) considers the dendrogram of emission in the broader framework of graph theory and utilizes spectral clustering to find discrete regions with similar emission properties. For Galactic molecular cloud structures, we show that the characteristic volume and/or integrated CO luminosity are useful criteria to define the clustering, yielding emission structures that closely reproduce `by-eye' identification results. SCIMES performs best on well-resolved, high-resolution data, making it complementary to other available algorithms. Using 12CO(1-0) data for the Orion-Monoceros complex, we demonstrate that SCIMES provides robust results against changes of the dendrogram-construction parameters, noise realizations and degraded resolution. By comparing SCIMES with other cloud decomposition approaches, we show that our method is able to identify all canonical clouds of the Orion-Monoceros region, avoiding the overdivision within high-resolution survey data that represents a common limitation of several decomposition algorithms. The Orion-Monoceros objects exhibit hierarchies and size-line width relationships typical to the turbulent gas in molecular clouds, although `the Scissors' region deviates from this common description. SCIMES represents a significant step forward in moving away from pixel-based cloud segmentation towards a more physical-oriented approach, where virtually all properties of the ISM can be used for the segmentation of discrete objects.

  1. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-05-14

    The directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In our paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We also demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also result in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMAS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel (R) Xeon Phi (TM) coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs: The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-05-14

    The directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In our paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We also demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also resultmore » in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMAS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel (R) Xeon Phi (TM) coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs: The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.« less

  3. Arthropod phylogeny based on eight molecular loci and morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giribet, G.; Edgecombe, G. D.; Wheeler, W. C.

    2001-01-01

    The interrelationships of major clades within the Arthropoda remain one of the most contentious issues in systematics, which has traditionally been the domain of morphologists. A growing body of DNA sequences and other types of molecular data has revitalized study of arthropod phylogeny and has inspired new considerations of character evolution. Novel hypotheses such as a crustacean-hexapod affinity were based on analyses of single or few genes and limited taxon sampling, but have received recent support from mitochondrial gene order, and eye and brain ultrastructure and neurogenesis. Here we assess relationships within Arthropoda based on a synthesis of all well sampled molecular loci together with a comprehensive data set of morphological, developmental, ultrastructural and gene-order characters. The molecular data include sequences of three nuclear ribosomal genes, three nuclear protein-coding genes, and two mitochondrial genes (one protein coding, one ribosomal). We devised new optimization procedures and constructed a parallel computer cluster with 256 central processing units to analyse molecular data on a scale not previously possible. The optimal 'total evidence' cladogram supports the crustacean-hexapod clade, recognizes pycnogonids as sister to other euarthropods, and indicates monophyly of Myriapoda and Mandibulata.

  4. [Evolution and systematics of nematodes based on molecular investigation].

    PubMed

    Okulewicz, Anna; Perec, Agnieszka

    2004-01-01

    Evolution and systematics of nematodes based on molecular investigation. The use of molecular phylogenetics to examine the interrelationships between animal parasites, free-living nematodes, and plant parasites versus traditional classification based on morphological-ecological characters was discussed and reviewed. Distinct differences were observed between parasitic nematodes and free-living ones. Within the former group, animal parasites turned out to be distinctly different from plant parasites. Using small subunit of ribosomal RNA gene sequence from a wide range of nematodes, there is a possibility to compare animal-parasitic, plant-parasitic and free-living taxa. Nowadays the parasitic nematodes expressed sequence tag (EST) project is currently generating sequence information to provide a new source of data to examine the evolutionary history of this taxonomic group. PMID:16859012

  5. Prediction of reactive hazards based on molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Saraf, S R; Rogers, W J; Mannan, M S

    2003-03-17

    There is considerable interest in prediction of reactive hazards based on chemical structure. Calorimetric measurements to determine reactivity can be resource consuming, so computational methods to predict reactivity hazards present an attractive option. This paper reviews some of the commonly employed theoretical hazard evaluation techniques, including the oxygen-balance method, ASTM CHETAH, and calculated adiabatic reaction temperature (CART). It also discusses the development of a study table to correlate and predict calorimetric properties of pure compounds. Quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR) based on quantum mechanical calculations can be employed to correlate calorimetrically measured onset temperatures, T(o), and energies of reaction, -deltaH, with molecular properties. To test the feasibility of this approach, the QSPR technique is used to correlate differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) data, T(o) and -deltaH, with molecular properties for 19 nitro compounds. PMID:12628775

  6. Context-based preprocessing of molecular docking data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Data preprocessing is a major step in data mining. In data preprocessing, several known techniques can be applied, or new ones developed, to improve data quality such that the mining results become more accurate and intelligible. Bioinformatics is one area with a high demand for generation of comprehensive models from large datasets. In this article, we propose a context-based data preprocessing approach to mine data from molecular docking simulation results. The test cases used a fully-flexible receptor (FFR) model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA enzyme (FFR_InhA) and four different ligands. Results We generated an initial set of attributes as well as their respective instances. To improve this initial set, we applied two selection strategies. The first was based on our context-based approach while the second used the CFS (Correlation-based Feature Selection) machine learning algorithm. Additionally, we produced an extra dataset containing features selected by combining our context strategy and the CFS algorithm. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, we evaluated its performance based on various predictive (RMSE, MAE, Correlation, and Nodes) and context (Precision, Recall and FScore) measures. Conclusions Statistical analysis of the results shows that the proposed context-based data preprocessing approach significantly improves predictive and context measures and outperforms the CFS algorithm. Context-based data preprocessing improves mining results by producing superior interpretable models, which makes it well-suited for practical applications in molecular docking simulations using FFR models. PMID:24564276

  7. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Based Sensor for the Detection of Theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Guilherme S.; Paterno, Leonardo G.; Fonseca, Fernando J.; del Valle, Manel

    2011-11-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) impedance-based sensor was employed to detect theophylline in distilled water. To evaluate its sensibility, impedance measurements were carried out in a diluted solution of theophylline (1 mM) and distilled water using MIP and NIP (reference non-imprinted polymer) sensors. MIP showed higher sensitivity to theophylline than the NIP. This feature shows their suitability for developing an electronic tongue system for determination of methylxanthines.

  8. Phylogeny of Kinorhyncha Based on Morphology and Two Molecular Loci.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Martin V; Dal Zotto, Matteo; Rho, Hyun Soo; Herranz, Maria; Sánchez, Nuria; Pardos, Fernando; Yamasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    RNA had been omitted. Analysis of the morphological data produced results that were similar with those from the combined molecular and morphological analysis. E.g., the morphological data also supported exclusion of Dracoderes from Cyclorhagida. The main differences between the morphological analysis and analyses based on the combined datasets include: 1) Homalorhagida appears as monophyletic in the morphological tree only, 2) the morphological analyses position Franciscideres and the new genus within Cyclorhagida near Zelinkaderidae and Cateriidae, whereas analyses including molecular data place the two genera inside Allomalorhagida, and 3) species of Campyloderes appear in a basal trichotomy within Kentrorhagata in the morphological tree, whereas analysis of the combined datasets places species of Campyloderes as a sister clade to Echinoderidae and Kentrorhagata. PMID:26200115

  9. Phylogeny of Kinorhyncha Based on Morphology and Two Molecular Loci

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Martin V.; Dal Zotto, Matteo; Rho, Hyun Soo; Herranz, Maria; Sánchez, Nuria; Pardos, Fernando; Yamasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    rRNA had been omitted. Analysis of the morphological data produced results that were similar with those from the combined molecular and morphological analysis. E.g., the morphological data also supported exclusion of Dracoderes from Cyclorhagida. The main differences between the morphological analysis and analyses based on the combined datasets include: 1) Homalorhagida appears as monophyletic in the morphological tree only, 2) the morphological analyses position Franciscideres and the new genus within Cyclorhagida near Zelinkaderidae and Cateriidae, whereas analyses including molecular data place the two genera inside Allomalorhagida, and 3) species of Campyloderes appear in a basal trichotomy within Kentrorhagata in the morphological tree, whereas analysis of the combined datasets places species of Campyloderes as a sister clade to Echinoderidae and Kentrorhagata. PMID:26200115

  10. A Molecular Selection Index Method Based on Eigenanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Cerón-Rojas, J. Jesús; Castillo-González, Fernando; Sahagún-Castellanos, Jaime; Santacruz-Varela, Amalio; Benítez-Riquelme, Ignacio; Crossa, José

    2008-01-01

    The traditional molecular selection index (MSI) employed in marker-assisted selection maximizes the selection response by combining information on molecular markers linked to quantitative trait loci (QTL) and phenotypic values of the traits of the individuals of interest. This study proposes an MSI based on an eigenanalysis method (molecular eigen selection index method, MESIM), where the first eigenvector is used as a selection index criterion, and its elements determine the proportion of the trait's contribution to the selection index. This article develops the theoretical framework of MESIM. Simulation results show that the genotypic means and the expected selection response from MESIM for each trait are equal to or greater than those from the traditional MSI. When several traits are simultaneously selected, MESIM performs well for traits with relatively low heritability. The main advantages of MESIM over the traditional molecular selection index are that its statistical sampling properties are known and that it does not require economic weights and thus can be used in practical applications when all or some of the traits need to be improved simultaneously. PMID:18716338

  11. Adamantane based molecular glass resist for 193 nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shinji; Ober, Christopher K.

    2006-03-01

    As the feature dimensions decreases there are several issues must be addressed to implement the corresponding technology in high volume production. Line width roughness (LWR) and line edge roughness (LER) are the most important technological issue arises as the feature dimension decreases. In order to improve both of LWR and LER, we have developed novel low molecular weight glass resists as high performance resist materials. These molecular glass resists are adamantane derivatives and are highly transparent at 193 nm. We have prepared series of new molecular glass resists based on adamantane core carrying acetal and ester protecting groups. Particularly, adamantane core derivatives of tripod structure were investigated in detail. Several compositions of them showed glass transition temperatures (Tg) above 120 °C. Lithographic evaluation confirmed their high sensitivity at 254 nm and e-beam exposure. It also resolved feature size as small as 200 nm line/space when it evaluated using e-beam lithography. These new molecular glass resists also have high plasma-etch resistance.

  12. Molecular Beacon CNT-based Detection of SNPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Veligura, A. A.; Shulitsky, B. G.; Y Fedotenkova, L.

    2015-11-01

    An fluorescence quenching effect due to few-walled carbon nanotubes chemically modified by carboxyl groups has been utilized to discriminate Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP). It was shown that the complex obtained from these nanotube and singlestranded primer DNA is formed due to stacking interactions between the hexagons of the nanotubes and aromatic rings of nucleotide bases as well as due to establishing of hydrogen bonds between acceptor amine groups of nucleotide bases and donor carboxyl groups of the nanotubes. It has been demonstrated that these complexes may be used to make highly effective DNA biosensors detecting SNPs which operate as molecular beacons.

  13. Femtosecond molecular dynamics of tautomerization in model base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douhal, A.; Kim, S. K.; Zewail, A. H.

    1995-11-01

    HYDROGEN bonds commonly lend robustness and directionality to molecular recognition processes and supramolecular structures1,2. In particular, the two or three hydrogen bonds in Watson-Crick base pairs bind the double-stranded DNA helix and determine the complementarity of the pairing. Watson and Crick pointed out3, however, that the possible tautomers of base pairs, in which hydrogen atoms become attached to the donor atom of the hydrogen bond, might disturb the genetic code, as the tautomer is capable of pairing with different partners. But the dynamics of hydrogen bonds in general, and of this tautomerization process in particular, are not well understood. Here we report observations of the femtosecond dynamics of tautomerization in model base pairs (7-azaindole dimers) containing two hydrogen bonds. Because of the femtosecond resolution of proton motions, we are able to examine the cooperativity of formation of the tautomer (in which the protons on each base are shifted sequentially to the other base), and to determine the characteristic timescales of the motions in a solvent-free environment. We find that the first step occurs on a timescale of a few hundred femtoseconds, whereas the second step, to form the full tautomer, is much slower, taking place within several picoseconds; the timescales are changed significantly by replacing hydrogen with deuterium. These results establish the molecular basis of the dynamics and the role of quantum tunnelling.

  14. Affinity sensor based on immobilized molecular imprinted synthetic recognition elements.

    PubMed

    Lenain, Pieterjan; De Saeger, Sarah; Mattiasson, Bo; Hedström, Martin

    2015-07-15

    An affinity sensor based on capacitive transduction was developed to detect a model compound, metergoline, in a continuous flow system. This system simulates the monitoring of low-molecular weight organic compounds in natural flowing waters, i.e. rivers and streams. During operation in such scenarios, control of the experimental parameters is not possible, which poses a true analytical challenge. A two-step approach was used to produce a sensor for metergoline. Submicron spherical molecularly imprinted polymers, used as recognition elements, were obtained through emulsion polymerization and subsequently coupled to the sensor surface by electropolymerization. This way, a robust and reusable sensor was obtained that regenerated spontaneously under the natural conditions in a river. Small organic compounds could be analyzed in water without manipulating the binding or regeneration conditions, thereby offering a viable tool for on-site application. PMID:25703726

  15. Treatment Algorithms Based on Tumor Molecular Profiling: The Essence of Precision Medicine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Le Tourneau, Christophe; Kamal, Maud; Tsimberidou, Apostolia-Maria; Bedard, Philippe; Pierron, Gaëlle; Callens, Céline; Rouleau, Etienne; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Servant, Nicolas; Alt, Marie; Rouzier, Roman; Paoletti, Xavier; Delattre, Olivier; Bièche, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of high-throughput molecular technologies, several precision medicine (PM) studies are currently ongoing that include molecular screening programs and PM clinical trials. Molecular profiling programs establish the molecular profile of patients’ tumors with the aim to guide therapy based on identified molecular alterations. The aim of prospective PM clinical trials is to assess the clinical utility of tumor molecular profiling and to determine whether treatment selection based on molecular alterations produces superior outcomes compared with unselected treatment. These trials use treatment algorithms to assign patients to specific targeted therapies based on tumor molecular alterations. These algorithms should be governed by fixed rules to ensure standardization and reproducibility. Here, we summarize key molecular, biological, and technical criteria that, in our view, should be addressed when establishing treatment algorithms based on tumor molecular profiling for PM trials. PMID:26598514

  16. Treatment Algorithms Based on Tumor Molecular Profiling: The Essence of Precision Medicine Trials.

    PubMed

    Le Tourneau, Christophe; Kamal, Maud; Tsimberidou, Apostolia-Maria; Bedard, Philippe; Pierron, Gaëlle; Callens, Céline; Rouleau, Etienne; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Servant, Nicolas; Alt, Marie; Rouzier, Roman; Paoletti, Xavier; Delattre, Olivier; Bièche, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of high-throughput molecular technologies, several precision medicine (PM) studies are currently ongoing that include molecular screening programs and PM clinical trials. Molecular profiling programs establish the molecular profile of patients' tumors with the aim to guide therapy based on identified molecular alterations. The aim of prospective PM clinical trials is to assess the clinical utility of tumor molecular profiling and to determine whether treatment selection based on molecular alterations produces superior outcomes compared with unselected treatment. These trials use treatment algorithms to assign patients to specific targeted therapies based on tumor molecular alterations. These algorithms should be governed by fixed rules to ensure standardization and reproducibility. Here, we summarize key molecular, biological, and technical criteria that, in our view, should be addressed when establishing treatment algorithms based on tumor molecular profiling for PM trials. PMID:26598514

  17. A Molecular Imaging Approach to Mercury Sensing Based on Hyperpolarized (129)Xe Molecular Clamp Probe.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qianni; Zeng, Qingbin; Jiang, Weiping; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Luo, Qing; Zhang, Xu; Bouchard, Louis-S; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-14

    Mercury pollution, in the form of mercury ions (Hg(2+)), is a major health and environmental hazard. Commonly used sensors are invasive and limited to point measurements. Fluorescence-based sensors do not provide depth resolution needed to image spatial distributions. Herein we report a novel sensor capable of yielding spatial distributions by MRI using hyperpolarized (129)Xe. A molecular clamp probe was developed consisting of dipyrrolylquinoxaline (DPQ) derivatives and twocryptophane-A cages. The DPQ derivatives act as cation receptors whereas cryptophane-A acts as a suitable host molecule for xenon. When the DPQ moiety interacts with mercury ions, the molecular clamp closes on the ion. Due to overlap of the electron clouds of the two cryptophane-A cages, the shielding effect on the encapsulated Xe becomes important. This leads to an upfield change of the chemical shift of the encapsulated Xe. This sensor exhibits good selectivity and sensitivity toward the mercury ion. This mercury-activated hyperpolarized (129)Xe-based chemosensor is a new concept method for monitoring Hg(2+) ion distributions by MRI. PMID:26792102

  18. Tunneling Nanoelectromechanical Switches Based on Compressible Molecular Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Niroui, Farnaz; Wang, Annie I; Sletten, Ellen M; Song, Yi; Kong, Jing; Yablonovitch, Eli; Swager, Timothy M; Lang, Jeffrey H; Bulović, Vladimir

    2015-08-25

    Abrupt switching behavior and near-zero leakage current of nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches are advantageous properties through which NEMs can outperform conventional semiconductor electrical switches. To date, however, typical NEMs structures require high actuation voltages and can prematurely fail through permanent adhesion (defined as stiction) of device components. To overcome these challenges, in the present work we propose a NEM switch, termed a "squitch," which is designed to electromechanically modulate the tunneling current through a nanometer-scale gap defined by an organic molecular film sandwiched between two electrodes. When voltage is applied across the electrodes, the generated electrostatic force compresses the sandwiched molecular layer, thereby reducing the tunneling gap and causing an exponential increase in the current through the device. The presence of the molecular layer avoids direct contact of the electrodes during the switching process. Furthermore, as the layer is compressed, the increasing surface adhesion forces are balanced by the elastic restoring force of the deformed molecules which can promote zero net stiction and recoverable switching. Through numerical analysis, we demonstrate the potential of optimizing squitch design to enable large on-off ratios beyond 6 orders of magnitude with operation in the sub-1 V regime and with nanoseconds switching times. Our preliminary experimental results based on metal-molecule-graphene devices suggest the feasibility of the proposed tunneling switching mechanism. With optimization of device design and material engineering, squitches can give rise to a broad range of low-power electronic applications. PMID:26244821

  19. Molecularly imprinted polymer based enantioselective sensing devices: a review.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Mahavir Prasad; Prasad, Amrita

    2015-01-01

    Chiral recognition is the fundamental property of many biological molecules and is a quite important field in pharmaceutical analysis because of the pharmacologically different activities of enantiomers in living systems. Enantio-differentiating signal of the sensor requires specific interaction between the chiral compounds (one or a mixture of enantiomers) in question and the selector. This type of interaction is controlled normally by at least three binding centers, whose mutual arrangement and interacting characteristics with one of the enantiomers effectively control the selectivity of recognition. Molecular imprinting technology provides a unique opportunity for the creation of three-dimensional cavities with tailored recognition properties. Over the past decade, this field has expanded considerably across the variety of disciplines, leading to novel transduction approaches and many potential applications. The state-of-art of molecularly imprinted polymer-based chiral recognition might set an exotic trend toward the development of chiral sensors. The objective of this review is to provide comprehensive knowledge and information to all researchers who are interested in exploiting molecular imprinting technology toward the rational design of chiral sensors operating on different transduction principles, ranging from electrochemical to piezoelectric, being used for the detection of chiral compounds as they pose significant impact on the understanding of the origin of life and all processes that occur in living organisms. PMID:25467446

  20. Polarizable Atomic Multipole-based Molecular Mechanics for Organic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Pengyu; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W.

    2011-01-01

    An empirical potential based on permanent atomic multipoles and atomic induced dipoles is reported for alkanes, alcohols, amines, sulfides, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, amides, aromatics and other small organic molecules. Permanent atomic multipole moments through quadrupole moments have been derived from gas phase ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The van der Waals parameters are obtained by fitting to gas phase homodimer QM energies and structures, as well as experimental densities and heats of vaporization of neat liquids. As a validation, the hydrogen bonding energies and structures of gas phase heterodimers with water are evaluated using the resulting potential. For 32 homo- and heterodimers, the association energy agrees with ab initio results to within 0.4 kcal/mol. The RMS deviation of hydrogen bond distance from QM optimized geometry is less than 0.06 Å. In addition, liquid self-diffusion and static dielectric constants computed from molecular dynamics simulation are consistent with experimental values. The force field is also used to compute the solvation free energy of 27 compounds not included in the parameterization process, with a RMS error of 0.69 kcal/mol. The results obtained in this study suggest the AMOEBA force field performs well across different environments and phases. The key algorithms involved in the electrostatic model and a protocol for developing parameters are detailed to facilitate extension to additional molecular systems. PMID:22022236

  1. DNA barcode-based molecular identification system for fish species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungmin; Eo, Hae-Seok; Koo, Hyeyoung; Choi, Jun-Kil; Kim, Won

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we applied DNA barcoding to identify species using short DNA sequence analysis. We examined the utility of DNA barcoding by identifying 53 Korean freshwater fish species, 233 other freshwater fish species, and 1339 saltwater fish species. We successfully developed a web-based molecular identification system for fish (MISF) using a profile hidden Markov model. MISF facilitates efficient and reliable species identification, overcoming the limitations of conventional taxonomic approaches. MISF is freely accessible at http://bioinfosys.snu.ac.kr:8080/MISF/misf.jsp . PMID:21110132

  2. Predictive Value of Molecular Drug Resistance Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in Valle del Cauca, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    García, Pamela K.; Nieto, Luisa Maria; van Soolingen, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Previous evaluations of the molecular GenoType tests have promoted their use to detect resistance to first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs in different geographical regions. However, there are known geographic variations in the mutations associated with drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and especially in South America, there is a paucity of information regarding the frequencies and types of mutations associated with resistance to first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs. We therefore evaluated the performance of the GenoType kits in this region by testing 228 M. tuberculosis isolates in Colombia, including 134 resistant and 94 pansusceptible strains. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of the GenoType MTBDRplus test ranged from 92 to 96% and 97 to 100%, respectively; the agreement index was optimal (Cohen's kappa, >0.8). The sensitivity of the GenoType MTBDRsl test ranged from 84 to 100% and the specificity from 88 to 100%. The most common mutations were katG S315T1, rpoB S531L, embB M306V, gyrA D94G, and rrs A1401G. Our results reflect the utility of the GenoType tests in Colombia; however, as some discordance still exists between the conventional and molecular approaches in resistance testing, we adhere to the recommendation that the GenoType tests serve as early guides for therapy, followed by phenotypic drug susceptibility testing for all cases. PMID:23658272

  3. Single-molecular diodes based on opioid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, M R S; Corrêa, S M; Gester, R M; Del Nero, J; Neto, A M J C

    2015-12-01

    We propose an efficient single-molecule rectifier based on a derivative of opioid. Electron transport properties are investigated within the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. The analysis of the current-voltage characteristics indicates obvious diode-like behavior. While heroin presents rectification coefficient R>1, indicating preferential electronic current from electron-donating to electron-withdrawing, 3 and 6-acetylmorphine and morphine exhibit contrary behavior, R<1. Our calculations indicate that the simple inclusion of acetyl groups modulate a range of devices, which varies from simple rectifying to resonant-tunneling diodes. In particular, the rectification rations for heroin diodes show microampere electron current with a maximum of rectification (R=9.1) at very low bias voltage of ∼0.6 V and (R=14.3)∼1.8 V with resistance varying between 0.4 and 1.5 M Ω. Once most of the current single-molecule diodes usually rectifies in nanoampere, are not stable over 1.0 V and present electrical resistance around 10 M. Molecular devices based on opioid derivatives are promising in molecular electronics. PMID:26613894

  4. Single-walled carbon nanotube based molecular switch tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Michael R; Steuerman, David W; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Vignon, Scott A; Star, Alexander; Celestre, Paul C; Stoddart, J Fraser; Heath, James R

    2003-12-15

    This article describes two-terminal molecular switch tunnel junctions (MSTJs) which incorporate a semiconducting, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) as the bottom electrode. The nanotube interacts noncovalently with a monolayer of bistable, nondegenerate [2]catenane tetracations, self-organized by their supporting amphiphilic dimyristoylphosphatidyl anions which shield the mechanically switchable tetracations from a two-micrometer wide metallic top electrode. The resulting 0.002 micron 2 area tunnel junction addresses a nanometer wide row of approximately 2000 molecules. Active and remnant current-voltage measurements demonstrated that these devices can be reconfigurably switched and repeatedly cycled between high and low current states under ambient conditions. Control compounds, including a degenerate [2]catenane, were explored in support of the mechanical origin of the switching signature. These SWNT-based MSTJs operate like previously reported silicon-based MSTJs, but differently from similar devices incorporating bottom metal electrodes. The relevance of these results with respect to the choice of electrode materials for molecular electronics devices is discussed. PMID:14714382

  5. 4-aminoquinoline based molecular hybrids as antimalarials: an overview.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Sunny; Tripathi, Mohit; Rawat, Diwan S

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, the novel concept of generating hybrid molecules by pharmacophoric hybridisation approach is fast becoming an alternative to other existing strategies of drug development. These hybrids also known as 'dual drugs' or 'double drugs' are especially found to be effective in overcoming drug resistance problems. Towards this end, a lot of effort has been put for generating 4-aminoquinoline based hybrid molecules as next generation antimalarial drugs effective in malarial chemotherapy. This short review deals about the recent advances carried in the field of 4-aminoquinoline based molecular hybrids as potential antimalarial agents. It also presents a brief and simplified story on the development of 4-aminoquinolines as a mainstay in malarial research programmes. PMID:25116580

  6. Molecular based subtyping of feline mammary carcinomas and clinicopathological characterization.

    PubMed

    Soares, Maria; Madeira, Sara; Correia, Jorge; Peleteiro, Maria; Cardoso, Fátima; Ferreira, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Molecular classification of feline mammary carcinomas (FMC) from which specific behavioral patterns may be estimated has potential applications in veterinary clinical practice and in comparative oncology. In this perspective, the main goal of this study was to characterize both the clinical and the pathological features of the different molecular phenotypes found in a population of FMC (n = 102), using the broadly accepted IHC-based classification established by St. Gallen International Expert Consensus panel. The luminal B/HER2-negative subtype was the most common (29.4%, 30/102) followed by luminal B/HER2-positive subtype (19.6%, 20/102), triple negative basal-like (16.7%, 17/102), luminal A (14.7%, 15/102), triple negative normal-like (12.7%, 13/102) and finally, HER2-positive subtype (6.9%, 7/102). Luminal A subtype was significantly associated with smaller tumors (p = 0.024) and with well differentiated ones (p < 0.001), contrasting with the triple negative basal-like subtype, that was associated with larger and poorly differentiated tumors (p < 0.001), and with the presence of necrotic areas in the tumoral lesion (p = 0.003). In the survival analysis, cats with Luminal A subtype presented the highest survival time (mean OS = 943.6 days) and animals with triple negative basal-like subtype exhibited the lowest survival time (OS mean = 368.9 days). Moreover, two thirds (64%, 32/50) of the queens with multiple primary tumors showed different molecular subtypes in each carcinoma, revealing that all independent lesions should be analyzed in order to improve the clinical management of animals. Finally, the similarities between the subtypes of feline mammary tumors and human breast cancer, reveal that feline can be a valuable model for comparative studies. PMID:27212699

  7. Graphene-based nanomaterials as molecular imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Garg, Bhaskar; Sung, Chu-Hsun; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging (MI) is a noninvasive, real-time visualization of biochemical events at the cellular and molecular level within tissues, living cells, and/or intact objects that can be advantageously applied in the areas of diagnostics, therapeutics, drug discovery, and development in understanding the nanoscale reactions including enzymatic conversions and protein-protein interactions. Consequently, over the years, great advancement has been made in the development of a variety of MI agents such as peptides, aptamers, antibodies, and various nanomaterials (NMs) including single-walled carbon nanotubes. Recently, graphene, a material popularized by Geim & Novoselov, has ignited considerable research efforts to rationally design and execute a wide range of graphene-based NMs making them an attractive platform for developing highly sensitive MI agents. Owing to their exceptional physicochemical and biological properties combined with desirable surface engineering, graphene-based NMs offer stable and tunable visible emission, small hydrodynamic size, low toxicity, and high biocompatibility and thus have been explored for in vitro and in vivo imaging applications as a promising alternative of traditional imaging agents. This review begins by describing the intrinsic properties of graphene and the key MI modalities. After which, we provide an overview on the recent advances in the design and development as well as physicochemical properties of the different classes of graphene-based NMs (graphene-dye conjugates, graphene-antibody conjugates, graphene-nanoparticle composites, and graphene quantum dots) being used as MI agents for potential applications including theranostics. Finally, the major challenges and future directions in the field will be discussed. PMID:25857851

  8. Molecular Dynamics and Energy Minimization Based on Embedded Atom Method

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-03-01

    This program performs atomic scale computer simulations of the structure and dynamics of metallic system using energetices based on the Embedded Atom Method. The program performs two types of calculations. First, it performs local energy minimization of all atomic positions to determine ground state and saddle point energies and structures. Second, it performs molecular dynamics simulations to determine thermodynamics or miscroscopic dynamics of the system. In both cases, various constraints can be applied to themore » system. The volume of the system can be varied automatically to achieve any desired external pressure. The temperature in molecular dynamics simulations can be controlled by a variety of methods. Further, the temperature control can be applied either to the entire system or just a subset of the atoms that would act as a thermal source/sink. The motion of one or more of the atoms can be constrained to either simulate the effects of bulk boundary conditions or to facilitate the determination of saddle point configurations. The simulations are performed with periodic boundary conditions.« less

  9. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-14

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule’s permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  10. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-01

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule's permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  11. Clinical and laboratory update on the DEL variant.

    PubMed

    Nuchnoi, Pornlada; Thongbus, Jairak; Srisarin, Apapan; Kerdpin, Usanee; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-01-01

    Serological assays for the RhD blood group are based on detection of the RhD antigen on human red blood cells using a specific anti-D antibody. The weak expression of the RhD antigen in the DEL variant hinders the sensitivity of conventional serological assays. Evidence of anti-D immunization in patients with D-negativity who have received DEL-variant blood units has been reported in various populations. This observation has prompted the need for genetic epidemiological and clinical data on the DEL variant in the development of DEL molecular diagnostic testing. This review highlights the molecular features of the DEL variant, the clinical consequences of DEL-blood transfusion, and current approaches for detection of the DEL-variant for donor screening and transfusion. PMID:25316658

  12. Hydrophobic composition based on mixed-molecular weight polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlenko, Nikolay; Debelova, Natalya; Sarkisov, Yuriy; Volokitin, Gennadiy; Zavyalova, Elena; Lapova, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents investigations of compositions based on low and high molecular weight polyethylene so as to synthesize a hydrophobic composition for moisture protection of timber. X-ray phase analysis and measurements of the tear-off force of hydrophobic coating needed to apply to the timber surface and the limiting wetting angle are carried out to detect the hydrophobic, adhesive, electrophysical, and physicochemical properties of compositions. Kinetic dependencies are given for moisture absorption of timber specimens. It is shown that the preliminary formation of the texture by the surface patterning or its treatment with low-temperature plasma with the following protective coating results in the improvement of hydrophobic properties of the suggested compositions. These compositions can be used in the capacity of water repellents to protect building materials from moisture including restoration works.

  13. Two new molecular bases for the Dombrock null phenotype.

    PubMed

    Rios, Maria; Storry, Jill R; Hue-Roye, Kim; Chung, Amy; Reid, Marion E

    2002-06-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) with the Do(null) phenotype lack all antigens in the Dombrock blood group system, i.e. Do(a), Do(b), Gy(a), Hy and Jo(a). Sequence analysis of DNA from one proband with the Do(null) phenotype revealed a single nucleotide mutation of t to c in the donor splice site of DO (IVS1 + 2t > c), with outsplicing of exon 2. Analysis of a second proband revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation 442 C > T in exon 2 predicting a premature stop codon (Gln148 Stop). The molecular bases described in these two probands provide an explanation for the lack of Do glycoprotein on their RBCs. PMID:12028057

  14. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-10-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neurotransmitter release from sympathetic innervations. The circadian rhythmicity of body physiology is driven by central and peripheral biological clockworks and entrained by the geophysical light/dark cycle. Chronodisruption, defined as the mismatch between environmental-social cues and physiological-behavioral patterns, causes internal desynchronization of periodic functions, leading to pathophysiological mechanisms underlying degenerative, immune related, metabolic and neoplastic diseases. In this review we will address the genetic, molecular and anatomical elements that hardwire circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and subtend disarray of time-dependent changes in renal pathology. PMID:23901050

  15. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L.; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neurotransmitter release from sympathetic innervations. The circadian rhythmicity of body physiology is driven by central and peripheral biological clockworks and entrained by the geophysical light/dark cycle. Chronodisruption, defined as the mismatch between environmental–social cues and physiological–behavioral patterns, causes internal desynchronization of periodic functions, leading to pathophysiological mechanisms underlying degenerative, immune related, metabolic and neoplastic diseases. In this review we will address the genetic, molecular and anatomical elements that hardwire circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and subtend disarray of time–dependent changes in renal pathology. PMID:23901050

  16. DNA Aptamer Based Nanodrugs: Molecular Engineering for Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cansiz, Sena; Zhang, Liqin; Wu, Cuichen; Wu, Yuan; Teng, I-Ting; Hou, Weijia; Wang, Yanyue; Wan, Shuo; Cai, Ren; Jin, Chen; Liu, Qiaoling; Tan, Weihong

    2015-10-01

    In the past two decades, the study of cancer therapy has gradually advanced to the "nano" era. Numerous novel nanomaterials armed with unique physical properties have been introduced into biomedical research. At the same time, functional nucleic acid molecules, especially aptamers, have aroused broad attention from the biomedical community. Benefiting from the advancement of molecular engineering strategies, it is now feasible to combine the cancer-specific recognition capability of aptamers with various other special functions of nanomaterials to develop cancer-specific drugs at the nanoscale. Nanodrugs are now offering an unprecedented opportunity to achieve the goal of efficient targeted delivery as well as controlled release. This review highlights some achievements made in multiple aptamer-based nanodrug systems that have emerged in recent years, including studies in the infant stage of "proof-of-concept". PMID:26177853

  17. Current Progress of Aptamer-Based Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers, single-stranded oligonucleotides, are an important class of molecular targeting ligand. Since their discovery, aptamers have been rapidly translated into clinical practice. They have been approved as therapeutics and molecular diagnostics. Aptamers also possess several properties that make them uniquely suited to molecular imaging. This review aims to provide an overview of aptamers’ advantages as targeting ligands and their application in molecular imaging. PMID:24525205

  18. Molecular Beacon-Based MicroRNA Imaging During Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Soonhag

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence monitoring system for examining endogenous microRNA (miRNA) activity in cellular level provides crucial information on not only understanding a critical role of miRNA involving a variety of biological processes, but also evaluating miRNA expression patterns in a noninvasive manner. In this protocol, we report the details of a new procedure for a molecular beacon-based miRNA monitoring system, which includes the illustration scheme for miRNA detection strategy, exogenous miRNA detection, and measurement of endogenous miRNA expression level during neurogenesis. The fluorescence signal of miR-124a beacon quenched by BHQ2 was gradually recovered as increasing concentration of the miR-124a in tube. The functional work of miR-124a beacon was examined in intracellular environment, allowing for the internalization of the miR-124a beacon by lipofectamine, which resulted in activated fluorescent signals of the miR-124a beacon in the HeLa cells after the addition of synthetic miR-124a. The endogenous miR-124a expression level was detected by miR-124a beacon system during neurogenesis, showing brighter fluorescence intensity in cytoplasmic area of P19 cells after induction of neuronal differentiation by retinoic acid. The molecular beacon based-miRNA detection technique could be applicable to the simultaneous visualization of a variety of miRNA expression patterns using different fluorescence dyes. For the study of examining endogenous miRNA expression level using miRNA-beacon system, if cellular differentiation step is already prepared, transfection step of miR-124a beacon into P19 cells, and acquisition of activated fluorescence signal measured by confocal microscope can be conducted approximately within 6 h. PMID:26530921

  19. Dissecting plasmodesmata molecular composition by mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Magali S.; Bayer, Emmanuelle M. F.

    2013-01-01

    In plants, the intercellular communication through the membranous channels called plasmodesmata (PD; singular plasmodesma) plays pivotal roles in the orchestration of development, defence responses, and viral propagation. PD are dynamic structures embedded in the plant cell wall that are defined by specialized domains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane (PM). PD structure and unique functions are guaranteed by their particular molecular composition. Yet, up to recent years and despite numerous approaches such as mutant screens, immunolocalization, or screening of random cDNAs, only few PD proteins had been conclusively identified and characterized. A clear breakthrough in the search of PD constituents came from mass-spectrometry-based proteomic approaches coupled with subcellular fractionation strategies. Due to their position, firmly anchored in the extracellular matrix, PD are notoriously difficult to isolate for biochemical analysis. Proteomic-based approaches have therefore first relied on the use of cell wall fractions containing embedded PD then on “free” PD fractions whereby PD membranes were released from the walls by enzymatic degradation. To discriminate between likely contaminants and PD protein candidates, bioinformatics tools have often been used in combination with proteomic approaches. GFP fusion proteins of selected candidates have confirmed the PD association of several protein families. Here we review the accomplishments and limitations of the proteomic-based strategies to unravel the functional and structural complexity of PD. We also discuss the role of the identified PD-associated proteins. PMID:23335932

  20. Development of EST-based SNP and InDel markers and their utilization in tetraploid cotton genetic mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were analyzed in silico in order to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion-deletion polymorphisms (InDels) in cotton. A total of 1349 EST-based SNP and InDel markers were developed by comparing ESTs between Gossypium hirsutum and G. barbadense, m...

  1. POLYANA-A tool for the calculation of molecular radial distribution functions based on Molecular Dynamics trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitroulis, Christos; Raptis, Theophanes; Raptis, Vasilios

    2015-12-01

    We present an application for the calculation of radial distribution functions for molecular centres of mass, based on trajectories generated by molecular simulation methods (Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo). When designing this application, the emphasis was placed on ease of use as well as ease of further development. In its current version, the program can read trajectories generated by the well-known DL_POLY package, but it can be easily extended to handle other formats. It is also very easy to 'hack' the program so it can compute intermolecular radial distribution functions for groups of interaction sites rather than whole molecules.

  2. Molecular bases of proliferation of Francisella tularensis in Arthropod vectors

    PubMed Central

    Asare, Rexford; Akimana, Christine; Jones, Snake; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    2010-01-01

    Summary Arthropod vectors are important vehicles for transmission of Francisella tularensis between mammals, but very little is known about the F. tularensis-arthropod vector interaction. Drosophila melanogaster has been recently developed as an arthropod vector model for F. tularensis. We have shown that intracellular trafficking of F. tularensis within human monocytes-derived macrophages and D. melanogaster-derived S2 cells is very similar. Within both evolutionarily distant host cells, the Francisella-containing phagosome matures to a late endosome-like phagosome with limited fusion to lysosomes followed by rapid bacterial escape into the cytosol where the bacterial proliferate. To decipher the molecular bases of intracellular proliferation of F. tularensis within arthropod-derived cells, we screened a comprehensive library of mutants of F. tularensis subsp novicida for their defect in intracellular proliferation within D. melanogaster-derived S2 cells. Our data show that 394 genes, representing 22% of the genome, are required for intracellular proliferation within D. melanogaster-derived S2 cells, including many of the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI) genes that are also required for proliferation within mammalian macrophages. Functional gene classes that exhibit growth defect include metabolic (25%), FPI (2%), Type IV pili (1%), transport (16%) and DNA modification (5%). Among 168 most defective mutants in intracellular proliferation in S2 cells, 80 are defective in lethality and proliferation within adult D. melanogaster. The observation that only 135 of the 394 mutants that are defective in S2 cells are also defective in human macrophages indicates that F. tularensis utilize common as well as distinct mechanisms to proliferate within mammalian and arthropod cells. Our studies will facilitate deciphering the molecular aspects of F. tularensis-arthropod vector interaction and its patho-adaptation to infect mammals. PMID:20482589

  3. Structural Assembly of Molecular Complexes Based on Residual Dipolar Couplings

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Konstantin; O’Leary, Dianne P.; Fushman, David

    2010-01-01

    We present and evaluate a rigid-body molecular docking method, called PATIDOCK, that relies solely on the three-dimensional structure of the individual components and the experimentally derived residual dipolar couplings (RDC) for the complex. We show that, given an accurate ab initio predictor of the alignment tensor from a protein structure, it is possible to accurately assemble a protein-protein complex by utilizing the RDC’s sensitivity to molecular shape to guide the docking. The proposed docking method is robust against experimental errors in the RDCs and computationally efficient. We analyze the accuracy and efficiency of this method using experimental or synthetic RDC data for several proteins, as well as synthetic data for a large variety of protein-protein complexes. We also test our method on two protein systems for which the structure of the complex and steric-alignment data are available (Lys48-linked diubiquitin and a complex of ubiquitin and a ubiquitin-associated domain) and analyze the effect of flexible unstructured tails on the outcome of docking. The results demonstrate that it is fundamentally possible to assemble a protein-protein complex based solely on experimental RDC data and the prediction of the alignment tensor from three-dimensional structures. Thus, despite the purely angular nature of residual dipolar couplings, they can be converted into intermolecular distance/translational constraints. Additionally we show a method for combining RDCs with other experimental data, such as ambiguous constraints from interface mapping, to further improve structure characterization of the protein complexes. PMID:20550109

  4. A Raman-based endoscopic strategy for multiplexed molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Zavaleta, Cristina L; Garai, Ellis; Liu, Jonathan T C; Sensarn, Steven; Mandella, Michael J; Van de Sompel, Dominique; Friedland, Shai; Van Dam, Jacques; Contag, Christopher H; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2013-06-18

    Endoscopic imaging is an invaluable diagnostic tool allowing minimally invasive access to tissues deep within the body. It has played a key role in screening colon cancer and is credited with preventing deaths through the detection and removal of precancerous polyps. However, conventional white-light endoscopy offers physicians structural information without the biochemical information that would be advantageous for early detection and is essential for molecular typing. To address this unmet need, we have developed a unique accessory, noncontact, fiber optic-based Raman spectroscopy device that has the potential to provide real-time, multiplexed functional information during routine endoscopy. This device is ideally suited for detection of functionalized surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles as molecular imaging contrast agents. This device was designed for insertion through a clinical endoscope and has the potential to detect and quantify the presence of a multiplexed panel of tumor-targeting SERS nanoparticles. Characterization of the Raman instrument was performed with SERS particles on excised human tissue samples, and it has shown unsurpassed sensitivity and multiplexing capabilities, detecting 326-fM concentrations of SERS nanoparticles and unmixing 10 variations of colocalized SERS nanoparticles. Another unique feature of our noncontact Raman endoscope is that it has been designed for efficient use over a wide range of working distances from 1 to 10 mm. This is necessary to accommodate for imperfect centering during endoscopy and the nonuniform surface topology of human tissue. Using this endoscope as a key part of a multiplexed detection approach could allow endoscopists to distinguish between normal and precancerous tissues rapidly and to identify flat lesions that are otherwise missed. PMID:23703909

  5. Unveiling the molecular mechanism of brassinosteroids: Insights from structure-based molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Lei, Beilei; Liu, Jiyuan; Yao, Xiaojun

    2015-12-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR) phytohormones play indispensable roles in plant growth and development. Brassinolide (BL) and 24-epibrassinolide (24-epiBL) are the most active ones among the BRs reported thus far. Unfortunately, the extremely low natural content and intricate synthesis process limit their popularization in agricultural production. Earlier reports to discover alternative compounds have resulted in molecules with nearly same scaffold structure and without diversity in chemical space. In the present study, receptors structure based BRs regulation mechanism was analyzed. First, we examined the detailed binding interactions and their dynamic stability between BL and its receptor BRI1 and co-receptor BAK1. Then, the binding modes and binding free energies for 24-epiBL and a series of representative BRs binding with BRI1 and BRI1-BAK1 were carried out by molecular docking, energy minimization and MM-PBSA free energy calculation. The obtained binding structures and energetic results provided vital insights into the structural factors affecting the activity from both receptors and BRs aspects. Subsequently, the obtained knowledge will serve as valuable guidance to build pharmacophore models for rational screening of new scaffold alternative BRs. PMID:26362600

  6. Maintain rigid structures in Verlet based Cartesian molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Peng; Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2012-10-01

    An algorithm is presented to maintain rigid structures in Verlet based Cartesian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. After each unconstrained MD step, the coordinates of selected particles are corrected to maintain rigid structures through an iterative procedure of rotation matrix computation. This algorithm, named as SHAPE and implemented in CHARMM program suite, avoids the calculations of Lagrange multipliers, so that the complexity of computation does not increase with the number of particles in a rigid structure. The implementation of this algorithm does not require significant modification of propagation integrator, and can be plugged into any Cartesian based MD integration scheme. A unique feature of the SHAPE method is that it is interchangeable with SHAKE for any object that can be constrained as a rigid structure using multiple SHAKE constraints. Unlike SHAKE, the SHAPE method can be applied to large linear (with three or more centers) and planar (with four or more centers) rigid bodies. Numerical tests with four model systems including two proteins demonstrate that the accuracy and reliability of the SHAPE method are comparable to the SHAKE method, but with much more applicability and efficiency.

  7. Magnetic and electronic properties of porphyrin-based molecular nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jia-Jia; Li, Qiao-Zhi; Dang, Jing-Shuang; Wang, Wei-Wei; Zhao, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Using spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, we performed theoretical investigations on the electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal embedded porphyrin-based nanowires (TM-PNWs, TM = Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn). Our results indicate that Ni-PNW and Zn-PNW are nonmagnetic while the rest species are magnetic, and the magnetic moments in TM-PNWs and their corresponding isolated monomer structures are found to be the same. In addition, the spin coupling in the magnetic nanowires can be ignored leading to their degenerate AFM and FM states. These results can be ascribed to the weak intermetallic interactions because of the relatively large distances between neighbor TM atoms. Among all TM-PNW structures considered here, only Mn-PNW shows a half-metallic property while the others are predicted to be semiconducting. The present work paves a new way of obtaining ferromagnetic porphyrin-based nanowires with TM atoms distributed separately and orderly, which are expected to be good candidates for catalysts, energy storage and molecular spintronics.

  8. Molecular Sentinel-on-Chip for SERS-Based Biosensing†

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yan; Batchelor, Dale; Leonard, Donovan N.; Misra, Veena; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2013-01-01

    The development of DNA detection techniques on large-area plasmonics-active platforms is critical for many medical applications such as high-throughput screening, medical diagnosis and systems biology research. Here, we report for the first time a unique “molecular sentinel-on-chip” (MSC) technology for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based DNA detection. This unique approach allows label-free detection of DNA molecules on chips developed on a wafer scale using large area nanofabrication methodologies. To develop plasmonics-active biosensing platforms in a repeatable and reproducible manner, we employed a combination of deep UV lithography, atomic layer deposition, and metal deposition to fabricate triangular-shaped nanowire (TSNW) arrays having controlled sub-10 nm gaps nanostructures over an entire 6-inch wafer. The detection of a DNA sequence of the Ki-67 gene, a critical breast cancer biomarker, on the TSNW substrate illustrates the usefulness and potential of the MSC technology as a novel SERS-based DNA detection method. PMID:23493773

  9. Pathological Bases for a Robust Application of Cancer Molecular Classification

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Cano, Salvador J.

    2015-01-01

    Any robust classification system depends on its purpose and must refer to accepted standards, its strength relying on predictive values and a careful consideration of known factors that can affect its reliability. In this context, a molecular classification of human cancer must refer to the current gold standard (histological classification) and try to improve it with key prognosticators for metastatic potential, staging and grading. Although organ-specific examples have been published based on proteomics, transcriptomics and genomics evaluations, the most popular approach uses gene expression analysis as a direct correlate of cellular differentiation, which represents the key feature of the histological classification. RNA is a labile molecule that varies significantly according with the preservation protocol, its transcription reflect the adaptation of the tumor cells to the microenvironment, it can be passed through mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes), and it is exposed to epigenetic modifications. More robust classifications should be based on stable molecules, at the genetic level represented by DNA to improve reliability, and its analysis must deal with the concept of intratumoral heterogeneity, which is at the origin of tumor progression and is the byproduct of the selection process during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The simultaneous analysis of multiple DNA targets and next generation sequencing offer the best practical approach for an analytical genomic classification of tumors. PMID:25898411

  10. Arrays of high quality SAM-based junctions and their application in molecular diode based logic.

    PubMed

    Wan, Albert; Suchand Sangeeth, C S; Wang, Lejia; Yuan, Li; Jiang, Li; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2015-12-14

    This paper describes a method to fabricate a microfluidic top-electrode that can be utilized to generate arrays of self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions. The top-electrodes consist of a liquid-metal of GaOx/EGaIn mechanically stabilized in microchannels and through-holes in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS); these top-electrodes form molecular junctions by directly placing them onto the SAM supported by template-stripped (TS) Ag or Au bottom-electrodes. Unlike conventional techniques to form multiple junctions, our method does not require lithography to pattern the bottom-electrode and is compatible with TS bottom-electrodes, which are ultra-flat with large grains, free from potential contamination of photoresist residues, and do not have electrode-edges where the molecules are unable to pack well. We formed tunneling junctions with n-alkanethiolate SAMs in yields of ∼80%, with good reproducibility and electrical stability. Temperature dependent J(V) measurements indicated that the mechanism of charge transport across the junction is coherent tunneling. To demonstrate the usefulness of these junctions, we formed molecular diodes based on SAMs with Fc head groups. These junctions rectify currents with a rectification ratio R of 45. These molecular diodes were incorporated in simple electronic circuitry to demonstrate molecular diode-based Boolean logic. PMID:26537895

  11. Postiive tone resists based on network deploymerization of molecular resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Richard A.; Cheng, Jing; Cheshmehkani, Ameneh; Tolbert, Laren M.; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2013-03-01

    Conventional chemically amplified resists have several issues that can potentially limit their capability for sub-40 nm imaging. One of the major issues at this size scale is that the mechanical strength of positive tone CARs limits the amount of stress they can withstand during development, rinse, and drying, thus leading to problems with pattern collapse due to the high capillary forces generated during drying. This problem is exasperated by the fact that linear polymers show dramatically reduced modulus at sub-50 nm features sizes. To improve on this problem, we have made a positive tone resist based on network depolymerization of molecular resists. The resist thermally cross-links after being spin cast into thin film form through reactions between vinyl ether groups and carboxylic acid groups. By cross-linking the resist to form a dense three dimensional polymer network, the mechanical strength of the resist is greatly improved compared to linear polymers. The network is depolymerized using an acid catalyzed reaction to create development contrast that allows for patterning of the resist via development in either aqueous base or organic solvent. One drawback of the current resist design is that the free carboxylic acids on the resist molecule appear to react in solution at room temperature with both the vinyl ether groups on adjacent molecules and with any added base quencher. These reactions cause reduced effectiveness of the base quencher and produce a noticeable resist shelf life problem. Despite these limitations, the material was used to compare the effect of development in aqueous base versus organic solvent. The resist formulated in this work showed a DUV sensitivity of 7 mJ/cm2 and a contrast of 5.2 for development in either solvent or aqueous base. Under 100 keV e-beam imaging, the material showed 40 nm resolution for both development types. In standard 0.26 N TMAH, the dose-to-size was 84 μC/cm2 with 3σ LER of 14.2 nm. Using methyl isobutyl ketone

  12. Ridge-based bias potentials to accelerate molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Penghao; Duncan, Juliana; Zhang, Liang; Henkelman, Graeme

    2015-12-28

    An effective way to accelerate rare events in molecular dynamics simulations is to apply a bias potential which destabilizes minima without biasing the transitions between stable states. This approach, called hyperdynamics, is limited by our ability to construct general bias potentials without having to understand the reaction mechanisms available to the system, a priori. Current bias potentials are typically constructed in terms of a metric which quantifies the distance that a trajectory deviates from the reactant state minimum. Such metrics include detection of negative curvatures of the potential, an energy increase, or deviations in bond lengths from the minimum. When one of these properties exceeds a critical value, the bias potentials are constructed to approach zero. A problem common to each of these schemes is that their effectiveness decreases rapidly with system size. We attribute this problem to a diminishing volume defined by the metrics around a reactant minimum as compared to the total volume of the reactant state basin. In this work, we mitigate the dimensionality scaling problem by constructing bias potentials that are based upon the distance to the boundary of the reactant basin. This distance is quantified in two ways: (i) by following the minimum mode direction to the reactant boundary and (ii) by training a machine learning algorithm to give an analytic expression for the boundary to which the distance can be calculated. Both of these ridge-based bias potentials are demonstrated to scale qualitatively better with dimensionality than the existing methods. We attribute this improvement to a greater filling fraction of the reactant state using the ridge-based bias potentials as compared to the standard potentials. PMID:26723648

  13. Optically switchable molecular device using microsphere based junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faramarzi, V.; Raimondo, C.; Reinders, F.; Mayor, M.; Samorı, P.; Doudin, B.

    2011-12-01

    Metallic planar electrodes are bridged using microspheres coated with chemisorbed azobenzene self-assembled monolayers. The circuit exhibits light-induced switching, with reproducibility over 90%, as statistically determined and compared to junctions incorporating photo-insensitive alkanethiol layers. Microsphere interconnects provide direct access to molecular transport properties, with reliability and stability, making multifunctional molecular electronics devices possible.

  14. Actin-based motility propelled by molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadyayula, Sai Pramod; Rangarajan, Murali

    2012-09-01

    Actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes propelled by filament end-tracking molecular motors has been simulated. Such systems may act as potential nanoscale actuators and shuttles useful in sorting and sensing biomolecules. Filaments are modeled as three-dimensional elastic springs distributed on one end of the capsule and persistently attached to the motile bacterial surface through an end-tracking motor complex. Filament distribution is random, and monomer concentration decreases linearly as a function of position on the bacterial surface. Filament growth rate increases with monomer concentration but decreases with the extent of compression. The growing filaments exert push-pull forces on the bacterial surface. In addition to forces, torques arise due to two factors—distribution of motors on the bacterial surface, and coupling of torsion upon growth due to the right-handed helicity of F-actin—causing the motile object to undergo simultaneous translation and rotation. The trajectory of the bacterium is simulated by performing a force and torque balance on the bacterium. All simulations use a fixed value of torsion. Simulations show strong alignment of the filaments and the long axis of the bacterium along the direction of motion. In the absence of torsion, the bacterial surface essentially moves along the direction of the long axis. When a small amount of the torsion is applied to the bacterial surface, the bacterium is seen to move in right-handed helical trajectories, consistent with experimental observations.

  15. Molecular and Cellular Bases of Iron Metabolism in Humans.

    PubMed

    Milto, I V; Suhodolo, I V; Prokopieva, V D; Klimenteva, T K

    2016-06-01

    Iron is a microelement with the most completely studied biological functions. Its wide dissemination in nature and involvement in key metabolic pathways determine the great importance of this metal for uni- and multicellular organisms. The biological role of iron is characterized by its indispensability in cell respiration and various biochemical processes providing normal functioning of cells and organs of the human body. Iron also plays an important role in the generation of free radicals, which under different conditions can be useful or damaging to biomolecules and cells. In the literature, there are many reviews devoted to iron metabolism and its regulation in pro- and eukaryotes. Significant progress has been achieved recently in understanding molecular bases of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to systematize available data on mechanisms of iron assimilation, distribution, and elimination from the human body, as well as on its biological importance and on the major iron-containing proteins. The review summarizes recent ideas about iron metabolism. Special attention is paid to mechanisms of iron absorption in the small intestine and to interrelationships of cellular and extracellular pools of this metal in the human body. PMID:27301283

  16. Molecular bases of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Nigro, V

    2003-09-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a heterogeneous group of genetically determined disorders with a primary or predominant involvement of the pelvic or shoulder girdle musculature. The clinical course is characterized by great variability, ranging from severe forms with rapid onset and progression to very mild forms allowing affected people to have fairly normal life spans and activity levels. Sixteen loci have been so far identified, six autosomal dominant and ten autosomal recessive. Linkage analyses indicate that there is further genetic heterogeneity both for dominant as well as for recessive LGMD. The dominant forms (LGMD1) are generally milder and relatively rare, representing less than 10% of all LGMD. The autosomal recessive forms (LGMD2) are much more common, having a cumulative prevalence of 1:15,000 with a number of geographical differences. The product of ten autosomal recessive LGMD genes has so far been identified. They are: calpain-3 (LGMD2A), dysferlin (LGMD2B), alpha-sarcoglycan (LGMD2D), beta-sarcoglycan (LGMD2E), gamma-sarcoglycan (LGMD2C), delta-sarcoglycan (LGMD2F), telethonin (LGMD2G), TRIM32 (LGMD2H), fukutin-related protein (LGMD2I) and titin (LGMD2J). There are, however, at least 25% of families who can be excluded from any known locus. The present review is devoted to outline the present advancements in the molecular bases of autosomal recessive LGMD. PMID:14959561

  17. Sensitive determination of citrinin based on molecular imprinted electrochemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atar, Necip; Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Eren, Tanju

    2016-01-01

    In this report, a novel molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor based on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) involved in a polyoxometalate (H3PW12O40, POM) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was prepared for the determination of citrinin (CIT). The developed surfaces were characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. CIT imprinted GCE was prepared via electropolymerization process of 80.0 mM pyrrole as monomer in the presence of phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) containing 20.0 mM CIT. The linearity range and the detection limit of the developed method were calculated as 1.0 × 10-12-1.0 × 10-10 M and 2.0 × 10-13 M, respectively. In addition, the voltammetric sensor was applied to rye samples. The stability and selectivity of the voltammetric sensor were also reported.

  18. Interfacial activation-based molecular bioimprinting of lipolytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Mingarro, I; Abad, C; Braco, L

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial activation-based molecular (bio)-imprinting (IAMI) has been developed to rationally improve the performance of lipolytic enzymes in nonaqueous environments. The strategy combinedly exploits (i) the known dramatic enhancement of the protein conformational rigidity in a water-restricted milieu and (ii) the reported conformational changes associated with the activation of these enzymes at lipid-water interfaces, which basically involves an increased substrate accessibility to the active site and/or an induction of a more competent catalytic machinery. Six model enzymes have been assayed in several model reactions in nonaqueous media. The results, rationalized in light of the present biochemical and structural knowledge, show that the IAMI approach represents a straightforward, versatile method to generate manageable, activated (kinetically trapped) forms of lipolytic enzymes, providing under optimal conditions nonaqueous rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. It is also shown that imprintability of lipolytic enzymes depends not only on the nature of the enzyme but also on the "quality" of the interface used as the template. PMID:7724558

  19. Molecular dynamics study of surfactant-like peptide based nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Colherinhas, Guilherme; Fileti, Eudes

    2014-10-23

    Surfactant-like peptide (SLP) based nanostructures are investigated using all-atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We report structure properties of nanostructures belonging to the ANK peptide group. In particular, the mathematical models for the two A3K membranes, A6K nanotube, and A9K nanorod were developed. Our MD simulation results are consistent with the experimental data, indicating that A3K membranes are stable in two different configurations: (1) SLPs are tilted relative to the normal membrane plane; (2) SLPs are interdigitated. The former configuration is energetically more stable. The cylindrical nanostructures feature a certain order of the A6K peptides. In turn, the A9K nanorod does not exhibit any long-range ordering. Both nanotube and nanorod structure contain large amounts of water inside. Consequently, these nanostructures behave similar to hydrogels. This property may be important in the context of biotechnology. Binding energy analysis-in terms of Coulomb and van der Waals contributions-unveils an increase as the peptide size increases. The electrostatic interaction constitutes 70-75% of the noncovalent attraction energy between SLPs. The nanotubular structures are notably stable, confirming that A6K peptides preferentially form nanotubes and A9K peptides preferentially form nanorods. PMID:25264942

  20. Molecular microenvironments: Solvent interactions with nucleic acid bases and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Pohorille, A.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of reconstructing plausible sequences of events in prebiotic molecular evolution is limited by the lack of fossil remains. However, with hindsight, one goal of molecular evolution was obvious: the development of molecular systems that became constituents of living systems. By understanding the interactions among molecules that are likely to have been present in the prebiotic environment, and that could have served as components in protobiotic molecular systems, plausible evolutionary sequences can be suggested. When stable aggregations of molecules form, a net decrease in free energy is observed in the system. Such changes occur when solvent molecules interact among themselves, as well as when they interact with organic species. A significant decrease in free energy, in systems of solvent and organic molecules, is due to entropy changes in the solvent. Entropy-driven interactioins played a major role in the organization of prebiotic systems, and understanding the energetics of them is essential to understanding molecular evolution.

  1. Optical sensors based on the molecular condensation nuclei detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuptsov, Vladimir D.; Katelevsky, Vadim Y.; Valyukhov, Vladimir P.

    2015-05-01

    Molecular condensation nuclei (MCN) detector is a specialized optical sensor which provides for monitoring of various chemicals impurity in the environment and diagnosis of diseases in human exhaled air ("electronic nose" biosensor). Structurally MCN detector is included in the highly sensitive gas analyzers based on MCN method. The article describes the fundamental principles, specific features and application fields of the advanced highly sensitive MCN method. The MCN method is based on the application of various physico-chemical processes to the flow of a gas containing impurities. As a result of these processes aerosol particle that are about 106 times larger than the original molecule of the impurity are produced. The ability of the aerosol particle to scatter incident light also increases ~1014÷1016 times compared with the original molecule and the aerosol particle with the molecule of the impurity in the center is easily detected by light scattering inside a photometer. By measuring of the light scattering intensity is determined concentration of chemical impurities in the air. Aerosol particles in the MCN detector are formed in the condensing devices through overgrowth of the molecule detectable impurity by molecules so-called «developer» substance. At the final stage of the analysis in the MCN detector is measured light scattering by aerosol particles which is proportional to the concentration of determined impurities in the environment. For calculations of the scattered radiation is applicable Mie's theory considering the scattering of light by spherical particles whose size is comparable to the wavelength of light. We have determined that the light scattering by aerosol particles is interferometric and is comparable within an order of magnitude with light scattering by the air inside a photometer. The detection threshold for the target component of the gas analyzer is attained at the spontaneous ionization background level and not at the limiting

  2. Arrays of high quality SAM-based junctions and their application in molecular diode based logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Albert; Suchand Sangeeth, C. S.; Wang, Lejia; Yuan, Li; Jiang, Li; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes a method to fabricate a microfluidic top-electrode that can be utilized to generate arrays of self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions. The top-electrodes consist of a liquid-metal of GaOx/EGaIn mechanically stabilized in microchannels and through-holes in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS); these top-electrodes form molecular junctions by directly placing them onto the SAM supported by template-stripped (TS) Ag or Au bottom-electrodes. Unlike conventional techniques to form multiple junctions, our method does not require lithography to pattern the bottom-electrode and is compatible with TS bottom-electrodes, which are ultra-flat with large grains, free from potential contamination of photoresist residues, and do not have electrode-edges where the molecules are unable to pack well. We formed tunneling junctions with n-alkanethiolate SAMs in yields of ~80%, with good reproducibility and electrical stability. Temperature dependent J(V) measurements indicated that the mechanism of charge transport across the junction is coherent tunneling. To demonstrate the usefulness of these junctions, we formed molecular diodes based on SAMs with Fc head groups. These junctions rectify currents with a rectification ratio R of 45. These molecular diodes were incorporated in simple electronic circuitry to demonstrate molecular diode-based Boolean logic.This paper describes a method to fabricate a microfluidic top-electrode that can be utilized to generate arrays of self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions. The top-electrodes consist of a liquid-metal of GaOx/EGaIn mechanically stabilized in microchannels and through-holes in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS); these top-electrodes form molecular junctions by directly placing them onto the SAM supported by template-stripped (TS) Ag or Au bottom-electrodes. Unlike conventional techniques to form multiple junctions, our method does not require lithography to pattern the bottom-electrode and is compatible with TS

  3. Conformational Analysis in 18-Membered Macrolactones Based on Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Belaidi, Salah; Harkati, Dalal

    2011-01-01

    Conformational analysis of 18-ring membered macrolactones has been carried out using molecular mechanics calculations and molecular dynamics. A high conformational flexibility of macrolactones was obtained, and an important stereoselectivity was observed for the complexed macrolides. For 18d macrolactone, which was presented by a most favored conformer with 20.1% without complex, it was populated with 50.1% in presence of Fe(CO)3. PMID:24052826

  4. Optical fiber-based photomechanical molecular delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Koki; Sato, Shunichi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Ashida, Hiroshi; Nishidate, Izumi

    2014-02-01

    Molecular delivery based on nanosecond pulsed laser-induced photomechanical waves (PMWs) enables endoscopic application by using an optical fiber for laser transmission. In our previous fiber system, a laser target, which was a black natural rubber film as a laser absorbing material covered with an optically transparent polyethylene terephthalate disk to confine the laser-induced plasma, was attached to the output end of a 1 mm core diameter quartz fiber. There were two problems in that system: 1) the outer diameter was large (~2.7 mm) and 2) available peak pressure rapidly decreased with increasing pulse number. In this study, we developed a new fiber delivery system to overcome these problems. As a laser absorbing material, we used a cap-type silicone rubber containing carbon black, into which the fiber output end can simply be inserted. The fiber end surface works to confine the laser-induced plasma. The outer diameter of the fiber system was reduced to ~1.4 mm. At an output laser fluence of 1.2 J/cm2, peak pressure of the first PMW pulse exceeded ~40 MPa. With successive 10 laser pulses, decreasing rate of the peak pressure was 22%, which was considerably lower than that with the previous fiber system (82%), enabling generation of at least successive 30 pulses of PMW with the same cap-type target. With this fiber system, we attempted transfer of plasmid DNA encoding EGFP (enhanced green fluorescence protein) to the rat skin as a test tissue in vivo, showing site-selective efficient gene expression.

  5. Sol-gel-based molecularly imprinted xerogel for capillary microextraction.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Habib; Piri-Moghadam, Hamed

    2012-09-01

    A novel molecularly imprinted xerogel (MIX) based on organically modified silica (ORMOSIL) was successfully prepared for on-line capillary microextraction (CME) coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The sol-gel-based xerogel was prepared using only one precursor and exhibited extensive selectivity towards triazines along with significant thermal and chemical stability. Atrazine was selected as a model template molecule and 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (TMSPMA) as a precursor in which the propylmethacrylate moiety was responsible for van der Waals, dipole-dipole, and hydrogen-bond interactions with the template. This moiety plays a key role in creation of selective sites while methoxysilyl groups in TMSPMA acted as crosslinkers between the template and the propylmethacrylate moiety. Moreover, a non-imprinted xerogel (NIX) was also prepared in the absence of the template for evaluating the extraction efficiency of the prepared MIX. Then, the prepared imprinted and non-imprinted xerogels were used for extraction of three selected analytes of triazines class including atrazine, ametryn, and terbutryn, which have rather similar structures. The extraction efficiency of the prepared xerogel for atrazine, the template molecule, was found to be ten times greater than the efficiency achieved by the non-imprinted one. In the meantime, the extraction efficiency ratio of MIX to NIX for ametryn and terbutryn was also rather significant (eight times). Moreover, other compounds from different classes including dicamba, mecoprop, and estriol were also analyzed to evaluate the selectivity of the prepared MIX towards triazines. The ratio of enrichment factors (EF) of MIX to NIX for atrazine, ametryn, terbutryn, dicamba, mecoprop, and estriol were about 10, 8, 8, 2, 2, and 3, respectively. The linearity for the analytes was in the range of 5-700 μg L(-1). Limit of detection was in the range of 1-5 μg L(-1) and the RSD% values (n = 5) were all below 6

  6. Computer-Based Molecular Modelling: Finnish School Teachers' Experiences and Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksela, Maija; Lundell, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Modern computer-based molecular modelling opens up new possibilities for chemistry teaching at different levels. This article presents a case study seeking insight into Finnish school teachers' use of computer-based molecular modelling in teaching chemistry, into the different working and teaching methods used, and their opinions about necessary…

  7. Validation of the basidiomycetous yeast, Sporidiobolus microsporus sp. nov., based on phenotypic and molecular analyses.

    PubMed

    Fell, J W; Blatt, G M; Statzell-Tallman, A

    1998-11-01

    The validation of Sporidiobolus microsporus Higham, nom. nud. is based on phenotypic characterization and molecular sequence analysis of a partial region of the large sub-unit ribosomal DNA. The species is compared, based on phenotypic and molecular characteristics, with other species of Sporidiobolus and the closely related Rhodosporidium fluviale. PMID:10081586

  8. Fluorescence molecular tomographic image reconstruction based on reduced measurement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Wei; Wang, Jiajun; Feng, David Dagan; Fang, Erxi

    2015-07-01

    The analysis of fluorescence molecular tomography is important for medical diagnosis and treatment. Although the quality of reconstructed results can be improved with the increasing number of measurement data, the scale of the matrices involved in the reconstruction of fluorescence molecular tomography will also become larger, which may slow down the reconstruction process. A new method is proposed where measurement data are reduced according to the rows of the Jacobian matrix and the projection residual error. To further accelerate the reconstruction process, the global inverse problem is solved with level-by-level Schur complement decomposition. Simulation results demonstrate that the speed of the reconstruction process can be improved with the proposed algorithm.

  9. Molecular-based electronically switchable tunnel junction devices.

    PubMed

    Collier, C P; Jeppesen, J O; Luo, Y; Perkins, J; Wong, E W; Heath, J R; Stoddart, J F

    2001-12-19

    Solid-state tunnel junction devices were fabricated from Langmuir Blodgett molecular monolayers of a bistable [2]catenane, a bistable [2]pseudorotaxane, and a single-station [2]rotaxane. All devices exhibited a (noncapacitive) hysteretic current-voltage response that switched the device between high- and low-conductivity states, although control devices exhibited no such response. Correlations between the structure and solution-phase dynamics of the molecular and supramolecular systems, the crystallographic domain structure of the monolayer film, and the room-temperature device performance characteristics are reported. PMID:11741428

  10. Sugar-based molecular computing by material implication.

    PubMed

    Elstner, Martin; Axthelm, Jörg; Schiller, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    A method to integrate an (in principle) unlimited number of molecular logic gates to construct complex circuits is presented. Logic circuits, such as half- or full-adders, can be reinterpreted by using the functional completeness of the implication function (IMP) and the trivial FALSE operation. The molecular gate IMP is represented by a fluorescent boronic acid sugar probe. An external wiring algorithm translates the fluorescent output from one gate into a chemical input for the next gate on microtiter plates. This process is demonstrated on a four-bit full adder. PMID:24924187

  11. Photocatalytic water oxidation by molecular assemblies based on cobalt catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xu; Li, Fei; Li, Hua; Zhang, Biaobiao; Yu, Fengshou; Sun, Licheng

    2014-09-01

    Chromophore-catalyst molecular assemblies towards visible light-driven water oxidation were synthesized by covalent integration of a light-harvesting complex [Ru(bpy)3](2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) and a Co4O4 cubane water oxidation catalyst. The two components were assembled either in linear or macrocyclic configurations. In the presence of the sacrificial reagent, the Ru-Co metallocycle exhibits remarkable photocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution, which is one order of magnitude higher than that of a multicomponent system and exceeds that of a linear assembly by a factor of five, offering access to highly active photocatalyst through molecular design. PMID:25111070

  12. Congenital neutropenia: diagnosis, molecular bases and patient management

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The term congenital neutropenia encompasses a family of neutropenic disorders, both permanent and intermittent, severe (<0.5 G/l) or mild (between 0.5-1.5 G/l), which may also affect other organ systems such as the pancreas, central nervous system, heart, muscle and skin. Neutropenia can lead to life-threatening pyogenic infections, acute gingivostomatitis and chronic parodontal disease, and each successive infection may leave permanent sequelae. The risk of infection is roughly inversely proportional to the circulating polymorphonuclear neutrophil count and is particularly high at counts below 0.2 G/l. When neutropenia is detected, an attempt should be made to establish the etiology, distinguishing between acquired forms (the most frequent, including post viral neutropenia and auto immune neutropenia) and congenital forms that may either be isolated or part of a complex genetic disease. Except for ethnic neutropenia, which is a frequent but mild congenital form, probably with polygenic inheritance, all other forms of congenital neutropenia are extremely rare and have monogenic inheritance, which may be X-linked or autosomal, recessive or dominant. About half the forms of congenital neutropenia with no extra-hematopoetic manifestations and normal adaptive immunity are due to neutrophil elastase (ELANE) mutations. Some patients have severe permanent neutropenia and frequent infections early in life, while others have mild intermittent neutropenia. Congenital neutropenia may also be associated with a wide range of organ dysfunctions, as for example in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (associated with pancreatic insufficiency) and glycogen storage disease type Ib (associated with a glycogen storage syndrome). So far, the molecular bases of 12 neutropenic disorders have been identified. Treatment of severe chronic neutropenia should focus on prevention of infections. It includes antimicrobial prophylaxis, generally with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and also granulocyte

  13. Dynamic molecules: molecular dynamics for everyone. An internet-based access to molecular dynamic simulations: basic concepts.

    PubMed

    Frank, Martin; Gutbrod, Peter; Hassayoun, Chokri; von Der Lieth, Claus-W

    2003-10-01

    Molecular dynamics is a rapidly developing field of science and has become an established tool for studying the dynamic behavior of biomolecules. Although several high quality programs for performing molecular dynamic simulations are freely available, only well-trained scientists are currently able to make use of the broad scientific potential that molecular dynamic simulations offer to gain insight into structural questions at an atomic level. The "Dynamic Molecules" approach is the first internet portal that provides an interactive access to set up, perform and analyze molecular dynamic simulations. It is completely based on standard web technologies and uses only publicly available software. The aim is to open molecular dynamics techniques to a broader range of users including undergraduate students, teachers and scientists outside the bioinformatics field. The time-limiting factors are the availability of free capacity on the computing server to run the simulations and the time required to transport the history file through the internet for the animation mode. The interactive access mode of the portal is acceptable for animations of molecules having up to about 500 atoms. PMID:12908101

  14. [Spectroscopic study of diazepam molecularly imprinted polymers and initiative application to conductimetric sensor based on molecularly imprinted films].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-fang; Li, Feng; Yao, Bing; Wang, Li; Liu, Guo-yan; Chai, Chun-yan

    2010-08-01

    The molecularly imprinted polymers were synthesized using diazepam as the template and molecularly imprinted films (MIF) prepared on screen printed electrodes (SPE). The binding mechanism and recognition characteristics of the molecularly imprinted polymers were studied by ultraviolet (UV) spectra and infrared (IR) spectra. In addition, a conductimetric sensor for diazepam was established preliminarily based on diazepam MIF modified SPE. The results of UV spectra indicated that template molecules and functional monomers had formed 1:2 hydrogen bonding complexes; the results of IR spectra showed that there were some functional groups in the molecularly imprinted polymers which could interact with the template molecules. The molecularly imprinted polymers manifested highly recognition to diazepam. The response of the conductimetric sensor to the concentration of diazepam displayed a linear correlation over a range of 0.04 to 0.62 mg x L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.008 mg x L(-1). The sensor is suitable for on-the-spot detection of diazepam. PMID:20939345

  15. Molecular filter-based diagnostics in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Gregory S.; Samimy, MO; Arnette, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    The use of iodine molecular filters in nonintrusive planar velocimetry methods is examined. Detailed absorption profiles are obtained to highlight the effects that determine the profile shape. It is shown that pressure broadening induced by the presence of a nonabsorbing vapor can be utilized to significantly change the slopes bounding the absorbing region while remaining in the optically-thick regime.

  16. Molecular bases and improvement of heat tolerance in crop plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High temperature is a major constraint to crop productivity, causing substantial reductions in yield and quality, and expected to become a more devastating factor due to global warming. A better understanding of molecular mechanisms of tolerance to high temperatures is necessary for designing and de...

  17. RYB tri-colour electrochromism based on a molecular cobaloxime.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Maik R J; Muresan, Nicoleta M; Steiner, Ullrich; Reisner, Erwin

    2013-11-18

    The three oxidation states of Co in a molecular cobaloxime were used to realise an electrochromic device displaying the red, yellow, blue (RYB) set of subtractive primary colours. A facile method for the lithographic patterning of a several micrometre thick indium tin oxide (ITO) mesoporous layer was developed, which served as the scaffold for cobaloxime adsorption. PMID:24056695

  18. Web Based Learning Support for Experimental Design in Molecular Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmsen, Tinri; Bisseling, Ton; Hartog, Rob

    An important learning goal of a molecular biology curriculum is a certain proficiency level in experimental design. Currently students are confronted with experimental approaches in textbooks, in lectures and in the laboratory. However, most students do not reach a satisfactory level of competence in the design of experimental approaches. This…

  19. An Inquiry-based Introduction to Molecular Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Foster

    2000-01-01

    Presents investigative approaches to teaching molecular biology. Emphasizes a deductive determination of the nature of nucleic acids visualized in a gel, and a comparison of different genomes. Asks why students should take it on faith that what they view on a gel is DNA. (SAH)

  20. Construction of an Interspecific Genetic Map Based on InDel and SSR for Mapping the QTLs Affecting the Initiation of Flower Primordia in Pepper (Capsicum spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Cheng; Nong, Ding-Guo; Li, Wei-Peng; Tang, Xin; Wu, Zhi-Ming; Hu, Kai-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Re-sequencing permits the mining of genome-wide variations on a large scale and provides excellent resources for the research community. To accelerate the development and application of molecular markers and identify the QTLs affecting the flowering time-related trait in pepper, a total of 1,038 pairs of InDel and 674 SSR primers from different sources were used for genetic mapping using the F2 population (n = 154) derived from a cross between BA3 (C. annuum) and YNXML (C. frutescens). Of these, a total of 224 simple PCR-based markers, including 129 InDels and 95 SSRs, were validated and integrated into a map, which was designated as the BY map. The BY map consisted of 13 linkage groups (LGs) and spanned a total genetic distance of 1,249.77 cM with an average marker distance of 5.60 cM. Comparative analysis of the genetic and physical map based on the anchored markers showed that the BY map covered nearly the whole pepper genome. Based on the BY map, one major and five minor QTLs affecting the number of leaves on the primary axis (Nle) were detected on chromosomes P2, P7, P10 and P11 in 2012. The major QTL on P2 was confirmed based on another subset of the same F2 population (n = 147) in 2014 with selective genotyping of markers from the BY map. With the accomplishment of pepper whole genome sequencing and annotations (release 2.0), 153 candidate genes were predicted to embed in the Nle2.2 region, of which 12 important flowering related genes were obtained. The InDel/SSR-based interspecific genetic map, QTLs and candidate genes obtained by the present study will be useful for the downstream isolation of flowering time-related gene and other genetic applications for pepper. PMID:25781878

  1. The use of density functional theory-based reactivity descriptors in molecular similarity calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Greet; De Proft, Frank; Langenaeker, Wilfried; Geerlings, Paul

    1998-10-01

    Molecular similarity is studied via density functional theory-based similarity indices using a numerical integration method. Complementary to the existing similarity indices, we introduce a reactivity-related similarity index based on the local softness. After a study of some test systems, a series of peptide isosteres is studied in view of their importance in pharmacology. The whole of the present work illustrates the importance of the study of molecular similarity based on both shape and reactivity.

  2. The HITRAN molecular data base - Editions of 1991 and 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence S.; Gamache, R. R.; Tipping, R. H.; Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.; Benner, D. C.; Devi, V. M.; Flaud, J.-M.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Perrin, A.

    1992-01-01

    We describe in this paper the modifications, improvements, and enhancements to the HITRAN molecular absorption database that have occurred in the two editions of 1991 and 1992. The current database includes line parameters for 31 species and their isotopomers that are significant for terrestrial atmospheric studies. This line-by-line portion of HITRAN presently contains about 709,000 transitions between 0 and 23,000/cm and contains three molecules not present in earlier versions: COF2, SF6, and H2S. The HITRAN compilation has substantially more information on chlorofluorocarbons and other molecular species that exhibit dense spectra which are not amenable to line-by-line representation. The user access of the database has been advanced, and new media forms are now available for use on personal computers.

  3. Testing molecular effects for tritium-based neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parno, Diana; Bodine, Laura; Robertson, R. G. Hamish

    2015-10-01

    The upcoming KATRIN experiment will use the kinematics of tritium beta decay to probe the neutrino mass. The tritium source is molecular, however, and one of KATRIN's largest expected systematic uncertainties arises from the population of molecular final states following beta decay. To study this uncertainty, the Tritium Recoil-Ion Mass Spectrometer will measure the dissociation probability of the daughter molecule following beta decay, addressing a discrepancy between modern, high-precision theoretical calculations and two mass spectrometry measurements from the 1950s. We will describe the novel measurement technique and the commissioning of the experiment. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  4. Effect of molecular electrical doping on polyfuran based photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shuwen; Opitz, Andreas; Salzmann, Ingo; Frisch, Johannes; Cohen, Erez; Bendikov, Michael; Koch, Norbert

    2015-05-18

    The electronic, optical, and morphological properties of molecularly p-doped polyfuran (PF) films were investigated over a wide range of doping ratio in order to explore the impact of doping in photovoltaic applications. We find evidence for integer-charge transfer between PF and the prototypical molecular p-dopant tetrafluoro-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ) and employed the doped polymer in bilayer organic solar cells using fullerene as acceptor. The conductivity increase in the PF films at dopant loadings ≤2% significantly enhances the short-circuit current of photovoltaic devices. For higher doping ratios, however, F4TCNQ is found to precipitate at the heterojunction between the doped donor polymer and the fullerene acceptor. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that its presence acts beneficial to the energy-level alignment by doubling the open-circuit voltage of solar cells from 0.2 V to ca. 0.4 V, as compared to pristine PF.

  5. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-10-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the ‘molecular clutch’ description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of major sperm protein, which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton.

  6. Voronoi-based extraction and visualization of molecular paths.

    PubMed

    Lindow, Norbert; Baum, Daniel; Hege, Hans-Christian

    2011-12-01

    Visual analysis is widely used to study the behavior of molecules. Of particular interest are the analysis of molecular interactions and the investigation of binding sites. For large molecules, however, it is difficult to detect possible binding sites and paths leading to these sites by pure visual inspection. In this paper, we present new methods for the computation and visualization of potential molecular paths. Using a novel filtering method, we extract the significant paths from the Voronoi diagram of spheres. For the interactive visualization of molecules and their paths, we present several methods using deferred shading and other state-of-the-art techniques. To allow for a fast overview of reachable regions of the molecule, we illuminate the molecular surface using a large number of light sources placed on the extracted paths. We also provide a method to compute the extension surface of selected paths and visualize it using the skin surface. Furthermore, we use the extension surface to clip the molecule to allow easy visual tracking of even deeply buried paths. The methods are applied to several proteins to demonstrate their usefulness. PMID:22034320

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. One gear was powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the buckytube to rotate, and a second gear was allowed.to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its buckytube on a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations were simulated. Cases in vacuum and with an inert atmosphere were examined. In an extension to molecular dynamics technology, some simulations used a thermostat on the atmosphere while the hydrocarbon gear's temperature was allowed to fluctuate. This models cooling the gears with an atmosphere. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50-100 gigahertz in a vacuum or inert atmosphere at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering temperature and/or rotation rate. Videos and atomic trajectory files in xyz format are presented.

  8. Comprehensive Characterization of Molecular Interactions Based on Nanomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hans-Peter; Gerber, Christoph; Hegner, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Molecular interaction is a key concept in our understanding of the biological mechanisms of life. Two physical properties change when one molecular partner binds to another. Firstly, the masses combine and secondly, the structure of at least one binding partner is altered, mechanically transducing the binding into subsequent biological reactions. Here we present a nanomechanical micro-array technique for bio-medical research, which not only monitors the binding of effector molecules to their target but also the subsequent effect on a biological system in vitro. This label-free and real-time method directly and simultaneously tracks mass and nanomechanical changes at the sensor interface using micro-cantilever technology. To prove the concept we measured lipid vesicle (∼748*106 Da) adsorption on the sensor interface followed by subsequent binding of the bee venom peptide melittin (2840 Da) to the vesicles. The results show the high dynamic range of the instrument and that measuring the mass and structural changes simultaneously allow a comprehensive discussion of molecular interactions. PMID:18978938

  9. Development of InDel markers for Brassica rapa based on whole-genome re-sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Yan; Zhai, Wen; Deng, Jie; Wang, Hui; Cui, Yang; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu; Wu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide detection of short insertion/deletion length polymorphisms (InDels, <5 bp) in Brassica rapa (named the A genome) was performed by comparing whole-genome re-sequencing data from two B. rapa accessions, L144 and Z16, to the reference genome sequence of Chiifu-401-42. In total, we identified 108,558 InDel polymorphisms between Chiifu-401-42 and L144, 26,795 InDels between Z16 and Chiifu-401-42, and 26,693 InDels between L144 and Z16. From these, 639 InDel polymorphisms of 3-5 bp in length between L144 and Z16 were selected for experimental validation; 491 (77%) yielded single PCR fragments and showed polymorphisms, 7 (1%) did not amplify a product, and 141 (22%) showed no polymorphism. For further validation of these intra-specific InDel polymorphisms, 503 candidates, randomly selected from the 639 InDels, were screened across seven accessions representing different B. rapa cultivar groups. Of these assayed markers, 387 (77%) were polymorphic, 111 (22%) were not polymorphic and 5 (1%) did not amplify a PCR product. Furthermore, we randomly selected 518 InDel markers to validate their polymorphism in B. napus (the AC genome) and B. juncea (the AB genome), of which more than 90% amplified a PCR product; 132 (25%) showed polymorphism between the two B. napus accessions and 41 (8%) between the two B. juncea accessions. This set of novel PCR-based InDel markers will be a valuable resource for genetic studies and breeding programs in B. rapa. PMID:22972202

  10. The Eyes Have It: A Problem-Based Learning Exercise in Molecular Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Harold B.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular evolution provides an interesting context in which to use problem-based learning because it integrates a variety of topics in biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology. This three-stage problem for advanced students deals with the structure, multiple functions, and properties of lactate dehydrogenase isozymes, and the related…

  11. Rapid Prototyping of Chemical Microsensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers Synthesized by Two-Photon Stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Laura Piedad Chia; Spangenberg, Arnaud; Ton, Xuan-Anh; Fuchs, Yannick; Bokeloh, Frank; Malval, Jean-Pierre; Tse Sum Bui, Bernadette; Thuau, Damien; Ayela, Cédric; Haupt, Karsten; Soppera, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Two-photon stereolithography is used for rapid prototyping of submicrometre molecularly imprinted polymer-based 3D structures. The structures are evaluated as chemical sensing elements and their specific recognition properties for target molecules are confirmed. The 3D design capability is exploited and highlighted through the fabrication of an all-organic molecularly imprinted polymeric microelectromechanical sensor. PMID:27145145

  12. Multifunctional water-soluble molecular capsules based on p-phosphonic acid calix[5]arene.

    PubMed

    Martin, Adam D; Boulos, Ramiz A; Hubble, Lee J; Hartlieb, Karel J; Raston, Colin L

    2011-07-14

    p-Phosphonic acid calix[5]arene forms molecular capsules in water based on two of the molecules, which can be loaded with carboplatin using intense shearing, and attached to single wall carbon nano-tubes. Spin coating of the capsules onto a substrate affords 2 nm fibres of stacked calixarenes, with the self-assembly understood using molecular modelling. PMID:21637889

  13. Dissipation in an electric field-driven synthetic rotary caltrop-based molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu, Corina; Crespi, Vincent

    2008-03-01

    A molecular caltrop has a three-legged base for attachment to a substrate and a vertical molecular shaft functionalized with a dipole-carrying molecular rotor at the upper end. The desired rotational motion of the rotor can generate dissipation when the motor is driven at frequencies which are close to the natural frequencies of soft vibrational modes in the structure or librational of the rotator about field direction. Classical molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the role of these resonances and investigate motor performance under external drive.

  14. Molecular recognition of α-cyclodextrin (CD) to choral amino acids based on methyl orange as a molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuexian, Fan; Yu, Yang; Shaomin, Shuang; Chuan, Dong

    2005-03-01

    The molecular recognition interaction of α-CD to chiral amino acids was investigated by using spectrophotometry based on methyl orange as a molecular probe. The molecular recognition ability depended on the inclusion formation constants. The molecular recognition of α-CD to aromatic amino acids was the order: DL-tryptophan > L-tryptophan > L-phenylalanine > L-tyrosine ≈ DL-β-3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine; whereas for aliphatic amino acids, the order was: L- iso-leucine > L-leucine ≈ L-methionine ≈ DL-mehtionine > D-leucine. The effect of temperature on the inclusion interaction was examined and the thermodynamic parameters of inclusion process, Δ G, Δ H, Δ S, were determined. The experimental results indicated that the inclusion process was an exothermic and enthalpy-driven process accompanied with a negative or minor positive entropic contribution. The inclusion interaction between α-CD and amino acids satisfied the law of enthalpy-entropy compensation. The compensation temperature was 291 K.

  15. Molecular recognition of alpha-cyclodextrin (CD) to choral amino acids based on methyl orange as a molecular probe.

    PubMed

    Yuexian, Fan; Yu, Yang; Shaomin, Shuang; Chuan, Dong

    2005-03-01

    The molecular recognition interaction of alpha-CD to chiral amino acids was investigated by using spectrophotometry based on methyl orange as a molecular probe. The molecular recognition ability depended on the inclusion formation constants. The molecular recognition of alpha-CD to aromatic amino acids was the order: DL-tryptophan > L-tryptophan > L-phenylalanine > L-tyrosine approximately DL-beta-3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine; whereas for aliphatic amino acids, the order was: L-iso-leucine > L-leucine approximately L-methionine approximately DL-mehtionine > D-leucine. The effect of temperature on the inclusion interaction was examined and the thermodynamic parameters of inclusion process, delta G, delta H, delta S, were determined. The experimental results indicated that the inclusion process was an exothermic and enthalpy-driven process accompanied with a negative or minor positive entropic contribution. The inclusion interaction between alpha-CD and amino acids satisfied the law of enthalpy-entropy compensation. The compensation temperature was 291 K. PMID:15683802

  16. Syntheses of steroid-based molecularly imprinted polymers and their molecular recognition study with spectrometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, He; Tong, Ai-jun; Li, Long-di

    2003-01-01

    Recognition of five steroid compounds, β-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, estradiolbenzoate, testosterone and methyltestosterone were studied using a synthesized molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP). When β-estradiol was used as the template molecule, the polymer was synthesized with methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross linking agent through non-covalent interactions. It is found that the kind of porogen solvent and the polymerization conditions greatly affected the binding ability of a MIP to a certain molecule. Releasing of the template was performed by continuous extraction with methanol containing 10% acetic acid in a Soxhlet extractor. Our results indicated that such carefully synthesized MIP showed specific affinity toward β-estradiol in the adsorption process.

  17. Drug Repositioning by Kernel-Based Integration of Molecular Structure, Molecular Activity, and Phenotype Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongcui; Chen, Shilong; Deng, Naiyang; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Computational inference of novel therapeutic values for existing drugs, i.e., drug repositioning, offers the great prospect for faster and low-risk drug development. Previous researches have indicated that chemical structures, target proteins, and side-effects could provide rich information in drug similarity assessment and further disease similarity. However, each single data source is important in its own way and data integration holds the great promise to reposition drug more accurately. Here, we propose a new method for drug repositioning, PreDR (Predict Drug Repositioning), to integrate molecular structure, molecular activity, and phenotype data. Specifically, we characterize drug by profiling in chemical structure, target protein, and side-effects space, and define a kernel function to correlate drugs with diseases. Then we train a support vector machine (SVM) to computationally predict novel drug-disease interactions. PreDR is validated on a well-established drug-disease network with 1,933 interactions among 593 drugs and 313 diseases. By cross-validation, we find that chemical structure, drug target, and side-effects information are all predictive for drug-disease relationships. More experimentally observed drug-disease interactions can be revealed by integrating these three data sources. Comparison with existing methods demonstrates that PreDR is competitive both in accuracy and coverage. Follow-up database search and pathway analysis indicate that our new predictions are worthy of further experimental validation. Particularly several novel predictions are supported by clinical trials databases and this shows the significant prospects of PreDR in future drug treatment. In conclusion, our new method, PreDR, can serve as a useful tool in drug discovery to efficiently identify novel drug-disease interactions. In addition, our heterogeneous data integration framework can be applied to other problems. PMID:24244318

  18. On-chip molecular electronic plasmon sources based on self-assembled monolayer tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wei; Wang, Tao; Chu, Hong-Son; Wu, Lin; Liu, Rongrong; Sun, Song; Phua, Wee Kee; Wang, Lejia; Tomczak, Nikodem; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular electronic control over plasmons offers a promising route for on-chip integrated molecular plasmonic devices for information processing and computing. To move beyond the currently available technologies and to miniaturize plasmonic devices, molecular electronic plasmon sources are required. Here, we report on-chip molecular electronic plasmon sources consisting of tunnel junctions based on self-assembled monolayers sandwiched between two metallic electrodes that excite localized plasmons, and surface plasmon polaritons, with tunnelling electrons. The plasmons originate from single, diffraction-limited spots within the junctions, follow power-law distributed photon statistics, and have well-defined polarization orientations. The structure of the self-assembled monolayer and the applied bias influence the observed polarization. We also show molecular electronic control of the plasmon intensity by changing the chemical structure of the molecules and by bias-selective excitation of plasmons using molecular diodes.

  19. Quantitative analysis of localized surface plasmons based on molecular probing.

    PubMed

    Deeb, Claire; Bachelot, Renaud; Plain, Jérôme; Baudrion, Anne-Laure; Jradi, Safi; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Soppera, Olivier; Jain, Prashant K; Huang, Libai; Ecoffet, Carole; Balan, Lavinia; Royer, Pascal

    2010-08-24

    We report on the quantitative characterization of the plasmonic optical near-field of a single silver nanoparticle. Our approach relies on nanoscale molecular molding of the confined electromagnetic field by photoactivated molecules. We were able to directly image the dipolar profile of the near-field distribution with a resolution better than 10 nm and to quantify the near-field depth and its enhancement factor. A single nanoparticle spectral signature was also assessed. This quantitative characterization constitutes a prerequisite for developing nanophotonic applications. PMID:20687536

  20. Vibrational Spectra of Molecular Crystals with the Generalized Energy-Based Fragmentation Approach.

    PubMed

    Fang, Tao; Jia, Junteng; Li, Shuhua

    2016-05-01

    The generalized energy-based fragmentation (GEBF) approach for molecular crystals with periodic boundary condition (PBC) (denoted as PBC-GEBF) is extended to allow vibrational spectra of molecular crystals to be easily computed at various theory levels. Within the PBC-GEBF approach, the vibrational frequencies of a molecular crystal can be directly evaluated from molecular quantum chemistry calculations on a series of nonperiodic molecular systems. With this approach, the vibrational spectra of molecular crystals can be calculated with much reduced computational costs at various theory levels, as compared to those required by the methods based on periodic electronic structure theory. By testing the performance of the PBC-GEBF method for two molecular crystals (CO2 and imidazole), we demonstrate that the PBC-GEBF approach can reproduce the results of the methods based on periodic electronic structure theory in predicting vibrational spectra of molecular crystals. We apply the PBC-GEBF method at second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (PBC-GEBF-MP2 in short) to investigate the vibrational spectra of the urea and ammonia borane crystals. Our results show that the PBC-GEBF-MP2 method can provide quite accurate descriptions for the observed vibrational spectra of the two systems under study. PMID:27076120

  1. Novel Metal Ion Based Estrogen Mimics for Molecular Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2006-01-30

    The overall objective of the SBIR Phase I proposal is to prepare and evaluate a new class of {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 94m}Tc containing estrogen-like small molecules ('estrogen mimics') for SPECT or PET molecular imaging of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) tumors. In this approach, the metal ion is integrated into the estrone skeleton by isosteric substitution of a carbon atom in the steroidal structure to give new class of mimics that are topologically similar to the native estrogen (Fig. 1). Although both N{sub 2}S{sub 2} and N{sub 3}S mimics 1 and 2 were considered as target structures, molecular modeling study revealed that the presence of the acetyl group at position-15 in the N{sub 3}S mimic 2 causes steric hinderance toward binding of 2 to SHBG. Therefore, initial efforts were directed at the synthesis and evaluation of the N{sub 2}S{sub 2} mimic 1.

  2. Linking traits based on their shared molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Yael; Nachshon, Aharon; Frishberg, Amit; Wilentzik, Roni; Gat-Viks, Irit

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that co-morbidity and co-occurrence of disease traits are often determined by shared genetic and molecular mechanisms. In most cases, however, the specific mechanisms that lead to such trait–trait relationships are yet unknown. Here we present an analysis of a broad spectrum of behavioral and physiological traits together with gene-expression measurements across genetically diverse mouse strains. We develop an unbiased methodology that constructs potentially overlapping groups of traits and resolves their underlying combination of genetic loci and molecular mechanisms. For example, our method predicts that genetic variation in the Klf7 gene may influence gene transcripts in bone marrow-derived myeloid cells, which in turn affect 17 behavioral traits following morphine injection; this predicted effect of Klf7 is consistent with an in vitro perturbation of Klf7 in bone marrow cells. Our analysis demonstrates the utility of studying hidden causative mechanisms that lead to relationships between complex traits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04346.001 PMID:25781485

  3. Choline metabolism-based molecular diagnosis of cancer: an update

    PubMed Central

    Glunde, Kristine; Penet, Marie-France; Jiang, Lu; Jacobs, Michael A; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal choline metabolism continues to be identified in multiple cancers. Molecular causes of abnormal choline metabolism are changes in choline kinase-α, ethanolamine kinase-α, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C and -D and glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterases, as well as several choline transporters. The net outcome of these enzymatic changes is an increase in phosphocholine and total choline (tCho) and, in some cancers, a relative decrease of glycerophosphocholine. The increased tCho signal detected by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy is being evaluated as a diagnostic marker in multiple cancers. Increased expression and activity of choline transporters and choline kinase-α have spurred the development of radiolabeled choline analogs as PET imaging tracers. Both tCho 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy and choline PET are being investigated to detect response to treatment. Enzymes mediating the abnormal choline metabolism are being explored as targets for cancer therapy. This review highlights recent molecular, therapeutic and clinical advances in choline metabolism in cancer. PMID:25921026

  4. Quantum-dots-encoded-microbeads based molecularly imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixi; Liu, Le; He, Yonghong; He, Qinghua; Ma, Hui

    2016-03-15

    Quantum dots encoded microbeads have various advantages such as large surface area, superb optical properties and the ability of multiplexing. Molecularly imprinted polymer that can mimic the natural recognition entities has high affinity and selectivity for the specific analyte. Here, the concept of utilizing the quantum dots encoded microbeads as the supporting material and the polydopamine as the functional monomer to form the core-shell molecular imprinted polymer was proposed for the first time. The resulted imprinted polymer can provide various merits: polymerization can complete in aqueous environment; fabrication procedure is facile and universal; the obvious economic advantage; the thickness of the imprinting layer is highly controllable; polydopamine coating can improve the biocompatibility of the quantum dot encoded microbeads. The rabbit IgG binding and flow cytometer experiment result showed the distinct advantages of this strategy: cost-saving, facile and fast preparation procedure. Most importantly, the ability for the multichannel detection, which makes the imprinted polydopamine modified encoded-beads very attractive in protein pre-concentration, recognition, separation and biosensing. PMID:26520251

  5. Estudio fotométrico de emisiones moleculares del cometa Halley en la etapa de post-perihelio.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisteró, R. F.; Clariá, J. J.; Lapasset, E.

    Results from photoelectric photometry in molecular bands of comet Halley carried out at Bosque Alegre are presented. The largest emissions measured are those of molecules of C2, CN and C3 respectively.

  6. Fragment based G-QSAR and molecular dynamics based mechanistic simulations into hydroxamic-based HDAC inhibitors against spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Siddharth; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Somvanshi, Pallavi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-10-01

    Expansion of polyglutamine (CAG) triplets within the coding gene ataxin 2 results in transcriptional repression, forming the molecular basis of the neurodegenerative disorder named spinocerebellar ataxia type-2 (SCA2). HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been elements of great interest in polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's and Ataxia's. In this study, we have selected hydroxamic acid derivatives as HDACi and performed fragment-based G-QSAR, molecular docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations for elucidating the dynamic mode of action of HDACi with His-Asp catalytic dyad of HDAC4. The model was statistically validated to establish its predictive robustness. The model was statistically significant with r(2) value of .6297, cross-validated co-relation coefficient q(2) value of .5905 and pred_r(2) (predicted square co-relation coefficient) value of .85. An F-test value of 56.11 confirms absolute robustness of the model. Two combinatorial libraries comprising of 3180 compounds were created with hydroxamate moiety as the template and their pIC50 activities were predicted based on the G-QSAR model. The combinatorial library created was screened on the basis of predicted activity (pIC50), with two resultant top scoring compounds, HIC and DHC. The interaction of the compounds with His-Asp dyad in terms of H-bond interactions with His802, Asp840, Pro942, and Gly975 residues of HDAC4 was evaluated by docking and 20 ns long molecular dynamics simulations. This study provides valuable leads for structural substitutions required for hydroxamate moiety to exhibit enhanced inhibitory activity against HDAC4. The reported compounds demonstrated good binding and thus can be considered as potent therapeutic leads against ataxia. PMID:26510381

  7. Synopsis of Trichosanthes (Cucurbitaceae) based on recent molecular phylogenetic data

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Hugo J.; Thulin, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The snake gourd genus, Trichosanthes, is the largest genus in the Cucurbitaceae family, with over 90 species. Recent molecular phylogenetic data have indicated that the genus Gymnopetalum is to be merged with Trichosanthes to maintain monophyly. A revised infrageneric classification of Trichosanthes including Gymnopetalum is proposed with two subgenera, (I) subg. Scotanthus comb. nov. and (II) subg. Trichosanthes, eleven sections, (i) sect. Asterospermae, (ii) sect. Cucumeroides, (iii) sect. Edulis, (iv) sect. Foliobracteola, (v) sect. Gymnopetalum, (vi) sect. Involucraria, (vii) sect. Pseudovariifera sect. nov., (viii) sect. Villosae stat. nov., (ix) sect. Trichosanthes, (x) sect. Tripodanthera, and (xi) sect. Truncata. A synopsis of Trichosanthes with the 91 species recognized here is presented, including four new combinations, Trichosanthes orientalis, Trichosanthes tubiflora, Trichosanthes scabra var. pectinata, Trichosanthes scabra var. penicaudii, and a clarified nomenclature of Trichosanthes costata and Trichosanthes scabra. PMID:22645411

  8. Two Molecular Information Processing Systems Based on Catalytic Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanovic, Milan

    Mixtures of molecules are capable of powerful information processing [1]. This statement is in the following way self-evident: it is a hierarchically organized complex mixture of molecules that is formulating it to other similarly organized mixtures of molecules. By making such a statement I am not endorsing the extreme forms of reductionism; rather, I am making what I think is a small first step towards harnessing information processing prowess of molecules and, hopefully, overcoming some limitations of more traditional computing paradigms. There are different ideas on how to understand and use molecular information processing abilities and I will list some below. My list is far from inclusive, and delineations are far from clear-cut; whenever available, I will provide examples from our research efforts. I should stress, for a computer science audience that I am a chemist. Thus, my approach may have much different focus and mathematical rigor, then if it would be taken by a computer scientist.

  9. [Molecular bases of cellular senescence: Hayflick phenomenon 50 years later].

    PubMed

    Sosińska, Patrycja; Mikuła-Pietrasik, Justyna; Książek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Normal human somatic cells have strictly limited proliferative capacity and reach a state of senescence when it becomes exhausted. It is believed that senescence is a response to extensive and irreparable DNA injury, localized in telomeric and/or non-telomeric regions of the genome. Main cause of this damage is oxidative stress, increasing due to deteriorated function of mitochondria. Senescent cells accumulate in tissues during aging, which is causatively linked with the development of various pathologies in elderly individuals, including cancer. This paper, prepared exactly 50 years after Leonard Hayflick's discovery of the relationship between cellular senescence and organismal aging is aimed at presenting the current knowledge about molecular determinants of senescence, with particular emphasis paid to the role of oxidative stress, effectors of senescence at the level of cell cycle, markers of this phenomenon, and the effect of senescent cells on the development of certain age-related diseases. PMID:27117098

  10. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R; Muruaga-Martínez, José S; Vargas-Vázquez, M L Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-10-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation. PMID:22215964

  11. Uncovering Molecular Bases Underlying Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Inhibitor Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Alsamarah, Abdelaziz; LaCuran, Alecander E.; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Hao, Jijun; Luo, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal alteration of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is implicated in many types of diseases including cancer and heterotopic ossifications. Hence, small molecules targeting BMP type I receptors (BMPRI) to interrupt BMP signaling are believed to be an effective approach to treat these diseases. However, lack of understanding of the molecular determinants responsible for the binding selectivity of current BMP inhibitors has been a big hindrance to the development of BMP inhibitors for clinical use. To address this issue, we carried out in silico experiments to test whether computational methods can reproduce and explain the high selectivity of a small molecule BMP inhibitor DMH1 on BMPRI kinase ALK2 vs. the closely related TGF-β type I receptor kinase ALK5 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2) tyrosine kinase. We found that, while the rigid docking method used here gave nearly identical binding affinity scores among the three kinases; free energy perturbation coupled with Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (FEP/H-REMD) simulations reproduced the absolute binding free energies in excellent agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the binding poses identified by FEP/H-REMD led to a quantitative analysis of physical/chemical determinants governing DMH1 selectivity. The current work illustrates that small changes in the binding site residue type (e.g. pre-hinge region in ALK2 vs. ALK5) or side chain orientation (e.g. Tyr219 in caALK2 vs. wtALK2), as well as a subtle structural modification on the ligand (e.g. DMH1 vs. LDN193189) will cause distinct binding profiles and selectivity among BMP inhibitors. Therefore, the current computational approach represents a new way of investigating BMP inhibitors. Our results provide critical information for designing exclusively selective BMP inhibitors for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for diseases caused by aberrant BMP signaling. PMID:26133550

  12. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R.; Muruaga-Martínez, José S.; Vargas-Vázquez, M.L. Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-01-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation. PMID:22215964

  13. Tip-induced gating of molecular levels in carbene-based junctions.

    PubMed

    Foti, Giuseppe; Vázquez, Héctor

    2016-03-29

    We study the conductance of N-heterocyclic carbene-based (NHC) molecules on gold by means of first-principles calculations based on density-functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions. We consider several tip structures and find a strong dependence of the position of the NHC molecular levels with the atomistic structure of the tip. The position of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) can change by almost 0.8 eV with tip shape. Through an analysis of the net charge transfer, electron redistribution and work function for each tip structure, we rationalize the LUMO shifts in terms of the sum of the work function and the maximum electrostatic potential arising from charge rearrangement. These differences in the LUMO position, effectively gating the molecular levels, result in large conductance variations. These findings open the way to modulating the conductance of NHC-based molecular circuits through the controlled design of the tip atomistic structure. PMID:26891059

  14. Tip-induced gating of molecular levels in carbene-based junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foti, Giuseppe; Vázquez, Héctor

    2016-03-01

    We study the conductance of N-heterocyclic carbene-based (NHC) molecules on gold by means of first-principles calculations based on density-functional theory and non-equilibrium Green’s functions. We consider several tip structures and find a strong dependence of the position of the NHC molecular levels with the atomistic structure of the tip. The position of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) can change by almost 0.8 eV with tip shape. Through an analysis of the net charge transfer, electron redistribution and work function for each tip structure, we rationalize the LUMO shifts in terms of the sum of the work function and the maximum electrostatic potential arising from charge rearrangement. These differences in the LUMO position, effectively gating the molecular levels, result in large conductance variations. These findings open the way to modulating the conductance of NHC-based molecular circuits through the controlled design of the tip atomistic structure.

  15. Ab initio study on (CO2)n clusters via electrostatics- and molecular tailoring-based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovan Jose, K. V.; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    An algorithm based on molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) and molecular tailoring approach (MTA) for building energetically favorable molecular clusters is presented. This algorithm is tested on prototype (CO2)n clusters with n = 13, 20, and 25 to explore their structure, energetics, and properties. The most stable clusters in this series are seen to show more number of triangular motifs. Many-body energy decomposition analysis performed on the most stable clusters reveals that the 2-body is the major contributor (>96%) to the total interaction energy. Vibrational frequencies and molecular electrostatic potentials are also evaluated for these large clusters through MTA. The MTA-based MESPs of these clusters show a remarkably good agreement with the corresponding actual ones. The most intense MTA-based normal mode frequencies are in fair agreement with the actual ones for smaller clusters. These calculated asymmetric stretching frequencies are blue-shifted with reference to the CO2 monomer.

  16. A new graph-based molecular descriptor using the canonical representation of the molecule.

    PubMed

    Hentabli, Hamza; Saeed, Faisal; Abdo, Ammar; Salim, Naomie

    2014-01-01

    Molecular similarity is a pervasive concept in drug design. The basic idea underlying molecular similarity is the similar property principle, which states that structurally similar molecules will exhibit similar physicochemical and biological properties. In this paper, a new graph-based molecular descriptor (GBMD) is introduced. The GBMD is a new method of obtaining a rough description of 2D molecular structure in textual form based on the canonical representations of the molecule outline shape and it allows rigorous structure specification using small and natural grammars. Simulated virtual screening experiments with the MDDR database show clearly the superiority of the graph-based descriptor compared to many standard descriptors (ALOGP, MACCS, EPFP4, CDKFP, PCFP, and SMILE) using the Tanimoto coefficient (TAN) and the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) when searches were carried. PMID:25140330

  17. Genetic diversity and population structure in Physalis peruviana and related taxa based on InDels and SNPs derived from COSII and IRG markers

    PubMed Central

    Garzón-Martínez, Gina A.; Osorio-Guarín, Jaime A.; Delgadillo-Durán, Paola; Mayorga, Franklin; Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E.; Landsman, David

    2015-01-01

    The genus Physalis is common in the Americas and includes several economically important species, among them Physalis peruviana that produces appetizing edible fruits. We studied the genetic diversity and population structure of P. peruviana and characterized 47 accessions of this species along with 13 accessions of related taxa consisting of 222 individuals from the Colombian Corporation of Agricultural Research (CORPOICA) germplasm collection, using Conserved Orthologous Sequences (COSII) and Immunity Related Genes (IRGs). In addition, 642 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNPs) markers were identified and used for the genetic diversity analysis. A total of 121 alleles were detected in 24 InDels loci ranging from 2 to 9 alleles per locus, with an average of 5.04 alleles per locus. The average number of alleles in the SNP markers was two. The observed heterozygosity for P. peruviana with InDel and SNP markers was higher (0.48 and 0.59) than the expected heterozygosity (0.30 and 0.41). Interestingly, the observed heterozygosity in related taxa (0.4 and 0.12) was lower than the expected heterozygosity (0.59 and 0.25). The coefficient of population differentiation FST was 0.143 (InDels) and 0.038 (SNPs), showing a relatively low level of genetic differentiation among P. peruviana and related taxa. Higher levels of genetic variation were instead observed within populations based on the AMOVA analysis. Population structure analysis supported the presence of two main groups and PCA analysis based on SNP markers revealed two distinct clusters in the P. peruviana accessions corresponding to their state of cultivation. In this study, we identified molecular markers useful to detect genetic variation in Physalis germplasm for assisting conservation and crossbreeding strategies. PMID:26550601

  18. Low-Density Lipoprotein Sensor Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymer.

    PubMed

    Chunta, Suticha; Suedee, Roongnapa; Lieberzeit, Peter A

    2016-01-19

    Increased level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) strongly correlates with incidence of coronary heart disease. We synthesized novel molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) as biomimetic specific receptors to establish rapid analysis of LDL levels. For that purpose the ratios of monomers acrylic acid (AA), methacrylic acid (MAA), and N-vinylpyrrolidone (VP), respectively, were screened on 10 MHz dual-electrode quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). Mixing MAA and VP in the ratio 3:2 (m/m) revealed linear sensor characteristic to LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) from 4 to 400 mg/dL or 0.10-10.34 mmol/L in 100 mM phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) without significant interference: high-density lipoprotein (HDL) yields 4-6% of the LDL signal, very-low-density-lipoprotein (VLDL) yields 1-3%, and human serum albumin (HSA) yields 0-2%. The LDL-MIP sensor reveals analytical accuracy of 95-96% at the 95% confidence interval with precision at 6-15%, respectively. Human serum diluted 1:2 with PBS buffer was analyzed by LDL-MIP sensors to demonstrate applicability to real-life samples. The sensor responses are excellently correlated to the results of the standard technique, namely, a homogeneous enzymatic assay (R(2) = 0.97). This demonstrates that the system can be successfully applied to human serum samples for determining LDL concentrations. PMID:26643785

  19. Polyphosphazene Based Star-Branched and Dendritic Molecular Brushes.

    PubMed

    Henke, Helena; Posch, Sandra; Brüggemann, Oliver; Teasdale, Ian

    2016-05-01

    A new synthetic procedure is described for the preparation of poly(organo)phosphazenes with star-branched and star dendritic molecular brush type structures, thus describing the first time it has been possible to prepare controlled, highly branched architectures for this type of polymer. Furthermore, as a result of the extremely high-arm density generated by the phosphazene repeat unit, the second-generation structures represent quite unique architectures for any type of polymer. Using two relativity straight forward iterative syntheses it is possible to prepare globular highly branched polymers with up to 30 000 functional end groups, while keeping relatively narrow polydispersities (1.2-1.6). Phosphine mediated polymerization of chlorophosphoranimine is first used to prepare three-arm star polymers. Subsequent substitution with diphenylphosphine moieties gives poly(organo)phosphazenes to function as multifunctional macroinitiators for the growth of a second generation of polyphosphazene arms. Macrosubstitution with Jeffamine oligomers gives a series of large, water soluble branched macromolecules with high-arm density and hydrodynamic diameters between 10 and 70 nm. PMID:27027404

  20. Molecular self assembly on optical fiber-based fluorescence sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyagari, Madhu S. R.; Gao, Harry H.; Bihari, Bipin; Chittibabu, Kethinni G.; Kumar, Jayant; Marx, Kenneth A.; Kaplan, David L.; Tripathy, Sukant K.

    1994-03-01

    We discuss the molecular self-assembly on optical fibers in which a novel method for protein attachment to the sensing tip of the fiber is used. Our objective is to assemble a conjugated polythiophene copolymer as an attachment vehicle. Subsequent attachment of the photodynamic phycobiliprotein serves as the fluorescence probe element. Following our earlier experiments from Langmuir-Blodgett deposition of these polymeric materials as thin films on glass substrates, we extended the technique to optical fibers. First, the bare fiber surface is silanized with a C18 silane compound. The copolymer (3-undecylthiophene-co-3- methanolthiophene, biotinylated at the methanol moiety) assembly on the fiber is carried out presumable through van der Waals interactions between the hydrophobic fiber surface and the undecyl alkyl chains on the polymer backbone. A conjugated Str-PE (streptavidin covalently attached to phycoerythrin) complex is then attached to the copolymer via the conventional biotin-streptavidin interaction. The conjugated polymer not only supports the protein but, in principle, may help to transduce the signal generated by phycoerythrin to the fiber. Our results from fluorescence intensity measurements proved the efficacy of this system. An improved methodology is also sought to more strongly attach the conjugated copolymer to the fiber surface, and a covalent scheme is developed to polymerize and biotinylate polythiophene in situ on the fiber surface.

  1. Polyphosphazene Based Star-Branched and Dendritic Molecular Brushes

    PubMed Central

    Henke, Helena; Posch, Sandra; Brüggemann, Oliver; Teasdale, Ian

    2016-01-01

    A new synthetic procedure is described for the preparation of poly(organo)phosphazenes with star-branched and star dendritic molecular brush type structures, thus describing the first time it has been possible to prepare controlled, highly branched architectures for this type of polymer. Furthermore, as a result of the extremely high-arm density generated by the phosphazene repeat unit, the second-generation structures represent quite unique architectures for any type of polymer. Using two relativity straight forward iterative syntheses it is possible to prepare globular highly branched polymers with up to 30 000 functional end groups, while keeping relatively narrow polydispersities (1.2–1.6). Phosphine mediated polymerization of chlorophosphoranimine is first used to prepare three-arm star polymers. Subsequent substitution with diphenylphosphine moieties gives poly(organo)phosphazenes to function as multifunctional macroinitiators for the growth of a second generation of polyphosphazene arms. Macrosubstitution with Jeffamine oligomers gives a series of large, water soluble branched macromolecules with high-arm density and hydrodynamic diameters between 10 and 70 nm. PMID:27027404

  2. Oriented growth of porphyrin-based molecular wires on ionic crystals analysed by nc-AFM

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerli, Lars; Kawai, Shigeki; Meyer, Ernst; Fendt, Leslie-Anne; Diederich, Francois

    2011-01-01

    Summary The growth of molecular assemblies at room temperature on insulating surfaces is one of the main goals in the field of molecular electronics. Recently, the directed growth of porphyrin-based molecular wires on KBr(001) was presented. The molecule–surface interaction associated with a strong dipole moment of the molecules was sufficient to bind them to the surface; while a stabilization of the molecular assemblies was reached due to the intermolecular interaction by π–π binding. Here, we show that the atomic structure of the substrate can control the direction of the wires and consequently, complex molecular assemblies can be formed. The electronic decoupling of the molecules by one or two monolayers of KBr from the Cu(111) substrate is found to be insufficient to enable comparable growth conditions to bulk ionic materials. PMID:21977413

  3. Density functional theory based study of molecular interactions, recognition, engineering, and quantum transport in π molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yeonchoo; Cho, Woo Jong; Youn, Il Seung; Lee, Geunsik; Singh, N Jiten; Kim, Kwang S

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: In chemical and biological systems, various interactions that govern the chemical and physical properties of molecules, assembling phenomena, and electronic transport properties compete and control the microscopic structure of materials. The well-controlled manipulation of each component can allow researchers to design receptors or sensors, new molecular architectures, structures with novel morphology, and functional molecules or devices. In this Account, we describe the structures and electronic and spintronic properties of π-molecular systems that are important for controlling the architecture of a variety of carbon-based systems. Although DFT is an important tool for describing molecular interactions, the inability of DFT to accurately represent dispersion interactions has made it difficult to properly describe π-interactions. However, the recently developed dispersion corrections for DFT have allowed us to include these dispersion interactions cost-effectively. We have investigated noncovalent interactions of various π-systems including aromatic-π, aliphatic-π, and non-π systems based on dispersion-corrected DFT (DFT-D). In addition, we have addressed the validity of DFT-D compared with the complete basis set (CBS) limit values of coupled cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] and Møller-Plesset second order perturbation theory (MP2). The DFT-D methods are still unable to predict the correct ordering in binding energies within the benzene dimer and the cyclohexane dimer. Nevertheless, the overall DFT-D predicted binding energies are in reasonable agreement with the CCSD(T) results. In most cases, results using the B97-D3 method closely reproduce the CCSD(T) results with the optimized energy-fitting parameters. On the other hand, vdW-DF2 and PBE0-TS methods estimate the dispersion energies from the calculated electron density. In these approximations, the interaction energies around the equilibrium

  4. Molecular and biomolecular-based nanomaterials: Tubulin and taxol as molecular constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Carmona, Javier Servando

    The new field of protein-based nano-technology takes advantage of the complex interactions between proteins to form unique structures with properties that cannot be achieved with traditional components. Microtubules (MTs), self assembled proteinaceous hollow filaments, offer promise in the development of MT-based nano-systems. The compelling need for the controlled assembly of 3D MT arrays is the fundamental motivation for the first part of this research. We report on the morphology of MTs grown in a crowded environment in the form of high viscosity fluids containing agarose and a novel process that enables the assembly of MTs supported by gel-based 3D scaffolds. Our research on MTs and their interaction with other molecules lead us to discover extraordinary spherulitic structures that changed the course of the project. The novel subject situate us into a complicated dilemma that question the nature of MT asters reported in experiments carried out in cells. The second part of this research is focused in the crystallization of Taxol, a MT stabilizing molecule used as anti-cancer drug. It was confirmed via fluorescent and differential interference contrast microscopy that Taxol crystals can be decorated with fluorescent proteins and fluorochromes without perturbing their morphology. We used theoretical calculations to further investigate Taxol-fluorescent agent interactions. Furthermore, the crystallization of Taxol was studied in pure water, aqueous solutions containing tubulin proteins and tubulin-containing agarose gels. We demonstrated that tubulin is able to heterogeneously nucleate Taxol spherulites. To explain the formation of tubulin-Taxol nuclei a new, secondary Taxol-binding site within the tubulin heterodimer is suggested. Results presented in this work are important for in vivo and in vitro microtubule studies due to the possibility of mistaking these Taxol spherulites for microtubule asters. Thus, we are confirming the need for careful interpretation of

  5. Molecular spies for bioimaging--fluorescent protein-based probes.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Atsushi; Niino, Yusuke

    2015-05-21

    Convergent advances in optical imaging and genetic engineering have fueled the development of new technologies for biological visualization. Those technologies include genetically encoded indicators based on fluorescent proteins (FPs) for imaging ions, molecules, and enzymatic activities "to spy on cells," as phrased by Roger Tsien, by sneaking into specific tissues, cell types, or subcellular compartments, and reporting on specific intracellular activities. Here we review the current range of unimolecular indicators whose working principle is the conversion of a protein conformational change into a fluorescence signal. Many of the indicators have been developed from fluorescence resonance energy transfer- and single-FP-based approaches. PMID:26000848

  6. Spin-dependent Seebeck effects in graphene-based molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei; Wang, Bin; Xu, Fuming; Wei, Yadong; Wang, Jian

    2016-05-01

    We report a first-principles investigation of spin-dependent transport properties in two different graphene-based molecular junctions. By applying different temperatures between two leads without bias voltage, spin-dependent currents are driven which depend on reference temperature T , temperature gradient Δ T , and gate voltage Vg. Moreover, pure spin currents without charge currents can be obtained by adjusting T ,Δ T , and Vg for both molecular junctions. The directions of pure spin currents in these two molecular junctions are opposite, which can be understood by analyzing the transmission coefficients under equilibrium states. Spin thermopower, thermal conductance, and the figure of merit as functions of T ,Vg, and chemical potential μ were also investigated in the linear response regime. Large spin thermopower and spin figure of merit can be obtained by adjusting Vg and μ for each junction, which indicates proper application of spin caloritronic devices of our graphene-based molecular junctions.

  7. [Molecular engineering of cellulase catalytic domain based on glycoside hydrolase family].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Li, Dandan; Wang, Lushan; Zhao, Yue; Chen, Guanjun

    2013-04-01

    Molecular engineering of cellulases can improve enzymatic activity and efficiency. Recently, the Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes Database (CAZy), including glycoside hydrolase (GH) families, has been established with the development of Omics and structural measurement technologies. Molecular engineering based on GH families can obviously decrease the probing space of target sequences and structures, and increase the odds of experimental success. Besides, the study of cellulase active-site architecture paves the way toward the explanation of catalytic mechanism. This review focuses on the main GH families and the latest progresses in molecular engineering of catalytic domain. Based on the combination of analysis of a large amount of data in the same GH family and their conservative active-site architecture information, rational design will be an important direction for molecular engineering and promote the rapid development of the conversion of biomass. PMID:23894816

  8. Molecular Design of Benzodithiophene-Based Organic Photovoltaic Materials.

    PubMed

    Yao, Huifeng; Ye, Long; Zhang, Hao; Li, Sunsun; Zhang, Shaoqing; Hou, Jianhui

    2016-06-22

    Advances in the design and application of highly efficient conjugated polymers and small molecules over the past years have enabled the rapid progress in the development of organic photovoltaic (OPV) technology as a promising alternative to conventional solar cells. Among the numerous OPV materials, benzodithiophene (BDT)-based polymers and small molecules have come to the fore in achieving outstanding power conversion efficiency (PCE) and breaking 10% efficiency barrier in the single junction OPV devices. Remarkably, the OPV device featured by BDT-based polymer has recently demonstrated an impressive PCE of 11.21%, indicating the great potential of this class of materials in commercial photovoltaic applications. In this review, we offered an overview of the organic photovoltaic materials based on BDT from the aspects of backbones, functional groups, alkyl chains, and device performance, trying to provide a guideline about the structure-performance relationship. We believe more exciting BDT-based photovoltaic materials and devices will be developed in the near future. PMID:27251307

  9. Rule-based classification models of molecular autofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Su, Bo-Han; Tu, Yi-Shu; Lin, Olivia A; Harn, Yeu-Chern; Shen, Meng-Yu; Tseng, Yufeng J

    2015-02-23

    Fluorescence-based detection has been commonly used in high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. Autofluorescent compounds, which can emit light in the absence of artificial fluorescent markers, often interfere with the detection of fluorophores and result in false positive signals in these assays. This interference presents a major issue in fluorescence-based screening techniques. In an effort to reduce the time and cost that will be spent on prescreening of autofluorescent compounds, in silico autofluorescence prediction models were developed for selected fluorescence-based assays in this study. Five prediction models were developed based on the respective fluorophores used in these HTS assays, which absorb and emit light at specific wavelengths (excitation/emission): Alexa Fluor 350 (A350) (340 nm/450 nm), 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin (AFC) (405 nm/520 nm), Alexa Fluor 488 (A488) (480 nm/540 nm), Rhodamine (547 nm/598 nm), and Texas Red (547 nm/618 nm). The C5.0 rule-based classification algorithm and PubChem 2D chemical structure fingerprints were used to develop prediction models. To optimize the accuracies of these prediction models despite the highly imbalanced ratio of fluorescent versus nonfluorescent compounds presented in the collected data sets, oversampling and undersampling strategies were applied. The average final accuracy achieved for the training set was 97%, and that for the testing set was 92%. In addition, five external data sets were used to further validate the models. Ultimately, 14 representative structural features (or rules) were determined to efficiently predict autofluorescence in data sets containing both fluorescent and nonfluorescent compounds. Several cases were illustrated in this study to demonstrate the applicability of these rules. PMID:25625768

  10. Relationships among 3 Kochia species based on PCR-generated molecular sequences and molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Lee, B S; Kim, M Y; Wang, R R-C; Waldron, B L

    2005-12-01

    Forage kochia (Kochia prostrata ssp. virescens 'Immigrant' is native to the arid and semiarid regions of central Eurasia. It was introduced into the United States in 1966 as PI 314929 and released as a perennial forage shrub in 1984. Kochia americana is a perennial native to the United States, whereas Kochia scorparia is an introduced annual species that became a weed. To assess both the breeding potential and the possibility of genetic contamination, relationships among the 3 Kochia species were analyzed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers, sequence tagged site (STS) marker sequences of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase gene (ndhF), genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (MC-FISH). Seventy decamer random primers yielded 458 polymorphic bands from 9 plants of K. americana, 20 plants of K. prostrata, and 7 plants of K. scoparia. Fifty-four and 55 species-specific RAPD markers were identified for K. americana and K. prostrata, whereas 80 RAPD markers were specific to K. scoparia. Based on the presence or absence of informative RAPD markers, the 3 species always grouped into 3 distinct clusters in a NTSYSpc2.01b-generated dendrogram. The same relationships were found among the 3 Kochia species based on ndhF DNA sequence divergence. Using a set of 7 STS markers that can identify each Kochia species, we did not find a single interspecific hybrid from artificial hybridizations among the 3 Kochia species. In GISH studies, chromosomes of 1 species fluoresced in green only when they were probed by genomic DNA of the same species. Cross-hybridization by genomic DNA of another species was not observed. In FISH studies using pTa71 (for 18S-5.8S-26S rDNAs) and pScT7 (for 5S rDNA) as probes, there were 1, 1 and 3 pTa71 sites and 2, 1, and 1 pScT7 sites in each haplome of K. prostrata, K. americana, and K. scoparia, respectively. It is concluded that these 3 Kochia species are so genomically distinct that gene

  11. Foraging on the potential energy surface: a swarm intelligence-based optimizer for molecular geometry.

    PubMed

    Wehmeyer, Christoph; Falk von Rudorff, Guido; Wolf, Sebastian; Kabbe, Gabriel; Schärf, Daniel; Kühne, Thomas D; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2012-11-21

    We present a stochastic, swarm intelligence-based optimization algorithm for the prediction of global minima on potential energy surfaces of molecular cluster structures. Our optimization approach is a modification of the artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm which is inspired by the foraging behavior of honey bees. We apply our modified ABC algorithm to the problem of global geometry optimization of molecular cluster structures and show its performance for clusters with 2-57 particles and different interatomic interaction potentials. PMID:23181297

  12. Foraging on the potential energy surface: A swarm intelligence-based optimizer for molecular geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehmeyer, Christoph; Falk von Rudorff, Guido; Wolf, Sebastian; Kabbe, Gabriel; Schärf, Daniel; Kühne, Thomas D.; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    We present a stochastic, swarm intelligence-based optimization algorithm for the prediction of global minima on potential energy surfaces of molecular cluster structures. Our optimization approach is a modification of the artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm which is inspired by the foraging behavior of honey bees. We apply our modified ABC algorithm to the problem of global geometry optimization of molecular cluster structures and show its performance for clusters with 2-57 particles and different interatomic interaction potentials.

  13. Microbial detection method based on sensing molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Stoner, G. E.; Boykin, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    A simple method for detecting bacteria, based on the time of hydrogen evolution, was developed and tested against various members of the Enterobacteriaceae group. The test system consisted of (1) two electrodes, platinum and a reference electrode, (2) a buffer amplifier, and (3) a strip-chart recorder. Hydrogen evolution was measured by an increase in voltage in the negative (cathodic) direction. A linear relationship was established between inoculum size and the time hydrogen was detected (lag period). Lag times ranged from 1 h for 1 million cells/ml to 7 h for 1 cell/ml. For each 10-fold decrease in inoculum, length of the lag period increased 60 to 70 min. Based on the linear relationship between inoculum and lag period, these results indicate the potential application of the hydrogen-sensing method for rapidly detecting coliforms and other gas-producing microorganisms in a variety of clinical, food, and other samples.

  14. Knowledge-Based Optimization of Molecular Geometries Using Crystal Structures.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jason C; Groom, Colin R; Korb, Oliver; McCabe, Patrick; Shields, Gregory P

    2016-04-25

    This paper describes a novel way to use the structural information contained in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) to drive geometry optimization of organic molecules. We describe how CSD structural information is transformed into objective functions for gradient-based optimization to provide good quality geometries for a large variety of organic molecules. Performance is assessed by minimizing different sets of organic molecules reporting RMSD movements for bond lengths, valence angles, torsion angles, and heavy atom positions. PMID:26977906

  15. Molecular engineering of manipulated alginate-based polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Daemi, Hamed; Barikani, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    The novel soluble alginate-based polyurethanes in organic solvents were synthesized by the reaction of NCO-terminated prepolymers and tributylammonium alginate (TBA-Alg) for the first time. The chemical structures of synthesized polyurethanes were characterized using FTIR, (1)H NMR and TGA. The reaction completion was confirmed by disappearing of NCO band in FTIR spectra. Furthermore, a peak at 4.71 ppm and some small peaks at a range of 4.12-4.37 ppm in the (1)H NMR of alginate-based polyurethanes were assigned to the backbone of alginate. The results of both FTIR and (1)H NMR were remarkably confirmed by TGA data. The ionic nature of polyurethane backbone not only affects on thermal properties of samples, but it also changes the chemically-bonded alginate morphology. Both polyether and polyester based non-ionic polyurethanes extended by TBA-Alg illustrated the distinct alginate, whereas those ionomers extended by alginate were appeared as the continuous systems at nanoscale. PMID:25129793

  16. New Molecular Architecture for Electrically Conducting Materials Based on Unsymmetrical Organometallic-Dithiolene Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Kazuya; Kato, Reizo

    New molecular architecture for highly conducting molecular materials was developed with use of unsymmetrical organometallic-dithiolene complexes. The new architecture has various advantages including easy modification of their molecular and electronic features. Organometallic complexes based on unsymmetrical Au(III)-dithiolene complexes [(ppy)Au(C8H4S8 or C8H4S6O2)] were prepared for new cationic components of molecular conductors. These unsymmetrical organometallic complexes can provide various cation radical salts [(ppy)Au(S-S)]2[anion][solvent] n (S-S = C8H4S8 or C8H4S6O2, anion = PF6 -, BF4 -, AsF6 -, TaF6 -, solvent = PhCl, n = 0-0.5) by constant current electrolysis of their benzonitrile or chlorobenzene solutions containing (Bu4N)(anion) as electrolyte. [(ppy)Au(C8H4S8)]2[PF6] under pressure is the first molecular metal based on the organometallic component. In this review, principle of the molecular architecture based on the unsymmetrical organometallic-dithiolene complexes and physical properties of their cation radical salts are discussed.

  17. The formation of ZnO-based coatings from solutions containing high-molecular polyvinylpyrrolidone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstrop'ev, S. K.; Soshnikov, I. P.; Khrebtov, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    A method for deposition of transparent nanosize ZnO-based coatings on the glass surface from solutions containing high-molecular polyvinylpyrrolidone is described. The method can be used to form transparent homogeneous coatings based on ZnO with an increased energy gap width. It does not require any intricate technological equipment.

  18. Lewis Acid-Base, Molecular Modeling, and Isotopic Labeling in a Sophomore Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nataro, Chip; Ferguson, Michelle A.; Bocage, Katherine M.; Hess, Brian J.; Ross, Vincent J.; Swarr, Daniel T.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment to prepare a deuterium labeled adduct of a Lewis acid and Lewis base, to use computational methods allowing students to visualize the LUMO of Lewis acids, the HOMO of Lewis bases and the molecular orbitals of the adduct that is formed is developed. This allows students to see the interplay between calculated and experimental results.

  19. Molecular spectroscopy and dynamics: a polyad-based perspective.

    PubMed

    Herman, Michel; Perry, David S

    2013-07-01

    The efficiency and insight of global, polyad-based modeling in overtone spectroscopy and dynamics is demonstrated. Both vibration and vibration-rotation polyads are considered. The spectroscopic implications of polyad Hamiltonians derive from their ability to account for the detailed line positions and intensities of spectral features and their unique predictive power. The dynamical implications of polyad Hamiltonians include classical bifurcations that lead to the birth of new vibrational modes and intramolecular vibrational-rotational energy redistribution over multiple timescales. The literature is reviewed, with emphasis on acetylene results. PMID:23646355

  20. Molecular Engineering of Technetium and Rhenium Based Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Zubieta, J.

    2003-06-30

    The research was based on the observation that despite the extraordinarily rich coordination chemistry of technetium and rhenium and several notable successes in reagent design, the extensive investigations by numerous research groups on a variety of N{sub 2}S{sub 2} and N{sub 3}S donor type ligands and on HYNIC have revealed that the chemistries of these ligands with Tc and Re are rather complex, giving rise to considerable difficulties in the development of reliable procedures for the development of radiopharmaceutical reagents.

  1. Polarization conversion-based molecular sensing using anisotropic plasmonic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verre, R.; Maccaferri, N.; Fleischer, K.; Svedendahl, M.; Odebo Länk, N.; Dmitriev, A.; Vavassori, P.; Shvets, I. V.; Käll, M.

    2016-05-01

    Anisotropic media induce changes in the polarization state of transmitted and reflected light. Here we combine this effect with the refractive index sensitivity typical of plasmonic nanoparticles to experimentally demonstrate self-referenced single wavelength refractometric sensing based on polarization conversion. We fabricated anisotropic plasmonic metasurfaces composed of gold dimers and, as a proof of principle, measured the changes in the rotation of light polarization induced by biomolecular adsorption with a surface sensitivity of 0.2 ng cm-2. We demonstrate the possibility of miniaturized sensing and we show that experimental results can be reproduced by analytical theory. Various ways to increase the sensitivity and applicability of the sensing scheme are discussed.Anisotropic media induce changes in the polarization state of transmitted and reflected light. Here we combine this effect with the refractive index sensitivity typical of plasmonic nanoparticles to experimentally demonstrate self-referenced single wavelength refractometric sensing based on polarization conversion. We fabricated anisotropic plasmonic metasurfaces composed of gold dimers and, as a proof of principle, measured the changes in the rotation of light polarization induced by biomolecular adsorption with a surface sensitivity of 0.2 ng cm-2. We demonstrate the possibility of miniaturized sensing and we show that experimental results can be reproduced by analytical theory. Various ways to increase the sensitivity and applicability of the sensing scheme are discussed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01336h

  2. Polarization conversion-based molecular sensing using anisotropic plasmonic metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Verre, R; Maccaferri, N; Fleischer, K; Svedendahl, M; Odebo Länk, N; Dmitriev, A; Vavassori, P; Shvets, I V; Käll, M

    2016-05-19

    Anisotropic media induce changes in the polarization state of transmitted and reflected light. Here we combine this effect with the refractive index sensitivity typical of plasmonic nanoparticles to experimentally demonstrate self-referenced single wavelength refractometric sensing based on polarization conversion. We fabricated anisotropic plasmonic metasurfaces composed of gold dimers and, as a proof of principle, measured the changes in the rotation of light polarization induced by biomolecular adsorption with a surface sensitivity of 0.2 ng cm(-2). We demonstrate the possibility of miniaturized sensing and we show that experimental results can be reproduced by analytical theory. Various ways to increase the sensitivity and applicability of the sensing scheme are discussed. PMID:27153470

  3. Analysis of plant diversity with retrotransposon-based molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Kalendar, R; Flavell, A J; Ellis, T H N; Sjakste, T; Moisy, C; Schulman, A H

    2011-01-01

    Retrotransposons are both major generators of genetic diversity and tools for detecting the genomic changes associated with their activity because they create large and stable insertions in the genome. After the demonstration that retrotransposons are ubiquitous, active and abundant in plant genomes, various marker systems were developed to exploit polymorphisms in retrotransposon insertion patterns. These have found applications ranging from the mapping of genes responsible for particular traits and the management of backcrossing programs to analysis of population structure and diversity of wild species. This review provides an insight into the spectrum of retrotransposon-based marker systems developed for plant species and evaluates the contributions of retrotransposon markers to the analysis of population diversity in plants. PMID:20683483

  4. Manganese-Based Molecular Electrocatalysts for Oxidation of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hulley, Elliott; Kumar, Neeraj; Raugei, Simone; Bullock, R. Morris

    2015-10-05

    Oxidation of H2 (1 atm) is catalyzed by the manganese electrocatalysts [(P2N2)MnI(CO)(bppm)]+ and [(PNP)MnI(CO)(bppm)]+ (P2N2= 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane; PNP = (Ph2PCH2)2NMe); bppm = (PArF2)2CH2, and ArF = 3,5-(CF3)2C6H3). In fluorobenzene solvent using 2,6-lutidine as the exogeneous base, the turnover frequency for [(P2N2)MnI(CO)(bppm)]+ is 3.5 s-1 with an estimated overpotential of 590 mV. For [(PNP)MnI(CO)(bppm)], in fluorobenzene solvent using N-methylpyrrolidine as the exogeneous base, the turnover frequency is 1.4 s-1 with an estimated overpotential of 700 mV. Density functional theory calculations suggest that the slow step in the catalytic cycle is proton transfer from the oxidized 17-electron manganese hydride, e.g., [(P2N2)MnIIH(CO)(bppm)]+ to the pendant amine. The computed activation barrier for intramolecular proton transfer from the metal to the pendant amine is 20.4 kcal/mol in [(P2N2)MnIIH(CO)(bppm)]+ and 21.3 kcal/mol in [(PNP)MnI(CO)(bppm)]. The high barrier appears to result from both the unfavorability of metal-to-nitrogen proton transfer (thermodynamically uphill by 6.6 pKa units, 9 kcal/mol), as well as the relatively long manganese-nitrogen separation in the MnIIH complexes.

  5. High-molecular-weight polymers for protein crystallization: poly-γ-glutamic acid-based precipitants

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ting-Chou; Korczyńska, Justyna; Smith, David K.; Brzozowski, Andrzej Marek

    2008-09-01

    High-molecular-weight poly-γ-glutamic acid-based polymers have been synthesized, tested and adopted for protein crystallization. Protein crystallization has been revolutionized by the introduction of high-throughput technologies, which have led to a speeding up of the process while simultaneously reducing the amount of protein sample necessary. Nonetheless, the chemistry dimension of protein crystallization has remained relatively undeveloped. Most crystallization screens are based on the same set of precipitants. To address this shortcoming, the development of new protein precipitants based on poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) polymers with different molecular-weight ranges is reported here: PGA-LM (low molecular weight) of ∼400 kDa and PGA-HM (high molecular weight) of >1000 kDa. It is also demonstrated that protein precipitants can be expanded further to polymers with much higher molecular weight than those that are currently in use. Furthermore, the modification of PGA-like polymers by covalent attachments of glucosamine substantially improved their solubility without affecting their crystallization properties. Some preliminary PGA-based screens are presented here.

  6. Molecular evidence of Burkholderia pseudomallei genotypes based on geographical distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zulkefli, Noorfatin Jihan; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Chong, Chun Wie; Thong, Kwai Lin; Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Background. Central intermediary metabolism (CIM) in bacteria is defined as a set of metabolic biochemical reactions within a cell, which is essential for the cell to survive in response to environmental perturbations. The genes associated with CIM are commonly found in both pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. As these genes are involved in vital metabolic processes of bacteria, we explored the efficiency of the genes in genotypic characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates, compared with the established pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes. Methods. Nine previously sequenced B. pseudomallei isolates from Malaysia were characterized by PFGE, MLST and CIM genes. The isolates were later compared to the other 39 B. pseudomallei strains, retrieved from GenBank using both MLST and sequence analysis of CIM genes. UniFrac and hierachical clustering analyses were performed using the results generated by both MLST and sequence analysis of CIM genes. Results. Genetic relatedness of nine Malaysian B. pseudomallei isolates and the other 39 strains was investigated. The nine Malaysian isolates were subtyped into six PFGE profiles, four MLST profiles and five sequence types based on CIM genes alignment. All methods demonstrated the clonality of OB and CB as well as CMS and THE. However, PFGE showed less than 70% similarity between a pair of morphology variants, OS and OB. In contrast, OS was identical to the soil isolate, MARAN. To have a better understanding of the genetic diversity of B. pseudomallei worldwide, we further aligned the sequences of genes used in MLST and genes associated with CIM for the nine Malaysian isolates and 39 B. pseudomallei strains from NCBI database. Overall, based on the CIM genes, the strains were subtyped into 33 profiles where majority of the strains from Asian countries were clustered together. On the other hand, MLST resolved the isolates into 31 profiles which formed three clusters

  7. Detecting Molecular Properties by Various Laser-Based Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hsin, Tse-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Four different laser-based techniques were applied to study physical and chemical characteristics of biomolecules and dye molecules. These techniques are liole burning spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy. Results from hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy suggested that two antenna states (C708 & C714) of photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 are connected by effective energy transfer and the corresponding energy transfer time is ~6 ps. In addition, results from hole burning spectroscopy indicated that the chlorophyll dimer of the C714 state has a large distribution of the dimer geometry. Direct observation of vibrational peaks and evolution of coumarin 153 in the electronic excited state was demonstrated by using the fs/ps CARS, a variation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In three different solvents, methanol, acetonitrile, and butanol, a vibration peak related to the stretch of the carbonyl group exhibits different relaxation dynamics. Laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, along with the biomimetic containers-liposomes, allows the measurement of the enzymatic activity of individual alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa without potential interferences from glass surfaces. The result showed a wide distribution of the enzyme reactivity. Protein structural variation is one of the major reasons that are responsible for this highly heterogeneous behavior.

  8. Computational design of intrinsic molecular rectifiers based on asymmetric functionalization of N-phenylbenzamide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ding, Wendu; Koepf, Matthieu; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Batra, Arunabh; Venkataraman, Latha; Negre, Christian F. A.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.; Batista, Victor S.

    2015-11-03

    Here, we report a systematic computational search of molecular frameworks for intrinsic rectification of electron transport. The screening of molecular rectifiers includes 52 molecules and conformers spanning over 9 series of structural motifs. N-Phenylbenzamide is found to be a promising framework with both suitable conductance and rectification properties. A targeted screening performed on 30 additional derivatives and conformers of N-phenylbenzamide yielded enhanced rectification based on asymmetric functionalization. We demonstrate that electron-donating substituent groups that maintain an asymmetric distribution of charge in the dominant transport channel (e.g., HOMO) enhance rectification by raising the channel closer to the Fermi level. These findingsmore » are particularly valuable for the design of molecular assemblies that could ensure directionality of electron transport in a wide range of applications, from molecular electronics to catalytic reactions.« less

  9. Computational design of intrinsic molecular rectifiers based on asymmetric functionalization of N-phenylbenzamide

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Wendu; Koepf, Matthieu; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Batra, Arunabh; Venkataraman, Latha; Negre, Christian F. A.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.; Batista, Victor S.

    2015-11-03

    Here, we report a systematic computational search of molecular frameworks for intrinsic rectification of electron transport. The screening of molecular rectifiers includes 52 molecules and conformers spanning over 9 series of structural motifs. N-Phenylbenzamide is found to be a promising framework with both suitable conductance and rectification properties. A targeted screening performed on 30 additional derivatives and conformers of N-phenylbenzamide yielded enhanced rectification based on asymmetric functionalization. We demonstrate that electron-donating substituent groups that maintain an asymmetric distribution of charge in the dominant transport channel (e.g., HOMO) enhance rectification by raising the channel closer to the Fermi level. These findings are particularly valuable for the design of molecular assemblies that could ensure directionality of electron transport in a wide range of applications, from molecular electronics to catalytic reactions.

  10. Electronic shift register memory based on molecular electron-transfer reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Beratan, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a shift register memory at the molecular level is described in detail. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules incorporated on a very large scale integrated (VLSI) substrate, and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. The design requirements for such a system are discussed, and several realistic strategies for synthesizing these systems are presented. The immediate advantage of such a hybrid molecular/VLSI device would arise from the possible information storage density. The prospect of considerable savings of energy per bit processed also exists. This molecular shift register memory element design solves the conceptual problems associated with integrating molecular size components with larger (micron) size features on a chip.

  11. Suppression of Acid Diffusion in Chemical Amplification Resists by Molecular Control of Base Matrix Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Toshiyuki; Shiraishi, Hiroshi; Okazaki, Shinji

    1995-12-01

    Suppression of acid diffusion during post-exposure baking (PEB) of chemical amplification resists is investigated from the standpoint of molecular control of base matrix polymers. Negative-type chemical amplification resists composed of cresol novolak-based matrix polymers, acid-catalyzed crosslinkers of melamine resins, and acid generators of onium salts are prepared. The molecular weight distributions of the base matrix polymers are controlled by means of a precipitation method. The resists are exposed with electron beams in isolated lines to evaluate the acid diffusion characteristics. Dependence of pattern sizes on the PEB time clearly shows that acid diffusion determines the resist pattern sizes based on Fick's law. The diffusion coefficients of resists with base matrix polymers with small polydispersities are smaller than those of resists with base matrix polymers with large polydispersities. Acid diffusion can still be suppressed by applying base matrix polymers with small weight-average molecular weights and small polydispersities. Diffusion coefficients can be further decreased by using base matrix polymers with more p-cresol components. A diffusion mechanism is proposed based on acid diffusion channels composed of active OH-groups and vacancies in the base matrix polymers.

  12. Biomedical wellness monitoring system based upon molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Whitney

    2012-06-01

    We wish to assist caretakers with a sensor monitoring systems for tracking the physiological changes of homealone patients. One goal is seeking biomarkers and modern imaging sensors like stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), which has achieved visible imaging at the nano-scale range. Imaging techniques like STORM can be combined with a fluorescent functional marker in a system to capture the early transformation signs from wellness to illness. By exploiting both microscopic knowledge of genetic pre-disposition and the macroscopic influence of epigenetic factors we hope to target these changes remotely. We adopt dual spectral infrared imaging for blind source separation (BSS) to detect angiogenesis changes and use laser speckle imaging for hypertension blood flow monitoring. Our design hypothesis for the monitoring system is guided by the user-friendly, veteran-preferred "4-Non" principles (noninvasive, non-contact, non-tethered, non-stop-to-measure) and by the NIH's "4Ps" initiatives (predictive, personalized, preemptive, and participatory). We augment the potential storage system with the recent know-how of video Compressive Sampling (CSp) from surveillance cameras. In CSp only major changes are saved, which reduces the manpower cost of caretakers and medical analysts. This CSp algorithm is based on smart associative memory (AM) matrix storage: change features and detailed scenes are written by the outer-product and read by the inner product without the usual Harsh index for image searching. From this approach, we attempt to design an effective household monitoring approach to save healthcare costs and maintain the quality of life of seniors.

  13. Comparison of molecular breeding values based on within- and across-breed training in beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the efficacy of genomic predictors based on within-breed training looks promising, it is necessary to develop and evaluate across-breed predictors for the technology to be fully applied in the beef industry. The efficacies of genomic predictors trained in one breed and utilized to predict genetic merit in differing breeds based on simulation studies have been reported, as have the efficacies of predictors trained using data from multiple breeds to predict the genetic merit of purebreds. However, comparable studies using beef cattle field data have not been reported. Methods Molecular breeding values for weaning and yearling weight were derived and evaluated using a database containing BovineSNP50 genotypes for 7294 animals from 13 breeds in the training set and 2277 animals from seven breeds (Angus, Red Angus, Hereford, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Limousin, and Simmental) in the evaluation set. Six single-breed and four across-breed genomic predictors were trained using pooled data from purebred animals. Molecular breeding values were evaluated using field data, including genotypes for 2227 animals and phenotypic records of animals born in 2008 or later. Accuracies of molecular breeding values were estimated based on the genetic correlation between the molecular breeding value and trait phenotype. Results With one exception, the estimated genetic correlations of within-breed molecular breeding values with trait phenotype were greater than 0.28 when evaluated in the breed used for training. Most estimated genetic correlations for the across-breed trained molecular breeding values were moderate (> 0.30). When molecular breeding values were evaluated in breeds that were not in the training set, estimated genetic correlations clustered around zero. Conclusions Even for closely related breeds, within- or across-breed trained molecular breeding values have limited prediction accuracy for breeds that were not in the training set. For breeds in the training

  14. Detection of airborne bacteria in a German turkey house by cultivation-based and molecular methods.

    PubMed

    Fallschissel, Kerstin; Klug, Kerstin; Kämpfer, Peter; Jäckel, Udo

    2010-11-01

    Today's large-scale poultry production with densely stocked and enclosed production buildings is often accompanied by very high concentrations of airborne microorganisms leading to a clear health hazard for employees working in such environments. Depending on the expected exposure to microorganisms, work has to be performed under occupational safety conditions. In this study, turkey houses bioaerosols were investigated by cultivation-based and molecular methods in parallel to determine the concentrations and the composition of bacterial community. Results obtained with the molecular approach showed clearly its applicability for qualitative exposure measurements. With both, cultivation-based and molecular methods species of microorganism with a potential health risk for employees (Acinetobacter johnsonii, Aerococcus viridans, Pantoea agglomerans, and Shigella flexneri) were identified. These results underline the necessity of adequate protection measures, including the recommendation to wear breathing masks during work in poultry houses. PMID:20720091

  15. Fast parallel molecular algorithms for DNA-based computation: factoring integers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Weng-Long; Guo, Minyi; Ho, Michael Shan-Hui

    2005-06-01

    The RSA public-key cryptosystem is an algorithm that converts input data to an unrecognizable encryption and converts the unrecognizable data back into its original decryption form. The security of the RSA public-key cryptosystem is based on the difficulty of factoring the product of two large prime numbers. This paper demonstrates to factor the product of two large prime numbers, and is a breakthrough in basic biological operations using a molecular computer. In order to achieve this, we propose three DNA-based algorithms for parallel subtractor, parallel comparator, and parallel modular arithmetic that formally verify our designed molecular solutions for factoring the product of two large prime numbers. Furthermore, this work indicates that the cryptosystems using public-key are perhaps insecure and also presents clear evidence of the ability of molecular computing to perform complicated mathematical operations. PMID:16117023

  16. Giant tunnel magneto-resistance in graphene based molecular tunneling junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Li, Jianwei; Yu, Yunjin; Wei, Yadong; Wang, Jian; Guo, Hong

    2016-02-01

    We propose and theoretically investigate a class of stable zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) based molecular magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs). For those junctions having pentagon-connecting formations, huge tunnel magneto-resistance (TMR) is found. Different from most of the other proposed molecular junctions, the huge TMR in our structures is generic, and is not significantly affected by external parameters such as bias voltage, gate voltage, length of the molecule and width of the ZGNRs. The double pentagon-connecting formation between the molecule and ZGNRs is critical for the remarkable TMR ratio, which is as large as ~2 × 105. These molecular MTJs behave as almost perfect spin filters and spin valve devices. Other connecting formations of the ZGNR based MTJs lead to much smaller TMR. By first principles analysis, we reveal the microscopic physics responsible for this phenomenon.

  17. Giant tunnel magneto-resistance in graphene based molecular tunneling junction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Li, Jianwei; Yu, Yunjin; Wei, Yadong; Wang, Jian; Guo, Hong

    2016-02-14

    We propose and theoretically investigate a class of stable zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) based molecular magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs). For those junctions having pentagon-connecting formations, huge tunnel magneto-resistance (TMR) is found. Different from most of the other proposed molecular junctions, the huge TMR in our structures is generic, and is not significantly affected by external parameters such as bias voltage, gate voltage, length of the molecule and width of the ZGNRs. The double pentagon-connecting formation between the molecule and ZGNRs is critical for the remarkable TMR ratio, which is as large as ∼2 × 10(5). These molecular MTJs behave as almost perfect spin filters and spin valve devices. Other connecting formations of the ZGNR based MTJs lead to much smaller TMR. By first principles analysis, we reveal the microscopic physics responsible for this phenomenon. PMID:26790615

  18. Double-hairpin molecular-beacon-based amplification detection for gene diagnosis linked to cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huo; Zhang, Rongbo; Li, Feng; Zhou, Yingying; Peng, Ting; Wang, Xuedong; Shen, Zhifa

    2016-09-01

    A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related KRAS gene detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. During target DNA detection, DHMB can execute signal transduction even if no any exogenous element is involved. Unlike the conventional molecular beacon based on the one-to-one interaction, one target DNA not only hybridizes with one DHMB and opens its hairpin but also promotes the interaction between two DHMBs, causing the separation of two fluorophores from quenchers. This leads to an enhanced fluorescence signal. As a result, the target KRAS gene is able to be detected within a wide dynamic range from 0.05 to 200 nM with the detection limit of 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons. Moreover, the point mutations existing in target DNAs can be easily screened. The potential application for target species in real samples was indicated by the analysis of PCR amplicons of DNAs from the DNA extracted from SW620 cell. Besides becoming a promising candidate probe for molecular biology research and clinical diagnosis of genetic diseases, the DHMB is expected to provide a significant insight into the design of DNA probe-based homogenous sensing systems. Graphical Abstract A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related gene KRAS detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. Without the help of any exogenous probe, the point mutation is easily screened, and the target DNA can be quantified down to 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons. PMID:27422649

  19. Accelerated electronic structure-based molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The initiation and progression of shock-induced chemistry in organic materials at moderate temperatures and pressures are slow on the time scales available to regular molecular dynamics simulations. Accessing the requisite time scales is particularly challenging if the interatomic bonding is modeled using accurate yet expensive methods based explicitly on electronic structure. We have combined fast, energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the parallel replica accelerated molecular dynamics formalism to study the relatively sluggish shock-induced chemistry of benzene around 13-20 GPa. We model interatomic bonding in hydrocarbons using self-consistent tight binding theory with an accurate and transferable parameterization. Shock compression and its associated transient, non-equilibrium effects are captured explicitly by combining the universal liquid Hugoniot with a simple shrinking-cell boundary condition. A number of novel methods for improving the performance of reactive electronic structure-based molecular dynamics by adapting the self-consistent field procedure on-the-fly will also be discussed. The use of accelerated molecular dynamics has enabled us to follow the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of carbon clusters in benzene under thermodynamic conditions pertinent to experiments.

  20. Ultrasound-based Measurement of Molecular Marker Concentration in Large Blood Vessels: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiying; Mauldin, F. William; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hossack, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging has demonstrated efficacy in pre-clinical studies for cancer and cardiovascular inflammation. However, these techniques often require lengthy protocols due to waiting periods or additional control microbubble injections. Moreover, they are not capable of quantifying molecular marker concentration in human tissue environments that exhibit variable attenuation and propagation path lengths. Our group recently investigated a modulated Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF)-based imaging sequence, which was demonstrated to detect targeted adhesion independent of control measurements. In the present study, this sequence was tested against various experimental parameters to determine feasibility for quantitative measurements of molecular marker concentration. Results demonstrated that measurements obtained from the sequence (residual-to-saturation ratio, Rresid) were independent of acoustic pressure and attenuation (p> 0.13, n = 10)when acoustic pressures were sufficiently low. The Rresid parameter exhibited a linear relationship with measured molecular marker concentration (R2> 0.94). Consequently, feasibility was demonstrated in vitro, for quantification of molecular marker concentration in large vessels using a modulated ARF-based sequence. Moreover, these measurements were independent of absolute acoustic reflection amplitude and used short imaging protocols(3 min) without control measurements. PMID:25308943

  1. Base de linhas moleculares para síntese espectral estelar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, A.; Sanzovo, G.

    2003-08-01

    A análise das abundâncias quí micas fotosféricas em estrelas do tipo solar ou tardia, através do cálculo teórico de seus espectros, emprega a espectroscopia de alta resolução e necessita de uma base representativa de linhas atômicas e moleculares com suas respectivas constantes bem determinadas. Nesse trabalho, utilizamos como ponto de partida as extensas listas de linhas espectrais de sistemas eletrônicos de algumas moléculas diatômicas compiladas por Kurucz para a construção de uma base de linhas moleculares para a sí ntese espectral estelar. Revisamos as determinações dos fatores rotacionais de Honl-London das forças de oscilador das linhas moleculares, para cada banda vibracional de alguns sistemas eletrônicos, seguindo a regra usual de normalização. Usamos as forças de oscilador eletrônicas da literatura. Os fatores vibracionais de Franck-Condon de cada banda foram especialmente recalculados empregando-se novas constantes moleculares. Reproduzimos, com êxito, as absorções espectrais de determinadas bandas eletrônicas-vibracionais das espécies moleculares C12C12, C12N14 e Mg24H em espectros de estrelas de referência como o Sol e Arcturus.

  2. Molecular Interactions between a Novel Soybean Oil-Based Polymer and Doxorubicin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel soybean oil-based polymer, hydrolyzed polymers of epoxidized soybean oil (HPESO), was developed and investigated for drug delivery. This work was aimed at determining the molecular interactions between HPESO and doxorubicin (DOX), an anticancer drug. Powder X-ray diffraction, ATR-FTIR and ...

  3. Designing and Implementing a Hands-On, Inquiry-Based Molecular Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regassa, Laura B.; Morrison-Shetlar, Alison I.

    2007-01-01

    Inquiry-based learning was used to enhance an undergraduate molecular biology course at Georgia Southern University, a primarily undergraduate institution in rural southeast Georgia. The goal was to use a long-term, in-class project to accelerate higher-order thinking, thereby enabling students to problem solve and apply their knowledge to novel…

  4. Molecular Docking of Enzyme Inhibitors: A Computational Tool for Structure-Based Drug Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudnitskaya, Aleksandra; Torok, Bela; Torok, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    Molecular docking is a frequently used method in structure-based rational drug design. It is used for evaluating the complex formation of small ligands with large biomolecules, predicting the strength of the bonding forces and finding the best geometrical arrangements. The major goal of this advanced undergraduate biochemistry laboratory exercise…

  5. Development of new candidate gene and EST-based molecular markers for Gossypium species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New source of molecular markers accelerates the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences, and validated them through amplification, ge...

  6. Light-triggered molecular devices based on photochromic oligothiophene substituted chromenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassar, A.; Garnier, F.; Jaafari, H.; Rebiere-Galy, N.; Frigoli, M.; Moustrou, C.; Samat, A.; Guglielmetti, R.

    2002-06-01

    An original concept for the realization of a molecular photoswitch is proposed, based on photochrochromic oligothiophene-substituted chromenes. When optically excited, these compounds undergo a structural change passing from a neutral state (closed form) to a strongly polarized one (open form). This photochromism process is also accompanied by a large increase in the electrical conductivity.

  7. GIS based Relative Tsunami Hazard Maps for Northern California, Humboldt and Del Norte Counties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, J. R.; Dengler, L. A.

    2004-12-01

    Tsunami hazard maps are generated using a geographical information systems (GIS) approach to depict the relative tsunami hazard of coastal Humboldt and Del Norte Counties in northern California. Maps are composed for the Humboldt Bay, Eel River, and Crescent City regions and available online at http://www.humboldt.edu/~geodept/earthquakes/rctwg/toc.html . In contrast to previous mapping efforts that utilize a single line to represent inundation, hazard is displayed gradationally. A 2.5D surface is constructed to represent this hazard. Elevation, normally used for 2.5D surfaces, is substituted with hazard units. Criteria boundaries are used to separate regions of increasing hazard. Criteria boundaries are defined based on numerical modeling, paleoseismic studies, historical flooding, FEMA Q3 flood maps, and impacts of recent tsunamis elsewhere. Zones are constructed to further adjust the criteria with respect to a physically determined variable hazard (e.g. proximity to open ocean). A triangular irregular network (TIN) is constructed using hazard criteria boundaries as breaklines. Fabricated points are necessary to construct a hazard surface and are placed where criteria boundaries diverge or where hazard is nonlinear between criteria boundaries. Hazard is displayed as a continuous gradational color scale ranging from red (high hazard) through orange (medium), yellow (low) to gray (no hazard). The maps are GIS based to facilitate ready adaptation by planners and emergency managers. The maps are intended for educational purposes, to improve awareness of tsunami hazards and to encourage emergency planning efforts of local and regional organizations by illustrating the range of possible tsunami events.

  8. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  9. Ab initio based force field and molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline TATB.

    PubMed

    Gee, Richard H; Roszak, Szczepan; Balasubramanian, Krishnan; Fried, Laurence E

    2004-04-15

    An all-atom force field for 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) is presented. The classical intermolecular interaction potential for TATB is based on single-point energies determined from high-level ab initio calculations of TATB dimers. The newly developed potential function is used to examine bulk crystalline TATB via molecular dynamics simulations. The isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compression under hydrostatic pressures obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations are in good agreement with experiment. The calculated volume-temperature expansion is almost one dimensional along the c crystallographic axis, whereas under compression, all three unit cell axes participate, albeit unequally. PMID:15267608

  10. Restoring electronic coherence/decoherence for a trajectory-based nonadiabatic molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chaoyuan

    2016-04-01

    By utilizing the time-independent semiclassical phase integral, we obtained modified coupled time-dependent Schrödinger equations that restore coherences and induce decoherences within original simple trajectory-based nonadiabatic molecular dynamic algorithms. Nonadiabatic transition probabilities simulated from both Tully’s fewest switches and semiclassical Ehrenfest algorithms follow exact quantum electronic oscillations and amplitudes for three out of the four well-known model systems. Within the present theory, nonadiabatic transitions estimated from statistical ensemble of trajectories accurately follow those of the modified electronic wave functions. The present theory can be immediately applied to the molecular dynamic simulations of photochemical and photophysical processes involving electronic excited states.

  11. Isatin based thiosemicarbazone derivatives as potential bioactive agents: Anti-oxidant and molecular docking studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haribabu, J.; Subhashree, G. R.; Saranya, S.; Gomathi, K.; Karvembu, R.; Gayathri, D.

    2016-04-01

    A new series of isatin based thiosemicarbazones has been synthesized from benzylisatin and unsubstituted/substituted thiosemicarbazides (1-5). The synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, and UV-Visible, FT-IR, 1H &13C NMR and mass spectroscopic techniques. Three dimensional molecular structure of three compounds (1, 3 and 4) was determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. Anti-oxidant activity of the thiosemicarbazone derivatives showed their excellent scavenging effect against free radicals. In addition, all the compounds showed good anti-haemolytic activity. In silico molecular docking studies were performed to screen the anti-inflammatory and anti-tuberculosis properties of thiosemicarbazone derivatives.

  12. Molecular Toxicology of Substances Released from Resin–Based Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Bakopoulou, Athina; Papadopoulos, Triantafillos; Garefis, Pavlos

    2009-01-01

    Resin-based dental restorative materials are extensively used today in dentistry. However, significant concerns still remain regarding their biocompatibility. For this reason, significant scientific effort has been focused on the determination of the molecular toxicology of substances released by these biomaterials, using several tools for risk assessment, including exposure assessment, hazard identification and dose-response analysis. These studies have shown that substances released by these materials can cause significant cytotoxic and genotoxic effects, leading to irreversible disturbance of basic cellular functions. The aim of this article is to review current knowledge related to dental composites’ molecular toxicology and to give implications for possible improvements concerning their biocompatibility. PMID:19865523

  13. Triazolyl-Based Molecular Gels as Ligands for Autocatalytic 'Click' Reactions.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Marco; Díaz-Oltra, Santiago; Escuder, Beatriu

    2016-06-13

    The catalytic performance of triazolyl-based molecular gels was investigated in the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of alkynes and azides. Low-molecular-weight gelators derived from l-valine were synthesized and functionalized with a triazole fragment. The resultant compounds formed gels either with or without copper, in a variety of solvents of different polarity. The gelators coordinated Cu(I) and exhibited a high catalytic activity in the gel phase for the model reaction between phenylacetylene and benzylazide. Additionally, the gels were able to participate in autocatalytic synthesis and the influence of small structural changes on their performance was observed. PMID:27168408

  14. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation: An approach based on quantum measurement picture

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Wei; Xu, Luting; Li, Xin-Qi; Fang, Weihai; Yan, YiJing

    2014-07-15

    Mixed-quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulation implies an effective quantum measurement on the electronic states by the classical motion of atoms. Based on this insight, we propose a quantum trajectory mean-field approach for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. The new protocol provides a natural interface between the separate quantum and classical treatments, without invoking artificial surface hopping algorithm. Moreover, it also bridges two widely adopted nonadiabatic dynamics methods, the Ehrenfest mean-field theory and the trajectory surface-hopping method. Excellent agreement with the exact results is illustrated with representative model systems, including the challenging ones for traditional methods.

  15. Integration of Culture-Based and Molecular Analysis of a Complex Sponge-Associated Bacterial Community

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Jan; Pittiglio, Raquel; Ravel, Jacques; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial communities of sponges have been studied using molecular techniques as well as culture-based techniques, but the communities described by these two methods are remarkably distinct. Culture-based methods describe communities dominated by Proteobacteria, and Actinomycetes while molecular methods describe communities dominated by predominantly uncultivated groups such as the Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, and Acidimicrobidae. In this study, we used a wide range of culture media to increase the diversity of cultivable bacteria from the closely related giant barrel sponges, Xestospongia muta collected from the Florida Keys, Atlantic Ocean and Xestospongia testudinaria, collected from Indonesia, Pacific Ocean. Over 400 pure cultures were isolated and identified from X. muta and X. testudinaria and over 90 bacterial species were represented. Over 16,000 pyrosequences were analyzed and assigned to 976 OTUs. We employed both cultured-based methods and pyrosequencing to look for patterns of overlap between the culturable and molecular communities. Only one OTU was found in both the molecular and culturable communities, revealing limitations inherent in both approaches. PMID:24618773

  16. Gold-based hybrid nanomaterials for biosensing and molecular diagnostic applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Eun; Choi, Ji Hye; Colas, Marion; Kim, Dong Ha; Lee, Hyukjin

    2016-06-15

    The properties of gold nanomaterials are particularly of interest to many researchers, since they show unique physiochemical properties such as optical adsorption of specific wavelength of light, high electrical conductance with rich surface electrons, and facile surface modification with sulfhydryl groups. These properties have facilitated the use of gold nanomaterials in the development of various hybrid systems for biosensors and molecular diagnostics. Combined with various synthetic materials such as fluorescence dyes, polymers, oligonucleotides, graphene oxides (GO), and quantum dots (QDs), the gold-based hybrid nanomaterials offer multi-functionalities in molecular detection with high specificity and sensitivity. These two aspects result in the increase of detection speed as well as the lower detection limits, having shown that this diagnosis method is more effective than other conventional ones. In this review, we have highlighted various examples of nanomaterials for biosensing and molecular diagnostics. The gold-based hybrid systems are categorized by three distinct detection approaches, in which include (1) optical, such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR), RAMAN, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), (2) fluorescence, such as förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and nanomaterial surface energy transfer (NSET), and (3) electrochemical, such as potentiometic, amperometric, and conductometric. Each example provides the detailed mechanism of molecular detection as well as the supporting experimental result with the limit of detection (LOD). Lastly, future perspective on novel development of gold-based hybrid nanomaterials is discussed as well as their challenges. PMID:26894985

  17. Molecular evidence-based medicine: evolution and integration of information in the genomic era.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, J P A

    2007-05-01

    Evidence-based medicine and molecular medicine have both been influential in biomedical research in the last 15 years. Despite following largely parallel routes to date, the goals and principles of evidence-based and molecular medicine are complementary and they should be converging. I define molecular evidence-based medicine as the study of medical information that makes sense of the advances of molecular biological disciplines and where errors and biases are properly appreciated and placed in context. Biomedical measurement capacity improves very rapidly. The exponentially growing mass of hypotheses being tested requires a new approach to both statistical and biological inference. Multidimensional biology requires careful exact replication of research findings, but indirect corroboration is often all that is achieved at best. Besides random error, bias remains a major threat. It is often difficult to separate bias from the spirit of scientific inquiry to force data into coherent and 'significant' biological stories. Transparency and public availability of protocols, data, analyses and results may be crucial to make sense of the complex biology of human disease and avoid being flooded by spurious research findings. Research efforts should be integrated across teams in an open, sharing environment. Most research in the future may be designed, performed, and integrated in the public cyberspace. PMID:17461979

  18. A Cucurbit[7]uril Based Molecular Shuttle Encoded by Visible Room-Temperature Phosphorescence.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yifan; Chen, Hui; Ma, Xiang; Tian, He

    2016-06-17

    A visible room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) signal, generated by complexation of cururbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and bromo-substituted isoquinoline in aqueous solution, is employed to address the shuttling of a pH-controlling molecular shuttle fabricated by CB[7] and a phosphor 6-bromoisoquinoline derivative IQC[5]. The CB[7] host shuttles along the axial guest under acidic conditions, accompanied by a weak RTP emission signal, while deprotonation of the guest IQC[5] makes the CB[7] wheel locate on the phosphor group, leading to intense RTP emission. The switching RTP emission of the molecular shuttle, via pH adjusting, can be visibly identified by the naked eye. This is the first CB-based molecular shuttle with an RTP signal as the output address of its shuttling and conformation. PMID:26548653

  19. Realizing tunable molecular thermal devices based on photoisomerism—Is it possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganathan, Raghavan; Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2015-01-14

    In this work, we address the question if it is possible to tune the thermal conductance through photoisomerism-capable molecular junctions. Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we study heat flow due to phonons between two silicon leads connected via two classes of photoisomeric molecules—(a) azobenzene and (b) Spiropyran (SP)–Merocyanine (MC) isomers. For the case of azobenzene, isomeric states with different conformations are realized via mechanical strain, while in the case of SP-MC, via a hybridization change. Based on the phononic contribution to thermal conductance, we observe that the thermal conductance of both junctions is rather insensitive to the isomeric state, thereby rendering the tunability of molecular thermal devices rather difficult. Consistent with these observations, the vibrational density of states for different configurations yields very similar spectra. We note that including the effect of electronic contribution to thermal conductance could enhance the tunability of thermal properties, albeit weakly.

  20. Fibrin-based biomaterials: Modulation of macroscopic properties through rational design at the molecular level

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ashley C.; Barker, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrinogen is one of the primary components of the coagulation cascade and rapidly forms an insoluble matrix following tissue injury. In addition to its important role in hemostasis, fibrin acts as a scaffold for tissue repair and provides important cues for directing cell phenotype following injury. Because of these properties and the ease of polymerization of the material, fibrin has been widely utilized as a biomaterial for over a century. Modifying the macroscopic properties of fibrin, such as elasticity and porosity, has been somewhat elusive until recently, yet with a molecular-level rational design approach can now be somewhat easily modified through alterations of molecular interactions key to the protein’s polymerization process. This review outlines the biochemistry of fibrin and discusses methods for modification of molecular interactions and their application to fibrin based biomaterials. PMID:24056097

  1. Sunlight-powered kHz rotation of a hemithioindigo-based molecular motor

    PubMed Central

    Guentner, Manuel; Schildhauer, Monika; Thumser, Stefan; Mayer, Peter; Stephenson, David; Mayer, Peter J.; Dube, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Photodriven molecular motors are able to convert light energy into directional motion and hold great promise as miniaturized powering units for future nanomachines. In the current state of the art, considerable efforts have still to be made to increase the efficiency of energy transduction and devise systems that allow operation in ambient and non-damaging conditions with high rates of directional motions. The need for ultraviolet light to induce the motion of virtually all available light-driven motors especially hampers the broad applicability of these systems. We describe here a hemithioindigo-based molecular motor, which is powered exclusively by nondestructive visible light (up to 500 nm) and rotates completely directionally with kHz frequency at 20 °C. This is the fastest directional motion of a synthetic system driven by visible light to date permitting materials and biocompatible irradiation conditions to establish similarly high speeds as natural molecular motors. PMID:26411883

  2. Towards artificial molecular motor-based electroactive/photoactive biomimetic muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tony Jun

    2007-04-01

    Artificial molecular motors have recently attracted considerable interest from the nanoscience and nanoengineering community. These molecular-scale systems utilize a 'bottom-up' technology centered around the design and manipulation of molecular assemblies, and are potentially capable of delivering efficient actuations at dramatically reduced length scales when compared to traditional microscale actuators. When stimulated by light, electricity, or chemical reagents, a group of artificial molecular motors called bistable rotaxanes - which are composed of mutually recognizable and intercommunicating ring and dumbbell-shaped components - experience relative internal motions of their components just like the moving parts of macroscopic machines. Bistable rotaxanes' ability to precisely and cooperatively control mechanical motions at the molecular level reveals the potential of engineering systems that operate with the same elegance, efficiency, and complexity as biological motors function within the human body. We are in a process of developing a new class of bistable rotaxane-based electroactive/photoactive biomimetic muscles with unprecedented performance (strain: 40-60%, operating frequency: up to 1 MHz, energy density: ~50 J/cm 3, multi-stimuli: chemical, electricity, light). As a substantial step towards this longterm objective, we have proven, for the first time, that rotaxanes are mechanically switchable in condensed phases on solid substrates. We have further developed a rotaxane-powered microcantilever actuator utilizing an integrated approach that combines "bottom-up" assembly of molecular functionality with "top-down" micro/nano fabrication. By harnessing the nanoscale mechanical motion from artificial molecular machines and eliciting a nanomechanical response in a microscale device, this system mimics natural skeletal muscle and provides a key component for the development of nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS).

  3. De novo design of caseinolytic protein proteases inhibitors based on pharmacophore and 2D molecular fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guanzhong; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Hong; Lin, Kejiang

    2015-06-01

    Caseinolytic protein proteases (ClpP) are large oligomeric protein complexes that contribute to cell homeostasis as well as virulence regulation in bacteria. Inhibitors of ClpP can significantly attenuate the capability to produce virulence factors of the bacteria. In this work, we developed a workflow to expand the chemical space of potential ClpP inhibitors based on a set of β-lactones. In our workflow, an artificial pharmacophore model was generated based on HipHop and HYPOGEN method. A de novo compound library based on molecular fingerprints was constructed and virtually screened by the pharmacophore model. The results were further investigated by molecular docking study. The workflow successfully achieved potential ClpP inhibitors. It could be applied to design more novel potential ClpP inhibitors and provide theoretical basis for the further optimization of the hit compounds. PMID:25937012

  4. PC-based molecular modeling in the classroom: applications to medicinal chemistry and biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Henkel, J G

    1991-03-01

    Among the most difficult aspects of medicinal chemistry and biochemistry for the student to master are the three-dimensional (3D) nature of drugs and bio-organic substances and the interaction of these substances with 3D targets. Compounding this problem is the fact that such relationships are very difficult to illustrate in a lecture or discussion format. While skeletal molecular models serve a useful role in the learning process, the techniques of PC-based desktop molecular visualization provide a more powerful and effective alternative to the lecture format. These techniques can be implemented on standard MS-DOS PC hardware using one of the commonly available data projection systems. The approach has found considerable use in several areas, including the generation of computer-based lecture aids, the illustration of the molecular shapes of drugs and biochemical structures, the superposition and comparison of drug substances with common pharmacophores, and the illustration of enzyme-substrate interactions. Another related technique, molecular animation, has proven to be quite successful at illustrating the essentials of enzyme mechanisms in the classroom. The "film clips" resulting from this technique may have use beyond the classroom, and further work in this area is underway. PMID:1708280

  5. Personalized Medicine Based on Theranostic Radioiodine Molecular Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging based personalized therapy has been a fascinating concept for individualized therapeutic strategy, which is able to attain the highest efficacy and reduce adverse effects in certain patients. Theranostics, which integrates diagnostic testing to detect molecular targets for particular therapeutic modalities, is one of the key technologies that contribute to the success of personalized medicine. Although the term “theranostics” was used after the second millennium, its basic principle was applied more than 70 years ago in the field of thyroidology with radioiodine molecular imaging. Differentiated thyroid cancer, which arises from follicular cells in the thyroid, is the most common endocrine malignancy, and theranostic radioiodine has been successfully applied to diagnose and treat differentiated thyroid cancer, the applications of which were included in the guidelines published by various thyroid or nuclear medicine societies. Through better pathophysiologic understanding of thyroid cancer and advancements in nuclear technologies, theranostic radioiodine contributes more to modern tailored personalized management by providing high therapeutic effect and by avoiding significant adverse effects in differentiated thyroid cancer. This review details the inception of theranostic radioiodine and recent radioiodine applications for differentiated thyroid cancer management as a prototype of personalized medicine based on molecular imaging. PMID:27239470

  6. Personalized Medicine Based on Theranostic Radioiodine Molecular Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging based personalized therapy has been a fascinating concept for individualized therapeutic strategy, which is able to attain the highest efficacy and reduce adverse effects in certain patients. Theranostics, which integrates diagnostic testing to detect molecular targets for particular therapeutic modalities, is one of the key technologies that contribute to the success of personalized medicine. Although the term "theranostics" was used after the second millennium, its basic principle was applied more than 70 years ago in the field of thyroidology with radioiodine molecular imaging. Differentiated thyroid cancer, which arises from follicular cells in the thyroid, is the most common endocrine malignancy, and theranostic radioiodine has been successfully applied to diagnose and treat differentiated thyroid cancer, the applications of which were included in the guidelines published by various thyroid or nuclear medicine societies. Through better pathophysiologic understanding of thyroid cancer and advancements in nuclear technologies, theranostic radioiodine contributes more to modern tailored personalized management by providing high therapeutic effect and by avoiding significant adverse effects in differentiated thyroid cancer. This review details the inception of theranostic radioiodine and recent radioiodine applications for differentiated thyroid cancer management as a prototype of personalized medicine based on molecular imaging. PMID:27239470

  7. Resonant cavity enhanced optical microsensor for molecular interactions based on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Stefano, Luca; Rea, Ilaria; Rendina, Ivo; Rotiroti, Lucia; Rossi, Mosè; D'Auria, Sabato

    2006-04-01

    The molecular binding between the glutamine binding-protein (GlnBP) from Escherichia coli and L-glutamine (Gln) is detected by means of an optical biosensor based on porous silicon technology. The binding event is optically transduced in the wavelength shift of the porous silicon optical microcavity (PSMC) reflectivity spectrum. The hydrophobic interaction links the GlnBP, which acts as a molecular probe for Gln, to the hydrogenated porous silicon surface area. We can thus avoid any preliminary surface functionalization process. The protein infiltrated PSMC results stable to oxidation at least for few cycles of wet measurements. The penetration of the proteins into the pores of the porous silicon matrix has been optimized: a strong base post-etch process increases the pore size and removes any nanostructure on top and inside the porous silicon multilayer while does not degrade the optical response and the quality of the microcavity.

  8. A Novel Methodology for Metal Ion Separation Based on Molecularly Imprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Xiaobin; Mosha, Donnati; Hassan, Mansour M.; Givens, Richard S.; Busch, Daryle H.

    2004-03-31

    The siderophore-based extraction of iron from the soil by bacteria is proposed as a model for a new separation methodology labeled the soil poutice, a molecular device that would selectively retrieve the complex of a targeted metal ion. In this report we described the synthesis and characterization of molecularly imprinted polymers and their application in the specific recognition of macrocyclic metal complexes. The imprinting is based on non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, electrostatic attractions and minor metal-ligand coordination. Good rebinding capacity for the imprinting metal complex was observed in acetonitrile as well as in water. The polymers are resistant to strong acids and oxidizing agents and showed an increase of rebinding capacity during cycles of reuse. The imprinting procedure, combined with the previously known selective chelation of macrocyclic ligands, supports the feasibility of a new methodology that can be used to extract waste metal ions effectively and selectively from soils and ground water.

  9. Efficient electronic coupling and improved stability with dithiocarbamate-based molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Wrochem, Florian; Gao, Deqing; Scholz, Frank; Nothofer, Heinz-Georg; Nelles, Gabriele; Wessels, Jurina M.

    2010-08-01

    Molecular electronic devices require stable and highly conductive contacts between the metal electrodes and molecules. Thiols and amines are widely used to attach molecules to metals, but they form poor electrical contacts and lack the robustness required for device applications. Here, we demonstrate that dithiocarbamates provide superior electrical contact and thermal stability when compared to thiols on metals. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory show the presence of electronic states at 0.6 eV below the Fermi level of Au, which effectively reduce the charge injection barrier across the metal-molecule interface. Charge transport measurements across oligophenylene monolayers reveal that the conductance of terphenyl-dithiocarbamate junctions is two orders of magnitude higher than that of terphenyl-thiolate junctions. The stability and low contact resistance of dithiocarbamate-based molecular junctions represent a significant step towards the development of robust, organic-based electronic circuits.

  10. Efficient electronic coupling and improved stability with dithiocarbamate-based molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    von Wrochem, Florian; Gao, Deqing; Scholz, Frank; Nothofer, Heinz-Georg; Nelles, Gabriele; Wessels, Jurina M

    2010-08-01

    Molecular electronic devices require stable and highly conductive contacts between the metal electrodes and molecules. Thiols and amines are widely used to attach molecules to metals, but they form poor electrical contacts and lack the robustness required for device applications. Here, we demonstrate that dithiocarbamates provide superior electrical contact and thermal stability when compared to thiols on metals. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory show the presence of electronic states at 0.6 eV below the Fermi level of Au, which effectively reduce the charge injection barrier across the metal-molecule interface. Charge transport measurements across oligophenylene monolayers reveal that the conductance of terphenyl-dithiocarbamate junctions is two orders of magnitude higher than that of terphenyl-thiolate junctions. The stability and low contact resistance of dithiocarbamate-based molecular junctions represent a significant step towards the development of robust, organic-based electronic circuits. PMID:20562871