Science.gov

Sample records for basic oxygen steel

  1. POLLUTION EFFECTS OF ABNORMAL OPERATIONS IN IRON AND STEEL MAKING. VOLUME VI. BASIC OXYGEN PROCESS, MANUAL OF PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is one in a six-volume series considering abnormal operating conditions (AOCs) in the primary section (sintering, blast furnace ironmaking, open hearth, electric furnace, and basic oxygen steelmaking) of an integrated iron and steel plant. Pollution standards, generall...

  2. Reducing BOF Hood Scrubber Energy Costs at a Steel Mill (Bethlehem Steel Corporation Basic Oxygen Furnace No. 3)

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    This Office of Industrial Technologies Technical Case Study reveals how Bethlehem Steel Corporation was able to save energy, reduce operational costs, and decrease system maintenance by installing a variable-frequency drive and making associated equipment modifications.

  3. Basic Oxygen Furnace steel slag aggregates for phosphorus treatment. Evaluation of its potential use as a substrate in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Ivan; Molle, Pascal; Sáenz de Miera, Luis E; Ansola, Gemma

    2016-02-01

    Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF) steel slag aggregates from NW Spain were tested in batch and column experiments to evaluate its potential use as a substrate in constructed wetlands (CWs). The objectives of this study were to identify the main P removal mechanisms of BOF steel slag and determine its P removal capacity. Also, the results were used to discuss the suitability of this material as a substrate to be used in CWs. Batch experiments with BOF slag aggregates and increasing initial phosphate concentrations showed phosphate removal efficiencies between 84 and 99% and phosphate removal capacities from 0.12 to 8.78 mg P/g slag. A continuous flow column experiment filled with BOF slag aggregates receiving an influent synthetic solution of 15 mg P/L during 213 days showed a removal efficiency greater than 99% and a phosphate removal capacity of 3.1 mg P/g slag. In both experiments the main P removal mechanism was found to be calcium phosphate precipitation which depends on Ca(2+) and OH(-) release from the BOF steel slag after dissolution of Ca(OH)2 in water. P saturation of slag was reached within the upper sections of the column which showed phosphate removal capacities between 1.7 and 2.5 mg P/g slag. Once Ca(OH)2 was completely dissolved in these column sections, removal efficiencies declined gradually from 99% until reaching stable outlet concentrations with P removal efficiencies around 7% which depended on influent Ca(2+) for limited continuous calcium phosphate precipitation. PMID:26722756

  4. Looking southwest toward the basic oxygen steelmaking plant from a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking southwest toward the basic oxygen steelmaking plant from a neighborhodd in Braddock by Eleventh Street. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  5. 12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF BASIC OXYGEN FURNACE No. 2 ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF BASIC OXYGEN FURNACE No. 2 ON THE OPERATING FLOOR OF THE FURNACE AISLE IN THE BOP SHOP - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  6. 13. WESTERN VIEW OF INVERTED BASIC OXYGEN FURNACE No. 2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. WESTERN VIEW OF INVERTED BASIC OXYGEN FURNACE No. 2 ON THE OPERATING FLOOR OF THE FURNACE AISLE IN THE BOP SHOP. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  7. 15. WESTERN VIEW OF INVERTED BASIC OXYGEN FURNACE No. 2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. WESTERN VIEW OF INVERTED BASIC OXYGEN FURNACE No. 2 ON THE GROUND FLOOR OF THE FURNACE AISLE IN THE BOP SHOP. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  8. 14. WESTERN VIEW OF INVERTED BASIC OXYGEN FURNACE No. 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. WESTERN VIEW OF INVERTED BASIC OXYGEN FURNACE No. 1 ON THE OPERATING FLOOR OF THE FURNACE AISLE IN THE BOP SHOP. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  9. Enhanced humification by carbonated basic oxygen furnace steel slag--I. Characterization of humic-like acids produced from humic precursors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guangxia; Yue, Dongbei; Fukushima, Masami; Fukuchi, Shigeki; Nie, Yongfeng

    2012-01-01

    Carbonated basic oxygen furnace steel slag (hereinafter referred to as "steel slag") is generated during iron and steel manufacturing and is often classified as waste. The effect of steel slag on humification process was investigated. Catechol, glycine and glucose were used as model humic precursors from degraded biowastes. To verify that humification occurred in the system, humic-like acids (HLAs) were isolated and characterized structurally by elemental analysis, FTIR spectra, solid-state CP-MAS (13)C NMR spectra, and TMAH-Py-GC/MS. Characteristics of the steel slag-HLA were compared with those of HLAs formed in the presence of zeolite and birnessite, and with that of mature compost humic acid. The results showed that steel slag-HLA, like zeolite- and birnessite-HLA, is complex organic material containing prominent aromatic structures. Steel slag substantially accelerated the humification process, which would be highly significant for accelerating the stabilization of biowastes during composting (e.g. municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, and food waste). PMID:22130079

  10. 1. LOOKING NORTH AT THE BASIC OXYGEN STEELMAKING PLANT. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LOOKING NORTH AT THE BASIC OXYGEN STEELMAKING PLANT. THE FLUX HANDLING BUILDING IS ON THE RIGHT, THE MOULD CONDITIONING BUILDING IS IN THE CENTER, THE BASIC OXYGEN PROCESS (BOP) SHOP IS IN THE CENTER BACKGROUND, AND OPEN HEARTH No. 2 BUILDING IS ON THE LEFT. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  11. Laboratory Study on Prevention of CaO-Containing ASTM "D-Type" Inclusions in Al-Deoxidized Low-Oxygen Steel Melts During Basic Slag Refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Min; Wang, Xin-Hua; Yang, Die; Lei, Shao-Long; Wang, Kun-Peng

    2015-12-01

    Present work was attempted to explore the possibility of preventing CaO-containing inclusions in Al-deoxidized low-oxygen special steel during basic slag refining, which were known as ASTM D-type inclusions. Based on the analysis on formation thermodynamics of CaO-containing inclusions, a series of laboratory experiments were designed and carried out in a vacuum induction furnace. During the experiments, slag/steel reaction equilibrium was intentionally suppressed with the aim to decrease the CaO contents in inclusions, which is different from ordinary concept that slag/steel reaction should be promoted for better control of inclusions. The obtained results showed that high cleanliness of steel was obtained in all the steel melts, with total oxygen contents varied between 0.0003 and 0.0010 pct. Simultaneously, formation of CaO-containing inclusions was successfully prohibited, and all the formed oxide inclusions were MgO-Al2O3 or/and Al2O3 in very small sizes of about 1 to 3 μm. And 90 pct to nearly 98 pct of them were wrapped by relative thicker MnS outer surface layers to produce dual-phased "(MgO-Al2O3) + MnS" or "Al2O3 + MnS" complex inclusions. Because of much better ductility of MnS, certain deformability of these complex inclusions can be expected which is helpful to improve fatigue resistance property of steel. Only very limited number of singular MnS inclusions were with sizes larger than 13 μm, which were formed during solidification because of. In the end, formation of oxide inclusions in steel was qualitatively evaluated and discussed.

  12. 11. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF BASIC OXYGEN FURNACES No. 1 AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF BASIC OXYGEN FURNACES No. 1 AND No. 2 ON THE OPERATING FLOOR OF THE FURNACE AISLE IN THE BOP SHOP - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  13. Looking east at the basic oxygen furnace building with gas ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking east at the basic oxygen furnace building with gas cleaning plants in foreground on the left and the right side of the furnace building. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  14. 17. SOUTHEAST VIEW OF THE TAPPING SIDE OF BASIC OXYGEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. SOUTHEAST VIEW OF THE TAPPING SIDE OF BASIC OXYGEN FURNACE No. 2 ON THE OPERATING FLOOR OF THE FURNACE AISLE IN THE BOP SHOP. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  15. Steel Wool and Oxygen: A Look at Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, James; Chancey, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is demonstrated to determine the percentage of oxygen in air using a pretreated piece of steel wool, which is an alternative to spectroscopic kinetic analysis. Students are able to determine the order of reaction for oxygen in its reaction with the iron in steel wool, and are able to use the existing technology to collect and analyze…

  16. Experimental investigation of basic oxygen furnace slag used as aggregate in asphalt mixture.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yongjie; Wu, Shaopeng; Hou, Haobo; Zha, Jin

    2006-11-16

    Chinese researchers have commenced a great deal of researches on the development of application fields of basic oxygen steel making furnace slag (BOF slag) for many years. Lots of new applications and properties have been found, but few of them in asphalt mixture of road construction engineering. This paper discussed the feasibility of BOF steel slag used as aggregate in asphalt pavement by two points of view including BOF steel slag's physical and micro-properties as well as steel slag asphalt materials and pavement performances. For the former part, this paper mainly concerned the mechanochemistry and physical changes of the steel slag and studied it by performing XRD, SEM, TG and mercury porosimeter analysis and testing method. In the second part, this paper intended to use BOF steel slag as raw material, and design steel slag SMA mixture. By using traditional rutting test, soak wheel track and modified Lottman test, the high temperature stability and water resistance ability were tested. Single axes compression test and indirect tensile test were performed to evaluate the low temperature crack resistance performance and fatigue characteristic. Simultaneously, by observing steel slag SMA pavement which was paved successfully. A follow-up study to evaluate the performance of the experimental pavement confirmed that the experimental pavement was comparable with conventional asphalt pavement, even superior to the later in some aspects. All of above test results and analysis had only one main purpose that this paper validated the opinion that using BOF slag in asphalt concrete is feasible. So this paper suggested that treated and tested steel slag should be used in a more extensive range, especially in asphalt mixture paving projects in such an abundant steel slag resource region. PMID:16982138

  17. Laser ignition of bulk 1018 carbon steel in pure oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K.; Branch, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to study the ignition characteristics of bulk 1018 carbon steel in a pure oxygen environment. Cylindrical 1018 carbon steel specimens 5 mm in diameter and 5 mm high were ignited by a focused CW CO2 laser beam in a cool, static, pure oxygen environment at oxygen pressures ranging from 0.103 to 6.895 MPa. A two-color pyrometer was designed and used to measure the ignition temperatures of the specimens. The temperature history of a spot approximately 0.5 mm in diameter located at the center of the specimen top surface was recorded with a maximum time resolution of 25 microsec, and with an accuracy of a few percent. Ignition temperature of bulk 1018 carbon steel was identified from the temperature history curve with the aid of the light intensity curve. Results show that 1018 carbon steel specimens ignite at temperatures between 1388 and 1450 K, which are below the melting range of the alloy (1662-1685 K). The ignition temperature of 1018 carbon steel is mildly dependent on oxygen pressure over the range of oxygen pressure investigated in this study.

  18. Coordinated control of carbon and oxygen for ultra-low-carbon interstitial-free steel in a smelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Bao, Yan-ping; Yang, Quan; Zhao, Li-hua; Lin, Lu

    2015-12-01

    Low residual-free-oxygen before final de-oxidation was beneficial to improving the cleanness of ultra-low-carbon steel. For ultra-low-carbon steel production, the coordinated control of carbon and oxygen is a precondition for achieving low residual oxygen during the Ruhrstahl Heraeus (RH) decarburization process. In this work, we studied the coordinated control of carbon and oxygen for ultra-low-carbon steel during the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) endpoint and RH process using data statistics, multiple linear regressions, and thermodynamics computations. The results showed that the aluminum yield decreased linearly with increasing residual oxygen in liquid steel. When the mass ratio of free oxygen and carbon ([O]/[C]) in liquid steel before RH decarburization was maintained between 1.5 and 2.0 and the carbon range was from 0.030wt% to 0.040wt%, the residual oxygen after RH natural decarburization was low and easily controlled. To satisfy the requirement for RH decarburization, the carbon and free oxygen at the BOF endpoint should be controlled to be between 297 × 10-6 and 400 × 10-6 and between 574 × 10-6 and 775 × 10-6, respectively, with a temperature of 1695 to 1715°C and a furnace campaign of 1000 to 5000 heats.

  19. 48 CFR 252.216-7000 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. 252.216-7000 Section 252.216-7000 Federal... adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. As prescribed in 216.203-4-70(a), use the following clause: Economic Price Adjustment—Basic Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or...

  20. 48 CFR 252.216-7000 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. 252.216-7000 Section 252.216-7000 Federal... adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. As prescribed in 216.203-4-70(a), use the following clause: Economic Price Adjustment—Basic Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or...

  1. 48 CFR 252.216-7000 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. 252.216-7000 Section 252.216-7000 Federal... adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. As prescribed in 216.203-4-70(a)(1), use the following clause: Economic Price Adjustment—Basic Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or...

  2. 48 CFR 252.216-7000 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. 252.216-7000 Section 252.216-7000 Federal... adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. As prescribed in 216.203-4-70(a)(1), use the following clause: Economic Price Adjustment—Basic Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or...

  3. 48 CFR 252.216-7000 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. 252.216-7000 Section 252.216-7000 Federal... adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products. As prescribed in 216.203-4-70(a)(1), use the following clause: Economic Price Adjustment—Basic Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or...

  4. The influence of oxygen on the impact toughness and microstructure of steel weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Kuwana, Takeshi; Maie, Tsuyoshi

    1995-12-31

    A steel plate was welded in a low oxygen potential welding atmosphere. The weld metal obtained is classified in two groups on the oxygen content, very low oxygen content (less than 0.002 mass %) weld metal and relatively high oxygen content (over 0.015 mass%) weld metal. The effect of oxygen in steel weld metal on the Charpy v-notch impact values and the microstructure is investigated and discussed. Very low oxygen content steel weld metal shows superior impact toughness at 273 K as well as the well-known ``optimum oxygen`` containing steel weld metal. The very low oxygen weld metal has relatively large amounts of grain boundary ferrite and side plate ferrite microstructure, instead of upper bainite compared with the relatively high oxygen content weld metal.

  5. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel by oxygen and tellurium at low oxygen potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, H.; Saito, M.; Sugisaki, M.

    1988-06-01

    Oxidation behavior of SUS-316 stainless steel was investigated under oxygen pressures ranging from 10 -23 Pa (as controlled by a {Mo}/{MoO 2} buffer) to 10 -13 Pa (as controlled by a {Ni}/{NiO} buffer). Te-induced corrosion was studied under the oxygen pressure controlled by the {Mo}/{MoO 2} buffer. Based on the kinetic and metallographical data and thermodynamic consideration, the reaction mechanism was discussed. Under the oxygen pressures controlled by the {Mo}/{MoO 2} buffer, a single oxide film was formed on the specimen surface and its growth rate was governed by lattice and grain-boundary diffusion of Cr in the stainless steel substrate. Under the oxygen pressures controlled by the {Ni}/{NiO} buffer, a duplex oxide film was formed and its growth rate depended on the outward diffusion of Fe ions in the outer oxide layer. In the case of simultaneous reaction by O and Te, it was found that the uptakes of these elements increases beyond about 10 Pa Te pressure and the reaction rate was controlled by the outward diffusion of Fe and Ni in the inner reaction layer.

  6. 48 CFR 252.216-7007 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products-representation. 252.216-7007 Section 252....216-7007 Economic price adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products... Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or Copper Mill Products—Representation (MAR 2012) (a) Definitions....

  7. 48 CFR 252.216-7007 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products-representation. 252.216-7007 Section 252....216-7007 Economic price adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products... Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or Copper Mill Products—Representation (MAR 2012) (a) Definitions....

  8. 48 CFR 252.216-7007 - Economic price adjustment-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products-representation. 252.216-7007 Section 252....216-7007 Economic price adjustment—basic steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, or copper mill products... Steel, Aluminum, Brass, Bronze, or Copper Mill Products—Representation (MAR 2012) (a) Definitions....

  9. Looking northwest at the teeming aisle building of the basic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking northwest at the teeming aisle building of the basic oxygen plant; furnace building is in background. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  10. Silicon-containing ferritic/martensitic steel after exposure to oxygen-containing flowing lead-bismuth eutectic at 450 and 550 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, Carsten; Koch, Verena; Wedemeyer, Olaf; Skrypnik, Aleksandr; Konys, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    A ferritic/martensitic (f/m) steel with 9 and 3 mass% of chromium (Cr) and silicon (Si), respectively, was tested on performance in flowing lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 450 and 550 °C, each at concentrations of solved oxygen of both 10-7 and 10-6 mass%. The 9Cr-3Si steel generally exhibits the same basic corrosion modes as other f/m materials with 9 mass% Cr and typically lower Si content, namely Steel T91. The Si-rich steel shows an overall improved performance in comparison to T91 at 450 °C and 10-7 mass% solved oxygen, but especially at 450 °C and 10-6 mass% solved oxygen. The advantage of higher Si-content in 9Cr steel is less clear at 550 °C. Especially high oxygen content in flowing LBE at 550 °C, between >10-6 mass% and oxygen saturation, seems detrimental for the high-Si material in respect of the initiation and progress of a solution-based corrosion.

  11. Oxygen metabolism, oxygen extraction and positron emission tomography: Historical perspective and impact on basic and clinical neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Baron, Jean-Claude; Jones, Terry

    2012-06-01

    Oxygen utilization is central to the human brain's high metabolic rate. Measurement of this fundamental process, in both disease and health, has been a focus of research attention over the last 35 years. This review plots the course of the use of oxygen-15 to study regional cerebral oxygen extraction and metabolism using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in disease and in health. The scientific discoveries and resulting conceptual changes to both basic and clinical neuroscience, as well as the new methodological approaches brought about by this area of research, are also summarized. We conclude with a brief overview of the current status of oxygen-15 PET in neuroscience, along with our visions for future developments and applications. PMID:22227130

  12. A Simple Experiment To Measure the Content of Oxygen in the Air Using Heated Steel Wool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Francisco; Rivera, Rodrigo; Nunez, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    The typical experiment to measure the oxygen content in the atmosphere uses the rusting of steel wool inside a closed volume of air. Two key aspects of this experiment that make possible a successful measurement of the content of oxygen in the air are the use of a closed atmosphere and the use of a chemical reaction that involves the oxidation of…

  13. Profiles in garbage: Steel cans

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.

    1998-02-01

    Steel mills are the largest market for steel cans. Integrated mills use the basic oxygen process to manufacture tinplate, appliances, car bodies, and steel framing. Electric arc furnaces use 100% scrap to produce steel shapes such as railroad ties and bridge spans. Electric arc furnaces are more geographically diverse and tend to have smaller capacities than basic oxygen furnaces. Detinners remove the tin from steel cans for resale to tin using industries. With less tin use in steel cans, the importance of the detinning market has declined substantially. Foundries use scrap as a raw material in making castings and molds for industrial users.

  14. Essentials of Airway Management, Oxygenation, and Ventilation: Basic Equipment and Devices.

    PubMed

    Becker, Daniel E; Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2015-01-01

    Offices and outpatient dental facilities must be properly equipped with devices for airway management, oxygenation, and ventilation. Optimizing patient safety using crisis resource management involves the entire dental office team being familiar with airway rescue equipment. Basic equipment for oxygenation, ventilation, and airway management is mandated in the majority of U.S. dental offices, per state regulations. The immediate availability of this equipment is especially important during the administration of sedation and anesthesia, as well as the treatment of medical urgencies/emergencies. This article reviews basic equipment and devices essential in any dental practice, whether providing local anesthesia alone or in combination with procedural sedation. PMID:26168530

  15. Basicity of the framework oxygen atom of alkali and alkaline earth-exchanged zeolites: a hard soft acid base approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Ramesh Ch; Kinkar Roy, Ram; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2000-12-01

    The basicity of framework oxygen atoms of alkali and alkaline earth-exchanged zeolites has been studied using reactivity descriptors based on a local hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) concept. We have calculated the `local softness' and the `relative nucleophilicity' values of the framework oxygen atoms of zeolite clusters as the measure of basicity. The local softness and relative nucleophilicity appear to be more reliable descriptors to predict the experimental basicity trend, compared to the negative charge on the oxygen atom.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTROLLING BOP (BASIC OXYGEN PROCESS) CHARGING EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the basic oxygen process (BOP) hot metal charging emission control technology, conducted with a 900 kg pilot vessel designed for the experiments. Complete instrumentation was provided to measure the emissions, the effectiveness of the variou...

  17. Use of basic deuterium peroxide in the chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrovec, John; Yang, Tientsai T.; Copeland, Drew A.

    2000-05-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) uses a reaction of gaseous chorine and aqueous solution of basic oxygen peroxide (BHP) to produce oxygen singlet delta molecules, O2(1(Delta) ). Quenching of O2(1(Delta) ) during its extraction from the BHP solution and quenching of excited atomic iodine I* by water vapor from the O2(1(Delta) ) production process are well-known parasitic effects in COIL. This paper shows that both of these effects can be significantly reduced by replacing the hydrogen 1H1 isotope atoms in BHP by the 1H2 isotope atoms. In addition to restoring laser power lost to parasitic quenching, use of basic deuterium peroxide (BDP) rather than BHP is expected to allow generation of O2(1(Delta) ) at elevated temperature. This approach promises to save refrigerant, reduce the risk of BDP freezing, and delay precipitation of salt form BDP solution. Methods for producing BDP are outlined.

  18. Promoted Ignition and Burning Tests of Stainless Steel in Flowing and Nonflowing Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsyth, Elliot T.; Maes, Miguel; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Bachelier, Frederic

    2003-01-01

    The Industry-Sponsored Metals Combustion Test Program 96-1 was coordinated through Wendell Hull & Associates, Inc. on behalf of several contributing companies, and all design and testing was performed at the NASA White Sands Test Facility. Phase I of this test program studied the threshold pressure for self-sustained burning of various types and sizes of stain less steel rods in nonflowing oxygen, as observed in Standard Test Method for Determining the Combustion Behavior of Metallic Materials in Oxygen-Enriched Atmospheres (ASTM G 124-95). Phase II studied the ignition and propagation of burning of 316L stainless steel rods and pipe in flowing gaseous oxygen. The test sample configurations were chosen to replicate previous promoted ignition and burning tests as well as to represent geometries and cross-sectional thicknesses common in industrial piping applications. The gas pressw'es and velocities for the test matrix were selected to generally compare with CGA G-4.4 guidelines for the use of stain less steel in oxygen service. This paper summarizes the results from the Phase I nonflowing oxygen tests and presents in detail the results of the Phase II flowing oxygen tests. The maximum sample burn-length is shown as a function of test pressure in Phase 1 and also as a function of gas velocity in Phase IT. These results indicate that flowing oxygen, under the given test conditions, significantly affects maximum sample burn length as compared to nonflowing oxygen. Supplementary flowing oxygen test data on stainless steel rods from a follow-up test program are consistent with these results and are presented herein.

  19. Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels: a basic research joint program in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutard, J.-L.; Badjeck, V.; Barguet, L.; Barouh, C.; Bhattacharya, A.; Colignon, Y.; Hatzoglou, C.; Loyer-Prost, M.; Rouffié, A. L.; Sallez, N.; Salmon-Legagneur, H.; Schuler, T.

    2014-12-01

    AREVA, CEA, CNRS, EDF and Mécachrome are funding a joint program of basic research on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels (ODISSEE), in support to the development of oxide dispersion strengthened 9-14% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels for the fuel element cladding of future Sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors. The selected objectives and the results obtained so far will be presented concerning (i) physical-chemical characterisation of the nano-clusters as a function of ball-milling process, metallurgical conditions and irradiation, (ii) meso-scale understanding of failure mechanisms under dynamic loading and creep, and, (iii) kinetic modelling of nano-clusters nucleation and α/α‧ unmixing.

  20. Essentials of airway management, oxygenation, and ventilation: part 1: basic equipment and devices.

    PubMed

    Becker, Daniel E; Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2014-01-01

    Offices and outpatient dental facilities must be properly equipped with devices for airway management, oxygenation, and ventilation. Optimizing patient safety using crisis resource management (CRM) involves the entire dental office team being familiar with airway rescue equipment. Basic equipment for oxygenation, ventilation, and airway management is mandated in the majority of US dental offices per state regulations. The immediate availability of this equipment is especially important during the administration of sedation and anesthesia as well as the treatment of medical urgencies/emergencies. This article reviews basic equipment and devices essential in any dental practice whether providing local anesthesia alone or in combination with procedural sedation. Part 2 of this series will address advanced airway devices, including supraglottic airways and armamentarium for tracheal intubation and invasive airway procedures. PMID:24932982

  1. Essentials of Airway Management, Oxygenation, and Ventilation: Part 1: Basic Equipment and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.; Rosenberg, Morton B.; Phero, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Offices and outpatient dental facilities must be properly equipped with devices for airway management, oxygenation, and ventilation. Optimizing patient safety using crisis resource management (CRM) involves the entire dental office team being familiar with airway rescue equipment. Basic equipment for oxygenation, ventilation, and airway management is mandated in the majority of US dental offices per state regulations. The immediate availability of this equipment is especially important during the administration of sedation and anesthesia as well as the treatment of medical urgencies/emergencies. This article reviews basic equipment and devices essential in any dental practice whether providing local anesthesia alone or in combination with procedural sedation. Part 2 of this series will address advanced airway devices, including supraglottic airways and armamentarium for tracheal intubation and invasive airway procedures. PMID:24932982

  2. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen ion implantation of stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Gavrilov, N.V.; Emlin, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ion implantation experiments of C, N, and O into stainless steel have been performed, with beam-line and plasma source ion implantation methods. Acceleration voltages were varied between 27 and 50 kV, with pulsed ion current densities between 1 and 10 mA/cm{sup 2}. Implanted doses ranged from 0.5 to 3 {times} 10{sup 18}cm{sup -2}, while workpiece temperatures were maintained between 25 and 800 C. Implant concentration profiles, microstructure, and surface mechanical properties of the implanted materials are reported.

  3. Study on Control of Inclusion Compositions in Tire Cord Steel by Low Basicity Top Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Cai-ping; Yue, Feng; Jiang, Chen-xu; Wu, Qi-fan

    2016-01-01

    Top slag melting experiment was conducted in a silicon molybdenum furnace with tire cord steel billet. The influence of top slag composition on the plasticity of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-MgO inclusion and inclusion plasticization conditions was calculated by thermodynamic software FactSage. Use the thermodynamic calculation to guide the laboratory experiments to study slag compositions influence inclusions composition. Then industrial experiments were conducted based on the theoretical calculation and results of laboratory experiments. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to determine the morphology and composition of inclusions in steel. All studies show that in the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-10% MgO diagram, when CaO = 8-48%, SiO2 = 35-75%, Al2O3 = 0-32%, inclusions are in the plastic area. When basicity of top slag is certain, Al2O3 content in inclusions increases with the increase of Al2O3 content in the slag, and the distribution of inclusions becomes scattered with the increase of Al2O3 content in slag. Inclusion plasticization can be achieved when the binary basicities of top slag are 0.6, 0.8-1.2, 1.4 and corresponding w(Al2O3)s are 2-15%, 2-10%, <2%. According to industrial experimental results, when top slag basicity decreases from 1.5 to 0.67-0.9 and Al2O3 content decreases below 10 wt%, the inclusion falls into plastic area. It is feasible in practice to control the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-MgO inclusions plastic through adjusting Al2O3 content in slag.

  4. Characterization and wear tests of steel surfaces implanted with oxygen, aluminum, and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langguth, Kathrin; Kluge, Andreas; Ryssel, Heiner

    1991-07-01

    A number of screening tests were performed to determine ion species that effectively reduce wear rates when implanted in four industrial steels. Ball bearing steel 100Cr6 (AISI 52100) showed a wear rate reduction by a factor of 20 when implanted with carbon dioxide to a dose of 5 × 10 17 cm -2 with a non-mass-separated ion beam and by a factor of ⩾ 20 when implanted with 5 × 10 17 cm -2 oxygen ions. For the ferritic and martensitic steels X90CrMoV18 (AISI 440B, unhardened and hardened) also a strong wear reduction after implantation of oxygen ions was found. Co-implantation of aluminum and oxygen also reduces wear rates of X90CrMoV18, of S6-5-2 (AISI M2), and of 100Cr6, respectively. For comparison, thin oxide layers were grown in a low-temperature thermal oxidation process. These experiments also yielded reduced wear rates by a factor of 10. The surfaces were investigated and characterized by XPS, SIMS, TEM, and microhardness measurements to determine possible oxidation states, maximum concentration of oxygen ions, amorphization effects, and changes in surface hardness, respectively.

  5. Genetic relations among basic lavas and ultramafic nodules: Evidence from oxygen isotope compositions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kyser, T.K.; O'Neil, J.R.; Carmichael, I.S.E.

    1982-01-01

    ??18O values of unaltered basic lavas range from 4.9 to 8.3 but different types of basalts are usually restricted to narrow and distinct ranges of isotopic composition. The average ??18O values for Hawaiian tholeiites, mid-ocean ridge tholeiites, and alkali basalts are 5.4, 5.7, and 6.2 permil, respectively. Potassic lavas and andesites tend to be more 18O rich with ??18O values between 6.0 and 8.0 permil. The differences among the oxygen isotopic compositions of most of these lavas can be attributed to partial melting of isotopically distinct sources. The oxygen isotope compositions of the sources may be a function of prior melting events which produce 18O-depleted partial melts and 18O-enriched residues as a consequence of relatively large isotopic fractionations that exist at high temperatures. It is proposed that lavas with relatively low ??18O values are derived from primitive, 18O-depleted sources whereas 18O-rich basalts are produced from refractory sources that have already produced partial melts. High temperature fractionations among silicate liquids and coexisting minerals can be used in conjunction with the oxygen isotope compositions of ultramafic nodules to place constraints on the genetic relations between some nodules and different types of basic lavas. ?? 1982 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Cellular Automata Modeling of Decarburization of Metal Droplets in Basic Oxygen Steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankit; Kundu, T. K.

    2016-02-01

    In steelmaking, a supersonic jet is blown over the bath to refine the hot metal to produce steel. The refining process primarily consists of removal of impurities from the hot metal to a permissible level. The impact of oxygen jet on the surface of the hot metal bath results in ejection of droplets, which mix with slag and form emulsion. The formed emulsion plays an important role in refining reactions kinetics and understanding of this process is required todevelopimproved process control model for the steel industry. In this paper, cellular automata technique has been explored to simulate decarburization in emulsion caused by interfacial reactions between the metal droplets and slag. In the course of the work, a framework has also been developed to quantify the contribution of carbon monoxide, generated by decarburization, in bloating of metal droplets and formation of halo around the droplets. The model has incorporated diffusion and decarburization reaction based on probabilities to study the evolution of the system. Simulations with varying parameters have been performed and decarburization trends obtained are comparable with the experimentally determined data reported in literatures.

  7. Influence of Sample Pretreatment Methods on the Determination of Trace Oxygen in Iron and Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuhara, H.; Shimura, M.; Yoshioka, K.

    1997-04-01

    Removing the oxide film from the sample surface is an important process in analyzing trace oxygen in iron and steel. The depth profiles of oxygen on the surface after electropolishing in CH3COOH - HClO4, CrO3 - H3PO4, and HCl, and chemical polishing by HF- H2O2 are investigated. The thickness of the oxide layer after electropolishing is estimated to be about 3 nm, which is approximately equivalent to 1 mass ppm oxygen. This indicates that the currently available surface polishing methods are inadequate for the analysis of mass ppm or sub-ppm oxygen levels. A surface without an oxide layer is obtained by Ar ion sputtering in a vacuum, but the oxide layer reappears within 1 min when the sample comes into contact with air.

  8. The Effect of Refining Slag and Refractory on Inclusion Transformation in Extra Low Oxygen Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunyang; Huang, Fuxiang; Wang, Xinhua

    2016-04-01

    MgO-based refractory and MgO bearing slag both have the potential to supply Mg or Ca to the molten steel and then prompt the inclusion transformation. In this paper, the effect of MgO-based refractory and MgO bearing slag on the spinel generation was investigated on laboratorial scale. The results indicated that refractory had a great contribution to MgO·Al2O3 spinel generation. Although refining slag was faster than MgO-C refractory and than MgO refractory in terms of Mg supply velocity, if the interaction area with the molten steel was taken into calculation, MgO-C and MgO refractory supplied more Mg into molten steel than refining slag during the same time. In addition, refining slag can not only supply Mg into the molten steel to form MgO in inclusions but also supply Ca to generate CaO bearing inclusions. The Al2O3 inclusions transformed through the Al2O3 → MgO·Al2O3 → CaO·MgO·Al2O3 routine and the reason why the Al2O3 inclusions degraded into MgO·Al2O3 rather than CaO·Al2O3 inclusions firstly was clarified. CaO and MgO in the slag can be both reduced at the slag-metal interface and then supply [Ca] and [Mg] into the steel melt. [Ca] activity was dramatically suppressed by the dissolved oxygen in the steel melt and the Ca activity coefficient was near zero, however, the Mg activity coefficient was almost 1, and therefore, MgO·Al2O3 spinel generated firstly. When the dissolved oxygen decreased and the Ca activity increased, [Ca] reacted with existed inclusions spinel and generated CaO·MgO·Al2O3 inclusions.

  9. Modeling of Dephosphorization using Bloated Droplet Theory in Basic Oxygen Steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankit; Kundu, T. K.

    2015-02-01

    A considerable fraction of refining of hot metal in basic oxygen steelmaking is carried out in emulsion layer by interaction between the metal droplets and slag. The top oxygen blowing ejects metal droplets into the slag which then undergo refining reactions and return to the metal bath. During this period, the carbon in metal droplets reacts with available oxygen to form carbon monoxide. Above a certain threshold decarburization rate, the evolved carbon monoxide inside the droplet causes the droplet to bloat which increases its surface area. The bloating affects the residence time and the rate of certain interfacial reactions. Here, efforts have been made to study dephosphorization in metal droplet in emulsion by coupling dephosphorization kinetics with the 'bloated droplet theory'. As observed in industrial furnaces, the calculated phosphorous concentration in droplet was found to be lower than that of metal bath. Dephosphorization model developed using mixed transport control model was found to fit industrial data. The results obtained were in satisfactory agreement with the available data and a step ahead in improving the understanding of dephosphorization in steelmaking.

  10. Evidence of enzymatic catalysis of oxygen reduction on stainless steels under marine biofilm.

    PubMed

    Faimali, Marco; Benedetti, Alessandro; Pavanello, Giovanni; Chelossi, Elisabetta; Wrubl, Federico; Mollica, Alfonso

    2011-04-01

    Cathodic current trends on stainless steel samples with different surface percentages covered by biofilm and potentiostatically polarized in natural seawater were studied under oxygen concentration changes, temperature increases, and additions of enzymic inhibitors to the solution. The results showed that on each surface fraction covered by biofilm the oxygen reduction kinetics resembled a reaction catalyzed by an immobilised enzyme with high oxygen affinity (apparent Michaelis-Menten dissociation constant close to K(O(2))(M)  ≈ 10 μM) and low activation energy (W ≈ 20 KJ mole(-1)). The proposed enzyme rapidly degraded when the temperature was increased above the ambient (half-life time of ∼1 day at 25°C, and of a few minutes at 50°C). Furthermore, when reversible enzymic inhibitors (eg sodium azide and cyanide) were added, the cathodic current induced by biofilm growth was inhibited. PMID:21526439

  11. Combustion of 316 stainless steel in high-pressure gaseous oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Frank; Steinberg, Theodore A.; Janoff, Dwight

    1989-01-01

    Upward combustion of 316 stainless steel (SS) rods is discussed and a combustion model is presented. The effects of varying oxygen pressure and rod diameter on the rate limiting processes for combustion of 316 SS are evaluated. The rate-limiting steps for combustion up 316 SS rods are shown to be dependent on the incorporation and mass transport of oxygen in the molten mass, and heat transfer between the molten mass and rod. Both these rate-limiting steps are shown to be dependent on rod diameter. Small (d/r/ = 0.051 cm) 316 SS rods are shown to be dependent on convective heat transfer, and larger rods (d/r/ not less than 0.32 cm) are shown to be dependent on oxygen incorporation and mass transport in the molten mass.

  12. 38. DETAIL OF COOLING WATER BOOSTER PUMP FOR OXYGEN FURNACES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. DETAIL OF COOLING WATER BOOSTER PUMP FOR OXYGEN FURNACES, LANCES, AND FUME HOODS IN THE GAS WASHER PUMP HOUSE LOOKING EAST. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  13. 3. EASTERN VIEW OF HOISTING RIG FOR OXYGEN LANCES ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EASTERN VIEW OF HOISTING RIG FOR OXYGEN LANCES ON THE FLUX STORAGE FLOOR OF THE FURNACE AISLE IN THE BOP SHOP. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  14. Basic properties of steel plant dust and technological properties of direct reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Xue-Feng; Wang, Jing-Song; Xue, Qing-Guo; Ding, Yin-Gui; Zhang, Sheng-Sheng; Dong, Jie-Ji; Zeng, Hui

    2011-06-01

    Basic physicochemical properties of the dust from Laiwu Iron and Steel Co. Ltd. were studied. It is found that C, Zn, K, Na, etc. exist in the fabric filter dust, off gas (OG) sludge, fine ash in converter, and electrical field dust in sinter. Among these, OG sludge gives the finest particle, more than 90% of which is less than 2.51 μm. The dust can lead to a serious negative influence on the production of sintering and blast furnaces (BF) if it is recycled in sintering. The briquette and reduction experimental results showed that the qualified strength could be obtained in the case of 8wt% molasses or 4wt% QT-10 added as binders. Also, more than 75% of metallization ratio, more than 95% of dezincing ratio, as well as more than 80% of K and Na removal rates were achieved for the briquettes kept at 1250°C for 15 min during the direct reduction process. SEM observation indicated that the rates of indirect reduction and carbonization became dominating when the briquettes were kept at 1250°C for 6 min.

  15. Hydrogen and oxygen trapping and retention in stainless steel and graphite materials irradiated in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begrambekov, L.; Ayrapetov, A.; Ermakov, V.; Kaplevsky, A.; Sadovsky, Ya.; Shigin, P.

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental investigation of energy and flux dependences of hydrogen isotopes and oxygen trapping in carbon materials (carbon fiber composite and pyrolitic graphite), and metals (stainless steel and nickel) under irradiation in the deuterium gas discharge plasma with and without oxygen addition. The dependence of hydrogen trapping on ion energy, ion current density, oxygen addition in deuterium plasma are presented and analyzed. The sorbed molecules, containing hydrogen atoms from the residual gas and deuterium atoms of the working gas are shown to be the important source of hydrogen trapping in both carbon based materials and stainless steel. Irradiation of the SS vacuum vessel with the neutrals or/and ions of (D2 + O2) plasma initiate the hydrogen diffusion from the vessel wall and H2, HD, D2O, HDO, H2O molecule formation on the wall surface. Trapping of the low energy plasma particles and the particles from the sorbed molecules as well as modification of working gas composition are considered as the processes provided at the expense of the potential energy of plasma particles with respect to the surface and occurred through their inelastic collisions with the surface. The hydrogen trapping occurred due to “potential” processes was named as “potential”, and in contrast the trapping of fast particles due to their kinetic energy was labeled as “kinetic”.

  16. Mechanical impact tests of materials in oxygen effects of contamination. [Teflon, stainless steel, and aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordin, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of contaminants on the mechanical impact sensitivity of Teflon, stainless steel, and aluminum in a high-pressure oxygen environment was investigated. Uncontaminated Teflon did not ignite under the test conditions. The liquid contaminants - cutting oil, motor lubricating oil, and toolmaker dye - caused Teflon to ignite. Raising the temperature lowered the impact energy required for ignition. Stainless steel was insensitive to ignition under the test conditions with the contaminants used. Aluminum appeared to react without contaminants under certain test conditions; however, contamination with cutting oil, motor lubricating oil, and toolmakers dye increased the sensitivity of aluminum to mechanical impact. The grit contaminants silicon dioxide and copper powder did not conclusively affect the sensitivity of aluminum.

  17. Volatilization of elemental mercury from fresh blast furnace sludge mixed with basic oxygen furnace sludge under different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Földi, Corinna; Dohrmann, Reiner; Mansfeldt, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Blast furnace sludge (BFS) is a waste with elevated mercury (Hg) content due to enrichment during the production process of pig iron. To investigate the volatilization potential of Hg, fresh samples of BFS mixed with basic oxygen furnace sludge (BOFS; a residue of gas purification from steel making, processed simultaneously in the cleaning devices of BFS and hence mixed with BFS) were studied in sealed column experiments at different temperatures (15, 25, and 35 °C) for four weeks (total Hg: 0.178 mg kg(-1)). The systems were regularly flushed with ambient air (every 24 h for the first 100 h, followed by every 72 h) for 20 min at a flow rate of 0.25 ± 0.03 L min(-1) and elemental Hg vapor was trapped on gold coated sand. Volatilization was 0.276 ± 0.065 ng (x m: 0.284 ng) at 15 °C, 5.55 ± 2.83 ng (x m: 5.09 ng) at 25 °C, and 2.37 ± 0.514 ng (x m: 2.34 ng) at 35 °C. Surprisingly, Hg fluxes were lower at 35 than 25 °C. For all temperature variants, an elevated Hg flux was observed within the first 100 h followed by a decrease of volatilization thereafter. However, the background level of ambient air was not achieved at the end of the experiments indicating that BFS mixed with BOFS still possessed Hg volatilization potential. PMID:26444147

  18. Basic Regulatory Principles of Escherichia coli's Electron Transport Chain for Varying Oxygen Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, Sebastian G.; Beek, Alexander Ter; Steinsiek, Sonja; Stagge, Stefan; Bettenbrock, Katja; de Mattos, M. Joost Teixeira; Sauter, Thomas; Sawodny, Oliver; Ederer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    For adaptation between anaerobic, micro-aerobic and aerobic conditions Escherichia coli's metabolism and in particular its electron transport chain (ETC) is highly regulated. Although it is known that the global transcriptional regulators FNR and ArcA are involved in oxygen response it is unclear how they interplay in the regulation of ETC enzymes under micro-aerobic chemostat conditions. Also, there are diverse results which and how quinones (oxidised/reduced, ubiquinone/other quinones) are controlling the ArcBA two-component system. In the following a mathematical model of the E. coli ETC linked to basic modules for substrate uptake, fermentation product excretion and biomass formation is introduced. The kinetic modelling focusses on regulatory principles of the ETC for varying oxygen conditions in glucose-limited continuous cultures. The model is based on the balance of electron donation (glucose) and acceptance (oxygen or other acceptors). Also, it is able to account for different chemostat conditions due to changed substrate concentrations and dilution rates. The parameter identification process is divided into an estimation and a validation step based on previously published and new experimental data. The model shows that experimentally observed, qualitatively different behaviour of the ubiquinone redox state and the ArcA activity profile in the micro-aerobic range for different experimental conditions can emerge from a single network structure. The network structure features a strong feed-forward effect from the FNR regulatory system to the ArcBA regulatory system via a common control of the dehydrogenases of the ETC. The model supports the hypothesis that ubiquinone but not ubiquinol plays a key role in determining the activity of ArcBA in a glucose-limited chemostat at micro-aerobic conditions. PMID:25268772

  19. Application of PIGE, BS and NRA techniques to oxygen profiling in steel joints using deuteron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csedreki, L.; Huszank, R.

    2015-04-01

    In order to study the oxygen content and to characterize the oxygen depth profile on the surface of welded steel joints in the function of the applied shielding gases, particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), backscattering spectrometry (BS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) methods were used. The measurements were carried out at 1.0, 1.4 and 1.8 MeV deuteron energies. From the PIGE oxygen and carbon elemental maps (1000 × 1000 μm2) taken with a beam of 2 × 2 μm2 beam size, oxygen rich regions were chosen for the depth profile analysis. The investigated depth was ∼6 μm using particle detection (BS, NRA), which was extended to ∼11 μm with the application of the differential-PIGE method, using the numerical integration of experimental cross-section data. The oxygen depth profiles show systematic discrepancy in the oxide layer thickness and composition between the two different kind of shielding gases.

  20. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... authorized. (b) Steel. Open-hearth, electric or basic oxygen process steel of uniform quality must be used... component parts of hand fire extinguishers. (2) The closure of a fitting, boss, or pad must be adequate...

  1. Oxidation characteristics of 440 C CRES in gaseous oxygen (GOX) environments. [Corrosion Resistant Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennies, Daniel P.; Parsons, Terry D.

    1986-01-01

    The oxidation characteristics of 440 C corrosion-resistant steel are evaluated. The dependence of oxide color, type, and thickness, material hardness, and microstructure on temperature is examined. The effects of exposure time, passivation layer, and oxygen pressure on the oxide formation are investigated. A direct relationship between temperature and oxide color, formation, and thickness is detected. It is observed that the exposure time does not affect the microstructure or oxide color, type, or thickness; however, the passivation layer does affect oxide color and type.

  2. Oxidation characteristics of 440 C CRES in gaseous oxygen (GOX) environments. [Corrosion Resistant Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Dennies, D.P.; Parsons, T.D.

    1986-10-01

    The oxidation characteristics of 440 C corrosion-resistant steel are evaluated. The dependence of oxide color, type, and thickness, material hardness, and microstructure on temperature is examined. The effects of exposure time, passivation layer, and oxygen pressure on the oxide formation are investigated. A direct relationship between temperature and oxide color, formation, and thickness is detected. It is observed that the exposure time does not affect the microstructure or oxide color, type, or thickness; however, the passivation layer does affect oxide color and type. 9 references.

  3. Oxidation behavior of ferritic/martensitic steels in stagnant liquid LBE saturated by oxygen at 600 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Quanqiang; Liu, Jian; Luan, He; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Yan, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2015-02-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are primary candidates for application as cladding and structural materials in the Generation IV Nuclear Reactor, especially accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS). The compatibility of F/M steels with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is a critical issue for development of ADS using liquid LBE as the coolant. In this work, the corrosion tests of two F/M steels, including a novel 9-12 Cr modified F/M steel named SIMP steel and a commercial T91 steel, were conducted in the static oxygen-saturated liquid LBE at 600 °C up to 1000 h, the microstructure of the oxide scale formed on these two steels was analyzed, the relationship between the microstructure and the oxidation behavior was studied, and the reason why the SIMP steel showed better oxidation resistance compared to T91 steel was analyzed. The results of this study confirmed that the oxidation behavior of the F/M steels in liquid metals is influenced by their alloying elements and microstructures.

  4. Investigation of the phosphorus removal capacities of basic oxygen furnace slag under variable conditions.

    PubMed

    Han, Chong; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Wangjin; Wu, Qianqian; Yang, He; Xue, Xiangxin

    2016-05-01

    Effects of reaction time, initial phosphorus concentration, basic oxygen furnace slag (BOF-slag) dosage and size, and temperature on the phosphorus removal capacities (PRCs) of BOF-slag have been investigated in detail through batch tests. Weakly bound phosphorus, Fe- and Al-associated phosphorus, and Ca-associated phosphorus from fresh and reacted BOF-slag were analysed using sequential chemical extraction processes. It was determined that the PRCs of BOF-slag increased with the increase of initial phosphorus concentration and temperature while it decreased with the increase of BOF-slag dosage and size. The phosphorus removed by BOF-slag was primarily assigned to weakly bound phosphorus and Ca-associated phosphorus. Weakly bound phosphorus showed a significant decrease with the increase in all experimental parameter values. However, Ca-associated phosphorus exhibited a prominent increase with increasing reaction time, initial phosphorus concentration, and temperature. These demonstrate that experimental parameters can simultaneously affect the PRCs of BOF-slag and the ways of phosphorus removal by BOF-slag. PMID:26507932

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of hexavalent chromium removal by basic oxygen furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Han, Chong; Jiao, Yanan; Wu, Qianqian; Yang, Wangjin; Yang, He; Xue, Xiangxin

    2016-08-01

    Basic oxygen furnace slag (BOFS) has the potential to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from wastewater by a redox process due to the presence of minerals containing Fe(2+). The effects of the solution pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration, BOFS dosage, BOFS particle size, and temperature on the removal of Cr(VI) was investigated in detail through batch tests. The chemical and mineral compositions of fresh and reacted BOFS were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) system and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The results show that Cr(VI) in wastewater can be efficiently removed by Fe(2+) released from BOFS under appropriate acidic conditions. The removal of Cr(VI) by BOFS significantly depended on the parameters mentioned above. The reaction of Cr(VI) with BOFS followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Fe(2+) responsible for Cr(VI) removal was primarily derived from the dissolution of FeO and Fe3O4 in BOFS. When H2SO4 was used to adjust the solution acidity, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) could be formed and become an armoring precipitate layer on the BOFS surface, hindering the release of Fe(2+) and the removal of Cr(VI). Finally, the main mechanism of Cr(VI) removal by BOFS was described using several consecutive reaction steps. PMID:27521937

  6. Melting of corrosion-resisting steels using air in bath agitation at the end of oxygen blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizatulin, R. A.; Valuev, D. V.; Valueva, A. V.; Yedesheva, Ch V.

    2014-10-01

    A number of metallurgical plants employ ladle stirring with argon at the end of oxygen blowing during the melting process of corrosion-resisting steels [1, 2]. At the same time, the scarcity and relatively high cost of argon, its low pressure in a shop air pipeline restrain most plants from using argon for corrosion-resisting steel production. Compressed air was used instead of argon to intensify the process of decarbonizing when chromium-nickel stainless steels were made with a 40-ton electric arc furnace at the Kuznetsk Metallurgical Plant.

  7. Investigation on Nonmetallic Inclusions in Ultra-Low-Oxygen Special Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin Zhu; Jiang, Min; He, Xiao-Fei; Sun, Wei; Wang, Xin-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Investigation was carried out on inclusions in ultra-low-oxygen special steel by taking systematic samplings not only from secondary refining but also from continuous casting. It was found that RH degassing had a much stronger ability than LF refining in removing inclusions. Total oxygen (TO) can be further reduced from 0.0013 to 0.0015 mass pct to about 0.00047 mass pct without too much difficulty by elongating RH degassing time to 33 minute. Inclusions larger than 5 μm were decreased from 1.49 to 0.08 N/mm2 with a removal ratio of about 94 pct. During secondary refining, inclusions experienced continuous evolution from Al2O3 to the MgO-Al2O3, CaO-MgO-Al2O3, and CaO-Al2O3 system due to complex reactions among slag, steel, and refractory materials. Because of more efficient removal of solid inclusions, especially those large ones during RH treatment, thorough modification of solid inclusions into liquid CaO-MgO-Al2O3 can be achieved. Reoxidation during casting resulted in an obvious rise in Al2O3 content in inclusions, which offset the efforts made during secondary refining. Liquid CaO-Al2O3 systems after RH were changed to solid CaO-Al2O3, MgO-Al2O3, or CaO-MgO-Al2O3 again. Large inclusions with sizes approaching several hundred micron were frequently observed in casting bloom by a vast area of scanning under an automatic scanning electron microscope despite very low TO of about 0.00059 mass pct. A total of 78 pct of them were cluster-shaped CaO-MgO-Al2O3 solid inclusions with sizes as large as 200-330 μm. Most clusters over 100 μm were constituted by smaller particles with similar chemical compositions to other small singular inclusions in steel, which indicated that they were formed due to the aggregations of small inclusions during casting. Moreover, the location of them indicated a close relationship to the solidification microstructure of steel, which has not been covered before. It was impressively found that larger inclusions were mainly in the column

  8. Investigation on Nonmetallic Inclusions in Ultra-Low-Oxygen Special Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin Zhu; Jiang, Min; He, Xiao-Fei; Sun, Wei; Wang, Xin-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Investigation was carried out on inclusions in ultra-low-oxygen special steel by taking systematic samplings not only from secondary refining but also from continuous casting. It was found that RH degassing had a much stronger ability than LF refining in removing inclusions. Total oxygen (TO) can be further reduced from 0.0013 to 0.0015 mass pct to about 0.00047 mass pct without too much difficulty by elongating RH degassing time to 33 minute. Inclusions larger than 5 μm were decreased from 1.49 to 0.08 N/mm2 with a removal ratio of about 94 pct. During secondary refining, inclusions experienced continuous evolution from Al2O3 to the MgO-Al2O3, CaO-MgO-Al2O3, and CaO-Al2O3 system due to complex reactions among slag, steel, and refractory materials. Because of more efficient removal of solid inclusions, especially those large ones during RH treatment, thorough modification of solid inclusions into liquid CaO-MgO-Al2O3 can be achieved. Reoxidation during casting resulted in an obvious rise in Al2O3 content in inclusions, which offset the efforts made during secondary refining. Liquid CaO-Al2O3 systems after RH were changed to solid CaO-Al2O3, MgO-Al2O3, or CaO-MgO-Al2O3 again. Large inclusions with sizes approaching several hundred micron were frequently observed in casting bloom by a vast area of scanning under an automatic scanning electron microscope despite very low TO of about 0.00059 mass pct. A total of 78 pct of them were cluster-shaped CaO-MgO-Al2O3 solid inclusions with sizes as large as 200-330 μm. Most clusters over 100 μm were constituted by smaller particles with similar chemical compositions to other small singular inclusions in steel, which indicated that they were formed due to the aggregations of small inclusions during casting. Moreover, the location of them indicated a close relationship to the solidification microstructure of steel, which has not been covered before. It was impressively found that larger inclusions were mainly in the column

  9. 25. LOOKING SOUTH AT THE MAIN CONTROL PANEL FOR BASIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. LOOKING SOUTH AT THE MAIN CONTROL PANEL FOR BASIC OXYGEN FURNACE No. 1 IN THE BOP SHOP'S No. 1 CONTROL ROOM ON THE OPERATING FLOOR OF THE FURNACE AISLE. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  10. Comparison of stainless and mild steel welding fumes in generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Welding fumes consist of a wide range of complex metal oxide particles which can be deposited in all regions of the respiratory tract. The welding aerosol is not homogeneous and is generated mostly from the electrode/wire. Over 390,000 welders were reported in the U.S. in 2008 while over 1 million full-time welders were working worldwide. Many health effects are presently under investigation from exposure to welding fumes. Welding fume pulmonary effects have been associated with bronchitis, metal fume fever, cancer and functional changes in the lung. Our investigation focused on the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species from stainless and mild steel welding fumes generated by a gas metal arc robotic welder. An inhalation exposure chamber located at NIOSH was used to collect the welding fume particles. Results Our results show that hydroxyl radicals (.OH) were generated from reactions with H2O2 and after exposure to cells. Catalase reduced the generation of .OH from exposed cells indicating the involvement of H2O2. The welding fume suspension also showed the ability to cause lipid peroxidation, effect O2 consumption, induce H2O2 generation in cells, and cause DNA damage. Conclusion Increase in oxidative damage observed in the cellular exposures correlated well with .OH generation in size and type of welding fumes, indicating the influence of metal type and transition state on radical production as well as associated damage. Our results demonstrate that both types of welding fumes are able to generate ROS and ROS-related damage over a range of particle sizes; however, the stainless steel fumes consistently showed a significantly higher reactivity and radical generation capacity. The chemical composition of the steel had a significant impact on the ROS generation capacity with the stainless steel containing Cr and Ni causing more damage than the mild steel. Our results suggest that welding fumes may cause acute lung injury. Since type of

  11. Effects of oxygen, salt, and pH level on corrosion rate of drill-stem steel

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.

    1982-11-01

    A technique proposed to control corrosion of the drill pipe is removal of oxygen from the drilling fluid. One approach to oxygen reduction is to substitute an anaerobic gas for air in the drilling fluid. A critical question to be answered when designing the anaerobic gas generator is what level of oxygen concentration is acceptable within the inert gas such that a low corrosion rate will be maintained. A laboratory program was done to answer this question. The program was designed to determine the effect of oxygen content, salt concentration and pH level on the corrosion rate of plain carbon steel. The corrosion rate of steel was found to decrease with increasing salt concentration at fixed pH levels and with oxygen contents in solution at equilibrium with air at 90/sup 0/C. The corrosion rate was found to decrease with increasing pH at fixed concentrations of salt and oxygen at 90/sup 0/C. The corrosion rate was also found to be proportional to the dissolved oxygen concentration at fixed pH levels and salt concentration. It is recommended that the anaerobic gas generator be designed to lower the oxygen concentration one order of magnitude below that in solution in equilibrium with air, that is, to approximately 500 ppB at 90/sup 0/C.

  12. Effect of Rb2O and Cs2O on Inclusion Removal in 321 Stainless Steels Using Novel Basic Tundish Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyunsuk; Kang, Youngjo; Sohn, Il

    2016-06-01

    Inclusion removal and modification of the 321 stainless steel using Rb2O- and Cs2O-containing novel basic tundish flux has been investigated. The average inclusion diameter was significantly lowered after reaction of the liquid metal with the flux after 45 minutes in an induction furnace set at 1823 K (1550 °C) under an Ar atmosphere. The number of inclusions was also decreased with increased reaction time and the majority of the inherent TiN inclusions were removed after reaction with the proposed novel basic tundish flux. Spinel inclusions were also observed after the reaction, which was due to the reaction of the MgO crucible and the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-MgO-` x'wt pct R2O flux system at fixed CaO/(Al2O3 + SiO2) of 1.45. The Rb2O and Cs2O seemed to have allowed significant removal of the TiN inclusions due to its ion compensation effect and the supplement of free oxygen ions, while increasing the viscosity of the slag to retain the absorbed inclusions.

  13. Basic studies of the oxygen chemistry of silver: Oxygen, dioxygen and superoxide on potassium-dosed Ag(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitson, M.; Lambert, R. M.

    1981-08-01

    The adsorption—desorption and structural properties of oxygen phases on K-dosed Ag(100) have been investigated. At 298 K, potassium enhances the sticking probability of O 2 on Ag(100) by a factor of ⪆100; the initial sticking probability and saturation uptake of O 2 are proportional to the potassium coverage (θ K) for θ K < 0.5. For θ K < 0.5 the desorption spectra reveal the presence of three distinct oxygen species — O(a), O 2(a) and dissolved O. The dioxygen species, O 2(a), is associated with the presence of subsurface K and its identity is confirmed by isotope-mixing experiments and CO titration. For θ K > 1.0 LEED shows the formation of two ordered structures and two additional features appear in the O 2 desorption spectra. One of these structures is ascribed to the growth of (001) oriented potassium superoxide (KO 2). The oxygen chemistry of Na and Rb-dosed Ag surfaces is compared with the results of the present work.

  14. Quantifying the composition of yttrium and oxygen rich nanoparticles in oxide dispersion strengthened steels.

    PubMed

    Williams, C A; Smith, G D W; Marquis, E A

    2013-02-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is used to investigate the composition of oxygen rich nanoparticles within a ferritic matrix in Fe-14Cr-2W-0.1Ti oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel. This study investigates whether artifacts associated with APT analysis are the cause of a sub-stoichiometric oxide composition measurement. Bulk Y₂O₃ is analyzed by APT, thus demonstrating the ability of the technique to measure near-stoichiometric composition measurements in insulating oxides. Through analysis of the sequence of ion hits on the detector during APT data acquisition, it is shown that a proportion of yttrium hits are spatially correlated but oxygen hits are not. Y-O based nanoparticles in a ferritic matrix are analyzed by APT using voltage pulsing and a laser pulsing with a range of laser energies from 0.3-0.8 nJ. When the material is analyzed using a high effective evaporation field, this influences the effect of trajectory aberrations, and the apparent size of the nanoparticles is reduced. Some reduction in Y:O ratio is observed, caused by high instances of multiple-ion evaporation events. From a detailed comparison between the results of APT analysis of the bulk Y₂O₃ the nanoparticles in the ODS material are concluded to have an approximate Y:O ratio of 1:1. PMID:23262147

  15. A Study on Factors Influencing Toughness of Basic Flux-Cored Weld of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arivazhagan, B.; Kamaraj, M.

    2011-10-01

    Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is relatively a new process for joining of modified 9Cr-1Mo (P91) steel. In this study, effect of shielding gas composition, inclusion content, gas tungsten-arc welding (GTAW) surface remelting, and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) on toughness were investigated. The high amount of silicon resulted in the formation of δ-ferrite in basic flux-cored weld. A mixture of 80% argon + 20% (80A) carbon dioxide shielding gas during welding resulted in the required toughness of 47 J at room temperature. The 95% argon + 5% carbon dioxide (95A) gas-shielded welds have lower toughness due to higher amount of δ-ferrite (4%) than 80% argon + 20% carbon dioxide welds (2%). In essence, most desirable shielding gas medium to achieve optimum toughness was 80% argon + 20% carbon dioxide in basic flux-cored arc welding.

  16. Ground-water basic data for Griggs and Steele Counties, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downey, Joe S.

    1973-01-01

    The objectives of the hydrologic investigation in Griggs and Steele Counties, N. Dak. (fig. 1) were to: (1) determine the location, extent, and nature of the major aquifers; (2) evaluate the occurrence and movement of ground water, including recharge and discharge; (3) estimate the quantities of water stored in the aquifers; (4) estimate the potential yields of wells tapping the major aquifers; and (5) determine the chemical quality of the ground water.

  17. Chem I Supplement: Chemistry of Steel Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Neal

    1980-01-01

    Provides information about the chemistry of steel making applicable to teaching secondary school science. Generalized chemical reactions describe the manufacture of steel from iron ore. Also discussed are raw materials, processing choices, and how various furnaces (blast, direct reduction, open hearth, basic oxygen, electric) work. (CS)

  18. Ignition of steel alloys by impact of low-velocity iron/inert particles in gaseous oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Frank J.; Mcilroy, Kenneth; Williams, Ralph E.

    1988-01-01

    The ignition of carbon steel and 316 and 304 stainless steels caused by the impact of low-velocity particles (a standard mixture consisting of 2 g of iron and 3 g of inert materials) in gaseous oxygen was investigated using NASA/White Sands Test Facility for the ignition test, and a subsonic particle impact chamber to accelerate the particles that were injected into flowing oxygen upstream of the target specimen. It was found that the oxygen velocities required to ignite the three alloys were the same as that required to ignite the particle mixture. Ignition occurred at oxygen velocities greater than 45 m/sec at 20 to 24 MPa and was found to be independent of pressure between 2 and 30 MPa. Comparison of the present results and the past results from Wegener (1964) with the Compressed Gas Association (CGA) oxygen velocity limits for safe operations indicates that the CGA limits may be excessively conservative at high pressures and too liberal at low pressures.

  19. Recombination probability of oxygen atoms on dynamic stainless steel surfaces in inductively coupled O{sub 2} plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, Luc; Guha, Joydeep; Donnelly, Vincent M.

    2008-05-15

    The authors have investigated the influence of plasma exposure time (t) on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (i.e., delayed) recombination of O atoms on electropolished stainless steel surfaces using the spinning-wall method. They found a recombination probability ({gamma}{sub O}) of 0.13{+-}0.01 after about 60 min of plasma exposure. {gamma}{sub O} decreased to 0.09{+-}0.01 for t{>=}12 h and was independent of the O flux impinging onto the surface. These recombination probabilities are much lower than those obtained in plasma chambers exclusively made of stainless steel, but similar to values recorded in stainless steel reactors with large silica surfaces exposed to the plasma. Near real-time elemental analysis by in situ Auger electron spectroscopy showed that the stainless steel surface became rapidly coated with a Si-oxide-based layer (Fe:[Si+Al]:O{approx_equal}2:1:9 for t=60 min and 1:2:9 for t=12 h), due to the slow erosion of the silica discharge tube and anodized Al chamber walls. Thus, the recombination probability of oxygen atoms on stainless steel in plasma reactors with large amounts of exposed silica is largely determined by the amount of sputtered silica coating the chamber walls.

  20. Creep-to-rupture of 9%Cr steel T91 in air and oxygen-controlled lead at 650 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurechko, Mariya; Schroer, Carsten; Wedemeyer, Olaf; Skrypnik, Aleksandr; Konys, Jürgen

    2011-12-01

    This article reports results of uniaxial creep-to-rupture experiments at static loads ranging from 100 to 200 MPa on ferritic-martensitic steel T91 in stagnant lead at 650 °C and oxygen concentration co in a narrow range around 10 -6 mass%. Respective experiments in stagnant air have been performed for comparison. The steel showed almost no difference in creep performance in oxygen-controlled lead and air at 650 °C. No dissolution attack and no lead penetration were found on the steel.

  1. Electrochemical regeneration of basic hydrogen peroxide for chemical oxygen iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Hano, Masami; Wakita, Syuhei; Uno, Masaharu; Takeda, Shuzaburo

    2005-03-01

    A 3.6M basic hydrogen peroxide solution is electrochemically regenerated. The apparatus was originally developed for electrolytic H2O2 production, generating dilute (<0.2M) BHP for paper manufacturing. To suppress decomposition by various mechanisms, they are identified and quantified. Both caffeine and peracetic acid are found effective to suppress autodecomposition. Theoretical prediction of the current efficiency is made to find an optimum operational condition. A BHP of 3.614M is regenerated to 3.657M with a current efficiency of 67%.

  2. Avoiding chromium transport from stainless steel interconnects into contact layers and oxygen electrodes in intermediate temperature solid oxide electrolysis stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlupp, Meike V. F.; Kim, Ji Woo; Brevet, Aude; Rado, Cyril; Couturier, Karine; Vogt, Ulrich F.; Lefebvre-Joud, Florence; Züttel, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the ability of (La0.8Sr0.2)(Mn0.5Co0.5)O3-δ (LSMC) and La(Ni0.6Fe0.4)O3-δ (LNF) contact coatings to avoid the transport of Cr from steel interconnects to solid oxide electrolysis electrodes, especially to the anode. The transport of chromium from commercial Crofer 22 APU (ThyssenKrupp) and K41X (AISI441, Aperam Isbergues) steels through LSMC and LNF contact coatings into adjacent (La0.8Sr0.2)MnO3-δ (LSM) oxygen electrodes was investigated in an oxygen atmosphere at 700 °C. Chromium concentrations of up to 4 atom% were detected in the contact coatings after thermal treatments for 3000 h, which also lead to the presence of chromium in adjacent LSM electrodes. Introduction of a dense (Co,Mn)3O4 coating between steel and contact coating was necessary to prevent the diffusion of chromium into contact coatings and electrodes and should lead to extended stack performance and lifetime.

  3. Basic investigation into the production of oxygen in a solid electrolyte process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, R.

    1981-01-01

    Mission analyses indicated that by extracting oxygen from the Martian atmosphere, which consists primarily of carbon dioxide, the launch mass of a spacecraft can be reduced by such an amount that samples from the planet can be returned to earth. The solid electrolyte process for producing O2 from CO2 was investigated. A model of the thermodynamic and electrochemical processes in the electrolyte cell was postulated, thereby establishing the parameters influencing the effectiveness and efficiency of an in situ O2 production system. The major operating parameters were investigated over a wide range of temperature and pressure. Operating limits imposed by the solid electrolyte material, 8% yttria stabilized zirconia, were determined as a function of the operating temperature.

  4. Addition of Fe 2O 3 as oxygen carrier for preparation of nanometer-sized oxide strengthened steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yuren; Liu, Yong; Liu, Feng; Fujita, Takeshi; Liu, Donghua; Chen, Mingwei; Huang, Boyun

    2010-10-01

    Nano-structured ferritic alloys, which are prepared almost exclusively via the mechanical alloying of Y 2O 3, have recently attracted much attention. Our preliminary results show that the usage of Fe 2O 3 as oxygen source leads to better control of powder properties than Y 2O 3 and a high density of nanometer-sized oxide particles can be formed by atomic mixing of Y, Ti and O. This may provide a new route with reduced costs and improved reproducibility for industrial production of nanometer-sized oxide strengthened steels.

  5. Kinetics, isothermal and thermodynamics studies of electrocoagulation removal of basic dye rhodamine B from aqueous solution using steel electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeogun, Abideen Idowu; Balakrishnan, Ramesh Babu

    2015-09-01

    Electrocoagulation was used for the removal of basic dye rhodamine B from aqueous solution, and the process was carried out in a batch electrochemical cell with steel electrodes in monopolar connection. The effects of some important parameters such as current density, pH, temperature and initial dye concentration, on the process, were investigated. Equilibrium was attained after 10 min at 30 °C. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and Avrami kinetic models were used to test the experimental data in order to elucidate the kinetic adsorption process; pseudo-first-order and Avrami models best fitted the data. Experimental data were analysed using six model equations: Langmuir, Freudlinch, Redlich-Peterson, Temkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich and Sips isotherms and it was found that the data fitted well with Sips isotherm model. The study showed that the process depends on current density, temperature, pH and initial dye concentration. The calculated thermodynamics parameters (Δ G^circ ,Δ H^circ {text{and}}Δ S{^circ } ) indicated that the process is spontaneous and endothermic in nature.

  6. The Role of Oxygen Transfer in Sintering of Low Alloy Steel Powder Compacts: A Review of the "Internal Getter" Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierl-Mayer, Christian; de Oro Calderon, Raquel; Danninger, Herbert

    2016-03-01

    The chemical aspects of sintering have to be considered, in particular the role of oxygen. For sintered alloy steels used for highly stressed components, traditional alloy elements have been Cu, Ni and Mo, which in their oxygen affinity are very similar to the base constituent iron. Advanced alloying systems however contain Cr, Mn and/or Si. In the present study it is shown that one of the principal aspects of sintering to be considered is oxygen transfer from the base iron oxides to the alloy elements, which then form oxides that are more difficult to reduce. This process, defined as "internal gettering", occurs both in mixed powder compacts and in prealloyed materials, although through different mechanisms. The effect can at least be alleviated by presintering in H2 in the 400°C range, part of the oxygen being removed as H2O before internal gettering becomes kinetically effective. However, in industrial practice, this collides with delubricaton. Furthermore for both alloy variants high temperature sintering is advantageous because it enhances reduction of the more stable oxides, thus eliminating the effects of internal gettering.

  7. Development and field testing of an alternative latrine design utilizing basic oxygen furnace slag as a treatment media for pathogen removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimson, J.; Suhogusoff, A. V.; Blowes, D. W.; Hirata, R. A.; Ptacek, C. J.; Robertson, W. D.; Emelko, M. B.

    2009-05-01

    In densely-populated communities in developing countries, appropriate setback distances for pit latrines often cannot be met. An alternative latrine was designed that incorporates two permeable reactive media to treat pathogens and nitrate from effluent. Basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slag in contact with wastewater effluent elevates pH to levels (> 11) that inactivate pathogens. Saturated woodchip creates reducing conditions that encourage the growth of denitrifying bacteria which remove NO3-. The field application was constructed in Santo Antônio, a peri-urban community located 25 km south of the city of São Paulo, Brazil. A 2-m diameter pit was excavated to a depth of 4 m into the sandy-clay unsaturated zone. A geotextile liner was emplaced to create saturated conditions in the 0.5-m thick woodchip barrier. Above the woodchip barrier, a 1-m thick layer of BOF slag mixed with pea gravel and sand was emplaced. A series of filter layers, grading upward from coarse sand to fine gravel, where placed above the BOF layer, and gravel was also infilled around the outer perimeter of the excavation, to ensure O2 diffusion into the design, the formation of biofilm, and degradation of organic material. A control latrine, constructed with similar hydraulic characteristics and nonreactive materials, was constructed at a locality 100 m away, in the same geological materials. Total coliform, thermotolerant coliform, and E. coli are removed by approximately 4-5 log concentration units in less than one meter of vertical transport through the BOF slag media. In the control latrine, comparable reductions in these pathogenic indicators are observed over three meters of vertical transport. Removal of sulphur-reducing Clostridia, Clostridium perfrigens and somatic coliphage are also achieved in the alternative design, but initial concentrations in effluent are low. Some measurable concentrations of pathogen indicators are measured in lysimeters below the BOF layer, but are associated

  8. Relations among nonbridging oxygen, optical properties, optical basicity, and color center formation in CaO-MgO aluminosilicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Novatski, A.; Steimacher, A.; Medina, A. N.; Bento, A. C.; Baesso, M. L.; Andrade, L. H. C.; Lima, S. M.; Guyot, Y.; Boulon, G.

    2008-11-01

    In this study the relations among nonbridging oxygen (NBO), optical properties, optical basicity, and color center formation in CaO-MgO aluminosilicate glasses were studied. Samples containing (in mol %) 35.9-57.5 of CaO, 16-27.7 of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 7.9-41.6 of SiO{sub 2}, and 6.5-6.9 of MgO were measured by optical absorption and excitation, luminescence, and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that when the SiO{sub 2} content was increased, the absorption edge shifted toward lower wavelengths and the bonds between O{sup 2-} ions and cations became more covalent. These observations were confirmed by Raman results that showed a decrease in the number of NBO per silicon tetrahedron as a function of SiO{sub 2} content. The results indicate that the effects of higher NBO concentration are the narrowing of the band gap energy and the delocalization of O{sup 2-} electrons, which facilitates the O{sup 2-} electrons to be trapped by anion vacancies and, consequently, forming color centers. The relationship between color center formation and SiO{sub 2} content was confirmed by optical spectroscopic measurements under UV radiation.

  9. Enhanced phosphorus removal from wastewater by growing deep-sea bacterium combined with basic oxygen furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weizhi; Huang, Zhaosong; Sun, Cuiping; Zhao, Haixia; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2016-08-01

    As one solid waste with potential for phosphorus removal, application of slags in water treatment merits attention. But it was inhibited greatly by alkaline solution (pH>9.5) and cemented clogging generated. To give one solution, phosphorus removal was investigated by combining deep-sea bacterium Alteromonas 522-1 and basic oxygen furnace slag (BOFS). Results showed that by the combination, not only higher phosphorous removal efficiency (>90%) but also neutral solution pH of 7.8-8.0 were achieved at wide ranges of initial solution pH value of 5.0-9.0, phosphorus concentration of 5-30mg/L, salinity of 0.5-3.5%, and temperature of 15-35°C. Moreover, sedimentary property was also improved with lower amount of sludge production and alleviated BOFS cementation with increased porosity and enlarged particle size. These results provided a promising strategy for the phosphorus recovery with slags in large-scale wastewater treatment. PMID:27179297

  10. Aluminum Bronze Alloys to Improve the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs and Side Vents.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Boyd Jr.; Dr. Vinod K. Sikka

    2006-12-29

    Energy Industries of Ohio was the lead organization for a consortium that examined the current situation involving the service life of electric arc and basic oxygen furnace hoods, roofs and side vents. Republic Engineered Products (REP), one of the project partners, installed a full-scale Al-Bronze “skirt” in their BOF at their Lorain OH facility, believed to be the first such installation of this alloy in this service. In 24 months of operation, the Al-Bronze skirt has processed a total of 4,563 heats, requiring only 2 shutdowns for maintenance, both related to physical damage to the skirt from operational mishaps. Yearly energy savings related to the REP facility are projected to be ~ 10 billion Btu's with significant additional environmental and productivity benefits. In recognition of the excellent results, this project was selected as the winner of the Ohio’s 2006 Governor’s Award for Excellence in Energy, the state’s award for outstanding achievements in energy efficiency.

  11. Wear of liquid nitrogen-cooled 440C bearing steels in an oxygen environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, Dilip K.; Verma, Ravi

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents up-to-date findings of the research being conducted to understand the mechanism of sliding wear in unlubricated 440C bearing steels under oxidative conditions. A sliding wear test rig has been designed and built with a cylinder-on-flat geometry. The equipment is capable of testing specimens under high axial loads and sliding speeds in a simulated LOX environment. Samples of 440C steel, quenched and tempered to a hardness of Rc 56, were tested under a load of 890 N and a sliding speed of 2.05 m/sec for total sliding distances of up to 5.54 km. Flash temperatures during these tests were measured with an IR camera and a fast digital recorder. Microstructural and microanalytical data from the worn surfaces and the debris particles are analyzed extensively, along with wear rates, flash temperatures, surface profiles, hardnesses, and residual stresses, in the context of oxidation and wear theories.

  12. Fabrication of biomimetic superhydrophobic steel surface under an oxygen rich environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Liang; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Yuyang; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Ruimin; Chen, Weiping; Liu, Xiaowei

    2016-09-01

    A novel and facile approach was proposed to fabricate superhydrophobic surface with similar micro- and nanostructures of lotus leaf on the steel foil. The acidic solution was used to grow Fe3O4 nanosheet films consisted of hydrochloric acid and potassium chloride under an O2 rich environment. The as-prepared superhydrophobic steel surfaces had water CA (contact angle) of 166 ± 2°. The water SA (sliding angle) was less than 2°. In order to estimate the drag reduction property of the as-prepared surface, the experimental setup of the liquid-solid friction drag was proposed. The drag reduction ratio for superhydrophobic surface was 61.3% compare with untreated surface at a flow velocity of 1.66 m s-1.

  13. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

    2014-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  14. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 1 of 6: Optical Sensors and Controls for Improved Basic Oxygen Furnace Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah Allendorf; David Ottesen; Donald Hardesty

    2002-01-31

    The development of an optical sensor for basic oxygen furnace (BOF) off-gas composition and temperature in this Advanced Process Control project has been a laboratory spectroscopic method evolve into a pre-commercialization prototype sensor system. The sensor simultaneously detects an infrared tunable diode laser ITDL beam transmitted through the process off-gas directly above the furnace mouth, and the infrared greybody emission from the particulate-laden off-gas stream. Following developmental laboratory and field-testing, the sensor prototype was successfully tested in four long-term field trials at Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point plant in Baltimore, MD> The resulting optical data were analyzed and reveal correlations with four important process variables: (1) bath turndown temperature; (2) carbon monoxide post-combustion control; (2) bath carbon concentration; and (4) furnace slopping behavior. The optical sensor measurement of the off-gas temperature is modestly correlated with bath turndown temperature. A detailed regression analysis of over 200 heats suggests that a dynamic control level of +25 Degree F can be attained with a stand-alone laser-based optical sensor. The ability to track off-gas temperatures to control post-combustion lance practice is also demonstrated, and may be of great use in optimizing post-combustion efficiency in electric furnace steelmaking operations. In addition to the laser-based absorption spectroscopy data collected by this sensor, a concurrent signal generated by greybody emission from the particle-laden off-gas was collected and analyzed. A detailed regression analysis shows an excellent correlation of a single variable with final bath turndown carbon concentration. Extended field trials in 1998 and early 1999 show a response range from below 0.03% to a least 0.15% carbon concentration with a precision of +0.0007%. Finally, a strong correlation between prolonged drops in the off-gas emission signal and furnace slopping events

  15. Influences of Basicity and Li2O on the Properties of Fluorine-Free Mold Flux for the Casting of Medium Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wanlin; Yan, Xiong; Zhou, Lejun; Xie, Senlin; Huang, Daoyuan

    2016-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to study the influences of basicity and Li2O on the melting, crystallization, and heat transfer behavior of Fluorine-free mold flux designed for the casting of medium carbon steels using double hot thermocouple technology and infrared emitter technique. The results showed that with the addition of basicity, the melting and crystallization temperatures of the mold fluxes were increased, and the final heat transfer rate was reduced, as the basicity tends to promote the crystallization behavior of the designed mold fluxes. Besides, with the increase of Li2O content in the mold flux, the melting and crystallization temperature decreased, as the Li2O tends to inhibit the formation of high melting temperature crystal and lower the system melting temperature zone; meanwhile the crystallization capability of the mold flux was enhanced in the low-temperature region. Moreover, the results of EDS and XRD were confirmed that the main crystal phase in the Fluorine-free mold fluxes is calcium borate silicate (Ca11Si4B2O22). Those results obtained can provide guidelines for the design of new Fluorine-free mold flux for the casting medium carbon steels.

  16. Ignition of bulk 302 stainless steel in oxygen by laser heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K.; Branch, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of oxygen pressure on the ignition temperature of cylindrical 302 SS specimens ignited by a focused CW CO2 laser beam in a cool, static, oxygen environment was investigated. The ignition temperature was determined quantitatively from the specimen temperature history obtained from a fast response, near infrared, two-color pyrometer, which recorded the temperature history of a spot approximately 0.5 mm in diameter and located at the center of the cylindrical 302 SS specimen's top surface. Ignition and combustion occurred in three stages. The first stage began with specimen heating and ended with ignition, the second stage corresponded to combustion, and the third stage represented cooling. The physical changes that occurred in the first stage are described.

  17. Laboratory Study on Oxide Inclusions in High-Strength Low-Alloyed Steel Refined by Slag with Basicity 2-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huixiang; Wang, Xinhua; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Wanjun

    2015-11-01

    Non-metallic inclusions in high-strength low-alloyed steel refined by slag with basicity (B) 2-5 and Al2O3 content 20%-30% (in mass percent) were investigated by slag-metal equilibrium experiments in laboratory and thermodynamic calculations. Most inclusions in equilibrium were quasi-spherical CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 system and the sizes were less than 5 µm. The average content ratio, CaO/Al2O3 and CaO/SiO2 of the inclusions, increased with slag basicity increasing when Al2O3 content in slag was around 25%, MgO/Al2O3 and CaO/Al2O3 increased with Al2O3 content in slag decreasing when slag basicity was around 3.3. The MgO/Al2O3 of the inclusions was influenced mainly by Al2O3 content in slag and CaO/Al2O3 was influenced mainly by slag basicity. To make the inclusions out of relative lower melting region (<1,773 K), the values of CaO/Al2O3, MgO/Al2O3 and (CaO+MgO)/Al2O3 of the inclusions should be enhanced by increasing basicity and decreasing Al2O3 content in slag properly.

  18. Configuration of the Hemoglobin Oxygen Dissociation Curve Demystified: A Basic Mathematical Proof for Medical and Biological Sciences Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leow, Melvin Khee-Shing

    2007-01-01

    The oxygen dissociation curve (ODC) of hemoglobin (Hb) has been widely studied and mathematically described for nearly a century. Numerous mathematical models have been designed to predict with ever-increasing accuracy the behavior of oxygen transport by Hb in differing conditions of pH, carbon dioxide, temperature, Hb levels, and…

  19. Tritium migration to the surfaces of Type 316 stainless steel; aluminum 6061; and oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sharpe, M.; Shmayda, W. T.; Schroder, W. U.

    2016-05-25

    The migration of tritium to the surfaces of aluminum 6061, oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper (OFHC), and stainless-steel 316 from the bulk metal was studied using low-pressure Tonks–Langmuir argon plasma. The plasma is shown to be effective at removing tritium from metal surfaces in a controlled manner. Tritium is removed in decreasing quantities with successive plasma exposures, which suggests a depletion of the surface and near-surface tritium inventories. A diffusion model was developed to predict tritium migration from the bulk and its accumulation in the water layers present on the metal surface. The model reproduces the rate of tritium re-growth on themore » surface for all three metals and can be used to calculate the triton solubility in the water layers present on metal surfaces. The ratio of surface-to-bulk solubilities at the water-layer/bulk-metal interface uniquely determines the concentration ratio between these two media. Removing the tritium-rich water layers induces tritium to migrate from the bulk to the surface. Furthermore, this process is driven by a concentration gradient that develops in the bulk because of the perturbation on the surface.« less

  20. Stainless Steel Mesh-Supported NiS Nanosheet Array as Highly Efficient Catalyst for Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun Song; Ren, Jiawen; Shalom, Menny; Fellinger, Tim; Antonietti, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Nickel(II) sulfide (NiS) nanosheets with a thickness of 10 nm and a size of 200 nm were facilely grown on stainless steel (SLS) meshes via a one-pot hydrothermal method. This unique construction renders an excellent electrical contact between the porous film of active NiS sheets and the highly conductive substrate, which exhibits a superior catalytic activity toward oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The NiS@SLS electrocatalyst exhibits an unusually low overpotential of 297 mV (i.e., 1.524 V vs RHE) at a current density of 11 mA·cm(-2), and an extra small Tafel slope of only 47 mV·dec(-1) proves an even more competitive performance at high to very high current densities. This performance compares very favorably to other Ni-based catalysts and even to the precious state-of-the-art IrO2 or RuO2 catalyst. PMID:26849857

  1. Results of High R-Ratio Fatigue Crack Growth Tests on 304 Stainless Steel in Low Oxygen Water

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, W. M.; Wire, G. L.

    2002-08-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate tests were performed on a 304 stainless steel compact tension (CT) specimen in water with 40-60 cc/kg H[sub]2. Data in the literature for CT tests show minor environmental effects in hydrogenated water, but higher effects in oxygenated water. However, the PWR data presented by Bernard, et al (1979) were taken at low stress ratios (R=0.05) and high stress intensity levels (delta K=16-41 MPa square root m). The purpose of these tests is to explore the crack growth rate characteristics of 304 SS in hydrogenated water at higher R values (0.7 and 0.83) and lower delta K values (11.0 and 7.7 MPa square root m). Each set of R, delta K conditions were tested at frequencies of 0.1, 0.01 and 0.001 Hz. The results show a pronounced effect on crack growth rates when compared to available literature data on air rates.

  2. Effect of Oxygen Content Upon the Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Type 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Manufactured by Hot Isostatic Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Adam J.; Cooper, Norman I.; Dhers, Jean; Sherry, Andrew H.

    2016-09-01

    Although hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has been shown to demonstrate significant advances over more conventional manufacture routes, it is important to appreciate and quantify the detrimental effects of oxygen involvement during the HIP manufacture process on the microstructural and material properties of the resulting component. This paper quantifies the effects of oxygen content on the microstructure and Charpy impact properties of HIP'd austenitic stainless steel, through combination of detailed metallographic examination and mechanical testing on HIP'd Type 316L steel containing different concentrations (100 to 190 ppm) of oxygen. Micron-scale pores were visible in the microstructure of the HIP'd materials postmetallographic preparation, which result from the removal of nonmetallic oxide inclusions during metallographic preparation. The area fraction of the resulting pores is shown to correlate with the oxygen concentration which influences the Charpy impact toughness over the temperature range of 77 K to 573 K (-196 °C to 300 °C), and demonstrates the influence of oxygen involved during the HIP manufacture process on Charpy toughness. The same test procedures and microstructural analyses were performed on commercially available forged 316L. This showed comparatively fewer inclusions and exhibited higher Charpy impact toughness over the tested temperature range.

  3. Effect of Oxygen Content Upon the Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Type 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Manufactured by Hot Isostatic Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Adam J.; Cooper, Norman I.; Dhers, Jean; Sherry, Andrew H.

    2016-06-01

    Although hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has been shown to demonstrate significant advances over more conventional manufacture routes, it is important to appreciate and quantify the detrimental effects of oxygen involvement during the HIP manufacture process on the microstructural and material properties of the resulting component. This paper quantifies the effects of oxygen content on the microstructure and Charpy impact properties of HIP'd austenitic stainless steel, through combination of detailed metallographic examination and mechanical testing on HIP'd Type 316L steel containing different concentrations (100 to 190 ppm) of oxygen. Micron-scale pores were visible in the microstructure of the HIP'd materials postmetallographic preparation, which result from the removal of nonmetallic oxide inclusions during metallographic preparation. The area fraction of the resulting pores is shown to correlate with the oxygen concentration which influences the Charpy impact toughness over the temperature range of 77 K to 573 K (-196 °C to 300 °C), and demonstrates the influence of oxygen involved during the HIP manufacture process on Charpy toughness. The same test procedures and microstructural analyses were performed on commercially available forged 316L. This showed comparatively fewer inclusions and exhibited higher Charpy impact toughness over the tested temperature range.

  4. Oxidation study of coated Crofer 22 APU steel in dry oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molin, Sebastian; Chen, Ming; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2014-04-01

    The effect of a dual layer coating composed of a layer of a Co3O4 and a layer of a La0.85Sr0.15MnO3/Co3O4 mixture on the high temperature corrosion of the Crofer 22 APU alloy is reported. Oxidation experiments were performed in dry oxygen at three temperatures: 800 °C, 850 °C and 900 °C for periods up to 1000 h. Additionally at 850 °C a 5000 h long oxidation test was performed to evaluate longer term suitability of the proposed coating. Corrosion kinetics were evaluated by measuring mass gain during oxidation. The corrosion kinetics for the coated samples are analyzed in terms of a parabolic rate law. Microstructural features were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray diffractometry. The coating is effective in reducing the corrosion rate and in ensuring long lifetime of coated alloys. The calculated activation energy for the corrosion process is around 1.8 eV. A complex Co-Mn-Cr spinel is formed caused by diffusion of Cr and Mn from the alloy into the Co3O4 coating and by additional diffusion of Mn from the LSM layer. Adding a layer of LSM/Co3O4, acting as an additional Mn source, on top of the cobalt spinel is beneficial for the improved corrosion resistance.

  5. Creep-to-rupture of the steel P92 at 650 °C in oxygen-controlled stagnant lead in comparison to air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurechko, Mariya; Schroer, Carsten; Skrypnik, Aleksandr; Wedemeyer, Olaf; Konys, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Creep-to-rupture experiments were performed on 9%-Cr ferritic-martensitic steel P92 in the CRISLA facility. The specimens of P92 were examined at 650 °C and static tensile stress between 75 and 325 MPa in both stagnant lead with 10-6 mass% dissolved oxygen and air. The steel showed an insignificant difference in time-to-rupture, tR, and ductile fracture in both environments at >100 MPa, corresponding to tR < 3,442 h. At 75 MPa in Pb (tR = 13,090 h), the steel, however, featured purely brittle fracture pointing to liquid metal embrittlement. Structural changes in the steel and surface oxidation in the different environments were studied using metallographic techniques. The Laves phase that forms during thermal aging at 650 °C was found along prior austenite grain boundaries and martensite laths already after relatively short testing time, along with chromium carbides that are already present in the as-received condition of the steel.

  6. 5. MOTOR/WINCH DRUM ASSEMBLY FOR OXYGEN LANCE HOISTING RIG ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. MOTOR/WINCH DRUM ASSEMBLY FOR OXYGEN LANCE HOISTING RIG ON THE WEIGHING FLOOR OF THE FURNACE AISLE IN THE BOP SHOP LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  7. Effect of oxygen on weld shape and crystallographic orientation of duplex stainless steel weld using advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ying Ueji, Rintaro; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2014-05-01

    The double-shielded advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method was adopted in this study for the welding of the SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel with the shielding gases of different oxygen content levels. The oxygen content in the shielding gas was controlled by altering the oxygen content in the outer layer gas, while the inner layer remained pure argon to suppress oxidation on the tungsten electrode. As a result, a deep weld penetration was obtained due to the dissolution of oxygen into the weld metals. Additionally, the microstructure of the weld metal was changed by the dissolution of oxygen. The austenite phase at the ferrite grain boundary followed a Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix phase at any oxide content. On the other hand, the orientation relationship between the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase exhibited different patterns under different oxygen content levels. When there was little oxide in the fusion zone, only a limited part of the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase followed the K–S orientation relationship. With the increase of the oxide, the correspondence of the K–S relationship increased and fit very well in the 2.5% O{sub 2} shielded sample. The investigation of this phenomenon was carried out along with the nucleation mechanisms of the intragranular austenite phases. - Highlights: • Weld penetration increased with the increase of the oxygen content. • Average diameter and number density of oxide were changed by the oxygen content. • K-S relationship of Widmanstätten austenite/ferrite wasn’t varied by oxide. • Orientation relationship of intragranular austenite/ferrite was varied by oxide.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking of A471 turbine disk steels: Effects of dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide in high-purity water: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eiselstein, L.E.; Caligiuri, R.D.

    1987-06-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effect of dilute impurities in high purity water on the rate of initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracks in NiCrMoV steels. 3.5 NiCrMoV steels of commercial quality, high purity, and high purity with intentionally added tramp elements were investigated. Dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide were the primary water impurities investigated. The tests were conducted on constant load, smooth bar tensile specimens of the NiCrMoV steels in flowing 160C high purity water containing various dilute levels of impurities. It was determined that the initiation rate is very sensitive to changes in dissolved oxygen content; the peak initiation rate are achieved between 20 and 80 ppB dissolved oxygen. The initiation rate is less sensitive to dissolved CO2 content. The crack growth rate in high purity water is only weakly dependent on dissolved O2 and CO2. This work shows that the crack growth rate is strongly dependent on the yield strength (and therefore the microstructure that develops as a result of tempering) of the turbine disc alloy, whereas the initiation rate is only weakly dependent on material yield strength. In addition, crack growth rates decrease as grain sizes are decreased. In general, crack growth rates are very slow (less than 10 m/s) in these dilute environments in materials with yield strengths below 690 Mpa (100 ksi). The results of these experiments indicate that a hydrogen-assisted process may be an important cracking mechanism in these alloys in these dilute environments. Implication of a hydrogen-assisted mechanism could have important consequences in the design and selection of turbine disc alloys.

  9. FUGITIVE EMISSIONS FROM INTEGRATED IRON AND STEEL PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an engineering investigation of fugitive (non-ducted) emissions in the iron and steel industry. Operations excluded from the study are coke ovens, basic oxygen furnace (BOF) charging, and blast furnace cast houses. Fugitive emission factors for iron an...

  10. Corrosion behavior of austenitic steels in liquid lead bismuth containing 10-6 wt% and 10-8 wt% oxygen at 400-500 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, A.; Weisenburger, A.; Müller, G.

    2014-05-01

    Three austenitic steels (316L, DIN 1.4970 tube and rod material) were tested up to 5000 h at temperatures between 400 and 500 °C in PbBi containing 10-8 wt% oxygen and at 450 °C and 500 °C in PbBi with 10-6 wt% oxygen. Protective scales grown on the surface up to 450 °C consist mainly of Cr rich oxides. However, after 5000 h at 500 °C dissolution attack occurred. At 10-6 wt% and 450 °C the thin Cr rich oxide scale is interrupted by areas with a thicker duplex-layered oxide of magnetite and spinel. At the higher temperature of 500 °C the whole surface is covered by the duplex-layered oxide scale.

  11. Effect of basic additives on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for CO and propylene oxidation under oxygen-deficient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Chen, Y.W.

    1997-05-01

    Pt catalysts supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and K{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared and characterized with respect to surface area, CO chemisorption, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO{sub 2}, and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) of H{sub 2}. The effects of basic additives on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for CO and propylene oxidation were investigated. The addition of basic additives slightly decreases the surface area of the catalyst and does not significantly change Pt dispersion. The basicity of the catalyst is in the order Pt-K{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Pt-Na{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Pt-CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The promoted Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts are much more active than the unpromoted one for CO and propylene oxidation under the stoichiometric point. Under oxygen-deficient conditions and in the absence of water, propylene conversions on all catalysts studied herein increase with increasing reaction temperature. Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibits the highest propylene conversion and the lowest CO conversion among these catalysts, and the addition of CeO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, and K{sub 2}O on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} can promote the CO conversion. Under oxygen-deficient conditions and in the presence of water, the water-gas shift and steam re-forming reactions can take place and result in increases of CO and propylene conversions. Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the most active catalyst for the steam reforming reaction and the least active catalyst for the water-gas shift reaction among these catalysts. However, the addition of basic additives on Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst can significantly enhance the water-gas shift reaction that can reduce CO emission. The promotional effect is in the order K{sub 2}O > Na{sub 2}O > CeO{sub 2}. K{sub 2}O could be a promising additive to a catalytic converter of a two-stroke motorcycle since it can enhance CO conversion.

  12. MnO2-x nanosheets on stainless steel felt as a carbon- and binder-free cathode for non-aqueous lithium-oxygen batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Z. H.; Zhao, T. S.; Zhu, X. B.; Tan, P.

    2016-02-01

    Manganese dioxide (MnO2) has been recognized as an effective catalyst for the oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions in non-aqueous lithium-oxygen batteries. However, a further improvement in battery performance with the MnO2 catalyst is limited by its low electronic conductivity and catalytic activity, which strongly depend on the morphology and composition. In this work, we develop a carbon- and binder-free MnO2-x nanosheets/stainless steel (SS) cathode via a simple and effective electrodeposition-solvothermal route. The created Mn(III) and oxygen vacancy in MnO2-x nanosheets allows an significant increase in the electronic conductivity and catalytic activity. It is experimentally shown that the use of the present nanostructure MnO2-x/SS cathode in a non-aqueous lithium-oxygen battery results in a rechargeable specific capacity of 7300 mAh g-1 at a current density of 200 mA g-1, which is 39% higher than that with the MnO2/SS cathode. In addition, the specific capacities at 400 mA g-1 and 800 mA g-1 reach 5249 mAh g-1 and 2813 mAh g-1, respectively, which are over 30% higher than that with the MnO2/SS cathode. Furthermore, the discharge/charge cycle test shows no degradation for 120 cycles. All the results show that the present nanostructure MnO2-x/SS cathode is a promising candidate for high-performance lithium-oxygen batteries.

  13. Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Moris

    2012-05-01

    Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT) should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound's environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT) is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review. PMID:23162229

  14. Variation and optimization of acid-dissolved aluminum content in stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Le-chen; Bao, Yan-ping; Wang, Min; Zhang, Chao-jie

    2016-04-01

    As a key step in secondary refining, the deoxidation process in clean stainless steel production is widely researched by many scholars. In this study, vacuum oxygen decarburization (VOD) deoxidation refining in a 40-t electric arc furnace + VOD + ingot casting process was analyzed and optimized on the basis of Al deoxidation of stainless steel and thermodynamic equilibrium reactions between the slag and steel. Under good stirring conditions in VOD, the deoxidation reaction reaches equilibrium rapidly, and the oxygen activity in the bulk steel is controlled by the slag composition and Al content. A basicity of 3-5 and an Al content greater than 0.015wt% in the melt resulted in an oxygen content less than 0.0006wt%. In addition, the dissolved oxygen content decreased slightly when the Al content in the steel was greater than 0.02wt%. Because of the equilibrium of the Si-O reaction between the slag and steel, the activity of SiO2 will increase while the Si content increases; thus, the Si content should be lowered to enable the formation of a high-basicity slag. A high-basicity, low-Al2O3 slag and an increased Si content will reduce the Al consumption caused by SiO2 reduction.

  15. Characterization of the mechanism of bi-layer oxide growth on austenitic stainless steels 316L and D9 in oxygen-controlled Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koury, Daniel

    Lead Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) has been proposed for use in programs for accelerator-based and reactor-based transmutation of nuclear waste. LBE is a leading candidate material as a spallation target (in accelerator-based transmutation) and an option for the sub-critical blanket coolant. The corrosion by LBE of annealed and cold-rolled 316L stainless steels, and the modified austenitic stainless steel alloy D9, has been studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Exposed and unexposed samples have been compared and the differences studied. Small amounts of surface contamination are present on the samples and have been removed by ion-beam sputtering. The unexposed samples reveal typical stainless steel characteristics: a chromium oxide passivation surface layer and metallic iron and nickel. The exposed samples show protective iron oxide and chromium oxide growths on the surface. Oxygen takes many forms on the exposed samples, including oxides of iron and chromium, carbonates, and organic acids from subsequent handling after exposure to LBE. Different types of surface preparation have lead to considerably different modes of corrosion. The cold-rold samples were resistant to thick oxide growth, having only a thin (< 1 mum), dense chromium-rich oxide. The annealed 316L and D9 samples developed thick, bi-layered oxides, the inner layer consisting of chromium-rich oxides (likely spinel) and the outer layer consisting mostly of iron oxides. The cold-rolled samples were able to maintain a thin chromium oxide layer because of the surface work performed on it, as ample diffusion pathways provided an adequate supply of chromium atoms. The annealed samples grew thick oxides because iron was the primary diffusant, as there are fewer fast-diffusion pathways and therefore an amount of chromium insufficient to maintain a chromium based oxide. Even the thick oxide, however, can prolong the life of

  16. On the corrosion resistance of AISI 316L-type stainless steel coated with manganese and annealed with flow of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savaloni, Hadi; Agha-Taheri, Ensieh; Abdi, Fateme

    2016-06-01

    AISI 316L-type stainless steel was coated with 300-nm-thick Mn thin films and post-annealed at 673 K with a constant flow of oxygen (250 cm3/min). The films crystallographic and morphological structures were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) before corrosion test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after corrosion test. Corrosion behavior of the samples in 0.3, 0.5 and 0.6 M NaCl solutions was investigated by means of potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Results showed that the corrosion inhibition of annealed Mn/SS316L in all NaCl solutions with different concentrations is higher than that of bare SS316L. A correlation is achieved between the structural variation of the films with the potentiodynamic and EIS corrosion results.

  17. Detection of oxygen at the interface and its effect on strain, stress, and temperature at the interface between cold sprayed aluminum and steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, KeeHyun; Li, Wenya; Guo, Xueping

    2015-12-01

    Aluminum powder particles were deposited on medium carbon steel substrate by cold spraying process. High resolution observation showed that the particles were severely deformed in solid state, whereas the substrate was hardly deformed. Furthermore, the particles were not bonded intimately to the substrate, and most of all, oxygen as well as thin gap were clearly detected along the interface of particle/substrate. Based on the observations, the impacting behavior of a particle on a substrate as well as the influence of the oxide film was modeled. The oxides covering the surface of metallic powder particles and the substrate significantly affect the impact and deformation behaviors of particle and substrate, and consequently the values of strain, stress, and temperature at the interface in the numerical simulation.

  18. Kinetic modeling on CO₂ capture using basic oxygen furnace slag coupled with cold-rolling wastewater in a rotating packed bed.

    PubMed

    Chang, E-E; Chen, Tse-Lun; Pan, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Hung; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2013-09-15

    In this study, direct and indirect carbonation of basic oxygen furnace slag (BOFS) coupled with cold-rolling wastewater (CRW) was carried out via a rotating packed bed (RPB). The solid products were qualitatively characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) and quantitatively analyzed with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The leachate was analyzed with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The results indicate that the maximum achievable carbonation conversion (MACC) of BOFS was 90.7%, corresponding to a capture capacity of 0.277 g CO₂/g of BOFS, by direct carbonation with CRW under a rotation speed of 750 rpm at 30 °C for 20 min. In addition, CO₂ mass balance among the gas, liquid, and solid phases within an RPB was well-developed, with an error less than 10%, to confirm the actual CO₂ capture capacity of BOFS with precision and accuracy. Furthermore, a reaction kinetic model based on mass balance was established to determine the reaction rate constant for various liquid agents (CRW and pure water). It was concluded that co-utilization of alkaline wastes including BOFS and CRW via the RPB is a novel approach for both enhancing CO₂ capture capacity and reducing the environmental impacts of alkaline wastes. PMID:23892160

  19. Self-Supported Cedarlike Semimetallic Cu3P Nanoarrays as a 3D High-Performance Janus Electrode for Both Oxygen and Hydrogen Evolution under Basic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chun-Chao; Chen, Qian-Qian; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Liang, Fei; Lin, Zheshuai; Fu, Wen-Fu; Chen, Yong

    2016-09-01

    There has been strong and growing interest in the development of cost-effective and highly active oxygen evolution reaction (OER) electrocatalysts for alternative fuels utilization and conversion devices. We report herein that semimetallic Cu3P nanoarrays directly grown on 3D copper foam (CF) substrate can function as effective electrocatalysts for water oxidation. Specifically, the surface oxidation-activated Cu3P only required a relatively low overpotential of 412 mV to achieve a current density of 50 mA cm(-2) and displayed a small Tafel slope of 63 mV dec(-1) in 0.1 M KOH solution, on account of the collaborative effect of large roughness factor (RF) and semimetallic character. Following that, investigations into the mechanism revealed the formation of a unique active phase during the water oxidation process in which conductive Cu3P was the core covered with a thin copper oxide/hydroxide layer. Moreover, this Cu3P 3D electrode was also applied to the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and showed good catalytic performance and stability under the same basic conditions. PMID:27559613

  20. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  1. Determination of oxygen diffusion in the SnO2/stainless steel interface of thin films by spectrophotometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretero, E.; Alonso, R.; Pelayo, C.

    2016-06-01

    Diffusion processes at high temperatures can change the transmittance and reflectance curves of multilayer coatings. These changes can significantly degrade coatings which use optical interference to obtain specific optical properties. This paper describes a study of the oxygen diffusion in SnO2/Sst interfaces using spectrophotometric measurements. A model is developed to optically describe the diffusion process in the multilayer interfaces. The validity of this model is checked experimentally using 16 samples exposed to temperatures between 475 °C and 600 °C for different exposure times: 5, 15, 50 and 120 min. Finally, these measurements are used to estimate the effective thickness of oxide formed at the interface due to oxygen diffusion, and to calculate the corresponding effective diffusion coefficients.

  2. Corrosion behavior of austenitic steels 1.4970, 316L and 1.4571 in flowing LBE at 450 and 550 °C with 10-7 mass% dissolved oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsisar, Valentyn; Schroer, Carsten; Wedemeyer, Olaf; Skrypnik, Aleksandr; Konys, Jürgen

    2014-11-01

    Corrosion behavior of austenitic steels 1.4571, 1.4970 and 316L was investigated in flowing oxygen-controlled LBE (2 m/s, 10-7 mass% O) at 450 and 550 °C for up to 8766 and 2011 h, respectively. The corrosion modes and material loss were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Steels underwent both oxidation accompanied by formation of a thin (⩽0.5 μm) Cr-based oxide film and selective leaching of Ni and Cr that resulted in formation of a layer-type ferrite zone and deeper local damages with pit-type appearance both penetrated by Bi and Pb. The corrosion loss increases with time and temperature providing that the oxygen content is constant (10-7 mass%). Detailed quantitative analyses of corrosion loss showed that at 450 °C metal recession of steels ranged from 4 to 27 μm after 8766 h. Maximum depth of local attack reached 114, 183 and 210 μm for 1.4571, 1.4970 and 316L steels, respectively. At 550 °C metal recession ranged from 23 to 60 μm after 2011 h that correlates well with thickness of ferrite layer formed. The maximum depth of local attack reached 587, 207 and 158 μm for 1.4571, 1.4970 and 316L steels, respectively. The effect of composition, surface state and bulk micro-structure on the corrosion response of steels is discussed. The results are compared with those obtained in LBE with higher oxygen concentration, i.e., 10-6 mass% O.

  3. Steel slag affects pH and Si content of container substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A substrate representing a typical greenhouse potting mix was prepared using 85% sphagnum peat and 15% perlite. The substrate was filled into 10 cm wide containers. A pulverized steel slag (SS) from a basic oxygen furnace, and dolomitic limestone (DL) were amended to the base substrate at a rate o...

  4. POLLUTION EFFECTS OF ABNORMAL OPERATIONS IN IRON AND STEEL MAKING. VOLUME II. SINTERING, MANUAL OF PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is one in a six-volume series considering abnormal operating conditions (AOCs) in the primary section (sintering, blast furnace ironmaking, open hearth, electric furnace, and basic oxygen steelmaking) of an integrated iron and steel plant. Pollution standards, generall...

  5. POLLUTION EFFECTS OF ABNORMAL OPERATIONS IN IRON AND STEEL MAKING. VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is the first in a six-volume series considering abnormal operating conditions (AOCs) in the primary section (sintering, blast furnace ironmaking, open hearth, electric furnace, and basic oxygen steelmaking) of an integrated iron and steel plant. Pollution standards, ge...

  6. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  7. Effect of cold rolling on the oxidation resistance of T91 steel in oxygen-saturated stagnant liquid lead-bismuth eutectic at 450 °C and 550 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hong; Ye, Zhongfei; Wang, Pei; Li, Dianzhong; Zhang, Yutuo; Li, Yiyi

    2016-08-01

    The compatibility of T91 steels having different preparation processes with oxygen-saturated stagnant lead-bismuth eutectic have been investigated at 450 °C and 550 °C. It is found that cold rolling decreases the thickness of the oxide scale of T91 steel by forming a continuous enhanced Cr-rich belt in the inner oxide layer next to the internal oxidation zone, which is attributed to the rapid diffusion of Cr induced by numerous non-equilibrium grain boundaries and migrating dislocations.

  8. Corrosion of 310 stainless steel in H2- H2O- H2S gas mixtures: Studies at constant temperature and fixed oxygen potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D. Bhogeswara; Jacob, K. T.; Nelson, Howard G.

    1983-02-01

    Corrosion of SAE 310 stainless steel in H2-H2O-H2S gas mixtures was studied at a constant temperature of 1150 K. Reactive gas mixtures were chosen to yield a constant oxygen potential of approximately 6 × 10-13 Nm-2 and sulfur potentials ranging from 0.19 × 10-2 Nm-2 to 33 × 10-2 Nm-2. The kinetics of corrosion were determined using a thermobalance, and the scales were analyzed using metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Two corrosion regimes, which were dependent on sulfur potential, were identified. At high sulfur potentials ( P S 2 ± 2.7 × 10-2 Nm-2) the corrosion rates were high, the kinetics obeyed a linear rate equation, and the scales consisted mainly of sulfide phases similar to those observed from pure sulfidation. At low sulfur potentials ( P S 2 ± 0.19 × 10-2 Nm-2) the corrosion rates were low, the kinetics obeyed a parabolic rate equation, and scales consisted mainly of oxide phases. Thermochemical diagrams for the Fe-Cr-S-O, Fe-Ni-S-O, Cr-Ni-S-O, and Si-Cr-S-O systems were constructed, and the experimental results are discussed in relation to these diagrams. Based on this comparison, reasonable corrosion mechanisms were developed. At high sulfur potentials, oxide and sulfide phases initially nucleate as separate islands. Overgrowth of the oxide by the sulfide occurs and an exchange reaction governs the corrosion process. Preoxidation at low oxygen potentials and 1150 K is beneficial in suppressing sulfidation at high sulfur potentials.

  9. Experimental study of laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers under conditions of minimal roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Golyshev, A A; Malikov, A G; Orishich, A M; Shulyatyev, V B

    2014-10-31

    The results of an experimental study of laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers are generalised. The dependence of roughness of the cut surface on the cutting parameters is investigated, and the conditions under which the surface roughness is minimal are formulated. It is shown that for both types of lasers these conditions can be expressed in the same way in terms of the dimensionless variables – the Péclet number Pe and the output power Q of laser radiation per unit thickness of the cut sheet – and take the form of the similarity laws: Pe = const, Q = const. The optimal values of Pe and Q are found. We have derived empirical expressions that relate the laser power and cutting speed with the thickness of the cut sheet under the condition of minimal roughness in the case of cutting by means of radiation from fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers. (laser technologies)

  10. Corrosion of 310 stainless steel in H2-H2O-H2S gas mixtures: Studies at constant temperature and fixed oxygen potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. B.; Jacob, K. T.; Nelson, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    Corrosion of SAE 310 stainless steel in H2-H2O-H2S gas mixtures was studied at a constant temperature of 1150 K. Reactive gas mixtures were chosen to yield a constant oxygen potential of approximately 6 x 10 to the minus 13th power/cu Nm and sulfur potentials ranging from 0.19 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm to 33 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm. The kinetics of corrosion were determined using a thermobalance, and the scales were analyzed using metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Two corrosion regimes, which were dependent on sulfur potential, were identified. At high sulfur potentials (p sub S sub 2 less than or equal to 2.7 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm) the corrosion rates were high, the kinetics obeyed a linear rate equation, and the scales consisted mainly of sulfide phases similar to those observed from pure sulfication. At low sulfur potentials (P sub S sub 2 less than or equal to 0.19 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm) the corrosion rates were low, the kinetics obeyed a parabolic rate equation, and scales consisted mainly of oxide phases.

  11. Influence of Heat Treatment on Corrosion Resistance of High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Sprayed WC-17Co Coatings on 42CrMo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wan-chang; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Feng; Dong, Chu-xu; Zhang, Ju-mei; Cai, Hui

    2015-09-01

    The influence of heat treatment from 500 to 1100 °C on the 5 wt.% H2SO4 solution-induced corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxygen-fuel sprayed WC-17Co coatings on 42CrMo steel was investigated, by using x-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and polarization curve methods. XRD analysis showed decrease in W2C phase intensity with recrystallization of amorphous Co and generation of new Co3W3C and Co6W6C phases with heat treatment. Porosity distribution did not follow a particular pattern; it initially increased and then decreased with increasing temperature. Corrosion resistance sequence of the as-sprayed and heat-treated coatings in 5 wt.% H2SO4 solution was C-5 > C-9 > C-A > C-7 > C-11. Furthermore, microstructure and phase structure of heat-treated coatings revealed the formation of different discontinuous plate-like oxide films on the surface of the heat-treated coatings which indicated the vital effect of binder structure on the corrosion resistance.

  12. POLLUTION EFFECTS OF ABNORMAL OPERATIONS IN IRON AND STEEL MAKING. VOLUME V. ELECTRIC ARC FURNACE, MANUAL OF PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is one in a six-volume series considering abnormal operating conditions (AOCs) in the primary section (sintering, blast furnace ironmaking, open hearth, electric furnace, and basic oxygen steelmaking) of an integrated iron and steel plant. Pollution standards, generall...

  13. POLLUTION EFFECTS OF ABNORMAL OPERATIONS IN IRON AND STEEL MAKING. VOLUME IV. OPEN HEARTH FURNACE, MANUAL OF PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is one in a six-volume series considering abnormal operating conditions (AOCs) in the primary section (sintering, blast furnace ironmaking, open hearth, electric furnace, and basic oxygen steelmaking) of an integrated iron and steel plant. Pollution standards, generall...

  14. POLLUTION EFFECTS OF ABNORMAL OPERATIONS IN IRON AND STEEL MAKING. VOLUME III. BLAST FURNACE IRONMAKING, MANUAL OF PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is one in a six-volume series considering abnormal operating conditions (AOCs) in the primary section (sintering, blast furnace ironmaking, open hearth, electric furnace, and basic oxygen steelmaking) of an integrated iron and steel plant. Pollution standards, generall...

  15. Occupational Profiles in the European Steel Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, Hans-Werner; And Others

    The steel industry in Europe has faced great changes, with resulting layoffs and restructuring. Now that the most basic changes seem to be over, it has become evident that the remaining steel industry requires more highly trained workers than was the case previously. Although steel maintenance employees were always highly skilled, steel production…

  16. Comparison of temperature, specific conductance, pH, and dissolved oxygen at selected basic fixed sites in south-central Texas, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ging, Patricia B.; Otero, Cassi L.

    2003-01-01

    One component of the surface-water part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program is the use of continuous water-quality monitors to help characterize the spatial and temporal distribution of general water quality in relation to hydrologic conditions. During 1996?98, six continuous water-quality monitors in the South-Central Texas study unit collected water temperature, specific conductance, pH, and dissolved oxygen data. The data were compared among the six sites using boxplots of monthly mean values, summary statistics of monthly values, and hydrographs of daily mean values.

  17. Desulfurization ability of refining slag with medium basicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui-xiang; Wang, Xin-hua; Wang, Mao; Wang, Wan-jun

    2014-12-01

    The desulfurization ability of refining slag with relative lower basicity ( B) and Al2O3 content ( B = 3.5-5.0; 20wt%-25wt% Al2O3) was studied. Firstly, the component activities and sulfide capacity ( C S) of the slag were calculated. Then slag-metal equilibrium experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium sulfur distribution ( L S). Based on the laboratorial experiments, slag composition was optimized for a better desulfurization ability, which was verified by industrial trials in a steel plant. The obtained results indicated that an MgO-saturated CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-MgO system with the basicity of about 3.5-5.0 and the Al2O3 content in the range of 20wt%-25wt% has high activity of CaO ( a CaO), with no deterioration of C S compared with conventional desulfurization slag. The measured L S between high-strength low-alloyed (HSLA) steel and slag with a basicity of about 3.5 and an Al2O3 content of about 20wt% and between HSLA steel and slag with a basicity of about 5.0 and an Al2O3 content of about 25wt% is 350 and 275, respectively. The new slag with a basicity of about 3.5-5.0 and an Al2O3 content of about 20wt% has strong desulfurization ability. In particular, the key for high-efficiency desulfurization is to keep oxygen potential in the reaction system as low as possible, which was also verified by industrial trials.

  18. Braze alloy spreading on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siewert, T. A.; Heine, R. W.; Lagally, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron microscopy (AEM) were employed to observe elemental surface decomposition resulting from the brazing of a copper-treated steel. Two types of steel were used for the study, stainless steel (treated with a eutectic silver-copper alloy), and low-carbon steel (treated with pure copper). Attention is given to oxygen partial pressure during the processes; a low enough pressure (8 x 10 to the -5th torr) was found to totally inhibit the spreading of the filler material at a fixed heating cycle. With both types of steel, copper treatment enhanced even spreading at a decreased temperature.

  19. Basic investigations on the performance of a normoxic polymer gel with tetrakis-hydroxy-methyl-phosphonium chloride as an oxygen scavenger: Reproducibility, accuracy, stability, and dose rate dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Bayreder, Christian; Georg, Dietmar; Moser, Ewald; Berg, Andreas

    2006-07-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-based polymer gel dosimetry using normoxic polymer gels, represents a new dosimetric method specially suited for high-resolution three-dimensional dosimetric problems. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose response with regard to stability, accuracy, reproducibility, and the dose rate dependence. Tetrakis-hydroxy-methyl-phosphonium chloride (THPC) is used as an oxygen scavenger, and methacrylic acid as a monomer. Accuracy, reproducibility, and dose resolution were determined for MR protocols at low spatial resolution (typical for clinical scanners), medium, and microimaging-resolution protocols at three different dose levels. The dose-response stability and preirradiation-induced variations in R2, related to the time interval between preparation and irradiation of the polymer gel, were investigated. Also postirradiation stability of the polymer gel was considered. These experiments were performed using a {sup 60}Co beam (E=1.2 MV) in a water phantom. Moreover, we investigated the dose rate dependence in the low, medium, and saturation dose region of the normoxic polymer gel using a linear accelerator at photon energy of 25 MV. MR scanning was performed on a 3 T whole body scanner (MEDSPEC 30/80, BRUKER BIOSPIN, Ettlingen, Germany) using several coils and different gradient systems adapted to the acquired spatial resolution investigated. For T2-parameter selective imaging and determination of the relaxation rate R2=1/T2, a multiple spin echo sequence with 20 equidistant echoes was used. With regard to preirradiation induced variations R2 increases significantly with the increasing time interval between the polymer gel preparation and irradiation. Only a slight increase in R2 can be observed for varying the postirradiation-time solely. The dose reproducibility at voxel volumes of about 1.4x1.4x2 mm{sup 3} is better than 2%. The accuracy strongly depends on the calibration curve. THPC represents a very effective oxygen scavenger in

  20. The impact of energy prices on technology choice in the United States steel industry

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, S.H. . Dept. of Economics); Boyd, G. )

    1991-01-01

    In the last thirty years US steel producers have replaced their aging open hearth steel furnaces with basic oxygen or large electric arc furnaces. This choice of technology leads to the opportunity to substitute electricity for fossil fuels as a heat source. We extend earlier research to investigate whether or not energy prices affect this type of technology adoption as predicted by economic theory. The econometric model uses the seemingly unrelated Tobit'' method to capture the effects of the industry's experience with both technologies, technical change, and potential cost reductions, as well as energy prices, on adoption. When we include the prices of electricity and coking coal as explanatory variables, the four energy price coefficients have the signs predicted by the law of demand. The two price coefficients have a statistically significant effect on adoption of basic oxygen furnaces. The inclusion of energy prices leads to significantly more efficient estimates of other coefficients in the model. 19 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. Effect of Magnesia-Carbon Refractory on the Kinetics of MgO·Al2O3 Spinel Inclusion Generation in Extra-Low Oxygen Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunyang; Huang, Fuxiang; Suo, Jinliang; Wang, Xinhua

    2016-04-01

    MgO-base refractory and MgO bearing slag both have the potential to supply Mg to the molten steel and then prompt the spinel generation. In this article, the effect of MgO-C refractory on the kinetics of spinel transformation was investigated on a laboratorial scale by inserting a MgO-C refractory rod into the Al-killed molten steel. With the refractory/steel reaction time increasing from 1 to 10 minutes, inclusions of Al2O3 gradually degraded into MgO ·Al2O3 spinel and the high MgO content inclusion was finally equilibrium with the MgO-C refractory. This interaction process involved Mg supply reactions, Mg transfer in molten steel, and spinel generation reactions. Although MgO-C refractory could supply Mg into the molten steel through MgO reduction reaction both by Al in the melt and by carbon in the refractory, it was found that the Mg mainly came from MgO reduction by the carbon in the refractory. Mg transfer in molten steel was set as the rate controlling step of spinel generation according to theoretical analysis. A mathematic model was developed based on this rate controlling step, and the model calculation agreed well with the experimental results. The Mg diffusion rate was obtained by the regression of the experimental results as 5 × 10-4 m/s. The mechanism of MgO ·Al2O3 generation was clarified, and the reaction between dissolved Mg and Al2O3 inclusions occurred first and then the extra dissolved Mg reacted with dissolved Al to generate MgO ·Al2O3.

  2. Optical Basicity: A Practical Acid-Base Theory for Oxides and Oxyanions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, J. A.

    1996-12-01

    The optical basicity concept relies on the Lewis approach to acids and bases and was developed for dealing with chemical problems in non-aqueous, non-protonic media such as silicates, phosphates and borates which are important in glass making and (as slags) for refining steel. Basic oxides such as Na2O or CaO are ionic while SO3, P4O10 or SiO2 are covalent, and it is the magnitude of negative charge borne by the oxygen atoms or ions which governs the degree of acidity or basicity. The oxygen atoms of sulfates, phosphates or network systems such as silicates bear charges which are between those of their parent oxides. In principle, the negative charge can be estimated using the optical (ultraviolet) spectra of certain probe ions and is represented by the optical basicity value, Lambda. Optical basicity values, available for 16 oxides, increase from the acidic SO3 to the very basic Cs2O in a way which conforms with electronegativity and polarizability. The optical basicity concept also extends to fluorides and sulfides.

  3. Basic Warehousing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on basic warehousing is designed to provide Marines with Military Occupation Speciality 3051 in the rank of private through corporal with instruction in those basic principles, methods, and procedures that can be applied to any warehousing or storage…

  4. BASIC Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Carol Ann

    Designed for use by both secondary- and postsecondary-level business teachers, this curriculum guide consists of 10 units of instructional materials dealing with Beginners All-Purpose Symbol Instruction Code (BASIC) programing. Topics of the individual lessons are numbering BASIC programs and using the PRINT, END, and REM statements; system…

  5. Long-term corrosion of austenitic steels in flowing LBE at 400 °C and 10-7 mass% dissolved oxygen in comparison with 450 and 550 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsisar, Valentyn; Schroer, Carsten; Wedemeyer, Olaf; Skrypnik, Aleksandr; Konys, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Long-term corrosion tests for up to ˜13,194 h on 1.4970 (15-15 Ti), 316L and 1.4571 austenitic steels were carried out at 400 °C in flowing LBE (2 m/s) with 10-7 mass% dissolved oxygen. The steels show general slight oxidation (Cr-based oxide film) along with local, pit-type solution-based corrosion attack. The incubation time for pit-type attack is ˜4500 h. After ˜13,194 h, the maximum pit depth observed was ˜14, 23 and 57 μm for 1.4970, 316L and 1.4571, respectively, that corresponds to local corrosion rates of ˜6, 10 and 26 μm/year. At 450 °C and 550 °C, the corrosion rates are ranged in between ˜120-220 μm/year and ˜500-3000 μm/year, respectively. Corrosion appearances and mechanisms are discussed.

  6. The world iron and steel industry and its impact on Indiana iron and steel and electric utility industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Thomas Cheong-Yuen

    In this research, a large scale mathematical programming model is developed to represent steel production and distribution. This model is used to investigate how technological changes, environmental restrictions, and government trade policies will affect future production location and relocation, world energy consumption, environmental pollution, and international trade in steel. Future potential relocation of production capacity of the world iron and steel industry will have substantial impacts on the North American electric utility industry, especially in Indiana. Given that the iron and steel industry is among the most energy intensive industries in North America, the electricity consumption of Indiana in particular is expected to change significantly as the industry adjusts to the changing environment. This research models the iron and steel industry in its use of two types of mills: integrated mills and mini-mills. Integrated mills use complex and capital intensive production processes to produce steel from iron ore, using a combination of the blast furnace and basic oxygen furnace. Mini-mills use electric melters which convert mainly scrap or directly reduced iron to steel. The model can reflect the trade and energy consequences of a chosen pattern of steel production, as well as the constraints on the pollutant generation. It also reflects various government trade policies to protect domestic steel production, such as quotas and protective tariffs. In addition, the model minimizes the total cost of steel production and transportation by evaluating the geographic patterns of the following factors: (1) iron and steel production; (2) new facility construction; (3) trade patterns. These factors are each subject to various constraints, such as demands, environmental restrictions, and government trade policies, imposed on the pattern of production. Optimization is performed for a single target year far enough in the future to allow construction of new capacity

  7. French Basic Course: Basic Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This volume of the French Basic Course contains ten situations from daily life, each divided into five sub-situations. The material for each situation consists of cartoons and lists of selected words. The purpose of the volume is to provide a vehicle for reviewing the grammar and vocabulary of lessons 1-85 of the Basic Course and adding new words…

  8. Method of making steel strapping and strip

    SciTech Connect

    Robert D. Reilly

    2000-02-16

    proposed processing line conditions however variations in test results have necessitated further investigations into the nature of cold rolled steel vs. hot rolled steel and electric furnace steel vs. basic oxygen furnace steel as it may apply to heat treating procedures and selection of appropriate steel chemistry for the process.

  9. The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indrisano, Roselmina; And Others

    1976-01-01

    These articles are presented as an aide in teaching basic subjects. This issue examines reading diagnosis, food preservation, prime numbers, electromagnets, acting out in language arts, self-directed spelling activities, and resources for environmental education. (Editor/RK)

  10. Cancer Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Show All Cancer Types News and Features Cancer Glossary ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects ...

  11. Basic Finance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vittek, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of the basic measures of corporate financial strength, and the sources of the information is reported. Considered are: balance sheet, income statement, funds and cash flow, and financial ratios.

  12. Schizophrenia Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... I know with schizophrenia? For More Information Share Schizophrenia Basics Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy What is schizophrenia? Schizophrenia is a serious mental disorder that affects ...

  13. Fluoridation Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Water Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Water Fluoridation Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... because of tooth decay. History of Fluoride in Water In the 1930s, scientists examined the relationship between ...

  14. Supporting steel

    SciTech Connect

    Badra, C.

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) have just completed a pilot program on the technical and economic viability of direct ironmaking by a process based on bath smelting. In this process, oxygen, prereduced iron ore pellets, coal, and flux are charged into a molten slag bath containing a high percentage of carbon. The carbon removes oxygen from the iron ore and generates carbon monoxide and liquid iron. Oxygen is then injected to burn some of the carbon monoxide gas before it leaves the smelting vessel. The partially combusted gas is sued to preheat and prereduced the ore before it is injected into the bath. There are several competing cokeless ironmaking processes in various stages of development around the world. A brief comparison of these processes provides a useful perspective with which to gauge the progress and objectives of the AISI-DOE research initiative. The principal competing foreign technologies include the Corex process, DIOS, HIsmelt, and Jupiter. The advantages of the direct ironmaking process examined by AISI-DOE were not sufficiently demonstrated to justify commercialization without further research. However, enough knowledge was gained from laboratory and pilot testing to teach researchers how to optimize the direct ironmaking process and to provide the foundation for future research. Researchers now better understand issues such as the dissolution of materials, reduction mechanisms and rates, slag foaming and control, the behavior of sulfur, dust generation, and the entire question of energy efficiency--including post combustion and the role of coal/volatile matter.

  15. DOS basics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    DOS is an acronym for Disk Operating System. It is actually a set of programs that allows you to control your personal computer. DOS offers the capabilities to create and manage files; organize and maintain information placed on disks; use application programs such as WordPerfect, Lotus 123, Excel, Windows, etc. In addition, DOS provides the basic utilities needed to copy files from one area to another, delete files and list files. The latest version of DOS also offers more advanced features that include hard disk compression and memory management. Basic DOS commands are discussed.

  16. Effects of Ce, Y and Mo Addition on the Stress Accelerated Oxidation of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Oxygenated High Temperature Water

    SciTech Connect

    Shengchun Wang; Nobuaki Kawaguchi; Tetsuo Shoji

    2004-07-01

    Based upon the recent progress in mechanistic understanding of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water in light water reactor (LWR), the effects of Ce, Y, and Mo addition on oxidation kinetics under a tensile stress condition was investigated. Minor impurity of P was also studied. A kind of circumferentially notched tensile specimen was prepared to simulate the crack tip stress field. The notched specimens of different materials studied were applied with an almost constant load in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water. The oxidation was examined by the specimen cross section. It was shown that these elements have quite clear effects on the metal oxidation and alloying element distribution in the oxide layer. (authors)

  17. Basic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luparelli, Augustus N.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    These four articles focus on developing basic reading, science, and job search skills: "Reading Program for Vocational Classes" by Augustus Luparelli; "Why Teach Employability Skills?" by Larry Siefferman; "Improving Vocabulary and Reading Skills" by Edythe Conway; and "Science in Everyday Life" by Virginia Eleazer and George Carney. (SK)

  18. Body Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... more about how the body works, what basic human anatomy is, and what happens when parts of the body don't function properly. Blood Bones, Muscles, and Joints Brain and Nervous System Digestive System Endocrine System Eyes Female Reproductive System ...

  19. Basic Backwardness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weingartner, Charles

    This paper argues that the "back to basics" movement is regressive and that regression is the characteristic mode of fear-ridden personalities. It is argued that many people in American society today have lost their ability to laugh and do not have the sense of humor which is crucial to a healthy mental state. Such topics as necrophilia, mental…

  20. Armchair BASIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Annie; Fox, David

    1983-01-01

    A first lesson in learning the computer programing language BASIC, this article explains how to give instructions to the computer; the commands PRINT, NEW, LIST, and RUN; and how to do simple line editing. There is a short quiz at the end. (EAO)

  1. Ethanol Basics

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  2. Basic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer County Community Coll., Trenton, NJ.

    Instructional materials are provided for a course that covers basic concepts of physics and chemistry. Designed for use in a workplace literacy project developed by Mercer County Community College (New Jersey) and its partners, the course describes applications of these concepts to real-life situations, with an emphasis on applications of…

  3. Basic Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Barbra Farabough

    This learning packet contains teaching suggestions and student learning materials for a course in basic horticulture aimed at preparing students for employment in a number of horticulture areas. The packet includes nine sections and twenty instructional units. Following the standard format established for Oklahoma vocational education materials in…

  4. Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Virginia, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This issue of "Basic Education" is devoted to the arts in education as a concern that should be addressed in a time of new priorities for the curriculum. Five articles and a book review are included. The opening article, "The State of the Arts in Education: Envisioning Active Participation By All" (Virginia Robinson), emphasizes that the study of…

  5. Basic Skills--Basic Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conference Board of Canada, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The experience of eight prominent Canadian business organizations was examined in terms of how basic skills deficits are identified in their work force, the impact of those deficiencies on organizational competitiveness, and why corporate programs are developed in response to the issue. Some of the key findings were as follows: (1) employee…

  6. Basic cryogenics and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of cryogenic temperatures on the mechanical and physical properties of materials are summarized. Heat capacity and thermal conductivity are considered in the context of conservation of liquid nitrogen, thermal stability of the gas stream, and the response time for changes in operating temperature. Particular attention is given to the effects of differential expansion and failure due to thermal fatigue. Factors affecting safety are discussed, including hazards created due to the inadvertent production of liquid oxygen and the physiological effects of exposure to liquid and gaseous nitrogen, such as cold burns and asphyxiation. The preference for using f.c.c. metals at low temperatures is explained in terms of their superior toughness. The limitations on the use of ferritic steels is also considered. Nonmetallic materials are discussed, mainly in the context of their LOX compatibility and their use in the form of foams and fibers as insulatants, seals, and fiber reinforced composites.

  7. Steel slag carbonation in a flow-through reactor system: the role of fluid-flux.

    PubMed

    Berryman, Eleanor J; Williams-Jones, Anthony E; Migdisov, Artashes A

    2015-01-01

    Steel production is currently the largest industrial source of atmospheric CO2. As annual steel production continues to grow, the need for effective methods of reducing its carbon footprint increases correspondingly. The carbonation of the calcium-bearing phases in steel slag generated during basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel production, in particular its major constituent, larnite {Ca2SiO4}, which is a structural analogue of olivine {(MgFe)2SiO4}, the main mineral subjected to natural carbonation in peridotites, offers the potential to offset some of these emissions. However, the controls on the nature and efficiency of steel slag carbonation are yet to be completely understood. Experiments were conducted exposing steel slag grains to a CO2-H2O mixture in both batch and flow-through reactors to investigate the impact of temperature, fluid flux, and reaction gradient on the dissolution and carbonation of steel slag. The results of these experiments show that dissolution and carbonation of BOF steel slag are more efficient in a flow-through reactor than in the batch reactors used in most previous studies. Moreover, they show that fluid flux needs to be optimized in addition to grain size, pressure, and temperature, in order to maximize the efficiency of carbonation. Based on these results, a two-stage reactor consisting of a high and a low fluid-flux chamber is proposed for CO2 sequestration by steel slag carbonation, allowing dissolution of the slag and precipitation of calcium carbonate to occur within a single flow-through system. PMID:25597686

  8. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  9. 1. LOOKING SOUTH AT LOW PURITY BULK OXYGEN BUILDING (FORMERLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LOOKING SOUTH AT LOW PURITY BULK OXYGEN BUILDING (FORMERLY BLOW ENGINE HOUSE No. 1), WITH LIQUID OXYGEN STORAGE TANKS IN THE FOREGROUND. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Fuel & Utilities Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  10. 20. VIEW OF WORTHINGTON BASE LOAD OXYGEN COMPRESSOR IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW OF WORTHINGTON BASE LOAD OXYGEN COMPRESSOR IN THE HIGH PURITY OXYGEN BUILDING LOOKING NORTH. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Fuel & Utilities Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  11. 21. VIEW OF CLARK OXYGEN BOOSTER COMPRESSOR IN THE HIGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW OF CLARK OXYGEN BOOSTER COMPRESSOR IN THE HIGH PURITY OXYGEN BUILDING LOOKING SOUTH. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Fuel & Utilities Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  12. 3. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF LOW PURITY BULK OXYGEN BUILDING, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF LOW PURITY BULK OXYGEN BUILDING, WITH THE LINDE LOW PURITY OXYGEN FRACTIONATING TOWERS ON LEFT. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Fuel & Utilities Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  13. Behavior of oxide scales on 2. 25Cr-1Mo steel during thermal cycling. I. Scales formed in oxygen and air

    SciTech Connect

    Christl, W.; Rahmel, A.; Schuetze, M.

    1989-02-01

    The acoustic-emission (AE) technique has been applied to study scale-damage processes during thermal cycling of a tube, preferentially between 600 and 300/degree/C in air, oxygen, and air + 0.5% SO/sub 2/. The AE measurements were accompanied by optical and electron-optical investigations on tube rings exposed to the same cycling conditions. During the first period of cycling, a scale rich in hematite is formed. It suffers compressive stresses during cooling. The result is a buckled multilayered scale with separated lamellae. The scaling rate is lower than under isothermal conditions. AE signals start after 175/degree/C cooling. After longer exposure times, the scale contains an increasing amount of magnetite and becomes more compact. The scaling rate increases and is comparable to that under isothermal conditions. AE signals are already observed after 50/degree/C cooling and are correlated with crack formation in the magnetite caused by tensile stresses there. The addition of SO/sub 2/ to air enhances the crack-healing process due to higher Fe diffusion in FeS. The scale is more compact.

  14. Fatigue handbook: Offshore steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Almarnaess, A.

    1985-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Overview of Offshore Steel Structures; Loads on Ocean Structures; Fracture Mechanics As a Tool in Fatigue Analysis; Basic Fatigue Properties of Welded Joints; Significance of Defects; Improving the Fatigue Strength of Welded Joints; Effects of Marine Environment and Cathodic Protection on Fatigue of Structural Steels Fatigue of Tubular Joints; Unstable Fracture; Fatigue Life Calculations; and Fatigue in Building Codes Background and Applications.

  15. Sunspace basics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    Anyone who lives in a home with a sunspace will tell you that the sunspace is the most enjoyable room in the house. Many times the homeowner`s only regret is that the sunspace is not larger. Although aesthetics often drive the decision to add a sunspace or include one in a new home design, sunspaces can also provide supplemental space heating and a healthy environment for plants and people. In fact, a well-designed sunspace can provide up to 60% of a home`s winter heating requirements. This publication addresses basic elements of sunspace design; design considerations for supplemental space heating, growing plants, and use as a living space; design guidelines including siting, heat distribution, and glazing angles; and major sunspace components including glazing options, thermal mass, insulation, and climate controls. A list of sources for more information is also provided.

  16. Magnetoacoustic stress measurements in steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Utrata, D.; Allison, S. G.; Heyman, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Uniaxial stress effects on the low-field magnetoacoustic interaction have been studied using bulk compressional waves and Rayleigh surface waves in numerous steel samples having various impurity concentrations (Namkung et al., 1984). The results invariably showed that the initial slope of acoustic natural velocity variations, with respect to net induced magnetization parallel to the stress axis, is positive under tension and negative under compression. The results of current measurements in railroad rail steel having about 0.68 wt percent carbon content are typical for medium range carbon steels. The low-field natural velocity slope in this particular type of steel, which is almost zero when unstressed, becomes steeper with increased magnitude of stress in both directions. Hence, the nondestructive determination of the sign of residual stress in railroad wheels and rails is possible using this technique. This paper discusses the basic physical mechanism underlying the experimental observations and presents the results obtained in railroad rail steel.

  17. Formation Mechanism of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-(MgO) Inclusions in Si-Mn-Killed Steel with Limited Aluminum Content During the Low Basicity Slag Refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kunpeng; Jiang, Min; Wang, Xinhua; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Haoqian; Cao, Zhanmin

    2016-02-01

    Pilot trails were carried out to study the formation mechanism of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-(MgO) inclusions in tire cord steel. 48 samples were taken from 8 heats of liquid steel during secondary refining, which were subsequently examined by an automatic scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS). Characteristics of thousands of oxide inclusions at different refining stages were obtained, including their compositions, sizes, morphologies, etc. Based on the obtained information of inclusions, details during formation of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-(MgO) inclusions were revealed and a new mechanism was proposed, including their origin, formation, and evolution during the refining process. It was found that CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-(MgO) inclusions were initially originated from the CaO-SiO2-MnO-(MgO) inclusions, which were formed during BOF tapping by the coalescence between MnO-SiO2 deoxidation products and the emulsified slag particles because of violent flow of steel. This can be well confirmed by the evaluation of the formation thermodynamics of CaO-SiO2-MnO-(MgO) inclusions, which was proved very difficult to be produced by intrinsic reactions inside liquid steel. Because of chemical reactions between CaO-SiO2-MnO-(MgO) inclusions and molten steel, they were mainly changed into CaO-SiO2-MnO-Al2O3-(MgO) and partially into CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-(MgO), which may be detrimental to the cold drawing ability of coils. Based on this finding, improvements were made in industrial production during BOF tapping and secondary refining. The results indicated that such (CaO-SiO2)-based inclusions existed in conventional process were effectively decreased after the improvements.

  18. Study of hot hardness characteristics of tool steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, J. L.; Dietrich, M. W.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    Hardness measurements of tool steel materials in electric furnace at elevated temperatures and low oxygen environment are discussed. Development of equation to predict short term hardness as function of intial room temperature hardness of steel is reported. Types of steel involved in the process are identified.

  19. Inflation Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Dan

    2014-03-01

    metrical fluctuations, both scalar and tensor, are also produced in inflationary models. Thus, the time appears to be appropriate for a very basic and simple exposition of the inflationary model written from a particle physics perspective. Only the simplest scalar model will be explored because it is easy to understand and contains all the basic elements of the inflationary model.

  20. The basic anaesthesia machine.

    PubMed

    Gurudatt, Cl

    2013-09-01

    After WTG Morton's first public demonstration in 1846 of use of ether as an anaesthetic agent, for many years anaesthesiologists did not require a machine to deliver anaesthesia to the patients. After the introduction of oxygen and nitrous oxide in the form of compressed gases in cylinders, there was a necessity for mounting these cylinders on a metal frame. This stimulated many people to attempt to construct the anaesthesia machine. HEG Boyle in the year 1917 modified the Gwathmey's machine and this became popular as Boyle anaesthesia machine. Though a lot of changes have been made for the original Boyle machine still the basic structure remains the same. All the subsequent changes which have been brought are mainly to improve the safety of the patients. Knowing the details of the basic machine will make the trainee to understand the additional improvements. It is also important for every practicing anaesthesiologist to have a thorough knowledge of the basic anaesthesia machine for safe conduct of anaesthesia. PMID:24249876

  1. The Basic Anaesthesia Machine

    PubMed Central

    Gurudatt, CL

    2013-01-01

    After WTG Morton's first public demonstration in 1846 of use of ether as an anaesthetic agent, for many years anaesthesiologists did not require a machine to deliver anaesthesia to the patients. After the introduction of oxygen and nitrous oxide in the form of compressed gases in cylinders, there was a necessity for mounting these cylinders on a metal frame. This stimulated many people to attempt to construct the anaesthesia machine. HEG Boyle in the year 1917 modified the Gwathmey's machine and this became popular as Boyle anaesthesia machine. Though a lot of changes have been made for the original Boyle machine still the basic structure remains the same. All the subsequent changes which have been brought are mainly to improve the safety of the patients. Knowing the details of the basic machine will make the trainee to understand the additional improvements. It is also important for every practicing anaesthesiologist to have a thorough knowledge of the basic anaesthesia machine for safe conduct of anaesthesia. PMID:24249876

  2. Morphology Control for Al2O3 Inclusion Without Ca Treatment in High-Aluminum Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shengping; Chen, Gujun; Guo, Yintao; Shen, Boyi; Wang, Qian

    2015-04-01

    Nozzle blockage is a major problem during continuous casting of Al-containing steel. Herein, we analyzed the thermodynamic equilibrium behavior between aluminum and oxygen in steel at 1873 K (1600 °C) and demonstrated that, the dissolved [O] initially decreases with increasing the dissolved [Al] until approximately 0.1 wt pct [Al], and after that, the dissolved [O] increases with dissolved [Al]. Thus, for high-aluminum steel with 1.0 wt pct dissolved [Al], the precipitation of Al2O3 inclusion can be avoided during cooling from deoxidation temperature to the liquidus temperature, if the actual dissolved [O] can be kept from increasing when the dissolved [Al] further increases from 0.1 to 1.0 wt pct. Hence, a method of inclusion control for high-aluminum steel without traditional Ca treatment technology was proposed based on the thermodynamic analysis. Industrial tests confirmed that low-melting point Ca-aluminate inclusions were observed typically through a slag washing with SiO2-minimized high-basicity slag during tapping, accompanied by two-step Al-adding process for production of high-aluminum steel. Moreover, there was no nozzle clogging occurred for five heats of continuous casting.

  3. Work-based Project Overcomes Basic Skills Stigma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallis, Emma

    2002-01-01

    A project to provide steel workers in North Wales with guidance about learning opportunities and to promote lifelong learning in the workplace focused on the development of basic information technology skills. (JOW)

  4. Mars oxygen production system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, Charles E.; Pillow, Linda K.; Perkinson, Robert C.; Brownlie, R. P.; Chwalowski, P.; Carmona, M. F.; Coopersmith, J. P.; Goff, J. C.; Harvey, L. L.; Kovacs, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    The design and construction phase is summarized of the Mars oxygen demonstration project. The basic hardware required to produce oxygen from simulated Mars atmosphere was assembled and tested. Some design problems still remain with the sample collection and storage system. In addition, design and development of computer compatible data acquisition and control instrumentation is ongoing.

  5. Kinetics of steel slag leaching: Batch tests and modeling.

    PubMed

    De Windt, Laurent; Chaurand, Perrine; Rose, Jerome

    2011-02-01

    Reusing steel slag as an aggregate for road construction requires to characterize the leaching kinetics and metal releases. In this study, basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel slag were subjected to batch leaching tests at liquid to solid ratios (L/S) of 10 and 100 over 30 days; the leachate chemistry being regularly sampled in time. A geochemical model of the steel slag is developed and validated from experimental data, particularly the evolution with leaching of mineralogical composition of the slag and trace element speciation. Kinetics is necessary for modeling the primary phase leaching, whereas a simple thermodynamic equilibrium approach can be used for secondary phase precipitation. The proposed model simulates the kinetically-controlled dissolution (hydrolysis) of primary phases, the precipitation of secondary phases (C-S-H, hydroxide and spinel), the pH and redox conditions, and the progressive release of major elements as well as the metals Cr and V. Modeling indicates that the dilution effect of the L/S ratio is often coupled to solubility-controlled processes, which are sensitive to both the pH and the redox potential. A sensitivity analysis of kinetic uncertainties on the modeling of element releases is performed. PMID:20646922

  6. Great Lakes Steel -- PCI facility

    SciTech Connect

    Eichinger, F.T.; Dake, S.H.; Wagner, E.D.; Brown, G.S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper discusses the planning, design, and start-up of the 90 tph PCI facility for National Steel`s Great Lakes Steel Division in River Rouge, MI. This project is owned and operated by Edison Energy Services, and was implemented on a fast-track basis by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Babcock Material Handling, and Babcock and Wilcox. This paper presents important process issues, basic design criteria, an the challenges of engineering and building a state-of-the-art PCI facility in two existing plants. Pulverized coal is prepared at the River Rouge Power Plant of Detroit Edison, is pneumatically conveyed 6,000 feet to a storage silo at Great Lakes Steel, and is injected into three blast furnaces.

  7. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 85-95% pure oxygen. The concentrator runs on electricity or a battery. A concentrator for home usually ... systems deliver 100% oxygen, and do not require electricity. A small canister can be filled from the ...

  8. Glow discharge cleaning of carbon fiber composite and stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetov, A.; Begrambekov, L.; Brémond, S.; Douai, D.; Kuzmin, A.; Sadovsky, Ya.; Shigin, P.; Vergasov, S.

    2011-08-01

    The paper experimentally investigates and analyses the features and mechanisms of both of oxygen removal by deuterium glow discharge from CFC, pyrolytic graphite and stainless steel subjected to irradiation in oxygen contaminated plasma. It is shown that oxygen implanted in pyrolytic graphite (PG) perpendicular to basal plates is removed after sputtering the layer slightly thicker than oxygen stopping zone (≈2 nm). Fast deuterium ions penetrating into CFC during GDC transfer the trapped oxygen atoms into the bulk. Thus, much thicker surface layer has to be removed (500-1000 nm) for oxygen release. Irradiation of stainless steel in plasma leads to formation of a barrier layer with thickness (2-4 nm) equal, or slightly higher than stopping range of oxygen ions. The layer accumulates the main fraction of implanted oxygen and prevents its penetration into the bulk. After barrier layer sputtering oxygen spreads into the bulk. Parameters and conditions of optimum GDC are discussed.

  9. Reaction of iron and steel slags with refractories

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.; Anderson, M.W.

    1993-04-01

    Slag corrosion and erosion has been a major wear factor for refractories wear in contact with molten iron and steel. In blast furnace ironmaking, the slag/iron interface plays a more important role than does the slag/refractory interface. On the other hand in steelmaking, the slag in the ladles and tundish predominantly affect refractory wear. This paper presents the results of a detailed microstructural evaluation of (a) slag and slag/iron interactions with A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiC-C refractories for ironmaking in blast furnaces, (b) basic oxygen furnace and ladle slag interactions with alumina spinel refractories for steelmaking, and (c) slag interactions with working refractory lining for continuous casting tundishes. Results will also be presented on refractory wear/failure due to simultaneous corrosion and penetration by the slag.

  10. A Model for Scrap Melting in Steel Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruskopf, Ari

    2015-03-01

    A process model for basic oxygen furnace is in development. The full model will include a 2-D axisymmetric turbulent flow model for iron melt, a steel scrap melting model, and a chemical reaction model. A theoretical basis for scrap melting model is introduced in this paper and an in-house implementation of the model is tested in this article independently from the other parts of the full process model. The model calculates a melting curve for the scrap piece and the heat and carbon mass exchange between the melt and the scrap. A temperature and carbon concentration-dependent material data are used for heat capacity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion coefficient. The equations are discretized into a moving grid, which is uncommon in literature in the context of scrap melting. A good agreement is found between the modeling results and experiments from literature. Also a heat transfer correlation for dimensionless Nusselt number is determined using the numerical results.

  11. Fatigue of 1018 steel in hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, S. H.; Johnson, H. H.

    1986-01-01

    Tests are performed at different hydrogen pressures and mechanical load parameter values (applied load, stress concentration factor, applied load frequency) to study enhanced fatigue crack growth in SAE 1018 steel. Oxygen was introduced as a hydrogen-oxygen gas mixture environment in order to compare the role of oxygen in crack inhibition with that previously reported for both static and cyclic loading of higher strength steels. In a number of experiments, a thin film of palladium was applied to the specimen surface to facilitate the study of steel-hydrogen interaction in the absence of any surface impedance to hydrogen entry. The kinetics of the diffusing atoms are found to be influenced by the stress field around the notch tip and the applied frequency. An increment in environmental effect occurred when applied load or stress concentration factor was increased.

  12. Steel project fact sheet: Steel reheating for further processing

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Steel reheating is an energy-intensive process requiring uniform temperature distribution within reheating furnaces. Historically, recuperators have ben used to preheat combustion air, thereby conserving energy. More recent innovations include oxygen enrichment and the use of regenerative burners, which provide higher preheat air temperatures than recuperators. These processes have limitations such as equipment deterioration, decreasing energy efficiency over time, high maintenance costs, and increased NO{sub x} emissions with increased air preheat temperature, unless special equipment is used. Praxair, Inc., supplier of oxygen and other industrial gases to the steel industry, proposes to introduce an innovative oxy-fuel burner technology (using 100% oxygen) to the steel reheating industry. Oxy-fuel combustion reduces or eliminates nitrogen in combustion air and substantially reduces waste heat carried out with flue gas. Based on technology currently used in the glass, hazardous waste, and aluminum industries, Praxair has developed and patented low temperature, oxy-fuel burners that can be used in high temperature industrial furnaces where temperature uniformity is critical and extremely low NO{sub x} emissions are desired. The technical goal of the project is to demonstrate the use of oxy-fuel burners in a slab reheat furnace while reducing energy consumption by 45% and NO{sub x} emissions by 90% within the converted furnace zones. Successful implementation of this technology also will eliminate the need to periodically replace recuperators and install NO{sub x} removal equipment.

  13. Possibilities of improving the quality of rail steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Boikov, D. V.

    2012-12-01

    An experimental process of production of degassed rail steel is briefly described: it ensures low contents of oxygen, hydrogen, and brittle nonmetallic inclusions in the metal and the required metal quality.

  14. Adult Basic Education Basic Computer Literacy Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manini, Catalina M.; Cervantes, Juan

    This handbook, in both English and Spanish versions, is intended for use with adult basic education (ABE) students. It contains five sections of basic computer literacy activities and information about the ABE computer literacy course offered at Dona Ana Community College (DACC) in New Mexico. The handbook begins with forewords by the handbook's…

  15. Appreciating Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  16. Oxygen safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch out for splattering grease. It can catch fire. Keep children with oxygen away from the stove top and oven. Cooking ... under the bed. Keep liquids that may catch fire away from your oxygen. This includes cleaning products that contain oil, grease, ...

  17. Oxygen therapy and intraocular oxygenation.

    PubMed Central

    Jampol, L M

    1987-01-01

    When delivered to the corneal surface of rabbits or monkeys, 100% oxygen can significantly increase the pO2 in the aqueous humor. Under hyperbaric conditions (two atmospheres), an observed rise in the aqueous pO2 in rabbits breathing room air can be increased further by exposing the rabbit cornea to 100% oxygen. The high oxygen levels under hyperbaric conditions are mediated by intravascular and transcorneal delivery of oxygen. The increase in the pO2 levels in the aqueous can prevent sickling of intracameral human erythrocytes containing sickle hemoglobin. Thus, oxygen therapy transcorneally or systemically could potentially be used to treat a sickle cell hyphema. The exposure of rabbit eyes to 100% oxygen at the corneal surface is followed by autoregulation (constriction) of the iris vasculature. We could demonstrate no constriction in the eyes of two normal human volunteers or of four patients with chronic stable rubeosis iridis. Preretinal vitreous pO2 levels can be significantly raised by exposing monkeys to hyperbaric 100% oxygen. This procedure may be of value in treating acute, reversible ischemic inner retinal diseases. Transcorneal or vascular delivery of oxygen to the eye under normobaric or hyperbaric conditions may be effective in treating ischemic diseases of the anterior segment, such as anterior segment necrosis or rubeosis iridis, or ischemic inner retinal diseases. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 5 C FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 6 PMID:3447339

  18. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) steel drum

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1998-09-29

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) provides the analyses and evaluations necessary to demonstrate that the steel drum packaging system meets the transportation safety requirements of HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments, for an onsite packaging containing Type B quantities of solid and liquid radioactive materials. The basic component of the steel drum packaging system is the 208 L (55-gal) steel drum.

  19. Clean Steel: Advancing the State of the Art (TRP 0003)

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar Seetharaman; Alan W. Cramb

    2004-05-19

    This project had 3 objectives: (1) to determine the kinetic factors governing inclusion removal from liquid steels at a slag metal interface; (2) to develop a methodology to enable steels of less than 1 ppm total oxygen to be produced with an average inclusion diameter of less than 5 {micro}m; and, (3) to determine the slag-metal interface conditions necessary for ultra clean steels. In objectives 1, and 3, the major finding was that dissolution rates of solid particles in slags were found to be significant in both ladle and tundish slags and must be included in a model to predict steel cleanliness. The work towards objective 2 indicated that liquid steel temperature was a very significant factor in our understanding of clean steel potential and that undercooled steels equilibrated with low oxygen potential inert gases have the potential to be significantly cleaner than current steels. Other work indicated that solidification front velocity could be used to push particles to produce clean steels and that reoxidation must be severely curtailed to allow the potential for clean steels to be realized.

  20. Basic BASIC; An Introduction to Computer Programming in BASIC Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coan, James S.

    With the increasing availability of computer access through remote terminals and time sharing, more and more schools and colleges are able to introduce programing to substantial numbers of students. This book is an attempt to incorporate computer programming, using BASIC language, and the teaching of mathematics. The general approach of the book…

  1. Source Apportionment of Particulate Matter Collected Upwind and Downwind of a Steel Facility in Granite City, IL (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvall, R. M.; Norris, G. A.; Willis, R. D.; Turner, J. R.; Kaleel, R.; Sweitzer, T.; Preston, B.; Hays, M. D.

    2009-04-01

    St. Louis is currently in nonattainment of the annual PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). Granite City Steel Works (GSCW), located in Granite City, IL is considered to be a significant source impacting the St. Louis area and the largest PM2.5 point source contributor. Twelve grab samples were collected in and around the steel facility including the basic oxygen furnace, steel and iron slag crushing, coal pulverizing, baghouse dust, paved road dust, and unpaved road dust. The bulk samples were resuspended in a resuspension chamber using a PM2.5 cutpoint and collected on Teflon, quartz and polycarbonate filters. Fine particulate matter (PM) samples (12-hr and 24-hr) were collected upwind and downwind of GSCW from October 13 to December 13, 2007 to identify sources contributing to nonattainment in St. Louis. The samples were analyzed for trace metals (X-Ray Fluorescence), ions (Ion Chromatography), elemental and organic carbon (thermal optical analysis), and organic species (solvent extraction Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry). Source apportionment was conducted using the EPA Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) Model (v 8.2). Major sources impacting the 12-hr samples included the blast oxygen furnace, secondary sulfate, and road dust. Higher excess steel and coke works contributions were associated with higher wind speeds (greater than 5 mph) and more variability in source impacts was observed. Major sources impacting the 24-hr samples included secondary sulfate and motor vehicles (diesel and gasoline). Contributions were similar between the coke and steel works sources. Disclaimer: Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  2. PASCAL vs BASIC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundie, David A.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison between PASCAL and BASIC as general purpose microprocessor languages rates PASCAL above BASIC in such points as program structure, data types, structuring methods, control structures, procedures and functions, and ease in learning. (CMV)

  3. Health Insurance Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Health Insurance Basics KidsHealth > For Teens > Health Insurance Basics Print ... thought advanced calculus was confusing. What Exactly Is Health Insurance? Health insurance is a plan that people buy ...

  4. Consider oxygen for hydrocarbon oxidations

    SciTech Connect

    Shahani, G.H.; Gunardson, H.H.; Easterbrook, N.C.

    1996-11-01

    A number of commodity petrochemicals are produced by the selective, catalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons in the liquid and gas phase. These chemicals are the basic building blocks for a host of chemical intermediates. Producing each of these chemicals requires large volumes of air or tonnage quantities of oxygen for oxidation. This oxidation can be carried out using air, oxygen-enriched air, or pure oxygen. Many oxidation processes, such as that for making ethylene oxide, originally were implemented using air but have switched to oxygen. Other processes, such as for vinyl acetate, were developed as oxygen-based processes directly. Over the years, using pure oxygen has become an accepted practice in a number of petrochemical processes, such as those for acetaldehyde, ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, vinyl acetate, and vinyl chloride. As the authors will discuss, using oxygen provides some significant advantages. So, the authors expect that the trend of existing air-based processes converting to oxygen will continue, while new processes based on oxygen will emerge.

  5. CSF myelin basic protein

    MedlinePlus

    CSF myelin basic protein is a test to measure the level of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The CSF ... less than 4 ng/mL of myelin basic protein in the CSF. Normal value ranges may vary ...

  6. Basic Cake Decorating Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdany, Mel

    Included in this student workbook for basic cake decorating are the following: (1) Drawings of steps in a basic way to ice a layer cake, how to make a paper cone, various sizes of flower nails, various sizes and types of tin pastry tubes, and special rose tubes; (2) recipes for basic decorating icings (buttercream, rose paste, and royal icing);…

  7. Interim fatigue design curves for carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Both temperature and oxygen affect fatigue life; at the very low dissolved-oxygen levels in PWRs and BWRs with hydrogen water chemistry, environmental effects on fatigue life are modest at all temperatures (T) and strain rates. Between 0.1 and 0.2 ppM, the effect of dissolved-oxygen increases rapidly. In oxygenated environments, fatigue life depends strongly on strain rate and T. A fracture mechanics model is developed for predicting fatigue lives, and interim environmentally assisted cracking (EAC)-adjusted fatigue curves are proposed for carbon steels, low-alloy steels, and austenitic stainless steels.

  8. Atomic Oxygen Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.

    1997-01-01

    This report details work performed by the Center for Applied Optics (CAO) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) on the contract entitled 'Atomic Oxygen Task' for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (contract NAS8-38609, Delivery Order 109, modification number 1). Atomic oxygen effects on exposed materials remain a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The basic objective of atomic oxygen research in NASA's Materials & Processes (M&P) Laboratory is to provide the solutions to material problems facing present and future space missions. The objective of this work was to provide the necessary research for the design of specialized experimental test configurations and development of techniques for evaluating in-situ space environmental effects, including the effects of atomic oxygen and electromagnetic radiation on candidate materials. Specific tasks were performed to address materials issues concerning accelerated environmental testing as well as specifically addressing materials issues of particular concern for LDEF analysis and Space Station materials selection.

  9. Inclusion Optimization for Next Generation Steel Products

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sridar Seetharaman: Dr. Alan Cramb

    2006-04-06

    The project objective is to determine the conditions under which the inclusions in liquid steel can act as heterogeneous nucleants for solidification. The experimental approach consisted of measuring the undercooling of a pure iron droplet in contact with different oxides to determine which oxides promote iron solidification by providing a suitable surface for nucleation and which oxides and under which conditions the metal can be deeply undercooled. The conclusions suggest that deep undercoolings are possible at low oxygen content provided the oxygen potential is such that substrate decomposition does not occur. If the oxygen content increases the undercooling decreases.

  10. Steel shear walls, behavior, modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Astaneh-Asl, Abolhassan

    2008-07-08

    In recent years steel shear walls have become one of the more efficient lateral load resisting systems in tall buildings. The basic steel shear wall system consists of a steel plate welded to boundary steel columns and boundary steel beams. In some cases the boundary columns have been concrete-filled steel tubes. Seismic behavior of steel shear wall systems during actual earthquakes and based on laboratory cyclic tests indicates that the systems are quite ductile and can be designed in an economical way to have sufficient stiffness, strength, ductility and energy dissipation capacity to resist seismic effects of strong earthquakes. This paper, after summarizing the past research, presents the results of two tests of an innovative steel shear wall system where the boundary elements are concrete-filled tubes. Then, a review of currently available analytical models of steel shear walls is provided with a discussion of capabilities and limitations of each model. We have observed that the tension only 'strip model', forming the basis of the current AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls, is not capable of predicting the behavior of steel shear walls with length-to-thickness ratio less than about 600 which is the range most common in buildings. The main reasons for such shortcomings of the AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls is that it ignores the compression field in the shear walls, which can be significant in typical shear walls. The AISC method also is not capable of incorporating stresses in the shear wall due to overturning moments. A more rational seismic design procedure for design of shear walls proposed in 2000 by the author is summarized in the paper. The design method, based on procedures used for design of steel plate girders, takes into account both tension and compression stress fields and is applicable to all values of length-to-thickness ratios of steel shear walls. The method is also capable of including the effect of

  11. "Back to Basics" or "Forward to Basics"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perso, Thelma

    2007-01-01

    Politicians have used the promise of "back to basics in our schools" as an educational platform for some time now, possibly in recognition that this is something the general population perceives as an issue they might just vote for. In the various positions the author has held, both professional and in community service, she has been required to…

  12. The Basic and Semi-Basic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitler, Gail

    1978-01-01

    Presented is a paradigm for teaching basic and semibasic arithmetic facts to children with arithmetic difficulties, in which the student progresses from the use of concrete materials such as blocks, to the use of diagrams such as tally marks, to a reasoning process, to responding in an automatic manner. (DLS)

  13. 5. LOOKING WEST IN LOW PURITY BULK OXYGEN BUILDING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. LOOKING WEST IN LOW PURITY BULK OXYGEN BUILDING AT STEAM TURBINE END OF TWO ALLIS-CHALMER AXIAL AIR COMPRESSORS FOR 1000 TON PER DAY HIGH PURITY OXYGEN MAKING PLANT. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Fuel & Utilities Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  14. 6. LOOKING WEST IN LOW PURITY BULK OXYGEN BUILDING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. LOOKING WEST IN LOW PURITY BULK OXYGEN BUILDING AT STEAM TURBINE END OF TWO ALLIS-CHALMERS AXIAL AIR COMPRESSORS FOR 1000 TON PER DAY HIGH PURITY OXYGEN MAKING PLANT. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Fuel & Utilities Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  15. Coating Hydrostatic Bearings To Resist Ignition In Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funkhouser, Merle E.

    1993-01-01

    Coats of superalloy MA754 plasma-sprayed onto occasionally rubbing surfaces of hydrostatic journal bearings operating in liquid and/or gaseous oxygen, according to proposal. Prevents ignition and combustion occurring when components made of stainless steels or other conventional bearing alloys rub against each other in oxygen. Eliminates need for runner and enhances control over critical bearing clearance.

  16. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  17. Oxygen-Concentrating Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, K.

    1986-01-01

    High-purity oxygen produced from breathing air or from propellantgrade oxygen in oxygen-concentrating cell. Operating economics of concentrator attractive: Energy consumption about 4 Wh per liter of oxygen, slightly lower than conventional electrochemical oxygen extractors.

  18. Using oxygen at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... DO NOT use oil-based products, such as petroleum jelly (Vaseline). Ask your oxygen equipment provider about ... oxygen; Hypoxia - home oxygen; Hospice - home oxygen References American Thoracic Society. Why do I need oxygen therapy? ...

  19. Irradiation embrittlement of neutron-irradiated low activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayano, H.; Kimura, A.; Narui, M.; Sasaki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Ohta, S.

    1988-07-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation and additions of small amounts of alloying elements on the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of three different groups of ferritic steels were investigated by means of the Charpy impact test in order to gain an insight into the development of low-activation ferritic steels suitable for the nuclear fusion reactor. The groups of ferritic steels used in this study were (1) basic 0-5% Cr ferritic steels, (2) low-activation ferritic steels which are FeCrW steels with additions of small amounts of V, Mn, Ta, Ti, Zr, etc. and (3) FeCrMo, Nb or V ferritic steels for comparison. In Fe-0-15% Cr and FeCrMo steels, Fe-3-9% Cr steels showed minimum brittleness and provided good resistance against irradiation embrittlement. Investigations on the effects of additions of trace amounts of alloying elements on the fracture toughness of low-activation ferritic steels made clear the optimum amounts of each alloying element to obtain higher toughness and revealed that the 9Cr-2W-Ta-Ti-B ferritic steel showed the highest toughness. This may result from the refinement of crystal grains and improvement of quenching characteristics caused by the complex effect of Ti and B.

  20. Nonmetallic inclusions in a chromium steel intended for the power engineering industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpishon, E. Yu.; Mal'Ginov, A. N.; Romashkin, A. N.; Durynin, V. A.; Afanas'ev, S. Yu.; Shitov, E. V.; Afanas'eva, L. T.; Batov, Yu. M.

    2010-06-01

    The behavior of oxygen in the course of manufacturing large steel ingots containing 1.5-20% Cr, the formation of oxides depending on the contents of deoxidizing agents and oxygen, and the composition of the oxide phase in ingots and forgings made of the steel are considered. The steel is manufactured using an arc steel-melting furnace and unit for complex treatment of steel (ASF-ACSPU technology) and the ASF-ACSPU technology and electroslag remelting (ESR). It is shown that the oxide phase composition depends on the contents of strong deoxidizing agents and oxygen and the development of secondary oxidation. Chromium- and manganese-containing spinels are characteristic species of the secondary and tertiary oxides in the chromium steel in the case of deficient aluminum and silicon.

  1. Fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Michaud, W.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-10-01

    Fatigue tests have been conducted on A106-Gr B carbon steel and A533-Gr B low-alloy steel to evaluate the effects of an oxygenated-water environment on the fatigue life of these steels. For both steels, environmental effects are modest in PWR water at all strain rates. Fatigue data in oxygenated water confirm the strong dependence of fatigue life on dissolved oxygen (DO) and strain rate. The effect of strain rate on fatigue life saturates at some low value, e.g., between 0.0004 and 0.001%/s in oxygenated water with {approximately}0.8 ppm DO. The data suggest that the saturation value of strain rate may vary with DO and sulfur content of the steel. Although the cyclic stress-strain and cyclic-hardening behavior of carbon and low-alloy steels is distinctly different, the degradation of fatigue life of these two steels with comparable sulfur levels is similar. The carbon steel exhibits pronounced dynamic strain aging, whereas strain-aging effects are modest in the low-alloy steel. Environmental effects on nucleation of fatigue crack have also been investigated. The results suggest that the high-temperature oxygenated water has little or no effect on crack nucleation.

  2. Fluency with Basic Addition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza-Kling, Gina

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, learning basic facts has focused on rote memorization of isolated facts, typically through the use of flash cards, repeated drilling, and timed testing. However, as many experienced teachers have seen, "drill alone does not develop mastery of single-digit combinations." In contrast, a fluency approach to learning basic addition…

  3. Basic Electronics I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, L. Paul

    Designed for use in basic electronics programs, this curriculum guide is comprised of twenty-nine units of instruction in five major content areas: Orientation, Basic Principles of Electricity/Electronics, Fundamentals of Direct Current, Fundamentals of Alternating Current, and Applying for a Job. Each instructional unit includes some or all of…

  4. Construction & Basic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCEL Newsletter for the Business and Literacy Communities, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Basic skills education has become a pressing need in the construction industry as jobs become more complex and fewer workers have needed skills. However, the construction industry lags in spending on training for entry-level workers. The Home Builders Institute (HBI) is testing a pilot basic skills program that it hopes will prove useful to the…

  5. Romanian Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    The "Romanian Basic Course," consisting of 89 lesson units in eight volumes, is designed to train native English language speakers to Level 3 proficiency in comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing Romanian (based on a 1-5 scale in which Level 5 is native speaker proficiency). Volume 1, which introduces basic sentences in dialog form with…

  6. Basic Science Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brummel, Clete

    These six learning modules were developed for Lake Michigan College's Basic Science Training Program, a workshop to develop good study skills while reviewing basic science. The first module, which was designed to provide students with the necessary skills to study efficiently, covers the following topics: time management; an overview of a study…

  7. HEBREW BASIC COURSE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEVINSON, HANNA; REIF, JOSEPH A.

    THIS HEBREW BASIC COURSE IS INTENDED AS A TRAINING MANUAL TO TEACH STUDENTS THE INFORMAL SPEECH OF EDUCATED NATIVE ISRAELIS AND IS DESIGNED TO BE USED WITH A NATIVE INSTRUCTOR AND TAPE RECORDINGS PREPARED FOR THIS COURSE. THE UNITS CONSIST OF BASIC CONVERSATION, ADDITIONAL VOCABULARY, GRAMMAR NOTES, REVIEW CONVERSATIONS, AND DRILLS ON VOCABULARY,…

  8. BASIC Beats PASCAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ever, Jacob

    1981-01-01

    Features of two versions of the BASIC programing language are compared with the features of the PASCAL programing language. The application chosen for comparison was a word processor. The conclusion was that PASCAL had the best language features, but BASIC had better systems capabilities. (MP)

  9. Exponentiation: A New Basic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Brent

    2015-01-01

    For centuries, the basic operations of school mathematics have been identified as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Notably, these operations are "basic," not because they are foundational to mathematics knowledge, but because they were vital to a newly industrialized and market-driven economy several hundred years…

  10. TOOLS AND BASIC MACHINES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. School of Education.

    THIS BASIC READER IS A PART OF AN EXPERIMENTAL CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROJECT DESCRIBED IN VT 004 454, TO DEVELOP AND EVALUATE SPECIAL NEW TRAINING MATERIALS TO TEACH BASIC VOCATIONAL TALENT SKILLS TO DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS WHICH WERE TESTED ON APPROXIMATELY 2,500 EIGHTH AND NINTH GRADERS IN EIGHT SCHOOL SYSTEMS ACROSS THE NATION. THIS READER WAS…

  11. Bracken Basic Concept Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naglieri, Jack A.; Bardos, Achilles N.

    1990-01-01

    The Bracken Basic Concept Scale, for use with preschool and primary-aged children, determines a child's school readiness and knowledge of English-language verbal concepts. The instrument measures 258 basic concepts in such categories as comparisons, time, quantity, and letter identification. This paper describes test administration, scoring and…

  12. Ultrahigh carbon steels, Damascus steels, and superplasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sherby, O.D.; Wadsworth, J.

    1997-04-01

    The processing properties of ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCSs) have been studied at Stanford University over the past twenty years. These studies have shown that such steels (1 to 2.1% C) can be made superplastic at elevated temperature and can have remarkable mechanical properties at room temperature. It was the investigation of these UHCSs that eventually brought us to study the myths, magic, and metallurgy of ancient Damascus steels, which in fact, were also ultrahigh carbon steels. These steels were made in India as castings, known as wootz, possibly as far back as the time of Alexander the Great. The best swords are believed to have been forged in Persia from Indian wootz. This paper centers on recent work on superplastic UHCSs and on their relation to Damascus steels. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  13. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Removal of Residual Elements in The Steel Ladle by a Combination of Top Slag and Deep Injection Practice

    SciTech Connect

    S. Street; K.S. Coley; G.A. Iron

    2001-08-31

    The objective of this work was to determine if tin could be removed from liquid steel by a combination of deep injection of calcium and a reducing top-slag practice. The work was carried out in three stages: injection of Ca wire into 35 Kg heats in an induction furnace under laboratory condition; a fundamental study of the solubility of Sn in the slag as a function of oxygen potential, temperature and slag composition; and, two full-scale plant trials. During the first stage, it was found that 7 to 50% of the Sn was removed from initial Sn contents of 0.1%, using 8 to 16 Kg of calcium per tonne of steel. The Sn solubility study suggested that low oxygen potential, high basicity of the slag and lower temperature would aid Sn removal by deep injection of Ca in the bath. However, two full-scale trials at the LMF station in Dofasco's plant showed virtually no Sn removal, mainly because of very low Ca consumption rates used (0.5 to 1.1 Kg/tonne vs. 8 to 16 Kg/tonne used during the induction furnace study in the laboratory). Based on the current price of Ca, addition of 8 to 16 Kg/tonne of steel to remove Sn is too cost prohibitive, and therefore, it is not worthwhile to pursue this process further, even though it may be technically feasible.

  14. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ... reduces the risk of HIV transmission . How do HIV medicines work? HIV attacks and destroys the infection- ...

  15. Kidney Disease Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Take the first step Alternate Language URL Kidney Disease Basics Page Content Your kidneys filter extra water ... blood pressure are the most common causes of kidney disease. ​These conditions can slowly damage the kidneys over ...

  16. Video Screen Capture Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  17. E-Mail Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Sacha

    1996-01-01

    Offers electronic mail basics, mail etiquette and tips, interesting World Wide Web sites, and how to do a Web search. Includes Web sites that offer beginner tutorials and a glossary of Internet terms. (JOW)

  18. High temperature carburization of nickel-chromium steels exposed to low-oxygen activity H/sub 2/-CH/sub 4/ atmospheres with and without the addition of sulphur-bearing species

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, J.F.; Barnes, J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper contains the results of a series of corrosion investigations carried out on a range of commercial and laboratory cast 'model' nickel-chromium steels. The main study is concerned with an evaluation of the performance of these wrought and cast materials in carburizing environments within the temperature range 825/sup 0/C (1517/sup 0/F) to 1050/sup 0/C (1922/sup 0/F). In addition the results of selected studies, designed to establish the influence of adding varying amounts of H/sub 2/S to the H/sub 2/-CH/sub 4/ carburising atmospheres, are also presented. Gravimetric determinations and surface and cross-sectional microstructural examinations have been used to establish the kinetics and mechanisms of the corrosion process. A series of experiments have been carried out in which environmental and material parameters have been varied systematically thereby enabling the relative importance of environmental temperature and activity (a/SUB c/ and Ps/sub 2/) and alloy composition, form and surface condition to be established.

  19. 77 FR 473 - Certain Steel Threaded Rod From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Anti-Circumvention...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... Republic of China: Notice of Antidumping Duty Order, 74 FR 17154 (April 14, 2009) (``Steel Threaded Rod... the Steel Threaded Rod Order.\\3\\ \\3\\ See Notice of Scope Rulings, 76 FR 10558, 10559 (February 25... chemistry of the steel, focusing instead on basic dimensions, zinc coating, and tensile strength, none...

  20. Monitoring oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, John W

    2011-06-01

    Cyanosis was used for a century after dentists began pulling teeth under 100% N(2)O in 1844 because brief (2 min) severe hypoxia is harmless. Deaths came with curare and potent anesthetic respiratory arrest. Leland Clark's invention of a polarographic blood oxygen tension electrode (1954) was introduced for transcutaneous PO2 monitoring to adjust PEEP and CPAP PO2 to prevent premature infant blindness from excess O2 (1972). Oximetry for warning military aviators was tried after WW II but not used for routine monitoring until Takuo Aoyagi (1973) discovered an equation to measure SaO2 by the ratio of ratios of red and IR light transmitted through tissue as it changed with arterial pulses. Pulse oximetry (1982) depended on simultaneous technology improvements of light emitting red and IR diodes, tiny cheap solid state sensors and micro-chip computers. Continuous monitoring of airway anesthetic concentration and oxygen also became very common after 1980. Death from anesthesia fell 10 fold between 1985 and 2000 as pulse oximetry became universally used, but no proof of a causative relationship to pulse oximetry exists. It is now assumed that all anesthesiologist became much more aware of the dangers of prolonged hypoxia, perhaps by using the pulse oximeters. PMID:21717228

  1. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.

    1998-01-13

    Fatigue tests have been conducted on Types 304 and 316NG stainless steels to evaluate the effects of various material and loading variables, e.g., steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen (DO) in water, and strain range, on the fatigue lives of these steels. The results confirm significant decreases in fatigue life in water. Unlike the situation with ferritic steels, environmental effects on Types 304 and 316NG stainless steel are more pronounced in low-DO than in high-DO water. Experimental results have been compared with estimates of fatigue life based on a statistical model. The formation and growth of fatigue cracks in air and water environments are discussed.

  2. Cardiogenic Shock: Failure of Oxygen Delivery and Oxygen Utilization.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hoong Sern

    2016-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock remains a highly lethal condition. Conventional therapy including revascularization and mechanical circulatory support aims to improve cardiac output and oxygen delivery, but increasing basic and clinical observations indicate wider circulatory and cellular abnormalities, particularly at the advanced stages of shock. Progressive cardiogenic shock is associated with microcirculatory and cellular abnormalities. Cardiogenic shock is initially characterized by a failure to maintain global oxygen delivery; however, progressive cardiogenic shock is associated with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, derangement of the regulation of regional blood flow, microcirculatory abnormalities, and cellular dysoxia. These abnormalities are analogous to septic shock and may not be reversed by increase in oxygen delivery, even to supranormal levels. Earlier mechanical circulatory support in cardiogenic shock may limit the development of microcirculatory and cellular abnormalities. PMID:27509355

  3. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  4. Welding Rustproof Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, W

    1929-01-01

    The following experimental results will perhaps increase the knowledge of the process of welding rustproof steels. The experiments were made with two chrome-steel sheets and with two chrome-steel-nickel sheets having the composition shown in Table I.

  5. [How did the earth's oxygen atmosphere originate?].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, G

    2004-09-01

    The planet earth did not carry an oxygen atmosphere from the beginning. Though oxygen could arise from radiation mediated water splitting, these processes were not efficient enough to create a global gas atmosphere. Oxygen in the latter is a product of the photosynthetic activity of early green organisms. Only after biological mass-formation of oxygen the UV-protective ozone layer could develop, then enabeling life to move from water onto land. This took billions of years. The basics of the processes of biological oxygen liberation and utilization are described in the following as well as the importance of their steady state equilibrium. Also a hint is given to oxygen as a toxic compound though being a chemical prerequisite for aerobic life on earth. PMID:15490337

  6. An oxygen enrichment attachment for use with humidified air

    PubMed Central

    Jebson, P.; Dewar, J.; White, J.

    1974-01-01

    Jebson, P., Dewar, J., and White, J. (1974).Thorax, 29, 371-376. An oxygen enrichment attachment for use with humidified air. An oxygen enrichment attachment is described which fulfils the basic requirements for intubated patients. Using values for tidal volume and inspiratory time found in the type of patients for whom the attachment is intended, a range of mean inspired oxygen concentration has been given for 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 1/min oxygen flow. Images PMID:4850557

  7. Imaging of oxygen in microreactors and microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shiwen; Ungerböck, Birgit; Mayr, Torsten

    2015-09-01

    This review gives an overview on the state-of-the-art of oxygen imaging in microfluidics. Oxygen imaging using optical oxygen sensors based on luminescence is a versatile and powerful tool for obtaining profoundly space-resolved information of oxygen in microreactors and microfluidic systems. We briefly introduce the principle of oxygen imaging and present techniques of oxygen imaging applied in microreactors and microfluidic devices, including selection criteria and demands of sensing material and basic set-up for a 2D oxygen sensing system. A detailed review of oxygen imaging in microreactors and microfluidic systems is given on different applications in oxygen gradient monitoring, cell culturing, single-cell analysis and chemical reactions. Finally, we discuss challenges and trends of oxygen imaging in microfluidic systems.

  8. Basic science highlights.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Mario

    2007-01-01

    The 14th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections generated a lot of excitement with the announcement of clinical studies employing the use of 2 new classes of antiretroviral drugs that target the viral integrase enzyme and the viral coreceptor CCR5. In addition, a number of presentations on cellular restriction factors provided surprises regarding the mechanism by which cellular restrictions antagonize viral infection. There was also much interest in studies presenting novel cellular cofactors of HIV-1 infection. The conference illustrated how basic science research is paying off. Essential steps in the viral life cycle, uncovered through basic research, are now being targeted by new classes of antiviral agents. In addition, basic science is unveiling potential new targets of antiretroviral therapy. PMID:17485783

  9. Influence of inclusion characteristics on the formability and toughness properties of a hot-rolled deep-drawing quality steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S. K.; Ray, A.

    1997-02-01

    In industrial practice, variations in the steelmaking process may cause significant change in inclusion characteristics. During hot rolling of flat steel products, manganese sulfides, which are plastic at elevated temperatures, are elongated in the rolling direction. These elongated inclusions affect the formability properties, such as ductility, strain hardening exponent, average plastic strain ratio, critical strain represented by the forming limit diagram, and Charpy V- notch (CVN) impact energy as well as fracture behavior. The inclusion characteristics and microstructural features of three commercially produced hot- rolled deep- drawing quality steels were evaluated and their effects on formability and impact properties were investigated. All three heats were made in a basic oxygen furnace. Two heats were teemed into ingots while the other heat was argon purged and continuous cast. These heats were then processed into 3.10 mm thick strips with identical processing parameters. Manganese sulfide stringers were found to reduce the transverse ductility, whereas yield and tensile strengths remained virtually the same in all directions. The formability parameters were not significantly affected by small variations in inclusion characteristics. However, CVN impact energy and impact transition temperature data were observed to improve with steel cleanliness. The sulfide stringers were also found to adversely affect the impact energy, transition temperature, and fracture behavior in the transverse direction.

  10. Decontamination: back to basics.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Susan J; Sjorgen, Geoff

    2008-07-01

    My invitation from this Journal's Editor, Felicia Cox, to provide a paper for this themed issue, included the sentence 'I was wondering if you or a colleague would like to contribute a back to basics article on the relevant standards and guidelines for decontamination, including what is compliance?'. The reason it is so interesting to me is that the term 'back to basics' implies reverting to a simpler time in life - when by just sticking to the rules, life became easier. However, with decontamination this is not actually true. PMID:18710126