Science.gov

Sample records for basin numerical analysis

  1. Global analysis of intraplate basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, C.; Mueller, D. R.; Dyksterhuis, S.

    2005-12-01

    Broad intraplate sedimentary basins often show a mismatch of lithospheric extension factors compared to those inferred from sediment thickness and subsidence modelling, not conforming to the current understanding of rift basin evolution. Mostly, these basins are underlain by a very heterogeneous and structurally complex basement which has been formed as a product of Phanerozoic continent-continent or terrane/arc-continent collision and is usually referred to as being accretionary. Most likely, the basin-underlying substrate is one of the key factors controlling the style of extension. In order to investigate and model the geodynamic framework and mechanics controlling formation and evolution of these long-term depositional regions, we have been analysing a global set of more than 200 basins using various remotely sensed geophysical data sets and relational geospatial databases. We have compared elevation, crustal and sediment thickness, heatflow, crustal structure, basin ages and -geometries with computed differential beta, anomalous tectonic subsidence, and differential extension factor grids for these basins. The crust/mantle interactions in the basin regions are investigated using plate tectonic reconstructions in a mantle convection framework for the last 160 Ma. Characteristic parameters and patterns derived from this global analysis are then used to generate a classification scheme, to estimate the misfit between models derived from either crustal thinning or sediment thickness, and as input for extension models using particle-in-cell finite element codes. Basins with high differential extension values include the ``classical'' intraplate-basins, like the Michigan Basin in North America, the Zaire Basin in Africa, basins of the Arabian Penisula, and the West Siberian Basin. According to our global analysis so far, these basins show, that with increasing basin age, the amount of crustal extension vs. the extension values estimated from sediment thickness

  2. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  3. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  4. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  5. Numerical model analysis of the effects of ground-water withdrawals on discharge to streams and springs in small basins typical of the Puget Sound lowland, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, David S.; Jones, Joseph L.

    1999-01-01

    A numerical ground-water flow model of a hypothetical basin typical of those in the Puget Sound Lowland of western Washington simulated effects of ground-water withdrawals on rates of natural discharge to streams and springs. The model was calibrated to natural conditions and simulated effects by varying distance from well to stream, presence of confining layers, pumping rate, depth of pumped aquifer, distance from well to a bluff, well density, and recharge rate.

  6. Numerical analysis of bifurcations

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenheimer, J.

    1996-06-01

    This paper is a brief survey of numerical methods for computing bifurcations of generic families of dynamical systems. Emphasis is placed upon algorithms that reflect the structure of the underlying mathematical theory while retaining numerical efficiency. Significant improvements in the computational analysis of dynamical systems are to be expected from more reliance of geometric insight coming from dynamical systems theory. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Numerical thermal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ketkar, S.P.

    1999-07-01

    This new volume is written for both practicing engineers who want to refresh their knowledge in the fundamentals of numerical thermal analysis as well as for students of numerical heat transfer. it is a handy desktop reference that covers all the basics of finite difference, finite element, and control volume methods. In this volume, the author presents a unique hybrid method that combines the best features of finite element modeling and the computational efficiency of finite difference network solution techniques. It is a robust technique that is used in commercially available software. The contents include: heat conduction: fundamentals and governing equations; finite difference method; control volume method; finite element method; the hybrid method; and software selection.

  8. Thermal regime and amplitude of lithosphere extension in the Sirte basin, Libya: Numerical estimates in the plane basin modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galushkin, Yu. I.; El Maghbi, Ali; El Gtlawi, M.

    2014-01-01

    The GALO basin modeling system has been applied for the numerical reconstruction of the subsidence history, variations in temperature, and maturity of the organic matter of sedimentary rocks composing the main tectonic structures of Sirte Basin. The reconstruction was carried out for eight sedimentary cross sections along the profile stretching from the Cyrenaica Platform on the eastern coast of the basin to the Hun Graben on its western wall. The interval of depths for temperature calculations included the sedimentary layer, consolidated crust, and the mantle to below 100 km. This extensive depth coverage made it possible to use the analysis of the variations in the tectonic subsidence of the basin for estimating the amplitudes and duration of the events of thermal activation and extension of the lithosphere of the basin in the history of its evolution. The modeling suggests that thermal activations of the lithosphere in the Albian-Cenomanian and Oligocene-Pleistocene are common for all tectonic structures of the Sirte Basin and the Cyrenaica Platform and that a relatively high temperature regime is also characteristic of the present-day conditions in the Sirte Basin and Cyrenaica Platform. To a considerable extent, such a regime is caused by the thermal activation of the lithosphere of the basin during the last 10 Ma. The intensity of this activation is highest in the western part of the basin, where it is accompanied by the highest erosion amplitudes. The analysis of the variations in tectonic subsidence of the basement also suggests a series of intervals of lithospheric extension, which accounts for the stages of relatively rapid subsidence of the basin. Two intervals of significant extension of the lithosphere in the Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene are common for all areas within the basin. Here, the total amplitudes of the crustal extension attained 1.5 in the central part of the Sirte Basin (the Ajdabiya and Maradah troughs and Zelten and Dahra platforms

  9. Meso-Cenozoic thermal-rheological evolution in Jiyang sub-basin, Bohai Bay Basin and its implication for basin extension revealed by numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lu; Qiu, Nansheng; Xu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Jiyang sub-basin is an oil-rich depression located in the southeast of Bohai Bay Basin, which is one of the most important hydrocarbon area in east of China. The thermal-rheological structure of the lithosphere can explain the dynamics evolution processes of basins, continental margins and orogenic belts, which directly reflects the characteristics of the lithosphere geodynamics. Nevertheless it is poorly to understand the evolution of lithospheric thermal-rheological structure in Jiyang sub-basin and its implication for basin extension. In this study, two dimensional numerical modelling is applied to calculate the paleo-temperature field and the thermo-lithospheric structure, which are used to estimate the evolution of lithospheric thermal-rheological structure. The results of study show that in Mesozoic the lithosphere was of relative rigidity and stable, as featured by large thickness and strength whereas after late Cretaceous the lithospheric strength decreased rapidly. The analysis of thermal-rheological properties shows that the lithospheric thermo-lithospheric structure is sandwiched-like with two ductile layers and two brittle layers. The upper crust is usually brittle. The brittle layers appear at outer 20km of the crust, below 20km ductile deformation predominates. There is also a 10km brittle layer on the top of the upper mantle. The integrated lithospheric yield strength is about 1.3-4.5×1012N/m, showing a weak lithosphere which may support the idea that the extension achieved by the ductile flow below the brittle layers. Keywords: lithospheric thermal-rheological structure; Jiyang sub-basin; Numerical modeling

  10. Numerical models of carbonate hosted gold mineralization, Great Basin Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Person, M.; Hofstra, A.; Gao, Y.; Sweetkind, D.; Banerjee, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Great Basin, Nevada contains many modern hydrothermal system and world class gold deposits hosted within Paleozoic carbonate rocks. Temperature profiles, fluid inclusion studies, and isotopic evidence suggest that modern geothermal and fossil hydrothermal systems associated with gold mineralization share many common features including the absence of a clear magmatic source, flow restricted to fault zones, and remarkably high temperatures at shallow depth. While the plumbing of these systems is not well understood, geochemical and isotopic data suggest that fluid circulation along fault zones is relatively deep (greater than 5 km) and comprised of relatively unexchanged Pleistocene meteoric water with small (less than 2.5 per mill) shifts from the MWL. Many fossil ore-forming systems were also dominated by meteoric water, but are usually exhibit shifts of 5 to 15 per mill from the MWL. Here we present two-dimensional numerical models to reconstruct the plumbing of modern geothermal and Tertiary hydrothermal systems in the Great Basin. Multiple tracers are used in our models, including O- and C-isotopic compositions of fluids/rocks, silica transport/ precipitation, and temperature anomalies, to constrain the plumbing of these systems. Our results suggest that both fossil hydrothermal and modern geothermal systems were probably driven by natural convection cells associated with localized high basal heating. We conclude that the fault controlled flow systems responsible for the genesis of Carlin gold mineralization and modern geothermal systems had to be transient in nature. Permeability changes within the carbonate reservoir was probably associated with extensional tectonic events.

  11. Chronologic Analysis of Terrestrial Sediments and Basin Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbank, D.

    1985-01-01

    The use of magnetic-polarity stratigraphy to provide detailed chronologies of numerous areas within a sedimentary basin is discussed. Sediments suitable for magnetostratigraphic studies are identified. Sets of figures intended to illustrate some of the applications of magnetic-polarity stratigraphy to various aspects of basin analysis are given. Most of the examples are drawn from the Himalayan molasse (Indo-Gangetic foredeep) in northern Pakistan and northwestern India. Each of the figures illustrates an example of how detailed chronologies can be utilized in enhancing and refining models of basin analysis and tectonic deformation.

  12. Numerical analysis of engine instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habiballah, M.; Dubois, I.

    Following a literature review on numerical analyses of combustion instability, to give the state of the art in the area, the paper describes the ONERA methodology used to analyze the combustion instability in liquid propellant engines. Attention is also given to a model (named Phedre) which describes the unsteady turbulent two-phase reacting flow in a liquid rocket engine combustion chamber. The model formulation includes axial or radial propellant injection, baffles, and acoustic resonators modeling, and makes it possible to treat different engine types. A numerical analysis of a cryogenic engine stability is presented, and the results of the analysis are compared with results of tests of the Viking engine and the gas generator of the Vulcain engine, showing good qualitative agreement and some general trends between experiments and numerical analysis.

  13. Geologic Observations and Numerical Modeling: A Combined Approach to Understanding Crater and Basin Formation and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, R. W. K.; Head, J. W., III

    2014-12-01

    Impact cratering is a fundamental geological process throughout the Solar System. The Moon is an ideal location to document the impact cratering process due to the number and excellent state of preservation of large craters and basins, and the wide range of geological, geophysical, topographic, mineralogic, remote sensing and returned sample data. Despite the number and excellent preservation state of many large complex craters and basins, their formation and the origin of their structural features and the stages in their evolution remain contentious. To more comprehensively document the final stage of lunar impact basin formation, we have compiled detailed topographic, geological and mineralogic maps of several type examples of peak-ring and multi-ring basins, including the Orientale basin. These data include the mineralogic characteristics of basin ring structures and assist in the interpretation of the target stratigraphy, and the depth of origin of basin rings. Data for the current structure of basins is compared to numerical model outputs of basin-forming impacts, which track formation to the conclusion of dynamic processes (2 to 3 hours after impact). We use the Orientale basin as an example and provide combined correlations and interpretations that assign rings to various stages in the numerical models, and compare these candidates to crustal stratigraphy, with the ultimate aim of producing a consistent model for large crater/basin formation. The shock physics code iSALE is used to numerically model the basin-scale impacts. Constitutive equations and equations of state for materials analogous to the lunar crust (gabbroic anorthosite) and mantle (dunite) are used. Aspects of the numerically-produced lunar basins (e.g., material distribution and accumulated stress) are compared and contrasted to remote observations and geological maps of the Orientale rings and geological units, including ejecta and impact melt deposits.

  14. Numerical analysis of Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Hiroshi

    1992-11-01

    A simulation model of the Stirling engine based on the third order method of analysis is presented. The fundamental equations are derived by applying conservation laws of physics to the machine model, the characteristic equations for heat transfer and gas flow are represented, and a numerical calculation technique using these equations is discussed. A numerical model of the system for balancing pressure in four cylinders is included in the simulation model. Calculations results from the model are compared with experimental results. A comparable study of engine performance using helium and hydrogen as working gas is conducted, clarifying the heat transfer and gas flow characteristics, and the effects of temperature conditions in the hot and cold engine sections on driving conditions. The design optimization of the heat exchanger is addressed.

  15. Using PASCAL for numerical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volper, D.; Miller, T. C.

    1978-01-01

    The data structures and control structures of PASCAL enhance the coding ability of the programmer. Proposed extensions to the language further increase its usefulness in writing numeric programs and support packages for numeric programs.

  16. An Ensemble Numerical Modeling Study of Atlantic Basin Hurricane Intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bonnie R.

    Rapid intensification of tropical cyclones is an active area of research in the atmospheric sciences due to the difficulty of forecasting cyclone intensity and the unclear mechanism by which a hurricane my undergo explosive deepening. Ensemble numerical modeling studies of six tropical cyclones from 2009, 2010 and 2011 which underwent periods of strong intensification are conducted here. The goal is to identify common storm structures in intensifying hurricanes while filling a gap in the current research between case studies of rapid intensification and climatological/statistical type studies of hurricane intensification rates by using a compositing method. A 96-member ensemble is run for a 24 hour forecast using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for hurricanes Bill (2009), Earl (2010), Igor (2010), Julia (2010), Katia (2011), and Ophelia (2011). Ensemble sensitivity analysis is used to investigate which patterns in the analysis have a strong influence on the forecast intensity and then a novel sensitivity compositing is used to identify common patterns which affect the forecast intensity. It is found that these hurricanes are all predicted to respond to an increased primary and secondary circulation, an increased warm core, a raised tropopause and moistening of rain bands with an increased forecast intensity. Perturbed initial conditions show a linear model response for small perturbations but also signs of non-linearity at large perturbations, indicating that these sensitivity patterns are robust for limited additional strengthening of the hurricane. When perturbations are partitioned into dry and moist variables, it is seen that most of the model response is achieved by the dry dynamics. Further investigation is conducted into the rapid intensification of Earl (2010) and Igor (2010) but creating ensemble forecasts with additional, high-resolution nested domains which allow explicit convection. When the ensemble sensitivity analysis is repeated

  17. Numerical Relativity meets Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waveforms (GW) from coalescing black hole binaries obtained by Numerical Relativity (NR) play a crucial role in the construction and validation of waveform models used as templates in GW matched filter searches and parameter estimation. In previous efforts, notably the NINJA and NINJA-2 collaborations, NR groups and data analysts worked closely together to use NR waveforms as mock GW signals to test the search and parameter estimation pipelines employed by LIGO. Recently, however, NR groups have been able to simulate hundreds of different binary black holes systems. It is desirable to directly use these waveforms in GW data analysis, for example to assess systematic errors in waveform models, to test general relativity or to appraise the limitations of aligned-spin searches among many other applications. In this talk, I will introduce recent developments that aim to fully integrate NR waveforms into the data analysis pipelines through a standardized interface. I will highlight a number of select applications for this new infrastructure.

  18. BasinVis 1.0: A MATLAB®-based program for sedimentary basin subsidence analysis and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Young; Novotny, Johannes; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Stratigraphic and structural mapping is important to understand the internal structure of sedimentary basins. Subsidence analysis provides significant insights for basin evolution. We designed a new software package to process and visualize stratigraphic setting and subsidence evolution of sedimentary basins from well data. BasinVis 1.0 is implemented in MATLAB®, a multi-paradigm numerical computing environment, and employs two numerical methods: interpolation and subsidence analysis. Five different interpolation methods (linear, natural, cubic spline, Kriging, and thin-plate spline) are provided in this program for surface modeling. The subsidence analysis consists of decompaction and backstripping techniques. BasinVis 1.0 incorporates five main processing steps; (1) setup (study area and stratigraphic units), (2) loading well data, (3) stratigraphic setting visualization, (4) subsidence parameter input, and (5) subsidence analysis and visualization. For in-depth analysis, our software provides cross-section and dip-slip fault backstripping tools. The graphical user interface guides users through the workflow and provides tools to analyze and export the results. Interpolation and subsidence results are cached to minimize redundant computations and improve the interactivity of the program. All 2D and 3D visualizations are created by using MATLAB plotting functions, which enables users to fine-tune the results using the full range of available plot options in MATLAB. We demonstrate all functions in a case study of Miocene sediment in the central Vienna Basin.

  19. Numerical modeling of Late Miocene tectonic inversion in the Xihu Sag, East China Sea Shelf Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liming; Li, Sanzhong; Lou, Da; Liu, Xin; Suo, Yanhui; Yu, Shan

    2014-06-01

    The East China Sea Shelf Basin is an important oil- and gas-bearing basin in the West Pacific continental margin. This region was affected by subduction of the Pacific Plate and the Philippine Plate in Cenozoic and experienced multi-stage tectonic inversions. This paper presents results from a numerical simulation by finite element method to the Xihu Sag in the East China Sea Shelf Basin and neighboring areas in an attempt to evaluate the WNW-directed compression on the sag during Late Miocene. Based on comprehensive structural analysis of a large number of seismic profiles, we determine the structural geometry of the sag, including the basement of the basin, the sedimentary cover, and 29 major faults in the Xihu Sag. Simulation results show that under continuous WNW-directed compression, tectonic inversion occurred firstly in the Longjing and Yuquan tectonic zones in the sag. Based on quantitative analysis of vertical displacement field of the Xihu Sag and peripheral areas and its stress intensity evolution, we identify a compressional regime in the Longjing Anticline Zone with a gradually propagated uplifting from south to north; whereas the propagation of uplifting in the Yuquan Anticline Zone is from north to south. The inversion intensity decreases from north to south. The formation of the tectonic inversion zone in the Xihu Sag is not only correlated to the direction of compression and fault patterns in the basin, but also closely related to the spatial configuration of fault surfaces of the Xihu-Jilong Fault in the Xihu Sag.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Water Circulation and Pollutant Transport in a Shallow Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charafi, My. M.; Sadok, A.; Kamal, A.; Menai, A.

    A two-dimensional numerical model was developed1-3 to simulate the sediment and pollutant transport in a shallow basin. The developed model consist of two modules: Hydrodynamic module and sediment/pollutant transport module. A numerical hydrodynamic module based on the Saint-Venant equations, is resolved by a MacCormack numerical scheme and is used to simulate the circulation pattern in the basin. The obtained flow circulation is used as an input to the sediment/pollutant transport module to simulate the transport and dispersion of a pollutant emitted into the basin. To calibrate the numerical model, the distorted scale model of the Windermere Basin4 was used. In this physical model, the flow visualization and pollutant transport experiments provide a good calibration. The simulated results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental measurements and the results in Ref. 4. With the aid of the validated model, the influence of the construction of dikes on the residence time distributions in the basin was examined.

  1. Numerical Package in Computer Supported Numeric Analysis Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tezer, Murat

    2007-01-01

    At universities in the faculties of Engineering, Sciences, Business and Economics together with higher education in Computing, it is stated that because of the difficulty, calculators and computers can be used in Numerical Analysis (NA). In this study, the learning computer supported NA will be discussed together with important usage of the…

  2. Flexural analysis of two broken foreland basins; Late Cenozoic Bermejo basin and Early Cenozoic Green River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Flemings, P.B.; Jordan, T.E.; Reynolds, S.

    1986-05-01

    Lithospheric flexure that generates basin in a broke foreland setting (e.g., the Laramide foreland of Wyoming) is a three-dimensional system related to shortening along basin-bounding faults. The authors modeled the elastic flexure in three dimensions for two broken foreland basins: the early Cenozoic Green River basin and the analogous late Cenozoic Bermejo basin of Argentina. Each basin is located between a thrust belt and a reverse-fault-bounded basement uplift. Both basins are asymmetric toward the basement uplifts and have a central basement high: the Rock Springs uplift and the Pie de Palo uplift, respectively. The model applies loads generated by crustal thickening to an elastic lithosphere overlying a fluid mantle. Using the loading conditions of the Bermejo basin based on topography, limited drilling, and reflection and earthquake seismology, the model predicts the current Bermejo basin geometry. Similarly, flexure under the loading conditions in the Green River basin, which are constrained by stratigraphy, well logs, and seismic profiling and summed for Late Cretaceous (Lance Formation) through Eocene (Wasatch Formation), successfully models the observed geometry of the pre-Lance surface. Basin depocenters (> 4 km for the Green River basin; > 7 km for the Bermejo basin) and central uplifts are predicted to result from constructive interference of the nonparallel applied loads. Their Bermejo model implies that instantaneous basin geometry is successfully modeled by crustal loading, whereas the Green River basin analysis suggests that basin evolution can be modeled over large time steps (e.g., 20 Ma). This result links instantaneous basin geometry to overall basin evolution and is a first step in predicting stratigraphic development.

  3. SE Great Basin Play Fairway Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    Within this submission are multiple .tif images with accompanying metadata of magnetotelluric conductor occurrence, fault critical stress composite risk segment (CRS), permeability CRS, Quaternary mafic extrusions, Quaternary fault density, and Quaternary rhyolite maps. Each of these contributed to a final play fairway analysis (PFA) for the SE Great Basin study area.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Potential Groundwater Contaminant Pathways from Hydraulically Fractured Oil Shale in the Nevada Basin and Range Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybarski, S.; Pohll, G.; Pohlmann, K.; Plume, R.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, hydraulic fracturing (fracking) has become an increasingly popular method for extraction of oil and natural gas from tight formations. Concerns have been raised over a number of environmental risks associated with fracking, including contamination of groundwater by fracking fluids, upwelling of deep subsurface brines, and methane migration. Given the potentially long time scale for contaminant transport associated with hydraulic fracturing, numerical modeling remains the best practice for risk assessment. Oil shale in the Humboldt basin of northeastern Nevada has now become a target for hydraulic fracturing operations. Analysis of regional and shallow groundwater flow is used to assess several potential migration pathways specific to the geology and hydrogeology of this basin. The model domain in all simulations is defined by the geologic structure of the basin as determined by deep oil and gas well bores and formation outcrops. Vertical transport of gaseous methane along a density gradient is simulated in TOUGH2, while fluid transport along faults and/or hydraulic fractures and lateral flow through more permeable units adjacent to the targeted shale are modeled in FEFLOW. Sensitivity analysis considers basin, fault, and hydraulic fracturing parameters, and results highlight key processes that control fracking fluid and methane migration and time scales under which it might occur.

  5. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Strain Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    A DEM of the Tularosa Basin was divided into twelve zones, each of which a ZR ratio was calculated for. This submission has a TIFF image of the zoning designations, along with a table with respective ZR ratio calculations in the metadata.

  6. Tidally averaged circulation in Puget Sound sub-basins: Comparison of historical data, analytical model, and numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Kim, Tae Yun; Roberts, Mindy

    2011-07-20

    Through extensive field data collection and analysis efforts conducted since the 1950s, researchers have established an understanding of the characteristic features of circulation in Puget Sound. The pattern ranges from the classic fjordal behavior in some basins, with shallow brackish outflow and compensating inflow immediately below, to the typical two-layer flow observed in many partially mixed estuaries with saline inflow at depth. An attempt at reproducing this behavior by fitting an analytical formulation to past data is presented, followed by the application of a three-dimensional circulation and transport numerical model. The analytical treatment helped identify key physical processes and parameters, but quickly reconfirmed that response is complex and would require site-specific parameterization to include effects of sills and interconnected basins. The numerical model of Puget Sound, developed using unstructured-grid finite volume method, allowed resolution of the sub-basin geometric features, including presence of major islands, and site-specific strong advective vertical mixing created by bathymetry and multiple sills. The model was calibrated using available recent short-term oceanographic time series data sets from different parts of the Puget Sound basin. The results are compared against (1) recent velocity and salinity data collected in Puget Sound from 2006 and (2) a composite data set from previously analyzed historical records, mostly from the 1970s. The results highlight the ability of the model to reproduce velocity and salinity profile characteristics, their variations among Puget Sound subbasins, and tidally averaged circulation. Sensitivity of residual circulation to variations in freshwater inflow and resulting salinity gradient in fjordal sub-basins of Puget Sound is examined.

  7. How sensitive is earthquake ground motion to source parameters? Insights from a numerical study in the Mygdonian basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaljub, Emmanuel; Maufroy, Emeline; deMartin, Florent; Hollender, Fabrice; Guyonnet-Benaize, Cédric; Manakou, Maria; Savvaidis, Alexandros; Kiratzi, Anastasia; Roumelioti, Zaferia; Theodoulidis, Nikos

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the origin of the variability of earthquake ground motion is critical for seismic hazard assessment. Here we present the results of a numerical analysis of the sensitivity of earthquake ground motion to seismic source parameters, focusing on the Mygdonian basin near Thessaloniki (Greece). We use an extended model of the basin (65 km [EW] x 50 km [NS]) which has been elaborated during the Euroseistest Verification and Validation Project. The numerical simulations are performed with two independent codes, both implementing the Spectral Element Method. They rely on a robust, semi-automated, mesh design strategy together with a simple homogenization procedure to define a smooth velocity model of the basin. Our simulations are accurate up to 4 Hz, and include the effects of surface topography and of intrinsic attenuation. Two kinds of simulations are performed: (1) direct simulations of the surface ground motion for real regional events having various back azimuth with respect to the center of the basin; (2) reciprocity-based calculations where the ground motion due to 980 different seismic sources is computed at a few stations in the basin. In the reciprocity-based calculations, we consider epicentral distances varying from 2.5 km to 40 km, source depths from 1 km to 15 km and we span the range of possible back-azimuths with a 10 degree bin. We will present some results showing (1) the sensitivity of ground motion parameters to the location and focal mechanism of the seismic sources; and (2) the variability of the amplification caused by site effects, as measured by standard spectral ratios, to the source characteristics

  8. Precambrian shield and basement tectonics in sedimentary basin analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Touborg, J.F.

    1984-04-01

    This study focused on the use of (1) regional structural analysis of basement and Precambrian rocks surrounding a sedimentary basin, and (2) tracing basement structures into the sedimentary basin. The structural analysis of the Precambrian shield has a fundamental bearing on interpretation of overlying sedimentary cover rocks. This is expressed in the southern part of the Hudson's Bay basin and its southeastern arm, the Moose River basin. For instance, the rims of both basins are controlled by faults or graben structures. Approximately 13 major fault systems with strike lengths of 200-300 km (125-186 mi) or more can be traced from the exposed Precambrian shield into the basin in terms of lineament arrays and/or aeromagnetic and/or gravity signature. The data suggest reactivation of faults during basin sedimentation. This type of basement structural analysis in areas adjacent to sedimentary basins can provide a valuable interpretation base for subsequent seismic surveys and basin evaluation.

  9. Comprehensive Representation of Hydrologic and Geomorphic Process Coupling in Numerical Models: Internal Dynamics and Basin Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istanbulluoglu, E.; Vivoni, E. R.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Bras, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    Landscape morphology has an important control on the spatial and temporal organization of basin hydrologic response to climate forcing, affecting soil moisture redistribution as well as vegetation function. On the other hand, erosion, driven by hydrology and modulated by vegetation, produces landforms over geologic time scales that reflect characteristic signatures of the dominant land forming process. Responding to extreme climate events or anthropogenic disturbances of the land surface, infrequent but rapid forms of erosion (e.g., arroyo development, landsliding) can modify topography such that basin hydrology is significantly influenced. Despite significant advances in both hydrologic and geomorphic modeling over the past two decades, the dynamic interactions between basin hydrology, geomorphology and terrestrial ecology are not adequately captured in current model frameworks. In order to investigate hydrologic-geomorphic-ecologic interactions at the basin scale we present initial efforts in integrating the CHILD landscape evolution model (Tucker et al. 2001) with the tRIBS hydrology model (Ivanov et al. 2004), both developed in a common software environment. In this talk, we present preliminary results of the numerical modeling of the coupled evolution of basin hydro-geomorphic response and resulting landscape morphology in two sets of examples. First, we discuss the long-term evolution of both the hydrologic response and the resulting basin morphology from an initially uplifted plateau. In the second set of modeling experiments, we implement changes in climate and land-use to an existing topography and compare basin hydrologic response to the model results when landscape form is fixed (e.g. no coupling between hydrology and geomorphology). Model results stress the importance of internal basin dynamics, including runoff generation mechanisms and hydrologic states, in shaping hydrologic response as well as the importance of employing comprehensive

  10. Experimental and numerical study on the design of a deposition basin outlet structure at a mountain debris cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gems, B.; Wörndl, M.; Gabl, R.; Weber, C.; Aufleger, M.

    2014-02-01

    Mountain debris cones in the Alpine region often provide space for dense population and cultivation. Hence, a great number of buildings are exposed to torrential hazards. In order to protect the settlement areas against flooding and overbank sedimentation, torrent defence structures are implemented at various locations within catchments. Directly at the debris cones, these protection measures often include a deposition basin at the fan apex and/or a confined channel that passes through the settlement. The work presented within this paper deals with the effect of specific outlet structure layouts, situated at the lower end of a selected deposition basin, on bed-load transport processes and flood protection. A case study analysis was accomplished comprising a 3-D numerical model (FLOW-3D) and a physical scale model test (1 : 30). The subject of investigation was the deposition basin of the Larsennbach torrent in the Austrian Northern Limestone Alps. The basin is situated on a large debris cone and opens out into a paved channel. Since the basin is undersized and the accumulation of sediment in the outlet section reduces the available cross section during floods, adjoining settlements are considerably endangered of lateral overtopping of both clear water and sediment. Aiming for an upgrade in flood protection, certain layouts for a "closing-off structure" at the outlet were tested within this project. For the most efficient design layout, its effect on flood protection, a continuous bed-load output from the basin and the best possible use of the retention volume are pointed out. The simple design of the structure and the key aspects that have to be taken into consideration for implementation are highlighted.

  11. Experimental and numerical study on the design of a deposition basin outlet structure at a mountain debris cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gems, B.; Wörndl, M.; Gabl, R.; Weber, C.; Aufleger, M.

    2013-07-01

    Mountain debris cones in the Alpine region often provide space for dense population and cultivation. Hence, a great number of buildings are exposed to torrential hazards. In order to protect the settlement areas against flooding and overbank sedimentation, torrent defence structures are implemented directly at the debris cones. In many cases, these protection measures include a deposition basin at the head of the debris cone and/or a confined channel that passes or tracks through the settlement. The work presented within this paper deals with the effect of specific outlet structure layouts, situated at the lower end of a selected deposition basin, on bed-load transport processes and flood protection. A case study analysis was accomplished comprising of a 3-D-numerical model (FLOW-3D) and a physical scale model test (1:30). The subject of investigation was the deposition basin of the Larsennbach torrent in the Austrian Northern Limestone Alps. The basin is situated on a large debris cone and opens out into a paved channel. Since the basin is undersized and the accumulation of sediment in the outlet section reduces the available cross section during floods, adjoining settlements are considerably endangered of lateral overtopping of both clear water and sediment. Aiming for an upgrade in flood protection, certain layouts for a "closing-off structure" at the outlet were tested within this project. For the most efficient design layout, its effect on flood protection, a continuous bed-load output from the basin and the best possible use of the retention volume are pointed out. The simple design of the structure and the key aspects, that have to be taken into consideration for implementation, are highlighted.

  12. Analysis of K west basin canister gas

    SciTech Connect

    Trimble, D.J., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    Gas and Liquid samples have been collected from a selection of the approximately 3,820 spent fuel storage canisters in the K West Basin. The samples were taken to characterize the contents of the gas and water in the canisters providing source term information for two subprojects of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) (Fulton 1994): the K Basins Integrated Water Treatment System Subproject (Ball 1996) and the K Basins Fuel Retrieval System Subproject (Waymire 1996). The barrels of ten canisters were sampled for gas and liquid in 1995, and 50 canisters were sampled in a second campaign in 1996. The analysis results from the first campaign have been reported (Trimble 1995a, 1995b, 1996a, 1996b). The analysis results from the second campaign liquid samples have been documented (Trimble and Welsh 1997; Trimble 1997). This report documents the results for the gas samples from the second campaign and evaluates all gas data in terms of expected releases when opening the canisters for SNFP activities. The fuel storage canisters consist of two closed and sealed barrels, each with a gas trap. The barrels are attached at a trunion to make a canister, but are otherwise independent (Figure 1). Each barrel contains up to seven N Reactor fuel element assemblies. A gas space of nitrogen was established in the top 2.2 to 2.5 inches (5.6 to 6.4 cm) of each barrel. Many of the fuel elements were damaged allowing the metallic uranium fuel to be corroded by the canister water. The corrosion releases fission products and generates hydrogen gas. The released gas mixes with the gas-space gas and excess gas passes through the gas trap into the basin water. The canister design does not allow canister water to be exchanged with basin water.

  13. Three-dimensional numerical models of the evolution of pull-apart basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrunin, A. G.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2008-12-01

    Pull-apart basins are depressions that form as the result of crustal extension along strike-slip systems where the sense of fault stepping or bending coincides with that of fault slip. They are common features of strike-slip systems. We perform a number of numerical thermomechanical experiments to explore how the rheology of the lithosphere influences basin evolution and lithospheric structure beneath the basin. Our modeling shows that basin subsidence results from the competition of extension of the brittle part of the lithosphere, which leads to its subsidence, and of the compensating flow of the deeper ductile part of the lithosphere, which pushes the extended brittle block upwards. The result of this competition is the subsidence rate. Strain partitioning beneath the basin and crustal structures is controlled by (i) the thickness of the brittle layer and basin width, (ii) the magnitude of strike-slip displacement, (iii) the rate of frictional softening of the crust, and (iv) the viscosity of the ductile part of the lithosphere. The thickness of the brittle layer and the viscosity of the underlying ductile part of the lithosphere in turn depend on temperature, composition and material softening. We interpret the modeling results, deducing simple analytical expressions based on the "brittle brick stretching" (BBS) approach, which despite its simplicity describes the structure and evolution of pull-apart basins reasonably well. We also demonstrate that the structure and evolution of the Dead Sea Basin, located at a left step of the Dead Sea Transform in the Middle East, is consistent with a BBS type of deformation with only a minor contribution from compensational flow in the ductile part of the lithosphere. Finally, we show that the formation of a deep narrow pull-apart basin in relatively cold lithosphere, as in the Dead Sea Basin, requires very low friction at major faults (lower than 0.1-0.2). If this condition is not satisfied, strike-slip deformation does

  14. Numerical Simulation of Petroleum Generation and Migration in the Song Hong Basin, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Byeong-Kook; Thi Nguyen, Hong; Park, Mee-Sook

    2014-05-01

    The numerical modeling of petroleum systems is an effective tool to understand generation, migration and accumulation of hydrocarbons in a sedimentary basin and hence to determine future targets for the hydrocarbon exploration. The numerical modeling identifies two petroleum systems in the Song Hong Basin, which is a petroliferous Cenozoic basin, offshore eastern Vietnam. These petroleum systems were named DinhCao-PhuCu(.) Petroleum System and SongHuong-BienDong(.) Petroleum System. DinhCao-PhuCu(.) Petroleum System covers northern and central parts of the Song Hong basin with Oligocene shale and coaly shale source rocks of Dinh Cao formation, which are dominated by type II-III kerogens. The hydrocarbon generation starts at 13 Ma within deeply buried Oligocene strata located in the centre of the basin. The hydrocarbon expels from the Oligocene source rock and migrates laterally and then up dip toward marginal areas where Middle Miocene sandstones of Phu Cu formation are present as major reservoirs. The numerical model shows that the critical moment occurs at about 3.5 Ma. The DinhCao-PhuCu(.) petroleum system is confirmed by sparse occurrence of oil and gas along the coast of eastern Vietnam. SongHuong-BienDong(.) Petroleum System is identified in limited areas of the central and southern Song Hong basin. The major source rock of this petroleum system is Lower Miocene dark claystones of Song Huong formation which contain gas prone, type III kerogen. The migration model shows that hydrocarbons are generated from the Miocene source rocks in the center of the basin at about 12 Ma, and migrates updip through sand bodies of Quang Ngai formation to the major boundaries faults, and further moves into highly permeable up-dipping units, the Bien Dong formation. The best depiction of the generation-migration-accumulation of hydrocarbons occurs at about 2 Ma. The presence of the SongHuong-BienDong(.) Petroleum System is indicated by the large gas fields in the central and

  15. SE Great Basin Play Fairway Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a Na/K geothermometer probability greater than 200 deg C map, as well as two play fairway analysis (PFA) models. The probability map acts as a composite risk segment for the PFA models. The PFA models differ in their application of magnetotelluric conductors as composite risk segments. These PFA models map out the geothermal potential in the region of SE Great Basin, Utah.

  16. Numerical analysis of wave scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beran, Mark J.

    1994-12-01

    The following topics were studied in detail during the report period: (1) Combined volume and surface scattering in a channel, using a modal formulation. (2) Two-way formulation to account for backscattering in a channel. (3) Data analysis to determine vertical and horizontal correlation lengths of the random index-of-refraction fluctuations in a channel. (4) The effect of random fluctuations on the two-frequency coherence function in a shallow channel. (5) Approximate eigenfunctions and eigenvalues for linear sound-speed profiles. (6) The effect of sea-water absorption on scattering in a shallow channel.

  17. Basin analysis of South Mozambique graben

    SciTech Connect

    Iliffe, J.; Lerche, I.; De Buyl, M.

    1987-05-01

    Basin analysis of the South Mozambique graben between latitudes 25/sup 0/ and 26/sup 0/ and longitudes 34/sup 0/ and 35/sup 0/ demonstrates how modeling techniques may help to assess the oil potential of a speculative basin with only minimal seismic data. Two-dimensional restoration of the seismic profiles, using a backstripping and decompaction program on pseudowells linked with structural reconstruction, assesses the rift's two-phase extensional history. Since no well or thermal indicator data exist within the basin, the thermal history had to be derived from extensional models. The best fit of observed subsidence curves and those predicted by the models results in values of lithospheric extension (gamma). The disagreement in observed and theoretical basement subsidence curves was minimized by taking a range of gamma for each model for each well. These extension factors were then used in each model's equations for paleoheat flux to derive the heat-flow histories. (It is noted that a systematic basinwide variance of gamma occurs.) The heat-flux histories were then used with a one-dimensional fluid flow/compaction model to calculate TTI values and oil windows. A Tissot generation model was applied to each formation in every well for kerogen Types I, II, and III. The results were contoured across the basin to assess possible oil- and gas-prone formations. The extensional, burial, and thermal histories are integrated into an overall basin development picture and provide an oil and gas provenance model. Thus they estimate the basinwide hydrocarbon potential and also gain insight into the additional data necessary to significantly decrease the uncertainty.

  18. Numerical simulation of the basin scale hydrogeological impacts of carbon sequestration in deep saline aquifers of the St. Lawrence Lowlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girou, O.; Lemieux, J. M.; Malo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Full-scale carbon capture and storage in deep saline aquifers implies injecting important quantities of carbon in order to significantly reduce greenhouse gases emissions. At the basin scale, impacts related to CO2 injection are pressure perturbation as well as brine migration into freshwater aquifers. In this study, potential impacts of an industrial-scale carbon capture and storage project in Bécancour (Quebec, Canada), in the St. Lawrence Lowlands basin, are discussed, as well as the role played by regional normal faults that divide the basin into multiple compartments. The basin is 300 km long and 90 km wide, formed by sub-horizontal Paleozoic formations on top of which the Utica and Lorraine shale formations represent the caprock of the potential CO2reservoir. These formations cover most of the basin, except in its eroded northwestern part, located between 10 to 40 km away from the potential injection sites. Three injection scenarios were considered, corresponding to greenhouse gases emissions from large emitters located; in Bécancour industrial park, in a larger area that allow affordable transport and in the entire basin without considering transport costs (1, 5, 10 Mt/yr). The numerical model FEFLOW was used to simulate CO2 injection into different compartments to evaluate pressure build up propagation and brine migration in order to define which compartments are best suited for long-term storage. The simulations considered an injection period of 100 years and post-injections period of 1000 years. Numerical simulations indicate that normal faults, which exhibit a low hydraulic conductivity, play a major role orienting pressure build-up and brine migration. Due to the presence of normal faults, no pressure build up occurred close to the surface. Similarly, preliminary mass transport simulations show very limited brine migration. These first results indicate that basin-scale impacts of carbon injection are low for the 3 injection scenarios, however, the

  19. Simple Numerical Analysis of Longboard Speedometer Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Simple numerical data analysis is described, using a standard spreadsheet program, to determine distance, velocity (speed) and acceleration from voltage data generated by a skateboard/longboard speedometer (Hare 2012 "Phys. Educ." 47 409-17). This simple analysis is an introduction to data processing including scaling data as well as…

  20. Multivariate analysis of environmental data for two hydrographic basins

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, J.M.; Prada, D.; Muniategui, S.; Gonzalez, E.; Alonso, E. )

    1992-02-01

    A multivariate study (PCA Analysis and Cluster analysis) of two Spanish hydrographic basins (The Mandeo and Mero basins) was made to achieve reliable conclusions about their actual physico-chemical environmental situation. Two police-samples' are defined, their effects explained, and are introduced in Cluster analysis as a way to examine sample quality. The multivariate analysis shows different qualities in the two hydrographic basins.

  1. Numerical analysis of randomly forced glycolitic oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Ryashko, Lev

    2015-03-10

    Randomly forced glycolytic oscillations in Higgins model are studied both numerically and analytically. Numerical analysis is based on the direct simulation of the solutions of stochastic system. Non-uniformity of the stochastic bundle along the deterministic cycle is shown. For the analytical investigation of the randomly forced Higgins model, the stochastic sensitivity function technique and confidence domains method are applied. Results of the influence of additive noise on the cycle of this model are given.

  2. Numerical modeling of the ejecta distribution and formation of the Orientale basin on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meng-Hua; Wünnemann, Kai; Potter, Ross W. K.

    2015-12-01

    The formation and structure of the Orientale basin on the Moon has been extensively studied in the past; however, estimates of its transient crater size, excavated volume and depth, and ejecta distribution remain uncertain. Here we present a new numerical model to reinvestigate the formation and structure of Orientale basin and better constrain impact parameters such as impactor size and velocity. Unlike previous models, the observed ejecta distribution and ejecta thickness were used as the primary constraints to estimate transient crater size—the best measure of impact energy. Models were also compared to basin morphology and morphometry, and subsurface structures derived from high-resolution remote sensing observations and gravity data, respectively. The best fit model suggests a 100 km diameter impactor with a velocity of ~12 km s-1 formed the Orientale basin on a relatively "cold" Moon. In this impact scenario the transient crater diameter is ~400 km or 460 km depending on whether the crater is defined using the diameter of the excavation zone or the diameter of the growing cavity at the time of maximum crater volume, respectively. The volume of ejecta material is ~4.70 × 106 km3, in agreement with recent estimates of the Orientale ejecta blanket thickness from remote sensing studies. The model also confirms the remote sensing spectroscopic observations that no mantle material was excavated and deposited at Orientale's rim.

  3. Key Curriculum Reform Research on Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong; Peng, Chensong

    Based on the current undergraduate teaching characteristics and the actual teaching situation of numerical analysis curriculum, this paper gives a useful discussion and appropriate adjustments for this course's teaching content and style, and it also proposes some new curriculum reform plans to improve the teaching effectiveness which can develop student's abilities of mathematical thinking and computational practice.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Groundwater Withdrawal within the Mercury Valley Administrative Groundwater Basin, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    A.B. Gilliam; R.W.H. Carroll; G. Pohll; R.L. Hershey

    2006-01-01

    A detailed, transient, three-dimensional, finite-difference groundwater flow model was created for the Mercury Valley Administrative Groundwater Basin (MVB). The MVB is a distinct groundwater basin as defined by the State of Nevada and is located partially within the boundary of the Nevada Test Site. This basin is being studied as a potential location for new industrial facilities and therefore would be subject to Nevada water-use limitations. The MVB model was used to estimate the volume of water that could be withdrawn from Mercury Valley without inducing laterally or vertically extensive water-table effects. In each model simulation, water-table drawdown was limited to a maximum of 0.5 m at the boundary of the basin and held within the screened interval of the well. Water withdrawal from Nevada groundwater basins is also limited to the State-defined perennial yield for that area. The perennial yield for the MVB is 27,036 m{sup 3}/day. The one existing water-supply well in Mercury Valley is capable of sustaining significantly higher withdrawal rates than it currently produces. Simulations showed this single well could produce 50 percent of the basin?s perennial yield with limited water-table drawdown. Pumping from six hypothetical water-supply wells was also simulated. Each hypothetical well was placed in an area of high hydraulic conductivity and far from the basin's boundaries. Each of these wells was capable of producing at least 50 percent of the basin's perennial yield. One of the hypothetical wells could simulate 100 percent of the perennial yield while staying within drawdown limitations. Multi-well simulations where two or more water-supply wells were simultaneously pumping were also conducted. These simulations almost always resulted in very limited lateral and vertical drawdown and produced 100 percent of Mercury Valley's perennial yield. A water-budget analysis was also conducted for each of the various stress simulations. Each of the stress scenarios

  5. Systems Improved Numerical Fluids Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    Systems Improved Numerical Fluids Analysis Code, SINFAC, consists of additional routines added to April, 1983, version of SINDA. Additional routines provide for mathematical modeling of active heat-transfer loops. Simulates steady-state and pseudo-transient operations of 16 different components of heat-transfer loops, including radiators, evaporators, condensers, mechanical pumps, reservoirs, and many types of valves and fittings. Program contains property-analysis routine used to compute thermodynamic properties of 20 different refrigerants. Source code written in FORTRAN 77.

  6. Numerical Simulation of The Mediterranean Sea Using Diecast: Interaction Between Basin, Sub-basin and Local Scale Features and Natural Variability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, V.; Dietrich, D. E.; Haney, R. L.; Tintoré, J.

    In situ and satellite data obtained during the last ten years have shown that the circula- tion in the Mediterranean Sea is extremely complex in space, with significant features ranging from mesoscale to sub-basin and basin scale, and highly variable in time, with mesoscale to seasonal and interannual signals. Also, the steep bottom topography and the variable atmospheric conditions from one sub-basin to another, make the circula- tion to be composed of numerous energetic and narrow coastal currents, density fronts and mesoscale structures that interact at sub-basin scale with the large scale circula- tion. To simulate numerically and better understand these features, besides high grid resolution, a low numerical dispersion and low physical dissipation ocean model is required. We present the results from a 1/8z horizontal resolution numerical simula- tion of the Mediterranean Sea using DieCAST ocean model, which meets the above requirements since it is stable with low general dissipation and uses accurate fourth- order-accurate approximations with low numerical dispersion. The simulations are carried out with climatological surface forcing using monthly mean winds and relax- ation towards climatological values of temperature and salinity. The model reproduces the main features of the large basin scale circulation, as well as the seasonal variabil- ity of sub-basin scale currents that are well documented by observations in straits and channels. In addition, DieCAST brings out natural fronts and eddies that usually do not appear in numerical simulations of the Mediterranean and that lead to a natural interannual variability. The role of this intrinsic variability in the general circulation will be discussed.

  7. Manufacturing in space: Fluid dynamics numerical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.; Nicholson, L. A.; Spradley, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Natural convection in a spherical container with cooling at the center was numerically simulated using the Lockheed-developed General Interpolants Method (GIM) numerical fluid dynamic computer program. The numerical analysis was simplified by assuming axisymmetric flow in the spherical container, with the symmetry axis being a sphere diagonal parallel to the gravity vector. This axisymmetric spherical geometry was intended as an idealization of the proposed Lal/Kroes growing experiments to be performed on board Spacelab. Results were obtained for a range of Rayleigh numbers from 25 to 10,000. For a temperature difference of 10 C from the cooling sting at the center to the container surface, and a gravitional loading of 0.000001 g a computed maximum fluid velocity of about 2.4 x 0.00001 cm/sec was reached after about 250 sec. The computed velocities were found to be approximately proportional to the Rayleigh number over the range of Rayleigh numbers investigated.

  8. Ferrofluids: Modeling, numerical analysis, and scientific computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomas, Ignacio

    This dissertation presents some developments in the Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) describing the behavior of ferrofluids. The most widely accepted PDE model for ferrofluids is the Micropolar model proposed by R.E. Rosensweig. The Micropolar Navier-Stokes Equations (MNSE) is a subsystem of PDEs within the Rosensweig model. Being a simplified version of the much bigger system of PDEs proposed by Rosensweig, the MNSE are a natural starting point of this thesis. The MNSE couple linear velocity u, angular velocity w, and pressure p. We propose and analyze a first-order semi-implicit fully-discrete scheme for the MNSE, which decouples the computation of the linear and angular velocities, is unconditionally stable and delivers optimal convergence rates under assumptions analogous to those used for the Navier-Stokes equations. Moving onto the much more complex Rosensweig's model, we provide a definition (approximation) for the effective magnetizing field h, and explain the assumptions behind this definition. Unlike previous definitions available in the literature, this new definition is able to accommodate the effect of external magnetic fields. Using this definition we setup the system of PDEs coupling linear velocity u, pressure p, angular velocity w, magnetization m, and magnetic potential ϕ We show that this system is energy-stable and devise a numerical scheme that mimics the same stability property. We prove that solutions of the numerical scheme always exist and, under certain simplifying assumptions, that the discrete solutions converge. A notable outcome of the analysis of the numerical scheme for the Rosensweig's model is the choice of finite element spaces that allow the construction of an energy-stable scheme. Finally, with the lessons learned from Rosensweig's model, we develop a diffuse-interface model describing the behavior of two-phase ferrofluid flows and present an energy-stable numerical scheme for this model. For a

  9. Numerical Analysis of Rocket Exhaust Cratering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Supersonic jet exhaust impinging onto a flat surface is a fundamental flow encountered in space or with a missile launch vehicle system. The flow is important because it can endanger launch operations. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of a landing rocket s exhaust on soils. From numerical simulations and analysis, we developed characteristic expressions and curves, which we can use, along with rocket nozzle performance, to predict cratering effects during a soft-soil landing. We conducted a series of multiphase flow simulations with two phases: exhaust gas and sand particles. The main objective of the simulation was to obtain the numerical results as close to the experimental results as possible. After several simulating test runs, the results showed that packing limit and the angle of internal friction are the two critical and dominant factors in the simulations.

  10. Numerical analysis method for linear induction machines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    A numerical analysis method has been developed for linear induction machines such as liquid metal MHD pumps and generators and linear motors. Arbitrary phase currents or voltages can be specified and the moving conductor can have arbitrary velocity and conductivity variations from point to point. The moving conductor is divided into a mesh and coefficients are calculated for the voltage induced at each mesh point by unit current at every other mesh point. Combining the coefficients with the mesh resistances yields a set of simultaneous equations which are solved for the unknown currents.

  11. Numerical Analysis of Convection/Transpiration Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Dilley, Arthur D.; Kelly, H. Neale

    1999-01-01

    An innovative concept utilizing the natural porosity of refractory-composite materials and hydrogen coolant to provide CONvective and TRANspiration (CONTRAN) cooling and oxidation protection has been numerically studied for surfaces exposed to a high heat flux high temperature environment such as hypersonic vehicle engine combustor walls. A boundary layer code and a porous media finite difference code were utilized to analyze the effect of convection and transpiration cooling on surface heat flux and temperature. The boundary layer code determined that transpiration flow is able to provide blocking of the surface heat flux only if it is above a minimum level due to heat addition from combustion of the hydrogen transpirant. The porous media analysis indicated that cooling of the surface is attained with coolant flow rates that are in the same range as those required for blocking, indicating that a coupled analysis would be beneficial.

  12. Numerical Analysis of Convection/Transpiration Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Dilley, Arthur D.; Kelly, H. Neale

    1999-01-01

    An innovative concept utilizing the natural porosity of refractory-composite materials and hydrogen coolant to provide CONvective and TRANspiration (CONTRAN) cooling and oxidation protection has been numerically studied for surfaces exposed to a high heat flux, high temperature environment such as hypersonic vehicle engine combustor walls. A boundary layer code and a porous media finite difference code were utilized to analyze the effect of convection and transpiration cooling on surface heat flux and temperature. The boundary, layer code determined that transpiration flow is able to provide blocking of the surface heat flux only if it is above a minimum level due to heat addition from combustion of the hydrogen transpirant. The porous media analysis indicated that cooling of the surface is attained with coolant flow rates that are in the same range as those required for blocking, indicating that a coupled analysis would be beneficial.

  13. Three Dimensional Numerical Analysis on Discharge Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaishi, Kenji; Katsurai, Makoto

    2003-10-01

    A three dimensional simulation code with the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method combined with the two fluids model for electron and ion has been developed for the microwave excited surface wave plasma in the RDL-SWP device. This code permits the numerical analysis of the spatial distributions of electric field, power absorption, electron density and electron temperature. At low gas pressure of about 10 mTorr, the numerical results compared with the experimental measurements that shows the validity of this 3-D simulation code. A simplified analysis assuming that an electron density is spatially uniform has been studied and its applicability is evaluated by 3-D simulation. The surface wave eigenmodes are determined by electron density, and it is found that the structure of the device strongly influences to the spatial distribution of the electric fields of surface wave in a low density area. A method to irradiate a microwave to the whole surface area of the plasma is proposed which is found to be effective to obtain a high uniformity distribution of electron density.

  14. A theoretical analysis of basin-scale groundwater temperature distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ran; Jiang, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Jun-Zhi; Wan, Li; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Li, Hailong

    2015-03-01

    The theory of regional groundwater flow is critical for explaining heat transport by moving groundwater in basins. Domenico and Palciauskas's (1973) pioneering study on convective heat transport in a simple basin assumed that convection has a small influence on redistributing groundwater temperature. Moreover, there has been no research focused on the temperature distribution around stagnation zones among flow systems. In this paper, the temperature distribution in the simple basin is reexamined and that in a complex basin with nested flow systems is explored. In both basins, compared to the temperature distribution due to conduction, convection leads to a lower temperature in most parts of the basin except for a small part near the discharge area. There is a high-temperature anomaly around the basin-bottom stagnation point where two flow systems converge due to a low degree of convection and a long travel distance, but there is no anomaly around the basin-bottom stagnation point where two flow systems diverge. In the complex basin, there are also high-temperature anomalies around internal stagnation points. Temperature around internal stagnation points could be very high when they are close to the basin bottom, for example, due to the small permeability anisotropy ratio. The temperature distribution revealed in this study could be valuable when using heat as a tracer to identify the pattern of groundwater flow in large-scale basins. Domenico PA, Palciauskas VV (1973) Theoretical analysis of forced convective heat transfer in regional groundwater flow. Geological Society of America Bulletin 84:3803-3814

  15. Numerical analysis of flows in reciprocating engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, H.; Kojima, M.

    1986-07-01

    A numerical method of the analysis for three-dimensional turbulent flow in cylinders of reciprocating engines with arbitrary geometry is described. A scheme of the finite volume/finite element methods is used, employing a large number of small elements of arbitrary shapes to form a cylinder. The fluid dynamic equations are expressed in integral form for each element, taking into account the deformation of the element shape according to the piston movements, and are solved in the physical space using rectangular coordinates. The conventional k-epsilon two-equation model is employed to describe the flow turbulence. Example calculations are presented for simple pancake-type combustion chambers having an annular intake port at either center or asymmetric position of the cylinder head. The suction inflow direction is also changed in several ways. The results show a good simulation of overall fluid movements within the engine cylinder.

  16. The DESIRE Airborne gravity project in the Dead Sea Basin and 3D numerical gravity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Goetze, H.; Meyer, U.; Group, D.

    2008-12-01

    This geo-scientific research focuses on the geological setting of the Dead Sea Transform (DST) and the Dead Sea Basin (DSB) and its resulting pull-apart basins. Since the late 1970s, crustal scale geophysical experiments have been carried out in this region. However, the nature of the crust underlying the eastern and western shoulders of the DSB and underneath the DST itself is still a hotly debated topic among researchers. To address one of the central questions of plate tectonics - How do large transform systems work and what are their typical features? - An international geoscientific Dead Sea Integrated Research project (DESIRE) is being conducted by colleagues from Germany, Israel, Palestine, and Jordan. In order to provide a high resolution gravity database that support 3D numerical modeling and hence a more comprehensive understanding of the nature and segmentation of the DST, an airborne gravity survey as a part of the DESIRE project has been carried out from February to March 2007. The airborne gravity survey covered the DST from Elat/Aqaba in the South to the northern rim of the Dead Sea. The low speed and terrain-following helicopter gravity flights were performed to acquire the highest possible data quality. In total, 32 north-south profiles and 16 west-east profiles crossing the DST have been measured. Most of the profiles concentrated in areas that lacked terrestrial gravity data coverage, e. g. over the shoulders of the DSB. The airborne gravity data are merged with existing conventional (terrestrial) data sets to provide a seamless gravity map of the area of interest. Using that combined gravity dataset and DESIRE wide angle refractions seismic interpretation we modified density structures in the DSB. As results we estimated that (1) the Moho depth varies from 26 km in the Israel side to 34 km in the Jordan side. (2) The maximum thickness of the Dead Sea sediment Basin is about 15 km. (3) The salt rock with an average thickness of about 5 km is

  17. 183-H Basin Mixed Waste Analysis and Testing Report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this sampling and analysis report is to provide data necessary to support treatment and disposal options for the low-level mixed waste from the 183-H solar evaporation ponds. In 1973, four of the 16 flocculation and sedimentation basins were designated for use as solar evaporation basins to provide waste reduction by natural evaporation of liquid chemical wastes from the 300 Area fuel fabrication facilities. The primary purpose of this effort is to gather chemical and bulk property data for the waste in the drums/boxes of sediment removed from the basin at Central Waste Complex.

  18. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Water Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-12-15

    This shapefile contains 409 well data points on Tularosa Basin Water Chemistry, each of which have a location (UTM), temperature, quartz and Potassium/Magnesium geothermometer; as well as concentrations of chemicals like Mn, Fe, Ba, Sr, Cs, Rb, As, NH4, HCO3, SO4, F, Cl, B, SiO2, Mg, Ca, K, Na, and Li.

  19. Two numerical models for landslide dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungr, Oldrich; McDougall, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Two microcomputer-based numerical models (Dynamic ANalysis (DAN) and three-dimensional model DAN (DAN3D)) have been developed and extensively used for analysis of landslide runout, specifically for the purposes of practical landslide hazard and risk assessment. The theoretical basis of both models is a system of depth-averaged governing equations derived from the principles of continuum mechanics. Original features developed specifically during this work include: an open rheological kernel; explicit use of tangential strain to determine the tangential stress state within the flowing sheet, which is both more realistic and beneficial to the stability of the model; orientation of principal tangential stresses parallel with the direction of motion; inclusion of the centripetal forces corresponding to the true curvature of the path in the motion direction and; the use of very simple and highly efficient free surface interpolation methods. Both models yield similar results when applied to the same sets of input data. Both algorithms are designed to work within the semi-empirical framework of the "equivalent fluid" approach. This approach requires selection of material rheology and calibration of input parameters through back-analysis of real events. Although approximate, it facilitates simple and efficient operation while accounting for the most important characteristics of extremely rapid landslides. The two models have been verified against several controlled laboratory experiments with known physical basis. A large number of back-analyses of real landslides of various types have also been carried out. One example is presented. Calibration patterns are emerging, which give a promise of predictive capability.

  20. Neotectonics of the Surma Basin, Bangladesh from GPS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulbul, M. A. U.

    2015-12-01

    The Surma Basin is a sub-basin of the Bengal Basin situated at the northeastern corner of Bangladesh. The tectonically-active basin lies at the junction of three tectonic plates: the Indian plate, the Eurasian plate and the Burma platelet. The Surma Basin is bounded on the north by the Shillong Massif, east and southeast by CTFB of the Indo-Burman Ranges, west by the Indian Shield and to the south and southeast it is open to the main part of Bengal Basin. The Surma basin is subsiding at a high rate, which is controlled by flexure loading along the southern margin of the 2-km high Shillong Massif because of Dauki thrust fault system. The objective of this study is to explore and reconstruct the present scenario of the tectonically active zone of the northeastern Bangladesh, identify the active faults, identify the relation between the neotectonic activities and seismicity, relation between neotectonic activities and natural hazards and describe the nature of the possible future earthquakes. The present effort to establish the tectonics of the Surma basin mainly utilizes the horizontal and vertical movements of the area using GPS geodetic data and other constraints on the structure of the region. We also make use historical seismologic data, field geology, and satellite image data. The GPS data has been processed using GAMIT-GLOBK. The analysis of 5 continuous GPS geodetic stations installed in the Surma Basin are combined with published data from the adjacent parts of India. While the area is moving northeast at a rate of 50-52 mm/year relative to ITRF2008 reference frame, it is moving south in an Indian reference frame. The velocities reflect that the Surma Basin being overthrust by both Shillong Plateau from the north and Burmese microplate from the east, respectively. The combined GPS velocity data indicates shortening across Dauki Fault and Indo Burman Ranges at a rate of 7 mm/yr and 18 mm/yr, respectively. The complex anticlinal structures in and around the

  1. Sedimentary basin analysis using airborne gravity data: a case study from the Bohai Bay Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenyong; Liu, Yanxu; Zhou, Jianxin; Zhou, Xihua; Li, Bing

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss the application of an airborne gravity survey to sedimentary basin analysis. Using high-precision airborne gravity data constrained by drilling and seismic data from the Bohai Bay Basin in eastern China, we interpreted faults, structural elements, sedimentary thickness, structural styles and local structures (belts) in the central area of the Basin by the wavelet transform method. Subsequently, these data were subtracted from the Bouguer gravity to calculate the residual gravity anomalies. On this basis, the faults were interpreted mainly by linear zones of high gravity gradients and contour distortion, while the sedimentary thicknesses were computed by the Euler deconvolution. The structural styles were identified by the combination of gravity anomalies and the local structures interpreted by the first vertical derivative of the residual gravity. The results showed evidence for seven faults, one sag and ten new local structure belts.

  2. Nonclassicality thresholds for multiqubit states: Numerical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gruca, Jacek; Zukowski, Marek; Laskowski, Wieslaw; Kiesel, Nikolai; Wieczorek, Witlef; Weinfurter, Harald; Schmid, Christian

    2010-07-15

    States that strongly violate Bell's inequalities are required in many quantum-informational protocols as, for example, in cryptography, secret sharing, and the reduction of communication complexity. We investigate families of such states with a numerical method which allows us to reveal nonclassicality even without direct knowledge of Bell's inequalities for the given problem. An extensive set of numerical results is presented and discussed.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Ground-Water Withdrawals in the Southern Lihue Basin, Kauai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izuka, Scot K.; Oki, Delwyn S.

    2002-01-01

    Numerical simulations indicate that ground-water withdrawals from the Hanamaulu and Puhi areas of the southern Lihue Basin will result in a decline in water levels and reductions in base flows of streams near proposed new water-supply wells. Most of the changes will be attained within 10 to 20 years of the start of pumping. Except for areas such as Puhi and Kilohana, the freshwater lens in most inland areas of the southern Lihue Basin is thick and model simulations indicate that changes in water level and the position of the freshwater- saltwater interface in response to pumping will be small relative to the present thickness of the freshwater lens. Effects of the proposed withdrawals on streamflow depend on withdrawal rate and proximity of the wells to streams. Placing pumped wells away from streams with low base flow and toward streams with high base flow can reduce the relative effect on individual streams. Simulation of the 0.42-million-gallon-per-day increase in withdrawal projected for 2000 indicates that the resulting changes in water levels and interface position, relative to conditions prior to the withdrawal increase, will be small, and that stream base flow will be reduced by less than 10 percent. Simulation of the 0.83-million-gallon-per-day withdrawal projected for 2010 indicates further thinning of the freshwater lens in the Puhi area, where the lens already may be thin, as well as base-flow reduction in Nawiliwili Stream. Simulation of an alternative distribution of the 0.83-million-gallon-per-day withdrawal indicates that the effects can be reduced by shifting most of the new withdrawal to the Hanamaulu area where the freshwater lens is thicker and stream base flows are greater. Simulation of the 1.16-million-gallon-per-day increase in withdrawal projected for 2020 indicates that if withdrawal is distributed only among Hana-maulu wells 1, 3, and 4, and Puhi well 5A, further thinning of the already-thin freshwater lens in the Puhi area would occur

  4. Using environmental tracers and numerical simulation to investigate regional hydrothermal basins—Norris Geyser Basin area, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, W. Payton; Susong, David D.; Solomon, D. Kip; Heasler, Henry P.

    2013-06-01

    Heat and fluid flow fields are simulated for several conceptual permeability fields and compared to processes inferred from environmental tracers in springs around Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park. Large hydrothermal basins require specific permeability distributions in the upper crust. High permeability connections must exist between the land surface and high-temperature environments at depths of up to 5 km. The highest modeled temperatures are produced with a vertical conduit permeability of 10-15m2. Permeability at depths of 3-5 km must be within one order of magnitude of the near-surface permeability and must be ≥10-16m2. Environmental tracers from springs are used to develop a plausible numerical model of the local to regional groundwater flow field for the Norris Geyser Basin area. The model simulations provide insight into the dynamics of heat and fluid flow in a large regional hydrothermal system.

  5. Imaging 3D geological structure of the Mygdonian basin (Northern Greece) with geological numerical modeling and geophysical methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cédric, Guyonnet-Benaize; Fabrice, Hollender; Maria, Manakou; Alexandros, Savvaidis; Elena, Zargli; Cécile, Cornou; Nikolaos, Veranis; Dimitrios, Raptakis; Artemios, Atzemoglou; Pierre-Yves, Bard; Nikolaos, Theodulidis; Kyriazis, Pitilakis; Emmanuelle, Chaljub

    2013-04-01

    The Mygdonian basin, located 30 km E-NE close to Thessaloniki, is a typical active tectonic basin, trending E-NW, filled by sediments 200 to 400 m thick. This basin has been chosen as a European experimental site since 1993 (European Commission research projects - EUROSEISTEST). It has been investigated for experimental and theoretical studies on site effects. The Mygdonian basin is currently covered by a permanent seismological network and has been mainly characterized in 2D and 3D with geophysical and geotechnical studies (Bastani et al, 2011; Cadet and Savvaidis, 2011; Gurk et al, 2007; Manakou et al, 2007; Manakou et al, 2010; Pitilakis et al, 1999; Raptakis et al, 2000; Raptakis et al, 2005). All these studies allowed understanding the influence of geological structures and local site conditions on seismic site response. For these reasons, this site has been chosen for a verification exercise for numerical simulations in the framework of an ongoing international collaborative research project (Euroseistest Verification and Validation Project - E2VP). The verification phase has been made using a first 3D geophysical and geotechnical model (Manakou, 2007) about 5 km wide and 15 km long, centered on the Euroseistest site. After this verification phase, it has been decided to update, optimize and extend this model in order to obtain a more detailed model of the 3D geometry of the entire basin, especially the bedrock 3D geometry which can affect drastically the results of numerical simulations for site effect studies. In our study, we build a 3D geological model of the present-day structure of the entire Mygdonian basin. This "precise" model is 12 km wide, 65 km long and is 400 m deep in average. It has been built using geophysical, geotechnical and geological data. The database is heterogeneous and composed of hydrogeological boreholes, seismic refraction surveys, array microtremor measurements, electrical and geotechnical surveys. We propose an integrated

  6. Numerical analysis and measurement in corner-fired furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Zhengjun, S.; Rongsheng, G.

    1999-07-01

    For several years, numerical analysis has been successfully used by Dongfang Boiler (Group) Co., Ltd. at a 200MW boiler, a 300MW boiler and so on, which were designed and made by DBC. The distribution of results is agreement each other between numerical analysis and measurement. In conclusion, it is considered that numerical analysis can be used as an important reference method in pulverized coal boiler design and test.

  7. Numerical analysis of granular soil fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbahn, L.; Huhn, K.

    2012-04-01

    Soil stability strongly depends on the material strength that is in general influenced by deformation processes and vice versa. Hence, investigation of material strength is of great interest in many geoscientific studies where soil deformations occur, e.g. the destabilization of slopes or the evolution of fault gouges. Particularly in the former case, slope failure occurs if the applied forces exceed the shear strength of slope material. Hence, the soil resistance or respectively the material strength acts contrary to deformation processes. Besides, geotechnical experiments, e.g. direct shear or ring shear tests, suggest that shear resistance mainly depends on properties of soil structure, texture and fabric. Although laboratory tests enable investigations of soil structure and texture during shear, detailed observations inside the sheared specimen during the failure processes as well as fabric effects are very limited. So, high-resolution information in space and time regarding texture evolution and/or grain behavior during shear is refused. However, such data is essential to gain a deeper insight into the key role of soil structure, texture, etc. on material strength and the physical processes occurring during material deformation on a micro-scaled level. Additionally, laboratory tests are not completely reproducible enabling a detailed statistical investigation of fabric during shear. So, almost identical setups to run methodical tests investigating the impact of fabric on soil resistance are hard to archive under laboratory conditions. Hence, we used numerical shear test experiments utilizing the Discrete Element Method to quantify the impact of different material fabrics on the shear resistance of soil as this granular model approach enables to investigate failure processes on a grain-scaled level. Our numerical setup adapts general settings from laboratory tests while the model characteristics are fixed except for the soil structure particularly the used

  8. Morphometric analysis of the Marmara Sea river basins, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbaşı, Emre; Ozdemir, Hasan

    2014-05-01

    The drainage basin, the fundamental unit of the fluvial landscape, has been focus of research aimed at understanding the geometric characteristics of the master channel and its tributary network. This geometry is referred to as the basin morphometry and is nicely reviewed by Abrahams (1984). A great amount of research has focused on geometric characteristic of drainage basins, including the topology of the stream networks, and quantitative description of drainage texture, pattern, shape, and relief characteristics. Evaluation of morphometric parameters necessitates the analysis of various drainage parameters such as ordering of the various streams, measurement of basin area and perimeter, length of drainage channels, drainage density (Dd), stream frequency (Fs), bifurcation ratio (Rb), texture ratio (T), basin relief (Bh), Ruggedness number (Rn), time of concentration (Tc), hypsometric curve and integral (Hc and Hi) (Horton, 1932, Schumn, 1956, Strahler, 1957; Verstappen 1983; Keller and Pinter, 2002; Ozdemir and Bird, 2009). These morphometric parameters have generally been used to predict flood peaks, to assess sediment yield, and to estimate erosion rates in the basins. River basins of the Marmara Sea, has an area of approximately 40,000 sqkm, are the most important basins in Turkey based on their dense populations, industry and transportation systems. The primary aim of this study is to determine and analyse of morphometric characteristics of the Marmara Sea river basins using 10 m resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and to evaluate of the results. For these purposes, digital 10 m contour maps scaled 1:25000 and geological maps scaled 1:100000 were used as the main data sources in the study. 10 m resolution DEM data were created using the contour maps and then drainage networks and their watersheds were extracted using D8 pour point model. Finally, linear, areal and relief morphometries were applied to the river basins using Geographic Information Systems

  9. Exploration of drought evolution using numerical simulations over the Xijiang (West River) basin in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jun; Chen, Ji; Sun, Liqun

    2015-07-01

    The knowledge of drought evolution characteristics may aid the decision making process in mitigating drought impacts. This study uses a macro-scale hydrological model, Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, to simulate terrestrial hydrological processes over the Xijiang (West River) basin in South China. Three drought indices, namely standardized precipitation index (SPI), standardized runoff index (SRI), and soil moisture anomaly index (SMAI), are employed to examine the spatio-temporal and evolution features of drought events. SPI, SRI and SMAI represent meteorological drought, hydrological drought and agricultural drought, respectively. The results reveal that the drought severity depicted by SPI and SRI is similar with increasing timescales; SRI is close to that of SPI in the wet season for the Liu River basin as the high-frequency precipitation is conserved more by runoff; the time lags appear between SPI and SRI due to the delay response of runoff to precipitation variability for the You River basin. The case study in 2010 spring drought further shows that the spatio-temporal evolutions are modulated by the basin-scale topography. There is more consistency between meteorological and hydrological droughts for the fan-like basin with a converged river network. For the west area of the Xijiang basin with the high elevation, the hydrological drought severity is less than meteorological drought during the developing stage. The recovery of hydrological and agricultural droughts is slower than that of meteorological drought for basins with a longer mainstream.

  10. SINFAC - SYSTEMS IMPROVED NUMERICAL FLUIDS ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, F. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Systems Improved Numerical Fluids Analysis Code, SINFAC, consists of additional routines added to the April 1983 revision of SINDA, a general thermal analyzer program. The purpose of the additional routines is to allow for the modeling of active heat transfer loops. The modeler can simulate the steady-state and pseudo-transient operations of 16 different heat transfer loop components including radiators, evaporators, condensers, mechanical pumps, reservoirs and many types of valves and fittings. In addition, the program contains a property analysis routine that can be used to compute the thermodynamic properties of 20 different refrigerants. SINFAC can simulate the response to transient boundary conditions. SINFAC was first developed as a method for computing the steady-state performance of two phase systems. It was then modified using CNFRWD, SINDA's explicit time-integration scheme, to accommodate transient thermal models. However, SINFAC cannot simulate pressure drops due to time-dependent fluid acceleration, transient boil-out, or transient fill-up, except in the accumulator. SINFAC also requires the user to be familiar with SINDA. The solution procedure used by SINFAC is similar to that which an engineer would use to solve a system manually. The solution to a system requires the determination of all of the outlet conditions of each component such as the flow rate, pressure, and enthalpy. To obtain these values, the user first estimates the inlet conditions to the first component of the system, then computes the outlet conditions from the data supplied by the manufacturer of the first component. The user then estimates the temperature at the outlet of the third component and computes the corresponding flow resistance of the second component. With the flow resistance of the second component, the user computes the conditions down stream, namely the inlet conditions of the third. The computations follow for the rest of the system, back to the first component

  11. Fractal Analysis of Drainage Basins on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Marinova, M. M.; McGovern, P. J.; Clifford, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    We used statistical properties of drainage networks on Mars as a measure of martian landscape morphology and an indicator of landscape evolution processes. We utilize the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data to construct digital elevation maps (DEMs) of several, mostly ancient, martian terrains. Drainage basins and channel networks are computationally extracted from DEMs and their structures are analyzed and compared to drainage networks extracted from terrestrial and lunar DEMs. We show that martian networks are self-affine statistical fractals with planar properties similar to terrestrial networks, but vertical properties similar to lunar networks. The uniformity of martian drainage density is between those for terrestrial and lunar landscapes. Our results are consistent with the roughening of ancient martian terrains by combination of rainfall-fed erosion and impacts, although roughening by other fluvial processes cannot be excluded. The notion of sustained rainfall in recent Mars history is inconsistent with our findings.

  12. Numerical likelihood analysis of cosmic ray anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos Hojvat et al.

    2003-07-02

    A numerical likelihood approach to the determination of cosmic ray anisotropies is presented which offers many advantages over other approaches. It allows a wide range of statistically meaningful hypotheses to be compared even when full sky coverage is unavailable, can be readily extended in order to include measurement errors, and makes maximum unbiased use of all available information.

  13. Application of Sediment Backstripping Corrections for Basin Analysis Using Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Marlon Scott; Hsui, Albert Tong-Kwan

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is a program created to serve as an instructional tool for teaching basin analysis. Described is the use of the program for interpreting plots resulting from backstripping methods. Included in the discussion are implementation, applications and availability of the "Subside!" program. (CW)

  14. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Methodology Flow Charts

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    These images show the comprehensive methodology used for creation of a Play Fairway Analysis to explore the geothermal resource potential of the Tularosa Basin, New Mexico. The deterministic methodology was originated by the petroleum industry, but was custom-modified to function as a knowledge-based geothermal exploration tool. The stochastic PFA flow chart uses weights of evidence, and is data-driven.

  15. Numerical Analysis of the SCHOLAR Supersonic Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Carlos G.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2003-01-01

    The SCHOLAR scramjet experiment is the subject of an ongoing numerical investigation. The facility nozzle and combustor were solved separate and sequentially, with the exit conditions of the former used as inlet conditions for the latter. A baseline configuration for the numerical model was compared with the available experimental data. It was found that ignition-delay was underpredicted and fuel-plume penetration overpredicted, while the pressure rise was close to experimental values. In addition, grid-convergence by means of grid-sequencing could not be established. The effects of the different turbulence parameters were quantified. It was found that it was not possible to simultaneously predict the three main parameters of this flow: pressure-rise, ignition-delay, and fuel-plume penetration.

  16. A Numerical Model for Atomtronic Circuit Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng W.; Straatsma, Cameron J. E.; Anderson, Dana Z.

    2015-07-16

    A model for studying atomtronic devices and circuits based on finite-temperature Bose-condensed gases is presented. The approach involves numerically solving equations of motion for atomic populations and coherences, derived using the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian and the Heisenberg picture. The resulting cluster expansion is truncated at a level giving balance between physics rigor and numerical demand mitigation. This approach allows parametric studies involving time scales that cover both the rapid population dynamics relevant to nonequilibrium state evolution, as well as the much longer time durations typical for reaching steady-state device operation. This model is demonstrated by studying the evolution of a Bose-condensed gas in the presence of atom injection and extraction in a double-well potential. In this configuration phase locking between condensates in each well of the potential is readily observed, and its influence on the evolution of the system is studied.

  17. Numerical model for atomtronic circuit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Weng W.; Straatsma, Cameron J. E.; Anderson, Dana Z.

    2015-07-01

    A model for studying atomtronic devices and circuits based on finite-temperature Bose-condensed gases is presented. The approach involves numerically solving equations of motion for atomic populations and coherences, derived using the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian and the Heisenberg picture. The resulting cluster expansion is truncated at a level giving balance between physics rigor and numerical demand mitigation. This approach allows parametric studies involving time scales that cover both the rapid population dynamics relevant to nonequilibrium state evolution, as well as the much longer time durations typical for reaching steady-state device operation. The model is demonstrated by studying the evolution of a Bose-condensed gas in the presence of atom injection and extraction in a double-well potential. In this configuration phase locking between condensates in each well of the potential is readily observed, and its influence on the evolution of the system is studied.

  18. Numerical Analysis of Robust Phase Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudinger, Kenneth; Kimmel, Shelby

    Robust phase estimation (RPE) is a new technique for estimating rotation angles and axes of single-qubit operations, steps necessary for developing useful quantum gates [arXiv:1502.02677]. As RPE only diagnoses a few parameters of a set of gate operations while at the same time achieving Heisenberg scaling, it requires relatively few resources compared to traditional tomographic procedures. In this talk, we present numerical simulations of RPE that show both Heisenberg scaling and robustness against state preparation and measurement errors, while also demonstrating numerical bounds on the procedure's efficacy. We additionally compare RPE to gate set tomography (GST), another Heisenberg-limited tomographic procedure. While GST provides a full gate set description, it is more resource-intensive than RPE, leading to potential tradeoffs between the procedures. We explore these tradeoffs and numerically establish criteria to guide experimentalists in deciding when to use RPE or GST to characterize their gate sets.Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Analysis of single ring infiltrometer test by direct numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réfloch, Aurore; Oxarango, Laurent; Rossier, Yvan; Gaudet, Jean Paul

    2016-04-01

    The well field of the Lyon metropolitan area provides drinking water to approximately 1,300,000 inhabitants. It is equipped with 12 infiltration basins. These basins have two main goals: sustaining the water table in times of peak demand for water, and preventing a possible contamination from the Rhône river by inverting groundwater flow direction. The water infiltration under the basins is thus crucial for the overall hydrogeologic behavior of the site. In order to characterize this phenomenon, a set of infiltrometer tests were performed to estimate the soil hydraulic properties. The soil is a coarse alluvial deposits. In order to deal with its sparse granulometric curve, a large single ring infiltrometer (1 meter in diameter) was used. A constant hydraulic head (=0.07 m) was imposed during the test. Two kinds of data are recorded: the amount of water infiltrated over time and the extension of the moisture stain around the ring. The main hydraulic properties are estimated using Richard's equation in a 2D axi-symmetric configuration. Simulations are performed using a finite element commercial software package (Comsol Multiphysics 5.1). According to simplified numerical models, an average homogeneous saturated permeability of the alluvial deposits is estimated at 5.0 10-6 m.s-1. However, such a simple model is not able to represent accurately the moisture stain at the soil surface. More complex models introduce anisotropy of permeability in the alluvium layer, with mono or bi-layer domain. In these cases, experimental and modeling results are consistent, both for the amount of water infiltrated over time and the extension of the moisture stain around the ring. The hydraulic anisotropy in the soil could be due to the stratified nature of alluvial deposits and to soil compaction during the construction of infiltration basins. Keywords: Single ring infiltrometer test, artificial aquifer recharge, numerical modeling.

  20. Evaluation of a landscape evolution model to simulate stream piracies: Insights from multivariable numerical tests using the example of the Meuse basin, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaïchouche, Abed; Stab, Olivier; Tessier, Bruno; Cojan, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    In landscapes dominated by fluvial erosion, the landscape morphology is closely related to the hydrographic network system. In this paper, we investigate the hydrographic network reorganization caused by a headward piracy mechanism between two drainage basins in France, the Meuse and the Moselle. Several piracies occurred in the Meuse basin during the past one million years, and the basin's current characteristics are favorable to new piracies by the Moselle river network. This study evaluates the consequences over the next several million years of a relative lowering of the Moselle River (and thus of its basin) with respect to the Meuse River. The problem is addressed with a numerical modeling approach (landscape evolution model, hereafter LEM) that requires empirical determinations of parameters and threshold values. Classically, fitting of the parameters is based on analysis of the relationship between the slope and the drainage area and is conducted under the hypothesis of equilibrium. Application of this conventional approach to the capture issue yields incomplete results that have been consolidated by a parametric sensitivity analysis. The LEM equations give a six-dimensional parameter space that was explored with over 15,000 simulations using the landscape evolution model GOLEM. The results demonstrate that stream piracies occur in only four locations in the studied reach near the city of Toul. The locations are mainly controlled by the local topography and are model-independent. Nevertheless, the chronology of the captures depends on two parameters: the river concavity (given by the fluvial advection equation) and the hillslope erosion factor. Thus, the simulations lead to three different scenarios that are explained by a phenomenon of exclusion or a string of events.

  1. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-02-28

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  2. Numerical Analysis of the Symmetric Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ji-Hong; Zhang, A.-Li

    1995-03-01

    Aimed at the initial value problem of the particular second-order ordinary differential equations,y ″=f(x, y), the symmetric methods (Quinlan and Tremaine, 1990) and our methods (Xu and Zhang, 1994) have been compared in detail by integrating the artificial earth satellite orbits in this paper. In the end, we point out clearly that the integral accuracy of numerical integration of the satellite orbits by applying our methods is obviously higher than that by applying the same order formula of the symmetric methods when the integration time-interval is not greater than 12000 periods.

  3. Numerical analysis of slender vortex motion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, H.

    1996-02-01

    Several numerical methods for slender vortex motion (the local induction equation, the Klein-Majda equation, and the Klein-Knio equation) are compared on the specific example of sideband instability of Kelvin waves on a vortex. Numerical experiments on this model problem indicate that all these methods yield qualitatively similar behavior, and this behavior is different from the behavior of a non-slender vortex with variable cross-section. It is found that the boundaries between stable, recurrent, and chaotic regimes in the parameter space of the model problem depend on the method used. The boundaries of these domains in the parameter space for the Klein-Majda equation and for the Klein-Knio equation are closely related to the core size. When the core size is large enough, the Klein-Majda equation always exhibits stable solutions for our model problem. Various conclusions are drawn; in particular, the behavior of turbulent vortices cannot be captured by these local approximations, and probably cannot be captured by any slender vortex model with constant vortex cross-section. Speculations about the differences between classical and superfluid hydrodynamics are also offered.

  4. The circulation in the Levantine Basin as inferred from in-situ data and numerical modelling (1995-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zodiatis, George; Radhakrishnan, Hari; Lardner, Robin; Hayes, Daniel; Gertman, Isaac; Menna, Milena; Poulain, Pierre-Marie

    2014-05-01

    The general anticlockwise circulation along the coastline of the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin was first proposed by Nielsen in 1912. Half a century later the schematic of the circulation in the area was enriched with sub-basin flow structures. In late 1980s, a more detailed picture of the circulation composed of eddies, gyres and coastal-offshore jets was defined during the POEM cruises. In 2005, Millot and Taupier-Letage have used SST satellite imagery to argue for a simpler pattern similar to the one proposed almost a century ago. During the last decade, renewed in-situ multi-platforms investigations under the framework of CYBO, CYCLOPS, NEMED, GROOM, HaiSec and PERSEUS projects, as well the development of the operational ocean forecasts and hindcasts in the framework of the MFS, ECOOP, MERSEA and MyOcean projects, have made possible to obtain an improved, higher spatial and temporal resolution picture of the circulation in the area. After some years of scientific disputes on the circulation pattern of the region, the new in-situ data sets and the operational numerical simulations confirm the relevant POEM results. The existing POM-based Cyprus Coastal Ocean Forecasting System (CYCOFOS), downscaling the MyOcean MFS, has been providing operational forecasts in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin region since early 2002. Recently, Radhakrishnan et al. (2012) parallelized the CYCOFOS hydrodynamic flow model using MPI to improve the accuracy of predictions while reducing the computational time. The parallel flow model is capable of modeling the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin flow at a resolution of 500 m. The model was run in hindcast mode during which the innovations were computed using the historical data collected using gliders and cruises. Then, DD-OceanVar (D'Amore et al., 2013), a data assimilation tool based on 3DVAR developed by CMCC was used to compute the temperature and salinity field corrections. Numerical modeling results after the

  5. Mechanical stratification of autochthonous salt: Implications from basin-scale numerical models of rifted margin salt tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ings, Steven; Albertz, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Deformation of salt and sediments owing to the flow of weak evaporites is a common phenomenon in sedimentary basins worldwide, and the resulting structures and thermal regimes have a significant impact on hydrocarbon exploration. Evaporite sequences ('salt') of significant thickness (e.g., >1km) are typically deposited in many cycles of seawater inundation and evaporation in restricted basins resulting in layered autochthonous evaporite packages. However, analogue and numerical models of salt tectonics typically treat salt as a homogeneous viscous material, often with properties of halite, the weakest evaporite. In this study, we present results of two-dimensional plane-strain numerical experiments designed to illustrate the effects of variable evaporite viscosity and embedded frictional-plastic ('brittle') sediment layers on the style of salt flow and associated deformation of the sedimentary overburden. Evaporite viscosity is a first-order control on salt flow rate and the style of overburden deformation. Near-complete evacuation of low-viscosity salt occurs beneath expulsion basins, whereas significant salt is trapped when viscosity is high. Embedded frictional-plastic sediment layers (with finite yield strength) partition salt flow and develop transient contractional structures (folds, thrust faults, and folded faults) in a seaward salt-squeeze flow regime. Multiple internal sediment layers reduce the overall seaward salt flow during sediment aggradation, leaving more salt behind to be re-mobilized during subsequent progradation. This produces more seaward extensive allochthonous salt sheets. If there is a density difference between the embedded layers and the surrounding salt, then the embedded layers 'fractionate' during deformation and either float to the surface or sink to the bottom (depending on density), creating a thick zone of pure halite. Such a process of 'buoyancy fractionation' may partially explain the apparent paradox of layered salt in

  6. Procedures for numerical analysis of circadian rhythms

    PubMed Central

    REFINETTI, ROBERTO; LISSEN, GERMAINE CORNÉ; HALBERG, FRANZ

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews various procedures used in the analysis of circadian rhythms at the populational, organismal, cellular and molecular levels. The procedures range from visual inspection of time plots and actograms to several mathematical methods of time series analysis. Computational steps are described in some detail, and additional bibliographic resources and computer programs are listed. PMID:23710111

  7. Carbonate aquifer of the Central Roswell Basin: recharge estimation by numerical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rehfeldt, K.R.; Gross, G.W.

    1982-02-01

    The flow of ground water in the Roswell, New Mexico, Artesian Basin, has been studied since the early 1900s and varied ideas have been proposed to explain different aspects of the ground water flow system. The purpose of the present study was to delineate the spatial distribution and source, or sources, of recharge to the carbonate aquifer of the central Roswell Basin. A computer model was used to simulate ground water flow in the carbonate aquifer, beneath and west of Roswell and in the Glorieta Sandstone and Yeso Formation west of the carbonate aquifer.

  8. Numerical Analysis of Magnetic Sail Spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Daisuke; Yamakawa, Hiroshi; Usui, Hideyuki; Funaki, Ikkoh; Kojima, Hirotsugu

    2008-12-31

    To capture the kinetic energy of the solar wind by creating a large magnetosphere around the spacecraft, magneto-plasma sail injects a plasma jet into a strong magnetic field produced by an electromagnet onboard the spacecraft. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of the IMF (interplanetary magnetic field) on the magnetosphere of magneto-plasma sail. First, using an axi-symmetric two-dimensional MHD code, we numerically confirm the magnetic field inflation, and the formation of a magnetosphere by the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetic field. The expansion of an artificial magnetosphere by the plasma injection is then simulated, and we show that the magnetosphere is formed by the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetic field expanded by the plasma jet from the spacecraft. This simulation indicates the size of the artificial magnetosphere becomes smaller when applying the IMF.

  9. Research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized and abstracts of published reports are presented. The major categories of the ICASE research program are: (1) numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; (2) control and parameter identification; (3) computational problems in engineering and the physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and (4) computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers.

  10. Meso-/Cenozoic thermal and inversion history of the Tarfaya Basin and provenance analysis of the basin fill (Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehrt, Manuel; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.

    2014-05-01

    The Tarfaya Basin is the northern part of the Tarfaya-Laâyoune-Dakhla Basin that extends over 1000 km along the western Saharan margin from the Mauritanian border to the Canary Islands in the north. The basin is bounded by the Mauritanide thrust belt and Precambrian Reguibat Arch in the SE-E and the Palaeozoic fold belt of the Anti-Atlas in the NE. A large amount of Mesozoic terrigenous sedimentary rocks are deposited in most of the basins along the continental margin of Morocco indicating a major episode of erosion occurred during the rift and early post-rift period in the Central Atlantic. In the Tarfaya-Laâyoune-Dakhla Basin, the Mesozoic to Cenozoic sedimentary cover reaches a thickness of up to 12 km. The presence of high surface elevations in the Anti-Atlas mountain belt (2700 m) indicates a potential source area for the surrounding basins, i.e. the Tarfaya Basin. The present study was focused on the thermal and inversion history of the Tarfaya Basin, the provenance of the Meso-Cenozoic sedimentary rocks of the basin and additionally on the thermal and exhumation history of the Western Anti-Atlas. In order to characterize the t-T history, apatite and zircon fission-track dating, apatite and zircon (U-Th-Sm)/He dating and furthermore 2-D modelling with 'HeFTy' software has been carried out at Precambrian rocks of the Western Anti-Atlas and Cretaceous to Neogene sedimentary rocks from the Tarfaya Basin. Thermochronological data and t-T path modelling indicate an inversion of the onshore Tarfaya Basin in the Palaeogene. The provenance analysis suggests an almost continuous sediment transport from the Anti-Atlas to the Tarfaya Basin and a simultaneous sediment input from the Reguibat Shield.

  11. NA-NET numerical analysis net

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, J. |; Rosener, B.

    1991-12-01

    This report describes a facility called NA-NET created to allow numerical analysts (na) an easy method of communicating with one another. The main advantage of the NA-NET is uniformity of addressing. All mail is addressed to the Internet host ``na-net.ornl.gov`` at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hence, members of the NA-NET do not need to remember complicated addresses or even where a member is currently located. As long as moving members change their e-mail address in the NA-NET everything works smoothly. The NA-NET system is currently located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is running on the same machine that serves netlib. Netlib is a separate facility that distributes mathematical software via electronic mail. For more information on netlib consult, or send the one-line message ``send index`` to netlib{at}ornl.gov. The following report describes the current NA-NET system from both a user`s perspective and from an implementation perspective. Currently, there are over 2100 members in the NA-NET. An average of 110 mail messages pass through this facility daily.

  12. NA-NET numerical analysis net

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, J. . Dept. of Computer Science Oak Ridge National Lab., TN ); Rosener, B. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-12-01

    This report describes a facility called NA-NET created to allow numerical analysts (na) an easy method of communicating with one another. The main advantage of the NA-NET is uniformity of addressing. All mail is addressed to the Internet host na-net.ornl.gov'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hence, members of the NA-NET do not need to remember complicated addresses or even where a member is currently located. As long as moving members change their e-mail address in the NA-NET everything works smoothly. The NA-NET system is currently located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is running on the same machine that serves netlib. Netlib is a separate facility that distributes mathematical software via electronic mail. For more information on netlib consult, or send the one-line message send index'' to netlib{at}ornl.gov. The following report describes the current NA-NET system from both a user's perspective and from an implementation perspective. Currently, there are over 2100 members in the NA-NET. An average of 110 mail messages pass through this facility daily.

  13. Integrated numerical modeling for basin-wide water management: The case of the Rattlesnake Creek basin in south-central Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sophocleous, M. A.; Koelliker, J. K.; Govindaraju, R. S.; Birdie, T.; Ramireddygari, S. R.; Perkins, S. P.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this article is to develop and implement a comprehensive computer model that is capable of simulating the surface-water, ground-water, and stream-aquifer interactions on a continuous basis for the Rattlesnake Creek basin in south-central Kansas. The model is to be used as a tool for evaluating long-term water-management strategies. The agriculturally-based watershed model SWAT and the ground-water model MODFLOW with stream-aquifer interaction routines, suitably modified, were linked into a comprehensive basin model known as SWATMOD. The hydrologic response unit concept was implemented to overcome the quasi-lumped nature of SWAT and represent the heterogeneity within each subbasin of the basin model. A graphical user-interface and a decision support system were also developed to evaluate scenarios involving manipulation of water rights and agricultural land uses on stream-aquifer system response. An extensive sensitivity analysis on model parameters was conducted, and model limitations and parameter uncertainties were emphasized. A combination of trial-and-error and inverse modeling techniques were employed to calibrate the model against multiple calibration targets of measured ground-water levels, streamflows, and reported irrigation amounts. The split-sample technique was employed for corroborating the calibrated model. The model was run for a 40 y historical simulation period, and a 40 y prediction period. A number of hypothetical management scenarios involving reductions and variations in withdrawal rates and patterns were simulated. The SWATMOD model was developed as a hydrologically rational low-flow model for analyzing, in a user-friendly manner, the conditions in the basin when there is a shortage of water.

  14. Integrated numerical modeling for basin-wide water management: The case of the Rattlesnake Creek basin in south-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.A.; Koelliker, J.K.; Govindaraju, R.S.; Birdie, T.; Ramireddygari, S.R.; Perkins, S.P.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this article is to develop and implement a comprehensive computer model that is capable of simulating the surface-water, ground-water, and stream-aquifer interactions on a continuous basis for the Rattlesnake Creek basin in south-central Kansas. The model is to be used as a tool for evaluating long-term water-management strategies. The agriculturally-based watershed model SWAT and the ground-water model MODFLOW with stream-aquifer interaction routines, suitably modified, were linked into a comprehensive basin model known as SWATMOD. The hydrologic response unit concept was implemented to overcome the quasi-lumped nature of SWAT and represent the heterogeneity within each subbasin of the basin model. A graphical user-interface and a decision support system were also developed to evaluate scenarios involving manipulation of water fights and agricultural land uses on stream-aquifer system response. An extensive sensitivity analysis on model parameters was conducted, and model limitations and parameter uncertainties were emphasized. A combination of trial-and-error and inverse modeling techniques were employed to calibrate the model against multiple calibration targets of measured ground-water levels, streamflows, and reported irrigation amounts. The split-sample technique was employed for corroborating the calibrated model. The model was run for a 40 y historical simulation period, and a 40 y prediction period. A number of hypothetical management scenarios involving reductions and variations in withdrawal rates and patterns were simulated. The SWATMOD model was developed as a hydrologically rational low-flow model for analyzing, in a user-friendly manner, the conditions in the basin when there is a shortage of water.

  15. 3-D Numerical Modeling as a Tool for Managing Mineral Water Extraction from a Complex Groundwater Basin in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanini, A.; Tanda, M.

    2007-12-01

    The groundwater in Italy plays an important role as drinking water; in fact it covers about the 30% of the national demand (70% in Northern Italy). The mineral water distribution in Italy is an important business with an increasing demand from abroad countries. The mineral water Companies have a great interest in order to increase the water extraction, but for the delicate and complex geology of the subsoil, where such very high quality waters are contained, a particular attention must be paid in order to avoid an excessive lowering of the groundwater reservoirs or great changes in the groundwater flow directions. A big water Company asked our University to set up a numerical model of the groundwater basin, in order to obtain a useful tool which allows to evaluate the strength of the aquifer and to design new extraction wells. The study area is located along Appennini Mountains and it covers a surface of about 18 km2; the topography ranges from 200 to 600 m a.s.l.. In ancient times only a spring with naturally sparkling water was known in the area, but at present the mineral water is extracted from deep pumping wells. The area is characterized by a very complex geology: the subsoil structure is described by a sequence of layers of silt-clay, marl-clay, travertine and alluvial deposit. Different groundwater layers are present and the one with best quality flows in the travertine layer; the natural flow rate seems to be not subjected to seasonal variations. The water age analysis revealed a very old water which means that the mineral aquifers are not directly connected with the meteoric recharge. The Geologists of the Company suggest that the water supply of the mineral aquifers comes from a carbonated unit located in the deep layers of the mountains bordering the spring area. The valley is crossed by a river that does not present connections to the mineral aquifers. Inside the area there are about 30 pumping wells that extract water at different depths. We built a 3

  16. An analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Mcguire, David; Hayes, Daniel J; Kicklighter, David W.; Manizza, Manfredi; Zhuang, Qianlai; Chen, Min; Follows, Michael J; Gurney, Kevin; Mcclelland, James W; Melillo, Jerry; Peterson, Bruce; Prinn, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    This study used several model-based tools to analyse the dynamics of the Arctic Basin between 1997 and 2006 as a linked system of land-ocean-atmosphere C exchange. The analysis estimates that terrestrial areas of the Arctic Basin lost 62.9 Tg C yr 1 and that the Arctic Ocean gained 94.1 Tg C yr 1. Arctic lands and oceans were a net CO2 sink of 108.9 Tg C yr 1, which is within the range of uncertainty in estimates from atmospheric inversions. Although both lands and oceans of the Arctic were estimated to be CO2 sinks, the land sink diminished in strength because of increased fire disturbance compared to previous decades, while the ocean sink increased in strength because of increased biological pump activity associated with reduced sea ice cover. Terrestrial areas of the Arctic were a net source of 41.5 Tg CH4 yr 1 that increased by 0.6 Tg CH4 yr 1 during the decade of analysis, a magnitude that is comparable with an atmospheric inversion of CH4. Because the radiative forcing of the estimated CH4 emissions is much greater than the CO2 sink, the analysis suggests that the Arctic Basin is a substantial net source of green house gas forcing to the climate system.

  17. Numerical analysis and design of upwind sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankaran, Sriram

    The use of computational techniques that solve the Euler or the Navier-Stokes equations are increasingly being used by competing syndicates in races like the Americas Cup. For sail configurations, this desire stems from a need to understand the influence of the mast on the boundary layer and pressure distribution on the main sail, the effect of camber and planform variations of the sails on the driving and heeling force produced by them and the interaction of the boundary layer profile of the air over the surface of the water and the gap between the boom and the deck on the performance of the sail. Traditionally, experimental methods along with potential flow solvers have been widely used to quantify these effects. While these approaches are invaluable either for validation purposes or during the early stages of design, the potential advantages of high fidelity computational methods makes them attractive candidates during the later stages of the design process. The aim of this study is to develop and validate numerical methods that solve the inviscid field equations (Euler) to simulate and design upwind sails. The three dimensional compressible Euler equations are modified using the idea of artificial compressibility and discretized on unstructured tetrahedral grids to provide estimates of lift and drag for upwind sail configurations. Convergence acceleration techniques like multigrid and residual averaging are used along with parallel computing platforms to enable these simulations to be performed in a few minutes. To account for the elastic nature of the sail cloth, this flow solver was coupled to NASTRAN to provide estimates of the deflections caused by the pressure loading. The results of this aeroclastic simulation, showed that the major effect of the sail elasticity; was in altering the pressure distribution around the leading edge of the head and the main sail. Adjoint based design methods were developed next and were used to induce changes to the camber

  18. Validation of a numerical modeling method for simulating rainfall-runoff relations for headwater basins in western King and Snohomish Counties, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinicola, Richard S.

    2001-01-01

    The validity of a previously determined numerical modeling method was assessed. Numerical models for 11 drainage basins were constructed with the Hydrologic Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) with parameter values that were generalized for the physiographic region. Large and recurrent simulation errors were initially identified, but three systematic modifications of the models corrected those errors for 10 out of the 11 basins. The validity of the numerical modeling method for simulating rainfall-runoff relations in the study area, as modified during this investigation, was not rejected, but observed streamflow data were needed to apply the method.

  19. Numerical bifurcation analysis of immunological models with time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzyanina, Tatyana; Roose, Dirk; Bocharov, Gennady

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, a large number of mathematical models that are described by delay differential equations (DDEs) have appeared in the life sciences. To analyze the models' dynamics, numerical methods are necessary, since analytical studies can only give limited results. In turn, the availability of efficient numerical methods and software packages encourages the use of time delays in mathematical modelling, which may lead to more realistic models. We outline recently developed numerical methods for bifurcation analysis of DDEs and illustrate the use of these methods in the analysis of a mathematical model of human hepatitis B virus infection.

  20. Numerical Uncertainty Quantification for Radiation Analysis Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brooke; Blattnig, Steve; Clowdsley, Martha

    2007-01-01

    Recently a new emphasis has been placed on engineering applications of space radiation analyses and thus a systematic effort of Verification, Validation and Uncertainty Quantification (VV&UQ) of the tools commonly used for radiation analysis for vehicle design and mission planning has begun. There are two sources of uncertainty in geometric discretization addressed in this paper that need to be quantified in order to understand the total uncertainty in estimating space radiation exposures. One source of uncertainty is in ray tracing, as the number of rays increase the associated uncertainty decreases, but the computational expense increases. Thus, a cost benefit analysis optimizing computational time versus uncertainty is needed and is addressed in this paper. The second source of uncertainty results from the interpolation over the dose vs. depth curves that is needed to determine the radiation exposure. The question, then, is what is the number of thicknesses that is needed to get an accurate result. So convergence testing is performed to quantify the uncertainty associated with interpolating over different shield thickness spatial grids.

  1. A numerical comparison of sensitivity analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    Engineering and scientific phenomena are often studied with the aid of mathematical models designed to simulate complex physical processes. In the nuclear industry, modeling the movement and consequence of radioactive pollutants is extremely important for environmental protection and facility control. One of the steps in model development is the determination of the parameters most influential on model results. A {open_quotes}sensitivity analysis{close_quotes} of these parameters is not only critical to model validation but also serves to guide future research. A previous manuscript (Hamby) detailed many of the available methods for conducting sensitivity analyses. The current paper is a comparative assessment of several methods for estimating relative parameter sensitivity. Method practicality is based on calculational ease and usefulness of the results. It is the intent of this report to demonstrate calculational rigor and to compare parameter sensitivity rankings resulting from various sensitivity analysis techniques. An atmospheric tritium dosimetry model (Hamby) is used here as an example, but the techniques described can be applied to many different modeling problems. Other investigators (Rose; Dalrymple and Broyd) present comparisons of sensitivity analyses methodologies, but none as comprehensive as the current work.

  2. Numerical analysis on pump turbine runaway points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Liu, J. T.; Wang, L. Q.; Jiao, L.; Li, Z. F.

    2012-11-01

    To research the character of pump turbine runaway points with different guide vane opening, a hydraulic model was established based on a pumped storage power station. The RNG k-ε model and SMPLEC algorithms was used to simulate the internal flow fields. The result of the simulation was compared with the test data and good correspondence was got between experimental data and CFD result. Based on this model, internal flow analysis was carried out. The result show that when the pump turbine ran at the runway speed, lots of vortexes appeared in the flow passage of the runner. These vortexes could always be observed even if the guide vane opening changes. That is an important way of energy loss in the runaway condition. Pressure on two sides of the runner blades were almost the same. So the runner power is very low. High speed induced large centrifugal force and the small guide vane opening gave the water velocity a large tangential component, then an obvious water ring could be observed between the runner blades and guide vanes in small guide vane opening condition. That ring disappeared when the opening bigger than 20°. These conclusions can provide a theory basis for the analysis and simulation of the pump turbine runaway points.

  3. Synoptic climatological analysis of persistent cold air pools over the Carpathian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabóné André, Karolina; Bartholy, Judit; Pongrácz, Rita

    2016-04-01

    A persistent cold air pool (PCAP) is a winter-time, anticyclone-related weather event over a relatively large basin. During this time the air is colder near the surface than aloft. This inversion near the surface can last even for weeks. As the cold air cools down, relative humidity increases and fog forms. The entire life cycle of a PCAP depends on the large scale circulation pattern. PCAP usually appears when an anticyclone builds up after a cold front passed over the examined basin, and it is usually destructed by a coming strong cold front of another midlatitude cyclone. Moreover, the intensity of the anticyclone affects the intensity of the PCAP. PCAP may result in different hazards for the population: (1) Temperature inversion in the surface layers together with weak wind may lead to severe air pollution causing health problems for many people, especially, elderly and children. (2) The fog and/or smog during chilly weather conditions often results in freezing rain. Both fog and freezing rain can distract transportation and electricity supply. Unfortunately, the numerical weather prediction models have difficulties to predict PCAP formation and destruction. One of the reasons is that PCAP is not defined objectively with a simple formula, which could be easily applied to the numerical output data. However, according to some recommendations from the synoptic literature, the shallow convective potential energy (SCPE) can be used to mathematically describe PCAP. In this study, we used the ERA-Interim reanalysis datasets to examine this very specific weather event (i.e., PCAP) over the Carpathian Basin. The connection between the mean sea level pressure and some PCAP measures (e.g., SCPE, energy deficit, etc.) is evaluated. For instance, we used logistic regression to identify PCAP periods over the Carpathian Basin. Then, further statistical analysis includes the evaluation of the length and intensity of these PCAP periods.

  4. Combustion irreversibilities: Numerical simulation and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Valter; Rouboa, Abel

    2012-08-01

    An exergy analysis was performed considering the combustion of methane and agro-industrial residues produced in Portugal (forest residues and vines pruning). Regarding that the irreversibilities of a thermodynamic process are path dependent, the combustion process was considering as resulting from different hypothetical paths each one characterized by four main sub-processes: reactant mixing, fuel oxidation, internal thermal energy exchange (heat transfer), and product mixing. The exergetic efficiency was computed using a zero dimensional model developed by using a Visual Basic home code. It was concluded that the exergy losses were mainly due to the internal thermal energy exchange sub-process. The exergy losses from this sub-process are higher when the reactants are preheated up to the ignition temperature without previous fuel oxidation. On the other hand, the global exergy destruction can be minored increasing the pressure, the reactants temperature and the oxygen content on the oxidant stream. This methodology allows the identification of the phenomena and processes that have larger exergy losses, the understanding of why these losses occur and how the exergy changes with the parameters associated to each system which is crucial to implement the syngas combustion from biomass products as a competitive technology.

  5. Numerical analysis of human dental occlusal contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, F. S.; Las Casas, E. B.; Godoy, G. C. D.; Meireles, A. B.

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain real contact areas, forces, and pressures acting on human dental enamel as a function of the nominal pressure during dental occlusal contact. The described development consisted of three steps: characterization of the surface roughness by 3D contact profilometry test, finite element analysis of micro responses for each pair of main asperities in contact, and homogenization of macro responses using an assumed probability density function. The inelastic deformation of enamel was considered, adjusting the stress-strain relationship of sound enamel to that obtained from instrumented indentation tests conducted with spherical tip. A mechanical part of the static friction coefficient was estimated as the ratio between tangential and normal components of the overall resistive force, resulting in μd = 0.057. Less than 1% of contact pairs reached the yield stress of enamel, indicating that the occlusal contact is essentially elastic. The micro-models indicated an average hardness of 6.25GPa, and the homogenized result for macroscopic interface was around 9GPa. Further refinements of the methodology and verification using experimental data can provide a better understanding of processes related to contact, friction and wear of human tooth enamel.

  6. NASCRIN - NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF SCRAMJET INLET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.

    1994-01-01

    The NASCRIN program was developed for analyzing two-dimensional flow fields in supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) inlets. NASCRIN solves the two-dimensional Euler or Navier-Stokes equations in conservative form by an unsplit, explicit, two-step finite-difference method. A more recent explicit-implicit, two-step scheme has also been incorporated in the code for viscous flow analysis. An algebraic, two-layer eddy-viscosity model is used for the turbulent flow calculations. NASCRIN can analyze both inviscid and viscous flows with no struts, one strut, or multiple struts embedded in the flow field. NASCRIN can be used in a quasi-three-dimensional sense for some scramjet inlets under certain simplifying assumptions. Although developed for supersonic internal flow, NASCRIN may be adapted to a variety of other flow problems. In particular, it should be readily adaptable to subsonic inflow with supersonic outflow, supersonic inflow with subsonic outflow, or fully subsonic flow. The NASCRIN program is available for batch execution on the CDC CYBER 203. The vectorized FORTRAN version was developed in 1983. NASCRIN has a central memory requirement of approximately 300K words for a grid size of about 3,000 points.

  7. Analysis of water from K west basin canisters (second campaign)

    SciTech Connect

    Trimble, D.J., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    Gas and liquid samples have been obtained from a selection of the approximately 3,820 spent fuel storage canisters in the K West Basin. The samples were taken to characterize the contents of the gas and water in the canisters. The data will provide source term information for two subprojects of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) (Fulton 1994): the K Basins Integrated Water Treatment System subproject (Ball 1996) and the K Basins Fuel Retrieval System subproject (Waymire 1996). The barrels of ten canisters were sampled in 1995, and 50 canisters were sampled in a second campaign in 1996. The analysis results for the gas and liquid samples of the first campaign have been reported (Trimble 1995a; Trimble 1995b; Trimble 1996a; Trimble 1996b). An analysis of cesium-137 (137CS ) data from the second campaign samples was reported (Trimble and Welsh 1997), and the gas sample results are documented in Trimble 1997. This report documents the results of all analytes of liquid samples from the second campaign.

  8. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-05

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  9. Hydrogeology and numerical simulation of the unconsolidated glacial aquifer in the Pootatuck River Basin, Newtown, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, Carl S.; Mondazzi, Remo A.; Bjerklie, David M.; Brown, Craig J.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the groundwater and stream-aquifer interaction in the Pootatuck River Basin, Newtown, Connecticut, was conducted to analyze the effect of production wells on the groundwater levels and streamflow in the Pootatuck River as part of a cooperative program between the U.S. Geological Survey and Newtown, Connecticut. This study will help address concerns about the increasing competition for water for human uses and protection of aquatic habitat. The groundwater-flow model developed in the study was designed for use as a tool to assist planners in assessing the effects of potential future development, which will change the amount and distribution of recharge available to the groundwater system. Several different techniques were used to investigate the interconnection between the stream and the aquifer. Temperature, groundwater levels, stream stage, and stable-isotope data collected during aquifer tests at the principal production wells in the Pootatuck River Basin, as well as groundwater-flow simulations of the system, indicate that more than half of the water pumped from the wells comes from the Pootatuck River. This finding potentially has a large effect on approaches for protecting the water quality of the pumped water. Increases in the amount of impervious surface from future development will reduce and redistribute recharge to the groundwater system. The simulation of future development scenarios showed a decrease in the simulated base flow in the main stem of the Pootatuck River and in all of the 26 simulated subbasins, with some of the subbasins showing a decrease of more than 20 percent when new development had 85 percent impervious area. The groundwater-flow model and particle tracking were used to determine areas that contribute recharge to the five production wells available for use in the Pootatuck River Basin. These areas included narrow portions of the aquifer that extended beyond the immediate upgradient areas, probably because of deeper

  10. Influence of surface slope and roughness on the shape of river basins: a comparison between nature and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamato, Philippe; Castelltort, Sébastien; Willett, Sean

    2010-05-01

    The last two decades have been marked by a large amount of studies on the relative influences of climate and tectonics on landscape evolution. Coevally, considerable advances have been achieved in numerical modelling of landscape evolution. These have been particularly useful in testing hypotheses and scenarios of the potential controls and feedbacks between climate, tectonics and landscape evolution. However, our current knowledge of the physical processes of erosion in nature remains incomplete. Indeed, although the predictions of landscape evolution models are often insightful, they are also sometimes overlooked due to their lack of physical basis. In parallel with current field and experimental investigations on erosion processes, one way to tackle this problem is to compare simulated and natural landscapes. Then, this allows us to know how can one assess whether a simulated landscape is realistic in a long-standing problem in geomorphology. The scaling between stream length and upstream drainage area, a relation known as Hack's law (Hack, 1957) provides a constrain on the geometry of natural landscapes. It is however notoriously difficult to use this law to assess the goodness of a landscape evolution model since it must be regarded over a logarithmic range of scales (stream orders), which is usually not possible in landscape evolution models because of their resolution. The convergence angle, a measure of a basin's elongation (Castelltort et al., 2009) is a similar metrics of drainage basin shape. It is controlled by the slope and roughness of the undissected surface on which a new basin develops. This relation arises from analytical predictions of water flow over simple topography and is supported by data on median to large-scale natural networks. In the present study we investigate the influence of slope and surface roughness on the shape of river basins using the CASCADE code (Braun and Sambridge, 1997). Results show that the rules used to route water in

  11. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike‐slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east‐west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north‐ to northeast‐striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local‐scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  12. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterisation of Western Bredasdorp Basin, Southern Offshore of South Africa: Insights from a 3d Crust-Scale Basin Model - (Phase 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonibare, W. A.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Sippel, J.; Mikeš, D.

    2012-04-01

    + (Interactive Gravity and Magnetic Assistant System; Götze et al., 2010 and Schmidt et al., 2011). The ensuing model will be applied to predict the present-day deep crustal configuration and thermal field characteristics of the basin. Thereafter, 3D volumetric backstripping analysis will be performed to predict basin subsidence mechanisms (i.e. tectonic, thermal and sediment load) through time as well as to estimate paleo-water depths for paleogeographic reconstruction. The information gathered from crust-scale basin dynamics will be subsequently used at the petroleum system modelling stage to holistically assess the hydrocarbon potential of the basin in terms of source rock maturity and hydrocarbon generation, migration, timing and accumulation.

  13. A hydrologic analysis for the infiltration basins planned on Jeju Island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Kang, T.; Lee, J.; Kang, S.

    2010-12-01

    Urban development is a cause of expansion of impervious area. It reduces infiltration of rain water and may increase runoff volume from storms. Infiltration basins can be a method to receive storm water and to let the water move into the soil. The contents of the study include a hydrologic analysis on a site and an evaluation of the capacity of infiltration basins planned on the site. Most region of Jeju Island, Korea is highly pervious. Three infiltration basins were designed on the area of the Jeju English Education City. To evaluate adequacy of the capacities of the infiltration basins, infiltration rates were measured and storm water runoff was simulated. Infiltration rates on the surface of the reserved land for infiltration basins were measured by a standard double ring infiltrometer or a small infiltrometer. A FORTRAN version of SWMM was modified to incorporate the infiltration basin and the basic equations of the infiltration basin are same as those of the infiltration trench used in MIDUSS. The code modified was used to simulate storm runoff from watersheds, infiltration from the infiltration basins, and reservoir routing of the infiltration basins. The saturated hydraulic conductivities on the reserved sites were measured by 0.0068, 0.0038, and 0.00017 cm/sec. The return period of the design rainfall is fifty years. The following results were obtained from a hydrologic analysis on the watersheds and the infiltration basins to be built. The two infiltration basins with higher infiltration rates have adequate capacities to infiltrate the total water inflow to the basins. Some water, however releases from the other infiltration basin and the capacity of the basin is not sufficient to infiltrate the total runoff after the land use change. A channel is needed in which the water released from the less pervious basin flows. The hydrologic analysis method of the study can be used for capacity evaluation of future infiltration basins on highly pervious areas in

  14. 2D numerical modeling of gravity-driven giant-scale deformation processes in the offshore Barreirinhas Basin (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruciani, Francesco; Manconi, Andrea; Rinaldo Barchi, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    Gravity-driven deformation processes at continental passive margins occur at different scales, from small-scale turbidity currents and sediment slides, to large-scale mass transport complexes (MTCs), to the giant-scale deep water fold and thrust belts (DW-FTBs), which affect most or the entire sedimentary sequence. This kind of giant structures, quite widespread in passive margins, may be active for tens of millions of years. In this context, the Brazilian Atlantic margin hosts several well-known DW-FTBs detached on both shale and salt décollement. Despite of their relevant scientific and economic importance, the mechanical processes driving the onset and evolution of these giant-scale structures are still poorly investigated. In this work, we focus on the shale décollement DW-FTB of the Barreirinhas Basin, where the continental slope has been affected by multi-phase gravitational processes since the Late Cretaceous. This DW-FTB consists of a linked fault system of listric normal faults updip and thrust faults downdip, detached over a common concave upward décollement surface. From the onshore extensional to the offshore compressional domain the DW-FTB is about 50 km wide and involve a sedimentary sequence up to 5 km thick. Shortening within the compressional domain is accommodated almost entirely from a single thrust ramp with a large related anticline fold. Previous studies have shown that the main activity phases of the gravitational processes are closely linked to significant increases in the sediment supply within the basin. Indeed, the highest deformation rate, accounting for about 80% of the net strain, occurred in the Upper Miocene following a drainage rearrangement which led to the birth of the modern Amazon River drainage system. The Barreirinhas Basin DW-FTB entails a rather simple geometrical structure, which can be well schematized, therefore is particularly suitable for numerical simulations aimed to study and understand the dynamics of DW-FTB at

  15. A general numerical model for wave rotor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel W.

    1992-01-01

    Wave rotors represent one of the promising technologies for achieving very high core temperatures and pressures in future gas turbine engines. Their operation depends upon unsteady gas dynamics and as such, their analysis is quite difficult. This report describes a numerical model which has been developed to perform such an analysis. Following a brief introduction, a summary of the wave rotor concept is given. The governing equations are then presented, along with a summary of the assumptions used to obtain them. Next, the numerical integration technique is described. This is an explicit finite volume technique based on the method of Roe. The discussion then focuses on the implementation of appropriate boundary conditions. Following this, some results are presented which first compare the numerical approximation to the governing differential equations and then compare the overall model to an actual wave rotor experiment. Finally, some concluding remarks are presented concerning the limitations of the simplifying assumptions and areas where the model may be improved.

  16. Numerical modeling of fracking fluid migration through fault zones and fractures in the North German Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfunt, Helena; Houben, Georg; Himmelsbach, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Gas production from shale formations by hydraulic fracturing has raised concerns about the effects on the quality of fresh groundwater. The migration of injected fracking fluids towards the surface was investigated in the North German Basin, based on the known standard lithology. This included cases with natural preferential pathways such as permeable fault zones and fracture networks. Conservative assumptions were applied in the simulation of flow and mass transport triggered by a high pressure boundary of up to 50 MPa excess pressure. The results show no significant fluid migration for a case with undisturbed cap rocks and a maximum of 41 m vertical transport within a permeable fault zone during the pressurization. Open fractures, if present, strongly control the flow field and migration; here vertical transport of fracking fluids reaches up to 200 m during hydraulic fracturing simulation. Long-term transport of the injected water was simulated for 300 years. The fracking fluid rises vertically within the fault zone up to 485 m due to buoyancy. Progressively, it is transported horizontally into sandstone layers, following the natural groundwater flow direction. In the long-term, the injected fluids are diluted to minor concentrations. Despite the presence of permeable pathways, the injected fracking fluids in the reported model did not reach near-surface aquifers, either during the hydraulic fracturing or in the long term. Therefore, the probability of impacts on shallow groundwater by the rise of fracking fluids from a deep shale-gas formation through the geological underground to the surface is small.

  17. Investigating Convergence Patterns for Numerical Methods Using Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2013-01-01

    The article investigates the patterns that arise in the convergence of numerical methods, particularly those in the errors involved in successive iterations, using data analysis and curve fitting methods. In particular, the results obtained are used to convey a deeper level of understanding of the concepts of linear, quadratic, and cubic…

  18. Scilab and Maxima Environment: Towards Free Software in Numerical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mora, Angel; Galan, Jose Luis; Aguilera, Gabriel; Fernandez, Alvaro; Merida, Enrique; Rodriguez, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    In this work we will present the ScilabUMA environment we have developed as an alternative to Matlab. This environment connects Scilab (for numerical analysis) and Maxima (for symbolic computations). Furthermore, the developed interface is, in our opinion at least, as powerful as the interface of Matlab. (Contains 3 figures.)

  19. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, Ernest A.

    2003-02-06

    The project objectives are improving access to information for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the region, making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format, increasing the amount of information available on domestic sedimentary basins through a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, and enhancing the understanding of the petroleum systems operating in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  20. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Partial Basin and Range Heat and Zones of Critical Stress Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    Interpolated maps of heat flow, temperature gradient, and quartz geothermometers are included as TIF files. Zones of critical stress map is also included as a TIF file. The zones are given a 5km diameter buffer. The study area is only a part of the Basin and Range, but it does includes the Tularosa Basin.

  1. Classification and analysis of candidate impact crater-hosted closed-basin lakes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudge, Timothy A.; Aureli, Kelsey L.; Head, James W.; Fassett, Caleb I.; Mustard, John F.

    2015-11-01

    We present a new catalog of 205 candidate closed-basin lakes contained within impact craters across the surface of Mars. These basins have an inlet valley that incises the crater rim and flows into the basin but no visible outlet valley, and are considered candidate closed-basin lakes; the presence of a valley flowing into a basin does not necessitate the formation of a standing body of water. The major geomorphic distinction within our catalog of candidate paleolakes is the length of the inlet valley(s), with two major classes - basins with long (>20 km) inlet valleys (30 basins), and basins with short (<20 km) inlet valleys (175 basins). We identify 55 basins that contain sedimentary fan deposits at the mouths of their inlet valleys, of which nine are fed by long inlet valleys and 46 are fed by short inlet valleys. Analysis of the mineralogy of these fan deposits suggests that they are primarily composed of detrital material. Additionally, we find no evidence for widespread evaporite deposit formation within our catalog of candidate closed-basin lakes, which we conclude is indicative of a general transience for any lakes that did form within these basins. Morphometric characteristics for our catalog indicate that as an upper limit, these basins represent a volume of water equivalent to a ∼1.2 m global equivalent layer (GEL) of water spread evenly across the martian surface; this is a small fraction of the modern water ice reservoir on Mars. Our catalog offers a broader context within which results from the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover can be interpreted, as Gale crater is a candidate closed-basin lake contained within our catalog. Gale is also one of 12 closed-basin lakes fed by both long and short inlet valleys, and so in␣situ analyses by Curiosity can shed light on the relative importance of these two types of inlets for any lacustrine activity within the basin.

  2. Formulation of numerical procedures for dynamic analysis of spinning structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1986-01-01

    The paper presents the descriptions of recently developed numerical algorithms that prove to be useful for the solution of the free vibration problem of spinning structures. First, a generalized procedure for the computation of nodal centrifugal forces in a finite element owing to any specified spin rate is derived in detail. This is followed by a description of an improved eigenproblem solution procedure that proves to be economical for the free vibration analysis of spinning structures. Numerical results are also presented which indicate the efficacy of the currently developed procedures.

  3. Gravity analysis of the Precambrian basement topography associated with the northern boundary of Ghadames Basin (southern Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaoui, Mohamed; Gabtni, Hakim; Jallouli, Chokri; Jleilia, Ali; Mickus, Kevin Lee; Turki, Mohamed Moncef

    2014-12-01

    Gravity data were analyzed to determine the structural development of the northern boundary of the Ghadames Basin in southern Tunisia. The Ghadames Basin which also occurs in eastern Algeria and northwestern Libya is one of the most prolific hydrocarbon producers in North Africa with several of the largest oil fields occurring along its northern boundary. The Ghadames Basin was formed during a series of tectonic events ranging from the Early Paleozoic to the Early Cenozoic. These tectonic events produced a basin in southern Tunisia that has a complex basement configuration which is not completely known. A residual gravity anomaly map constructed using polynomial trend surfaces, and vertical and horizontal gravity derivative maps indicate that the northern boundary contains a series of maxima and minima anomalies that trend in two prominent directions: northeast-southwest and east-west. The horizontal and vertical derivative gravity anomaly maps indicate that the width of the basement structures range between 10 and 20 km in width. Three-dimensional (3D) Euler deconvolution and 3D forward modeling constrained by well data, one seismic reflection profile and remote sensing data confirm the width of the basement structures and indicates that the depth of basin varies between 1.5 and 5 km, with deeper sections in general more numerous in the southern sections of the boundary. The gravity analysis constrained by the seismic reflection profile and well data implies that the basement topography may have been formed during the Pan African and/or late Mesozoic rifting. However, additional seismic reflection and well data are needed to confirm this conclusion. The discovery of the numerous basement structures suggests that there may exist additional hydrocarbon traps within the northern boundary of the Ghadames Basin.

  4. Basin analysis of tertiary strata in the Pattani Basin, Gulf of Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Chonchawalit, A. ); Bustin, R.M. )

    1994-07-01

    The stratigraphic and structural evolution of the Pattani basin, the most prolific petroleum basin in Thailand, reflects the extensional tectonics of continental southeast Asia. East-west extension, a product of the northward collision of India with Eurasia since the early Tertiary resulted in the formation of a series of north-south-trending sedimentary basins including the Pattani basin. Subsidence and thermal histories of the basin can generally be accounted for by nonuniform lithospheric stretching. The validity of nonuniform lithospheric stretching as a mechanic for the formation of the Pattani basin is confirmed by a reasonably good agreement between modeled and observed vitrinite reflectance at various depths and locations. The amount of stretching and surface heat flow generally increases from the basin margin to the basin center. Crustal stretching factor ([beta]) ranges from 1.3 at the basin margin to 2.8 in the center. Subcrustal stretching factor ([sigma]) ranges from 1.3 at the margin to more than 3.0 in the center. The stretching of the lithosphere may have extended basement rocks as much as 45 to 90 km and may have caused the upwelling of asthenosphere, resulting in high heat flow. The sedimentary succession in the Pattani basin is divisible into synrift and postrift sequences. The synrift sequences comprise (1) late Eocene ( ) to early Oligocene alluvial fan, braided river, and flood-plain deposits; (2) late Oligocene to early Miocene floodplain and channel deposits; and (3) an early Miocene regressive package of marine to nonmarine sediments. Deposition of synrift sequences corresponded to rifting and extension, which included episodic block faulting and rapid subsidence. Postrift succession comprises (1) an early to middle Miocene regressive package of shallow marine to nonmarine sediments, (2) a late early Miocene transgressive package; and (3) a late Miocene to Pleistocene transgression succession.

  5. Application of Response Surface based Calibration and Sensitivity Analysis methods for Regional Hydrogeological Modelling in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Palombi, D.; Huff, G. F.

    2014-12-01

    A regional scale study of groundwater flow dynamics was undertaken in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB), comprising parts of Alberta, Saskatchewan and British Columbia. The objective of the study is to investigate basin-scale hydrogeology in WCSB and to establish boundary conditions for future local-scale groundwater management models. Earlier work in the Alberta basin has acknowledged the fact that in addition to topography controlled conditions, a substantial part of the basin exhibits sub-hydrostatic regimes. The basin-scale model (approx. 420,000 km2) includes Upper Cretaceous aquifers to Recent age sediments which collectively attain maximum thicknesses of >2600 m. Regional aquifer units considered for the numerical model are Quaternary sediments, and the sedimentary rocks of the Paskapoo, Scollard, Horseshoe Canyon formations and the Belly River Group. Regional aquitards delineated include the Battle and Bear Paw formations. The study area is bound to the west by the Brazeau-Waptiti thrust belt and to the south by the Canada-USA international border. The boundary to the north and east is delineated by the maximum extent of the Wapiti and Belly River groups and Judith River Formation. USGS MODFLOW was implemented for numerical simulation. The steady state numerical model was calibrated using a Response Surface based (Radial Basis Functions) optimization method. The calibration targets (~2000) were comprised of drill stem tests for deeper units and static water levels for shallower units. Petrophysical analyses of cores averaged K values from analyses of aquifer test results,and literature values were used to provide initial values and calibration ranges for hydraulic properties. Results indicate predominance of topography driven, local- to intermediate-scale flow systems in all hydrostratigraphic units with recharge of these units occurring in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. The Battle aquitard, where present, acts to retard regional flow

  6. Numerical analysis of the big bounce in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Laguna, Pablo

    2007-01-15

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) homogeneous models with a massless scalar field show that the big-bang singularity can be replaced by a big quantum bounce. To gain further insight on the nature of this bounce, we study the semidiscrete loop quantum gravity Hamiltonian constraint equation from the point of view of numerical analysis. For illustration purposes, we establish a numerical analogy between the quantum bounces and reflections in finite difference discretizations of wave equations triggered by the use of nonuniform grids or, equivalently, reflections found when solving numerically wave equations with varying coefficients. We show that the bounce is closely related to the method for the temporal update of the system and demonstrate that explicit time-updates in general yield bounces. Finally, we present an example of an implicit time-update devoid of bounces and show back-in-time, deterministic evolutions that reach and partially jump over the big-bang singularity.

  7. Numerical analysis of 3-D potential flow in centrifugal turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daiguji, H.

    1983-09-01

    A numerical method is developed for analysing a three-dimensional steady incompressible potential flow through an impeller in centrifugal turbomachines. The method is the same as the previous method which was developed for the axial flow turbomachines, except for some treatments in the downstream region. In order to clarify the validity and limitation of the method, a comparison with the existing experimental data and numerical results is made for radial flow compressor impellers. The calculated blade surface pressure distributions almost coincide with the quasi-3-D calculation by Krimerman and Adler (1978), but are different partly from the quasi-3-D calculation using one meridional flow analysis. It is suggested from this comparison that the flow through an impeller with high efficiency near the design point can be predicted by this fully 3-D numerical method.

  8. Numerical Analysis of Deflections of Multi-Layered Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biliński, Tadeusz; Socha, Tomasz

    2015-03-01

    The paper concerns the rheological bending problem of wooden beams reinforced with embedded composite bars. A theoretical model of the behaviour of a multi-layered beam is presented. The component materials of this beam are described with equations for the linear viscoelastic five-parameter rheological model. Two numerical analysis methods for the long-term response of wood structures are presented. The first method has been developed with SCILAB software. The second one has been developed with the finite element calculation software ABAQUS and user subroutine UMAT. Laboratory investigations were conducted on sample beams of natural dimensions in order to validate the proposed theoretical model and verify numerical simulations. Good agreement between experimental measurements and numerical results is observed.

  9. Integrated numerical methods for hypersonic aircraft cooling systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petley, Dennis H.; Jones, Stuart C.; Dziedzic, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical methods have been developed for the analysis of hypersonic aircraft cooling systems. A general purpose finite difference thermal analysis code is used to determine areas which must be cooled. Complex cooling networks of series and parallel flow can be analyzed using a finite difference computer program. Both internal fluid flow and heat transfer are analyzed, because increased heat flow causes a decrease in the flow of the coolant. The steady state solution is a successive point iterative method. The transient analysis uses implicit forward-backward differencing. Several examples of the use of the program in studies of hypersonic aircraft and rockets are provided.

  10. Large-scale numerical analysis of three-dimensional seismic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, G. L.; Vaughan, D. K.

    1984-05-01

    This report concludes our study of large-scale vectorized numerical analysis applied to time domain seismic wave phenomena in filled basins. Applications include calculations of waves from simple surface or buried sources in a variety of idealized 2-D Basin and Range models (36,000 to 120,000 nodes) described in an interim report, and one large 3-D model (400,000 nodes) from Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, described here. Analysis is based on an explicit, finite element, elastic wave solver designed for vectorized execution on the CRAY-1. The primary result of the present 3-D study is that, given the database available from investigations in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, the size of feasible 3-D computational models on the CRAY-1S is adequate to simulate elastic wave fields and interpret arrivals for comparison with existing 3-D ground motion data. Synthetic seismograms from a 400,000 element 3-D simulation of the COALORA event a Yucca Flat indicate that a significant source of transverse motion on radial lines through the source is diffraction from a discontinuity in the Rainier Mesa tuff layer across the Yucca fault. Successful time-domain simulations in 3-D are feasible with pipelined supercomputers but optimal processing requires careful tailoring of the algorithm to vectorize inner code loops and eliminate nonessential arithmetic.

  11. Estimation of Geologic Storage Capacity of Carbon Dioxide in the Bukpyeong Basin, Korea Using Integrated Three-Dimensional Geologic Formation Modeling and Thermo-Hydrological Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Kihm, J.; Park, S.; SNU CO2 GEO-SEQ TEAM

    2011-12-01

    A conventional method, which was suggested by NETL (2007), has been widely used for estimating the geologic storage capacity of carbon dioxide in sedimentary basins. Because of its simple procedure, it has been straightforwardly applied to even spatially very complicate sedimentary basins. Thus, the results from the conventional method are often not accurate and reliable because it can not consider spatial distributions of fluid conditions and carbon dioxide properties, which are not uniform but variable within sedimentary basins. To overcome this limit of the conventional method, a new method, which can consider such spatially variable distributions of fluid conditions and carbon dioxide properties within sedimentary basins, is suggested and applied in this study. In this new method, a three-dimensional geologic formation model of a target sedimentary basin is first established and discretized into volume elements. The fluid conditions (i.e., pressure, temperature, and salt concentration) within each element are then obtained by performing thermo-hydrological numerical modeling. The carbon dioxide properties (i.e., phase, density, dynamic viscosity, and solubility to groundwater) within each element are then calculated from thermodynamic database under corresponding fluid conditions. Finally, the geologic storage capacity of carbon dioxide with in each element is estimated using the corresponding carbon dioxide properties as well as porosity and element volume, and that within the whole sedimentary basin is determined by summation over all elements. This new method is applied to the Bukpyeong Basin, which is one of the prospective offshore sedimentary basins for geologic storage of carbon dioxide in Korea. A three-dimensional geologic formation model of the Bukpyeong Basin is first established considering the elevation data of the boundaries between the geologic formations obtained from seismic survey and geologic maps at the sea floor surface. This geologic

  12. BASINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:The U.S EPA's water programs and their counterparts in states and pollution control agencies are increasingly emphasizing watershed- and water quality-based assessment and integrated analysis of point and nonpoint sources. Better Assessment Science Integra...

  13. Analysis of sludge from Hanford K East Basin canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Makenas, B.J.; Welsh, T.L.; Baker, R.B.; Hoppe, E.W.; Schmidt, A.J.; Abrefah, J.; Tingey, J.M.; Bredt, P.R.; Golcar, G.R.

    1997-09-12

    Sludge samples from the canisters in the Hanford K East Basin fuel storage pool have been retrieved and analyzed. Both chemical and physical properties have been determined. The results are to be used to determine the disposition of the bulk of the sludge and to assess the impact of residual sludge on dry storage of the associated intact metallic uranium fuel elements. This report is a summary and review of the data provided by various laboratories. Although raw chemistry data were originally reported on various bases (compositions for as-settled, centrifuged, or dry sludge) this report places all of the data on a common comparable basis. Data were evaluated for internal consistency and consistency with respect to the governing sample analysis plan. Conclusions applicable to sludge disposition and spent fuel storage are drawn where possible.

  14. Digital database architecture and delineation methodology for deriving drainage basins, and a comparison of digitally and non-digitally derived numeric drainage areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dupree, Jean A.; Crowfoot, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    The drainage basin is a fundamental hydrologic entity used for studies of surface-water resources and during planning of water-related projects. Numeric drainage areas published by the U.S. Geological Survey water science centers in Annual Water Data Reports and on the National Water Information Systems (NWIS) Web site are still primarily derived from hard-copy sources and by manual delineation of polygonal basin areas on paper topographic map sheets. To expedite numeric drainage area determinations, the Colorado Water Science Center developed a digital database structure and a delineation methodology based on the hydrologic unit boundaries in the National Watershed Boundary Dataset. This report describes the digital database architecture and delineation methodology and also presents the results of a comparison of the numeric drainage areas derived using this digital methodology with those derived using traditional, non-digital methods. (Please see report for full Abstract)

  15. Accounting for Errors in Model Analysis Theory: A Numerical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Steven R.; Lindell, Rebecca S.

    2004-09-01

    By studying the patterns of a group of individuals' responses to a series of multiple-choice questions, researchers can utilize Model Analysis Theory to create a probability distribution of mental models for a student population. The eigenanalysis of this distribution yields information about what mental models the students possess, as well as how consistently they utilize said mental models. Although the theory considers the probabilistic distribution to be fundamental, there exists opportunities for random errors to occur. In this paper we will discuss a numerical approach for mathematically accounting for these random errors. As an example of this methodology, analysis of data obtained from the Lunar Phases Concept Inventory will be presented. Limitations and applicability of this numerical approach will be discussed.

  16. A numerical analysis of the unsteady flow past bluff bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, M. S. U. K.; Modi, V. J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes in detail a relatively sophisticated numerical approach, using the Boundary Element Method in conjunction with the Discrete Vortex Model, to represent the complex unsteady flow field around a bluff body with separating shear layers. Important steps in the numerical analysis of this challenging problem are discussed and a performance evaluation algorithm established. Of considerable importance is the effect of computational parameters such as number of elements representing the geometry, time-step size, location of the nascent vortices, etc., on the accuracy of results and the associated cost. As an example, the method is applied to the analysis of the flow around a stationary Savonius rotor. A detailed parametric study provides fundamental information concerning the starting torque time histories, evolution of the wake, Strouhal number, etc. A comparison with the wind tunnel test data shows remarkable correlation suggesting considerable promise for the approach.

  17. Asymptotic/numerical analysis of supersonic propeller noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, M. K.; Wydeven, R.

    1989-01-01

    An asymptotic analysis based on the Mach surface structure of the field of a supersonic helical source distribution is applied to predict thickness and loading noise radiated by high speed propeller blades. The theory utilizes an integral representation of the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings equation in a fully linearized form. The asymptotic results are used for chordwise strips of the blade, while required spanwise integrations are performed numerically. The form of the analysis enables predicted waveforms to be interpreted in terms of Mach surface propagation. A computer code developed to implement the theory is described and found to yield results in close agreement with more exact computations.

  18. Numerical analysis on thermal drilling of aluminum metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Maheshwaran, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    The work-material deformation is very large and both the tool and workpiece temperatures are high in thermal drilling. Modeling is a necessary tool to understand the material flow, temperatures, stress, and strains, which are difficult to measure experimentally during thermal drilling. The numerical analysis of thermal drilling process of aluminum metal matrix composite has been done in the present work. In this analysis the heat flux of different stages is calculated. The calculated heat flux is applied on the surface of work piece and thermal distribution is predicted in different stages during the thermal drilling process.

  19. Numerical simulation of unidirectional irregular nonlinear waves in the basin of intermediate depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slunyaev, Alexey; Sergeeva, Anna; Didenkulova, Ira

    2016-04-01

    waves over intermediate-depth waves, we show that in the situation of very rough sea, the extreme waves possess noticeable front-rear asymmetry in all considered cases. In the situation of modulationaly stable waves, kph ≈ 1 < 1.36, the asymmetry is equally pronounced as in the deeper water situations. Thus the Benjamin - Feir instability seems to be irrelevant for this peculiarity of extreme wave shapes. The results of numerical simulations are discussed in view of available in-situ measurements at shallow regions of the Baltic Sea. [1] A. Sergeeva, A. Slunyaev, Rogue waves, rogue events and extreme wave kinematics in spatio-temporal fields of simulated sea states. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. 13, 1759-1771 (2013).

  20. Numerical analysis of volcanic SO{sub 2} plume transport

    SciTech Connect

    Uno, Itsushi

    1996-12-31

    Mt. Sakurajima volcano (1060m) located southern part of Kyushu island, Japan, emitted a huge amount of volcanic gas (e.g., 1000-2000 SO{sub 2}-ton/day) and has a strong impact in the environmental SO{sub 2} concentration. This volcanic SO{sub 2} plume transport process over the Kyushu island was simulated by a random walk model based on the wind and turbulence fields simulated by a mesoscale numerical model using four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA). Continuous four days of numerical simulation was the period covering from May 7 to May 10, 1987. Grided global analysis by ECMWF and the special pilot-balloon observation data were used in the FDDA. Mesoscale numerical model with FDDA simulated well the general wind fields during the passage of high pressure system, and the complicated local wind circulation within the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Simulated surface wind variation was quantitatively compared with the observation data, and showed the good agreements. Numerical results of plume transport process were compared with SO{sub 2} surface and 3-D airborne measurements. It was revealed that simulated three-dimensional plume behavior explained well the observed SO{sub 2} variation, and the day-time development of PBL played an important role for the transport of the volcanic SO{sub 2} aloft to the surface level. Transformation rate from SO{sub 2} to sulfate was also determined from the trajectory by the random walk calculation.

  1. Clustered Numerical Data Analysis Using Markov Lie Monoid Based Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    We have designed and build an optimal numerical standardization algorithm that links numerical values with their associated units, error level, and defining metadata thus supporting automated data exchange and new levels of artificial intelligence (AI). The software manages all dimensional and error analysis and computational tracing. Tables of entities verses properties of these generalized numbers (called ``metanumbers'') support a transformation of each table into a network among the entities and another network among their properties where the network connection matrix is based upon a proximity metric between the two items. We previously proved that every network is isomorphic to the Lie algebra that generates continuous Markov transformations. We have also shown that the eigenvectors of these Markov matrices provide an agnostic clustering of the underlying patterns. We will present this methodology and show how our new work on conversion of scientific numerical data through this process can reveal underlying information clusters ordered by the eigenvalues. We will also show how the linking of clusters from different tables can be used to form a ``supernet'' of all numerical information supporting new initiatives in AI.

  2. Sequential analysis of the numerical Stroop effect reveals response suppression.

    PubMed

    Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Gevers, Wim; Notebaert, Wim

    2011-09-01

    Automatic processing of irrelevant stimulus dimensions has been demonstrated in a variety of tasks. Previous studies have shown that conflict between relevant and irrelevant dimensions can be reduced when a feature of the irrelevant dimension is repeated. The specific level at which the automatic process is suppressed (e.g., perceptual repetition, response repetition), however, is less understood. In the current experiment we used the numerical Stroop paradigm, in which the processing of irrelevant numerical values of 2 digits interferes with the processing of their physical size, to pinpoint the precise level of the suppression. Using a sequential analysis, we dissociated perceptual repetition from response repetition of the relevant and irrelevant dimension. Our analyses of reaction times, error rates, and diffusion modeling revealed that the congruity effect is significantly reduced or even absent when the response sequence of the irrelevant dimension, rather than the numerical value or the physical size, is repeated. These results suggest that automatic activation of the irrelevant dimension is suppressed at the response level. The current results shed light on the level of interaction between numerical magnitude and physical size as well as the effect of variability of responses and stimuli on automatic processing. PMID:21500951

  3. Hydrological evolution of Atlantis basin, Sirenum Terrae, Mars. Preliminar analysis of MOC and THEMIS images.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablo, M. A.; Márquez, A.; Centeno, J. D.

    The Atlantis basin is one of the martian highlands areas where there was proposed the existence of an ancient lake during the early geological history of Mars [1] [2] [3] [4]. The existence of some morphological features inside the basin and in the surrounding area, allow to check the existence of liquid water in the past of the planet. On the other hand, other morphological features indicate the existence of snow and liquid groundwater in recent times. The detailed study of the geomorphologic features allows to make an approach to the hydrological evolution of the Atlantis basin. The study of the geomorphology of this region has been carried out by means of the analysis of MOC high resolution images obtained by the Mars Global Surveyor mission and the THEMIS images, in the visible spectrum, sent by Mars Odyssey spacecrafts. The most clearly morphological feature indicative of the existence of water in the surface of Mars in the past are the numerous channels that end into Atlantis basin from the highest terrains. In addiction to these fluvial channels, the existence of mass flow deposits is also indicative of the existence of water in the area. Some of these slumps are in the internal slopes of impact craters, but others cover huge extensions around the chaotic terrains of the studied area. The lobated ejecta deposits observed in the Atlantis basin region are indicative of the existence of groundwater (solid or liquid) [5]. Serrated reliefs and tables in the borders of the basins are indicative of the existence of a water sheet. Beneath this water sheet some deposits was formed which was eroded, due to the gradual desiccation of the basin, forming the tables and serrated reliefs. The existence of different chaotic terrains in the area implies the existence of huge amounts of water under the surface according to the different models of chaotic terrain formation [6] [7]. The existence of groundwater could be decided by the existence of collapses in the near to the

  4. Hydrological evolution of Atlantis basin, Sirenum Terrae, Mars. Preliminar analysis of MOC and THEMIS images.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablo, M. A.; Márquez, A.; Centeno, J. D.

    The Atlantis basin is one of the martian highlands areas where there was proposed the existence of an ancient lake during the early geological history of Mars [1] [2] [3] [4]. The existence of some morphological features inside the basin and in the surrounding area, allow to check the existence of liquid water in the past of the planet. On the other hand, other morphological features indicate the existence of snow and liquid groundwater in recent times. The detailed study of the geomorphologic features allows to make an approach to the hydrological evolution of the Atlantis basin. The study of the geomorphology of this region has been carried out by means of the analysis of MOC high resolution images obtained by the Mars Global Surveyor mission and the THEMIS images, in the visible spectrum, sent by Mars Odyssey spacecrafts. The most clearly morphological feature indicative of the existence of water in the surface of Mars in the past are the numerous channels that end into Atlantis basin from the highest terrains. In addiction to these fluvial channels, the existence of mass flow deposits is also indicative of the existence of water in the area. Some of these slumps are in the internal slopes of impact craters, but others cover huge extensions around the chaotic terrains of the studied area. The lobated ejecta deposits observed in the Atlantis basin region are indicative of the existence of groundwater (solid or liquid) [5]. Serrated reliefs and tables in the borders of the basins are indicative of the existence of a water sheet. Beneath this water sheet some deposits was formed which was eroded, due to the gradual desiccation of the basin, forming the tables and serrated reliefs. The existence of different chaotic terrains in the area implies the existence of huge amounts of water under the surface according to the different models of chaotic terrain formation [6] [7]. The existence of groundwater could be decided by the existence of collapses in the near to the

  5. The geostatistical approach for structural and stratigraphic framework analysis of offshore NW Bonaparte Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Ali; Salim, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed; Gaafar, Gamal Ragab; Yusoff, Wan Ismail Wan

    2016-02-01

    Geostatistics or statistical approach is based on the studies of temporal and spatial trend, which depend upon spatial relationships to model known information of variable(s) at unsampled locations. The statistical technique known as kriging was used for petrophycial and facies analysis, which help to assume spatial relationship to model the geological continuity between the known data and the unknown to produce a single best guess of the unknown. Kriging is also known as optimal interpolation technique, which facilitate to generate best linear unbiased estimation of each horizon. The idea is to construct a numerical model of the lithofacies and rock properties that honor available data and further integrate with interpreting seismic sections, techtonostratigraphy chart with sea level curve (short term) and regional tectonics of the study area to find the structural and stratigraphic growth history of the NW Bonaparte Basin. By using kriging technique the models were built which help to estimate different parameters like horizons, facies, and porosities in the study area. The variograms were used to determine for identification of spatial relationship between data which help to find the depositional history of the North West (NW) Bonaparte Basin.

  6. Numerical analysis of free vibrations of damped rotating structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1977-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the efficient numerical solution of damped and undamped free vibration problems of rotating structures. While structural discretization is achieved by the finite element method, the associated eigenproblem solution is effected by a combined Sturm sequence and inverse iteration technique that enables the computation of a few required roots only without having to compute any other. For structures of complex configurations, a modal synthesis technique is also presented, which is based on appropriate combinations of eigenproblem solution of various structural components. Such numerical procedures are general in nature, which fully exploit matrix sparsity inherent in finite element discretizations, and prove to be most efficient for the vibration analysis of any damped rotating structure, such as rotating machineries, helicopter and turbine blades, spinning space stations, among others.

  7. Numerical Ergonomics Analysis in Operation Environment of CNC Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. F.; Yang, Z. X.

    2010-05-01

    The performance of operator will be affected by different operation environments [1]. Moreover, poor operation environment may cause health problems of the operator [2]. Physical and psychological considerations are two main factors that will affect the performance of operator under different conditions of operation environment. In this paper, applying scientific and systematic methods find out the pivot elements in the field of physical and psychological factors. There are five main factors including light, temperature, noise, air flow and space that are analyzed. A numerical ergonomics model has been built up regarding the analysis results which can support to advance the design of operation environment. Moreover, the output of numerical ergonomic model can provide the safe, comfortable, more productive conditions for the operator.

  8. Numeral-Incorporating Roots in Numeral Systems: A Comparative Analysis of Two Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuentes, Mariana; Massone, Maria Ignacia; Fernandez-Viader, Maria del Pilar; Makotrinsky, Alejandro; Pulgarin, Francisca

    2010-01-01

    Numeral-incorporating roots in the numeral systems of Argentine Sign Language (LSA) and Catalan Sign Language (LSC), as well as the main features of the number systems of both languages, are described and compared. Informants discussed the use of numerals and roots in both languages (in most cases in natural contexts). Ten informants took part in…

  9. Analysis of Ignition Testing on K-West Basin Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    J. Abrefah; F.H. Huang; W.M. Gerry; W.J. Gray; S.C. Marschman; T.A. Thornton

    1999-08-10

    Approximately 2100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) discharged from the N-Reactor have been stored underwater at the K-Basins in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The spent fuel has been stored in the K-East Basin since 1975 and in the K-West Basin since 1981. Some of the SNF elements in these basins have corroded because of various breaches in the Zircaloy cladding that occurred during fuel discharge operations and/or subsequent handling and storage in the basins. Consequently, radioactive material in the fuel has been released into the basin water, and water has leaked from the K-East Basin into the soil below. To protect the Columbia River, which is only 380 m from the basins, the SNF is scheduled to be removed and transported for interim dry storage in the 200 East Area, in the central portion of the Site. However, before being shipped, the corroded fuel elements will be loaded into Multi-Canister OverPacks and conditioned. The conditioning process will be selected based on the Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) (WHC 1995), which was prepared on the basis of the dry storage concept developed by the Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) team (ITA 1994).

  10. Analysis of runoff from small drainage basins in Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Gordon S.; Rankl, James G.

    1978-01-01

    A flood-hydrograph study has defined the magnitude and frequency of flood volumes and flood peaks that can be expected from drainage basins smaller than 11 square miles in the plains and valley areas of Wyoming. Rainfall and runoff data, collected for 9 years on a seasonal basis (April through September), were used to calibrate a rainfall-runoff model on each of 22 small basins. Long-term records of runoff volume and peak discharge were synthesized for these 22 basins. Flood volumes and flood peaks of specific recurrence intervals (2, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 years) were then related to basin characteristics with a high degree of correlation. Flood volumes were related to drainage area, maximum relief, and basin slope. Flood peaks were related to drainage area, maximum relief, basin slope, and channel slope. An investigation of ponding behind a highway embankment, with available storage capacity and with a culvert to allow outflow, has shown that the single fast-rising peak is most important in culvert design. Consequently, a dimensionless hydrograph defines the characteristic shape of flood hydrographs to be expected from small drainage basins in Wyoming. For design purposes, a peak and volume can be estimated from basin characteristics and used with the dimensionless hydrograph to produce a synthetic single-peak hydrograph. Incremental discharges of the hydrograph can be routed along a channel, where a highway fill and culvert are to be placed, to help determine the most economical size of culvert if embankment storage is to be considered.

  11. Unsaturated Shear Strength and Numerical Analysis Methods for Unsaturated Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Kim, G.; Kim, D.; Baek, H.; Kang, S.

    2011-12-01

    The angles of shearing resistance(φb) and internal friction(φ') appear to be identical in low suction range, but the angle of shearing resistance shows non-linearity as suction increases. In most numerical analysis however, a fixed value for the angle of shearing resistance is applied even in low suction range for practical reasons, often leading to a false conclusion. In this study, a numerical analysis has been undertaken employing the estimated shear strength curve of unsaturated soils from the residual water content of SWCC proposed by Vanapalli et al.(1996). The result was also compared with that from a fixed value of φb. It is suggested that, in case it is difficult to measure the unsaturated shear strength curve through the triaxial soil tests, the estimated shear strength curve using the residual water content can be a useful alternative. This result was applied for analyzing the slope stablity of unsaturated soils. The effects of a continuous rainfall on slope stability were analyzed using a commercial program "SLOPE/W", with the coupled infiltration analysis program "SEEP/W" from the GEO-SLOPE International Ltd. The results show that, prior to the infiltration by the intensive rainfall, the safety factors using the estimated shear strength curve were substantially higher than that from the fixed value of φb at all time points. After the intensive infiltration, both methods showed a similar behavior.

  12. Basin Analysis of Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest Mancini

    2001-03-01

    Part 3 (Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation) objectives are to provide an analysis of the Smackover petroleum system in Years 4 and 5 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work Accomplished (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - Basin flow modeling has been completed and the topical report has been submitted to the U.S. DOE for review. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum source rocks has been integrated into the basin flow model. The information on the source rocks is being prepared for inclusion in the final report. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum reservoirs continues. The cores to be described have been identified and many of the cores for the eastern and western parts of the basin have been described. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Work on reservoir diagenesis continues. Samples from the cores selected for the reservoir characterization are being used for this task. Task 5 - Underdeveloped Reservoirs - Two underdeveloped Smackover reservoirs have been identified. They are the microbial reef and shoal reservoirs. Work Planned (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - This task has been completed and the topical report has been submitted to the U.S. DOE. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Petroleum source rock information will continue to be prepared for the final report. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Characterization of petroleum reservoirs will continue through core studies. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Characterization of reservoir diagenesis will continue through petrographic analysis. Task 5 - Underdeveloped Reservoirs - Study of Smackover underdeveloped reservoirs will continue with focus on the microbial reef and shoal reservoirs.

  13. An improved numerical model for wave rotor design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Wilson, Jack

    1992-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed which can predict both the unsteady flows within a wave rotor and the steady averaged flows in the ports. The model is based on the assumptions of one-dimensional, unsteady, and perfect gas flow. Besides the dominant wave behavior, it is also capable of predicting the effects of finite tube opening time, leakage from the tube ends, and viscosity. The relative simplicity of the model makes it useful for design, optimization, and analysis of wave rotor cycles for any application. This paper discusses some details of the model and presents comparisons between the model and two laboratory wave rotor experiments.

  14. Numerical analysis of decoy state quantum key distribution protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Jim W; Rice, Patrick R

    2008-01-01

    Decoy state protocols are a useful tool for many quantum key distribution systems implemented with weak coherent pulses, allowing significantly better secret bit rates and longer maximum distances. In this paper we present a method to numerically find optimal three-level protocols, and we examine how the secret bit rate and the optimized parameters are dependent on various system properties, such as session length, transmission loss, and visibility. Additionally, we show how to modify the decoy state analysis to handle partially distinguishable decoy states as well as uncertainty in the prepared intensities.

  15. Numerical modeling of saline water transport in the lower Nam Kam Basin, Amphoe That Phanom, Changwat Nakhon Phanom, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srisuk, K; Sriboonlue, V; Buaphan, C; Archvichai, L; Youngme, W; Satarak, P; Jaruchaikul, S

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the project is to establish a conceptual groundwater model over the lower Nam Kam Basin in order to apply a numerical technique for the prediction of the impact of saline water transport due to the proposed weir across the Nam Kam River. Hydrogeological investigations including mapping, drilling, piezometer installations and monitoring were systematically conducted during 1997 to 1998. Brackish groundwater is saturated under the area with a depth of 30-60 m. Groundwater regionally flows from the south (the Phu Phan Range) to the north and discharges to the Nam Kam River. Another direction is from the northern region to the southern region, discharging to the central region. A two-dimensional model was constructed along the principal gradient in the NW-SE direction. There are several local recharge and discharge areas across the Nam Kam floodplain. A local groundwater flow is active within the depth of 2 m to 30 m below the ground surface within the sand and gravel unit. Simulations were calibrated with hydraulic heads and salinity of groundwater in the piezometers. It is found that the recharge and evapotranspiration rates are 1% to 40% of the rainfall and 10% to 15% of a pan evaporation, respectively. The ranges of horizontal hydraulic conductivity to vertical hydraulic conductivity are 0.1 to 0.01. The possible longitudinal dispersivity values of the hydrostratigraphic units are 20 m to 500 m, but the transverse dispersivity is less than the longitude by one order of magnitude. The comparison of calculated heads and measured heads give a root mean square error of less than 1 m. The different salinity concentrations are still in a range of 2000-5000 mg/l. Ten year simulation of saline water transport indicates that the reservoir ponding with water level at +140.5 m above mean sea level may divert groundwater flow and discharging to the northern boundary of the reservoir at Ban Don Kao. PMID:11724482

  16. An analysis of stream temperatures, Green River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowham, H.W.

    1978-01-01

    A method for estimating temperatures of streams in the Green River basin, Wyoming, utilizes a regional model for estimating mean daily temperatures of streams at unmeasured sites. The regional model was developed by describing annual temperature patterns at 43 measured sites and by applying the harmonic function T = M + A -sin (0.0172 t + C)- where: T is mean daily temperature; M, A, and C are harmonic coefficients calculated from data for each stream-temperature station; and t is the day of the water year. Application of the equation for estimating temperatures at unmeasured sites requires regionalized estimates of M, A, and C. Regional estimates were developed with the aid of multiple-regression techniques, whereby the calculated harmonic coefficients were regressed against physical and climatic characteristics of the stream-temperature stations. Stream elevation was a significant factor affecting water temperature. Analysis of areal and temporal variations in temperature showed that springs, irrigation return flows, and reservoir storage were affecting reaches of several major streams. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Geologic Analysis of Priority Basins for Exploration and Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, H.B.; Reeves, T.K.

    1999-04-27

    There has been a substantial decline in both exploratory drilling and seismic field crew activity in the United States over the last 10 years, due primarily to the declining price of oil. To reverse this trend and to preserve the entrepreneurial independent operator, the U.S. DOE is attempting to encourage hydrocarbon exploration activities in some of the under exploited regions of the United States. This goal is being accomplished by conducting broad regional reviews of potentially prospective areas within the lower 48 states. Data are being collected on selected areas, and studies are being done on a regional scale generally unavailable to the smaller independent. The results of this work will be made available to the public to encourage the undertaking of operations in areas which have been overlooked until this project. Fifteen criteria have been developed for the selection of study areas. Eight regions have been identified where regional geologic analysis will be performed. This report discusses preliminary findings concerning the geology, early tectonic history, structure and potential unconventional source rocks for the Black Mesa basin and South Central states region, the two highest priority study areas.

  18. Numerical analysis of cocurrent conical and cylindrical axial cyclone separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor, M. A. M.; Al-Kayiem, H. H.; Lemma, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Axial concurrent liquid-liquid separator is seen as an alternative unit to the traditional tangential counter current cyclone due to lower droplet break ups, turbulence and pressure drop. This paper presents the numerical analysis of a new conical axial cocurrent design along with a comparison to the cylindrical axial cocurrent type. The simulation was carried out using CFD technique in ANSYS-FLUENT software. The simulation results were validated by comparison with experimental data from literature, and mesh independency and quality were performed. The analysis indicates that the conical version achieves better separation performance compared to the cylindrical type. Simulation results indicate tangential velocity with 8% higher and axial velocity with 80% lower recirculation compared to the cylindrical type. Also, the flow visualization counters shows smaller recirculation region relative to the cylindrical unit. The proposed conical design seems more efficient and suits the crude/water separation in O&G industry.

  19. Numerical Analysis on Air Ingress Behavior in GTHTR300H

    SciTech Connect

    Tetsuaki Takeda; Xing Yan; Kazuhiko Kunitomi

    2006-07-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been developing the analytical code for the safety characteristics of the HTGR and carrying out design study of the gas turbine high temperature reactor of 300 MWe nominal-capacity for hydrogen production, the GTHTR300H (Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300 for Hydrogen). The objective of this study is to clarify safety characteristics of the GTHTR300H for the pipe rupture accident. A numerical analysis of heat and mass transfer fluid flow with multi-component gas mixture has been performed to obtain the variation of the density of the gas mixture, and the onset time of natural circulation of air. From the results obtained in this analysis, it was found that the duration time of the air ingress by molecular diffusion would increase due to the existence of the recuperator in the GTHTR300H system. (authors)

  20. Asymptotic and numerical analysis of electrohydrodynamic flows of dielectric liquid.

    PubMed

    Suh, Y K; Baek, K H; Cho, D S

    2013-08-01

    We perform an asymptotic analysis of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flow of nonpolar liquid subjected to an external, nonuniform electric field. The domain of interest covers the bulk as well as the thin dissociation layers (DSLs) near the electrodes. Outer (i.e., bulk) equations for the ion transport in hierarchical order of perturbation parameters can be expressed in linear form, whereas the inner (i.e., DSL) equations take a nonlinear form. We derive a simple formula in terms of various parameters which can be used to estimate the relative importance of the DSL-driven flow compared with the bulk-driven flow. EHD flow over a pair of cylindrical electrodes is then solved asymptotically and numerically. It is found that in large geometric scale and high ion concentration the EHD flow is dominated by the bulk-charge-induced flow. As the scale and concentration are decreased, the DSL-driven slip velocity increases and the resultant flow tends to dominate the domain and finally leads to flow reversal. We also conduct a flow-visualization experiment to verify the analysis and attain good agreement between the two results with parameter tuning. We finally show, based on the comparison of experimental and numerical solutions, that the rate of free-ion generation (dissociation) should be less than the one predicted from the existing formula. PMID:24032920

  1. Numerical analysis of distortion characteristics of heterojunction bipolar transistor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piramasubramanian, S.; Ganesh Madhan, M.; Nagella, Jyothsna; Dhanapriya, G.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical analysis of harmonic and third order intermodulation distortion of transistor laser is presented in this paper. The three level rate equations are numerically solved to determine the modulation and distortion characteristics. DC and AC analysis on the device are carried out to determine its power-current and frequency response characteristics. Further, the effects of quantum well recombination time and electron capture time in the quantum well, on the modulation depth and distortion characteristics are examined. It is observed that the threshold current density of the device decreases with increasing electron lifetime, which coincides with earlier findings. Also, the magnitude of harmonic distortion and intermodulation products are found to reduce with increasing current density and with a reduction of spontaneous emission recombination lifetime. However, an increase of electron capture time improves the distortion performance. A maximum modulation depth of 18.42 dB is obtained for 50 ps spontaneous emission life time and 1 ps electron capture time, for 2.4 GHz frequency at a current density of 2Jth. A minimum second harmonic distortion magnitude of -66.8 dBc is predicted for 50 ps spontaneous emission life time and 1 ps electron capture time for 2.4 GHz frequency, at a current density of 7Jth. Similarly, a minimum third order intermodulation distortion of -83.93 dBc is obtained for 150 ps spontaneous emission life time and 5 ps electron capture time under similar biasing conditions.

  2. Numerical analysis and experimental verification of vehicle trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wekezer, J. W.; Cichocki, K.

    2003-09-01

    The paper presents research results of a study, in which computational mechanics was utilized to predict vehicle trajectories upon traversing standard Florida DOT street curbs. Computational analysis was performed using LS-DYNA non-linear, finite element computer code with two public domain, finite element models of motor vehicles: Ford Festiva and Ford Taurus. Shock absorbers were modeled using discrete spring and damper elements. Connections for the modifie suspension systems were carefully designed to assure proper range of motion for the suspension models. Inertia properties of the actual vehicles were collected using tilt-table tests and were used for LS-DYNA vehicle models. Full-scale trajectory tests have been performed at Texas Transportation Institute to validate the numerical models and predictions from computational mechanics. Experiments were conducted for Ford Festiva and Ford Taurus, both for two values of approach angle: 15 and 90 degrees, with impact velocity of 45 mph. Experimental data including accelerations, displacements and overall vehicles behavior were collected by high-speed video cameras and have e been compared with numerical results. Verification results indicated a good correlation between computational analysis and full-scale test data. The study also underlined a strong dependence of properly modeled suspension and tires on resulting vehicle trajectories.

  3. Numerical analysis of modified Central Solenoid insert design

    SciTech Connect

    Khodak, Andrei; Martovetsky, Nicolai; Smirnov, Aleksandre; Titus, Peter

    2015-06-21

    The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for fabrication of the Central Solenoid (CS) for ITER project. The ITER machine is currently under construction by seven parties in Cadarache, France. The CS Insert (CSI) project should provide a verification of the conductor performance in relevant conditions of temperature, field, currents and mechanical strain. The US IPO designed the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at JAEA, Naka. To validate the modified design we performed three-dimensional numerical simulations using coupled solver for simultaneous structural, thermal and electromagnetic analysis. Thermal and electromagnetic simulations supported structural calculations providing necessary loads and strains. According to current analysis design of the modified coil satisfies ITER magnet structural design criteria for the following conditions: (1) room temperature, no current, (2) temperature 4K, no current, (3) temperature 4K, current 60 kA direct charge, and (4) temperature 4K, current 60 kA reverse charge. Fatigue life assessment analysis is performed for the alternating conditions of: temperature 4K, no current, and temperature 4K, current 45 kA direct charge. Results of fatigue analysis show that parts of the coil assembly can be qualified for up to 1 million cycles. Distributions of the Current Sharing Temperature (TCS) in the superconductor were obtained from numerical results using parameterization of the critical surface in the form similar to that proposed for ITER. Lastly, special ADPL scripts were developed for ANSYS allowing one-dimensional representation of TCS along the cable, as well as three-dimensional fields of TCS in superconductor material. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Numerical analysis of modified Central Solenoid insert design

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khodak, Andrei; Martovetsky, Nicolai; Smirnov, Aleksandre; Titus, Peter

    2015-06-21

    The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for fabrication of the Central Solenoid (CS) for ITER project. The ITER machine is currently under construction by seven parties in Cadarache, France. The CS Insert (CSI) project should provide a verification of the conductor performance in relevant conditions of temperature, field, currents and mechanical strain. The US IPO designed the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at JAEA, Naka. To validate the modified design we performed three-dimensional numerical simulations using coupled solver for simultaneous structural, thermal and electromagnetic analysis. Thermal and electromagneticmore » simulations supported structural calculations providing necessary loads and strains. According to current analysis design of the modified coil satisfies ITER magnet structural design criteria for the following conditions: (1) room temperature, no current, (2) temperature 4K, no current, (3) temperature 4K, current 60 kA direct charge, and (4) temperature 4K, current 60 kA reverse charge. Fatigue life assessment analysis is performed for the alternating conditions of: temperature 4K, no current, and temperature 4K, current 45 kA direct charge. Results of fatigue analysis show that parts of the coil assembly can be qualified for up to 1 million cycles. Distributions of the Current Sharing Temperature (TCS) in the superconductor were obtained from numerical results using parameterization of the critical surface in the form similar to that proposed for ITER. Lastly, special ADPL scripts were developed for ANSYS allowing one-dimensional representation of TCS along the cable, as well as three-dimensional fields of TCS in superconductor material. Published by Elsevier B.V.« less

  5. Analysis of runoff from small drainage basins in Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Gordon S.; Rankl, James G.

    1977-01-01

    A flood-hydrograph study has defined the magnitude and frequency of flood volumes and flood peaks that can be expected from drainage basins smaller than 11 square miles in the plains and valley areas of Wyoming. Rainfall and runoff data, collected for 9 years on a seasonal basis (April through September), were used to calibrate a rainfall-runoff model on each of 22 small basins. Long-term records of runoff volume and peak discharge were synthesized for these 22 basins. Flood volumes and flood peaks of specific recurrence intervals (2, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 years) were then related to basin characteristics with a high degree of correlation. Flood volumes were related to drainage area, maximum relief, and basin slope. Flood peaks were related to drainage area, maximum relief, basin slope, and channel slope. An investigation of ponding behind a highway embankment, with available storage capacity and with a culvert to allow outflow, has shown that the single fast-rising peak is most important in culvert design. Consequently, a dimensionless hydrograph defines the characteristic shape of flood hydrographs to be expected from small drainage basins in Wyoming. For design purposes, a peak and volume can be estimated from basin characteristics and used with the dimensionless hydrograph to produce a synthetic single-peak hydrograph. Incremental discharges of the hydrograph can be routed along a channel, where a highway fill and culvert are to be placed, to help determine the most economical size of culvert if embankment storage is to be considered. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Analysis of urban storm-water quality for seven basins near Portland, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Timothy L.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1978-01-01

    Over a 1.5-year period, water-quality data were collected for seven small drainage basins in urban aeas of Portland, Oreg. Analysis of the data followed three approaches. First, the constituent concentrations were analyzed. Average concentrations of suspended sediment, settleable solids, and fecal coliform bacteria generally exceeded levels expected for secondary waste-treatment plant effluent, whereas biochemical oxygen demand concentrations were lower than expected. The second analytical approach established correlations and bivariate regression relationships between constituents for individual storms in each basin, for all storms in each basin, and for all storms in all basins. Generally, correlation coefficients decreased when progressing from data for individual storms in each basin, to data for all storms in each basin, to data for all storms in all basins. In the third approach, storm yields for 10 constituents were related to basin and precipitation characteristics by use of multiple-linear-regression techniques. Storm yields for suspended sediment varied by about four orders of magnitude. Generally, results of the multiple-regression analysis indicated that variations in storm yields were highly dependent on precipitation characteristics, with total rainfall of the storm frequently explaining most of the variation of the dependent variable.

  7. Analysis of urban storm-water quality for seven basins near Portland, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Timothy L.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1978-01-01

    Over a 1.5-year period, water-quality data were collected for seven small drainage basins in urban aeas of Portland, Oreg. Analysis of the data followed three approaches. First, the constituent concentrations were analyzed. Average concentrations of suspended sediment, settleable solids, and fecal coliform bacteria generally exceeded levels expected for secondary waste-treatment plant effluent, whereas biochemical oxygen demand concentrations were lower than expected. The second analytical approach established correlations and bivariate regression relationships between constituents for individual storms in each basin, for all storms in each basin, and for all storms in all basins. Generally, correlation coefficients decreased when progressing from data for individual storms in each basin, to data for all storms in each basin, to data for all storms in all basins. In the third approach, storm yields for 10 constituents were related to basin and precipitation characteristics by use of multiple-linear-regression techniques. Storm yields for suspended sediment varied by about four orders of magnitude. Generally, results of the multiple-regression analysis indicated that variations in storm yields were highly dependent on precipitation characteristics, with total rainfall of the storm frequently explaining most of the variation of the dependent variable. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Application of GIS and RS for Morphometric Analysis of Upper Bhima Basin: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Amol D.; Sarup, Jyoti; Mittal, Sushil Kumar

    2014-12-01

    This study presents a morphometric analysis of Upper Bhima Basin (UBB), located in state of Maharahstra, India. Study area is in western part of Maharashtra State, which has a huge socio—economic impact as many towns and metros are emerged as important centres for employment, industrial hubs, and Information Technology (IT) parks. The study focuses only on the morphometric analysis of UBB. Analysis done using ArcGIS software, by digitizing the toposheets, georeferencing them and then analyzing in the GIS environment. The analysis revealed that the basin was of seventh order with dendritic type of drainage pattern. Results revealed that the value of bifurcation ratio Rb lies between 3 and 5. Values of drainage density range from 1.60 to 0.01 km/km2, indicating low drainage density. Average value of drainage density is 0.374 km/km2 for entire basin, so classifying the basin as coarse.

  9. 105-N basin sediment disposition phase-two sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. C.

    1997-03-14

    The sampling and analysis plan for Phase 2 of the 105-N Basin sediment disposition task defines the sampling and analytical activities that will be performed to support characterization of the sediment and selection of an appropriate sediment disposal option.

  10. TCLP Preparation and Analysis of K East Basin Composite Sludge Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Silvers, Kurt L.

    2000-08-15

    This report contains results from TCLP preparation and analysis of K East Basin floor and canister composite sludge samples. Analyses were performed in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (PNNL, 325 Building).

  11. Numerical Simulations of Precipitation Processes, Microphysics, and Microwave Radiative Properties of flood Producing Storms in Mediterranean & Adriatic Basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the meteorological and microphysical nature of Mediterranean storms requires a combination of in situ data analysis, radar data analysis, and satellite data analysis, effectively integrated with numerical modeling studies at various scales. An important aspect of understanding microphysical controls of severe storms, is first understanding the meteorological controls under which a storm has evolved, and then using that information to help characterize the dominant microphysical processes. For hazardous Mediterranean storms, highlighted by the October 5-6, 1998 Friuli flood event in northern Italy, a comprehensive microphysical interpretation requires an understanding of the multiple phases of storm evolution. This involves intense convective development, Sratiform decay, orographic lifting, and sloped frontal lifting processes, as well as the associated vertical motions and thermodynamical instabilities governing physical processes that effect details of the size distributions and fall rates of the various types of hydrometeors found within the storm environment. This talk overviews the microphysical elements of a severe Mediterranean storm in such a context, investigated with the aid of TRMM satellite and other remote sensing measurements, but guided by a nonhydrostatic mesoscale model simulation of the Friuli flood event. The data analysis for this paper was conducted by my research groups at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center in Huntsville, AL and Florida State University in Tallahassee, and in collaboration with Dr. Alberto Mugnai's research group at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Rome. The numerical modeling was conducted by Professor Oreg Tripoli and Ms. Giulia Panegrossi at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, using Professor Tripoli's nonhydrostatic modeling system (NMS). This is a scalable, fully nested mesoscale model capable of resolving nonhydrostatic circulations from regional scale down to cloud scale

  12. Stochastic algorithms for the analysis of numerical flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2004-04-26

    Recent progress in simulation methodologies and high-performance parallel computers have made it is possible to perform detailed simulations of multidimensional reacting flow phenomena using comprehensive kinetics mechanisms. As simulations become larger and more complex, it becomes increasingly difficult to extract useful information from the numerical solution, particularly regarding the interactions of the chemical reaction and diffusion processes. In this paper we present a new diagnostic tool for analysis of numerical simulations of reacting flow. Our approach is based on recasting an Eulerian flow solution in a Lagrangian frame. Unlike a conventional Lagrangian view point that follows the evolution of a volume of the fluid, we instead follow specific chemical elements, e.g., carbon, nitrogen, etc., as they move through the system . From this perspective an ''atom'' is part of some molecule of a species that is transported through the domain by advection and diffusion. Reactions cause the atom to shift from one chemical host species to another and the subsequent transport of the atom is given by the movement of the new species. We represent these processes using a stochastic particle formulation that treats advection deterministically and models diffusion and chemistry as stochastic processes. In this paper, we discuss the numerical issues in detail and demonstrate that an ensemble of stochastic trajectories can accurately capture key features of the continuum solution. The capabilities of this diagnostic are then demonstrated by applications to study the modulation of carbon chemistry during a vortex-flame interaction, and the role of cyano chemistry in rm NO{sub x} production for a steady diffusion flame.

  13. Numerical analysis of impact-damaged sandwich composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Youngkeun

    Sandwich structures are used in a wide variety of structural applications due to their relative advantages over other conventional structural materials in terms of improved stability, weight savings, and ease of manufacture and repair. Foreign object impact damage in sandwich composites can result in localized damage to the facings, core, and core-facing interface. Such damage may result in drastic reductions in composite strength, elastic moduli, and durability and damage tolerance characteristics. In this study, physically-motivated numerical models have been developed for predicting the residual strength of impact-damaged sandwich composites comprised of woven-fabric graphite-epoxy facesheets and Nomex honeycomb cores subjected to compression-after-impact loading. Results from non-destructive inspection and destructive sectioning of damaged sandwich panels were used to establish initial conditions for damage (residual facesheet indentation, core crush dimension, etc.) in the numerical analysis. Honeycomb core crush test results were used to establish the nonlinear constitutive behavior for the Nomex core. The influence of initial facesheet property degradation and progressive loss of facesheet structural integrity on the residual strength of impact-damaged sandwich panels was examined. The influence of damage of various types and sizes, specimen geometry, support boundary conditions, and variable material properties on the estimated residual strength is discussed. Facesheet strains from material and geometric nonlinear finite element analyses correlated relatively well with experimentally determined values. Moreover, numerical predictions of residual strength are consistent with experimental observations. Using a methodology similar to that presented in this work, it may be possible to develop robust residual strength estimates for complex sandwich composite structural components with varying levels of in-service damage. Such studies may facilitate sandwich

  14. [Spatiotemporal variation analysis and identification of water pollution sources in the Zhangweinan River basin].

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua-Shan; Xu, Zong-Xue; Tang, Fang-Fang; Yu, Wei-Dong; Cheng, Yan-Ping

    2012-02-01

    In this study, several statistical methods including cluster analysis, seasonal Kendall test, factor analysis/principal component analysis and principal component regression were used to evaluate the spatiotemporal variation of water quality and identify the sources of water pollution in the Zhangweinan River basin. Results of spatial cluster analysis and principal component analysis indicated that the Zhangweinan River basin can be classified into two regions. One is the Zhang River upstream located in the northwest of the Zhangweinan River basin where water quality is good. The other one covers the Wei River and eastern plain of the Zhangweinan River basin, where water is seriously polluted. In this region, pollutants from point sources flow into the river and the water quality changes greatly. Results of temporal cluster analysis and seasonal Kendall test indicated that the study periods may be classified into three periods and two different trends were detected during the period of 2002-2009. The first period was the year of 2002-2003, during which water quality had deteriorated and serious pollution was observed in the Wei river basin and eastern plain of the Zhangweinan River basin. The second period was the year of 2004-2006, during which water quality became better. The year of 2007-2009 is the third period, during which water quality had been improved greatly. Despite that water quality in the Zhangweinan River basin had been improved during the period of 2004-2009, the water quality in the Wei River (southwestern part of the basin), the Wei Canal River and the Zhangweixin River (eastern plain of the basin) is still poor. Principal component analysis and multi-linear regression of the absolute principal component scores showed that the main pollutants of the Zhangweinan River basin came from point source discharge such as heavy industrial wastewater, municipal sewage, chemical industries wasterwater and mine drainage in upstream. Non-point source pollution

  15. The Geological, Geomorphological Features and Kinematic Analysis of Active Faults Controlling Kemalpaşa Basin, Southwestern Part of Gediz Graben, Western Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepe, Çiǧdem; Sözbilir, Hasan

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to discuss the geological and geomorphological features of active faults controlling Kemalpaşa Basin. The study consists of basin-bounding faults expressions, kinematic and geomorphic analysis. Kemalpaşa Basin, which is approximately ENE trending and asymmetric graben is located in the southern part of Gediz Graben. Menderes Massif and Bornova Complex comprise the basement rocks of basin. Kızılca Formation, Sütçüler Formation and Alluvium uncomformably overlie the basement rocks. Kemalpaşa Basin which is one of the Quaternary basin in the Western Anatolia Extensional Province was developed at the structural border of the Spildaǧı Fault Zone in the north and the Kemalpaşa Fault in the south. Both the north and south margin-bounding faults of Kemalpaşa Basin are oblique-slip normal faults. According to the results of kinematic analysis, Kemalpaşa Basin has been formed under a NE-GW trending extensional tectonic regime. The variation in the relative degree of tectonic activity in Kemalpaşa Basin and its surroundings were interpreted a detailed geomorphic study of the fault-generated mountain fronts and drainage pattern of the both sides. To identify the impacts of active faults controlling the north and south margins of Kemalpaşa Basin on the geomorphological evolution, the geomorphic indices such as drainage basin geometries, triangular facets, axial river profiles have been determined and the degree of tectonic activity in the both sides of Kemalpaşa Basin has been numerically defined using morphometric indexes such as asymmetry factor (AF), hypsometric curve and integral (HI), valley floor width-to-height ratio (Vf) and mountain front sinuosity (Smf). In morphometric analysis, the both sides of the basin were investigated separating into two segments as the west and east. The values of HI (0,28-0,60), Vf (0,27-0,60) and Smf (1,3) calculated for the western part of the north margin compared with the values of HI (0

  16. Numerical Analysis of Film Cooling at High Blowing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Gabry, Lamyaa; Heidmann, James; Ameri, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics is used in the analysis of a film cooling jet in crossflow. Predictions of film effectiveness are compared with experimental results for a circular jet at blowing ratios ranging from 0.5 to 2.0. Film effectiveness is a surface quantity which alone is insufficient in understanding the source and finding a remedy for shortcomings of the numerical model. Therefore, in addition, comparisons are made to flow field measurements of temperature along the jet centerline. These comparisons show that the CFD model is accurately predicting the extent and trajectory of the film cooling jet; however, there is a lack of agreement in the near-wall region downstream of the film hole. The effects of main stream turbulence conditions, boundary layer thickness, turbulence modeling, and numerical artificial dissipation are evaluated and found to have an insufficient impact in the wake region of separated films (i.e. cannot account for the discrepancy between measured and predicted centerline fluid temperatures). Analyses of low and moderate blowing ratio cases are carried out and results are in good agreement with data.

  17. Theoretical and Numerical Assessment of Strain Pattern Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, R. D.; Simpson, A.

    1996-04-01

    The Strain Pattern Analysis (SPA) method was conceived at the RAE in the 1970s as a means of estimating the displacement shape of a helicopter rotor blade by using only strain gauge data, but no attempt was made to provide theoretical justification for the procedure. In this paper, the SPA method is placed on a firm mathematical basis by the use of vector space theory. It is shown that the natural normwhich underlies the SPA projection is the strain energy functionalof the structure under consideration. The natural norm is a weightedversion of the original SPA norm. Numerical experiments on simple flexure and coupled flexure-torsion systems indicate that the use of the natural norm yields structural deflection estimates of significantly greater accuracy than those obtained from the original SPA procedure and that measurement error tolerance is also enhanced. Extensive numerical results are presented for an emulation of the SPA method as applied to existing mathematical models of the main rotor of the DRA Lynx ZD559 helicopter. The efficacy of SPA is demonstrated by using a quasi-linear rotor model in the frequency domain and a fully non-linear, kinematically exact model in the time domain: the procedure based on the natural (or weighted) norm is again found to be superior to that based on the original SPA method, both in respect of displacement estimates and measurement error tolerance.

  18. Numerical model of solar dynamic radiator for parametric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L.

    1989-01-01

    Growth power requirements for Space Station Freedom will be met through addition of 25 kW solar dynamic (SD) power modules. The SD module rejects waste heat from the power conversion cycle to space through a pumped-loop, multi-panel, deployable radiator. The baseline radiator configuration was defined during the Space Station conceptual design phase and is a function of the state point and heat rejection requirements of the power conversion unit. Requirements determined by the overall station design such as mass, system redundancy, micrometeoroid and space debris impact survivability, launch packaging, costs, and thermal and structural interaction with other station components have also been design drivers for the radiator configuration. Extensive thermal and power cycle modeling capabilities have been developed which are powerful tools in Station design and analysis, but which prove cumbersome and costly for simple component preliminary design studies. In order to aid in refining the SD radiator to the mature design stage, a simple and flexible numerical model was developed. The model simulates heat transfer and fluid flow performance of the radiator and calculates area mass and impact survivability for many combinations of flow tube and panel configurations, fluid and material properties, and environmental and cycle variations. A brief description and discussion of the numerical model, it's capabilities and limitations, and results of the parametric studies performed is presented.

  19. Thermo-tectonic history of Taranaki Basin (New Zealand) using Apatite Fission Track Analysis (AFTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Kamp, P.J.J.; Hegarty, K.A.; Green, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    The Taranaki basin, which extends offshore between the north and south island of New Zealand, contains several large gas fields (e.g., Maui field) and smaller oil fields. The Taranaki basin is New Zealand's only productive hydrocarbon basin. The basin trends north-south, is asymmetrical in cross section, and is faulted with up to 7 km of displacement along parts of its eastern margin. Preliminary results from Apatite Fission Track Analysis (AFTA) reveal the timing and magnitude of basin inversion. Four well cross sections from the southern part of the basin have been used. Initially, basin tectonics and sedimentation were associated with extension and the formation of half-grabens that began in the Late Cretaceous with the breakup of Gondwana. However, most of the observed subsidence and sedimentation resulted from mid-Cenozoic rifting throughout western New Zealand. Following the formation of the modern Australia-Pacific plate boundary during the early Miocene, the southern part of the basin, which lies 60 km from the Alpine fault in places, was partially inverted. AFTA parameters (apparent age and length) downhold at the Fresne-1 well show a distinct break in slope at 1,100 m depth (currently at 30/sup 0/C) where the apparent age is 15 Ma for the Late Cretaceous Parkawau Coal Measures. The data indicate that basin inversion began about 15 Ma and was accompanied by the removal of 2-3 km of section. Sedimentation began again in the Taranaki basin during the mid-Pliocene. The source of the gas and gas condensate in the basin is probably the Eocene coal measures. The maturation history of these beds and the overlying reservoirs was modeled using the constraints from AFTA data. Discrepancies exist between estimates of maximum paleotemperature from AFTA results and from vitrinite reflectance.

  20. A GIS-based approach in drainage morphometric analysis of Kanhar River Basin, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Praveen Kumar; Mohan, Kshitij; Mishra, Sameer; Ahmad, Aariz; Mishra, Varun Narayan

    2014-11-01

    The study indicates that analysis of morphometric parameters with the help of geographic information system (GIS) would prove a viable method of characterizing the hydrological response behaviour of the watershed. It is also well observed that remote sensing satellite data is emerging as the most effective, time saving and accurate technique for morphometric analysis of a basin. This technique is found relevant for the extraction of river basin and its stream networks through ASTER (DEM) in conjunction with remote sensing satellite data (Landsat etm+, 2013 and georeferenced survey of Indian toposheet, 1972). In this study, Kanhar basin a tributaries of Son River has been selected for detailed morphometric analysis. Seven sub-watersheds are also delineated within this basin to calculate the selected morphometric parameters. Morphometric parameters viz; stream order, stream length, bifurcation ratio, drainage density, stream frequency, form factor, circulatory ratio, etc., are calculated. The drainage area of the basin is 5,654 km2 and shows sub-dendritic to dendritic drainage pattern. The stream order of the basin is mainly controlled by physiographic and lithological conditions of the area. The study area is designated as seventh-order basin with the drainage density value being as 1.72 km/km2. The increase in stream length ratio from lower to higher order shows that the study area has reached a mature geomorphic stage.

  1. Development of a stream-aquifer numerical flow model to assess river water management under water scarcity in a Mediterranean basin.

    PubMed

    Mas-Pla, Josep; Font, Eva; Astui, Oihane; Menció, Anna; Rodríguez-Florit, Agustí; Folch, Albert; Brusi, David; Pérez-Paricio, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    Stream flow, as a part of a basin hydrological cycle, will be sensible to water scarcity as a result of climate change. Stream vulnerability should then be evaluated as a key component of the basin water budget. Numerical flow modeling has been applied to an alluvial formation in a small mountain basin to evaluate the stream-aquifer relationship under these future scenarios. The Arbúcies River basin (116 km(2)) is located in the Catalan Inner Basins (NE Spain) and its lower reach, which is related to an alluvial aquifer, usually becomes dry during the summer period. This study seeks to determine the origin of such discharge losses whether from natural stream leakage and/or induced capture due to groundwater withdrawal. Our goal is also investigating how discharge variations from the basin headwaters, representing potential effects of climate change, may affect stream flow, aquifer recharge, and finally environmental preservation and human supply. A numerical flow model of the alluvial aquifer, based on MODFLOW and especially in the STREAM routine, reproduced the flow system after the usual calibration. Results indicate that, in the average, stream flow provides more than 50% of the water inputs to the alluvial aquifer, being responsible for the amount of stored water resources and for satisfying groundwater exploitation for human needs. Detailed simulations using daily time-steps permit setting threshold values for the stream flow entering at the beginning of the studied area so surface discharge is maintained along the whole watercourse and ecological flow requirements are satisfied as well. The effects of predicted rainfall and temperature variations on the Arbúcies River alluvial aquifer water balance are also discussed from the outcomes of the simulations. Finally, model results indicate the relevance of headwater discharge management under future climate scenarios to preserve downstream hydrological processes. They also point out that small mountain basins

  2. Preliminary Numerical and Experimental Analysis of the Spallation Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Alexandre; Bailey, Sean C. C.; Panerai, Francesco; Davuluri, Raghava S. C.; Vazsonyi, Alexander R.; Zhang, Huaibao; Lippay, Zachary S.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Bathel, Brett F.; Splinter, Scott C.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The spallation phenomenon was studied through numerical analysis using a coupled Lagrangian particle tracking code and a hypersonic aerothermodynamics computational fluid dynamics solver. The results show that carbon emission from spalled particles results in a significant modification of the gas composition of the post shock layer. Preliminary results from a test-campaign at the NASA Langley HYMETS facility are presented. Using an automated image processing of high-speed images, two-dimensional velocity vectors of the spalled particles were calculated. In a 30 second test at 100 W/cm2 of cold-wall heat-flux, more than 1300 particles were detected, with an average velocity of 102 m/s, and most frequent observed velocity of 60 m/s.

  3. Numerical analysis of boosting scheme for scalable NMR quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    SaiToh, Akira; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2005-02-01

    Among initialization schemes for ensemble quantum computation beginning at thermal equilibrium, the scheme proposed by Schulman and Vazirani [in Proceedings of the 31st ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing (STOC'99) (ACM Press, New York, 1999), pp. 322-329] is known for the simple quantum circuit to redistribute the biases (polarizations) of qubits and small time complexity. However, our numerical simulation shows that the number of qubits initialized by the scheme is rather smaller than expected from the von Neumann entropy because of an increase in the sum of the binary entropies of individual qubits, which indicates a growth in the total classical correlation. This result--namely, that there is such a significant growth in the total binary entropy--disagrees with that of their analysis.

  4. A Cartesian parametrization for the numerical analysis of material instability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mota, Alejandro; Chen, Qiushi; Foulk, III, James W.; Ostien, Jakob T.; Lai, Zhengshou

    2016-02-25

    We examine four parametrizations of the unit sphere in the context of material stability analysis by means of the singularity of the acoustic tensor. We then propose a Cartesian parametrization for vectors that lie a cube of side length two and use these vectors in lieu of unit normals to test for the loss of the ellipticity condition. This parametrization is then used to construct a tensor akin to the acoustic tensor. It is shown that both of these tensors become singular at the same time and in the same planes in the presence of a material instability. Furthermore, themore » performance of the Cartesian parametrization is compared against the other parametrizations, with the results of these comparisons showing that in general, the Cartesian parametrization is more robust and more numerically efficient than the others.« less

  5. Numerical Analysis for Structural Safety Evaluation of Butterfly Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Myung-Seob; Yoon, Joon-Yong; Park, Han-Yung

    2010-06-01

    Butterfly valves are widely used in current industry to control the fluid flow. They are used for both on-off and throttling applications involving large flows at relatively low operating pressure especially in large size pipelines. For the industrial application of butterfly valves, it must be ensured that the valve could be used safety under the fatigue life and the deformations produced by the pressure of the fluid. In this study, we carried out the structure analysis of the body and the valve disc of the butterfly valve and the numerical simulation was performed by using ANSYS v11.0. The reliability of valve is evaluated under the investigation of the deformation, the leak test and the durability of the valve.

  6. Stability analysis and numerical simulation of simplified solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, G.; Casalis, G.; Estivalèzes, J.-L.

    2013-08-01

    This paper investigates the Parietal Vortex Shedding (PVS) instability that significantly influences the Pressure Oscillations of the long and segmented solid rocket motors. The eigenmodes resulting from the stability analysis of a simplified configuration, namely, a cylindrical duct with sidewall injection, are presented. They are computed taking into account the presence of a wall injection defect, which is shown to induce hydrodynamic instabilities at discrete frequencies. These instabilities exhibit eigenfunctions in good agreement with the measured PVS vortical structures. They are successfully compared in terms of temporal evolution and frequencies to the unsteady hydrodynamic fluctuations computed by numerical simulations. In addition, this study has shown that the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with the PVS are the driving force of the flow dynamics, since they are responsible for the emergence of pressure waves propagating at the same frequency.

  7. Numerical Analysis of a Finite Element/Volume Penalty Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maury, Bertrand

    The penalty method makes it possible to incorporate a large class of constraints in general purpose Finite Element solvers like freeFEM++. We present here some contributions to the numerical analysis of this method. We propose an abstract framework for this approach, together with some general error estimates based on the discretization parameter ɛ and the space discretization parameter h. As this work is motivated by the possibility to handle constraints like rigid motion for fluid-particle flows, we shall pay a special attention to a model problem of this kind, where the constraint is prescribed over a subdomain. We show how the abstract estimate can be applied to this situation, in the case where a non-body-fitted mesh is used. In addition, we describe how this method provides an approximation of the Lagrange multiplier associated to the constraint.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Notched Composites Under Tension Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidi, Bilel; Case, Scott W.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental quasi-static tests were performed on center notched carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites having different stacking sequences made of G40-600/5245C prepreg. The three-dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique was used during quasi-static tests conducted on quasi-isotropic notched samples to obtain the distribution of strains as a function of applied stress. A finite element model was built within Abaqus to predict the notched strength and the strain profiles for comparison with measured results. A user-material subroutine using the multi-continuum theory (MCT) as a failure initiation criterion and an energy-based damage evolution law as implemented by Autodesk Simulation Composite Analysis (ASCA) was used to conduct a quantitative comparison of strain components predicted by the analysis and obtained in the experiments. Good agreement between experimental data and numerical analyses results are observed. Modal analysis was carried out to investigate the effect of static damage on the dominant frequencies of the notched structure using the resulted degraded material elements. The first in-plane mode was found to be a good candidate for tracking the level of damage.

  9. Structural and Kinematic Analysis of a Transpressional Basin in Central Anatolia: Çiçekdaǧ Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokay, Bülent; Lefebvre, Côme

    2015-04-01

    The Central Anatolian Crystalline Complex (CACC), which lies within Turkish Alpine orogenic belt, incorporates several basins located either within the complex or at and along its boundaries. Many of the basins developed during extension since Late Cretaceous and then evolved with advancing collision of Anatolide-Tauride with Pontides. With regard to deformation and evolution of the region, recent paleomagnetic study from the central Anatolian intrusives defines three blocks with characteristic rotation, pointing out the break-up of the CACC and the formation of two deformation zones between blocks. This study is focused on Çiçekdağ Basin (ÇB) which is located within one of the intensely deformed zones in the CACC. The structural analysis within and around ÇB in support of these models and claims is, however, limited. Thus this present study aims to provide more structural data that bears on the evolution of the Çiçekdağı Basin as well as the CACC, especially during regional contraction taking place at the end of the Eocene. Major structures of the study area fall into six groups: (i) E-W-trending synclines and a burried major reverse fault, suggesting N-S shortening; (ii) approximately NW-SE-trending plunging en-échelon folds, consistent with NE-SW compression; (iii) a NW-SE-trending (130°) left-lateral strike-slip fault; (iv) E-W-trending (260°) normal fault at southern edge of the basin and NW-SE-trending (~150°) normal fault; (v) NE-SW-trending reverse faults (~050°-055°) in the north of and middle of the basin, with hanging wall syncline geometry compatible with NW-SE to N-S compression; (vi) WNW- ESE trending reverse faults implying nearly N-S compression. At this stage, it is not clear to us if all these structures were encountered within the same strain field or they belong to a poly-phase deformation. This will be evaluated and discussed further.

  10. Hydrodynamic analysis as an aid in exploration within mature basins: Examples from Sawtooth and Sunburst Reservoirs, northwestern Williston basin

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, P.E.; Moore, S. ); Ward, G. )

    1990-05-01

    Linking hydrodynamics to detailed stratigraphic and structural analyses is a powerful tool in hydrocarbon exploration in mature basins, In southernmost Canada straddling the Alberta-Saskatchewan border, significant petroleum reserves are encountered within Mesozoic units which are largely controlled by subsurface flow cells. The Jurassic Sawtooth Formation is characterized by an eastward shift from lower shoreface quartzarenites to basinal coquinas. The Sawtooth is a blanket deposit and crops out along the flanks of several Tertiary uplifts in northern Montana. In the subsurface the Sawtooth is draped over several relatively young structures. Potentiometric mapping illustrates a northerly flow orientation within the Sawtooth, and oil pools under artesian conditions are located where flow paths cross steeply flanked structures. The Lower Cretaceous Sunburst Formation is a series of valley-fill sandstones with mainly southwesterly paleoflow orientations. Hydrocarbon pools (e.g., Manyberries field) are located within a regional potentiometric low formed by three converging cells which recharge in the south, northwest, and east. This potentiometric low is characterized by systematic changes in oil and water compositions, with progressively lighter oils and NaCl-rich waters found toward the low's center. Stratigraphic variability controls pooling within the low, with hydrocarbons located on the updip flanks of valley fills which border nonreservoir rocks. In the northwestern Williston basin regional hydrodynamic analysis, combined with standard subsurface approaches, allows operators to discern large new hydrocarbon-bearing trends within and between densely drilled areas characterized by complex structure and stratigraphy.

  11. Effects of temperature on flood forecasting: analysis of an operative case study in Alpine basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceppi, A.; Ravazzani, G.; Salandin, A.; Rabuffetti, D.; Montani, A.; Borgonovo, E.; Mancini, M.

    2013-04-01

    In recent years the interest in the forecast and prevention of natural hazards related to hydro-meteorological events has increased the challenge for numerical weather modelling, in particular for limited area models, to improve the quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF) for hydrological purposes. After the encouraging results obtained in the MAP D-PHASE Project, we decided to devote further analyses to show recent improvements in the operational use of hydro-meteorological chains, and above all to better investigate the key role played by temperature during snowy precipitation. In this study we present a reanalysis simulation of one meteorological event, which occurred in November 2008 in the Piedmont Region. The attention is focused on the key role of air temperature, which is a crucial feature in determining the partitioning of precipitation in solid and liquid phase, influencing the quantitative discharge forecast (QDF) into the Alpine region. This is linked to the basin ipsographic curve and therefore by the total contributing area related to the snow line of the event. In order to assess hydrological predictions affected by meteorological forcing, a sensitivity analysis of the model output was carried out to evaluate different simulation scenarios, considering the forecast effects which can radically modify the discharge forecast. Results show how in real-time systems hydrological forecasters have to consider also the temperature uncertainty in forecasts in order to better understand the snow dynamics and its effect on runoff during a meteorological warning with a crucial snow line over the basin. The hydrological ensemble forecasts are based on the 16 members of the meteorological ensemble system COSMO-LEPS (developed by ARPA-SIMC) based on the non-hydrostatic model COSMO, while the hydrological model used to generate the runoff simulations is the rainfall-runoff distributed FEST-WB model, developed at Politecnico di Milano.

  12. Numerical simulations of complex temperature, burial, and erosion histories for sedimentary basins and their calibration: Examples from western Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Buker, C.; Littke, R.; Welte, D.H.

    1995-08-01

    The detailed and reliable reconstruction of the geological and thermal evolution of sedimentary basins forms the indispensable basis of any simulation of generation, migration and accumulation of hydrocarbons. For this purpose - although often not taken into account - analysing and quantifying the uplift and erosion history is as important as the subsidence and temperature history. The reconstruction of the timing of hydrocarbon generation, petroleum expulsion and migration and the changing reservoir characteristics is only possible based on such an integrated approach. Applying this technique on the Carboniferous Ruhr Basin and the Lower Saxony Basin (western Germany) by utilising 1-D and 2-D forward modeling approaches resulted in important and new quantitative information on their temperature, subsidence and erosion histories which are of fundamental geological interest. The basin evolution models were calibrated using vitrinite reflectance data, fluid inclusion temperatures, and apatite and zircon fission track data. The detailed knowledge of the geological and thermal basin evolution then allowed in combination with a new kinetic model for gas generation from coals the modeling of generation, migration and accumulation of methane from Carboniferous coal seams.

  13. A hybrid neurocomputing/numerical strategy for nonlinear structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Z. Peter; Noor, Ahmed K.

    1995-01-01

    A hybrid neurocomputing/numerical strategy is presented for geometrically nonlinear analysis of structures. The strategy combines model-free data processing capabilities of computational neural networks with a Pade approximants-based perturbation technique to predict partial information about the nonlinear response of structures. In the hybrid strategy, multilayer feedforward neural networks are used to extend the validity of solutions by using training samples produced by Pade approximations to the Taylor series expansion of the response function. The range of validity of the training samples is taken to be the radius of convergence of Pade approximants and is estimated by setting a tolerance on the diverging approximants. The norm of residual vector of unbalanced forces in a given element is used as a measure to assess the quality of network predictions. To further increase the accuracy and the range of network predictions, additional training data are generated by either applying linear regression to weight matrices or expanding the training data by using predicted coefficients in a Taylor series. The effectiveness of the hybrid strategy is assessed by performing large-deflection analysis of a doubly-curved composite panel with a circular cutout, and postbuckling analyses of stiffened composite panels subjected to an in-plane edge shear load. In all the problems considered, the hybrid strategy is used to predict selective information about the structural response, namely the total strain energy and the maximum displacement components only.

  14. A stable and efficient numerical algorithm for unconfined aquifer analysis.

    PubMed

    Keating, Elizabeth; Zyvoloski, George

    2009-01-01

    The nonlinearity of equations governing flow in unconfined aquifers poses challenges for numerical models, particularly in field-scale applications. Existing methods are often unstable, do not converge, or require extremely fine grids and small time steps. Standard modeling procedures such as automated model calibration and Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis typically require thousands of model runs. Stable and efficient model performance is essential to these analyses. We propose a new method that offers improvements in stability and efficiency and is relatively tolerant of coarse grids. It applies a strategy similar to that in the MODFLOW code to the solution of Richard's equation with a grid-dependent pressure/saturation relationship. The method imposes a contrast between horizontal and vertical permeability in gridblocks containing the water table, does not require "dry" cells to convert to inactive cells, and allows recharge to flow through relatively dry cells to the water table. We establish the accuracy of the method by comparison to an analytical solution for radial flow to a well in an unconfined aquifer with delayed yield. Using a suite of test problems, we demonstrate the efficiencies gained in speed and accuracy over two-phase simulations, and improved stability when compared to MODFLOW. The advantages for applications to transient unconfined aquifer analysis are clearly demonstrated by our examples. We also demonstrate applicability to mixed vadose zone/saturated zone applications, including transport, and find that the method shows great promise for these types of problem as well. PMID:19341374

  15. A stable and efficient numerical algorithm for unconfined aquifer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Elizabeth; Zyvoloski, George

    2008-01-01

    The non-linearity of equations governing flow in unconfined aquifers poses challenges for numerical models, particularly in field-scale applications. Existing methods are often unstable, do not converge, or require extremely fine grids and small time steps. Standard modeling procedures such as automated model calibration and Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis typically require thousands of forward model runs. Stable and efficient model performance is essential to these analyses. We propose a new method that offers improvements in stability and efficiency, and is relatively tolerant of coarse grids. It applies a strategy similar to that in the MODFLOW code to solution of Richard's Equation with a grid-dependent pressure/saturation relationship. The method imposes a contrast between horizontal and vertical permeability in gridblocks containing the water table. We establish the accuracy of the method by comparison to an analytical solution for radial flow to a well in an unconfined aquifer with delayed yield. Using a suite of test problems, we demonstrate the efficiencies gained in speed and accuracy over two-phase simulations, and improved stability when compared to MODFLOW. The advantages for applications to transient unconfined aquifer analysis are clearly demonstrated by our examples. We also demonstrate applicability to mixed vadose zone/saturated zone applications, including transport, and find that the method shows great promise for these types of problem, as well.

  16. Numerical analysis of sandstone composition, provenance, and paleogeography

    SciTech Connect

    Smosma, R.; Bruner, K.R.; Burns, A.

    1999-09-01

    Cretaceous deltaic sandstones of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska exhibit an extreme variability in their mineral makeup. A series of numerical techniques, however, provides some order to the petrographic characteristics of these complex rocks. Ten mineral constituents occur in the sandstones, including quartz, chert, feldspar, mica, and organic matter, plus rock fragments of volcanics, carbonates, shale, phyllite, and schist. A mixing coefficient quantities the degree of heterogeneity in each sample. Hierarchical cluster analysis then groups sandstones on the basis of similarities among all ten mineral components--in the Alaskan example, six groupings characterized mainly by the different rock fragments. Multidimensional scaling shows how the clusters relate to one another and arranges them along compositional gradients--two trends in Alaska based on varying proportions of metamorphic/volcanic and shale/carbonate rock fragments. The resulting sandstone clusters and petrographic gradients can be mapped across the study area and compared with the stratigraphic section. This study confirms the presence of three different source areas that provided diverse sediment to the Cretaceous deltas as well as the general transport directions and distances. In addition, the sand composition is shown to have changed over time, probably related to erosional unroofing in the source areas. This combination of multivariate-analysis techniques proves to be a powerful tool, revealing subtle spatial and temporal relationships among the sandstones and allowing one to enhance provenance and paleogeographic conclusions made from compositional data.

  17. Analysis of sonic well logs applied to erosion estimates in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.; Kharitonova, N.A.

    1996-05-01

    An improved exponential model of sonic transit time data as a function of depth takes into account the physical range of rock sonic velocities. In this way, the model is more geologically realistic for predicting compaction trends when compared to linear or simple exponential functions that fail at large depth intervals. The improved model is applied to the Bighorn basin of northwestern Wyoming for calculation of erosion amounts. This basin was chosen because of extensive geomorphic research that constrains erosion models and because of the importance of quantifying erosion amounts for basin analysis and hydrocarbon maturation prediction. Thirty-six wells were analyzed using the improved exponential model. Seven of these wells, due to limited data from the Tertiary section, were excluded from the basin erosion analysis. Erosion amounts from the remaining 29 wells ranged from 0 to 5600 ft (1700 m), with an average of 2500 ft (800 m).

  18. Numerical Methods in Quantum Mechanics: Analysis of Numerical Schemes on One-Dimensional Schrodinger Wave Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Marvin Quenten, Jr.

    The motion and behavior of quantum processes can be described by the Schrodinger equation using the wave function, Psi(x,t). The use of the Schrodinger equation to study quantum phenomena is known as Quantum Mechanics, akin to classical mechanics being the tool to study classical physics. This research focuses on the emphasis of numerical techniques: Finite-Difference, Fast Fourier Transform (spectral method), finite difference schemes such as the Leapfrog method and the Crank-Nicolson scheme and second quantization to solve and analyze the Schrodinger equation for the infinite square well problem, the free particle with periodic boundary conditions, the barrier problem, tight-binding hamiltonians and a potential wall problem. We discuss these techniques and the problems created to test how these different techniques draw both physical and numerical conclusions in a tabular summary. We observed both numerical stability and quantum stability (conservation of energy, probability, momentum, etc.). We found in our results that the Crank-Nicolson scheme is an unconditionally stable scheme and conserves probability (unitary), and momentum, though dissipative with energy. The time-independent problems conserved energy, momentum and were unitary, which is of interest, but we found when time-dependence was introduced, quantum stability (i.e. conservation of mass, momentum, etc.) was not implied by numerical stability. Hence, we observed schemes that were numerically stable, but not quantum stable as well as schemes that were quantum stable, but not numerically stable for all of time, t. We also observed that second quantization removed the issues with stability as the problem was transformed into a discrete problem. Moreover, all quantum information is conserved in second quantization. This method, however, does not work universally for all problems.

  19. A LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY ANALYSIS OF THE GREAT LAKES BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Natural Resources Canada: Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) are conducting a cooperative research landscape ecological study of the Great Lakes Basin. The analyses will include the areas located along the border of the Unit...

  20. A REGIONAL ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE GREAT LAKES BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Natural Resources Canada: Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) are conducting a cooperative research landscape ecological study of the Great Lakes Basin. The analyses will include the areas located along the border of the Unit...

  1. ALEXI analysis of water consumption in the Nile Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing can be used to generate diagnostic estimates of evapotranspiration (ET) that provide information regarding consumptive water use across landscapes. These satellite-based assessments can be a valuable complement to prognostic simulations of basin-scale water budgets, providing an inde...

  2. Sea-floor undulations formation by turbidity flow in the Adra prodeltaic system, western Mediterranean Basin: comparison between numerical simulation and real data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Salas, Luis Miguel; Barcenas, Patricia; Macias, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulation of turbidity currents are used to study the formation of the seafloor undulations in the Adra prodeltaic system, western Mediterranean basin. A series of elongated and subparallel bathymetric undulations are distinguished in the foreset-bottomsets domain of the Holocene pro-deltaic wedge associated with the Adra river. In this study, multibeam data and surficial sediment samples have been used in comparison with numerical simulation to propose an evolutionary model of the seafloor undulations. Numerical model suggests that the depositional basin slope gradient is one of the factors more influent in the seafloor undulations formation. The simulations allowed to observe as seafloor undulations are approximately in phase with the undulations of the turbidity layer. Therefore, undulations are associated with Froude-supercritical flow. The upslope and downslope undulations boundaries are limited by a hydraulic jump where the flow makes a conversion from supercriticial flow (Fr>1) to subcritical flow (Fr<1), respectively. The undulations axis are characterized by a point where Fr=1. The subcritical zone generates net sediment deposition and the supercritical zone produces erosion. This explains why seafloor undulations migrate upslope. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research has been partially supported by the Junta de Andalucía research project TESELA (P11-RNM7069)

  3. SAMSAN- MODERN NUMERICAL METHODS FOR CLASSICAL SAMPLED SYSTEM ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    SAMSAN was developed to aid the control system analyst by providing a self consistent set of computer algorithms that support large order control system design and evaluation studies, with an emphasis placed on sampled system analysis. Control system analysts have access to a vast array of published algorithms to solve an equally large spectrum of controls related computational problems. The analyst usually spends considerable time and effort bringing these published algorithms to an integrated operational status and often finds them less general than desired. SAMSAN reduces the burden on the analyst by providing a set of algorithms that have been well tested and documented, and that can be readily integrated for solving control system problems. Algorithm selection for SAMSAN has been biased toward numerical accuracy for large order systems with computational speed and portability being considered important but not paramount. In addition to containing relevant subroutines from EISPAK for eigen-analysis and from LINPAK for the solution of linear systems and related problems, SAMSAN contains the following not so generally available capabilities: 1) Reduction of a real non-symmetric matrix to block diagonal form via a real similarity transformation matrix which is well conditioned with respect to inversion, 2) Solution of the generalized eigenvalue problem with balancing and grading, 3) Computation of all zeros of the determinant of a matrix of polynomials, 4) Matrix exponentiation and the evaluation of integrals involving the matrix exponential, with option to first block diagonalize, 5) Root locus and frequency response for single variable transfer functions in the S, Z, and W domains, 6) Several methods of computing zeros for linear systems, and 7) The ability to generate documentation "on demand". All matrix operations in the SAMSAN algorithms assume non-symmetric matrices with real double precision elements. There is no fixed size limit on any matrix in any

  4. Hydrogeology and steady-state numerical simulation of groundwater flow in the Lost Creek Designated Ground Water Basin, Weld, Adams, and Arapahoe Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, L.R.

    2010-01-01

    The Lost Creek Designated Ground Water Basin (Lost Creek basin) is an important alluvial aquifer for irrigation, public supply, and domestic water uses in northeastern Colorado. Beginning in 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Lost Creek Ground Water Management District and the Colorado Water Conservation Board, collected hydrologic data and constructed a steady-state numerical groundwater flow model of the Lost Creek basin. The model builds upon the work of previous investigators to provide an updated tool for simulating the potential effects of various hydrologic stresses on groundwater flow and evaluating possible aquifer-management strategies. As part of model development, the thickness and extent of regolith sediments in the basin were mapped, and data were collected concerning aquifer recharge beneath native grassland, nonirrigated agricultural fields, irrigated agricultural fields, and ephemeral stream channels. The thickness and extent of regolith in the Lost Creek basin indicate the presence of a 2- to 7-mile-wide buried paleovalley that extends along the Lost Creek basin from south to north, where it joins the alluvial valley of the South Platte River valley. Regolith that fills the paleovalley is as much as about 190 ft thick. Average annual recharge from infiltration of precipitation on native grassland and nonirrigated agricultural fields was estimated by using the chloride mass-balance method to range from 0.1 to 0.6 inch, which represents about 1-4 percent of long-term average precipitation. Average annual recharge from infiltration of ephemeral streamflow was estimated by using apparent downward velocities of chloride peaks to range from 5.7 to 8.2 inches. Average annual recharge beneath irrigated agricultural fields was estimated by using passive-wick lysimeters and a water-balance approach to range from 0 to 11.3 inches, depending on irrigation method, soil type, crop type, and the net quantity of irrigation water applied

  5. The Upper Cretaceous Gosau Basins Of The Apuseni Mts./Romania; Basin Analysis, Provenance Analysis And Thermal History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, V.; Frisch, W.

    2003-12-01

    The remnants of the Upper Cretaceous Gosau basins of the Apuseni Mts. record a similar sedimentary succession as the Gosau basins of the Eastern Alps: the Lower Gosau subgroup, represented by shallow marine sediments, and the Upper Gosau subgroup (turbiditic flysch and pelagic sediments). The controlling tectonic process of the Austroalpine Gosau basins is proposed to be subduction tectonic erosion, which led to the strong subsidence within these basins. Investigations on heavy minerals and the maturation of organic matter can help to understand the sudden subsidence which took place in Campanian/Maastrichtian time. The Lower Gosau subgroup reflects a predominantly metamorphic clastic source. In the Upper Gosau subgroup the metamorphic influence becomes less important. In some samples Chrome Spinel and Glaucophane has been identified. Both minerals in one assemblage show that a former accretional wedge with high-pressure rocks and obducted oceanic crust was eroded. The vitrinite reflectance data show a range of 0,8 to 1,8 % Rr within the Upper Cretaceous sequence. Increased coalification was measured close to large Banatitic and Neogene intrusions (up to 5.0 % Rr). For basin modeling, an erosion of 1600 m of Late Cretaceous sediments has been computed. Together with the measured and interpreted field data, the entire Gosau succession had a max. thickness of 2800 m. This thickness values are also reported from the Eastern Alps. Fission track dating was used to determine the age of the dedritic Zirkons. With this age-population-method a dynamic evolution of the hinterland concerning its exhumation and erosion can be modeled. Combined with models based on Apatit fission track length, a rapid uplift of the crystalline basement can be shown. All these results prove the similarity to the Gosau Basins of the Eastern Alps and the assumption that a direct connection to the Basins in the Apuseni Mts. existed during the Upper Cretaceous time. The main mechanism for the

  6. Summary of research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The major categories of current ICASE research programs addressed include: numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; control and parameter identification problems, with emphasis on effective numerical methods; computational problems in engineering and physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers.

  7. Estimation of nutrient contributions from the ocean across a river basin using stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, K.; Maruya, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Komata, M.; Komai, K.; Kuwae, T.

    2015-11-01

    Total nitrogen (TN), which consists of total particulate nitrogen (TPN) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), is transported with not only in river channels but also across the entire river basin, including via ground water and migratory animals. In general, TPN export from an entire river basin to the ocean is larger than TDN in a mountainous region. Since marine derived nutrients (MDN) are hypothesized to be mainly transported as suspended matters from the ground surface, it is necessary to investigate the contribution of MDN to the forest floor (soils) in order to quantify the true role of MDN at the river ecosystem scale. This study investigated TN export from an entire river basin, and also we estimated the contribution of pink (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) and chum salmon (O. keta) to total oceanic nitrogen input across a river basin. The maximum potential contribution of TN entering the river basin by salmon was found to be 23.8 % relative to the total amount of TN exported from the river basin. The contribution of particulate nitrogen based on suspended sediment from the ocean to the river basin soils was 22.9 % with SD of 3.6 % by using stable isotope analysis (SIA) of nitrogen (δ15N).

  8. Generation of cyclonic eddies in the Eastern Gotland Basin of the Baltic Sea following dense water inflows: numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhurbas, V. M.; Oh, I. S.; Paka, V. T.

    2003-01-01

    A sigma ( σ)-coordinate ocean model by Blumberg and Mellor (POM) is applied to study the formation processes of mesoscale cyclones observed in the Eastern Gotland Basin following the dense water inflows. The initial conditions simulate a situation when the Arkona and Bornholm basins and partially the Slupsk Furrow are already filled with the inflow water of the North Sea origin, while the Eastern Gotland and Gdansk basins still contain the old water of pre-inflow stratification. Model runs with constant and time-dependent winds, changing the buoyancy forcing, grid geometry and bottom topography display the following. Entering the Eastern Gotland Basin from the Slupsk Furrow, the bottom intrusion of saline inflow water splits in two: one goes northeast towards the Gotland Deep, and second moves southeast towards the Gulf of Gdansk. An intensive mesoscale cyclonic eddy carrying the inflow water is generated just east of the Slupsk Furrow with the inflow pulse. A number of smaller cyclones with boluses of the inflow water are formed in the permanent halocline along the saline intrusion pathway to the Gotland Deep. Following Spall and Price [J. Phys. Oceanogr. 28 (1998) 1598], the cyclones are suggested to form by the adjustment of the high potential vorticity inflow water column to a low potential vorticity environment.

  9. a Numerical Method for Stability Analysis of Pinned Flexible Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, D. G.; Lee, S. W.

    1996-05-01

    A technique is presented to investigate the stability of mechanisms with pin-jointed flexible members. The method relies on a special floating frame from which elastic link co-ordinates are defined. Energies are easily developed for use in a Lagrange equation formulation, leading to a set of non-linear and mixed ordinary differential-algebraic equations of motion with constraints. Stability and bifurcation analysis is handled using a numerical procedure (generalized co-ordinate partitioning) that avoids the tedious and difficult task of analytically reducing the system of equations to a number equalling the system degrees of freedom. The proposed method was then applied to (1) a slider-crank mechanism with a flexible connecting rod and crank of constant rotational speed, and (2) a four-bar linkage with a flexible coupler with a constant speed crank. In both cases, a single pinned-pinned beam bending mode is employed to develop resonance curves and stability boundaries in the crank length-crank speed parameter plane. Flip and fold bifurcations are common occurrences in both mechanisms. The accuracy of the proposed method was also verified by comparison with previous experimental results [1].

  10. Numerical Analysis of Heat Transfer During Quenching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madireddi, Sowjanya; Krishnan, Krishnan Nambudiripad; Reddy, Ammana Satyanarayana

    2016-06-01

    A numerical model is developed to simulate the immersion quenching process of metals. The time of quench plays an important role if the process involves a defined step quenching schedule to obtain the desired characteristics. Lumped heat capacity analysis used for this purpose requires the value of heat transfer coefficient, whose evaluation requires large experimental data. Experimentation on a sample work piece may not represent the actual component which may vary in dimension. A Fluid-Structure interaction technique with a coupled interface between the solid (metal) and liquid (quenchant) is used for the simulations. Initial times of quenching shows boiling heat transfer phenomenon with high values of heat transfer coefficients (5000-2.5 × 105 W/m2K). Shape of the work piece with equal dimension shows less influence on the cooling rate Non-uniformity in hardness at the sharp corners can be reduced by rounding off the edges. For a square piece of 20 mm thickness, with 3 mm fillet radius, this difference is reduced by 73 %. The model can be used for any metal-quenchant combination to obtain time-temperature data without the necessity of experimentation.

  11. 1-D Numerical Analysis of RBCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1998-01-01

    An RBCC engine combines air breathing and rocket engines into a single engine to increase the specific impulse over an entire flight trajectory. Considerable research pertaining to RBCC propulsion was performed during the 1960's and these engines were revisited recently as a candidate propulsion system for either a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) or two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) launch vehicle. There are a variety of RBCC configurations that had been evaluated and new designs are currently under development. However, the basic configuration of all RBCC systems is built around the ejector scramjet engine originally developed for the hypersonic airplane. In this configuration, a rocket engine plays as an ejector in the air-augmented initial acceleration mode, as a fuel injector in scramjet mode and the rocket in all rocket mode for orbital insertion. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a useful tool for the analysis of complex transport processes in various components in RBCC propulsion systems. The objective of the present research was to develop a transient 1-D numerical model that could be used to predict flow behavior throughout a generic RBCC engine following a flight path.

  12. Numeric calculation of celestial bodies with spreadsheet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The motion of the planets and moons in our solar system can easily be calculated for any time by the Kepler laws of planetary motion. The Kepler laws are a special case of the gravitational law of Newton, especially if you consider more than two celestial bodies. Therefore it is more basic to calculate the motion by using the gravitational law. But the problem is, that by gravitational law it is not possible to calculate the state of motion with only one step of calculation. The motion has to be numerical calculated for many time intervalls. For this reason, spreadsheet analysis is helpful for students. Skills in programmes like Excel, Calc or Gnumeric are important in professional life and can easily be learnt by students. These programmes can help to calculate the complex motions with many intervalls. The more intervalls are used, the more exact are the calculated orbits. The sutdents will first get a quick course in Excel. After that they calculate with instructions the 2-D-coordinates of the orbits of Moon and Mars. Step by step the students are coding the formulae for calculating physical parameters like coordinates, force, acceleration and velocity. The project is limited to 4 weeks or 8 lessons. So the calcualtion will only include the calculation of one body around the central mass like Earth or Sun. The three-body problem can only be shortly discussed at the end of the project.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Orbital Perturbation Effects on Inclined Geosynchronous SAR.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xichao; Hu, Cheng; Long, Teng; Li, Yuanhao

    2016-01-01

    The geosynchronous synthetic aperture radar (GEO SAR) is susceptible to orbit perturbations, leading to orbit drifts and variations. The influences behave very differently from those in low Earth orbit (LEO) SAR. In this paper, the impacts of perturbations on GEO SAR orbital elements are modelled based on the perturbed dynamic equations, and then, the focusing is analyzed theoretically and numerically by using the Systems Tool Kit (STK) software. The accurate GEO SAR slant range histories can be calculated according to the perturbed orbit positions in STK. The perturbed slant range errors are mainly the first and second derivatives, leading to image drifts and defocusing. Simulations of the point target imaging are performed to validate the aforementioned analysis. In the GEO SAR with an inclination of 53° and an argument of perigee of 90°, the Doppler parameters and the integration time are different and dependent on the geometry configurations. Thus, the influences are varying at different orbit positions: at the equator, the first-order phase errors should be mainly considered; at the perigee and apogee, the second-order phase errors should be mainly considered; at other positions, first-order and second-order exist simultaneously. PMID:27598168

  14. Numerical Simulation and Scaling Analysis of Cell Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Rui; He, Ping

    2011-11-01

    Cell printing, i.e., printing three dimensional (3D) structures of cells held in a tissue matrix, is gaining significant attention in the biomedical community. The key idea is to use inkjet printer or similar devices to print cells into 3D patterns with a resolution comparable to the size of mammalian cells. Achieving such a resolution in vitro can lead to breakthroughs in areas such as organ transplantation. Although the feasibility of cell printing has been demonstrated recently, the printing resolution and cell viability remain to be improved. Here we investigate a unit operation in cell printing, namely, the impact of a cell-laden droplet into a pool of highly viscous liquids. The droplet and cell dynamics are quantified using both direct numerical simulation and scaling analysis. These studies indicate that although cell experienced significant stress during droplet impact, the duration of such stress is very short, which helps explain why many cells can survive the cell printing process. These studies also revealed that cell membrane can be temporarily ruptured during cell printing, which is supported by indirect experimental evidence.

  15. Analysis of Numerical Simulation Results of LIPS-200 Lifetime Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juanjuan; Zhang, Tianping; Geng, Hai; Jia, Yanhui; Meng, Wei; Wu, Xianming; Sun, Anbang

    2016-06-01

    Accelerator grid structural and electron backstreaming failures are the most important factors affecting the ion thruster's lifetime. During the thruster's operation, Charge Exchange Xenon (CEX) ions are generated from collisions between plasma and neutral atoms. Those CEX ions grid's barrel and wall frequently, which cause the failures of the grid system. In order to validate whether the 20 cm Lanzhou Ion Propulsion System (LIPS-200) satisfies China's communication satellite platform's application requirement for North-South Station Keeping (NSSK), this study analyzed the measured depth of the pit/groove on the accelerator grid's wall and aperture diameter's variation and estimated the operating lifetime of the ion thruster. Different from the previous method, in this paper, the experimental results after the 5500 h of accumulated operation of the LIPS-200 ion thruster are presented firstly. Then, based on these results, theoretical analysis and numerical calculations were firstly performed to predict the on-orbit lifetime of LIPS-200. The results obtained were more accurate to calculate the reliability and analyze the failure modes of the ion thruster. The results indicated that the predicted lifetime of LIPS-200's was about 13218.1 h which could satisfy the required lifetime requirement of 11000 h very well.

  16. Planning report for the southwest alluvial basins (east) regional aquifer-system analysis, parts of Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkins, D.W.; Scott, W.B.; Kaehler, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    The study of the Southwest alluvial basins (east) will involve an analysis of the regional aquifer system in parts of Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas. This area has been divided into 22 basins. The study of the alluvial aquifer-system will be made in the following stages: (1) project planning, (2) literature searches, (3) compiling existing data, (4) data collection, (5) basin modeling, (6) regional aquifer modeling, and (7) reports. The regional aquifer study will be accomplished through studying each of the 22 basins. Data compilation and limited data collection will be part of each basin study. Digital computer models will be made for those basins where data are sufficient. A regional aquifer model will be developed from the basin models. In addition to this report, there will be basin hydrology reports and the final regional report. Included in the final report will be a description of the regional hydrology and geology. (USGS)

  17. Numerical analysis of flow through oscillating cascade sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    1989-01-01

    The design of turbomachinery blades requires the prevention of flutter for all operating conditions. However, flow field predictions used for aeroelastic analysis are not well understood for all flow regimes. The present research focuses on numerical solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations using an ADI procedure to model two-dimensional, transonic flow through oscillating cascades. The model prescribes harmonic pitching motions for the blade sections for both zero and non-zero inter-blade phase angles. The code introduces the use of a deforming grid technique for convenient specification of the periodic boundary conditions. Approximate nonreflecting boundary conditions have been coded for the inlet and exit boundary conditions. Sample unsteady solutions have been performed for an oscillating cascade and compared to experimental data. Also, test cases were fun for a flat plate cascade to compare with an unsteady, small-perturbation, subsonic analysis. The predictions for oscillating cascades with non-zero inter-blade phase angles are in good agreement with experimental data and small-perturbation theory. The zero degree inter-blade phase angle cases, which were near a resonant condition, differ from the experiment and theory. Studies on reflecting versus non-reflecting inlet and exit boundary conditions show that the treatment of the boundary can have a significant effect on the first harmonic, unsteady pressure distributions for certain flow conditions. This code is expected to be used as a tool for reviewing simpler models that do not include the full nonlinear aerodynamics or as a final check for designs against flutter in turbomachinery.

  18. Numerical analysis of seismoelectromagnetic field conversion at confined geological units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, B.; Kemna, A.

    2010-12-01

    It is well known that at material boundaries in fluid-saturated porous media, an incoming seismic wave can give rise to electric and magnetic fields due to electrokinetic coupling effects. Given its sensitivity to rock parameters governing fluid flow, this so-called seismoelectromagnetic (or seismoelectric, if only the electric field is considered) interface response is of strong interest with a view to hydro geophysical and petroleum exploration applications. However, the understanding of the correspondence of the converting interface geometry on the one hand and electric and magnetic field characteristics on the other hand is still poor. By means of two-dimensional finite-element modeling in the time domain, we here investigate the character of the seismoelectromagnetic interface response for the special case of spatially confined geological units, which may be representative for clay lenses embedded in an aquifer or petroleum deposits in a host rock. In the numerical analysis we consider the interface response generated by both compressional and shear wave. The modeling results, which are analyzed in terms of snapshots, time slices, and electro and magneto grams, reveal a significant influence of the confined geological units on the generation and character of the seismoelectro-magnetic interface response. The different conversion patterns can be attributed to the induced streaming currents at the interfaces caused by the oscillation of the seismic body waves. Pattern analysis of the interface responses is done with a view to an improved qualitative understanding of their spatio-temporal occurrence and evolution relative to the geometry of the converting interfaces. Our time-lapse simulations illustrate that the seismoelectromagnetic interface response captures characteristics of the geometry of the converting geological unit, indicating the potential of the seismoelectromagnetic method in particular for exploration of confined targets.

  19. Analysis of the Tanana River Basin using LANDSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, L. A.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Carson-Henry, C.

    1981-01-01

    Digital image classification techniques were used to classify land cover/resource information in the Tanana River Basin of Alaska. Portions of four scenes of LANDSAT digital data were analyzed using computer systems at Ames Research Center in an unsupervised approach to derive cluster statistics. The spectral classes were identified using the IDIMS display and color infrared photography. Classification errors were corrected using stratification procedures. The classification scheme resulted in the following eleven categories; sedimented/shallow water, clear/deep water, coniferous forest, mixed forest, deciduous forest, shrub and grass, bog, alpine tundra, barrens, snow and ice, and cultural features. Color coded maps and acreage summaries of the major land cover categories were generated for selected USGS quadrangles (1:250,000) which lie within the drainage basin. The project was completed within six months.

  20. Isogeometric analysis: a powerful numerical tool for the elastic analysis of historical masonry arches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzani, Antonio; Malagù, Marcello; Turco, Emilio

    2016-03-01

    We illustrate a numerical tool for analyzing plane arches such as those frequently used in historical masonry heritage. It is based on a refined elastic mechanical model derived from the isogeometric approach. In particular, geometry and displacements are modeled by means of non-uniform rational B-splines. After a brief introduction, outlining the basic assumptions of this approach and the corresponding modeling choices, several numerical applications to arches, which are typical of masonry structures, show the performance of this novel technique. These are discussed in detail to emphasize the advantage and potential developments of isogeometric analysis in the field of structural analysis of historical masonry buildings with complex geometries.

  1. Great Basin NV Play Fairway Analysis - Carson Sink

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Faulds

    2015-10-28

    All datasets and products specific to the Carson Sink basin. Includes a packed ArcMap (.mpk), individually zipped shapefiles, and a file geodatabase for the Carson Sink area; a GeoSoft Oasis montaj project containing GM-SYS 2D gravity profiles along the trace of our seismic reflection lines; a 3D model in EarthVision; spreadsheet of links to published maps; and spreadsheets of well data.

  2. Identifying the origin of differences between 3D numerical simulations of ground motion in sedimentary basins: lessons from stringent canonical test models in the E2VP framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaljub, Emmanuel; Maufroy, Emeline; Moczo, Peter; Kristek, Jozef; Priolo, Enrico; Klin, Peter; De Martin, Florent; Zhang, Zenghuo; Hollender, Fabrice; Bard, Pierre-Yves

    2013-04-01

    Numerical simulation is playing a role of increasing importance in the field of seismic hazard by providing quantitative estimates of earthquake ground motion, its variability, and its sensitivity to geometrical and mechanical properties of the medium. Continuous efforts to develop accurate and computationally efficient numerical methods, combined with increasing computational power have made it technically feasible to calculate seismograms in 3D realistic configurations and for frequencies of interest in seismic design applications. Now, in order to foster the use of numerical simulations in practical prediction of earthquake ground motion, it is important to evaluate the accuracy of current numerical methods when applied to realistic 3D sites. This process of verification is a necessary prerequisite to confrontation of numerical predictions and observations. Through the ongoing Euroseistest Verification and Validation Project (E2VP), which focuses on the Mygdonian basin (northern Greece), we investigated the capability of numerical methods to predict earthquake ground motion for frequencies up to 4 Hz. Numerical predictions obtained by several teams using a wide variety of methods were compared using quantitative goodness-of-fit criteria. In order to better understand the cause of misfits between different simulations, initially performed for the realistic geometry of the Mygdonian basin, we defined five stringent canonical configurations. The canonical models allow for identifying sources of misfits and quantify their importance. Detailed quantitative comparison of simulations in relation to dominant features of the models shows that even relatively simple heterogeneous models must be treated with maximum care in order to achieve sufficient level of accuracy. One important conclusion is that the numerical representation of models with strong variations (e.g. discontinuities) may considerably vary from one method to the other, and may become a dominant source of

  3. Geohydrology, geochemistry, and groundwater simulation (1992-2011) and analysis of potential water-supply management options, 2010-60, of the Langford Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voronin, Lois M.; Densmore, Jill N.; Martin, Peter; Brush, Charles F.; Carlson, Carl S.; Miller, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater withdrawals began in 1992 from the Langford Basin within the Fort Irwin National Training Center (NTC), California. From April 1992 to December 2010, approximately 12,300 acre-feet of water (averaging about 650 acre-feet per year) has been withdrawn from the basin and transported to the adjacent Irwin Basin. Since withdrawals began, water levels in the basin have declined by as much as 40 feet, and the quality of the groundwater withdrawn from the basin has deteriorated. The U.S. Geological Survey collected geohydrologic data from Langford Basin during 1992–2011 to determine the quantity and quality of groundwater available in the basin. Geophysical surveys, including gravity, seismic refraction, and time-domain electromagnetic induction surveys, were conducted to determine the depth and shape of the basin, to delineate depths to the Quaternary-Tertiary interface, and to map the depth to the water table and changes in water quality. Data were collected from existing wells and test holes, as well as 11 monitor wells that were installed at 5 sites as part of this study. Water-quality samples collected from wells in the basin were used to determine the groundwater chemistry within the basin and to delineate potential sources of poor-quality groundwater. Analysis of stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in groundwater indicates that present-day precipitation is not a major source of recharge to the basin. Tritium and carbon-14 data indicate that most of the basin was recharged prior to 1952, and the groundwater in the basin has an apparent age of 12,500 to 30,000 years. Recharge to the basin, estimated to be less than 50 acre-feet per year, has not been sufficient to replenish the water that is being withdrawn from the basin. A numerical groundwater-flow model was developed for the Langford Basin to better understand the aquifer system used by the Fort Irwin NTC as part of its water supply, and to provide a tool to help manage groundwater resources at

  4. Organic geochemistry and petroleum geology, tectonics and basin analysis of southern Tarim and northern Qaidam basins, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Andrew Dean

    Organic geochemistry of oils from the Tarim basin, NW China, distinguish at least seven genetic groups of oils. The largest group are derived from Middle-Upper Ordovician anoxic slope-facies marls coincident with the margins of structural uplifts. Other groups include non-marine derived oils in the Luntai uplift, from southwest Tarim, in the Kuqa depression, and west of the Bachu uplift. A seep sample from west of Kashi clusters with Luntai oils. These results suggest that numerous source-rock horizons occur, but they are really restricted. Organic geochemistry of oils from northern Qaidam defines a family of hypersaline, anoxic lacustrine derived oils. Cenozoic outcrop samples from northern Qaidam are too organic lean to be of source quality, but dark laminated upper Oligocene mudstones from the Shi 28 well are of fair to good quality. Biomarkers provide a good correlation between the oils and the core samples. Organic matter is from algae and bacteria and lacks terrestrial material. Hydrocarbons are contained in upper Oligocene, Miocene, and Pliocene reservoirs. Eight oils are from NW Qaidam, but one sample comes from NE Qaidam, an area previously believed to only produce oils derived from Jurassic source rocks. Thus an unidentified Cenozoic source rock occurs in NE Qaidam. Thermal modeling indicates generation occurred in northwestern Qaidam within the last 3 million years, agreeing with observed low maturity biomarker parameters. Cenozoic stratigraphy in northern Qaidam and southern Tarim basins record the tectonic history of the surrounding structural/topographic elements. Paleocurrents record flow away from adjacent ranges from the Miocene to the present. Provenance data tie sediments to adjacent structural elements. Petrography indicates increasingly immature sandstones in Miocene and younger sediments relative to pre-Miocene samples. Apatite fission-track results from southeastern Tarim yield a cooling age of 17 +/- 1 Ma indicative of unroofing since at

  5. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest Mancini

    2000-12-31

    Part 3 (Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation) objectives are to provide an analysis of the Smackover petroleum system in Years 4 and 5 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work Accomplished (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - Basin flow modeling has been completed and the modeling results are being interpreted for report writing (Table 1). Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum source rocks has been integrated into the basin flow model. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum reservoirs continues. The cores to be described have been identified and many of the cores for the eastern part of the basin have been described. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Work on reservoir diagenesis has been initiated. Samples from the cores selected for the reservoir characterization are being used for this task. Work Planned (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - The report on basin flow will be completed. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Petroleum source rock data will be reviewed in light of the basin flow model results. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Characterization of petroleum reservoirs will continue through core studies. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Characterization of reservoir diagenesis will continue through petrographic analysis.

  6. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-08-01

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  7. Evaluating Mesoscale Numerical Weather Predictions and Spatially Distributed Meteorologic Forcing Data for Developing Accurate SWE Forecasts over Large Mountain Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedrick, A. R.; Marks, D. G.; Winstral, A. H.; Marshall, H. P.

    2014-12-01

    The ability to forecast snow water equivalent, or SWE, in mountain catchments would benefit many different communities ranging from avalanche hazard mitigation to water resource management. Historical model runs of Isnobal, the physically based energy balance snow model, have been produced over the 2150 km2 Boise River Basin for water years 2012 - 2014 at 100-meter resolution. Spatially distributed forcing parameters such as precipitation, wind, and relative humidity are generated from automated weather stations located throughout the watershed, and are supplied to Isnobal at hourly timesteps. Similarly, the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) Model provides hourly predictions of the same forcing parameters from an atmospheric physics perspective. This work aims to quantitatively compare WRF model output to the spatial meteorologic fields developed to force Isnobal, with the hopes of eventually using WRF predictions to create accurate hourly forecasts of SWE over a large mountainous basin.

  8. Investigation of Biogrout processes by numerical analysis at pore scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergwerff, Luke; van Paassen, Leon A.; Picioreanu, Cristian; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.

    2013-04-01

    Biogrout is a soil improving process that aims to improve the strength of sandy soils. The process is based on microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP). In this study the main process is based on denitrification facilitated by bacteria indigenous to the soil using substrates, which can be derived from pretreated waste streams containing calcium salts of fatty acids and calcium nitrate, making it a cost effective and environmentally friendly process. The goal of this research is to improve the understanding of the process by numerical analysis so that it may be improved and applied properly for varying applications, such as borehole stabilization, liquefaction prevention, levee fortification and mitigation of beach erosion. During the denitrification process there are many phases present in the pore space including a liquid phase containing solutes, crystals, bacteria forming biofilms and gas bubbles. Due to the amount of phases and their dynamic changes (multiphase flow with (non-linear) reactive transport), there are many interactions making the process very complex. To understand this complexity in the system, the interactions between these phases are studied in a reductionist approach, increasing the complexity of the system by one phase at a time. The model will initially include flow, solute transport, crystal nucleation and growth in 2D at pore scale. The flow will be described by Navier-Stokes equations. Initial study and simulations has revealed that describing crystal growth for this application on a fixed grid can introduce significant fundamental errors. Therefore a level set method will be employed to better describe the interface of developing crystals in between sand grains. Afterwards the model will be expanded to 3D to provide more realistic flow, nucleation and clogging behaviour at pore scale. Next biofilms and lastly gas bubbles may be added to the model. From the results of these pore scale models the behaviour of the system may be

  9. Numerical analysis of fume formation mechanism in arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Shinichi; Zeniya, Tasuku; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Tanaka, Manabu; Nakata, Kazuhiro; Murphy, Anthony B.; Yamamoto, Eri; Yamazaki, Kei; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2010-11-01

    In order to clarify the fume formation mechanism in arc welding, a quantitative investigation based on the knowledge of interaction among the electrode, arc and weld pool is indispensable. A fume formation model consisting of a heterogeneous condensation model, a homogeneous nucleation model and a coagulation model has been developed and coupled with the GTA or GMA welding model. A series of processes from evaporation of metal vapour to fume formation from the metal vapour was totally investigated by employing this simulation model. The aim of this paper is to visualize the fume formation process and clarify the fume formation mechanism theoretically through a numerical analysis. Furthermore, the reliability of the simulation model was also evaluated through a comparison of the simulation result with the experimental result. As a result, it was found that the size of the secondary particles consisting of small particles with a size of several tens of nanometres reached 300 nm at maximum and the secondary particle was in a U-shaped chain form in helium GTA welding. Furthermore, it was also clarified that most part of the fume was produced in the downstream region of the arc originating from the metal vapour evaporated mainly from the droplet in argon GMA welding. The fume was constituted by particles with a size of several tens of nanometres and had similar characteristics to that of GTA welding. On the other hand, if the metal transfer becomes unstable and the metal vapour near the droplet diffuses directly towards the surroundings of the arc not getting into the plasma flow, the size of the particles reaches several hundred nanometres.

  10. Numerical Analysis of the Sea State Bias for Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, R. E.; Fabrikant, A.; Srokosz, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Theoretical understanding of the dependence of sea state bias (SSB) on wind wave conditions has been achieved only for the case of a unidirectional wind-driven sea. Recent analysis of Geosat and TOPEX altimeter data showed that additional factors, such as swell, ocean currents, and complex directional properties of realistic wave fields, may influence SSB behavior. Here we investigate effects of two-dimensional multimodal wave spectra using a numerical model of radar reflection from a random, non-Gaussian surface. A recently proposed ocean wave spectrum is employed to describe sea surface statistics. The following findings appear to be of particular interest: (1) Sea swell has an appreciable effect in reducing the SSB coefficient compared with the pure wind sea case but has less effect on the actual SSB owing to the corresponding increase in significant wave height. (2) Hidden multimodal structure (the two-dimensional wavenumber spectrum contains separate peaks, for swell and wind seas, while the frequency spectrum looks unimodal) results in an appreciable change of SSB. (3) For unimodal, purely wind-driven seas, the influence of the angular spectral width is relatively unimportant; that is, a unidirectional sea provides a good qualitative model for SSB if the swell is absent. (4) The pseudo wave age is generally much better fo parametrization the SSB coefficient than the actual wave age (which is ill-defined for a multimodal sea) or wind speed. (5) SSB can be as high as 5% of the significant wave height, which is significantly greater than predicted by present empirical model functions tuned on global data sets. (6) Parameterization of SSB in terms of wind speed is likely to lead to errors due to the dependence on the (in practice, unknown) fetch.

  11. Identification and numerical modelling of hydrocarbon leakage in the Lower Congo Basin: Implications on the genesis of km-wide seafloor mounded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anka, Zahie; Ondrak, Robert; Kowitz, Astrid; Schødt, Niels

    2013-09-01

    We present a combined approach of interpretation of 2D seismic-reflection data and numerical modelling of hydrocarbon generation and migration across the southern slope of the Lower Congo Basin, in order to investigate the factors controlling timing and distribution of hydrocarbon leakage in this area. We identified three main families of past and present-day leakage features: (1) Mid-Upper Miocene seismic chimneys concentrated basinwards and ending up on buried pockmarks, (2) Plio-Pleistocene chimneys, rather clustered to the east of the study area and ending up in seafloor pockmarks, and (3) fewer scattered chimneys identified within the Miocene sequences ending up in shallow enhanced reflectors ("Flat spots"). Stratigraphic and structural elements seem to control the distribution of these features. At least two major events of leakage occurred during the Middle-Late Miocene and intermittently during the Pliocene-Present. External factors as sediment supply are associated to the Miocene leakage event, whilst internal structural elements probably triggered the Pliocene to present-day leakage. A major seabed morphological feature, represented by a margin-paralleled belt of more than 1-km-wide mounds, was identified above growth faults to the east of the study area. Data-constrained 2D HC generation and migration modelling suggests a genetic link between these structures and vertical migration/leakage of thermogenic methane sourced from either currently mature Oligo-Miocene source rocks or secondary cracking and further expulsion from over-mature Upper-Cretaceous source rocks. Hence, the mounds are likely to represent a lineation of methane-derived carbonate build-ups. Despite the natural limitations of a 2D migration model, when combined and calibrated with observations from seismic data, it can be used as a valid tool to assess petroleum migration routes in sedimentary basins. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first integrated approach combining both

  12. Comparative evaluation of numerical model and artificial neural network for simulating groundwater flow in Kathajodi-Surua Inter-basin of Odisha, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, S.; Jha, Madan K.; Kumar, Ashwani; Panda, D. K.

    2013-07-01

    In view of worldwide concern for the sustainability of groundwater resources, basin-wide modeling of groundwater flow is essential for the efficient planning and management of groundwater resources in a groundwater basin. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the performance of finite difference-based numerical model MODFLOW and the artificial neural network (ANN) model developed in this study in simulating groundwater levels in an alluvial aquifer system. Calibration of the MODFLOW was done by using weekly groundwater level data of 2 years and 4 months (February 2004 to May 2006) and validation of the model was done using 1 year of groundwater level data (June 2006 to May 2007). Calibration of the model was performed by a combination of trial-and-error method and automated calibration code PEST with a mean RMSE (root mean squared error) value of 0.62 m and a mean NSE (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency) value of 0.915. Groundwater levels at 18 observation wells were simulated for the validation period. Moreover, artificial neural network models were developed to predict groundwater levels in 18 observation wells in the basin one time step (i.e., week) ahead. The inputs to the ANN model consisted of weekly rainfall, evaporation, river stage, water level in the drain, pumping rate of the tubewells and groundwater levels in these wells at the previous time step. The time periods used in the MODFLOW were also considered for the training and testing of the developed ANN models. Out of the 174 data sets, 122 data sets were used for training and 52 data sets were used for testing. The simulated groundwater levels by MODFLOW and ANN model were compared with the observed groundwater levels. It was found that the ANN model provided better prediction of groundwater levels in the study area than the numerical model for short time-horizon predictions.

  13. Sheet Hydroforming Process Numerical Model Improvement Through Experimental Results Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, Papadia; Antonio, Del Prete; Alfredo, Anglani

    2010-06-01

    The increasing application of numerical simulation in metal forming field has helped engineers to solve problems one after another to manufacture a qualified formed product reducing the required time [1]. Accurate simulation results are fundamental for the tooling and the product designs. The wide application of numerical simulation is encouraging the development of highly accurate simulation procedures to meet industrial requirements. Many factors can influence the final simulation results and many studies have been carried out about materials [2], yield criteria [3] and plastic deformation [4,5], process parameters [6] and their optimization. In order to develop a reliable hydromechanical deep drawing (HDD) numerical model the authors have been worked out specific activities based on the evaluation of the effective stiffness of the blankholder structure [7]. In this paper after an appropriate tuning phase of the blankholder force distribution, the experimental activity has been taken into account to improve the accuracy of the numerical model. In the first phase, the effective capability of the blankholder structure to transfer the applied load given by hydraulic actuators to the blank has been explored. This phase ended with the definition of an appropriate subdivision of the blankholder active surface in order to take into account the effective pressure map obtained for the given loads configuration. In the second phase the numerical results obtained with the developed subdivision have been compared with the experimental data of the studied model. The numerical model has been then improved, finding the best solution for the blankholder force distribution.

  14. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Hydrothermal Alteration Map

    DOE Data Explorer

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This is a hydrothermal alteration map of the Tularosa Basin area, New Mexico and Texas that was created using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) multispectral data band ratios based upon diagnostic features of clay, calcite, silica, gypsum, ferric iron, and ferrous iron. Mesoproterozoic granite in the San Andreas Range often appeared altered, but this may be from clays produced by weathering or, locally, by hydrothermal alteration. However, no field checking was done. This work was done under U.S. D.O.E. Contract #DE-EE0006730

  15. Estimation of nutrient contributions from the ocean across a river basin using stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, K.; Maruya, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Komata, M.; Komai, K.; Kuwae, T.

    2015-04-01

    Since marine derived nutrients (MDN) are transported not only in river channels but also across the entire river basin, including via ground water and migratory animals, it is necessary to investigate the contribution of MDN to the forest floor (soils) in order to quantify the true role of MDN at the river ecosystem scale. This study investigated the contribution of pink (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) and chum salmon (O. keta) to total oceanic nitrogen (TN) input across a river basin using stable isotope analysis (SIA) of nitrogen (δ15N). The contribution of TN entering the river basin by salmon was 23.8 % relative to the total amount of TN exported from the river basin, providing a first estimate of MDN export for a river basin. The contribution of nitrogen from the ocean to the river basin soils was between 22.9 and 23.8 %. Furthermore, SIA showed that the transport of oceanic TN by sea eagles (Haliaeetus spp.) was greater than that by bears (Ursus arctos), which had previously been that bears are thought to be the major animal transporter of nutrients in the northern part of Japan.

  16. Quantitative analysis of numerical solvers for oscillatory biomolecular system models

    PubMed Central

    Quo, Chang F; Wang, May D

    2008-01-01

    Background This article provides guidelines for selecting optimal numerical solvers for biomolecular system models. Because various parameters of the same system could have drastically different ranges from 10-15 to 1010, the ODEs can be stiff and ill-conditioned, resulting in non-unique, non-existing, or non-reproducible modeling solutions. Previous studies have not examined in depth how to best select numerical solvers for biomolecular system models, which makes it difficult to experimentally validate the modeling results. To address this problem, we have chosen one of the well-known stiff initial value problems with limit cycle behavior as a test-bed system model. Solving this model, we have illustrated that different answers may result from different numerical solvers. We use MATLAB numerical solvers because they are optimized and widely used by the modeling community. We have also conducted a systematic study of numerical solver performances by using qualitative and quantitative measures such as convergence, accuracy, and computational cost (i.e. in terms of function evaluation, partial derivative, LU decomposition, and "take-off" points). The results show that the modeling solutions can be drastically different using different numerical solvers. Thus, it is important to intelligently select numerical solvers when solving biomolecular system models. Results The classic Belousov-Zhabotinskii (BZ) reaction is described by the Oregonator model and is used as a case study. We report two guidelines in selecting optimal numerical solver(s) for stiff, complex oscillatory systems: (i) for problems with unknown parameters, ode45 is the optimal choice regardless of the relative error tolerance; (ii) for known stiff problems, both ode113 and ode15s are good choices under strict relative tolerance conditions. Conclusions For any given biomolecular model, by building a library of numerical solvers with quantitative performance assessment metric, we show that it is possible

  17. Tectonic Subsidence Analysis of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X.; Huang, S. S. X. E. C.; Zhuang, W.; LIU, Z.; Duan, W.; Hu, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Pearl River Mouth Basin (PRMB hereafter) in the northern margin of the South China Sea has attracted great attention not only because of its special tectonic location but also for its abundant hydrocarbon resources. Tectonic evolution controls the petroleum geological condition of hydrocarbon-bearing basins. Efforts have been made to understand the tectonic evolution of this basin. However, many issues about the tectonic features and the evolution process of this basin, such as the age of the breakup unconformities and the anomalously accelerated subsidence during the post-rifting stage, remain controversial. Here we employ tectonic subsidence analysis of sedimentary basins, a technique of removing isostatic loading and compaction effects by back-stripping, to investigate the tectonic controls on the basin formation of the PRMB. We performed the analysis on 4 drill wells and 43 synthetic wells constructed based on recently acquired seismic profiles. The result shows that tectonic subsidence in the eastern sags of the PRMB began to decrease at ~30Ma while in the western sags the onset was ~23.8Ma. This suggests that the break-up time i.e. the end of rifting in the PRMB is earlier in the eastern sags than in the western sags. Abnormally accelerated tectonic subsidence occurred between 17.5-16.4Ma during the post-rifting stage, at an average subsidence rate as high as 301.9m/Ma. This phenomenon discriminates the PRMB from the category of classical Atlantic passive continental marginal basins, of which the tectonic subsidence during the post-rifting stage decays exponentially. The main objective of this paper is to provide insights into the geological and geodynamic evolution of the PRMB. The result bears significance to hydrocarbon exploration in this region.

  18. Differentiated control of web traffic: a numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Matta, Ibrahim

    2002-07-01

    Internet measurements show that the size distribution of Web-based transactions is usually very skewed; a few large requests constitute most of the total traffic. Motivated by the advantages of scheduling algorithms which favor short jobs, we propose to perform differentiated control over Web-based transactions to give preferential service to short web requests. The control is realized through service semantics provided by Internet Traffic Managers, a Diffserv-like architecture. To evaluate the performance of such a control system, it is necessary to have a fast but accurate analytical method. To this end, we model the Internet as a time-shared system and propose a numerical approach which utilizes Kleinrock's conservation law to solve the model. The numerical results are shown to match well those obtained by packet-level simulation, which runs orders of magnitude slower than our numerical method.

  19. Joint multifractal analysis based on the partition function approach: analytical analysis, numerical simulation and empirical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wen-Jie; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Gu, Gao-Feng; Xiong, Xiong; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2015-10-01

    Many complex systems generate multifractal time series which are long-range cross-correlated. Numerous methods have been proposed to characterize the multifractal nature of these long-range cross correlations. However, several important issues about these methods are not well understood and most methods consider only one moment order. We study the joint multifractal analysis based on partition function with two moment orders, which was initially invented to investigate fluid fields, and derive analytically several important properties. We apply the method numerically to binomial measures with multifractal cross correlations and bivariate fractional Brownian motions without multifractal cross correlations. For binomial multifractal measures, the explicit expressions of mass function, singularity strength and multifractal spectrum of the cross correlations are derived, which agree excellently with the numerical results. We also apply the method to stock market indexes and unveil intriguing multifractality in the cross correlations of index volatilities.

  20. An alternative basin characteristic for use in estimating impervious area in urban Missouri basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southard, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    A previous regression analysis of flood peaks on urban basins in St. Louis County, Missouri, indicated that the basin characteristics of percentage of impervious area and drainage area were statistically significant for estimating the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-. and 100-yr peak discharges at ungaged urban basins. In this statewide regression analysis of the urban basins for Missouri, an alternative basin characteristic called the percentage of developed area was evaluated. A regression analysis of the percentage of developed area (independent variable), resulted in a simple equation for computing percentage of impervious area. The percentage of developed area also was evaluated using flood-frequency data for 23 streamflow gaging stations, and the use of this variable was determined to be valid. Using nationwide data, an urban basin characteristic known as the basin development factor was determined to be valid for inclusion in urban regression equations for estimating flood flows. The basin development factor and the percentage of developed area were compared for use in regression equations to estimate peak flows of streams in Missouri. The equations with the basin development factor produced peak flow estimates with slightly smaller average standard errors of estimate than the equation with the percentage of developed area; however, this study indicates that there was not enough statistical or numerical difference to warrant using the basin development factor instead of the percentage of developed area in Missouri. The selection of a basin characteristic to describe the physical conditions of a drainage basin will depend not only on its contribution to accuracy of regression equations, but also on the ease of determining the characteristics; the percentage of developed area has this advantage. A correlation analysis was made by correlating drainage area to percentage of impervious area, the percentage of developed area, and the basin development factor. The results of

  1. Numerical analysis of entropy generation in a turbulent diffusion flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouras, F.; Khaldi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic irreversibilities generated by the combustion process are evaluated and analyzed numerically. The numerical simulation is performed for a reference case study for which experimental data are available in the literature: diffusion flame properties in a common burner configuration are studied by the Fluent software with the standard k-ɛ turbulence model and two-step chemical reaction. The study quantifies the contribution of each mechanism to entropy generation, i.e., friction, heat conduction, species diffusion, and chemical reaction. The chemical reaction and heat conduction are found to be the major sources of entropy production. Preheating of air reduces thermodynamic irreversibilities within the combustor.

  2. Numerical analysis of stiffened shear webs in the postbuckling range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, M.; Starnes, J. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The postbuckling behavior of shear webs divided into rectangular panels by stiffeners (uprights) was studied numerically, using the STAGS program in which two-dimensional finite differences are used to solve buckling and nonlinear problems. Universal nondimensional parameters, suggested by linear buckling data, are found to hold for the postbuckling range. Results indicate that the postbuckling stiffness of shear webs with isotropic panels is roughly two thirds of the prebuckling stiffness. The postbuckling behavior of shear webs with isotropic and orthotropic material properties is compared. Some practical aspects of solving nonlinear problems of this type by the numerical method employed are examined.

  3. Method Study of Flood Hazard Analysis for Plain River Network Area, Taihu Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HAN, C.; Liu, S.; Zhong, G.; Zhang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Flood is one of the most common and serious natural calamities. Taihu Basin is located in delta region of the Yangtze River in East China (see Fig. 1). Because of the abundant rainfall and low-lying terrain, the area frequently suffers from flood hazard which have caused serious casualty and economic loss. In order to reduce the severe impacts of floods events, numerous polder areas and hydraulic constructions (including pumps, water gates etc.) were constructed. Flood Hazard Map is an effective non-structural flood mitigation tool measures. Numerical simulation of flood propagation is one of the key technologies of flood hazard mapping. Because of the complexity of its underlying surface characteristics, numerical simulation of flood propagation was faced with some special problems for the plain river network area in Taihu Basin. In this paper, a coupled one and two dimensional hydrodynamic model was established. Densely covered and interconnected river networks, numerous polder areas and complex scheduling hydraulic constructions were generalized in the model. The model was proved to be believable and stable. Based on the results of the simulation of flood propagation, flood hazard map was compiled.

  4. Structural setting of the Bicol Basin and kinematic analysis of fractures on Mayon Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagmay, A. M. F.; Tengonciang, A. M. P.; Uy, H. S.

    2005-06-01

    Mayon Volcano is located within the Bicol Basin in the southeastern region of Luzon, Philippines. The basin is contained within a releasing bend associated with the curvature of the central segment of the left-lateral Philippine Fault. A structural analysis of the faults that traverse the Bicol Basin was conducted through reviews of existing literature, seismic data interpretation, and remote sensing; in particular, those structures that may have influenced the growth and evolution of Mayon. Dynamic analysis of the aforementioned structures reveals a regional transtensional stress regime for the Bicol Basin. Field investigation on Mayon's slopes revealed the existence of fractures along its western and eastern flanks. These structures on Mayon have the same geometry as the dominant faults found within the Bicol Basin. Interpretation of these fractures indicates a tectonic control over their origin. The identification of fractures on Mayon's slopes is the first description of such features on its edifice. These new data highlight the probable landslide hazards associated with an oversteepened volcano that may have been further destabilized by tectonic activity.

  5. Wellbore stability analysis and its application in the Fergana basin, central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuanliang, Yan; Jingen, Deng; Baohua, Yu; Hailong, Liu; Fucheng, Deng; Zijian, Chen; Lianbo, Hu; Haiyan, Zhu; Qin, Han

    2014-02-01

    Wellbore instability is one of the major problems hampering the drilling speed in the Fergana basin. Comprehensive analysis of the geological and engineering data in this area indicates that the Fergana basin is characterized by high in situ stress and plenty of natural fractures, especially in the formations which are rich in bedding structure and have several high-pressure systems. Complex accidents such as wellbore collapse, sticking, well kick and lost circulation happen frequently. Tests and theoretical analysis reveals that the wellbore instability in the Fergana basin was influenced by multiple interactive mechanisms dominated by the instability of the bedding shale. Selecting a proper drilling fluid density and improving the sealing characteristic of the applied drilling fluid is the key to preventing wellbore instability in the Fergana basin. The mechanical mechanism of wellbore instability in the Fergana basin was analysed and a method to determine the proper drilling fluid density was proposed. The research results were successfully used to guide the drilling work of the Jida-4 well; compared with the Jida-3 well, the drilling cycle of the Jida-4 well was reduced by 32%.

  6. Process-based numerical modelling of turbidity currents on a stepped slope-to-basin profile of the Fort Brown Fm., South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Empinotti, Thais; Spychala, Yvonne; Luthi, Stefan; Hodgson, David

    2016-04-01

    The depositional architectures of deep-water turbiditic deposits are strongly influenced by seafloor topography. Slope gradient variations of less than one degree might be sufficient to change the distribution of sands significantly along the basin profile. Stratigraphic units of deep-water sandstones from the Fort Brown Fm. in the Laingsburg depocentre (Karoo Basin, South Africa) are an example of that. Regional mapping and stratigraphic correlation of Units C to F (Van der Merwe et al., 2014) show a change from sand-attached systems in Units C and D to sand-detached systems in Units E and F. The sand-attached systems show a continuity of sands from entrenched slope valleys to basin-floor lobe complexes, while in the sand-detached systems there are widespread sand bypass zones of approximately 10 to 30 km where almost no sand is deposited and erosive features are observed. This is interpreted to reflect the development of a stepped slope profile. Lobe deposits occur before and after the bypass region, but significant differences in depositional architecture are noticed between these lobe deposits. The intraslope lobes are characterized by an aggradational to compensational stacking pattern and a common occurrence of erosive features, while the basin floor lobes show a lateral compensating stacking pattern with less erosive features. In this study, process-based numerical modelling of turbidity currents are performed to test if a stepped slope to basin profile with subtle gradient changes similar to that interpreted for the Laingsburg depocentre during the deposition of Unit E are suitable to generate the sediment distribution pattern observed in the field. Through an iterative modelling workflow we aim to constrain the paleoslope gradient changes using the parameters constrained from outcrop. The study also investigates how flow parameters such as sediment concentration, flow velocity, flow thickness and Froude number behave as a function of different slope

  7. Integrated Analysis on Gravity and Magnetic Fields of the Hailar Basin, NE China: Implications for Basement Structure and Deep Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Liangshu; Dong, Ping; Wu, YongJing; Li, Changbo; Hu, Bo; Wang, Chong

    2012-11-01

    The Hailar Basin is one of the typical basins among the NE China Basin Groups, which is situated in the east of East Asia Orogene between the Siberia Plate and the North China Plate. Based on the detailed analysis of magnetic, gravity, petrophysical, geothermal and seismological data, we separate the Gravity and Magnetic Anomalies (GMA) into four orders using Wavelet Multi-scale Decomposition (WMD). The apparent depths of causative sources were then assessed by Power Spectrum Analysis (PSA) of each order. Low-order wavelet detail anomalies were used to study the basin's basement structure such as major faults, the basement lithology, uplifts and depressions. High-order ones were used for the inversion of Moho and Curie discontinuities using the Parker method. The results show that the Moho uplifting area of the Hailar Basin is located at the NE part of the basin, the Curie uplifting area is at the NW part, and neither of them is consistent with the basin's sedimentary center. This indicates that the Hailar Basin may differ in basin building pattern from other middle and eastern basins of the basin groups, and the Hailar Basin might be of a passive type. When the Pacific Plate was subducting to NE China, the frontier of the plate lying on the mantle transition zone didn't pass through the Great Khingan Mountains region, so there is not an obvious magma upwelling or lithospheric extension in the Hailar Basin area. Finally, based on the seismological data and results of WMD, a probable 2D crust model is derived from an across-basin profile using the 2D forward modeling of the Bouguer gravity anomaly. The results agree with those from seismic inversion, suggesting WMD is suitable for identifying major crustal density interfaces.

  8. A numerical study of strike-slip bend formation with application to the Salton Sea pull-apart basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jiyang; Liu, Mian; Wang, Hui

    2015-03-01

    How stepovers of strike-slip faults connect to form bends is a question important for understanding the formation of push-up ranges (restraining bends) and pull-apart basins (releasing bends). We investigated the basic mechanics of this process in a simple three-dimensional viscoelastoplastic finite element model. Our model predicts localized plastic strain within stepovers that may eventually lead to the formation of strike-slip bends. Major parameters controlling strain localization include the relative fault strength, geometry of the fault system, and the plasticity model assumed. Using the Drucker-Prager plasticity model, in which the plastic yield strength of the crust depends on both shear and normal stresses, our results show that a releasing bend is easier to develop than a restraining bend under similar conditions. These results may help explain the formation of the Salton Sea pull-apart basin in Southern California 0.5-0.1 Ma ago, when the stepover between the Imperial Fault and the San Andreas Fault was connected by the Brawley seismic zone.

  9. A spatial analysis of phosphorus in the Mississippi river basin.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Linda M; David, Mark B; Drinkwater, Laurie E

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in rivers in the Mississippi River basin (MRB) contributes to hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico and impairs local water quality. We analyzed the spatial pattern of P in the MRB to determine the counties with the greatest January to June P riverine yields and the most critical factors related to this P loss. Using a database of P inputs and landscape characteristics from 1997 through 2006 for each county in the MRB, we created regression models relating riverine total P (TP), dissolved reactive P (DRP), and particulate P (PP) yields for watersheds within the MRB to these factors. Riverine yields of P were estimated from the average concentration of each form of P during January to June for the 10-yr period, multiplied by the average daily flow, and then summed for the 6-mo period. The fraction of land planted in crops, human consumption of P, and precipitation were found to best predict TP yields with a spatial error regression model ( = 0.48, = 101). Dissolved reactive P yields were predicted by fertilizer P inputs, human consumption of P, and precipitation in a multiple regression model ( = 0.42, = 73), whereas PP yields were explained by crop fraction, human consumption of P, and soil bulk density in a spatial error regression model ( = 0.49, = 61). Overall, the Upper Midwest's Cornbelt region and lower Mississippi basin had the counties with the greatest P yields. These results help to point out specific areas where agricultural conservation practices that reduce losses to streams and rivers and point source P removal might limit the intensity or spatial occurrence of Gulf of Mexico hypoxia and improve local water quality. PMID:21546679

  10. Numerical analysis of sapphire crystal growth by the Kyropoulos technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demina, S. E.; Bystrova, E. N.; Lukanina, M. A.; Mamedov, V. M.; Yuferev, V. S.; Eskov, E. V.; Nikolenko, M. V.; Postolov, V. S.; Kalaev, V. V.

    2007-09-01

    A numerical model has been suggested to analyze processes occurring during sapphire crystal growth by the Kyropoulos technique. The model accounts for the radiative heat exchange in the crystal and melt convection together with the crystallization front formation. The theoretical predictions agree well with available experimental data.