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Sample records for basolateral membrane vesicles

  1. Sugar uptake by intestinal basolateral membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Wright, E M; van Os, C H; Mircheff, A K

    1980-03-27

    A high yield of membrane vesicles was prepared from the basolateral surface of rat intestinal cells using an N2 cavitation bomb and density gradient centrifugation. The membranes were enriched 10-fold and were free of significatn contamination by brush border membranes and mitochondria. The rate of D-E114C]glucose and L-E13H]glucose uptake into the vesicle was measured using a rapid filtration technique. D-Glucose equilibrated within the vesicles with a half-time 1/25th that for L-glucose. The stereospecific uptake exhibited saturation kinetics with a Km of approx. 44 mM and a V of approx. 110 nmol . mg-1 min-1 at 10 degrees C. The activation energy for the process was 14 kcal . mol-1 below 15 degrees C and it approached 3 kcal . mol-1 above 22 degrees C. Carrier-mediated uptake was eliminated in the presence of 1 mM HgCl2 and 0.5 mM phloretin. The rate of transport was unaffected by the absence or presence of sodium concentration gradients. Competition studies demonstrated that all sugars with the D-glucose pyranose ring chair conformation shared the transport system, and that, with the possible exception of the -OH group at carbon No. 1, there were no specific requirements for an equatorial -OH group at any position in the pyranose ring. In the case of alpha-methyl-D-glucoside its inability to share the D-glucose transport system may be due to steric hindrance posed by the -OCH3 group rather than by a specific requirement for a free hydroxyl group at the position in the ring. It is concluded that sugars are transported across the basolateral membrane of the intestinal epithelium by a facilitated diffusion system reminiscent of that in human red blood cells. PMID:6245688

  2. Calcium uptake by brush-border and basolateral membrane vesicles in chick duodenum

    SciTech Connect

    Takito, J.; Shinki, T.; Sasaki, T.; Suda, T. )

    1990-01-01

    Calcium uptake was compared between duodenal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) and basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMV) isolated from vitamin D-deficient chicks and those injected with 625 ng of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1 alpha,25(OH)2D3). The uptake by BBMV in the 1 alpha,25-(OH)2D3-treated birds attained a maximum (280% of the control) at 12 h and was maintained at an elevated level (210%) at 24 h after the injection of the vitamin. In contrast, ATP-dependent calcium uptake by BLMV reached a maximum (185% of the control) at 6 h and decreased to the control level at 24 h. The kinetic analysis revealed that 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3 increased Vmax values without any changes in apparent Km values in both BBMV and BLMV. The activity of ATP-dependent calcium uptake was localized exclusively in the basolateral membrane, and the activity was inhibited by vanadate (IC50, 1 microM), but not by oligomycin, theophylline, calmodulin, trifluoperazine, or calbindin D28K. These results indicate that calcium transport through both the brush-border and basolateral membranes is involved in the 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3-dependent intestinal calcium absorption. The initiation of calcium absorption by 1 alpha,25(OH)2D3 appears to be due to an increase in the rate of calcium efflux at the basolateral membrane rather than the rate at the brush-border membrane.

  3. Proton-stimulated Cl-HCO/sub 3/ antiport by basolateral membrane vesicles of lobster hepatopancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Ahearn, G.A.; Grover, M.L.; Tsuji, R.T.; Clay, L.P.

    1987-05-01

    Purified epithelial basolateral membrane vesicles were prepared from lobster hepatopancreas by sorbitol gradient centrifugation. Na+-K+-adenosinetriphosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, and cytochrome-c oxidase enzyme activities in the final membrane preparation were enriched 9.6-, 1.4-, and 0.4-fold, respectively, compared with their activities in the original tissue homogenate. Vesicle osmotic reactivity was demonstrated using 60-min equilibrium /sup 36/Cl uptake experiments at a variety of transmembrane osmotic gradients. /sup 36/Cl uptake into vesicles preloaded with HCO/sub 3/ was significantly greater than into vesicles lacking HCO/sub 3/. This exchange process was stimulated by a transmembrane proton gradient (internal pH greater than external pH). Proton-gradient-dependent Cl-HCO/sub 3/ exchange was potential sensitive and stimulated by an electrically negative vesicle interior. /sup 36/Cl influx (4-s exposures) into HCO/sub 3/-loaded vesicles occurred by the combination of 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid sensitive, carrier-mediated transfer and apparent diffusion. /sup 36/Cl influx was a hyperbolic function of both internal (HCO/sub 3/) and internal (Cl). The two internal anions displayed a 100-fold difference in apparent affinity constants with HCO/sub 3/ being strongly preferred. /sup 36/Cl influx was stimulated more by preloaded monovalent than by divalent anions. Na was an inhibitor of proton-dependent anion antiport, whereas K had no effect. A model for HCl-HCO/sub 3/ antiport is suggested that employs combined transmembrane concentration gradients of Cl and HCO/sub 3/ to power anion exchange and transfer protons against a concentration gradient.

  4. NaCl reflection coefficients in proximal tubule apical and basolateral membrane vesicles. Measurement by induced osmosis and solvent drag.

    PubMed

    Pearce, D; Verkman, A S

    1989-06-01

    Two independent methods, induced osmosis and solvent drag, were used to determine the reflection coefficients for NaCl (sigma NaCl) in brush border and basolateral membrane vesicles isolated from rabbit proximal tubule. In the induced osmosis method, vesicles loaded with sucrose were subjected to varying inward NaCl gradients in a stopped-flow apparatus. sigma NaCl was determined from the osmolality of the NaCl solution required to cause no initial osmotic water flux as measured by light scattering (null point). By this method sigma NaCl was greater than 0.92 for both apical and basolateral membranes with best estimates of 1.0. sigma NaCl was determined by the solvent drag method using the Cl-sensitive fluorescent indicator, 6-methoxy-N-[3-sulfopropyl]quinolinium (SPQ), to detect the drag of Cl into vesicles by inward osmotic water movement caused by an outward osmotic gradient. sigma NaCl was determined by comparing experimental data with theoretical curves generated using the coupled flux equations of Kedem and Katchalsky. By this method we found that sigma NaCl was greater than 0.96 for apical and greater than 0.98 for basolateral membrane vesicles, with best estimates of 1.0 for both membranes. These results demonstrate that sigma NaCl for proximal tubule apical and basolateral membranes are near unity. Taken together with previous results, these data suggest that proximal tubule water channels are long narrow pores that exclude NaCl. PMID:2765660

  5. Electrogenic sulfate uptake by crustacean hepatopancreatic basolateral membrane vesicles. [Homarus americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Cattey, M.A.; Gerencser, G.A.; Aheam, G.A. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville )

    1990-02-26

    Basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMV) were isolated from Atlantic lobster (Homarus americanus) hepatopancreas and purified by discontinuous sucrose gradient centrifugation. BLMV prepared in this fashion were osmotically reactive exhibiting linear dependence of vesicular {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} uptake to increasing external osmotic pressure with negligible non-specific isotope binding. Under short circuited conditions (valinomycin/K{sup +}) BLMV responded to either a HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} gradient directed out or equilibrated HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} (10 mM) by displaying short term accumulation of sulfate above that of equilibrium. Uptake of divalent anion was unaffected by an inwardly directed transmembrane Na{sup +} or tetramethylammonium{sup +} gradient. {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}/HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} exchange in the presence of valinomycin was stimulated by transient inside positive K{sup +} diffusion potentials and inhibited by transient inside negative K{sup +} diffusion potentials. The role of electrogenic anion exchange by hepatopancreas BLMV in transcellular sulfate transport is discussed.

  6. Calcium transport in canine renal basolateral membrane vesicles. Effects of parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Scoble, J E; Mills, S; Hruska, K A

    1985-01-01

    The effects of parathyroid hormone were studied on Ca2+ fluxes in canine renal proximal tubular basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMV). Efflux of Ca2+ from preloaded BLMV was found to be stimulated by an external Na+ gradient, and this was inhibited by the Na+ ionophore, monensin, and enhanced by intravesicular negative electrical potentials, which indicated electrogenic Na+/Ca2+ exchange activity. There was a Na+ gradient independent Ca2+ flux, but membrane binding of Ca2+ was excluded from contributing to the Na+ gradient-dependent efflux. The Na+ gradient-dependent flux of Ca2+ was very rapid, and even 2- and 5-s points may not fully represent absolute initial rates. It was saturable with respect to the interaction of Ca2+ and Na+ with an apparent (5 s) Km for Na+-dependent Ca2+ uptake of 10 microM, and an apparent (5 s) Vmax of 0.33 nmol/mg protein per 5 s. The Na+ concentration that yielded half maximal Ca2+ efflux (2 s) was 11 mM, and the Hill coefficient was two or greater. Both Na+ gradient dependent and independent Ca2+ efflux were decreased in BLMV prepared from kidneys of thyroparathyroidectomized (TPTX) dogs, and both were stimulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH) infusion to TPTX dogs. BLMV from TPTX dogs exhibited significantly reduced maximal stimulation of Na+ gradient-dependent Ca2+ uptake with an apparent (5 s) Vmax of 0.23 nmol/mg protein per 5 s, but the apparent Km was 8 microM, which was unchanged from normal. The Na+ gradient independent Ca2+ uptake was also reduced in BLMV from TPTX dogs compared with normal. Thus, PTH stimulated both Na+/Ca2+ exchange activity and Na+ independent Ca2+ flux. In vivo, the latter could result in an elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ by PTH, and this might contribute to the observed decrease in solute transport in the proximal tubule. Images PMID:3988932

  7. Hydroxyl/bile acid exchange. A new mechanism for the uphill transport of cholate by basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Blitzer, B L; Terzakis, C; Scott, K A

    1986-09-15

    In order to characterize the driving forces for the concentrative uptake of unconjugated bile acids by the hepatocyte, the effects of pH gradients on the uptake of [3H]cholate by rat basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles were studied. In the presence of an outwardly directed hydroxyl gradient (pH 6.0 outside and pH 7.5 inside the vesicle), cholate uptake was markedly stimulated and the bile acid was transiently accumulated at a concentration 1.5- to 2-fold higher than at equilibrium ("overshoot"). In the absence of a pH gradient (pH 6.0 or 7.5 both inside and outside the vesicle), uptake was relatively slower and no overshoot was seen. Reductions in the magnitude of the transmembrane pH gradient were associated with slower initial uptake rates and smaller overshoots. Cholate uptake under pH gradient conditions was inhibited by furosemide and bumetanide but not by 4, 4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonic stilbene (SITS), 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), or probenecid. In the absence of a pH gradient, an inside-positive valinomycin-induced K+ diffusion potential caused a slight increase in cholate uptake which was insensitive to furosemide. Moreover, in the presence of an outwardly directed hydroxyl gradient, uphill cholate transport was observed even under voltage clamped conditions. These findings suggest that pH gradient-driven cholate uptake was not due to associated electrical potentials. Despite an identical pKa to that of cholate, an outwardly directed hydroxyl gradient did not drive uphill transport of three other unconjugated bile acids (deoxycholate, chenodeoxycholate, ursodeoxycholate), suggesting that a non-ionic diffusion mechanism cannot account for uphill cholate transport. In canalicular vesicles, although cholate uptake was relatively faster in the presence of a pH gradient than in the absence of a gradient, peak uptake was only slightly above that found at equilibrium under voltage clamped conditions. These findings

  8. Glucose and fructose uptake by Limulus polyphemus hepatopancreatic brush border and basolateral membrane vesicles: evidence for Na+-dependent sugar transport activity.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Kenneth M; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2011-05-01

    [(3)H]-fructose and [(3)H]-glucose transport activities were determined in brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) and basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMV) from Limulus polyphemus (horseshoe crab) hepatopancreas. Glucose transport was equilibrative in the absence of sodium and sodium dependent in the presence of sodium in BBMV, suggesting GLUT-like and SGLT-like transport activity. Glucose transport by BLMV was equilibrative and sodium independent. Fructose uptake by BBMV and BLMV was equilibrative in the absence of sodium and sodium dependent in the presence of sodium. Western blot analysis using a rabbit anti-mouse SGLT-1 polyclonal antibody indicated the presence of a cross-reacting horseshoe crab BBMV protein of similar molecular weight to the mammalian SGLT1. Sequence alignment of the mouse SGLT-4 and SGLT1 with a translated, horseshoe crab-expressed sequence tag also indicated significant identity between species. Fructose and glucose uptake in the absence and presence of sodium by hepatopancreas BBMV and BLMV indicated the presence of sodium-dependent transport activity for each sugar that may result from the presence of transporters similar to those described for other species. PMID:21184084

  9. Use of fluorescence-activated vesicle sorting for isolation of Naked2-associated, basolaterally targeted exocytic vesicles for proteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Li, Cunxi; Higginbotham, James N; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Tabb, David L; Graves-Deal, Ramona; Hill, Salisha; Cheek, Kristin; Jerome, W Gray; Lapierre, Lynne A; Goldenring, James R; Ham, Amy-Joan L; Coffey, Robert J

    2008-09-01

    By interacting with the cytoplasmic tail of a Golgi-processed form of transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFalpha), Naked2 coats TGFalpha-containing exocytic vesicles and directs them to the basolateral corner of polarized epithelial cells where the vesicles dock and fuse in a Naked2 myristoylation-dependent manner. These TGFalpha-containing Naked2-associated vesicles are not directed to the subapical Sec6/8 exocyst complex as has been reported for other basolateral cargo, and thus they appear to represent a distinct set of basolaterally targeted vesicles. To identify constituents of these vesicles, we exploited our finding that myristoylation-deficient Naked2 G2A vesicles are unable to fuse at the plasma membrane. Isolation of a population of myristoylation-deficient, green fluorescent protein-tagged G2A Naked2-associated vesicles was achieved by biochemical enrichment followed by flow cytometric fluorescence-activated vesicle sorting. The protein content of these plasma membrane de-enriched, flow-sorted fluorescent G2A Naked2 vesicles was determined by LC/LC-MS/MS analysis. Three independent isolations were performed, and 389 proteins were found in all three sets of G2A Naked2 vesicles. Rab10 and myosin IIA were identified as core machinery, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase alpha1 was identified as an additional cargo within these vesicles. As an initial validation step, we confirmed their presence and that of three additional proteins tested (annexin A1, annexin A2, and IQGAP1) in wild-type Naked2 vesicles. To our knowledge, this is the first large scale protein characterization of a population of basolaterally targeted exocytic vesicles and supports the use of fluorescence-activated vesicle sorting as a useful tool for isolation of cellular organelles for comprehensive proteomics analysis. PMID:18504258

  10. Characterization of the basolateral membrane conductance of Necturus urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Demarest, J R; Finn, A L

    1987-04-01

    Necturus urinary bladders stripped of serosal muscle and connective tissue were impaled through their basolateral membranes with microelectrodes in experiments that permitted rapid changes in the ion composition of the serosal solution. The transepithelial electrical properties exhibited a marked seasonal variation that could be attributed to variations in the conductance of the shunt pathway, apical membrane selectivity, and basolateral Na+ transport. In contrast, the passive electrical properties of the basolateral membrane remained constant throughout the year. The apparent transference numbers (Ti) of the basolateral membrane for K+ and Cl- were determined from the effect on the basolateral membrane equivalent electromotive force of a sudden increase in the serosal K+ concentration from 2.5 to 50 mM/liter or a decrease in the Cl- concentration from 101 to 10 mM/liter. TK and TCl were 0.71 +/- 0.05 and 0.04 +/- 0.01, respectively. The basolateral K+ conductance could be blocked by Ba2+ (0.5 mM), Cs+ (10 mM), or Rb+ (10 mM), but was unaffected by 3,4-diaminopyridine (100 microM), decamethonium (100 microM), or tetraethylammonium (10 mM). We conclude that a highly selective K+ conductance dominates the electrical properties of the basolateral membrane and that this conductance is different from those found in nerve and muscle membranes. PMID:2438371

  11. Tyrosine motifs are required for prestin basolateral membrane targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifan; Moeini-Naghani, Iman; Bai, JunPing; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prestin is targeted to the lateral wall of outer hair cells (OHCs) where its electromotility is critical for cochlear amplification. Using MDCK cells as a model system for polarized epithelial sorting, we demonstrate that prestin uses tyrosine residues, in a YXXΦ motif, to target the basolateral surface. Both Y520 and Y667 are important for basolateral targeting of prestin. Mutation of these residues to glutamine or alanine resulted in retention within the Golgi and delayed egress from the Golgi in Y667Q. Basolateral targeting is restored upon mutation to phenylalanine suggesting the importance of a phenol ring in the tyrosine side chain. We also demonstrate that prestin targeting to the basolateral surface is dependent on AP1B (μ1B), and that prestin uses transferrin containing early endosomes in its passage from the Golgi to the basolateral plasma membrane. The presence of AP1B (μ1B) in OHCs, and parallels between prestin targeting to the basolateral surface of OHCs and polarized epithelial cells suggest that outer hair cells resemble polarized epithelia rather than neurons in this important phenotypic measure. PMID:25596279

  12. Active urea transport and an unusual basolateral membrane composition in the gills of a marine elasmobranch.

    PubMed

    Fines, G A; Ballantyne, J S; Wright, P A

    2001-01-01

    In elasmobranch fishes, urea occurs at high concentrations (350-600 mM) in the body fluids and tissues, where it plays an important role in osmoregulation. Retention of urea by the gill against this huge blood-to-water diffusion gradient requires specialized adaptations to the epithelial cell membranes. Experiments were performed to determine the mechanisms and structural features that facilitate urea retention by the gill of the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias. Analysis of urea uptake by gill basolateral membrane vesicles revealed the presence of a phloretin-sensitive (half inhibition 0.09 mM), sodium-coupled, secondary active urea transporter (Michaelis constant = 10.1 mM, maximal velocity = 0.34 micromol. h(-1). mg protein(-1)). We propose that this system actively transports urea out of the gill epithelial cells back into the blood against the urea concentration gradient. Lipid analyses of the basolateral membrane revealed high levels of cholesterol contributing to the highest reported cholesterol-to-phospholipid molar ratio (3.68). This unique combination of active urea transport and modification of the phospholipid bilayer membrane is responsible for decreasing the gill permeability to urea and facilitating urea retention by the gill of Squalus acanthias. PMID:11124129

  13. Endocytosis of albumin and thyroglobulin at the basolateral membrane of thyrocytes organized in follicles.

    PubMed

    Gire, V; Kostrouch, Z; Bernier-Valentin, F; Rabilloud, R; Munari-Silem, Y; Rousset, B

    1996-02-01

    Serum proteins such as albumin are present inside thyroid follicles in both normal and pathological situations. To analyze the mechanism of entry of these proteins, we investigated the ability of polarized thyrocytes to internalize soluble molecules at their basolateral pole. Experiments were conducted on in vitro reconstituted thyroid follicles using BSA and pig thyroglobulin (Tg) coupled to gold particles for electron microscopy, conjugated to fluorescein for conventional and confocal fluorescence microscopy, or radioiodinated for biochemical measurements. Incubations were carried out at 37 C. BSA and Tg coupled to gold particles were rapidly internalized from the culture medium and sequentially found in small vesicles and early endosomes and in late endosomes and lysosomes. Fluorescence microscope analyses revealed that the majority of cells forming reconstituted thyroid follicles are capable of internalizing BSA and Tg, but that Tg was more efficiently endocytosed than BSA. Using radioiodinated ligands, it was observed that the endocytosis of Tg was 10 times higher than that of BSA. The internalization of [125I]Tg was inhibited by increasing concentrations of unlabeled Tg. In contrast, endocytosis of 125I-labeled BSA was independent of the unlabeled BSA concentration. Experiments performed at 4 C indicated the presence of a basolateral membrane binding activity for [125I]Tg; the Tg concentration that reduced the binding of labeled Tg by 50% ranged from 4-6 microM. These data are evidence of a process of internalization of soluble molecules at the basolateral pole of thyrocytes, with BSA being internalized by fluid phase endocytosis and Tg by selective endocytosis. Our findings explain how serum albumin can enter thyroid follicles and disclose a new cellular handling and transport pathway of Tg. We propose that selective uptake of Tg operating on molecules secreted at the basolateral surface of thyrocytes could control the amount of Tg released in the

  14. Differences in neutral amino acid and glucose transport between brush border and basolateral plasma membrane of intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hopfer, U; Sigrist-Nelson, K; Ammann, E; Murer, H

    1976-12-01

    A comparison of L-valine and D-glucose transport was carried out with vesicles of plasma membrane isolated either from the luminal (brush border) or from the contra-luminal (basolateral) region of small intestinal epithelial cells. The existence of transport systems for both non-electrolytes was demonstrated by stereospecificity and saturability of uptake, as well as tracer coupling. Transport of L-valine and D-glucose differs markedly in the two types of plasma membrane with respect to stimulation by Na+. The presence of Na+ stimulated initial L-valine and D-glucose uptake in brush border, but not in basolateral membrane. Moreover, an electro-chemical Na+ gradient, oriented with the lower potential on the inside, supported accumulation of the non-electrolytes above medium concentration only in the brush border membrane. L-Valine and D-glucose transport also were saturated at lower concentrations in brush border (10-20 mM) than in basolateral plasma membranes (30-50 mM). A third difference between the two membranes was found in the effectiveness of known inhibitors of D-glucose transport. In brush border membranes phlorizin was more potent than phloretin and 2', 3', 4'-trihydroxy-4-methoxy chalcone and cytochalasin B did not inhibit at all. In contrast, with the basolateral plasma membranes the order of potency was changed to phloretin = 2',3',4'-trihydroxy-4-methoxy chalcone greater than cytochalasin B greater than phlorizin. These results indicate the presence of different types of transport systems for monosaccharides and neutral amino acids in the luminal and contra-luminal region of the plasma membrane. Active transepithelial transport can be explained on the basis of the different properties of the non-electrolyte transport systems in the two cellular regions and an electro-chemical Na+ gradient that is dependent on cellular metabolism. PMID:137908

  15. Membrane tensiometer for heavy giant vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puech, P.-H.; Brochard-Wyart, F.

    2004-10-01

    One key parameter of giant-vesicles adhesion is their membrane tension, σ. A theoretically simple but delicate way to impose (and measure) it is to use micropipette manipulation techniques. But usually, the vesicles are free and their tension is unknown, until an adhesion patch grows. σ can be deduced from the detailed profile of the membrane close to the substrate, but this method is limited to very low tensions. We present here a rather simple way to estimate the membrane tension of heavy vesicles, which sediment close to a surface, by observing by RIM the size of the flat region of the vesicle. As an application, we follow the slow flattening of vesicles, when the surrounding sugar solution is evaporating, and their light-induced tensioning.

  16. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-07-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  17. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically. PMID:26465512

  18. Effects of ADH on the apical and basolateral membranes of toad urinary bladder epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, P J; Leader, J P

    1993-11-01

    Short-circuited urinary bladders from Bufo marinus were supported on their apical surface by an agar mounting method and impaled with microelectrodes via their basolateral membrane. This arrangement provided stable and long-lasting impalements of epithelial cells and yielded reliable membrane potentials and voltage divider ratios (Ra/Rb), where Ra and Rb are apical and basolateral membrane resistances respectively. The membrane potential under short-circuit conditions (Vsc) was -51.4 +/- 2.2 mV (n = 59), while under open-circuit conditions apical membrane potential (Va) and basolateral membrane potential (Vb) were -31.0 +/- 2.4 and 59.5 +/- 2.4 mV, respectively. This yields a "well-shaped" potential profile across the toad urinary bladder, where Va is inversely related to the rate of transport, Isc. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) produced a hyperpolarisation of Vsc and Vb but had no significant effect on Va. In addition, Ra/Rb was significantly increased by ADH (4.6 +/- 0.5 to 10.2 +/- 3.6). Calculation of individual membrane resistances following the addition of amiloride showed that ADH produced a parallel decrease in Ra and Rb membrane resistance, with the observed increase in Ra/Rb being due to a greater percentage decrease in Rb than in Ra. The ability of ADH to effect parallel changes in apical and basolateral membrane conductance helps to maintain a constant cellular volume despite an increase in transepithelial transport. PMID:8309781

  19. Phorbol ester-stimulated phosphorylation of basolateral membranes from canine kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerman, M.R.; Rogers, S.; Morrissey, J.J.; Gavin, J.R. III

    1986-06-01

    To determine whether protein kinase C is present in the basolateral membrane of the renal proximal tubular cell, we performed experiments to ascertain whether specific binding of (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate could be demonstrated in basolateral membranes isolated from canine kidney. Specific binding was demonstrable that was half maximal at between 10(-7) and 10(-8) M phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate. Binding was inhibited by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and other tumor-promoting phorbol esters, but not by inactive phorbol esters, including 4 alpha-phorbol. Incubation of basolateral membranes with TPA and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, but not with 4 alpha-phorbol, in the presence of submicromolar concentrations of free calcium, enhanced phosphorylation of several proteins demonstrable in autoradiograms of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels originating from membranes subsequently exposed to (gamma-32P)ATP for 30 s. Dephosphorylation of (/sup 32/P)phosphoproteins was observed in gels from membranes incubated with (gamma-32P)ATP over time. TPA-stimulated phosphorylation of one protein band with Mr 135,000 was quantitated and was found to increase as a function of (TPA). Half-maximal TPA-stimulated phosphorylation of this protein band occurred at slightly less than 10(-9) M TPA. Our findings are consistent with a role for protein kinase C-effected phosphorylation of basolateral membrane proteins in the mediation or modulation of hormonal actions in the proximal tubular cell.

  20. Bolaamphiphiles Promote Phospholipid Translocation Across Vesicle Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Christopher C.; DiVittorio, Kristy M.; Smith, Bradley D.

    2008-01-01

    A series of membrane-spanning bolaamphiphiles (molecules with two hydrophilic end-groups connected by a hydrophobic linker) were prepared by a modular synthetic method and evaluated for their abilities to affect the dynamics of a surrounding bilayer membrane. The goal was to determine if the bolaamphiphiles promote the translocation of phospholipids across vesicle membranes. The bolaamphiphiles were incorporated at low levels (up to 5 mol%) in vesicles composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Inward translocation assays were performed using fluorescent, NBD-labeled phospholipid probes with phosphocholine (PC) or phosphoglycerol (PG) head-groups. The membrane-spanning bolaamphiphiles promote the translocation of both phospholipid probes in the order PG > PC, while shorter bolaamphiphiles (structures that must adopt a U-shape and keep both end-groups in the same leaflet of the membrane), and regular amphiphiles with one hydrophilic end-group, are inactive. These results are an exception to the rule-of-thumb that membrane-spanning bolaamphiphiles are inherently membrane stabilizing molecules that inhibit all types of membrane transport. PMID:16834395

  1. The N-terminal basolateral targeting signal unlikely acts alone in the differential trafficking of membrane transporters in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shiu-Ming; Wang, Li-Yuan; Yu, Siyuan; Campbell, Christine E; Valiyaparambil, Sujith A; Rance, Mark; Blumenthal, Kenneth M

    2013-07-30

    We have shown previously, using confocal imaging and transport assays, that the N-terminus of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) can redirect apical SVCT1 to the basolateral membrane. Here, the SVCT model was used to further characterize the basolateral targeting peptide signal. Both the length (31 amino acids) and sequence accuracy of the N-terminus of SVCT2 were found to be important in basolateral targeting activity, suggesting a structural requirement. However, the N-terminal basolateral targeting sequence did not appear to act alone, based on analyses of heterologous chimeras. Although diverse N-terminal basolateral targeting signals from multipass membrane proteins can all redirect apical protein from the same gene family to the basolateral membrane, none of the N-terminal basolateral targeting signals can redirect the transmembrane and C-terminal regions from a different gene family. Instead, the presence of these heterologous N-terminal basolateral targeting signals affected the trafficking of otherwise apical protein, causing their accumulation in a stable tubulin-like non-actin structure. Nontargeting N-terminal sequences had no effect. Similar protein retention was observed previously and in this study when the C-terminus of apical or basolateral protein was mutated. These results suggest that the N- and C-termini interact, directly or indirectly, within each gene family for basolateral targeting. Circular dichroism and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance analyses both found a lack of regular secondary structure in the conserved N-terminus of SVCT2, consistent with the presence of partner(s) in the targeting unit. Our finding, a departure from the prevailing single-peptide motif model, is consistent with the evolution of basolateral transporters from the corresponding apical genes. The interaction among the N-terminus, its partner(s), and the cellular basolateral targeting machinery needs to be further elucidated. PMID:23837633

  2. Ba2+-inhibitable /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes across membranes of vesicles from toad urinary bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, H.; Civan, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes have been measured in suspensions of vesicles prepared from the epithelium of toad urinary bladder. A readily measurable barium-sensitive, ouabain-insensitive component has been identified; the concentration of external Ba2+ required for half-maximal inhibition was 0.6 mM. The effects of externally added cations on /sup 86/Rb+ influx and efflux have established that this pathway is conductive, with a selectivity for K+, Rb+ and Cs+ over Na+ and Li+. The Rb+ uptake is inversely dependent on external pH, but not significantly affected by internal Ca2+ or external amiloride, quinine, quinidine or lidocaine. It is likely, albeit not yet certain, that the conductive Rb+ pathway is incorporated in basolateral vesicles oriented right-side-out. It is also not yet clear whether this pathway comprises the principle basolateral K+ channel in vivo, and that its properties have been unchanged during the preparative procedures. Subject to these caveats, the data suggest that the inhibition by quinidine of Na+ transport across toad bladder does not arise primarily from membrane depolarization produced by a direct blockage of the basolateral channels. It now seems more likely that the quinidine-induced elevation of intracellular Ca2+ activity directly blocks apical Na+ entry.

  3. Expression of two membrane fusion proteins, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein, in choroid plexus epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chung, I; Burkart, A; Szmydynger-Chodobska, J; Dodd, K A; Trimble, W S; Miller, K V; Shim, M; Chodobski, A

    2003-01-01

    In addition to being the major site of cerebrospinal fluid formation, the choroid plexus epithelium emerges as an important source of polypeptides in the brain. Physiologically regulated release of some polypeptides synthesized by the choroid plexus has been shown. The molecular mechanisms underlying this polypeptide secretion have not been characterized, however. In the present study, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein, two membrane fusion proteins playing a critical role in exocytosis in neurons and endocrine cells, were found to be expressed in the choroid plexus epithelium. It was also shown that in choroidal epithelium, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein stably interact. Two members of the vesicle-associated membrane protein family, vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 and vesicle-associated membrane protein-2, were expressed in the rat choroid plexus at the messenger RNA and protein level. However, their newly discovered isoforms, vesicle-associated membrane protein-1b and vesicle-associated membrane protein-2b, produced by alternative RNA splicing, were not detected in choroidal tissue. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that vesicle-associated membrane protein is confined to the cytoplasm of choroidal epithelium, whereas synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa is associated with plasma membranes, albeit with a varied cellular distribution among species studied. Specifically, in the rat choroid plexus, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa was localized to the basolateral membrane domain of choroidal epithelium and was expressed in small groups of cells. In comparison, in ovine and human choroidal tissues, apical staining for synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa was found in the majority of epithelial cells. These species-related differences in cellular synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa distribution suggested that the synaptosome-associated protein of

  4. Evidence for basolateral but not apical membrane localization of outwardly rectifying depolarization-induced Cl(-) channel in airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, T H; Lee, H J; Lee, N K; Choi, Y C

    2000-08-01

    The rat primary cultured-airway monolayer had been an excellent model for deciphering the ion channel after nystatin permeabilization of its basolateral or apical membrane (Hwang et al., 1996). After apical membrane permeabilization of rat primary cultured-airway monolayer, 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2, 2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS)-sensitive outwardly rectifying depolarization-induced Cl(-) (BORDIC) currents were observed across the basolateral membrane in symmetrical NMG-Cl solution in this study. No significant Cl(-) current induced by the application of voltage clamping was observed across the apical membrane in symmetrical NMG-Cl solution after basolateral membrane permeabilization. The halide permeability sequence for BORDIC current was Br(-) = I(-) > Cl(-). BORDIC current was not affected by basolaterally applied bumetanide (0.5 mm). Basolateral DIDS (0.2 mm) but not apical DIDS inhibited CFTR mediated short-circuit current (I(sc)) in an intact monolayer of rat airway epithelia, a T84 human colonal epithelial cell line, and a Calu-3 human airway epithelial cell line. This is the first report showing that depolarization induced Cl(-) current is present on the basolateral membrane of airway epithelia. PMID:10931973

  5. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles and vaccine applications.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates. PMID:24715891

  6. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles and Vaccine Applications

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A.; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates. PMID:24715891

  7. Identification of a vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)-like membrane protein in zymogen granules of the rat exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Braun, J E; Fritz, B A; Wong, S M; Lowe, A W

    1994-02-18

    Zymogen granules of the exocrine pancreas are the secretory organelles responsible for the regulated secretion of digestive enzymes. Several proteins are associated with or are integral components of the lipid bilayer that forms the zymogen granule membrane. These proteins likely represent important components in the regulated secretion of digestive enzymes. VAMPs (vesicle-associated membrane proteins)/synaptobrevins are a family of 18-kDa integral membrane proteins originally characterized in synaptic vesicles. Polyclonal antisera raised against either a VAMP/glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein or rat brain synaptic vesicles, detected an 18-kDa immunoreactive protein in zymogen granule membranes that co-migrates electrophorectically with rat brain synaptic vesicle VAMP. Rat brain synaptic vesicle VAMP was detected by both antisera. Botulinum-B toxin treatment of zymogen granule membranes did not result in cleavage of zymogen granule membrane VAMP, indicating that exocrine pancreatic VAMP is either VAMP1 or a novel VAMP-isoform. Immunofluorescent studies demonstrated that exocrine pancreatic VAMP localized with GP2, a zymogen granule membrane protein, to the apical region of pancreatic acinar cells. No significant labeling was observed in basolateral regions of pancreatic acinar cells. These results establish the presence of a VAMP protein in the zymogen granule of the rat pancreas and suggest that VAMPs have a role in exocrine secretion. PMID:8106518

  8. Transmembrane flux and receptor desensitization measured with membrane vesicles. Homogeneity of vesicles investigated by computer simulation.

    PubMed Central

    Cash, D J; Langer, R M; Subbarao, K; Bradbury, J R

    1988-01-01

    The use of membrane vesicles to make quantitative studies of transmembrane transport and exchange processes involves an assumption of homogeneity of the membrane vesicles. In studies of 86Rb+ exchange mediated by acetylcholine receptor from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus and of 36Cl- exchange mediated by GABA receptor from rat brain, measurements of ion exchange and receptor desensitization precisely followed first order kinetics in support of this assumption. In other measurements a biphasic decay of receptor activity was seen. To elucidate the molecular properties of receptors from such measurements it is important to appreciate what the requirements of vesicle monodispersity are for meaningful results and what the effect of vesicle heterogeneity would be. The experiments were simulated with single vesicle populations with variable defined size distributions as well as with mixtures of different populations of vesicles. The properties of the receptors and their density in the membrane could be varied. Different receptors could be present on the same or different membrane vesicles. The simulated measurements were not very sensitive to size dispersity. A very broad size distribution of a single vesicle population was necessary to give rise to detectable deviations from first order kinetics or errors in the determined kinetic constants. Errors could become significant with mixtures of different vesicle populations, where the dispersity in initial ion exchange rate constant, proportional to the receptor concentration per internal volume, became large. In this case the apparent rate of receptor desensitization would diverge in opposite directions from the input value when measured by two different methods, suggesting an experimental test for such kinetic heterogeneity. A biphasic decrease of receptor activity could not be attributed to vesicle heterogeneity and must be due to desensitization processes with different rates. Significant errors would not

  9. Redox-Reactive Membrane Vesicles produced by Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Gorby, Yuri A.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Korenevsky, Anton A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Beveridge, Terrance J.

    2008-06-01

    Dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria produce and release membrane vesicles with diameters ranging from 50 to 250 nm. The vesicles, which arise from the outer membrane of these Gram-negative bacteria, lack DNA but contain proteins that catalyze the reduction of ferric iron and other multivalent heavy metals and radionuclides. This enzymatic process results in the formation of nano-size biogenic mineral assemblages that resemble nanofossils. Under low-shear conditions, membrane vesicles are commonly tethered to intact cells by electrically conductive filaments known as bacterial nanowires. The functional role of membrane vesicles and associated nanowires is not known, but the potential for mineralized vesicles that morphologically resemble nanofossils to serve as paleontological indicators of early life on earth and as biosignatures of like on other planets is recognized.

  10. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 is expressed in intestinal ER.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Shadab A; Mahan, James; Siddiqi, Shahzad; Gorelick, Fred S; Mansbach, Charles M

    2006-03-01

    Intestinal dietary triacylglycerol absorption is a multi-step process. Triacylglycerol exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the rate-limiting step in the progress of the lipid from its apical absorption to its basolateral membrane export. Triacylglycerol is transported from the ER to the cis Golgi in a specialized vesicle, the pre-chylomicron transport vesicle (PCTV). The vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7) was found to be more concentrated on PCTVs compared with ER membranes. VAMP7 has been previously identified associated with post-Golgi sites in eukaryotes. To examine the potential role of VAMP7 in PCTV trafficking, antibodies were generated that identified a 25 kDa band consistent with VAMP7 but did not crossreact with VAMP1,2. VAMP7 was concentrated on intestinal ER by immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that the ER proteins Sar1 and rBet1 were present on PCTVs and colocalized with VAMP7. Iodixanol gradient centrifugation showed VAMP7 to be isodense with ER and endosomes. Although VAMP7 localized to intestinal ER, it was not present in the ER of liver and kidney. Anti-VAMP7 antibodies reduced the transfer of triacylglycerol, but not newly synthesized proteins, from the ER to the Golgi by 85%. We conclude that VAMP7 is enriched in intestinal ER and that it plays a functional role in the delivery of triacylglycerol from the ER to the Golgi. PMID:16495485

  11. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease. PMID:26381655

  12. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease. PMID:26381655

  13. Membrane tubulation from giant lipid vesicles in alternating electric fields.

    PubMed

    Antonova, K; Vitkova, V; Meyer, C

    2016-01-01

    We report on the formation of tubular membrane protrusions from giant unilamellar vesicles in alternating electric fields. The construction of the experimental chamber permitted the application of external AC fields with strength of dozens of V/mm and kHz frequency during relatively long time periods (several minutes). Besides the vesicle electrodeformation from quasispherical to prolate ellipsoidal shape, the formation of long tubular membrane protrusions with length of up to several vesicle diameters, arising from the vesicular surface in the field direction, was registered and analyzed. The threshold electric field at which the electro-induced protrusions appeared was lower than the field strengths inducing membrane electroporation. PMID:26871107

  14. H/sup +/-translocating ATPases: advances using membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, two primary active transport systems (H/sup +/ -ATPases) in plant cells are examined using membrane vesicles as a simple experimental tool. One electrogenic, H/sup +/ -translocating ATPase is vanadate-sensitive and associated with the plasma membrane. Another electrogenic, H/sup +/ -translocating ATPases is anion-sensitive, and localized on the tonoplast (and perhaps other membranes). According to the working model, the plasma membrane and tonoplast-type H/sup +/ -ATPases are detectable in inside-out plasma membrane and right-side-out tonoplast vesicles. The direction of H/sup +/ pumping into these vesicles would be consistent with the results from intact cells where H/sup +/ are extruded from the cell across the plasma membrane and pumped into the vacuole from the cytoplasm. Understanding the properties of H/sup +/ -pumping ATPases using membrane vesicles has paved the way for studies to identify secondary active transport systems coupled to the proton electrochemical gradient. Redox-driven transport systems can also be studied directly using the isolated vesicles. As transport proteins are identified, the functional activities can be specifically studied after reconstitution of the purified protein(s) into phospholipid membrane vesicles. 154 references.

  15. Outer membrane vesicles as platform vaccine technology

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Michiel; van der Ley, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are released spontaneously during growth by many Gram‐negative bacteria. They present a range of surface antigens in a native conformation and have natural properties like immunogenicity, self‐adjuvation and uptake by immune cells which make them attractive for application as vaccines against pathogenic bacteria. In particular with Neisseria meningitidis, they have been investigated extensively and an OMV‐containing meningococcal vaccine has recently been approved by regulatory agencies. Genetic engineering of the OMV‐producing bacteria can be used to improve and expand their usefulness as vaccines. Recent work on meningitis B vaccines shows that OMVs can be modified, such as for lipopolysaccharide reactogenicity, to yield an OMV product that is safe and effective. The overexpression of crucial antigens or simultaneous expression of multiple antigenic variants as well as the expression of heterologous antigens enable expansion of their range of applications. In addition, modifications may increase the yield of OMV production and can be combined with specific production processes to obtain high amounts of well‐defined, stable and uniform OMV particle vaccine products. Further improvement can facilitate the development of OMVs as platform vaccine product for multiple applications. PMID:26912077

  16. Electro-hydrodynamic effects on lipid membranes in giant vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staykova, Margarita; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Dimova, Rumiana

    2009-11-01

    Electric fields are widely applied for cell manipulation in numerous micron-scale systems. Here, we show for the first time that alternating electric fields may cause pronounced flows in the membrane of giant lipid vesicles as well as in the surrounding fluid media.^ The lipid vesicles are not only biomimetic model for the cell membrane but also have many potential biotechnological applications, e.g. as drug-delivery systems and micro-reactors. The reported effects should be considered in electric micro-manipulation procedures on cells and vesicles. They might be useful for applications in microfluidic technologies, for lipid mixing, trapping and displacement, as will be demonstrated. We also believe that our method for visualization of the lipid flows by fluorescently labeled intra-membrane domains will be helpful for studies on membrane behavior in vesicles subjected to shear or mechanical stresses.

  17. Binding contribution between synaptic vesicle membrane and plasma membrane proteins in neurons: an AFM study.

    PubMed

    Sritharan, K C; Quinn, A S; Taatjes, D J; Jena, B P

    1998-01-01

    The final step in the exocytotic process is the docking and fusion of membrane-bound secretory vesicles at the cell plasma membrane. This docking and fusion is brought about by several participating vesicle membrane, plasma membrane and soluble cytosolic proteins. A clear understanding of the interactions between these participating proteins giving rise to vesicle docking and fusion is essential. In this study, the binding force profiles between synaptic vesicle membrane and plasma membrane proteins have been examined for the first time using the atomic force microscope. Binding force contributions of a synaptic vesicle membrane protein VAMP1, and the plasma membrane proteins SNAP-25 and syntaxin, are also implicated from these studies. Our study suggests that these three proteins are the major, if not the only contributors to the interactive binding force that exist between the two membranes. PMID:10452835

  18. Aminosilane/oleic acid vesicles as model membranes of protocells.

    PubMed

    Douliez, Jean-Paul; Zhendre, Vanessa; Grélard, Axelle; Dufourc, Erick J

    2014-12-16

    Oleic acid vesicles represent good models of membrane protocells that could have existed in prebiotic times. Here, we report the formation, growth polymorphism, and dynamics of oleic acid spherical vesicles (1-10 μm), stable elongated vesicles (>50 μm length; 1-3 μm diameter), and chains of vesicles (pearl necklaces, >50 μm length; 1-3 μm diameter) in the presence of aminopropyl triethoxysilane and guanidine hydrochloride. These vesicles exhibit a remarkable behavior with temperature: spherical vesicles only are observed when keeping the sample at 4 °C for 2 h, and self-aggregated spherical vesicles occur upon freezing/unfreezing (-20/20 °C) samples. Rather homogeneous elongated vesicles are reformed upon heating samples at 80 °C. The phenomenon is reversible through cycles of freezing/heating or cooling/heating of the same sample. Deuterium NMR evidences a chain packing rigidity similar to that of phospholipid bilayers in cellular biomembranes. We expect these bilayered vesicles to be surrounded by a layer of aminosilane oligomers, offering a variant model for membrane protocells. PMID:25420203

  19. VAMP-1: a synaptic vesicle-associated integral membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Trimble, W S; Cowan, D M; Scheller, R H

    1988-06-01

    Several proteins are associated with, or are integral components of, the lipid bilayer that forms the delineating membrane of neuronal synaptic vesicles. To characterize these molecules, we used a polyclonal antiserum raised against purified cholinergic synaptic vesicles from Torpedo to screen a cDNA expression library constructed from mRNA of the electromotor nucleus. One clone encodes VAMP-1 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 1), a nervous-system-specific protein of 120 amino acids whose primary sequence can be divided into three domains: a proline-rich amino terminus, a highly charged internal region, and a hydrophobic carboxyl-terminal domain that is predicted to comprise a membrane anchor. Tryptic digestion of intact and lysed vesicles suggests that the protein faces the cytoplasm, where it may play a role in packaging, transport, or release of neurotransmitters. PMID:3380805

  20. Functional Advantages Conferred by Extracellular Prokaryotic Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Andrew J.; Kuehn, Meta J.

    2015-01-01

    The absence of subcellular organelles is a characteristic typically used to distinguish prokaryotic from eukaryotic cells. But recent discoveries do not support this dogma. Over the past 50 years, researchers have begun to appreciate and characterize Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane derived vesicles and Gram-positive and archaeal membrane vesicles. These extracellular, membrane-bound organelles can perform a variety of functions, including binding and delivery of DNA, transport of virulence factors, protection of the cell from outer membrane targeting antimicrobials, and ridding the cell of toxic envelope proteins. Here we review the contributions of these extracellular organelles to prokaryotic physiology and compare these with the contributions of the bacterial interior membrane bound organelles responsible for harvesting light energy and for generating magnetic crystals of heavy metals. Understanding the roles of these multifunctional extracellular vesicle organelles as microbial tools will help us to better realize the diverse interactions that occur in our polymicrobial world. PMID:23615201

  1. Na sup + uptake into colonic enterocyte membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, R.J.; Garty, H.; Benos, D.J.; Rummel, W. Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham )

    1988-04-01

    Na{sup +} uptake was studied in colonic enterocyte membrane vesicles prepared from normal and dexamethasone-treated rats. Vesicles from rats treated with dexamethasone demonstrated a fivefold greater {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake compared with vesicles from normal rats. Most of the tracer uptake in membranes derived from treated rats occurred through a conductive, amiloride-blockable pathway located in vesicles with low native K{sup +} permeability and high Cl{sup {minus}} permeability. Kinetic analysis of the amiloride inhibition curve revealed the presence of two amiloride-blockable pathways, one with a high affinity accounting for 85% of the uptake, and one with a low affinity accounting for only 12% of the uptake. Only the low-affinity pathway was detected with vesicles from normal rats. The high sensitivity to amiloride, the dependence on dexamethasone pretreatment, and the relative permeabilities to K{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} indicate that most of the {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake in membranes derived from treated rats is through a Na{sup +}-specific channel located in apical membrane vesicles. Preincubation of the isolated cells from dexamethasone-treated rats at 37{degree}C in Ca{sup 2+}-free solutions before homogenization and membrane vesicle purification caused a 5- to 10-fold increase in amiloride-blockable {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake compared with vesicles derived from cells maintained at 0{degree}C. The addition of Ca{sup 2+}, but not of Mg{sup 2+}, to the incubation solution markedly reduced this temperature-dependent enhancement in {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake. These results suggest that Na{sup +} transport in colonic enterocytes from dexamethasone-treated rats is regulated by a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent, temperature-sensitive process which causes a sustained change in the apical membrane.

  2. Virulence and Immunomodulatory Roles of Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Terri N.; Kuehn, Meta J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Outer membrane (OM) vesicles are ubiquitously produced by Gram-negative bacteria during all stages of bacterial growth. OM vesicles are naturally secreted by both pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria. Strong experimental evidence exists to categorize OM vesicle production as a type of Gram-negative bacterial virulence factor. A growing body of data demonstrates an association of active virulence factors and toxins with vesicles, suggesting that they play a role in pathogenesis. One of the most popular and best-studied pathogenic functions for membrane vesicles is to serve as natural vehicles for the intercellular transport of virulence factors and other materials directly into host cells. The production of OM vesicles has been identified as an independent bacterial stress response pathway that is activated when bacteria encounter environmental stress, such as what might be experienced during the colonization of host tissues. Their detection in infected human tissues reinforces this theory. Various other virulence factors are also associated with OM vesicles, including adhesins and degradative enzymes. As a result, OM vesicles are heavily laden with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), virulence factors, and other OM components that can impact the course of infection by having toxigenic effects or by the activation of the innate immune response. However, infected hosts can also benefit from OM vesicle production by stimulating their ability to mount an effective defense. Vesicles display antigens and can elicit potent inflammatory and immune responses. In sum, OM vesicles are likely to play a significant role in the virulence of Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. PMID:20197500

  3. Active endocannabinoids are secreted on extracellular membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Martina; Battista, Natalia; Riganti, Loredana; Prada, Ilaria; Antonucci, Flavia; Cantone, Laura; Matteoli, Michela; Maccarrone, Mauro; Verderio, Claudia

    2015-02-01

    Endocannabinoids primarily influence neuronal synaptic communication within the nervous system. To exert their function, endocannabinoids need to travel across the intercellular space. However, how hydrophobic endocannabinoids cross cell membranes and move extracellularly remains an unresolved problem. Here, we show that endocannabinoids are secreted through extracellular membrane vesicles produced by microglial cells. We demonstrate that microglial extracellular vesicles carry on their surface N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA), which is able to stimulate type-1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1), and inhibit presynaptic transmission, in target GABAergic neurons. This is the first demonstration of a functional role of extracellular vesicular transport of endocannabinoids. PMID:25568329

  4. Structural Basis of Vesicle Formation at the Inner Nuclear Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Christoph; Dent, Kyle C.; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Grange, Michael; Bosse, Jens B.; Whittle, Cathy; Klupp, Barbara G.; Siebert, C. Alistair; Vasishtan, Daven; Bäuerlein, Felix J.B.; Cheleski, Juliana; Werner, Stephan; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Henzler, Katja; Demmerle, Justin; Adler, Barbara; Koszinowski, Ulrich; Schermelleh, Lothar; Schneider, Gerd; Enquist, Lynn W.; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Grünewald, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Summary Vesicular nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is becoming recognized as a general cellular mechanism for translocation of large cargoes across the nuclear envelope. Cargo is recruited, enveloped at the inner nuclear membrane (INM), and delivered by membrane fusion at the outer nuclear membrane. To understand the structural underpinning for this trafficking, we investigated nuclear egress of progeny herpesvirus capsids where capsid envelopment is mediated by two viral proteins, forming the nuclear egress complex (NEC). Using a multi-modal imaging approach, we visualized the NEC in situ forming coated vesicles of defined size. Cellular electron cryo-tomography revealed a protein layer showing two distinct hexagonal lattices at its membrane-proximal and membrane-distant faces, respectively. NEC coat architecture was determined by combining this information with integrative modeling using small-angle X-ray scattering data. The molecular arrangement of the NEC establishes the basic mechanism for budding and scission of tailored vesicles at the INM. PMID:26687357

  5. Nanoparticle-triggered release from lipid membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Reimhult, Erik

    2015-12-25

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used in a rapidly expanding number of research and practical applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. We highlight how recent developments in iron oxide nanoparticle design and understanding of nanoparticle membrane interactions have led to applications in magnetically triggered, liposome delivery vehicles with controlled structure. Nanoscale vesicles actuated by incorporated nanoparticles allow for controlling location and timing of compound release, which enables e.g. use of more potent drugs in drug delivery as the interaction with the right target is ensured. This review emphasizes recent results on the connection between nanoparticle design, vesicle assembly and the stability and release properties of the vesicles. While focused on lipid vesicles magnetically actuated through iron oxide nanoparticles, these insights are of general interest for the design of capsule and cell delivery systems for biotechnology controlled by nanoparticles. PMID:25534673

  6. Quinidine-sensitive K+ channels in the basolateral membrane of embryonic coprodeum epithelium: regulation by aldosterone and thyroxine.

    PubMed

    Illek, B; Fischer, H; Clauss, W

    1993-01-01

    Basolateral K+ channels and their regulation during aldosterone- and thyroxine-stimulated Na+ transport were studied in the lower intestinal epithelium (coprodeum) of embryonic chicken in vitro. Isolated tissues of the coprodeum were mounted in Ussing chambers and investigated under voltage-clamped conditions. Simultaneous stimulation with aldosterone (1 mumol.l-1) and thyroxine (1 mumol.l-1) raised short-circuit current after a 1- to 2-h latent period. Maximal values were reached after 6-7 h of hormonal treatment, at which time transepithelial Na+ absorption was more than tripled (77 +/- 11 microA.cm-2) compared to control (24 +/- 8 microA.cm-2). K+ currents across the basolateral membrane were investigated after permeabilizing the apical membrane with the pore-forming antibiotic amphotericin B and application of a mucosal-to-serosal K+ gradient. This K+ current could be dose dependently depressed by the K+ channel blocker quinidine. Fluctuation analysis of the short-circuit current revealed a spontaneous and a blocker-induced Lorentzian noise component in the power density spectra. The Lorentzian corner frequencies increased linearly with the applied blocker concentration. This enabled the calculation of single K+ channel current and K+ channel density. Single K+ channel current was not affected by stimulation, whereas the number of quinidine-sensitive K+ channels in the basolateral membrane increased from 11 to 26.10(6).cm-2 in parallel to the hormonal stimulation transepithelial Na+ transport. This suggests that the basolateral membrane is a physiological target during synergistic aldosterone and thyroxine regulation of transepithelial Na+ transport for maintaining intracellular K+ homeostasis. PMID:8151014

  7. Relative osmotic effects of raffinose, KCl, and NaCl across basolateral cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Welling, L W; Welling, D J; Ochs, T

    1990-10-01

    Lumen-collapsed segments of rabbit S2 proximal tubule were bathed in isotonic medium and then exposed acutely to a medium made hypertonic by the addition of raffinose, NaCl, KCl, Na gluconate, K gluconate, or choline Cl. The result was a rapid efflux of water and a shrinking of the tubule, which could be measured by video techniques within the first 0.1 s. After reequilibration in isotonic medium, each tubule was then exposed to a second hypertonic medium to provide a direct comparison between two different solutes, either NaCl vs. KCl or raffinose vs. any one of the other solutes. Because raffinose is impermeant across the basolateral cell membrane, the ratio of its effect to that of another solute is a measure of the reflection coefficient (sigma) of that other solute. The following results were obtained: sigma KCl = 0.70 +/- 0.02, sigma K gluconate = 0.97 +/- 0.07, sigma Na gluconate = 0.84 +/- 0.06, and sigma choline Cl = 0.75 +/- 0.06. We previously have reported sigma NaCl = 0.56 +/- 0.07. If sigma of each salt is considered to be the arithmetic average of its component parts, and if gluconate and choline are considered to be impermeant, we also obtain sigma Na+ = 0.68, sigma K+ = 0.94, and sigma Cl- = 0.50. PMID:2221098

  8. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. PMID:22234261

  9. Structural lipid changes and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity of gill cells' basolateral membranes during saltwater acclimation in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus, L.) juveniles.

    PubMed

    Lança, Maria João; Machado, Maria; Ferreira, Ana Filipa; Quintella, Bernardo Ruivo; de Almeida, Pedro Raposo

    2015-11-01

    Seawater acclimation is a critical period for anadromous species and a process yet to be understood in lampreys. Considering that changes in lipid composition of the gill cells' basolateral membranes may disrupt the major transporter Na(+)K(+)-ATPase, the goal of this study was to detect changes at this level during juvenile sea lamprey seawater acclimation. The results showed that saltwater acclimation has a direct effect on the fatty acid composition of gill cells basolateral membrane's phospholipids. When held in full-strength seawater, the fatty acid profile of basolateral membrane's phospholipids suffered a restructure by increasing either saturation or the ratio between oleic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid. Simultaneously, the activity of Na(+)K(+)-ATPase revealed a significant and positive correlation with basolateral membrane's cholesterol content in the presence of highest salinity. Our results pointed out for lipid adjustments involving the functional transporter present on the gill cell basolateral membranes to ensure the role played by branchial Na(+)K(+)-ATPase in ion transport during saltwater acclimation process. The responses observed contributed to the strategy adopted by gill cell's basolateral membranes to compensate for osmotic and ionic stressors, to ensure the success of the process of seawater acclimation associated with the downstream trophic migration of juvenile sea lamprey. PMID:26244517

  10. Membrane Elasticity in Giant Vesicles with Fluid Phase Coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, T.; Das, S.; Webb, W. W.; Jenkins, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Biological membranes are known to contain compositional heterogeneities, often termed rafts, with distinguishable composition and function, and these heterogeneities participate in vigorous transport processes. Membrane lipid phase coexistence is expected to modulate these processes through the differing mechanical properties of the bulk domains and line tension at phase boundaries. In this contribution, we compare the predictions from a shape theory derived for vesicles with fluid phase coexistence to the geometry of giant unilamellar vesicles with coexisting liquid-disordered (Ld) and liquid-ordered (Lo) phases. We find a bending modulus for the Lo phase higher than that of the Ld phase and a saddle-splay (Gauss) modulus difference with the Gauss modulus of the Lo phase being more negative than the Ld phase. The Gauss modulus critically influences membrane processes that change topology, such as vesicle fission or fusion, and could therefore be of significant biological relevance in heterogeneous membranes. Our observations of experimental vesicle geometries being modulated by Gaussian curvature moduli differences confirm the prediction by the theory of Juelicher and Lipowsky. PMID:15894634

  11. Sodium channels in membrane vesicles from cultured toad bladder cells

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, C.; Moran, A.; Rossier, B.C.; Garty, H. Ben Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva Institut de Pharmacologie de l'Universite de Lausanne )

    1988-04-01

    Electrical potential-driven {sup 22}Na{sup +} fluxes were measured in membrane vesicles prepared from TBM-18(cl23) cells (a clone of the established cell line TB-M). Fifty to seventy percent of the tracer uptake in vesicles derived from cells that were cultivated on a porous support were blocked by the diuretic amiloride. The amiloride inhibition constant was <0.1 {mu}M, indicating that this flux is mediated by the apical Na{sup +}-specific channels. Vesicles prepared from cells that were not grown on a porous support exhibited much smaller amiloride-sensitive fluxes. Two Ca{sup 2+}-dependent processes that down-regulated the channel conductance and were previously identified in native epithelia were found in the cultured cells as well. Vesicles isolated from cells that were preincubated with 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M aldosterone for 16-20 h exhibited higher amiloride-sensitive conductance than vesicles derived from control, steroid-depleted cells. Thus membrane derived from TBM-18(cl23) cells can be used to characterize the epithelial Na{sup +} channel and its hormonal regulation.

  12. Contribution of bacterial outer membrane vesicles to innate bacterial defense

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are constitutively produced by Gram-negative bacteria throughout growth and have proposed roles in virulence, inflammation, and the response to envelope stress. Here we investigate outer membrane vesiculation as a bacterial mechanism for immediate short-term protection against outer membrane acting stressors. Antimicrobial peptides as well as bacteriophage were used to examine the effectiveness of OMV protection. Results We found that a hyper-vesiculating mutant of Escherichia coli survived treatment by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) polymyxin B and colistin better than the wild-type. Supplementation of E. coli cultures with purified outer membrane vesicles provided substantial protection against AMPs, and AMPs significantly induced vesiculation. Vesicle-mediated protection and induction of vesiculation were also observed for a human pathogen, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), challenged with polymyxin B. When ETEC with was incubated with low concentrations of vesicles concomitant with polymyxin B treatment, bacterial survival increased immediately, and the culture gained resistance to polymyxin B. By contrast, high levels of vesicles also provided immediate protection but prevented acquisition of resistance. Co-incubation of T4 bacteriophage and OMVs showed fast, irreversible binding. The efficiency of T4 infection was significantly reduced by the formation of complexes with the OMVs. Conclusions These data reveal a role for OMVs in contributing to innate bacterial defense by adsorption of antimicrobial peptides and bacteriophage. Given the increase in vesiculation in response to the antimicrobial peptides, and loss in efficiency of infection with the T4-OMV complex, we conclude that OMV production may be an important factor in neutralizing environmental agents that target the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:22133164

  13. Insertion of isolated insulin receptors into placental membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, K; Carlsen, J

    1992-01-01

    Purified human insulin receptors were inserted into placental plasma-membrane vesicles by fusion of membranes with receptor-lysophosphatidylcholine micelles. Scatchard analysis of insulin binding showed that about 10-15% of the added receptors became inserted into the membrane. The receptor number could be increased about 3-fold, corresponding to approx. 5 pmol of receptor/mg of membrane protein. The receptors became firmly bound to the membrane, as they could not be removed by extensive wash. The insertion of exogenous receptors could be demonstrated by immunoblotting. The inserted insulin receptor had the same insulin-binding affinity as the isolated receptor and the endogenous receptor of the membrane. Insulin binding in the presence or absence of Triton X-100 revealed that more than 80% of the exogenous receptors had a right-side-out orientation. Function of the inserted receptors, as observed by insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation, could be demonstrated. About 80% of the added lysophospholipid, corresponding to approx. 160 nmol of lysophospholipid/mg of membrane protein, became integrated into the membrane and was partly metabolized to phospholipid and to non-esterified fatty acid. The method of insertion of isolated insulin receptors using the natural detergent, lysophospholipid, may be a method for insertion of receptors into intact cells, where the lysophospholipid, as in the plasma-membrane vesicles, will be acylated to phospholipid. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1736892

  14. Role of basolateral cell membranes in organic solute reabsorption in rabbit kidneys.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, E C

    1987-06-01

    The present work explores the contributions of basolateral carrier systems in tubular reabsorption of organic solutes. Reabsorption of sugars and amino acids, as previously shown, can be represented by a three-compartment linear model that predicts that 1) if basolateral transport contributes to sugar reabsorption, alpha-methylglucoside reabsorption compared with that of glucose should be characterized by a longer transepithelial transit time (TET) and a correspondingly increased cellular transport pool (S), and 2) saturation of basolateral amino acid carriers, or presence of competing amino acids or other basolateral transport inhibitors, should prolong TET of a test amino acid, and increase S above the expected value. Both predictions were fully confirmed. Heavy metal intoxication not only inhibits transport of amino acids at the brush border, but also prolongs their TET and increases the size of S for a given reabsorbed load. Basolateral extrusion of amino acids is more sensitive to metals than is uptake across the brush border. Although basolateral carriers accelerate return of reabsorbed solute to blood, their contribution to reabsorption does not seem to be mandatory. PMID:3591952

  15. Giant vesicles functionally expressing membrane receptors for an insect pheromone.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Satoshi; Tabuchi, Masashi; Toyota, Taro; Sakurai, Takeshi; Hosoi, Tomohiro; Nomoto, Tomonori; Nakatani, Kei; Fujinami, Masanori; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2014-03-18

    To date, biochemical approaches to membrane receptors have been limited to the following methods: knockout or overexpression of membrane receptors by gene introduction and genome engineering or extraction of membrane receptor-surfactant complexes from innate cells and their introduction into model biomembranes. Here, we describe the development of a third method involving gene expression using cell-free in situ protein synthesis inside model biomembrane capsules. We verified this method by synthesizing olfactory receptors from the silkmoth Bombyx mori inside giant vesicles and found that they were excited in the presence of their ligand the Bombyx mori sex pheromone. PMID:24509495

  16. Corneal endothelial cells possess an elaborate multipolar shape to maximize the basolateral to apical membrane area

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Theresa A.; He, Zhiguo; Boggs, Kristin; Thuret, Gilles; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The corneal endothelium is widely believed to consist of geometrically regular cells interconnected by junctional complexes. However, while en face visualization of the endothelial apical surface reveals characteristic polygonal borders, the overall form of the component cells has rarely been observed. Methods To visualize the shape of individual endothelial cells within the native monolayer, two independent Cre/LoxP-based cell labeling approaches were used. In the first, a P0-Cre mouse driver strain was bred to an R26-tdTomato reporter line to map neural crest–derived endothelial cells with cytosolic red fluorescent protein. In the second, HPRT-Cre induction of small numbers of green and red fluorescent protein–filled cells within a background of unlabeled cells was achieved using a dual-color reporter system, mosaic analysis with double markers (MADM). Selective imaging of the endothelial lateral membranes at different apicobasal levels was accomplished after staining with antibodies to ZO-1 and the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). Results When viewed in their entirety in whole-mount preparations, fluorescent protein–filled cells appear star-shaped, extending multiple dendritic processes that radiate outward in the plane of the monolayer. Examination of rare cases where cells expressing different fluorescent proteins lie directly adjacent to one another reveals that these long processes undergo extensive interdigitation. The resulting overlap allows individual cells to extend over a greater area than if the cell boundaries were mutually exclusive. Anti-NCAM staining of these interlocking peripheral cell extensions reveals an elaborate system of lateral membrane folds that, when viewed in optical sections, increase in complexity from the apical to the basal pole. This not only produces a substantial increase in the basolateral, relative to the apical, membrane but also greatly extends the paracellular pathway as a highly convoluted space

  17. Preparation of right-side-out, acetylcholine receptor enriched intact vesicles from Torpedo californica electroplaque membranes.

    PubMed

    Hartig, P R; Raftery, M A

    1979-04-01

    Intact vesicles enriched in acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica electroplaque membranes can be separated from collapsed or leaky vesicles and membrane sheets on sucrose density gradients. alpha-Bungarotoxin binding in intact vesicles reveals that approximately 95% of the acetylcholine receptor containing vesicles are formed outside-out (with the synaptic membrane face exposed on the vesicle exterior). The binding data also indicated that only 5% or less of the sites for alpha-bungarotoxin binding to synaptic membranes are located on the interior, cytoplasmic face. Intact vesicles are stable to gentle pelleting and resuspension but are easily osmotically shocked. The vesicles are impermeable to sucrose and Ficoll, but glycerol readily transverses to membrane barrier. Intact vesicles provide a sealed, oriented membrane preparation for studies of vectorial acetylcholine receptor mediated processes. PMID:427105

  18. Bending elasticity of vesicle membranes studied by Monte Carlo simulations of vesicle thermal shape fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Penič, Samo; Iglič, Aleš; Bivas, Isak; Fošnarič, Miha

    2015-07-01

    The membrane bending stiffness of nearly spherical lipid vesicles can be deduced from the analysis of their thermal shape fluctuations. The theoretical basis of this analysis [Milner and Safran, Phys. Rev. A: At., Mol., Opt. Phys., 1987, 36, 4371-4379] uses the mean field approximation. In this work we apply Monte Carlo simulations and estimate the error in the determination of the bending stiffness due to the approximations applied in the theory. It is less than 10%. The method presented in this work can also be used to determine the changes of the bending stiffness of biological membranes due to their chemical and/or structural modifications. PMID:25909915

  19. A mini Cl- channel sensitive to external pH in the basolateral membrane of guinea-pig parietal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kajita, H; Morishima, S; Shirakata, Y; Kotera, T; Ueda, S; Okuma, M; Okada, Y

    1995-01-01

    1. Voltage-independent whole-cell Cl- currents were recorded from both single, isolated parietal cells and parietal cells within gastric glands obtained from the fundus of guinea-pig stomach. 2. The Cl- currents were rapidly suppressed by a Cl- channel blocker, NPPB (5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate), added to the (basolateral) bathing solution in a concentration-dependent manner with a half-maximal inhibition concentration of 12 microM. 3. The selectivity sequence among anions was I- > Br- > Cl- > F-, corresponding to Eisenman's sequence I. 4. The Cl- currents were independent of cytosolic Ca2+, cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, GTP-gamma-S and cell volume, and were not affected by application of acid secretagogues, omeprazol, arachidonic acid or prostaglandin E2. 5. Reduction of pH in the (basolateral) bathing solution immediately inhibited the Cl- current with a pK (-log of KD) of 6.3, whereas changes in intracellular pH had no effect. 6. The single-channel conductance was estimated to be 0.46-0.6 pS by variance noise analysis during inhibition of whole-cell Cl- currents by NPPB or acidic pH. 7. It is concluded that pH-sensitive 'mini' Cl- channels, with a sub-picosiemens unitary conductance, exist in the basolateral membrane of guinea-pig parietal cells. PMID:8568665

  20. Lipid Bilayer Membrane-Triggered Presynaptic Vesicle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The formation of functional synapses on artificial substrates is a very important step in the development of engineered in vitro neural networks. Spherical supported bilayer lipid membranes (SS-BLMs) are used here as a novel substrate to demonstrate presynaptic vesicle accumulation at an in vitro synaptic junction. Confocal fluorescence microscopy, cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments have been used to characterize the SS-BLMs. Conventional immunocytochemistry combined with confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the formation of presynaptic vesicles at the neuron−SS-BLM contacts. These results indicate that lipid phases may play a role in the observed phenomenon, in addition to the chemical and electrostatic interactions between the neurons and SS-BLMs. The biocompatibility of lipid bilayers along with their membrane tunability makes the suggested approach a useful “toolkit” for many neuroengineering applications including artificial synapse formation and synaptogenesis in vivo. PMID:22778819

  1. Taurine transport in renal brush-border-membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Rozen, R; Tenenhouse, H S; Scriver, C R

    1979-01-01

    Taurine transport in isolated brush-border-membrane vesicles from rat kidney is concentrative and it is driven by the Na+ gradient and transmembrane potential difference; binding is not a significant component of net uptake. The Na+-dependent component of net uptake is saturable with an apparent Km of 17 microM. The taurine-transport mechanism is selective for beta-amino compounds. PMID:486101

  2. Direct determination of the driving forces for taurocholate uptake into rat liver plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M C; Blitzer, B L; Boyer, J L

    1983-10-01

    To determine directly the driving forces for bile acid entry into the hepatocyte, the uptake of [3H]taurocholic acid into rat liver plasma membrane vesicles was studied. The membrane preparation contained predominantly right-side-out vesicles, and was highly enriched in plasma membrane marker enzymes. The uptake of taurocholate at equilibrium was inversely related to medium osmolarity, indicating transport into an osmotically sensitive space. In the presence of an inwardly directed sodium gradient (NaCl or sodium gluconate), the initial rate of uptake was rapid and taurocholate was transiently accumulated at a concentration twice that at equilibrium (overshoot). Other inwardly directed cation gradients (K+, Li+, choline+) or the presence of sodium in the absence of a gradient (Na+ equilibrated) resulted in a slower initial uptake rate and did not sustain an overshoot. Bile acids inhibited sodium-dependent taurocholate uptake, whereas bromsulphthalein inhibited both sodium-dependent and sodium-independent uptake and D-glucose had no effect on uptake. Uptake was temperature dependent, with maximal overshoots occurring at 25 degrees C. Imposition of a proton gradient across the vesicle (pHo less than pHi) in the absence of a sodium gradient failed to enhance taurocholate uptake, indicating that double ion exchange (Na+-H+, OH- -anion) is unlikely. Creation of a negative intravesicular potential by altering accompanying anions or by valinomycin-induced K+-diffusion potentials did not enhance taurocholate uptake, suggesting an electroneutral transport mechanism. The kinetics of taurocholate uptake demonstrated saturability with a Michaelis constant at 52 microM and maximum velocity of 4.5 nmol X mg-1 X protein X min-1. These studies provide definitive evidence for a sodium gradient-dependent, carrier-mediated, electrically neutral transport mechanism for hepatic taurocholate uptake. These findings are consistent with a model for bile secretion in which the basolateral

  3. Direct determination of the driving forces for taurocholate uptake into rat liver plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M C; Blitzer, B L; Boyer, J L

    1983-01-01

    To determine directly the driving forces for bile acid entry into the hepatocyte, the uptake of [3H]taurocholic acid into rat liver plasma membrane vesicles was studied. The membrane preparation contained predominantly right-side-out vesicles, and was highly enriched in plasma membrane marker enzymes. The uptake of taurocholate at equilibrium was inversely related to medium osmolarity, indicating transport into an osmotically sensitive space. In the presence of an inwardly directed sodium gradient (NaCl or sodium gluconate), the initial rate of uptake was rapid and taurocholate was transiently accumulated at a concentration twice that at equilibrium (overshoot). Other inwardly directed cation gradients (K+, Li+, choline+) or the presence of sodium in the absence of a gradient (Na+ equilibrated) resulted in a slower initial uptake rate and did not sustain an overshoot. Bile acids inhibited sodium-dependent taurocholate uptake, whereas bromsulphthalein inhibited both sodium-dependent and sodium-independent uptake and D-glucose had no effect on uptake. Uptake was temperature dependent, with maximal overshoots occurring at 25 degrees C. Imposition of a proton gradient across the vesicle (pHo less than pHi) in the absence of a sodium gradient failed to enhance taurocholate uptake, indicating that double ion exchange (Na+-H+, OH- -anion) is unlikely. Creation of a negative intravesicular potential by altering accompanying anions or by valinomycin-induced K+-diffusion potentials did not enhance taurocholate uptake, suggesting an electroneutral transport mechanism. The kinetics of taurocholate uptake demonstrated saturability with a Michaelis constant at 52 microM and maximum velocity of 4.5 nmol X mg-1 X protein X min-1. These studies provide definitive evidence for a sodium gradient-dependent, carrier-mediated, electrically neutral transport mechanism for hepatic taurocholate uptake. These findings are consistent with a model for bile secretion in which the basolateral

  4. Origin of life: LUCA and extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, S.; Forterre, P.

    2016-01-01

    Cells from the three domains of life produce extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs), suggesting that EMV production is an important aspect of cellular physiology. EMVs have been implicated in many aspects of cellular life in all domains, including stress response, toxicity against competing strains, pathogenicity, detoxification and resistance against viral attack. These EMVs represent an important mode of inter-cellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer of DNA, RNA, proteins and lipids between cells. Here, we review recent progress in the understanding of EMV biology and their various roles. We focus on the role of membrane vesicles in early cellular evolution and how they would have helped shape the nature of the last universal common ancestor. A membrane-protected micro-environment would have been a key to the survival of spontaneous molecular systems and efficient metabolic reactions. Interestingly, the morphology of EMVs is strongly reminiscent of the morphology of some virions. It is thus tempting to make a link between the origin of the first protocell via the formation of vesicles and the origin of viruses.

  5. KCNJ10 (Kir4.1) is expressed in the basolateral membrane of the cortical thick ascending limb.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengbiao; Wang, Lijun; Su, Xiao-Tong; Lin, Dao-Hong; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the role of Kcnj10 (Kir.4.1) in contributing to the basolateral K conductance in the cortical thick ascending limb (cTAL) using Kcnj10(+/+) wild-type (WT) and Kcnj10(-/-) knockout (KO) mice. The patch-clamp experiments detected a 40- and an 80-pS K channel in the basolateral membrane of the cTAL. Moreover, the probability of finding the 40-pS K was significantly higher in the late part of the cTAL close to the distal convoluted tubule than those in the initial part. Immunostaining showed that Kcnj10 staining was detected in the basolateral membrane of the cTAL but the expression was not uniformly distributed. The disruption of Kcnj10 completely eliminated the 40-pS K channel but not the 80-pS K channel, suggesting the role of Kcnj10 in forming the 40-pS K channel of the cTAL. Also, the disruption of Kcnj10 increased the probability of finding the 80-pS K channel in the cTAL, especially in the late part of the cTAL. Because the channel open probability of the 80-pS K channel in KO was similar to those of WT mice, the increase in the 80-pS K channel may be achieved by increasing K channel number. The whole cell recording further showed that K reversal potential measured with 5 mM K in the bath and 140 mM K in the pipette was the same in the WT and KO mice. Moreover, Western blot and immunostaining showed that the disruption of Kcnj10 did not affect the expression of Na-K-Cl cotransporter 2 (NKCC2). We conclude that Kir.4.1 is expressed in the basolateral membrane of cTAL and that the disruption of Kir.4.1 has no significant effect on the membrane potential of the cTAL and NKCC2 expression. PMID:25834074

  6. Numerical computations of the dynamics of fluidic membranes and vesicles.

    PubMed

    Barrett, John W; Garcke, Harald; Nürnberg, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Vesicles and many biological membranes are made of two monolayers of lipid molecules and form closed lipid bilayers. The dynamical behavior of vesicles is very complex and a variety of forms and shapes appear. Lipid bilayers can be considered as a surface fluid and hence the governing equations for the evolution include the surface (Navier-)Stokes equations, which in particular take the membrane viscosity into account. The evolution is driven by forces stemming from the curvature elasticity of the membrane. In addition, the surface fluid equations are coupled to bulk (Navier-)Stokes equations. We introduce a parametric finite-element method to solve this complex free boundary problem and present the first three-dimensional numerical computations based on the full (Navier-)Stokes system for several different scenarios. For example, the effects of the membrane viscosity, spontaneous curvature, and area difference elasticity (ADE) are studied. In particular, it turns out, that even in the case of no viscosity contrast between the bulk fluids, the tank treading to tumbling transition can be obtained by increasing the membrane viscosity. Besides the classical tank treading and tumbling motions, another mode (called the transition mode in this paper, but originally called the vacillating-breathing mode and subsequently also called trembling, transition, and swinging mode) separating these classical modes appears and is studied by us numerically. We also study how features of equilibrium shapes in the ADE and spontaneous curvature models, like budding behavior or starfish forms, behave in a shear flow. PMID:26651720

  7. Numerical computations of the dynamics of fluidic membranes and vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, John W.; Garcke, Harald; Nürnberg, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Vesicles and many biological membranes are made of two monolayers of lipid molecules and form closed lipid bilayers. The dynamical behavior of vesicles is very complex and a variety of forms and shapes appear. Lipid bilayers can be considered as a surface fluid and hence the governing equations for the evolution include the surface (Navier-)Stokes equations, which in particular take the membrane viscosity into account. The evolution is driven by forces stemming from the curvature elasticity of the membrane. In addition, the surface fluid equations are coupled to bulk (Navier-)Stokes equations. We introduce a parametric finite-element method to solve this complex free boundary problem and present the first three-dimensional numerical computations based on the full (Navier-)Stokes system for several different scenarios. For example, the effects of the membrane viscosity, spontaneous curvature, and area difference elasticity (ADE) are studied. In particular, it turns out, that even in the case of no viscosity contrast between the bulk fluids, the tank treading to tumbling transition can be obtained by increasing the membrane viscosity. Besides the classical tank treading and tumbling motions, another mode (called the transition mode in this paper, but originally called the vacillating-breathing mode and subsequently also called trembling, transition, and swinging mode) separating these classical modes appears and is studied by us numerically. We also study how features of equilibrium shapes in the ADE and spontaneous curvature models, like budding behavior or starfish forms, behave in a shear flow.

  8. Protective role of E. coli outer membrane vesicles against antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Heramb M; Nagaraj, R; Jagannadham, Medicharla V

    2015-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from bacteria are known to posses both defensive and protective functions and thus participate in community related functions. In the present study, outer membrane vesicles have been shown to protect the producer bacterium and two other bacterial species from the growth inhibitory effects of some antibiotics. The OMVs isolated from E. coli MG1655 protected the bacteria against membrane-active antibiotics colistin, melittin. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 could also protect P. aeruginosa NCTC6751 and A. radiodioresistens MMC5 against these membrane-active antibiotics. However, OMVs could not protect any of these bacteria against the other antibiotics ciprofloxacin, streptomycin and trimethoprim. Hence, OMVs appears to protect the bacterial community against membrane-active antibiotics and not other antibiotics, which have different mechanism of actions. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 sequester the antibiotic colistin, whereas their protein components degrade the antimicrobial peptide melittin. Proteomic analysis of OMVs revealed the presence of proteases and peptidases which appear to be involved in this process. Thus, the protection of bacteria by OMVs against antibiotics is situation dependent and the mechanism differs for different situations. These studies suggest that OMVs of bacteria form a common defense for the bacterial community against specific antibiotics. PMID:26640046

  9. Binding of E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin to rat intestinal brush borders and to basolateral membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, A.; Cohen, M.B.; Overmann, G.; Thompson, M.R.; Giannella, R.A.

    1987-09-01

    We studied the binding of E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) to rat brush borders (BB) and to basolateral membranes (BLM) using a biologically active monoiodinated radioligand (( /sup 125/I)STa) and highly enriched BB and BLM preparations free of other significant organelle contamination. Binding of (/sup 125/I)STa to BB was specific; time-, temperature-, and pH-dependent; saturable; and partially reversible. Nonlabeled toxin competitively inhibited the binding of radioligand to BB in a dose-related manner. Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of receptors with an apparent affinity constant of 8.7 +/- 1.5 X 10(8) l/mol. Binding was not affected by amino acids, sugars, and lectins. Proteolytic enzymes significantly decreased binding, although several did so by modifying the radioligand. Trypsin inhibited binding without modifying the radioligand thus supporting the proteinaceous nature of the receptor. Since the enrichment in binding activity in the BB over the homogenate was significantly lower than the enrichment in sucrase activity, we concluded that binding activity is probably associated with other membranous domains, but direct examination revealed no binding activity on basolateral membranes.

  10. Characterization of Water Channels in Wheat Root Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Niemietz, C. M.; Tyerman, S. D.

    1997-01-01

    The functional significance of water channels in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) root membranes was assessed using light scattering to measure vesicle shrinking in response to osmotic gradients rapidly imposed in a stopped flow apparatus. Vesicles were obtained from both a plasma membrane fraction and a plasma membrane-depleted endomembrane fraction including tonoplast vesicles. Osmotic water permeability (Pos) in the endomembrane fraction was high (Pos= 86.0 [mu]m s-1) with a low activation energy (EA= 23.32 kJ mol-1 [plus or minus] 3.88 SE), and was inhibited by mercurials (K1= 40 [mu]M HgCl2, where K1 is the inhibition constant for half-maximal inhibition), suggesting participation of water channels. A high ratio of osmotic to diffusional permeability (Pd) (using D2O as a tracer, Pos/Pd = 7 [plus or minus] 0.5 SE) also supported this view. For the endomembrane fraction there was a marked decrease in Pos with increasing osmotic gradient that was not observed in the plasma membrane fraction. Osmotic water permeability in the plasma membrane fraction was lower (Pos= 12.5 [mu]m s-1) with a high activation energy (EA= 48.07 kJ mol-1 [plus or minus] 3.63 SE) and no mercury inhibition. Nevertheless, Pos/Pd was found to be substantially higher than one (Pos= 3 [plus or minus] 0.2 SE), indicating that water channels mediated water flow in this fraction, too. Possible distortion of the Pos/Pd value by unstirred layer effects was shown to be unlikely. PMID:12223824

  11. Use of inside-out chloroplast thylakoid membrane vesicles for studying electron transport and membrane structure

    SciTech Connect

    Atta-Asafo-Adjei, E.

    1987-01-01

    Inside-out and right-side-out thylakoid vesicles were isolated from spinach chloroplasts by aqueous-polymer two-phase partitioning following mechanical fragmentation of thylakoid membranes by Yeda press treatment. Externally added plastocyanin stimulated the whole-chain and PSI electron transport rates in the inside-out thylakoid vesicles by about 500 and 350%, respectively, compared to about 50% stimulation for both assays in the fraction enriched in right-side-out vesicles. The electron transport between PSII and PSI in inside-out thylakoid vesicles appears to be interrupted due to plastocyanin release from the thylakoids by the Yeda press treatment, but it was restored by externally added plastocyanin. Acetic anhydride chemical modification and uncoupler-induced proton release from dark-adapted membranes are probes for detecting the sequested proton domains in thylakoid membranes. Both assays were used to find out if inside-out membranes retain metastable, localized proton binding domains. Treatment of dark-maintained inside-out thylakoid membrane vesicles with ({sup 3}H)acetic anhydride showed no uncoupler-induced increase in acetylation of the 33, 24, and 18 kDa polypeptides of the oxygen-evolving-complex, indicating complete loss of the implicated proton domains in these polypeptides. The various steps in the inside-out preparation were studied to discern which steps(s) leads to the loss of the metastable domain proton pool.

  12. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions. PMID:26926999

  13. SULFATE/BICARBONATE ANTIPORT BY LOBSTER HEPATOPANCREATIC BASOLATERAL MEMBRANE VESICLES. (R823068)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. SULFATE-OXALATE EXCHANGE IN LOBSTER HEPATOPANCRETIC BASOLATERAL MEMBRANE VESICLES. (R823068)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. Association of the fusion protein NSF with clathrin-coated vesicle membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Steel, G J; Tagaya, M; Woodman, P G

    1996-01-01

    N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) is a component of intracellular transport reactions. In order to understand the role of NSF during the fusion of endocytic transport vesicles with the endosome, we have investigated the binding of NSF to purified clathrin-coated vesicle components. First, we have examined whether detergent-solubilized coated vesicle membranes will support formation of NSF-containing 'fusion complexes'. Our results show that these membranes are substantially enriched in components capable of driving formation of these complexes, when compared with membranes from other sources. Secondly, we have analysed coated vesicle preparations for their NSF content. Coated vesicle preparations contain significant amounts of NSF. This was shown to be associated with coated vesicles rather than contaminating membranes by a number of criteria, and was found to be bound in an ATP-independent manner. These findings are discussed in the light of current models for vesicle fusion. Images PMID:8631296

  16. Characterization and Immunogenicity of Outer Membrane Vesicles from Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Singh, Satparkash; Sunil Kumar, B V; Mahajan, Kanika; Verma, Ramneek

    2016-01-01

    Bovine brucellosis is a worldwide spread zoonotic disease. The objectives of this study were characterization of outer membrane vesicles from B. abortus and to evaluate their immunogenicity in mice. For this purpose, OMVs were derived from B. abortus strain 99 using ultracentrifugation method. Isolated OMVs were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transmission electron microscopy which revealed spherical 20-300 nm structures rich in proteins. OMVs also showed immuno-reactivity with mice antisera in Western blot. Further, indirect ELISA showed specific and high-titer immune responses against the antigens present in OMVs suggesting their potential for a safe acellular vaccine candidate. PMID:26684926

  17. Identification of Outer Membrane Vesicles Derived from Orientia tsutsugamushi

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Myoung; Kwon, Hea Yoon; Im, Jae-Hyong; Baek, Ji Hyeon; Kang, Jae-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi, a causative pathogen of Scrub typhus, is a gram-negative intracellular bacterium. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced from the membrane of bacteria and play many roles related to the survival of the pathogen. However, there have been no reports confirming whether O. tsutsugamushi indeed produce OMVs. O. tsutsugamushi boryong was cultured in ECV-304 cells for the purification of OMVs. Western blot analysis and immunoenrichment using anti-O. tsutsugamushi monoclonal antibody and electron microscopy were employed for identification and characterization of OMVs. We confirm the presence of OMVs derived from O. tsutsugamushi, and also found that those OMVs contain a major surface antigen of 56-kDa protein and variant immunogenic antigens. PMID:26130947

  18. LPS Remodeling Triggers Formation of Outer Membrane Vesicles in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Elhenawy, Wael; Bording-Jorgensen, Michael; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Haurat, M. Florencia; Wine, Eytan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are proposed to mediate multiple functions during pathogenesis and symbiosis. However, the mechanisms responsible for OMV formation remain poorly understood. It has been shown in eukaryotic membranes that lipids with an inverted-cone shape favor the formation of positive membrane curvatures. Based on these studies, we formulated the hypothesis that lipid A deacylation might impose shape modifications that result in the curvature of the outer membrane (OM) and subsequent OMV formation. We tested the effect of lipid A remodeling on OMV biogenesis employing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model organism. Expression of the lipid A deacylase PagL resulted in increased vesiculation, without inducing an envelope stress response. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed profound differences in the patterns of lipid A in OM and OMV, with accumulation of deacylated lipid A forms exclusively in OMV. OMV biogenesis by intracellular bacteria upon macrophage infection was drastically reduced in a pagL mutant strain. We propose a novel mechanism for OMV biogenesis requiring lipid A deacylation in the context of a multifactorial process that involves the orchestrated remodeling of the outer membrane. PMID:27406567

  19. Ciprofloxacin encapsulation into giant unilamellar vesicles: membrane binding and release.

    PubMed

    Kaszás, Nóra; Bozó, Tamás; Budai, Marianna; Gróf, Pál

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed at investigating some respects of binding and interaction between water-soluble drugs and liposomal carrier systems depending on their size and lamellarity. As model substance, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (CPFX) was incorporated into giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) to study their CPFX encapsulation/binding capacity. To characterize molecular interactions of various CPFX microspecies with lipid bilayer, zeta potential and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy measurements were performed. The increase of the zeta potential at pH 5.4 but no change at pH 7.2 was interpreted in terms of the CPFX microspecies' distribution at the two pH values. EPR observations showed an increased fluidity because of CPFX binding to GUVs. We worked out and applied a three-compartment dialysis model to separately determine the rate of drug diffusion through the liposomal membrane. Equilibrium dialysis showed (a) different permeation of CPFX through the membranes of GUVs and multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), with characteristic half-lives of 54.4 and 18.1 h, respectively; and (b) increased retention of CPFX in case of GUVs with released amounts of 70% compared with about 97% in case of MLVs. Our results may provide further details for efficient design of liposomal formulations incorporating water-soluble drugs. PMID:23233199

  20. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets

    PubMed Central

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated. PMID:27517914

  1. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    PubMed

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated. PMID:27517914

  2. Continuous Microfluidic Fabrication of Synthetic Asymmetric Vesicles for Membrane Biology Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li; Schertzer, Jeffrey; Chiarot, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Membrane vesicles are spherical structures comprised of a single lipid bilayer enclosing an aqueous lumen. In nature, vesicles carry out many important functions in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. When preparing vesicles artificially, it is difficult to simultaneously control vesicle membrane asymmetry, size, unilamellarity, throughput, and monodispersity. Membrane asymmetry, where each leaflet of the lipid bilayer consists of a different lipid distribution, is of particular importance as it is a feature of nearly all natural membranes. In this study, we report on a novel microfluidic strategy to build monodisperse asymmetric vesicles with customized membrane composition, size, and luminal content at high-throughput. The microfluidic device consists of a triangular post region and two flow-focusing regions. The major steps of the vesicle fabrication process include: (1) assembly of the inner-leaflet, (2) continuous flow separation - replacing the inner-leaflet-lipid with the outer-leaflet-lipid, (3) assembly of the outer-leaflet, and (4) extraction of the intermediate oil layer. Membrane asymmetry and unilamellarity are confirmed using a fluorescence quenching assay and a membrane protein insertion assay, respectively. Our vesicle fabrication method can yield membrane asymmetries as high as 95%, which is maintained at a high-degree for over 30 hours. In addition, over 80% of the vesicles remain stable for at least 6 weeks. The effect of bilayer composition on the mechanical properties of the membrane and the role of small molecules on membrane architecture will be investigated.

  3. Parameters affecting the fusion of unilamellar phospholipid vesicles with planar bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, F S; Akabas, M H; Zimmerberg, J; Finkelstein, A

    1984-03-01

    It was previously shown (Cohen, F. S., J. Zimmerberg, and A. Finkelstein, 1980, J. Gen. Physiol., 75:251-270) that multilamellar phospholipid vesicles can fuse with decane-containing phospholipid bilayer membranes. An essential requirement for fusion was an osmotic gradient across the planar membrane, with the vesicle-containing (cis) side hyperosmotic with respect to the opposite (trans) side. We now report that unilamellar vesicles will fuse with "hydrocarbon-free" membranes subject to these same osmotic conditions. Thus the same conditions that apply to fusion of multilamellar vesicles with planar bilayer membranes also apply to fusion of unilamellar vesicles with these membranes, and hydrocarbon is not required for the fusion process. If the vesicles and/or planar membrane contain negatively charged lipids, divalent cation (approximately 15 mM Ca++) is required in the cis compartment (in addition to the osmotic gradient across the membrane) to obtain substantial fusion rates. On the other hand, vesicles made from uncharged lipids readily fuse with planar phosphatidylethanolamine planar membranes in the near absence of divalent cation with just an osmotic gradient. Vesicles fuse much more readily with phosphatidylethanolamine-containing than with phosphatidylcholine-containing planar membranes. Although hydrocarbon (decane) is not required in the planar membrane for fusion, it does affect the rate of fusion and causes the fusion process to be dependent on stirring in the cis compartment. PMID:6699081

  4. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Physiological Role and Signalling Properties of Extracellular Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Iraci, Nunzio; Leonardi, Tommaso; Gessler, Florian; Vega, Beatriz; Pluchino, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a heterogeneous population of secreted membrane vesicles, with distinct biogenesis routes, biophysical properties and different functions both in physiological conditions and in disease. The release of EVs is a widespread biological process, which is conserved across species. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that several bioactive molecules are trafficked with(in) EVs, such as microRNAs, mRNAs, proteins and lipids. The understanding of their final impact on the biology of specific target cells remains matter of intense debate in the field. Also, EVs have attracted great interest as potential novel cell-free therapeutics. Here we describe the proposed physiological and pathological functions of EVs, with a particular focus on their molecular content. Also, we discuss the advances in the knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the secretion of EV-associated molecules and the specific pathways activated upon interaction with the target cell, highlighting the role of EVs in the context of the immune system and as mediators of the intercellular signalling in the brain. PMID:26861302

  5. DNA Inversion Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Yoneda, Saori; Nariya, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Motoo; Secher, Thomas; Miyake, Yoichiro; Oswald, Eric; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Phase changes in Bacteroides fragilis, a member of the human colonic microbiota, mediate variations in a vast array of cell surface molecules, such as capsular polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins through DNA inversion. The results of the present study show that outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in this anaerobe is also controlled by DNA inversions at two distantly localized promoters, IVp-I and IVp-II that are associated with extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis and the expression of outer membrane proteins. These promoter inversions are mediated by a single tyrosine recombinase encoded by BF2766 (orthologous to tsr19 in strain NCTC9343) in B. fragilis YCH46, which is located near IVp-I. A series of BF2766 mutants were constructed in which the two promoters were locked in different configurations (IVp-I/IVp-II = ON/ON, OFF/OFF, ON/OFF or OFF/ON). ON/ON B. fragilis mutants exhibited hypervesiculating, whereas the other mutants formed only a trace amount of OMVs. The hypervesiculating ON/ON mutants showed higher resistance to treatment with bile, LL-37, and human β-defensin 2. Incubation of wild-type cells with 5% bile increased the population of cells with the ON/ON genotype. These results indicate that B. fragilis regulates the formation of OMVs through DNA inversions at two distantly related promoter regions in response to membrane stress, although the mechanism underlying the interplay between the two regions controlled by the invertible promoters remains unknown. PMID:26859882

  6. Cellular Asymmetric Catalysis by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A8 Shows Functional Localization to the Basolateral Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Kerstin; Tumova, Sarka; Kerimi, Asimina; Williamson, Gary

    2015-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are highly expressed in liver, intestine and kidney, and catalyze the glucuronic acid conjugation of both endogenous compounds and xenobiotics. Using recombinant human UGT isoforms, we show that glucuronic acid conjugation of the model substrate, (−)-epicatechin, is catalyzed mainly by UGT1A8 and UGT1A9. In HepG2 cells, pretreatment with polyunsaturated fatty acids increased substrate glucuronidation. In the intestinal Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-culture model, overall relative glucuronidation rates were much higher than in HepG2 cells, and (−)-epicatechin was much more readily conjugated when applied to the basolateral side of the cell monolayer. Under these conditions, 95% of the conjugated product was effluxed back to the site of application, and none of the other phase 2-derived metabolites followed this distribution pattern. HT29-MTX cells contained >1000-fold higher levels of UGT1A8 mRNA than Caco-2 or HepG2 cells. Gene expression of UGT1A8 increased after treatment of cells with docosahexaenoic acid, as did UGT1A protein levels. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting showed the presence of UGT1A in the basal and lateral parts of the plasma membrane of HT29-MTX cells. These results suggest that some of the UGT1A8 enzyme is not residing in the endoplasmic reticulum but spans the plasma membrane, resulting in increased accessibility to compounds outside the cell. This facilitates more efficient conjugation of substrate and is additionally coupled with rapid efflux by functionally associated basolateral transporters. This novel molecular strategy allows the cell to carry out conjugation without the xenobiotic entering into the interior of the cell. PMID:25586184

  7. Cell-sized asymmetric lipid vesicles facilitate the investigation of asymmetric membranes.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Koki; Kawano, Ryuji; Osaki, Toshihisa; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetric lipid giant vesicles have been used to model the biochemical reactions in cell membranes. However, methods for producing asymmetric giant vesicles lead to the inclusion of an organic solvent layer that affects the mechanical and physical characteristics of the membrane. Here we describe the formation of asymmetric giant vesicles that include little organic solvent, and use them to investigate the dynamic responses of lipid molecules in the vesicle membrane. We formed the giant vesicles via the inhomogeneous break-up of a lipid microtube generated by applying a jet flow to an asymmetric planar lipid bilayer. The asymmetric giant vesicles showed a lipid flip-flop behaviour in the membrane, superficially similar to the lipid flip-flop activity observed in apoptotic cells. In vitro synthesis of membrane proteins into the asymmetric giant vesicles revealed that the lipid asymmetry in bilayer membranes improves the reconstitution ratio of membrane proteins. Our asymmetric giant vesicles will be useful in elucidating lipid-lipid and lipid-membrane protein interactions involved in the regulation of cellular functions. PMID:27554415

  8. Membrane vesicles: A simplified system for studying auxin transport

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin responsible for regulation of growth, is transported polarly in plants. Several different models have been suggested to account for IAA transport by cells and its accumulation by membrane vesicles. One model sees diffusion of IAA driven by a pH gradient. The anion of a lipophilic weak acid like IAA or butyrate accumulates in an alkaline compartment in accord with the size of the pH gradient The accumulation of IAA may be diminished by the permeability of its lipophilic anion. This anion leak may be blocked by NPA. With anion efflux blocked, a gradient of two pH units would support an IAA accumulation of less than 50-fold at equilibrium (2) Another model sees diffusion of IAA in parallel with a saturable symport (IAA[sup [minus

  9. Detection of outer membrane vesicles in Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Yehudah A; Florez, Catalina; Baker, Kristopher M; Schertzer, Jeffrey W; Mahler, Gretchen J

    2015-10-01

    It has been well established that many species of Gram-negative bacteria release nanoscale outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) during normal growth. Furthermore, the roles of these structures in heterotrophic bacteria have been extensively characterized. However, little is known about the existence or function of OMVs in photoautotrophs. In the present study, we report for the first time the production of OMVs by the model photosynthetic organism Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a species of biotechnological importance. We detected extracellular proteins and lipids in cell-free supernatants derived from Synechocystis culture, yet the cytoplasmic and thylakoid membrane markers NADH oxidase and chlorophyll were absent. This indicated that the extracellular proteins and lipids derived from the outer membrane, and not from cell lysis. Furthermore, we identified spherical structures within the expected size range of OMVs in Synechocystis culture using scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, these results suggest that the repertoire of Gram-negative bacteria that are known to produce OMVs may be expanded to include Synechocystis PCC6803. Because of the considerable genetic characterization of Synechocystis in particular, our discovery has the potential to support novel biotechnological applications as well. PMID:26363014

  10. Purification of outer membrane vesicles from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and their activation of an IL-8 response

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Susanne J.; Kuehn, Meta J.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable lung injury results from the inflammatory response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The P. aeruginosa laboratory strain PAO1, an environmental isolate, and isolates from CF patients were cultured in vitro and outer membrane vesicles from those cultures were quantitated, purified, and characterized. Vesicles were produced throughout the growth phases of the culture and vesicle yield was strain-independent. Strain-dependent differences in the protein composition of vesicles were quantitated and identified. The aminopeptidase PaAP (PA2939) was highly enriched in vesicles from CF isolates. Vesicles from all strains elicited IL-8 secretion by lung epithelial cells. These results suggest that P. aeruginosa colonizing the CF lung may produce vesicles with a particular composition and that the vesicles could contribute to inflammation. PMID:16807039

  11. Interaction of chloride and bicarbonate transport across the basolateral membrane of rabbit proximal straight tubule. Evidence for sodium coupled chloride/bicarbonate exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, S; Yoshiyama, N

    1988-01-01

    The existence of chloride/bicarbonate exchange across the basolateral membrane and its physiologic significance were examined in rabbit proximal tubules. S2 segments of the proximal straight tubule were perfused in vitro and changes in intracellular pH (pHi) and chloride activity (aCli) were monitored by double-barreled microelectrodes. Total peritubular chloride replacement with gluconate increased pHi by 0.8, and this change was inhibited by a pretreatment with an anion transport inhibitor, SITS. Peritubular bicarbonate reduction increased aCli, and most of this increase was lost when ambient sodium was totally removed. The reduction rates of pHi induced by a peritubular bicarbonate reduction or sodium removal were attenuated by 20% by withdrawal of ambient chloride. SITS application to the bath in the control condition quickly increased pHi, but did not change aCli. However, the aCli slightly decreased in response to SITS when the basolateral bicarbonate efflux was increased by reducing peritubular bicarbonate concentration. It is concluded that sodium coupled chloride/bicarbonate exchange is present in parallel with sodium-bicarbonate cotransport in the basolateral membrane of the rabbit proximal tubule, and it contributes to the basolateral bicarbonate and chloride transport. PMID:2450891

  12. Selective flow-induced vesicle rupture to sort by membrane mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Pommella, Angelo; Brooks, Nicholas J.; Seddon, John M.; Garbin, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Vesicle and cell rupture caused by large viscous stresses in ultrasonication is central to biomedical and bioprocessing applications. The flow-induced opening of lipid membranes can be exploited to deliver drugs into cells, or to recover products from cells, provided that it can be obtained in a controlled fashion. Here we demonstrate that differences in lipid membrane and vesicle properties can enable selective flow-induced vesicle break-up. We obtained vesicle populations with different membrane properties by using different lipids (SOPC, DOPC, or POPC) and lipid:cholesterol mixtures (SOPC:chol and DOPC:chol). We subjected vesicles to large deformations in the acoustic microstreaming flow generated by ultrasound-driven microbubbles. By simultaneously deforming vesicles with different properties in the same flow, we determined the conditions in which rupture is selective with respect to the membrane stretching elasticity. We also investigated the effect of vesicle radius and excess area on the threshold for rupture, and identified conditions for robust selectivity based solely on the mechanical properties of the membrane. Our work should enable new sorting mechanisms based on the difference in membrane composition and mechanical properties between different vesicles, capsules, or cells. PMID:26302783

  13. Immunogenicity of Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Roier, Sandro; Fenninger, Judith C.; Leitner, Deborah R.; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is able to cause disease in humans and in a wide range of animal hosts, including fowl cholera in birds, atrophic rhinitis in pigs, and snuffles in rabbits. Together with Mannheimia haemolytica, P. multocida also represents a major bacterial causative agent of bovine respiratory disease (BRD), which is one of the most important causes for economic losses for the cattle backgrounding and feedlot industry. Commercially available vaccines only partially prevent infections caused by P. multocida and M. haemolytica. Thus, this study characterized the immunogenicity of P. multocida and M. haemolytica outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) upon intranasal immunization of BALB/c mice. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) revealed that OMVs derived from P. multocida or M. haemolytica are able to induce robust humoral and mucosal immune responses against the respective donor strain. In addition, also significant cross-immunogenic potential was observed for both OMV types. Colonization studies showed that a potential protective immune response against P. multocida is not only achieved by immunization with P. multocida OMVs, but also by immunization with OMVs derived from M. haemolytica. Immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that M. haemolytica OMVs induce a more complex immune response compared to P. multocida OMVs. The outer membrane proteins OmpA, OmpH, and P6 were identified as the three major immunogenic proteins of P. multocida OMVs. Amongst others, the serotype 1-specific antigen, an uncharacterized outer membrane protein, as well as the outer membrane proteins P2 and OmpA were found to be the most important antigens of M. haemolytica OMVs. These findings are useful for the future development of broad-spectrum OMV based vaccines against BRD and other infections caused by P. multocida or M. haemolytica. PMID:23731905

  14. Actin dynamics provides membrane tension to merge fusing vesicles into the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Wen, Peter J; Grenklo, Staffan; Arpino, Gianvito; Tan, Xinyu; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Heureaux, Johanna; Peng, Shi-Yong; Chiang, Hsueh-Cheng; Hamid, Edaeni; Zhao, Wei-Dong; Shin, Wonchul; Näreoja, Tuomas; Evergren, Emma; Jin, Yinghui; Karlsson, Roger; Ebert, Steven N; Jin, Albert; Liu, Allen P; Shupliakov, Oleg; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Vesicle fusion is executed via formation of an Ω-shaped structure (Ω-profile), followed by closure (kiss-and-run) or merging of the Ω-profile into the plasma membrane (full fusion). Although Ω-profile closure limits release but recycles vesicles economically, Ω-profile merging facilitates release but couples to classical endocytosis for recycling. Despite its crucial role in determining exocytosis/endocytosis modes, how Ω-profile merging is mediated is poorly understood in endocrine cells and neurons containing small ∼30-300 nm vesicles. Here, using confocal and super-resolution STED imaging, force measurements, pharmacology and gene knockout, we show that dynamic assembly of filamentous actin, involving ATP hydrolysis, N-WASP and formin, mediates Ω-profile merging by providing sufficient plasma membrane tension to shrink the Ω-profile in neuroendocrine chromaffin cells containing ∼300 nm vesicles. Actin-directed compounds also induce Ω-profile accumulation at lamprey synaptic active zones, suggesting that actin may mediate Ω-profile merging at synapses. These results uncover molecular and biophysical mechanisms underlying Ω-profile merging. PMID:27576662

  15. Complexin-1 Enhances the On-Rate of Vesicle Docking via Simultaneous SNARE and Membrane Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In synaptic terminals, complexin is thought to have inhibitory and activating roles for spontaneous “mini” release and evoked synchronized neurotransmitter release, respectively. We used single vesicle–vesicle microscopy imaging to study the effect of complexin-1 on the on-rate of docking between vesicles that mimic synaptic vesicles and the plasma membrane. We found that complexin-1 enhances the on-rate of docking of synaptic vesicle mimics containing full-length synaptobrevin-2 and full-length synaptotagmin-1 to plasma membrane-mimicking vesicles containing full-length syntaxin-1A and SNAP-25A. This effect requires the C-terminal domain of complexin-1, which binds to the membrane, the presence of PS in the membrane, and the core region of complexin-1, which binds to the SNARE complex. PMID:24083833

  16. The lethal cargo of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Berleman, James E.; Allen, Simon; Danielewicz, Megan A.; Remis, Jonathan P.; Gorur, Amita; Cunha, Jack; Hadi, Masood Z.; Zusman, David R.; Northen, Trent R.; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a bacterial micro-predator known for hunting other microbes in a wolf pack-like manner. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced in large quantities by M. xanthus and have a highly organized structure in the extracellular milieu, sometimes occurring in chains that link neighboring cells within a biofilm. OMVs may be a vehicle for mediating wolf pack activity by delivering hydrolytic enzymes and antibiotics aimed at killing prey microbes. Here, both the protein and small molecule cargo of the OMV and membrane fractions of M. xanthus were characterized and compared. Our analysis indicates a number of proteins that are OMV-specific or OMV-enriched, including several with putative hydrolytic function. Secondary metabolite profiling of OMVs identifies 16 molecules, many associated with antibiotic activities. Several hydrolytic enzyme homologs were identified, including the protein encoded by MXAN_3564 (mepA), an M36 protease homolog. Genetic disruption of mepA leads to a significant reduction in extracellular protease activity suggesting MepA is part of the long-predicted (yet to date undetermined) extracellular protease suite of M. xanthus. PMID:25250022

  17. Polyamine Binding to Plasma Membrane Vesicles Isolated from Zucchini Hypocotyls.

    PubMed Central

    Tassoni, A.; Antognoni, F.; Bagni, N.

    1996-01-01

    The general features of [14C]spermidine binding to plasmalemma vesicles isolated from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) etiolated hypocotyls are reported in the present paper. The specific interaction of the polyamine with the plasma membranes was reversible and thermolabile, since it decreased by about 50% in the assay performed at 40[deg]C compared to that carried out on ice. On the contrary, nonspecific binding was unaffected by temperature. Specific spermidine binding showed a pH dependence with a maximum at pH 8.0 and it reached saturation between 0.75 and 1 mM external spermidine concentration. The value of the dissociation constant calculated from Scatchard analysis was 4.4 x 10-5 M. Specific spermidine interaction appeared to be sensitive to detergents and was markedly reduced by the presence of divalent cations, such as Mg2+ and Ca2+, whereas it was stimulated by monovalent cations. Polyamine binding sites were highly sensitive to pronase treatment. Competition experiments, performed using a series of compounds structurally related to spermidine, may provide some indication of the characteristics of spermidine binding sites. The results presented here suggest that specific spermidine binding occurs mainly with the protein component of the plasma membrane. PMID:12226221

  18. Membrane carbonic anhydrase (IV) and ciliary epithelium. Carbonic anhydrase activity is present in the basolateral membranes of the non-pigmented ciliary epithelium of rabbit eyes.

    PubMed

    Matsui, H; Murakami, M; Wynns, G C; Conroy, C W; Mead, A; Maren, T H; Sears, M L

    1996-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) lower intraocular pressure by reducing aqueous flow. It has been thought that this pharmacologic reduction of aqueous flow is mediated by the ciliary epithelium, but it is not known whether this cellular action is effected by inhibition of the membranal (CA IV) and/or cytosolic (CA II) carbonic anhydrases of the ciliary epithelium. The isolated ciliary epithelial bilayer maintains its anatomic and functional polarity and generates a transepithelial potential difference (TEP) in an Ussing type chamber. Depletion of HCO3-, accomplished either with an HCO3(-)-free solution bathing the epithelial bilayer, or, with addition of freely permeant CAIs to HCO3(-)-containing media, (from either the PE or NPE side of the bilayer) depolarizes the preparation. Addition of CAIs to an HCO3(-)-depleted preparation has no further effect, indicating the specific action of the CAIs. The CAI, 2-p-NH2 benzenesulfonamido-1,3,4,-thiadiazole-5-SO2NH2, linked to polybutadiene maleic acid yields an impermeant polymer of 20000 Da with no loss of activity. At 45 microM this impermeant polymer caused a 60% increase in the SCC, seen only when the compound was applied to the NPE side of the bilayer. This latter result indicates an effect from inhibition of CA IV in the basolateral membranes of the NPE. Thus there are probably two different cellular actions of CAIs upon the ciliary epithelium to reduce aqueous inflow, cytoplasmic and membranal. The action of NPE basolateral membranal CA IV is probably linked to the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger. PMID:8795459

  19. Membrane stress causes inhibition of water channels in brush border membrane vesicles from kidney proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Soveral, G; Macey, R I; Moura, T F

    1997-08-01

    Brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from rabbit kidney proximal tubule cells, prepared with different internal solute concentrations (cellobiose buffer 13, 18 or 85 mosM) developed an hydrostatic pressure difference across the membrane of 18.7 mosM, that causes a membrane tension close to 5 x 10(-5) N cm-1. When subjected to several hypertonic osmotic shocks an initial delay of osmotic shrinkage (a lag time), corresponding to a very small change in initial volume was apparent. This initial osmotic response, which is significantly retarded, was correlated with the initial period of elevated membrane tension, suggesting that the water permeability coefficient is inhibited by membrane stress. We speculate that this inhibition may serve to regulate cell volume in the proximal tubule. PMID:9468597

  20. Size-dependent, stochastic nature of lipid exchange between nano-vesicles and model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabaei, Seyed R.; Gillissen, Jurriaan J. J.; Vafaei, Setareh; Groves, Jay T.; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-07-01

    The interaction of nanoscale lipid vesicles with cell membranes is of fundamental importance for the design and development of vesicular drug delivery systems. Here, we introduce a novel approach to study vesicle-membrane interactions whereby we are able to probe the influence of nanoscale membrane properties on the dynamic adsorption, exchange, and detachment of vesicles. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we monitor these processes in real-time upon the electrostatically tuned attachment of individual, sub-100 nm vesicles to a supported lipid bilayer. The observed exponential vesicle detachment rate depends strongly on the vesicle size, but not on the vesicle charge, which suggests that lipid exchange occurs during a single stochastic event, which is consistent with membrane stalk formation. The fluorescence microscopy assay developed in this work may enable measuring of the probability of stalk formation in a controlled manner, which is of fundamental importance in membrane biology, offering a new tool to understand nanoscale phenomena in the context of biological sciences.The interaction of nanoscale lipid vesicles with cell membranes is of fundamental importance for the design and development of vesicular drug delivery systems. Here, we introduce a novel approach to study vesicle-membrane interactions whereby we are able to probe the influence of nanoscale membrane properties on the dynamic adsorption, exchange, and detachment of vesicles. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we monitor these processes in real-time upon the electrostatically tuned attachment of individual, sub-100 nm vesicles to a supported lipid bilayer. The observed exponential vesicle detachment rate depends strongly on the vesicle size, but not on the vesicle charge, which suggests that lipid exchange occurs during a single stochastic event, which is consistent with membrane stalk formation. The fluorescence microscopy assay developed

  1. Intracellular calcium store filling by an L-type calcium current in the basolateral amygdala at subthreshold membrane potentials

    PubMed Central

    Power, John M; Sah, Pankaj

    2005-01-01

    The long-term changes that underlie learning and memory are activated by rises in intracellular Ca2+ that activate a number of signalling pathways and trigger changes in gene transcription. Ca2+ rises due to influx via L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (L-VDCCs) and release from intracellular Ca2+ stores have been consistently implicated in the biochemical cascades that underlie the final changes in memory formation. Here, we show that pyramidal neurones in the basolateral amygdala express an L-VDCC that is active at resting membrane potentials. Subthreshold depolarization of neurones either by current injection or summating synaptic potentials led to a sustained rise in cytosolic Ca2+ that was blocked by the dihydropyridine nicardipine. Activation of metabotropic receptors released Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ stores. At hyperpolarized potentials, metabotropic-evoked store release ran down with repeated stimulation. Depolarization of cells to −50 mV, or maintaining them at the resting membrane potential, restored release from intracellular Ca2+ stores, an effect that was blocked by nicardipine. These results show that Ca2+ influx via a low-voltage-activated L-type Ca2+ current refills inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores, and maintains Ca2+ release and wave generation by metabotropic receptor activation. PMID:15550460

  2. Vesicles

    MedlinePlus

    ... pox Contact dermatitis (may be caused by poison ivy) Herpes simplex (cold sores, genital herpes ) Herpes zoster ( ... for certain conditions that cause vesicles, including poison ivy and cold sores.

  3. Outer-Inner Membrane Vesicles Naturally Secreted by Gram-Negative Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cruz, Carla; Delgado, Lidia; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Mercade, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Outer-inner membrane vesicles (O-IMVs) were recently described as a new type of membrane vesicle secreted by the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella vesiculosa M7T. Their formation is characterized by the protrusion of both outer and plasma membranes, which pulls cytoplasmic components into the vesicles. To demonstrate that this is not a singular phenomenon in a bacterium occurring in an extreme environment, the identification of O-IMVs in pathogenic bacteria was undertaken. With this aim, a structural study by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) was carried out, confirming that O-IMVs are also secreted by Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Acinetobacter baumannii AB41, in which they represent between 0.23% and 1.2% of total vesicles produced. DNA and ATP, which are components solely found in the cell cytoplasm, were identified within membrane vesicles of these strains. The presence of DNA inside the O-IMVs produced by N. gonorrhoeae was confirmed by gold DNA immunolabeling with a specific monoclonal IgM against double-stranded DNA. A proteomic analysis of N. gonorrhoeae-derived membrane vesicles identified proteins from the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. This confirmation of O-IMV extends the hitherto uniform definition of membrane vesicles in Gram-negative bacteria and explains the presence of components in membrane vesicles such as DNA, cytoplasmic and inner membrane proteins, as well as ATP, detected for the first time. The production of these O-IMVs by pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria opens up new areas of study related to their involvement in lateral gene transfer, the transfer of cytoplasmic proteins, as well as the functionality and role of ATP detected in these new vesicles. PMID:25581302

  4. Bestrophin, the product of the Best vitelliform macular dystrophy gene (VMD2), localizes to the basolateral plasma membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Marmorstein, Alan D.; Marmorstein, Lihua Y.; Rayborn, Mary; Wang, Xinxing; Hollyfield, Joe G.; Petrukhin, Konstantin

    2000-01-01

    Best vitelliform macular dystrophy is a dominantly inherited, early onset, macular degenerative disease that exhibits some histopathologic similarities to age-related macular degeneration. Although the vitelliform lesion is common in the fundus of individuals with Best disease, diagnosis is based on a reduced ratio of the light peak to dark trough in the electrooculogram. Recently, the VMD2 gene on chromosome 11q13, encoding the protein bestrophin, was identified. The function of bestrophin is unknown. To facilitate studies of bestrophin, we produced both rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies that proved useful for Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunocytochemistry. To characterize bestrophin, we initially probed the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-derived cell lines ARPE-19, D407, and RPE-J. All of the cell lines expressed bestrophin mRNA by reverse transcription-PCR, but not on Western blots. Bestrophin in human RPE partitioned in the detergent phase during Triton X-114 extraction and could be modified by biotin in intact cells, indicative of a plasma membrane localization. Immunocytochemical staining of macaque and porcine eyes indicated that bestrophin is localized at the basolateral plasma membrane of RPE cells. When expressed in RPE-J cells by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, bestrophin again was determined by confocal microscopy and cell surface biotinylation to be a basolateral plasma membrane protein. The basolateral plasma membrane localization of bestrophin suggests the possibility that bestrophin plays a role in generating the altered electrooculogram of individuals with Best disease. PMID:11050159

  5. Bestrophin, the product of the Best vitelliform macular dystrophy gene (VMD2), localizes to the basolateral plasma membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Marmorstein, A D; Marmorstein, L Y; Rayborn, M; Wang, X; Hollyfield, J G; Petrukhin, K

    2000-11-01

    Best vitelliform macular dystrophy is a dominantly inherited, early onset, macular degenerative disease that exhibits some histopathologic similarities to age-related macular degeneration. Although the vitelliform lesion is common in the fundus of individuals with Best disease, diagnosis is based on a reduced ratio of the light peak to dark trough in the electrooculogram. Recently, the VMD2 gene on chromosome 11q13, encoding the protein bestrophin, was identified. The function of bestrophin is unknown. To facilitate studies of bestrophin, we produced both rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies that proved useful for Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunocytochemistry. To characterize bestrophin, we initially probed the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-derived cell lines ARPE-19, D407, and RPE-J. All of the cell lines expressed bestrophin mRNA by reverse transcription-PCR, but not on Western blots. Bestrophin in human RPE partitioned in the detergent phase during Triton X-114 extraction and could be modified by biotin in intact cells, indicative of a plasma membrane localization. Immunocytochemical staining of macaque and porcine eyes indicated that bestrophin is localized at the basolateral plasma membrane of RPE cells. When expressed in RPE-J cells by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, bestrophin again was determined by confocal microscopy and cell surface biotinylation to be a basolateral plasma membrane protein. The basolateral plasma membrane localization of bestrophin suggests the possibility that bestrophin plays a role in generating the altered electrooculogram of individuals with Best disease. PMID:11050159

  6. Structure formation of lipid membranes: Membrane self-assembly and vesicle opening-up to octopus-like micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    We briefly review our recent studies on self-assembly and vesicle rupture of lipid membranes using coarse-grained molecular simulations. For single component membranes, lipid molecules self-assemble from random gas states to vesicles via disk-shaped clusters. Clusters aggregate into larger clusters, and subsequently the large disks close into vesicles. The size of vesicles are determined by kinetics than by thermodynamics. When a vesicle composed of lipid and detergent types of molecules is ruptured, a disk-shaped micelle called bicelle can be formed. When both surfactants have negligibly low critical micelle concentration, it is found that bicelles connected with worm-like micelles are also formed depending on the surfactant ratio and spontaneous curvature of the membrane monolayer.

  7. Cell-cell communication via extracellular membrane vesicles and its role in the immune response.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Inkyu

    2013-08-01

    The host immune response involves a variety of cell types, including specialized immune and non-immune cells. The delicate coordination among these cells via close communication is central for the proper operation of immune system. Cell-cell communication is mediated by a complex network that includes soluble factors such as cytokines, chemokines, and metabolites exported from cells, as well as membrane-bound receptors and their ligands. Cell-cell communication is also mediated by membrane vesicles (e.g., exosomes, ectosomes), which are either shed by distant cells or exchanged by cells that are making direct contact. Intercellular communication via extracellular membrane vesicles has drawn much attention recently, as they have been shown to carry various biomolecules that modulate the activities of recipient cells. In this review, I will discuss current views on cell-cell communication via extra-cellular membrane vesicles, especially shedded membrane vesicles, and their effects on the control of the immune system. PMID:23807045

  8. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release.

  9. Translocation of cationic amphipathic peptides across the membranes of pure phospholipid giant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Wheaten, Sterling A; Ablan, Francis D O; Spaller, B Logan; Trieu, Julie M; Almeida, Paulo F

    2013-11-01

    The ability of amphipathic polypeptides with substantial net positive charges to translocate across lipid membranes is a fundamental problem in physical biochemistry. These peptides should not passively cross the bilayer nonpolar region, but they do. Here we present a method to measure peptide translocation and test it on three representative membrane-active peptides. In samples of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) prepared by electroformation, some GUVs enclose inner vesicles. When these GUVs are added to a peptide solution containing a membrane-impermeant fluorescent dye (carboxyfluorescein), the peptide permeabilizes the outer membrane, and dye enters the outer GUV, which then exhibits green fluorescence. The inner vesicles remain dark if the peptide does not cross the outer membrane. However, if the peptide translocates, it permeabilizes the inner vesicles as well, which then show fluorescence. We also measure translocation, simultaneously on the same GUV, by the appearance of fluorescently labeled peptides on the inner vesicle membranes. All three peptides examined are able to translocate, but to different extents. Peptides with smaller Gibbs energies of insertion into the membrane translocate more easily. Further, translocation and influx occur broadly over the same period, but with very different kinetics. Translocation across the outer membrane follows approximately an exponential rise, with a characteristic time of 10 min. Influx occurs more abruptly. In the outer vesicle, influx happens before most of the translocation. However, some peptides cross the membrane before any influx is observed. In the inner vesicles, influx occurs abruptly sometime during peptide translocation across the membrane of the outer vesicle. PMID:24152283

  10. Vibrio fischeri-derived outer membrane vesicles trigger host development.

    PubMed

    Aschtgen, Marie-Stephanie; Wetzel, Keith; Goldman, William; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Ruby, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are critical elements in many host-cell/microbe interactions. Previous studies of the symbiotic association between Euprymna scolopes and Vibrio fischeri had shown that within 12 h of colonizing crypts deep within the squid's light organ, the symbionts trigger an irreversible programme of tissue development in the host. Here, we report that OMV produced by V. fischeri are powerful contributors to this process. The first detectable host response to the OMV is an increased trafficking of macrophage-like cells called haemocytes into surface epithelial tissues. We showed that exposing the squid to other Vibrio species fails to induce this trafficking; however, addition of a high concentration of their OMV, which can diffuse into the crypts, does. We also provide evidence that tracheal cytotoxin released by the symbionts, which can induce haemocyte trafficking, is not part of the OMV cargo, suggesting two distinct mechanisms to induce the same morphogenesis event. By manipulating the timing and localization of OMV signal delivery, we showed that haemocyte trafficking is fully induced only when V. fischeri, the sole species able to reach and grow in the crypts, succeeds in establishing a sustained colonization. Further, our data suggest that the host's detection of OMV serves as a symbiotic checkpoint prior to inducing irreversible morphogenesis. PMID:26399913

  11. Sulfate transport in apical membrane vesicles isolated from tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Elgavish, A.; DiBona, D.R.; Norton, P.; Meezan, E.

    1987-09-01

    Sulfate uptake in apical membrane vesicles isolated from bovine tracheal epithelium is shown to occur into an osmotically sensitive intravesicular space, via a carrier-mediated system. This conclusion is based on three lines of evidence: 1) saturation kinetics: 2) substrate specificity; and 3) inhibition by the anion transport inhibitors SITS and DIDS. The affinity of the transport system is highest in low ionic strength media and decreases in the presence of gluconate. Chloride appears to cis-inhibit sulfate uptake and to trans-stimulate sulfate efflux. Cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation studies with a variety of anions indicate that this exchange system may be shared by HCO/sub 3//sup -/, S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/, SeO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, and MoO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ but not by H/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup -/ or HAsO/sub 4//sup 2/. Studies indicate that protons may play two distinct roles in sulfate transport in this system. These studies show that the carrier-mediated system can function in the absence of chloride. The overshoot observed in the presence of a proton gradient indicates that under those conditions the mechanism of transport may be a SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-OH/sup -/ exchange.

  12. Glycoengineered Outer Membrane Vesicles: A Novel Platform for Bacterial Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Price, Nancy L; Goyette-Desjardins, Guillaume; Nothaft, Harald; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Szymanski, Christine M; Segura, Mariela; Feldman, Mario F

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization has indicated that we are entering into a post-antibiotic era in which infections that were routinely and successfully treated with antibiotics can now be lethal due to the global dissemination of multidrug resistant strains. Conjugate vaccines are an effective way to create a long-lasting immune response against bacteria. However, these vaccines present many drawbacks such as slow development, high price, and batch-to-batch inconsistencies. Alternate approaches for vaccine development are urgently needed. Here we present a new vaccine consisting of glycoengineered outer membrane vesicles (geOMVs). This platform exploits the fact that the initial steps in the biosynthesis of most bacterial glycans are similar. Therefore, it is possible to easily engineer non-pathogenic Escherichia coli lab strains to produce geOMVs displaying the glycan of the pathogen of interest. In this work we demonstrate the versatility of this platform by showing the efficacy of geOMVs as vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae in mice, and against Campylobacter jejuni in chicken. This cost-effective platform could be employed to generate vaccines to prevent infections caused by a wide variety of microbial agents in human and animals. PMID:27103188

  13. Glycoengineered Outer Membrane Vesicles: A Novel Platform for Bacterial Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Price, Nancy L.; Goyette-Desjardins, Guillaume; Nothaft, Harald; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Szymanski, Christine M.; Segura, Mariela; Feldman, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization has indicated that we are entering into a post-antibiotic era in which infections that were routinely and successfully treated with antibiotics can now be lethal due to the global dissemination of multidrug resistant strains. Conjugate vaccines are an effective way to create a long-lasting immune response against bacteria. However, these vaccines present many drawbacks such as slow development, high price, and batch-to-batch inconsistencies. Alternate approaches for vaccine development are urgently needed. Here we present a new vaccine consisting of glycoengineered outer membrane vesicles (geOMVs). This platform exploits the fact that the initial steps in the biosynthesis of most bacterial glycans are similar. Therefore, it is possible to easily engineer non-pathogenic Escherichia coli lab strains to produce geOMVs displaying the glycan of the pathogen of interest. In this work we demonstrate the versatility of this platform by showing the efficacy of geOMVs as vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae in mice, and against Campylobacter jejuni in chicken. This cost-effective platform could be employed to generate vaccines to prevent infections caused by a wide variety of microbial agents in human and animals. PMID:27103188

  14. Molecular characterisation of plasma membrane-derived vesicles.

    PubMed

    Antwi-Baffour, Samuel S

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane-derived vesicles (PMVs) are released into circulation in response to normal and stress/pathogenic conditions. They are of tremendous significance for the prediction, diagnosis, and observation of the therapeutic success of many diseases. Knowledge of their molecular characteristics and therefore functional properties would contribute to a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms leading to various diseases in which their levels are raised. The review aims at outlining and discussing the molecular characteristics of PMVs in order to bring to the fore some aspects/characteristics of PMVs that will assist the scientific community to properly understand the role of PMVs in various physiological and pathological processes. The review covers PMVs characterisation and discusses how distinct they are from exosomes and endosomes. Also, methods of PMVs analysis, importance of proper PMV level estimation/characterisation, PMVs and their constituents as well as their therapeutic significance are discussed. The review concludes by drawing attention to the importance of further study into the functions of the characteristics discussed which will lead to understanding the general role of PMVs both in health and in disease states. PMID:26259622

  15. Outer membrane vesicles – offensive weapons or good Samaritans?

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Amano, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Gram-negative bacteria were first considered as artifacts and were followed with disbelief and bad reputation. Later, their existence was accepted and they became characterized as bacterial bombs, virulence bullets, and even decoys. Today, we know that OMVs also can be involved in cell–cell signaling/communication and be mediators of immune regulation and cause disease protection. Furthermore, OMVs represent a distinct bacterial secretion pathway selecting and protecting their cargo, and they can even be good Samaritans providing nutrients to the gut microbiota maintaining commensal homeostasis beneficial to the host. The versatility in functions of these nanostructures is remarkable and includes both defense and offense. The broad spectrum of usability does not stop with that, as it now seems that OMVs can be used as vaccines and adjuvants or vehicles engineered for drug treatment of emerging and new diseases not only caused by bacteria but also by virus. They may even represent new ways of selective drug treatment. PMID:25840612

  16. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles and Immune Regulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cossetti, Chiara; Smith, Jayden A.; Iraci, Nunzio; Leonardi, Tommaso; Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Pluchino, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The brain is characterized by a complex and integrated network of interacting cells in which cell-to-cell communication is critical for proper development and function. Initially considered as an immune privileged site, the brain is now regarded as an immune specialized system. Accumulating evidence reveals the presence of immune components in the brain, as well as extensive bidirectional communication that takes place between the nervous and the immune system both under homeostatic and pathological conditions. In recent years the secretion of extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs) has been described as a new and evolutionary well-conserved mechanism of cell-to-cell communication, with EMVs influencing the microenvironment through the traffic of bioactive molecules that include proteins and nucleic acids, such as DNA, protein coding, and non-coding RNAs. Increasing evidence suggests that EMVs are a promising candidate to study cross-boundary cell-to-cell communication pathways. Herein we review the role of EMVs secreted by neural cells in modulating the immune response(s) within the brain under physiological and pathological circumstances. PMID:22557978

  17. Proteomic analysis of Vibrio cholerae outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Altindis, Emrah; Fu, Yang; Mekalanos, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria provide an interesting research material for defining cell-envelope proteins without experimental cell disruption. OMVs are also promising immunogenic platforms and may play important roles in bacterial survival and pathogenesis. We used in-solution trypsin digestion coupled to mass spectrometry to identify 90 proteins present in OMVs of Vibrio cholerae when grown under conditions that activate the TCP pilus virulence regulatory protein (ToxT) virulence regulon. The ToxT expression profile and potential contribution to virulence of these proteins were assessed using ToxT and in vivo RNA-seq, Tn-seq, and cholera stool proteomic and other genome-wide data sets. Thirteen OMV-associated proteins appear to be essential for cell growth, and therefore may represent antibacterial drug targets. Another 12 nonessential OMV proteins, including DegP protease, were required for intestinal colonization in rabbits. Comparative proteomics of a degP mutant revealed the importance of DegP in the incorporation of nine proteins into OMVs, including ones involved in biofilm matrix formation and various substrates of the type II secretion system. Taken together, these results suggest that DegP plays an important role in determining the content of OMVs and also affects phenotypes such as intestinal colonization, proper function of the type II secretion system, and formation of biofilm matrix. PMID:24706774

  18. DNA-tethered Membranes Formed by Giant Vesicle Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Minsub; Lowe, Randall; Chan, Yee-Hung M.; Ganesan, Prasad V.; Boxer, Steven G.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a strategy for preparing tethered lipid bilayer membrane patches on solid surfaces by DNA hybridization. In this way, the tethered membrane patch is held at a controllable distance from the surface by varying the length of the DNA used. Two basic strategies are described. In the first, single-stranded DNA strands are immobilized by click chemistry to a silica surface, whose remaining surface is passivated to prevent direct assembly of a solid supported bilayer. Then giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) displaying the antisense strand, using a DNA-lipid conjugate developed in earlier work (Chan, Lengerich et al. 2008), are allowed to tether, spread and rupture to form tethered bilayer patches. In the second, a supported lipid bilayer displaying DNA using the DNA-lipid conjugate is first assembled on the surface. Then GUVs displaying the antisense strand are allowed to tether, spread and rupture to form tethered bilayer patches. The essential difference between these methods is that the tethering hybrid DNA is immobile in the first, while it is mobile in the second. Both strategies are successful; however, with mobile DNA hybrids as tethers, the patches are unstable, while in the first strategy stable patches can be formed. In the case of mobile tethers, if different length DNA hybrids are present, lateral segregation by length occurs and can be visualized by fluorescence interference contrast microscopy making this an interesting model for interactions that occur in cell junctions. In both cases, lipid mobility is high and there is a negligible immobile fraction. Thus, these architectures offer a flexible platform for the assembly of lipid bilayers at a well-defined distance from a solid support. PMID:19560541

  19. Size-dependent, stochastic nature of lipid exchange between nano-vesicles and model membranes.

    PubMed

    Tabaei, Seyed R; Gillissen, Jurriaan J J; Vafaei, Setareh; Groves, Jay T; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-07-21

    The interaction of nanoscale lipid vesicles with cell membranes is of fundamental importance for the design and development of vesicular drug delivery systems. Here, we introduce a novel approach to study vesicle-membrane interactions whereby we are able to probe the influence of nanoscale membrane properties on the dynamic adsorption, exchange, and detachment of vesicles. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we monitor these processes in real-time upon the electrostatically tuned attachment of individual, sub-100 nm vesicles to a supported lipid bilayer. The observed exponential vesicle detachment rate depends strongly on the vesicle size, but not on the vesicle charge, which suggests that lipid exchange occurs during a single stochastic event, which is consistent with membrane stalk formation. The fluorescence microscopy assay developed in this work may enable measuring of the probability of stalk formation in a controlled manner, which is of fundamental importance in membrane biology, offering a new tool to understand nanoscale phenomena in the context of biological sciences. PMID:27355613

  20. Analytical characterization of plasma membrane-derived vesicles produced via osmotic and chemical vesiculation.

    PubMed

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Chan, Robin B; Zhou, Bowen; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Hristova, Kalina

    2015-07-01

    Plasma membrane-derived vesicles are being used in biophysical and biochemical research as a simple, yet native-like model of the cellular membrane. Here we report on the characterization of vesicles produced via two different vesiculation methods from CHO and A431 cell lines. The first method is a recently developed method which utilizes chloride salts to induce osmotic vesiculation. The second is a well established chemical vesiculation method which uses DTT and formaldehyde. We show that both vesiculation methods produce vesicles which contain the lipid species previously reported in the plasma membrane of these cell lines. The two methods lead to small but statistically significant differences in two lipid species only; phosphatidylcholine (PC) and plasmalogen phosphatidylethanolamine (PEp). However, highly significant differences were observed in the degree of incorporation of a membrane receptor and in the degree of retention of soluble cytosolic proteins within the vesicles. PMID:25896659

  1. Inward multivesiculation at the basal membrane of adherent giant phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Flores, Susana

    2016-04-01

    Adherent giant vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine and biotinylated lipids form clusters of inward spherical buds at their basal membrane. The process is spontaneous and occurs when the vesicles undergo a sequence of osmotic swelling and deswelling. The daughter vesicles have a uniform size (diameter ≈ 2-3 μm), engulf small volumes of outer fluid and remain attached to the region of the membrane from which they generate, even after restoring the isotonicity. A pinning-sealing mechanism of long-wavelength modes of membrane fluctuations is proposed, by which the just-deflated vesicles reduce the surplus of membrane area and avoid excessive spreading and compression via biotin anchors. The work discusses the rationale behind the mechanism that furnishes GUVs with basal endovesicles, and its prospective use to simulate cellular events or to create molecular carriers. PMID:26828120

  2. Selective production of sealed plasma membrane vesicles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L. ) storage tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Giannini, J.L.; Gildensoph, L.H.; Briskin, D.P.

    1987-05-01

    Modification of our previous procedure for the isolation of microsomal membrane vesicles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue allowed the recovery of sealed membrane vesicles displaying proton transport activity sensitive to both nitrate and orthovanadate. In the absence of a high salt concentration in the homogenization medium, contributions of nitrate-sensitive (tonoplast) and vanadate-sensitive (plasma membrane) proton transport were roughly equal. The addition of 0.25 M KCl to the homogenization medium increased the relative amount of nitrate-inhibited proton transport activity while the addition of 0.25 M KI resulted in proton pumping vesicles displaying inhibition by vanadate but stimulation by nitrate. These effects appeared to result from selective sealing of either plasma membrane or tonoplast membrane vesicles during homogenization in the presence of the two salts. Following centrifugation on linear sucrose gradients it was shown that the nitrate-sensitive, proton-transporting vesicles banded at low density and comigrated with nitrate-sensitive ATPase activity while the vanadate-sensitive, proton-transporting vesicles banded at a much higher density and comigrated with vanadate-sensitive ATPase. The properties of the vanadate-sensitive proton pumping vesicles were further characterized in microsomal membrane fractions produced by homogenization in the presence of 0.25 M KI and centrifugation on discontinuous sucrose density gradients. Proton transport was substrate specific for ATP, displayed a sharp pH optimum at 6.5, and was insensitive to azide but inhibited by N'-N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, diethylstilbestrol, and fluoride. The Km of proton transport for Mg:ATP was 0.67 mM and the K0.5 for vanadate inhibition was at about 50 microM. These properties are identical to those displayed by the plasma membrane ATPase and confirm a plasma membrane origin for the vesicles.

  3. ATP-driven calcium transport in membrane vesicles of Streptococcus sanguis. [Streptococcus sanguis; Streptococcus faecalis; Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Houng, H.; Lynn, A.R.; Rosen, B.P.

    1986-11-01

    Calcium transport was investigated in membrane vesicles prepared from the oral bacterium Streptococcus sanguis. Procedures were devised for the preparation of membrane vesicles capable of accumulation /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake was ATP dependent and did not require a proton motive force. Calcium transport in these vesicles was compared with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ accumulation in membrane vesicles from Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The data support the existence of an ATP-driven calcium pump in S. sanguis similar to that in S. faecalis. This pump, which catalyzes uptake into membrane vesicles, would be responsible for extrusion of calcium from intact cells.

  4. Shape bistability of a membrane neck: A toggle switch to control vesicle content release

    PubMed Central

    Frolov, Vadim A.; Lizunov, Vladimir A.; Dunina-Barkovskaya, Antonina Ya.; Samsonov, Andrey V.; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2003-01-01

    Shape dynamics and permeability of a membrane neck connecting a vesicle and plasma membrane are considered. The neck is modeled by a lipid membrane tubule extended between two parallel axisymmetric rings. Within a range of lengths, defined by system geometry and mechanical properties of the membrane, the tubule has two stable shapes: catenoidal microtubule and cylindrical nanotubule. The permeabilities of these two shapes, measured as ionic conductivity of the tubule interior, differ by up to four orders of magnitude. Near the critical length the transitions between the shapes occur within less than a millisecond. Theoretical estimates show that the shape switching is controlled by a single parameter, the tubule length. Thus the tubule connection can operate as a conductivity microswitch, toggling the release of vesicle content in such cellular processes as “kiss-and-run” exocytosis. In support of this notion, bistable behavior of membrane connections between vesicles and the cell plasma membrane in macrophages is demonstrated. PMID:12857952

  5. Outer membrane vesicles of Lysobacter sp. XL1: biogenesis, functions, and applied prospects.

    PubMed

    Kudryakova, Irina V; Shishkova, Nina A; Vasilyeva, Natalia V

    2016-06-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria have been intensively investigated in recent times. Vesicle formation models have been proposed, some factors affecting the process were established, and important roles vesicles play in vital activities of their producing cells were determined. Studies of pathogenic bacterial vesicles contribute to understanding the causes of acute infection and developing drugs on their basis. Despite intensive research, issues associated with the understanding of vesicle biogenesis, the mechanisms of bacterium-bacterium and pathogen-host interactions with participation of vesicles, still remain unresolved. This review discusses some results obtained in the research into OMVs of Lysobacter sp. XL1 VKM B-1576. This bacterium secretes into the environment a spectrum of bacteriolytic enzymes that hydrolyze peptidoglycan of competing bacteria, thus leading to their lysis. One of these enzymes, lytic endopeptidase L5, has been shown not only to be secreted by means of vesicles but also to be involved in their formation. As part of vesicles, the antimicrobial potential of L5 enzyme has been found to be considerably expanded. Vesicles have been shown to have a therapeutic effect in respect of anthrax infection and staphylococcal sepsis modelled in mice. The scientific basis for constructing liposomal antimicrobial preparations from vesicle phospholipids and recombinant bacteriolytic enzyme L5 has been formed. PMID:27098257

  6. Porin Loss Impacts the Host Inflammatory Response to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kelli L.; Cahill, Bethaney K.; Dilello, Sarah K.; Gutel, Dedra; Brunson, Debra N.; Albertí, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae often exhibit porin loss. In this study, we investigated how porin loss impacted the composition of secreted outer membrane vesicles as well as their ability to trigger proinflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages. We hypothesize that porin loss associated with antibiotic resistance will directly impact both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells. Using clonally related clinical isolates of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae with different patterns of porin expression, we demonstrated that altered expression of OmpK35 and OmpK36 results in broad alterations to the protein profile of secreted vesicles. Additionally, the level of OmpA incorporation was elevated in strains lacking a single porin. Porin loss significantly impacted macrophage inflammatory responses to purified vesicles. Outer membrane vesicles lacking both OmpK35 and OmpK36 elicited significantly lower levels of proinflammatory cytokine secretion than vesicles from strains expressing one or both porins. These data demonstrate that antibiotic resistance-associated porin loss has a broad and significant effect on both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells, which may impact bacterial survival and inflammatory reactions in the host. PMID:26666932

  7. Vesicular transport system in myotubes: ultrastructural study and signposting with vesicle-associated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Tajika, Yuki; Takahashi, Maiko; Khairani, Astrid Feinisa; Ueno, Hitoshi; Murakami, Tohru; Yorifuji, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Myofibers have characteristic membrane compartments in their cytoplasm and sarcolemma, such as the sarcoplasmic reticulum, T-tubules, neuromuscular junction, and myotendinous junction. Little is known about the vesicular transport that is believed to mediate the development of these membrane compartments. We determined the locations of organelles in differentiating myotubes. Electron microscopic observation of a whole myotube revealed the arrangement of Golgi apparatus, rough endoplasmic reticulum, autolysosomes, mitochondria, and smooth endoplasmic reticulum from the perinuclear region toward the end of myotubes and the existence of a large number of vesicles near the ends of myotubes. Vesicles in myotubes were further characterized using immunofluorescence microscopy to analyze expression and localization of vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VAMPs are a family of seven proteins that regulate post-Golgi vesicular transport via the fusion of vesicles to the target membranes. Myotubes express five VAMPs in total. Vesicles with VAMP2, VAMP3, or VAMP5 were found near the ends of the myotubes. Some of these vesicles are also positive for caveolin-3, suggesting their participation in the development of T-tubules. Our morphological analyses revealed the characteristic arrangement of organelles in myotubes and the existence of transport vesicles near the ends of the myotubes. PMID:24263617

  8. Outer membrane vesicles displaying engineered glycotopes elicit protective antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linxiao; Valentine, Jenny L; Huang, Chung-Jr; Endicott, Christine E; Moeller, Tyler D; Rasmussen, Jed A; Fletcher, Joshua R; Boll, Joseph M; Rosenthal, Joseph A; Dobruchowska, Justyna; Wang, Zhirui; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Putnam, David; Trent, M Stephen; Jones, Bradley D; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2016-06-28

    The O-antigen polysaccharide (O-PS) component of lipopolysaccharides on the surface of gram-negative bacteria is both a virulence factor and a B-cell antigen. Antibodies elicited by O-PS often confer protection against infection; therefore, O-PS glycoconjugate vaccines have proven useful against a number of different pathogenic bacteria. However, conventional methods for natural extraction or chemical synthesis of O-PS are technically demanding, inefficient, and expensive. Here, we describe an alternative methodology for producing glycoconjugate vaccines whereby recombinant O-PS biosynthesis is coordinated with vesiculation in laboratory strains of Escherichia coli to yield glycosylated outer membrane vesicles (glycOMVs) decorated with pathogen-mimetic glycotopes. Using this approach, glycOMVs corresponding to eight different pathogenic bacteria were generated. For example, expression of a 17-kb O-PS gene cluster from the highly virulent Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis (type A) strain Schu S4 in hypervesiculating E. coli cells yielded glycOMVs that displayed F. tularensis O-PS. Immunization of BALB/c mice with glycOMVs elicited significant titers of O-PS-specific serum IgG antibodies as well as vaginal and bronchoalveolar IgA antibodies. Importantly, glycOMVs significantly prolonged survival upon subsequent challenge with F. tularensis Schu S4 and provided complete protection against challenge with two different F. tularensis subsp. holarctica (type B) live vaccine strains, thereby demonstrating the vaccine potential of glycOMVs. Given the ease with which recombinant glycotopes can be expressed on OMVs, the strategy described here could be readily adapted for developing vaccines against many other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27274048

  9. Delivery of foreign antigens by engineered outer membrane vesicle vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chen, David J; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Metzger, Stephan M; Buckles, Elizabeth; Doody, Anne M; DeLisa, Matthew P; Putnam, David

    2010-02-16

    As new disease threats arise and existing pathogens grow resistant to conventional interventions, attention increasingly focuses on the development of vaccines to induce protective immune responses. Given their admirable safety records, protein subunit vaccines are attractive for widespread immunization, but their disadvantages include poor immunogenicity and expensive manufacture. We show here that engineered Escherichia coli outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are an easily purified vaccine-delivery system capable of greatly enhancing the immunogenicity of a low-immunogenicity protein antigen without added adjuvants. Using green-fluorescent protein (GFP) as the model subunit antigen, genetic fusion of GFP with the bacterial hemolysin ClyA resulted in a chimeric protein that elicited strong anti-GFP antibody titers in immunized mice, whereas immunization with GFP alone did not elicit such titers. Harnessing the specific secretion of ClyA to OMVs, the ClyA-GFP fusion was found localized in OMVs, resulting in engineered recombinant OMVs. The anti-GFP humoral response in mice immunized with the engineered OMV formulations was indistinguishable from the response to the purified ClyA-GFP fusion protein alone and equal to purified proteins absorbed to aluminum hydroxide, a standard adjuvant. In a major improvement over current practice, engineered OMVs containing ClyA-GFP were easily isolated by ultracentrifugation, effectively eliminating the need for laborious antigen purification from cell-culture expression systems. With the diverse collection of heterologous proteins that can be functionally localized with OMVs when fused with ClyA, this work signals the possibility of OMVs as a robust and tunable technology platform for a new generation of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:20133740

  10. v-SNARE cellubrevin is required for basolateral sorting of AP-1B–dependent cargo in polarized epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Ian C.; Shteyn, Elina; Pypaert, Marc; Proux-Gillardeaux, Véronique; Kang, Richard S.; Galli, Thierry; Fölsch, Heike

    2007-01-01

    The epithelial cell–specific adaptor complex AP-1B is crucial for correct delivery of many transmembrane proteins from recycling endosomes to the basolateral plasma membrane. Subsequently, membrane fusion is dependent on the formation of complexes between SNARE proteins located at the target membrane and on transport vesicles. Although the t-SNARE syntaxin 4 has been localized to the basolateral membrane, the v-SNARE operative in the AP-1B pathway remained unknown. We show that the ubiquitously expressed v-SNARE cellubrevin localizes to the basolateral membrane and to recycling endosomes, where it colocalizes with AP-1B. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cellubrevin coimmunoprecipitates preferentially with syntaxin 4, implicating this v-SNARE in basolateral fusion events. Cleavage of cellubrevin with tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) results in scattering of AP-1B localization and missorting of AP-1B–dependent cargos, such as transferrin receptor and a truncated low-density lipoprotein receptor, LDLR-CT27. These data suggest that cellubrevin and AP-1B cooperate in basolateral membrane trafficking. PMID:17485489

  11. Leda-1/Pianp is targeted to the basolateral plasma membrane by a distinct intracellular juxtamembrane region and modulates barrier properties and E-Cadherin processing.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, Konstantin; Biswas, Siladitta; Schledzewski, Kai; Winkler, Manuel; Gorzelanny, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W; Goerdt, Sergij; Géraud, Cyrill

    2016-07-01

    Leda-1/Pianp is a type-I transmembrane protein which is sorted to the basolateral membrane domain of polarized epithelial cells. Here, we investigated trafficking mechanisms and functions of Leda-1/Pianp in MDCK and MCF-7 cells. Basolateral sorting and posttranslational modifications depended on the intracellular juxtamembrane region. Functionally, Leda-1/Pianp increased the transepithelial electrical resistance generated by a polarized cell sheet. Furthermore, resistance to junctional destabilization by tumor cells was enhanced by Leda-1/Pianp indicating increased stability and tightness of intercellular junctions. While Claudin 1 and 4 expression and activities of small GTPases were not affected, γ-Secretase-mediated cleavage of E-Cadherin was attenuated by Leda-1/Pianp. Regulation of proteolytic processing is thus a molecular mechanism by which Leda-1/Pianp can affect junctional integrity and function. PMID:27216462

  12. Insulin and IGF-1 activate Kir4.1/5.1 channels in cortical collecting duct principal cells to control basolateral membrane voltage.

    PubMed

    Zaika, Oleg; Palygin, Oleg; Tomilin, Viktor; Mamenko, Mykola; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2016-02-15

    Potassium Kir4.1/5.1 channels are abundantly expressed at the basolateral membrane of principal cells in the cortical collecting duct (CCD), where they are thought to modulate transport rates by controlling transepithelial voltage. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulate apically localized epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) to augment sodium reabsorption in the CCD. However, little is known about their actions on potassium channels localized at the basolateral membrane. In this study, we implemented patch-clamp analysis in freshly isolated murine CCD to assess the effect of these hormones on Kir4.1/5.1 at both single channel and cellular levels. We demonstrated that K(+)-selective conductance via Kir4.1/5.1 is the major contributor to the macroscopic current recorded from the basolateral side in principal cells. Acute treatment with 10 μM amiloride (ENaC blocker), 100 nM tertiapin-Q (TPNQ; ROMK inhibitor), and 100 μM ouabain (Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase blocker) failed to produce a measurable effect on the macroscopic current. In contrast, Kir4.1 inhibitor nortriptyline (100 μM), but not fluoxetine (100 μM), virtually abolished whole cell K(+)-selective conductance. Insulin (100 nM) markedly increased the open probability of Kir4.1/5.1 and nortriptyline-sensitive whole cell current, leading to significant hyperpolarization of the basolateral membrane. Inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase cascade with LY294002 (20 μM) abolished action of insulin on Kir4.1/5.1. IGF-1 had similar stimulatory actions on Kir4.1/5.1-mediated conductance only when applied at a higher (500 nM) concentration and was ineffective at 100 nM. We concluded that both insulin and, to a lesser extent, IGF-1 activate Kir4.1/5.1 channel activity and open probability to hyperpolarize the basolateral membrane, thereby facilitating Na(+) reabsorption in the CCD. PMID:26632606

  13. Characterization of proteins in membrane vesicles from scrapie-infected hamster brain.

    PubMed

    Dees, C; German, T L; Wade, W F; Marsh, R F

    1985-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that the scrapie agent is highly membrane-associated. We examined the protein composition of gradient fractions enriched for large membrane vesicles prepared from scrapie-infected and uninfected hamster brain using various methods to extract membrane proteins. We also examined proteins in detergent-extracted membrane vesicles fractionated on CsCl gradients. No qualitative differences in protein composition were seen comparing scrapie-infected and uninfected samples by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Extraction of proteins from membrane vesicles by phenol, pyridine, perchloric acid or lithium diiodosalicylate also failed to reveal any unique proteins in scrapie-infected hamster brain. Attempts to solubilize hydrophobic proteins (proteolipids) from CsCl gradient fractions into organic solvents were unsuccessful. These findings indicate that any hydrophobic protein associated with the scrapie agent is not a proteolipid, and that the ability of solvents to reduce scrapie infectivity is not a result of extraction of a proteolipid. PMID:3920349

  14. Membrane curvature induced by Arf1-GTP is essential for vesicle formation

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Rainer; Sun, Zhe; Adolf, Frank; Rutz, Chistoph; Bassler, Jochen; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard; Hurt, Ed; Brügger, Britta; Béthune, Julien; Wieland, Felix

    2008-01-01

    The GTPase Arf1 is considered as a molecular switch that regulates binding and release of coat proteins that polymerize on membranes to form transport vesicles. Here, we show that Arf1-GTP induces positive membrane curvature and find that the small GTPase can dimerize dependent on GTP. Investigating a possible link between Arf dimerization and curvature formation, we isolated an Arf1 mutant that cannot dimerize. Although it was capable of exerting the classical role of Arf1 as a coat receptor, it could not mediate the formation of COPI vesicles from Golgi-membranes and was lethal when expressed in yeast. Strikingly, this mutant was not able to deform membranes, suggesting that GTP-induced dimerization of Arf1 is a critical step inducing membrane curvature during the formation of coated vesicles. PMID:18689681

  15. Retardation of Abeta fibril formation by phospholipid vesicles depends on membrane phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Hellstrand, Erik; Sparr, Emma; Linse, Sara

    2010-05-19

    An increasing amount of evidence suggests that in several amyloid diseases, the fibril formation in vivo and the mechanism of toxicity both involve membrane interactions. We have studied Alzheimer's disease related amyloid beta peptide (Abeta). Recombinant Abeta(M1-40) and Abeta(M1-42) produced in Escherichia coli, allows us to carry out large scale kinetics assays with good statistics. The amyloid formation process is followed in means of thioflavin T fluorescence at relatively low (down to 380 nM) peptide concentration approaching the physiological range. The lipid membranes are introduced in the system as large and small unilamellar vesicles. The aggregation lagtime increases in the presence of lipid vesicles for all situations investigated and the phase behavior of the membrane in the vesicles has a large effect on the aggregation kinetics. By comparing vesicles with different membrane phase behavior we see that the solid gel phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers cause the largest retardation of Abeta fibril formation. The membrane-induced retardation reaches saturation and is present when the vesicles are added during the lag time up to the nucleation point. No significant difference is detected in lag time when increasing amount of negative charge is incorporated into the membrane. PMID:20483329

  16. Heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate crystals in the presence of membrane vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saeed R.; Whalen, Patrick O.; Glenton, Patricia A.

    1993-12-01

    Membrane-assisted crystallization of calcium oxalate was studied in vitro, using constant composition methodology. Rat renal tubular brush border membrane vesicles were incubated in supersaturated solution of calcium oxalate. Calcium and oxalate depletion started much earlier in the presence of the vesicles than in their absence; within 8, 32, or 258 min of the incubation of vesicles in calcium oxalate solutions of relative supersaturation of 12, 10 or 6 respectively. Thin plate-like crystals with jagged edges formed in association with the membrane vesicles. Since crystal nucleation in the presence of membrane vesicles started within 8 min at a relative supersaturation as low as 12, it will start significantly earlier in the urine of stone formers which is known to have higher relative supersaturation with respect to calcium oxalate. These results demonstrate that cellular membranes can efficiently induce nucleation of calcium oxalate crystals from a metastable solution in an vitro system. Similar membrane induced heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate in vivo within the renal tubules is a distinct possibility.

  17. Rapid determination of internal volumes of membrane vesicles with electron spin resonance-stopped flow technique.

    PubMed

    Anzai, K; Higashi, K; Kirino, Y

    1988-01-13

    We have developed an electron spin resonance (ESR)-stopped flow technique and employed it for the simple and rapid determination of internal volumes of biomembrane vesicles and liposomes. A vesicle suspension containing a neutral and membrane-permeable spin label, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPONE), was mixed in the stopped-flow apparatus with an isotonic solution of relatively impermeable line broadening agents, potassium tris(oxalato)chromate(III) or potassium ferricyanide, and an ESR spectrum was recorded. From the relative intensity of the sharp triplet signal due to TEMPONE in the aqueous space within vesicles, the determination of the internal aqueous volume was straightforward. Using this technique, it is possible to measure intravesicular volumes in 0.1 s. The internal volume of sonicated phospholipid vesicles was approximately 0.3 microliter/mg lipid. The light fraction of sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle was estimated to have an internal volume of 2.2-2.6 microliter/mg protein in its resting state. Activation of Ca2+ pumps in the membrane upon addition of ATP and Ca2+ ions decreased the internal volume by about 10%. This finding supports the hypothesis that the Ca2+ pump is electrogenic and that the efflux of potassium ions compensates for the influx of positive charges. The present technique is widely applicable to the simple and rapid determination of the internal volumes of membrane vesicles. PMID:2825810

  18. Towards fully automated Identification of Vesicle-Membrane Fusion Events in TIRF Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallotton, Pascal; James, David E.; Hughes, William E.

    2007-11-01

    Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) is imposing itself as the tool of choice for studying biological activity in close proximity to the plasma membrane. For example, the exquisite selectivity of TIRFM allows monitoring the diffusion of GFP-phogrin vesicles and their recruitment to the plasma membrane in pancreatic β-cells. We present a novel computer vision system for automatically identifying the elusive fusion events of GFP-phogrin vesicles with the plasma membrane. Our method is based on robust object tracking and matched filtering. It should accelerate the quantification of TIRFM data and allow the extraction of more biological information from image data to support research in diabetes and obesity.

  19. Trypsin digestion for determining orientation of ATPase in Halobacterium saccharovorum membrane vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, H.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared by low pressure disruption of cells exhibited no ATPase activity in the absence of Triton X-100, although 43% of the total menadione reductase activity was detected. Trypsin digestion reduced menadione reductase activity by 45% whereas ATPase activity was not affected. Disruption of the membrane fraction at higher pressure solubilized about 45% of the ATPase activity. The soluble activity was still enhanced by Triton X-100, suggesting that the detergent, besides disrupting membrane vesicles, also activated the ATPase. The discrepancy in localization of menadione reductase and ATPase activities raised questions regarding the reliability of using a single marker enzyme as an indicator of vesicle orientation.

  20. Formation of polyhedral vesicles and polygonal membrane tubes induced by banana-shaped proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The shape transformations of fluid membranes induced by curved protein rods are studied using meshless membrane simulations. The rod assembly at low rod density induces a flat membrane tube and oblate vesicle. It is found that the polyhedral shapes are stabilized at high rod densities. The discrete shape transition between triangular and buckled discoidal tubes is obtained and their curvature energies are analyzed by a simple geometric model. For vesicles, triangular hosohedron and elliptic-disk shapes are formed in equilibrium, whereas tetrahedral and triangular prism shapes are obtained as metastable states.

  1. Formation of polyhedral vesicles and polygonal membrane tubes induced by banana-shaped proteins.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-28

    The shape transformations of fluid membranes induced by curved protein rods are studied using meshless membrane simulations. The rod assembly at low rod density induces a flat membrane tube and oblate vesicle. It is found that the polyhedral shapes are stabilized at high rod densities. The discrete shape transition between triangular and buckled discoidal tubes is obtained and their curvature energies are analyzed by a simple geometric model. For vesicles, triangular hosohedron and elliptic-disk shapes are formed in equilibrium, whereas tetrahedral and triangular prism shapes are obtained as metastable states. PMID:26723594

  2. The theory of semipermeable vesicles and membranes: An integral-equation approach. III. Vesicles with internal nonpermeating ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yaoqi; Stell, George

    1989-09-01

    The system of a fluid in the presence of a spherical semipermeable vesicle (SPV) with the freely mobile nonpermeating species inside the vesicle is investigated via an integral-equation approach. This system can be used to model certain feature of a biological cell, permeable to simple ions, in which solute proteins inside the cell are unable to permeate its walls. As an illustrative example of the use of our integral equations, the analytical solution for density profiles in the mean-spherical approximation/Debye-Hückel approximation (MSA/DH) is obtained, where the MSA is used to obtain the density profiles near a membrane and the DH approximation to obtain the bulk pair correlation functions. A method which applies to nonmobile protein fixed inside a cell is also considered.

  3. Electron microscopy during release and purification of mesosomal vesicles and protoplast membranes from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Popkin, T J; Theodore, T S; Cole, R M

    1971-09-01

    The mesosomes of log-phase Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538P and Staphylococcus aureus phage-type 80/81, as seen in situ in ultrathin sections, were of the vesicular type. The constituent vesicles ranged from 35 to 50 nm in diameter when the glutaraldehyde-osmium-uranium-lead sequence of fixation and staining was used. During protoplasting in hypertonic buffer containing a muralytic enzyme, vesicles of the same size were extruded and required magnesium ion to maintain structural integrity. The vesicles, purified from the protoplasting supernatant medium by density gradient centrifugation, maintained size and configuration in a homogeneous preparation. Cytoplasmic membranes, produced by osmotic shock and nuclease treatment of protoplasts, were similarly concentrated in gradients. However, they were not free of membrane-associated ribosomes nor of mesosomal vesicles except when prepared in the absence of magnesium. PMID:4106221

  4. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 mediates trafficking of {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Nazarul; Hu, Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Integrins are major receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). As transmembrane proteins, the levels of integrins at the plasma membrane or the cell surface are ultimately determined by the balance between two vesicle trafficking events: endocytosis of integrins at the plasma membrane and exocytosis of the vesicles that transport integrins. Here, we report that vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2), a SNARE protein that mediates vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane, is involved in the trafficking of {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin. VAMP2 was present on vesicles containing endocytosed {beta}1 integrin. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of VAMP2 markedly reduced cell surface {alpha}5{beta}1 and inhibited cell adhesion and chemotactic migration to fibronectin, the ECM ligand of {alpha}5{beta}1, without altering cell surface expression of {alpha}2{beta}1 integrin or {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin. By contrast, silencing of VAMP8, another SNARE protein, had no effect on cell surface expression of the integrins or cell adhesion to fibronectin. In addition, VAMP2-mediated trafficking is involved in cell adhesion to collagen but not to laminin. Consistent with disruption of integrin functions in cell proliferation and survival, VAMP2 silencing diminished proliferation and triggered apoptosis. Collectively, these data indicate that VAMP2 mediates the trafficking of {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane and VAMP2-dependent integrin trafficking is critical in cell adhesion, migration and survival.

  5. Bacterial Membrane Vesicles Mediate the Release of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lipoglycans and Lipoproteins from Infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Athman, Jaffre J; Wang, Ying; McDonald, David J; Boom, W Henry; Harding, Clifford V; Wearsch, Pamela A

    2015-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an intracellular pathogen that infects lung macrophages and releases microbial factors that regulate host defense. M. tuberculosis lipoproteins and lipoglycans block phagosome maturation, inhibit class II MHC Ag presentation, and modulate TLR2-dependent cytokine production, but the mechanisms for their release during infection are poorly defined. Furthermore, these molecules are thought to be incorporated into host membranes and released from infected macrophages within exosomes, 40-150-nm extracellular vesicles that derive from multivesicular endosomes. However, our studies revealed that extracellular vesicles released from infected macrophages include two distinct, largely nonoverlapping populations: one containing host cell markers of exosomes (CD9, CD63) and the other containing M. tuberculosis molecules (lipoglycans, lipoproteins). These vesicle populations are similar in size but have distinct densities, as determined by separation on sucrose gradients. Release of lipoglycans and lipoproteins from infected macrophages was dependent on bacterial viability, implicating active bacterial mechanisms in their secretion. Consistent with recent reports of extracellular vesicle production by bacteria (including M. tuberculosis), we propose that bacterial membrane vesicles are secreted by M. tuberculosis within infected macrophages and subsequently are released into the extracellular environment. Furthermore, extracellular vesicles released from M. tuberculosis-infected cells activate TLR2 and induce cytokine responses by uninfected macrophages. We demonstrate that these activities derive from the bacterial membrane vesicles rather than exosomes. Our findings suggest that bacterial membrane vesicles are the primary means by which M. tuberculosis exports lipoglycans and lipoproteins to impair effector functions of infected macrophages and circulate bacterial components beyond the site of infection to regulate immune responses by uninfected

  6. Structural Basis for Membrane Binding and Remodeling by the Exomer Secretory Vesicle Cargo Adaptor

    PubMed Central

    Paczkowski, Jon E.; Fromme, J. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cargo adaptor subunits of vesicle coat protein complexes sort transmembrane proteins to distinct membrane compartments in eukaryotic cells. The exomer complex is the only cargo adaptor known to sort proteins at the trans-Golgi network into secretory vesicles. Exomer function is regulated by the Arf1 GTPase, a master regulator of trafficking at the Golgi. We report the structure of exomer bound to two copies of Arf1. Exomer interacts with each Arf1 molecule via two surfaces; one is a non-canonical interface that regulates GTP hydrolysis. The structure uncovers an unexpected membrane-proximal hydrophobic element that exomer uses in cooperation with Arf1 to remodel membranes. Given the constrained motion of the exomer hinge region, we envision that exomer dynamically positions multiple membrane insertion elements to drive membrane fission. In contrast to other known cargo adaptors, exomer therefore couples two functions, cargo sorting and membrane fission, into a single complex. PMID:25203211

  7. Hypoxia directly increases serotonin transport by porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, G.B.; Block, E.R. )

    1990-02-26

    Alterations in the physical state and composition of membrane lipids have been shown to interfere with a number of critical cellular and membrane functions including transmembrane transport. The authors have reported that hypoxia has profound effects upon the physical state and lipid composition of the PAEC plasma membrane bilayer and have suggested that this is responsible for increased serotonin uptake by these cells. In order to determine whether hypoxia has a direct effect on the plasma membrane transport of serotonin, they measured serotonin transport activity (1) in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from normoxic (20% O{sub 2}-5% CO{sub 2}) and hypoxic (0% O{sub 2}-5% CO{sub 2}) PAEC and (2) in PAEC plasma membrane vesicles that were exposed directly to normoxia or hypoxia. A 24-h exposure of PAEC to hypoxia resulted in a 40% increase in specific serotonin transport by plasma membrane vesicles derived from these cells. When plasma membrane vesicles were isolated and then directly exposed to normoxia or hypoxia for 1 h at 37C, a 31% increase in specific 5-HT transport was observed in hypoxic vesicles. Hypoxia did not alter the Km of serotonin transport (normoxia = 3.47 {mu}M versus hypoxia = 3.76 {mu}M) but markedly increased the maximal rate of transport (V{sup max}) (normoxia = 202.4 pmol/min/mg protein versus hypoxia = 317.9 pmol/min/mg protein). These results indicate that hypoxia increases serotonin transport in PAEC by a direct effect on the plasma membrane leading to an increase in the effective number of transporter molecules without alteration in transporter affinity for serotonin.

  8. Complement-mediated production of plasma-membrane vesicles from rat fat-cells.

    PubMed

    Richardson, P J; Luzio, J P

    1980-03-15

    1. Rat isolated fat-cells were coated with rabbit anti-(rat erythrocyte) antibody and incubated with fresh guinea-pig serum for 25 min at 37 degrees C, which resulted in a more than 95% release of the cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. 2. Under these conditions fragmentation of the plasma membrane was examined by following the plasma-membrane markers 5'-nucleotidase, adrenaline-sensitive adenylate cyclase and membrane-bound rabbit immunoglobulin G through a differential-centrifugation fractionation procedure. 3. Approx. 50% of the plasma-membrane markers remained associated with triacylglycerol. Of the remainder more than half was pelleted by centrifugation at 10 000 g for 30 min. 4. The 10 000 g supernatant was fractionated by centrifugation on a sucrose density gradient (15-50%, w/w). This procedure resulted in the production of two visible white bands on the density gradient. The bands consisted of vesicles derived from the plasma membrane, since they coincided with peaks of 5'-nucleotidase activity, contained membrane-bound immunoglobulin G and the denser one had adenylate cyclase activity. The phospholipid and protein contents of the vesicles were determined and compared with those in purified plasma membrane. 5. It is suggested that complement-mediated lysis of rat fat-cells caused the production of plasma-membrane vesicles that differ in composition from the whole plasma membrane. PMID:6249263

  9. A synaptic vesicle antigen is restricted to the junctional region of the presynaptic plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, K M; Schweitzer, E S; Miljanich, G P; Clift-O'Grady, L; Kushner, P D; Reichardt, L F; Kelly, R B

    1983-01-01

    The plasma membrane of electric organ nerve terminals has two domains that can be distinguished by monoclonal antibodies. A library of 111 mouse monoclonal antibodies raised to nerve terminals from Torpedo californica contains 4 antibodies that bind specifically to the outside of intact synaptosomes. The distribution of the binding sites of these monoclonal antibodies on the outside of intact nerve terminals was examined by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. The binding sites of 3 (tor23, 25, and 132) are distributed uniformly over nerve trunks and fine terminal branches. The binding site of the fourth (tor70) is restricted to synaptic junctional regions. This antibody, but not the other 3, recognizes a major component of synaptic vesicles, a proteoglycan associated with the inner surface of the vesicle membrane. The difference in the pattern of binding of these monoclonal antibodies suggests that the region of the plasma membrane containing active zones is antigenically distinguishable from other nerve terminal plasma membrane. We suggest that the antigen recognized by tor70 is externalized by exocytosis of synaptic vesicles while other plasma antigens take a different route to the surface. The unexpected observation that the vesicle antigen remains on the surface after exocytosis and is prevented from diffusion from the synaptic junctional region would be consistent with an interaction between the vesicle proteoglycan and elements of the synaptic cleft. Images PMID:6359167

  10. Bacterial Social Networks: Structure and composition of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicle chains

    PubMed Central

    Remis, Jonathan P.; Wei, Doug; Gorur, Amita; Zemla, Marcin; Haraga, Jessica; Allen, Simon; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Costerton, J. William; Berleman, James E.; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Summary The social soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, displays a variety of complex and highly coordinated behaviors, including social motility, predatory rippling and fruiting body formation. Here we show that M. xanthus cells produce a network of outer membrane extensions in the form of vesicles and vesicle chains that interconnect cells. We observed peritrichous display of vesicles and vesicle chains and increased abundance in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. By applying a range of imaging techniques, including 3D Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM), we determined these structures to range between 30-60 nm in width and up to 5 μm in length. Purified vesicle chains consist of typical M. xanthus lipids, fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactoseamine (GalNAc) carbohydrates and a small set of cargo protein. The protein content includes CglB and Tgl membrane proteins transferred in a contact-dependent manner. Most significantly, the 3D organization of cells within biofilms indicates that cells are connected via an extensive network of membrane extensions that may connect cells at the level of the periplasmic space. Such a network would allow the transfer of membrane proteins and other molecules between cells, and likely provides a mechanism for the coordination of social activities. PMID:23848955

  11. Formation of secretory vesicles in permeabilized cells: a salt extract from yeast membranes promotes budding of nascent secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network of endocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, W L; Shields, D

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of secretory-vesicle formation from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) of endocrine cells is poorly understood. To identify cytosolic activities that facilitate the formation and fission of nascent secretory vesicles, we treated permeabilized pituitary GH3 cells with high salt to remove endogenous budding factors. Using this cell preparation, secretory-vesicle budding from the TGN required addition of exogenous cytosol and energy. Mammalian cytosols (GH3 cells and bovine brain) promoted post-TGN vesicle formation. Most significantly, a salt extract of membranes from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a cell lacking a regulated secretory pathway, stimulated secretory vesicle budding in the absence of mammalian cytosolic factors. These results demonstrate that the factors which promote secretory-vesicle release from the TGN are conserved between yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:8615761

  12. Inhibition of Sendai virus fusion with phospholipid vesicles and human erythrocyte membranes by hydrophobic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, D.R.; Flanagan, T.D.; Young, J.E.; Yeagle, P.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Hydrophobic di- and tripeptides which are capable of inhibiting enveloped virus infection of cells are also capable of inhibiting at least three different types of membrane fusion events. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of N-methyl dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (N-methyl DOPE), containing encapsulated 1-aminonaphthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid (ANTS) and/or p-xylene bis(pyridinium bromide) (DPX), were formed by extrusion. Vesicle fusion and leakage were then monitored with the ANTS/DPX fluorescence assay. Sendai virus fusion with lipid vesicles and Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes were measured by following the relief of fluorescence quenching of virus labeled with octadecylrhodamine B chloride (R18). This study found that the effectiveness of the peptides carbobenzoxy-L-Phe-L-Phe (Z-L-Phe-L-Phe), Z-L-Phe, Z-D-Phe, and Z-Gly-L-Phe-L-Phe in inhibiting N-methyl DOPE LUV fusion or fusion of virus with N-methyl DOPE LUV also paralleled their reported ability to block viral infectivity. Furthermore, Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly and Z-Gly-L-Phe inhibited Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes with the same relative potency with which they inhibited vesicle-vesicle and virus-vesicle fusion. The evidence suggests a mechanism by which these peptides exert their inhibition of plaque formation by enveloped viruses. This class of inhibitors apparently acts by inhibiting fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane, thereby preventing viral infection. The physical pathway by which these peptides inhibit membrane fusion was investigated. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of proposed intermediates in the pathway for membrane fusion in LUV revealed that the potent fusion inhibitor Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly selectively altered the structure (or dynamics) of the hypothesized fusion intermediates and that the poor inhibitor Z-Gly-L-Phe did not.

  13. Light-induced membrane potential and pH gradient in Halobacterium halobium envelope vesicles.

    PubMed

    Renthal, R; Lanyi, J K

    1976-05-18

    Illumination of envelope vesicles prepared from Halobacterium halobium cells causes translocation of protons from inside to outside, due to the light-induced cycling of bacteriorhodopsin. This process results in a pH gradient across the membranes, an electrical potential, and the movements of K+ and Na+. The electrical potential was estimated by following the fluorescence of a cyanine dye, 3,3'-dipentyloxadicarbocyanine. Illumination of H. halobium vesicles resulted in a rapid, reversible decrease of the dye fluorescence, by as much as 35%. This effect was not seen in nonvesicular patches of purple membrane. Observation of maximal fluorescence decreases upon ilumination of vesicles required an optimal dye/membrane protein ratio. The pH optimum for the lightinduced fluorescence decrease was 6.0. The decrease was linear with actinic light intensity up to about 4 X 10(5) ergs cn-2 s-1. Valinomycin, gramicidin, and triphenylmethylphosphonium ion all abolished the fluorescence changes. However, the light-induced pH change was enhanced by these agents. Conversely, buffered vesicles showed no pH change but gave the same or larger fluorescence changes. Thus, we have identified the fluorescence decrease with a light-induced membrane potential, inside negative. By using valinomycin-K+-induced membrane potentials, we calibrated the fluorescence decrease with calculated Nernst diffusion potentials. We found a linear dependence between potential and fluorescence decrease of 3 mV/%, up to 90 mV. When the envelope vesicles were illuminated, the total proton-motive force generated was dependent on the presence of Na+ and K+ and their concentration gradients across the membrane. In general, K+ appeared to be more permeable than Na+ and, thus, permitted development of greater pH gradients and lower electrical potentials. By calculating the total proton-motive force from the sum of the pH and potential terms, we found that the vesicles can produce proton-motive forces near--200 m

  14. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced calcium release from platelet plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Rengasamy, A.; Feinberg, H.

    1988-02-15

    A platelet membrane preparation, enriched in plasma membrane markers, took up /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in exchange for intravesicular Na+ and released it after the addition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). The possibility that contaminating dense tubular membrane (DTS) vesicles contributed the Ca/sup 2 +/ released by IP3 was eliminated by the addition of vanadate to inhibit Ca/sup +/-ATPase-mediated DTS Ca/sup 2 +/ sequestration and by the finding that only plasma membrane vesicles exhibit Na/sup +/-dependent Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake. Ca/sup 2 +/ released by IP3 was dependent on low extravesicular Ca/sup 2 +/ concentrations. IP3-induced Ca/sup 2 +/ release was additive to that released by Na/sup +/ addition while GTP or polyethylene glycol (PEG) had no effect. These results strongly suggest that IP3 facilitates extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ influx in addition to release from DTS membranes.

  15. The Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes Releases Lipoproteins as Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles*

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Massimiliano; Garibaldi, Manuela; Aprea, Susanna; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Doro, Francesco; Becherelli, Marco; Taddei, Anna Rita; Tani, Chiara; Tavarini, Simona; Mora, Marirosa; Teti, Giuseppe; D'Oro, Ugo; Nuti, Sandra; Soriani, Marco; Margarit, Immaculada; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido; Norais, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are attractive vaccine candidates because they represent a major class of cell surface-exposed proteins in many bacteria and are considered as potential pathogen-associated molecular patterns sensed by Toll-like receptors with built-in adjuvanticity. Although Gram-negative lipoproteins have been extensively characterized, little is known about Gram-positive lipoproteins. We isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes a large amount of lipoproteins organized in vesicles. These vesicles were obtained by weakening the bacterial cell wall with a sublethal concentration of penicillin. Lipid and proteomic analysis of the vesicles revealed that they were enriched in phosphatidylglycerol and almost exclusively composed of lipoproteins. In association with lipoproteins, a few hypothetical proteins, penicillin-binding proteins, and several members of the ExPortal, a membrane microdomain responsible for the maturation of secreted proteins, were identified. The typical lipidic moiety was apparently not necessary for lipoprotein insertion in the vesicle bilayer because they were also recovered from the isogenic diacylglyceryl transferase deletion mutant. The vesicles were not able to activate specific Toll-like receptor 2, indicating that lipoproteins organized in these vesicular structures do not act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In light of these findings, we propose to name these new structures Lipoprotein-rich Membrane Vesicles. PMID:26018414

  16. Selective Field Effects on Intracellular Vacuoles and Vesicle Membranes with Nanosecond Electric Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Tekle, Ephrem; Oubrahim, Hammou; Dzekunov, Sergey M.; Kolb, Juergen F.; Schoenbach, Karl H.; Chock, P. B.

    2005-01-01

    Electric pulses across intact vesicles and cells can lead to transient increase in permeability of their membranes. We studied the integrity of these membranes in response to external electric pulses of high amplitude and submicrosecond duration with a primary aim of achieving selective permeabilization. These effects were examined in two separate model systems comprising of 1), a mixed population of 1,2-di-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine phospholipid vesicles and in 2), single COS-7 cells, in which large endosomal membrane vacuoles were induced by stimulated endocytosis. It has been shown that large and rapidly varying external electric fields, with pulses shorter than the charging time of the outer-cell membrane, could substantially increase intracellular fields to achieve selective manipulations of intracellular organelles. The underlying principle of this earlier work is further developed and applied to the systems studied here. Under appropriate conditions, we show preferential permeabilization of one vesicle population in a mixed preparation of vesicles of similar size distribution. It is further shown that large endocytosed vacuoles in COS-7 cells can be selectively permeabilized with little effect on the integrity of outer cell membrane. PMID:15821165

  17. A novel micropipet method for measuring the bending modulus of vesicle membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Zhelev, D V; Needham, D; Hochmuth, R M

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical model and an experiment are presented for determining the bending modulus of a bilayer vesicle membrane. The vesicle is held with a pipet having a radius between 1 and 2 microns, and the tension in the membrane is changed by changing the suction pressure. Then the vesicle membrane is deformed by aspirating it into a smaller pipet having a radius on the order of 0.5 microns. The relationship between the suction pressures in the two pipets is found to be linear, as predicted by the theoretical model. The curvature of the vesicle membrane at the pipet orifice and the bending modulus are found with the help of the model from the slope and the intercept of the linear experimental relationship between the suction pressures in the two pipets. The bending modulus for the two SOPC membranes studied in these experiments was found to be either 0.6 or 1.15 x 10(-19) J, which is similar to the values measured previously. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7948685

  18. Comparative Proteome Analysis of Spontaneous Outer Membrane Vesicles and Purified Outer Membranes of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Andreas; Becher, Dörte; Vogel, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of Gram-negative bacteria receive increasing attention because of various biological functions and their use as vaccines. However, the mechanisms of OMV release and selective sorting of proteins into OMVs remain unclear. Comprehensive quantitative proteome comparisons between spontaneous OMVs (SOMVs) and the outer membrane (OM) have not been conducted so far. Here, we established a protocol for metabolic labeling of neisserial proteins with 15N. SOMV and OM proteins labeled with 15N were used as an internal standard for proteomic comparison of the SOMVs and OMs of two different strains. This labeling approach, coupled with high-sensitivity mass spectrometry, allowed us to comprehensively unravel the proteome of the SOMVs and OMs. We quantified the relative distribution of 155 proteins between SOMVs and the OM. Complement regulatory proteins, autotransporters, proteins involved in iron and zinc acquisition, and a two-partner secretion system were enriched in SOMVs. The highly abundant porins PorA and PorB and proteins connecting the OM with peptidoglycan or the inner membrane, such as RmpM, MtrE, and PilQ, were depleted in SOMVs. Furthermore, the three lytic transglycosylases MltA, MltB, and Slt were less abundant in SOMVs. In conclusion, SOMVs are likely to be released from surface areas with a low local abundance of membrane-anchoring proteins and lytic transglycosylases. The enrichment of complement regulatory proteins, autotransporters, and trace metal binding and transport proteins needs to be explored in the context of the pathogenesis of meningococcal disease. PMID:23893116

  19. Bioinspired polymer vesicles and membranes for biological and medical applications.

    PubMed

    Palivan, Cornelia G; Goers, Roland; Najer, Adrian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Car, Anja; Meier, Wolfgang

    2016-01-21

    Biological membranes play an essential role in living organisms by providing stable and functional compartments, preserving cell architecture, whilst supporting signalling and selective transport that are mediated by a variety of proteins embedded in the membrane. However, mimicking cell membranes - to be applied in artificial systems - is very challenging because of the vast complexity of biological structures. In this respect a highly promising strategy to designing multifunctional hybrid materials/systems is to combine biological molecules with polymer membranes or to design membranes with intrinsic stimuli-responsive properties. Here we present supramolecular polymer assemblies resulting from self-assembly of mostly amphiphilic copolymers either as 3D compartments (polymersomes, PICsomes, peptosomes), or as planar membranes (free-standing films, solid-supported membranes, membrane-mimetic brushes). In a bioinspired strategy, such synthetic assemblies decorated with biomolecules by insertion/encapsulation/attachment, serve for development of multifunctional systems. In addition, when the assemblies are stimuli-responsive, their architecture and properties change in the presence of stimuli, and release a cargo or allow "on demand" a specific in situ reaction. Relevant examples are included for an overview of bioinspired polymer compartments with nanometre sizes and membranes as candidates in applications ranging from drug delivery systems, up to artificial organelles, or active surfaces. Both the advantages of using polymer supramolecular assemblies and their present limitations are included to serve as a basis for future improvements. PMID:26563574

  20. Two-compartment behavior during transport of folate compounds in L1210 cell plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.H.; Dembo, M.; Sirotnak, F.M.

    1982-01-01

    The transport of (/sup 3/H) 1,L 5-formyltetrahydrofolate, (/sup 3/H) folic acid, and (/sup 3/H)methotrexate by L1210 cell plasma membrane vesicles exhibited multicompartmental behavior. Two separate vesicular compartments (parallel relationship) of approximately equal volume were revealed during measurements of influx and efflux. Flux in one compartment was rapid, saturable, highly temperature-sensitive, and inhibited by pCMBS. Flux in the other compartment exhibited all of the characteristics of passive diffusion. These results imply that our plasma membrane vesicle preparations consist of a mixture of two functional species. Transport of folate into one of these species occurs by passive diffusion alone, whereas transport into the other kind of vesicle occurs by both passive diffusion and carrier-facilitated transport.

  1. Membrane Viscosity Determined from Shear-Driven Flow in Giant Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honerkamp-Smith, Aurelia R.; Woodhouse, Francis G.; Kantsler, Vasily; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-07-01

    The viscosity of lipid bilayer membranes plays an important role in determining the diffusion constant of embedded proteins and the dynamics of membrane deformations, yet it has historically proven very difficult to measure. Here we introduce a new method based on quantification of the large-scale circulation patterns induced inside vesicles adhered to a solid surface and subjected to simple shear flow in a microfluidic device. Particle image velocimetry based on spinning disk confocal imaging of tracer particles inside and outside of the vesicle and tracking of phase-separated membrane domains are used to reconstruct the full three-dimensional flow pattern induced by the shear. These measurements show excellent agreement with the predictions of a recent theoretical analysis, and allow direct determination of the membrane viscosity.

  2. Membrane viscosity determined from shear-driven flow in giant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Honerkamp-Smith, Aurelia R; Woodhouse, Francis G; Kantsler, Vasily; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-07-19

    The viscosity of lipid bilayer membranes plays an important role in determining the diffusion constant of embedded proteins and the dynamics of membrane deformations, yet it has historically proven very difficult to measure. Here we introduce a new method based on quantification of the large-scale circulation patterns induced inside vesicles adhered to a solid surface and subjected to simple shear flow in a microfluidic device. Particle image velocimetry based on spinning disk confocal imaging of tracer particles inside and outside of the vesicle and tracking of phase-separated membrane domains are used to reconstruct the full three-dimensional flow pattern induced by the shear. These measurements show excellent agreement with the predictions of a recent theoretical analysis, and allow direct determination of the membrane viscosity. PMID:23909365

  3. Polymeric capsule-cushioned leukocyte cell membrane vesicles as a biomimetic delivery platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Changyong; Wu, Zhiguang; Lin, Zhihua; Lin, Xiankun; He, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    We report a biomimetic delivery of microsized capsule-cushioned leukocyte membrane vesicles (CLMVs) through the conversion of freshly reassembled leukocyte membrane vesicles (LMVs), including membrane lipids and membrane-bound proteins onto the surface of layer-by-layer assembled polymeric multilayer microcapsules. The leukocyte membrane coating was verified by using electron microscopy, a quartz crystal microbalance, dynamic light scattering, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The resulting CLMVs have the ability to effectively evade clearance by the immune system and thus prolong the circulation time in mice. Moreover, we also show that the right-side-out leukocyte membrane coating can distinctly improve the accumulation of capsules in tumor sites through the molecular recognition of membrane-bound proteins of CLMVs with those of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The natural cell membrane camouflaged polymeric multilayer capsules with the immunosuppressive and tumor-recognition functionalities of natural leukocytes provide a new biomimetic delivery platform for disease therapy.We report a biomimetic delivery of microsized capsule-cushioned leukocyte membrane vesicles (CLMVs) through the conversion of freshly reassembled leukocyte membrane vesicles (LMVs), including membrane lipids and membrane-bound proteins onto the surface of layer-by-layer assembled polymeric multilayer microcapsules. The leukocyte membrane coating was verified by using electron microscopy, a quartz crystal microbalance, dynamic light scattering, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The resulting CLMVs have the ability to effectively evade clearance by the immune system and thus prolong the circulation time in mice. Moreover, we also show that the right-side-out leukocyte membrane coating can distinctly improve the accumulation of capsules in tumor sites through the molecular recognition of membrane-bound proteins of CLMVs with those of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The natural

  4. Staphylococcus aureus α-Toxin-Dependent Induction of Host Cell Death by Membrane-Derived Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Thay, Bernard; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Oscarsson, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide spectrum of infections in humans, ranging from superficial cutaneous infections, infections in the circum-oral region, to life-threatening bacteremia. It was recently demonstrated that Gram-positive organisms such as S. aureus liberate membrane-derived vesicles (MVs), which analogously to outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of Gram-negative bacteria can play a role in delivering virulence factors to host cells. In the present study we have shown that cholesterol-dependent fusion of S. aureus MVs with the plasma membrane represents a route for delivery of a key virulence factor, α-toxin (α-hemolysin; Hla) to human cells. Most S. aureus strains produce this 33-kDa pore-forming protein, which can lyse a wide range of human cells, and induce apoptosis in T-lymphocytes. Our results revealed a tight association of biologically active α-toxin with membrane-derived vesicles isolated from S. aureus strain 8325-4. Concomitantly, α-toxin contributed to HeLa cell cytotoxicity of MVs, and was the main vesicle-associated protein responsible for erythrocyte lysis. In contrast, MVs obtained from an isogenic hla mutant were significantly attenuated with regards to both causing lysis of erythrocytes and death of HeLa cells. This is to our knowledge the first recognition of an S. aureus MV-associated factor contributing to host cell cytotoxicity. PMID:23382935

  5. The Enolase of Borrelia burgdorferi Is a Plasminogen Receptor Released in Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, A.; Coleman, J. L.; Kuhlow, C. J.; Crowley, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    The agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, has a number of outer membrane proteins that are differentially regulated during its life cycle. In addition to their physiological functions in the organism, these proteins also likely serve different functions in invasiveness and immune evasion. In borreliae, as well as in other bacteria, a number of membrane proteins have been implicated in binding plasminogen. The activation and transformation of plasminogen into its proteolytically active form, plasmin, enhances the ability of the bacteria to disseminate in the host. Outer membrane vesicles of B. burgdorferi contain enolase, a glycolytic-cycle enzyme that catalyzes 2-phosphoglycerate to form phosphoenolpyruvate, which is also a known plasminogen receptor in Gram-positive bacteria. The enolase was cloned, expressed, purified, and used to generate rabbit antienolase serum. The enolase binds plasminogen in a lysine-dependent manner but not through ionic interactions. Although it is present in the outer membrane, microscopy and proteinase K treatment showed that enolase does not appear to be exposed on the surface. However, enolase in the outer membrane vesicles is accessible to proteolytic degradation by proteinase K. Samples from experimentally and tick-infected mice and rabbits as well as from Lyme disease patients exhibit recognition of enolase in serologic assays. Thus, this immunogenic plasminogen receptor released in outer membrane vesicles could be responsible for external proteolysis in the pericellular environment and have roles in nutrition and in enhancing dissemination. PMID:22083700

  6. Sodium- and adenosine-triphosphate-dependent calcium movements in membrane vesicles prepared from dog erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, O E; Sjodin, R A

    1984-01-01

    Inside-out vesicles from the membranes of dog erythrocytes were obtained by the method of Lew & Seymour (1982) for study of Ca movements. In the absence of ATP, 45Ca accumulation by the vesicles was inhibited by external Na and stimulated by internal Na. The presence of either MgCl2, quinidine sulphate, or LaCl3 in the incubation medium inhibited 45Ca accumulation in the absence of ATP. The release of 45Ca from 45Ca-loaded vesicles was specifically promoted by Na+ in the absence as well as in the presence of ATP. The accumulation of 45Ca by vesicles was stimulated by ATP and the effect of ATP was entirely dependent on the presence of Mg. The Mg- and ATP-dependent 45Ca accumulation was stimulated by the presence of either K or Na in the medium, was hyperbolically activated by increasing the Ca2+ concentration in the medium, was stimulated by calmodulin and inhibited by orthovanadate (10(-4) M) or LaCl3 (10(-3) M). The data demonstrate the presence of two mechanisms for controlling Ca movements in inside-out vesicles from dog erythrocyte membranes, a Na-dependent one similar to the Na-Ca exchange described for squid axons and cardiac muscle and a Ca pump utilizing ATP with characteristics similar to those described for human erythrocytes and squid axons. PMID:6090650

  7. Raman spectroscopy of single extracellular vesicles reveals subpopulations with varying membrane content (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Zachary J.; Lee, Changwon; Rojalin, Tatu; Carney, Randy P.; Hazari, Sidhartha; Knudson, Alisha; Lam, Kit S.; Saari, Heikki; Lazaro Ibañez, Elisa; Viitala, Tapani; Laaksonen, Timo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Exosomes are small (~100nm) membrane bound vesicles excreted by cells as part of their normal biological processes. These extracellular vesicles are currently an area of intense research, since they were recently found to carry functional mRNA that allows transfer of proteins and other cellular instructions between cells. Exosomes have been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including cancer. Cancer cells are known to have increased exosome production, and may use those exosomes to prepare remote environments for metastasis. Therefore, there is a strong need to develop characterization methods to help understand the structure and function of these vesicles. However, current techniques, such as proteomics and genomics technologies, rely on aggregating a large amount of exosome material and reporting on chemical content that is averaged over many millions of exosomes. Here we report on the use of laser-tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) to probe individual vesicles, discovering distinct heterogeneity among exosomes both within a cell line, as well as between different cell lines. Through principal components analysis followed by hierarchical clustering, we have identified four "subpopulations" of exosomes shared across seven cell lines. The key chemical differences between these subpopulations, as determined by spectral analysis of the principal component loadings, are primarily related to membrane composition. Specifically, the differences can be ascribed to cholesterol content, cholesterol to phospholipid ratio, and surface protein expression. Thus, we have shown LTRS to be a powerful method to probe the chemical content of single extracellular vesicles.

  8. Improved stability of rabbit and rat intestinal brush border membrane vesicles using phospholipase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Maenz, D D; Chenu, C; Bellemare, F; Berteloot, A

    1991-11-01

    The initial rates of Na(+)-dependent D-aspartate and D-glucose uptakes were shown to decline from the time of resuspension of brush border membrane vesicles isolated from rabbit and rat jejunum by standard divalent cation precipitation procedures. The former were however more stable than the latter and followed quite closely the decrease in the intravesicular volume, thus suggesting that the loss of transport activity may involve both nonspecific opening of the vesicles and either direct or indirect specific inactivation of the transporters. Uptake rates for both substrates did tend to stabilize at 6-24 h from resuspension, however this final 'next day' uptake activity was too low to be of practical use in kinetic studies. Freezing aliquots of rabbit jejunal vesicles in liquid N2 until the time of assay resulted in complete stabilization of D-glucose uptake. A modified homogenate buffer designed to inhibit a broad spectrum of phospholipase activities resulted in a partial stabilization of glucose transport by rabbit jejunal vesicles with, on average, an over 6-fold enrichment in the 'next day' stable specific activity of uptake as compared to unfrozen vesicles. The modified homogenate buffer also improved the stability and the 'next day' specific activities of D-glucose uptake in rat jejunal brush border vesicles and D-aspartic acid uptake in rabbit jejunal vesicles. It also completely stabilized the intravesicular volume in the latter preparation. An evaluation of the kinetic parameters of Na(+)-dependent D-glucose transport in rabbit vesicles prepared from either the standard homogenate media and frozen in liquid N2 or the modified media and allowed to stabilize overnight, revealed a single transport system with a Km of 0.31-0.32 mM as the best model to fit the data. As such the modifications to the homogenate media do not appear to effect the functional properties of D-glucose transport in the membrane. While being less efficient in stabilizing the vesicles than

  9. Fundamental Studies of Assembly and Mechanical Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes and Unilamellar Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi

    This dissertation work focuses on: (i) obtaining a phospholipid bilayer membrane (LBM)/conducting electrode system with low defect density and optimized rigidity; (ii) investigating vesicle stability and mechanical properties. LBM is a simplified yet representative cell membrane model. LBMs assembled on conductive surfaces can probe protein-LBM interactions activities electrochemically. Sterically stabilized vesicles could be used as cell models or for drug delivery. The main challenges for LBM assembly on gold are vesicles do not spontaneously rupture to form LBMs on gold and the roughness of the gold substrate has considerable influence on molecular film defect density. In this study, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) vesicles were functionalized with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N-poly(ethylene glycol)-2000-N-[3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate] (DSPE-PEG-PDP) to yield stable LBMs on gold without surface modification. A template-stripping method was used to obtain atomically flat and pristine gold surfaces. The critical force to initiate vesicle rupture decreases with increasing DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration, indicating that gold-thiolate bonding between DSPE-PEG-PDP and gold substrates promotes LBM formation. Mechanical properties of LBMs and vesicles were investigated as a function of DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration via Atomic Force Microscopy. The elastic moduli of LBMs were determined with DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration ranging from 0mol% to 24mol% and were found to depend on PEG chain conformation. Incorporating DSPE-PEG-PDP molecules with PEG in mushroom conformation results in a decrease of LBM rigidity, while incorporating PEG in brush conformation leads to LBM stiffening. Contrarily, mechanical properties of functionalized vesicles did not vary significantly by varying DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration. LBM with tunable rigidity by adjusting DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration provides a versatile cell membrane model for studying protein or

  10. Identification of a plastid protein involved in vesicle fusion and/or membrane protein translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Hugueney, P; Bouvier, F; Badillo, A; d'Harlingue, A; Kuntz, M; Camara, B

    1995-01-01

    Structural evidence has accumulated suggesting that fusion and/or translocation factors are involved in plastid membrane biogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we have developed an in vitro system in which the extent of fusion and/or translocation is monitored by the conversion of the xanthophyll epoxide (antheraxanthin) into the red ketocarotenoid (capsanthin). Only chromoplast membrane vesicles from red pepper fruits (Capsicum annuum) contain the required enzyme. Vesicles prepared from the mutant yellow cultivar are devoid of this enzyme and accumulate antheraxanthin. The fusion and/or translocation activity is characterized by complementation due to the synthesis of capsanthin and the parallel decrease of antheraxanthin when the two types of vesicles are incubated together in the presence of plastid stroma. We show that the extent of conversion is dependent upon an ATP-requiring protein that is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. Further purification and immunological analysis have revealed that the active factor, designated plastid fusion and/or translocation factor (Pftf), resides in a protein of 72 kDa. cDNA cloning revealed that mature Pftf has significant homology to yeast and animal (NSF) or bacterial (Ftsh) proteins involved in vesicle fusion or membrane protein translocation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777561

  11. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Yamaoka, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs), while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles). Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN). The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence. PMID:26752045

  12. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Yamaoka, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs), while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles). Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN). The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence. PMID:26752045

  13. Genome-Wide Assessment of Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kulp, Adam J.; Sun, Bo; Ai, Teresa; Manning, Andrew J.; Orench-Rivera, Nichole

    2015-01-01

    The production of outer membrane vesicles by Gram-negative bacteria has been well documented; however, the mechanism behind the biogenesis of these vesicles remains unclear. Here a high-throughput experimental method and systems-scale analysis was conducted to determine vesiculation values for the whole genome knockout library of Escherichia coli mutant strains (Keio collection). The resultant dataset quantitatively recapitulates previously observed phenotypes and implicates nearly 150 new genes in the process of vesiculation. Gene functional and biochemical pathway analyses suggest that mutations that truncate outer membrane structures such as lipopolysaccharide and enterobacterial common antigen lead to hypervesiculation, whereas mutants in oxidative stress response pathways result in lower levels. This study expands and refines the current knowledge regarding the cellular pathways required for outer membrane vesiculation in E. coli. PMID:26406465

  14. Kinetics of ATP- and Na(+)-gradient driven Ca2+ transport in basolateral membranes from gills of freshwater- and seawater-adapted tilapia.

    PubMed

    Verbost, P M; Schoenmakers, T J; Flik, G; Wendelaar Bonga, S E

    1994-01-01

    Plasma membranes of the gills of freshwater- and seawater-adapted tilapia were analyzed for Ca(2+)-ATPase and Na+/Ca2+ exchange activity. The relative importance of ATP-driven and Na(+)-gradient-driven Ca2+ transport in Ca2+ extrusion was evaluated on the basis of kinetic analyses in vitro. The Na+/Ca2+ exchangers in branchial membranes from freshwater or seawater fish displayed similar kinetics. The ATP-driven Ca2+ pump, however, showed a somewhat lower affinity for Ca2+ in membranes isolated from seawater gills than in membranes from freshwater gills; no difference in Vmax was found. The activity of the exchanger was estimated to be 50% of that of the ATP-driven pump at prevailing cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations (10(-7) mol l-1). Opercular ionocyte densities and branchial Na+/K(+)-ATPase content were not significantly different in fish residing in fresh water or sea water. We conclude that the gills of tilapia living for prolonged periods in fresh water or sea water do not differ in the make-up of their basolateral membrane with regard to Ca(2+)-ATPase, Na+/Ca2+ exchange and Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity. Apparently, the densities of these carriers suffice for calcium and sodium homeostasis under these vastly different ambient conditions. PMID:7964377

  15. Assessing the efficacy of vesicle fusion with planar membrane arrays using a mitochondrial porin as reporter

    SciTech Connect

    Pszon-Bartosz, Kamila; Hansen, Jesper S.; Stibius, Karin B.; Groth, Jesper S.; Helix-Nielsen, Claus

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} We have established a vesicle fusion efficacy assay based on the major non-specific porin of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA). {yields} Maximal fusion obtained was almost 150,000 porin insertions during 20 min. {yields} Incorporation can be either first order or exponential kinetics which has implications for establishing protein delivery to biomimetic membranes. -- Abstract: Reconstitution of functionally active membrane protein into artificially made lipid bilayers is a challenge that must be overcome to create a membrane-based biomimetic sensor and separation device. In this study we address the efficacy of proteoliposome fusion with planar membrane arrays. We establish a protein incorporation efficacy assay using the major non-specific porin of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA) as reporter. We use electrical conductance measurements and fluorescence microscopy to characterize proteoliposome fusion with an array of planar membranes. We show that protein reconstitution in biomimetic membrane arrays may be quantified using the developed FomA assay. Specifically, we show that FomA vesicles are inherently fusigenic. Optimal FomA incorporation is obtained with a proteoliposome lipid-to-protein molar ratio (LPR) = 50 more than 10{sup 5} FomA proteins could be incorporated in a bilayer array with a total membrane area of 2 mm{sup 2} within 20 min. This novel assay for quantifying protein delivery into lipid bilayers may be a useful tool in developing biomimetic membrane applications.

  16. Versatile cellular uptake mediated by catanionic vesicles: simultaneous spontaneous membrane fusion and endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Mauroy, Chloé; Castagnos, Pauline; Orio, Julie; Blache, Marie-Claire; Rico-Lattes, Isabelle; Teissié, Justin; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Blanzat, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    Lactose-derived catanionic vesicles offer unique opportunities to overcome cellular barriers. These potential nanovectors, very easy to formulate as drug delivery systems, are able to encapsulate drugs of various hydrophilicity. This article highlights versatile interaction mechanisms between these catanionic vesicles, labeled with hydrophilic and amphiphilic fluorescent probes, and a mammalian cell line, Chinese Hamster Ovary. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry techniques show that these vesicles are internalized by cells through cellular energy dependent processes, as endocytosis, but are simultaneously able to spontaneously fuse with cell plasma membranes and release their hydrophilic content directly inside the cytosol. Such innovative and polyvalent nanovectors, able to deliver their content via different internalization pathways, would positively be a great progress for the coadministration of drugs of complementary efficiency. PMID:25310849

  17. Tubular lipid membranes pulled from vesicles: Dependence of system equilibrium on lipid bilayer curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golushko, I. Yu.; Rochal, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Conditions of joint equilibrium and stability are derived for a spherical lipid vesicle and a tubular lipid membrane (TLM) pulled from this vesicle. The obtained equations establish relationships between the geometric and physical characteristics of the system and the external parameters, which have been found to be controllable in recent experiments. In particular, the proposed theory shows that, in addition to the pressure difference between internal and external regions of the system, the variable spontaneous average curvature of the lipid bilayer (forming the TLM) also influences the stability of the lipid tube. The conditions for stability of the cylindrical phase of TLMs after switching off the external force that initially formed the TLM from a vesicle are discussed. The loss of system stability under the action of a small axial force compressing the TLM is considered.

  18. Plant plasma membrane aquaporins in natural vesicles as potential stabilizers and carriers of glucosinolates.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria Del Carmen; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Moreno, Diego A; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-07-01

    Their biodegradable nature and ability to target cells make biological vesicles potential nanocarriers for bioactives delivery. In this work, the interaction between proteoliposomes enriched in aquaporins derived from broccoli plants and the glucosinolates was evaluated. The vesicles were stored at different temperatures and their integrity was studied. Determination of glucosinolates, showed that indolic glucosinolates were more sensitive to degradation in aqueous solution than aliphatic glucosinolates. Glucoraphanin was stabilized by leaf and root proteoliposomes at 25°C through their interaction with aquaporins. An extensive hydrogen bond network, including different aquaporin residues, and hydrophobic interactions, as a consequence of the interaction between the linear alkane chain of glucoraphanin and Glu31 and Leu34 protein residues, were established as the main stabilizing elements. Combined our results showed that plasma membrane vesicles from leaf and root tissues of broccoli plants may be considered as suitable carriers for glucosinolate which stabilization can be potentially attributed to aquaporins. PMID:27022872

  19. Uptake of auxins into membrane vesicles isolated from pea stems: an in vitro auxin transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Slone, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research was to test the applicability of the chemiosmotic theory of auxin transport to a subcellular system. Membrane vesicles were isolated from the basal portion of the third internode of etiolated pea plants (Pisum sativum L. var. Alaska) by differential centrifugation. Uptake of auxin was determined by adding /sup 14/C-labeled indoleacetic acid (IAA) to vesicles. Nigericin, a monovalent cation ionophore, and the electrogenic protonophore, carbonyl-cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), at micromolar concentrations abolished saturable uptake. Bursting vesicles by sonication, osmotic shock and freeze/thawing also eliminated saturable uptake. As the temperature increased from 0 to 30/sup 0/C, saturable uptake decreased markedly. Nonsaturable auxin uptake was less affected by these treatments. The pH gradient-dependent uptake of auxin appeared to be a transmembrane uptake of auxin into the vesicles rather than surface binding. Unlabeled IAA, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) at low concentrations reduced the saturable accumulation of (/sup 14/C)IAA in vesicles, while phenylacetic acid, benzoic acid, and 1-NAA were effective only at high concentrations. Kinetic analysis revealed two types of sites: a high affinity site with an uptake capacity of 25 to 40 pmoles/g tissue, and a low affinity site with an uptake capacity of 260 to 600 pmole/g tissue, fresh wt. In conclusion, several principal elements of an auxin transport system, as specific by the chemiosmotic theory of polar auxin transport, were present in membrane vesicles isolated from relatively mature pea stem tissue. However, one important aspect of the theory was not demonstrated in this in vitro system - a TIBA/NPA-sensitive auxin efflux. The kinetics and specificity of auxin uptake strongly suggested that this system was physiologically significant.

  20. The Lantibiotic Nisin Induces Lipid II Aggregation, Causing Membrane Instability and Vesicle Budding

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Katharina M.; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Grein, Fabian; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin exerts its activity by a unique dual mechanism. It permeates the cell membranes of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to the cell wall precursor Lipid II and inhibits cell wall synthesis. Binding of nisin to Lipid II induces the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates in the membrane of bacteria as well as in Lipid II-doped model membranes. Mechanistic details of the aggregation process and its impact on membrane permeation are still unresolved. In our experiments, we found that fluorescently labeled nisin bound very inhomogeneously to bacterial membranes as a consequence of the strong aggregation due to Lipid II binding. A correlation between cell membrane damage and nisin aggregation was observed in vivo. To further investigate the aggregation process of Lipid II and nisin, we assessed its dynamics by single-molecule microscopy of fluorescently labeled Lipid II molecules in giant unilamellar vesicles using light-sheet illumination. We observed a continuous reduction of Lipid II mobility due to a steady growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregates as a function of time and nisin concentration. From the measured diffusion constants of Lipid II, we estimated that the largest aggregates contained tens of thousands of Lipid II molecules. Furthermore, we observed that the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates induced vesicle budding in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, we propose a membrane permeation mechanism that is dependent on the continuous growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregation and probably involves curvature effects on the membrane. PMID:25762323

  1. The lantibiotic nisin induces lipid II aggregation, causing membrane instability and vesicle budding.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Katharina M; Spille, Jan-Hendrik; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Grein, Fabian; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2015-03-10

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin exerts its activity by a unique dual mechanism. It permeates the cell membranes of Gram-positive bacteria by binding to the cell wall precursor Lipid II and inhibits cell wall synthesis. Binding of nisin to Lipid II induces the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates in the membrane of bacteria as well as in Lipid II-doped model membranes. Mechanistic details of the aggregation process and its impact on membrane permeation are still unresolved. In our experiments, we found that fluorescently labeled nisin bound very inhomogeneously to bacterial membranes as a consequence of the strong aggregation due to Lipid II binding. A correlation between cell membrane damage and nisin aggregation was observed in vivo. To further investigate the aggregation process of Lipid II and nisin, we assessed its dynamics by single-molecule microscopy of fluorescently labeled Lipid II molecules in giant unilamellar vesicles using light-sheet illumination. We observed a continuous reduction of Lipid II mobility due to a steady growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregates as a function of time and nisin concentration. From the measured diffusion constants of Lipid II, we estimated that the largest aggregates contained tens of thousands of Lipid II molecules. Furthermore, we observed that the formation of large nisin-Lipid II aggregates induced vesicle budding in giant unilamellar vesicles. Thus, we propose a membrane permeation mechanism that is dependent on the continuous growth of nisin-Lipid II aggregation and probably involves curvature effects on the membrane. PMID:25762323

  2. Dynamics of Crowded Vesicles: Local and Global Responses to Membrane Composition.

    PubMed

    Holdbrook, Daniel A; Huber, Roland G; Piggot, Thomas J; Bond, Peter J; Khalid, Syma

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell envelope is composed of a mixture of different lipids and proteins, making it an inherently complex organelle. The interactions between integral membrane proteins and lipids are crucial for their respective spatial localization within bacterial cells. We have employed microsecond timescale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of vesicles of varying sizes and with a range of protein and lipid compositions, and used novel approaches to measure both local and global system dynamics, the latter based on spherical harmonics analysis. Our results suggest that both hydrophobic mismatch, enhanced by embedded membrane proteins, and curvature based sorting, due to different modes of undulation, may drive assembly in vesicular systems. Interestingly, the modes of undulation of the vesicles were found to be altered by the specific protein and lipid composition of the vesicle. Strikingly, lipid dynamics were shown to be coupled to proteins up to 6 nm from their surface, a substantially larger distance than has previously been observed, resulting in multi-layered annular rings enriched with particular types of phospholipid. Such large protein-lipid complexes may provide a mechanism for long-range communication. Given the complexity of bacterial membranes, our results suggest that subtle changes in lipid composition may have major implications for lipid and protein sorting under a curvature-based membrane-sorting model. PMID:27310814

  3. Dynamics of Crowded Vesicles: Local and Global Responses to Membrane Composition

    PubMed Central

    Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Huber, Roland G.; Piggot, Thomas J.; Bond, Peter J.; Khalid, Syma

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell envelope is composed of a mixture of different lipids and proteins, making it an inherently complex organelle. The interactions between integral membrane proteins and lipids are crucial for their respective spatial localization within bacterial cells. We have employed microsecond timescale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of vesicles of varying sizes and with a range of protein and lipid compositions, and used novel approaches to measure both local and global system dynamics, the latter based on spherical harmonics analysis. Our results suggest that both hydrophobic mismatch, enhanced by embedded membrane proteins, and curvature based sorting, due to different modes of undulation, may drive assembly in vesicular systems. Interestingly, the modes of undulation of the vesicles were found to be altered by the specific protein and lipid composition of the vesicle. Strikingly, lipid dynamics were shown to be coupled to proteins up to 6 nm from their surface, a substantially larger distance than has previously been observed, resulting in multi-layered annular rings enriched with particular types of phospholipid. Such large protein-lipid complexes may provide a mechanism for long-range communication. Given the complexity of bacterial membranes, our results suggest that subtle changes in lipid composition may have major implications for lipid and protein sorting under a curvature-based membrane-sorting model. PMID:27310814

  4. Chemical modifications to vesicle forming diblock copolymers: Development of smart functional polymersome membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joshua S.

    2011-07-01

    A major limitation to current treatment regimens for diseases is the inability to adequately deliver therapeutics. Many routes to encapsulation of these materials have been explored to improve biodistribution and better protect encapsulants from harsh biological conditions. One vehicle particularly attractive for encapsulation of such materials is the polymersome. While promising for translation to clinical use, there are still limitations in polymer chemistry and resulting polymersome behavior that will slow their adaptation. This thesis addresses several of these limitations. The first major limitation to polymersomes is lack of control over their release rate. Release is generally by simple diffusion, leading to a burst. To address this burst, Aim 1 proposes a route to stabilizing polymersome membranes through their polymerization. PCL-PEG copolymers were terminally acrylated and the acrylates polymerized in the membrane following vesicle assembly. Polymerization enhanced mechanical robustness of the membranes and reduced diffusion of encapsulated contents. To ultimately trigger release, Aim 2 presents a novel route to synthesizing diblock copolymers, enabling insertion of a functional group at the blocks' junction. To facilitate triggering of release, we inserted UV-cleavable 2-nitrophenylalanine. Polymersomes assembled from this polymer collapse upon exposure to light and molecules release. Demonstrating further utility of this synthetic route, fluorescent vesicles were prepared using fluorescent lysine as the joining molecule. These vesicles labeled dendritic cells, providing a novel route to cell labeling and tracking. The second limitation to vesicles promising for biomedical applications (made of PCL-PEG) is their solid membranes. Aim 3 demonstrates partial (or full) replacement of the PCL block with a caprolactone analogue, TOSUO, which is non-crystalline and assembles into soft, deformable vesicles. Increasing TOSUO content in the copolymer leads to

  5. Model Systems of Precursor Cellular Membranes: Long-Chain Alcohols Stabilize Spontaneously Formed Oleic Acid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Rendón, Adela; Carton, David Gil; Sot, Jesús; García-Pacios, Marcos; Montes, Ruth; Valle, Mikel; Arrondo, José-Luis R.; Goñi, Felix M.; Ruiz-Mirazo, Kepa

    2012-01-01

    Oleic acid vesicles have been used as model systems to study the properties of membranes that could be the evolutionary precursors of more complex, stable, and impermeable phospholipid biomembranes. Pure fatty acid vesicles in general show high sensitivity to ionic strength and pH variation, but there is growing evidence that this lack of stability can be counterbalanced through mixtures with other amphiphilic or surfactant compounds. Here, we present a systematic experimental analysis of the oleic acid system and explore the spontaneous formation of vesicles under different conditions, as well as the effects that alcohols and alkanes may have in the process. Our results support the hypothesis that alcohols (in particular 10- to 14-C-atom alcohols) contribute to the stability of oleic acid vesicles under a wider range of experimental conditions. Moreover, studies of mixed oleic-acid-alkane and oleic-acid-alcohol systems using infrared spectroscopy and Langmuir trough measurements indicate that precisely those alcohols that increased vesicle stability also decreased the mobility of oleic acid polar headgroups, as well as the area/molecule of lipid. PMID:22339864

  6. A Bcl-xL-Drp1 complex regulates synaptic vesicle membrane dynamics during endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongmei; Alavian, Kambiz N.; Lazrove, Emma; Mehta, Nabil; Jones, Adrienne; Zhang, Ping; Licznerski, Pawel; Graham, Morven; Uo, Takuma; Guo, Junhua; Rahner, Christoph; Duman, Ronald S.; Morrison, Richard S.; Jonas, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Following exocytosis, the rate of recovery of neurotransmitter release is determined by vesicle retrieval from the plasma membrane and by recruitment of vesicles from reserve pools within the synapse, the latter of which is dependent on mitochondrial ATP. The Bcl-2 family protein Bcl-xL, in addition to its role in cell death, regulates neurotransmitter release and recovery in part by increasing ATP availability from mitochondria. We now find, however, that, Bcl-xL directly regulates endocytotic vesicle retrieval in hippocampal neurons through protein/protein interaction with components of the clathrin complex. Our evidence suggests that, during synaptic stimulation, Bcl-xL translocates to clathrin-coated pits in a calmodulin-dependent manner and forms a complex of proteins with the GTPase Drp1, Mff and clathrin. Depletion of Drp1 produces misformed endocytotic vesicles. Mutagenesis studies suggest that formation of the Bcl-xL-Drp1 complex is necessary for the enhanced rate of vesicle endocytosis produced by Bcl-xL, thus providing a mechanism for presynaptic plasticity. PMID:23792689

  7. Comparative Transport Activity of Intact Cells, Membrane Vesicles, and Mesosomes of Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Robert A.; Thurman, Paul; Rogers, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    Sodium ion was shown to stimulate strongly the transport of l-glutamic acid into cells of Bacillus licheniformis 6346 His−. Lithium ion had a slight capacity to replace Na+ in this capacity, but K+ was without effect. Three of five amino acids tested. l-glutamic acid, l-aspartic acid, and l-alanine, were concentrated against a gradient in the cells. Intracellular pools of these amino acids were extractable with 5% trichloroacetic acid. Pools of l-histidine and l-lysine could not be detected. No evidence of active transport of lysine into cells could be detected, and histidine was taken up in the absence of chloramphenicol but not in its presence. The uptake of glutamic acid by membrane vesicle preparations was strongly stimulated by reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and to a lesser extent by succinate. The presence of phenazine methosulfate increased uptake in the presence of succinate. Either l- or d-lactate and adenosine triphosphate were without effect. None of these compounds stimulated the uptake of glutamic acid by mesosomes, although some mesosome preparations contained separable membrane which was very active. NADH strongly stimulated the uptake of aspartic acid and alanine by membrane vesicles but had only a slight effect on the uptake of histidine and lysine. No evidence of active transport of any of the amino acids into mesosomes could be detected either in the presence or absence of NADH. NADH stimulation of the uptake of glutamic acid by membrane vesicles was destroyed by exposure to light of 360 nm; this inactivation was reversible by vitamin K2(5) or K2(10). Sodium ion stimulated transport of glutamic acid by membrane vesicles. PMID:4347247

  8. Subfractionation, characterization and in-depth proteomic analysis of glomerular membrane vesicles in human urine

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Marie C.; Johnson, Kenneth L.; Zenka, Roman M.; Charlesworth, M. Cristine; Madden, Benjamin J.; Mahoney, Doug W.; Oberg, Ann L.; Huang, Bing Q.; Nesbitt, Lisa L.; Bakeberg, Jason L.; Bergen, H. Robert; Ward, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary exosome-like vesicles (ELVs) are a heterogenous mixture (diameter 40–200nm) containing vesicles shed from all segments of the nephron including glomerular podocytes. Contamination with Tamm Horsfall protein (THP) oligomers has hampered their isolation and proteomic analysis. Here we improved ELV isolation protocols employing density centrifugation to remove THP and albumin, and isolated a glomerular membranous vesicle (GMV) enriched subfraction from 7 individuals identifying 1830 proteins and in 3 patients with glomerular disease identifying 5657 unique proteins. The GMV fraction was composed of podocin/podocalyxin positive irregularly shaped membranous vesicles and podocin/podocalyxin negative classical exosomes. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified integrin, actin cytoskeleton and RhoGDI signaling in the top three canonical represented signaling pathways and 19 other proteins associated with inherited glomerular diseases. The GMVs are of podocyte origin and the density gradient technique allowed isolation in a reproducible manner. We show many nephrotic syndrome proteins, proteases and complement proteins involved in glomerular disease are in GMVs and some were shed in the disease state (nephrin, TRPC6 and INF2 and PLA2R). We calculated sample sizes required to identify new glomerular disease biomarkers, expand the ELV proteome and provide a reference proteome in a database that may prove useful in the search for biomarkers of glomerular disease. PMID:24196483

  9. Membrane permeability of fructose-1,6-diphosphate in lipid vesicles and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ehringer, W D; Niu, W; Chiang, B; Wang, O L; Gordon, L; Chien, S

    2000-07-01

    Fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP) is a glycolytic intermediate which has been used an intervention in various ischemic conditions for two decades. Yet whether FDP can enter the cell is under constant debate. In this study we examined membrane permeability of FDP in artificial membrane bilayers and in endothelial cells. To examine passive diffusion of FDP through the membrane bilayer, L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk (Egg PC) (10 mM) multi-lamellar vesicles were created containing different external concentrations of FDP (0, 0.5, 5 and 50 mM). The passive diffusion of FDP into the vesicles was followed spectrophotometrically. The results indicate that FDP diffuses through the membrane bilayer in a dose-dependent fashion. The movement of FDP through Egg PC membrane bilayers was confirmed by measuring the conversion of FDP to dihydroxyacetone-phosphate and the formation of hydrozone. FDP (0, 0.5, 5 or 50 mM) was encapsulated in Egg PC multilamellar vesicles and placed in a solution containing aldolase. In the 5 and 50 mM FDP groups there was a significant increase in dihydroxyacetone/hydrazone indicating that FDP crossed the membrane bilayer intact. We theorized that the passive diffusion of FDP might be due to disruption of the membrane bilayer. To examine this hypothesis, small unilamellar vesicles composed of Egg PC were created in the presence of 60 mM carboxyfluorescein, and the leakage of the sequestered dye was followed upon addition of various concentrations of FDP, fructose, fructose-6-phosphate, or fructose-1-phosphate (0, 5 or 50 mM). These results indicate that increasing concentrations of FDP increase the leakage rate of carboxyfluorescein. In contrast, no concentration of fructose, fructose-6-phosphate, or fructose-1-phosphate resulted in any significant increase in membrane permeability to carboxyfluorescein. To examine whether FDP could pass through cellular membranes, we examined the uptake of 14C-FDP by endothelial cells cultured under hypoxia

  10. H+ V-ATPase-Energized Transporters in Brush Border Membrane Vesicles from Whole Larvae of Aedes Aegypti

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brush Border Membrane vesicles (BBMVs) from Whole larvae of Aedes aegypti (AeBBMVWs ) contain an H+ V-ATPase (V), a Na+/H+ antiporter, NHA1 (A) and a Na+-coupled, nutrient amino acid transporter, NAT8 (N), VAN for short. All V-ATPase subunits are present in the Ae. aegypti genome and in the vesicles...

  11. The Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 Protein Is Secreted in Association with Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Brittany K.; Voegel, Tanja; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a gram-negative, xylem-limited plant pathogenic bacterium that causes disease in a variety of economically important agricultural crops including Pierce's disease of grapevines. Xylella fastidiosa biofilms formed in the xylem vessels of plants play a key role in early colonization and pathogenicity by providing a protected niche and enhanced cell survival. Here we investigate the role of Xylella fastidiosa PD1063, the predicted ortholog of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968, which encodes an outer membrane protein. To assess the function of the Xylella fastidiosa ortholog, we created Xylella fastidiosa mutants deleted for PD1063 and then assessed biofilm formation, cell-cell aggregation and cell growth in vitro. We also assessed disease severity and pathogen titers in grapevines mechanically inoculated with the Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 mutant. We found a significant decrease in cell-cell aggregation among PD1063 mutants but no differences in cell growth, biofilm formation, disease severity or titers in planta. Based on the demonstration that Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968 encodes an outer membrane protein, secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles, we predicted that PD1063 would also be secreted in a similar manner. Using anti-PD1063 antibodies, we found PD1063 in the supernatant and secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles. PD1063 purified from the supernatant, outer membrane fractions and outer membrane vesicles was 19.2 kD, corresponding to the predicted size of the processed protein. Our findings suggest Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 is not essential for development of Pierce's disease in Vitis vinifera grapevines although further research is required to determine the function of the PD1063 outer membrane protein in Xylella fastidiosa. PMID:25426629

  12. The Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 protein is secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brittany K; Voegel, Tanja; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2014-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a gram-negative, xylem-limited plant pathogenic bacterium that causes disease in a variety of economically important agricultural crops including Pierce's disease of grapevines. Xylella fastidiosa biofilms formed in the xylem vessels of plants play a key role in early colonization and pathogenicity by providing a protected niche and enhanced cell survival. Here we investigate the role of Xylella fastidiosa PD1063, the predicted ortholog of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968, which encodes an outer membrane protein. To assess the function of the Xylella fastidiosa ortholog, we created Xylella fastidiosa mutants deleted for PD1063 and then assessed biofilm formation, cell-cell aggregation and cell growth in vitro. We also assessed disease severity and pathogen titers in grapevines mechanically inoculated with the Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 mutant. We found a significant decrease in cell-cell aggregation among PD1063 mutants but no differences in cell growth, biofilm formation, disease severity or titers in planta. Based on the demonstration that Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae PXO_03968 encodes an outer membrane protein, secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles, we predicted that PD1063 would also be secreted in a similar manner. Using anti-PD1063 antibodies, we found PD1063 in the supernatant and secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles. PD1063 purified from the supernatant, outer membrane fractions and outer membrane vesicles was 19.2 kD, corresponding to the predicted size of the processed protein. Our findings suggest Xylella fastidiosa PD1063 is not essential for development of Pierce's disease in Vitis vinifera grapevines although further research is required to determine the function of the PD1063 outer membrane protein in Xylella fastidiosa. PMID:25426629

  13. Binding of the vesicle docking protein p115 to the GTPase Rab1b regulates membrane recruitment of the COPI vesicle coat

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yusong; Linstedt, Adam D

    2014-01-01

    Membrane recruitment of the COPI vesicle coat is fundamental to its function and contributes to compartment identity in the early secretory pathway. COPI recruitment is triggered by guanine nucleotide exchange activating the Arf1 GTPase, but the key exchange factor, GBF1, is a peripheral membrane component whose membrane association is dependent on another GTPase, Rab1. Inactive Rab GTPases are in a soluble complex with guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) and activation of Rab GTPases by exchange factors can be enhanced by GDI dissociation factors (GDFs). In the present study, we investigated the vesicle docking protein p115 and it’s binding to the Rab1 isoform Rab1b. Inhibition of p115 expression induced dissociation of Rab1b from Golgi membranes. Rab1b bound the cc2 domain of p115 and p115 lacking this domain failed to recruit Rab1b. Further, p115 inhibition blocked association of the COPI coat with Golgi membranes and this was suppressed by constitutive activation of Rab1b. These findings show p115 enhancement of Rab1b activation leading to COPI recruitment suggesting a connection between the vesicle docking machinery and the vesicle coat complex during the establishment of post-ER compartment identity. PMID:25332841

  14. Measuring localization and diffusion coefficients of basolateral proteins in lateral versus basal membranes using functionalized substrates and kICS analysis.

    PubMed

    Marlar, Saw; Arnspang, Eva C; Pedersen, Gitte A; Koffman, Jennifer S; Nejsum, Lene N

    2014-10-01

    Micropatterning enabled semiquantitation of basolateral proteins in lateral and basal membranes of the same cell. Lateral diffusion coefficients of basolateral aquaporin-3 (AQP3-EGFP) and EGFP-AQP4 were extracted from "lateral" and "basal" membranes using identical live-cell imaging and k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS). To simultaneously image proteins in "lateral" and "basal" membranes, micropatterning with the extracellular domain of E-cadherin and collagen, to mimic cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion, respectively, was used. In kidney collecting duct principal cells AQP3 localizes lateral and basal whereas AQP4 localizes mainly basal. On alternating stripes of E-cadherin and collagen, AQP3-EGFP was predominantly localized to "lateral" compared to "basal" membranes, whereas Orange-AQP4 was evenly distributed. Average diffusion coefficients were extracted via kICS analysis of rapid time-lapse sequences of AQP3-EGFP and EGFP-AQP4 on uniform substrates of either E-cadherin or collagen. AQP3-EGFP was measured to 0.022±0.010μm(2)/s on E-cadherin and 0.019±0.004μm(2)/s on collagen, whereas EGFP-AQP4 was measured to 0.044±0.009μm(2)/s on E-cadherin and 0.037±0.009μm(2)/s on collagen, thus, diffusion did not differ between substrates. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD) reduced the AQP3-EGFP diffusion coefficient by 43% from 0.024±0.007μm(2)/s (water) to 0.014±0.003μm(2)/s (MBCD) (p<0.05) on collagen surfaces, and by 41% from 0.023±0.011μm(2)/s (water) to 0.014±0.005μm(2)/s (MBCD) (p<0.05) on E-cadherin surfaces. Thus, protein patterning enables the semiquantitation of protein distribution between the "lateral" and "basal" membranes as well as measurements of lateral diffusion coefficients. PMID:24950246

  15. Characterization of nucleic acids in membrane vesicles from scrapie-infected hamster brain.

    PubMed Central

    Dees, C; McMillan, B C; Wade, W F; German, T L; Marsh, R F

    1985-01-01

    This study reports the partial characterization of nucleic acids present in gradient fractions enriched for large membrane vesicles from scrapie-infected and uninfected hamster brains. Labeling of phenol-extracted nucleic acids at the 3' or 5' ends revealed abundant amounts of low-molecular-weight RNA and little or no DNA. These nucleic acids survived nuclease treatment of membrane vesicles but were sensitive to RNase after phenol extraction. Analysis of 5'-end-labeled nucleic acids by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed an RNA of ca. 100 bases in preparations from scrapie-infected hamster brain that could not be detected in uninfected brain. The possibility that this apparently unique small RNA may result from tissue damage or abnormal RNA processing or may be a component of the infectious complex is discussed. Images PMID:2409296

  16. Tissue-specific alternative RNA splicing of rat vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 (VAMP-1).

    PubMed

    Mandic, R; Trimble, W S; Lowe, A W

    1997-10-15

    The vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) family is essential to vesicle-mediated protein transport. Three mammalian isoforms, VAMP-1, VAMP-2, and cellubrevin, play a role in protein transport to the plasma membrane. In this study, we describe a new rat VAMP-1 isoform produced by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Only one VAMP-1 isoform dominates in each tissue. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence for the newly discovered isoform, VAMP-1b, reveals that its expression is determined by whether an intron is retained or removed. The predicted amino acid sequences for the VAMP-1 isoforms differ at the carboxy-terminal end of the protein. A similar process has been described for VAMPs in Drosophila melanogaster and suggests a conserved function for the carboxy-terminal domain that can be modulated. PMID:9358054

  17. Amino acid transport by membrane vesicles of an obligate anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, A J; Ubbink-Kok, T; Konings, W N

    1988-01-01

    Membrane vesicles were isolated from the obligate anaerobic bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum. Beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase was inserted in these membrane vesicles by membrane fusion by using the freeze-thaw sonication technique (A. J. M. Driessen, W. de Vrij, and W. N. Konings, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82:7555-7559, 1985) to accommodate them with a functional proton motive force-generating system. With ascorbate-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine-cytochrome c as the electron donor, a proton motive force (delta p) of -80 to -120 mV was generated in these fused membranes. This delta p drove the accumulation of leucine and lysine up to 40- and 100-fold, respectively. High transport activities were observed in fused membranes containing Escherichia coli lipids, whereas the transport activities in fused membranes containing mainly soybean lipids or phosphatidylcholine were low. It is suggested that branched-chain amino acids and lysine were taken up by separate systems. The effects of the ionophores nigericin and valinomycin indicated that lysine and leucine were translocated in symport with a proton. PMID:2828326

  18. Intra- and Interspecies Effects of Outer Membrane Vesicles from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia on β-Lactam Resistance.

    PubMed

    Devos, Simon; Stremersch, Stephan; Raemdonck, Koen; Braeckmans, Kevin; Devreese, Bart

    2016-04-01

    The treatment ofStenotrophomonas maltophiliainfection with β-lactam antibiotics leads to increased release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), which are packed with two chromosomally encoded β-lactamases. Here, we show that these β-lactamase-packed OMVs are capable of establishing extracellular β-lactam degradation. We also show that they dramatically increase the apparent MICs of imipenem and ticarcillin for the cohabituating speciesPseudomonas aeruginosaandBurkholderia cenocepacia. PMID:26787686

  19. Characterization of outer membrane vesicles released by the psychrotolerant bacterium Pseudoalteromonas antarctica NF3

    PubMed Central

    Nevot, Maria; Deroncelé, Víctor; Messner, Paul; Guinea, Jesús; Mercadé, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pseudoalteromonas antarctica NF3 is an Antarctic psychrotolerant Gram-negative bacterium that accumulates large amounts of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) with high protein content. Transmission electron microscopy analysis after high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution (HPF-FS) shows that the EPS is composed of a capsular polymer and large numbers of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). These vesicles are bilayered structures and predominantly spherical in shape, with an average diameter of 25–70 nm, which is similar to what has been observed in OMVs from other Gram-negative bacteria. Analyses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), phospholipids and protein profiles of OMVs are consistent with the bacterial outer membrane origin of these vesicles. In an initial attempt to elucidate the functions of OMVs proteins, we conducted a proteomic analysis on 1D SDS-PAGE bands. Those proteins putatively identified match with outer membrane proteins and proteins related to nutrient processing and transport in Gram-negative bacteria. This approach suggests that OMVs present in the EPS from P. antarctica NF3, might function to deliver proteins to the external media, and therefore play an important role in the survival of the bacterium in the extreme Antarctic environment. PMID:16913913

  20. Vesicle formation from the nuclear membrane is induced by coexpression of two conserved herpesvirus proteins

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, Barbara G.; Granzow, Harald; Fuchs, Walter; Keil, Günther M.; Finke, Stefan; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2007-01-01

    Although the nuclear envelope is a dynamic structure that disassembles and reforms during mitosis, the formation of membranous vesicles derived from the nuclear envelope has not yet been described in noninfected cells. However, during herpesvirus maturation, intranuclear capsids initiate transit to the cytosol for final maturation by budding at the inner nuclear membrane. Two conserved herpesvirus proteins are required for this primary envelopment, designated in the alphaherpesviruses as pUL31 and pUL34. Here, we show that simultaneous expression of pUL31 and pUL34 of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus in stably transfected rabbit kidney cells resulted in the formation of vesicles in the perinuclear space that resemble primary envelopes without a nucleocapsid. They contain pUL31 and pUL34 as shown by immunolabeling and are derived from the nuclear envelope. Thus, coexpression of only two conserved herpesvirus proteins without any other viral factor is sufficient to induce the formation of vesicles from the nuclear membrane. This argues for the contribution of cellular factors in this process either recruited from their natural cytoplasmic location or not yet identified as components of the nuclear compartment. PMID:17426144

  1. Fluorescence quenching in β-cyclodextrin vesicles: membrane confinement and host-guest interactions.

    PubMed

    Schibilla, Frauke; Stegemann, Linda; Strassert, Cristian A; Rizzo, Fabio; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent β-cyclodextrin vesicles (β-CDV) that display host cavities available for host-guest interactions at the vesicle surface were prepared by incorporation of the hydrophobic spirobifluorene-based dye 1 into the membrane of unilamellar vesicles. Fluorescence quenching of dye 1 was observed in the presence of different quenchers. Methyl viologen 2 does not quench dye 1 because it does not bind to β-CDV. 4-Nitrophenol 3 and 4-nitrophenol covalently connected to adamantane 4 quench the fluorescence of dye 1 in neutral solution, but by different mechanisms according to lifetime measurements. The quenching efficiency of 3 is pH dependent due to the presence of the phenolate form. Competition experiments with excess host and guest showed that 3 is likely to diffuse in and out of the membrane, while 4 forms an inclusion complex with β-CDV leading to close contact and efficient quenching. Our findings confirm that this dynamic supramolecular system is a versatile model to investigate quenching and recognition processes in bilayer membranes. PMID:26777315

  2. Identification of the endoplasmic reticulum targeting signal in vesicle-associated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, P K; Hollerbach, C; Trimble, W S; Leber, B; Andrews, D W

    1999-12-24

    The vesicle-associated membrane proteins (Vamp(s)) function as soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor proteins in the intracellular trafficking of vesicles. The membrane attachment of Vamps requires a carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic sequence termed an insertion sequence. Unlike other insertion sequence-containing proteins, targeting of the highly homologous Vamp1 and Vamp2 to the endoplasmic reticulum requires ATP and a membrane-bound receptor. To determine if this mechanism of targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum extends to other Vamps, we compared the membrane binding of Vamp1 and Vamp2 with the distantly related Vamp8. Similar to the other Vamps, Vamp8 requires both ATP and a membrane component to target to the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, binding curves for the three Vamps overlap, suggesting a common receptor-mediated process. We identified a minimal endoplasmic reticulum targeting domain that is both necessary and sufficient to confer receptor-mediated, ATP-dependent, binding of a heterologous protein to microsomes. Surprisingly, this conserved sequence includes four positively charged amino acids spaced along an amphipathic sequence, which unlike the carboxyl-terminal targeting sequence in mitochondrial Vamp isoforms, is amino-terminal to the insertion sequence. Because Vamps do not bind to phospholipid vesicles, it is likely that these residues mediate an interaction with a protein, rather than bind to acidic phospholipids. Therefore, we suggest that a bipartite motif is required for the specific targeting and integration of Vamps into the endoplasmic reticulum with receptor-mediated recognition of specifically configured positive residues leading to the insertion of the hydrophobic tail into the membrane. PMID:10601239

  3. Deciphering How Pore Formation Causes Strain-Induced Membrane Lysis of Lipid Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Joshua A; Goh, Haw Zan; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Knoll, Wolfgang; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-02-01

    Pore formation by membrane-active antimicrobial peptides is a classic strategy of pathogen inactivation through disruption of membrane biochemical gradients. It remains unknown why some membrane-active peptides also inhibit enveloped viruses, which do not depend on biochemical gradients. Here, we employ a label-free biosensing approach based on simultaneous quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation and ellipsometry measurements in order to investigate how a pore-forming, virucidal peptide destabilizes lipid vesicles in a surface-based experimental configuration. A key advantage of the approach is that it enables direct kinetic measurement of the surface-bound peptide-to-lipid (P:L) ratio. Comprehensive experiments involving different bulk peptide concentrations and biologically relevant membrane compositions support a unified model that membrane lysis occurs at or above a critical P:L ratio, which is at least several-fold greater than the value corresponding to the onset of pore formation. That is consistent with peptide-induced pores causing additional membrane strain that leads to lysis of highly curved membranes. Collectively, the work presents a new model that describes how peptide-induced pores may destabilize lipid membranes through a membrane strain-related lytic process, and this knowledge has important implications for the design and application of membrane-active peptides. PMID:26751083

  4. Membrane vesicles of Clostridium perfringens Type A strains induce innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L.; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle shedding from bacteria is a universal process in most Gram-negative bacteria and a few Gram-positive bacteria. In this report, we isolate extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs) from the supernatants of Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens). We demonstrated vesicle production in a variety of virulent and nonvirulent type A strains. MVs did not contain alpha-toxin and NetB toxin demonstrated by negative reaction to specific antibody and absence of specific proteins identified by LC-MS/MS. C. perfringens MVs contained DNA components such as 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA), alpha-toxin gene (plc) and the perfringolysin O gene (pfoA) demonstrated by PCR. We also identified a total of 431 proteins in vesicles by 1-D gel separation and LC-MS/MS analysis. In vitro studies demonstrated that vesicles could be internalized into murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells without direct cytotoxicity effects, causing release of inflammation cytokines including granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1), which could also be detected in mice injected with MVs through intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. Mice immunized with C. perfringens MVs produced high titer IgG, especially IgG1, antibodies against C. perfringens membrane proteins. However, this kind of antibody could not provide protection in mice following challenge, though it could slightly postpone the time of death. Our results indicate that release of MVs from C. perfringens could provide a previously unknown mechanism to induce release of inflammatory cytokines, especially TNF-α, these findings may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infection. PMID:24631214

  5. Epoxide-Mediated Differential Packaging of Cif and Other Virulence Factors into Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ballok, Alicia E.; Filkins, Laura M.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that contain a number of secreted bacterial proteins, including phospholipases, alkaline phosphatase, and the CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif). Previously, Cif, an epoxide hydrolase, was shown to be regulated at the transcriptional level by epoxides, which serve as ligands of the repressor, CifR. Here, we tested whether epoxides have an effect on Cif levels in OMVs. We showed that growth of P. aeruginosa in the presence of specific epoxides but not a hydrolysis product increased Cif packaging into OMVs in a CifR-independent fashion. The outer membrane protein, OprF, was also increased under these conditions, but alkaline phosphatase activity was not significantly altered. Additionally, we demonstrated that OMV shape and density were affected by epoxide treatment, with two distinct vesicle fractions present when cells were treated with epibromohydrin (EBH), a model epoxide. Vesicles isolated from the two density fractions exhibited different protein profiles in Western blotting and silver staining. We have shown that a variety of clinically or host-relevant treatments, including antibiotics, also alter the proteins packaged in OMVs. Proteomic analysis of purified OMVs followed by an analysis of transposon mutant OMVs yielded mutants with altered vesicle packaging. Finally, epithelial cell cytotoxicity was reduced in the vesicles formed in the presence of EBH, suggesting that this epoxide alters the function of the OMVs. Our data support a model whereby clinically or host-relevant signals mediate differential packaging of virulence factors in OMVs, which results in functional consequences for host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25112474

  6. Mixing Water, Transducing Energy, and Shaping Membranes: Autonomously Self-Regulating Giant Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ho, James C S; Rangamani, Padmini; Liedberg, Bo; Parikh, Atul N

    2016-03-01

    Giant lipid vesicles are topologically closed compartments bounded by semipermeable flexible shells, which isolate femto- to picoliter quantities of the aqueous core from the surrounding bulk. Although water equilibrates readily across vesicular walls (10(-2)-10(-3) cm(3) cm(-2) s(-1)), the passive permeation of solutes is strongly hindered. Furthermore, because of their large volume compressibility (∼10(9)-10(10) N m(-2)) and area expansion (10(2)-10(3) mN m(-1)) moduli, coupled with low bending rigidities (10(-19) N m), vesicular shells bend readily but resist volume compression and tolerate only a limited area expansion (∼5%). Consequently, vesicles experiencing solute concentration gradients dissipate the available chemical energy through the osmotic movement of water, producing dramatic shape transformations driven by surface-area-volume changes and sustained by the incompressibility of water and the flexible membrane interface. Upon immersion in a hypertonic bath, an increased surface-area-volume ratio promotes large-scale morphological remodeling, reducing symmetry and stabilizing unusual shapes determined, at equilibrium, by the minimal bending-energy configurations. By contrast, when subjected to a hypotonic bath, walls of giant vesicles lose their thermal undulation, accumulate mechanical tension, and, beyond a threshold swelling, exhibit remarkable oscillatory swell-burst cycles, with the latter characterized by damped, periodic oscillations in vesicle size, membrane tension, and phase behavior. This cyclical pattern of the osmotic influx of water, pressure, membrane tension, pore formation, and solute efflux suggests quasi-homeostatic self-regulatory behavior allowing vesicular compartments produced from simple molecular components, namely, water, osmolytes, and lipids, to sense and regulate their microenvironment in a negative feedback loop. PMID:26866787

  7. Adhesion-Induced Phase Behavior of Two-Component Membranes and Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Rouhiparkouhi, Tahereh; Weikl, Thomas R.; Discher, Dennis E.; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The interplay of adhesion and phase separation is studied theoretically for two-component membranes that can phase separate into two fluid phases such as liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. Many adhesion geometries provide two different environments for these membranes and then partition the membranes into two segments that differ in their composition. Examples are provided by adhering vesicles, by hole- or pore-spanning membranes, and by membranes supported by chemically patterned surfaces. Generalizing a lattice model for binary mixtures to these adhesion geometries, we show that the phase behavior of the adhering membranes depends, apart from composition and temperature, on two additional parameters, the area fraction of one membrane segment and the affinity contrast between the two segments. For the generic case of non-vanishing affinity contrast, the adhering membranes undergo two distinct phase transitions and the phase diagrams in the composition/temperature plane have a generic topology that consists of two two-phase coexistence regions separated by an intermediate one-phase region. As a consequence, phase separation and domain formation is predicted to occur separately in each of the two membrane segments but not in both segments simultaneously. Furthermore, adhesion is also predicted to suppress the phase separation process for certain regions of the phase diagrams. These generic features of the adhesion-induced phase behavior are accessible to experiment. PMID:23340655

  8. The localization of chitin synthase in membranous vesicles (chitosomes) in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Sietsma, J H; Beth Din, A; Ziv, V; Sjollema, K A; Yarden, O

    1996-07-01

    Polyclonal anti-chitin synthase antibodies raised against the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CHS2 gene product were used to identify and localize chitin synthase in the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa. A single band of approximately 110 kDa was observed in Western blots of total protein extracts of N. crassa, probed with these antibodies. However, several additional bands were labelled when membrane fraction proteins (microsomes) were probed. Histo-immunochemical localization of chitin synthase confirmed that the polypeptide is compartmentalized in membranous vesicles (chitosomes), which are abundant in the vicinity of the hyphal tip. TEM analysis did not reveal chitin synthase in the plasma membrane. However, dense labelling of membrane-associated chitin synthase was observed by light-microscopic analysis of N. crassa protoplasts and at young hyphal tips. PMID:8757723

  9. Gene cloning and expression of an aquaporin (AQP-h3BL) in the basolateral membrane of water-permeable epithelial cells in osmoregulatory organs of the tree frog.

    PubMed

    Akabane, Gen; Ogushi, Yuji; Hasegawa, Takahiro; Suzuki, Masakazu; Tanaka, Shigeyasu

    2007-06-01

    An aquaporin (Hyla AQP-h3BL), consisting of 292 amino acid residues, has been cloned from the urinary bladder of Hyla japonica. In a swelling assay using Xenopus oocytes, AQP-h3BL cRNA-injected oocytes developed a sevenfold and 2.8-fold higher permeability to water and glycerol, respectively, than the water-injected oocytes. This permeability was inhibited by HgCl2. Immunofluorescence revealed that AQP-h3BL is localized in the basolateral plasma membrane of both granular cells in the ventral pelvic and dorsal skins and the secretory cells in the mucous glands. Immunopositive cells were also observed in the basolateral membrane of principal cells in the collecting ducts and in a portion of the late distal tubules in the kidneys, as well as in the principal cells of the urinary bladder. Sequence homology suggests that AQP-h3BL is a homolog to mammalian AQP3. This conclusion is supported by the observed localization of AQP-h3BL to the basolateral membrane in water- and glycerol-permeable epithelial cells. In ventral pelvic skins and urinary bladders, water enters into the cytoplasm through the apical plasma membrane at sites where AQP-h2, sometimes in association with AQP-h3, responds to stimulation by vasotocin; the water exits throughout AQP-h3BL to extracellular spaces. In the mucous glands, on the other hand, water enters throughout this AQP-h3BL and exits through AQP-x5, which is in the apical membrane of secretory cells. Thus, water homeostasis in the frog body is regulated by AQP-h3BL expressed in the basolateral membrane in concert with arginine vasotocin (AVT)-dependent or AVT-independent AQP. PMID:17332153

  10. Quantitative and Rapid Estimation of H+ Fluxes in Membrane Vesicles 1

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Ian R.; Rea, Philip A.; Leigh, Roger A.; Sanders, Dale

    1988-01-01

    Proton transport is often visualized in membrane vesicles by use of fluorescent monoamines which accumulate in acidic intravesicular compartments and undergo concentration-dependent fluorescence quenching. Software for an IBM microcomputer is described which permits logging and editing of changes in fluorescence monitored by a Perkin-Elmer LS-5 luminescence spectrometer. An accurate estimate of the instantaneous rate of fluorescence quenching or recovery is then facilitated by least squares fitting of fluorescence data to a nonlinear function. The software is tested with tonoplast vesicles from Beta vulgaris. Quenching of acridine orange fluorescence by ATP-driven (primary) transport and relaxation of quenching by Na+/H+ antiport can both be fitted with single exponential functions. Initial rates of ATP- and Na+ -dependent fluorescence changes are derived and can be used for Km determinations. The method constitutes a simple and efficient alternative to manual analysis of analog fluorescence traces and results in a reliable quantitative measurement of the relative rate of proton transport in membrane vesicle preparations. PMID:16666064

  11. Glucose transport by brush-border membrane vesicles after proximal resection or ileo-jejunal transposition in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Menge, H; Murer, H; Robinson, J W

    1978-01-01

    1. The functional properties of the ileal mucosa following jejunal resection or interposition in the jejunum were studied with the help of membrane vesicles. 2. Despite the development of functional and morphological features in the mucosa which are more generally associated with the jejunum than with the ileum, examination of brush-border vesicles derived from ileal and jejunal enterocytes from resected or transposed intestines reveals that the functional characteristics of apical membranes isolated from the different regions of the intestine are maintained after these surgical manoeuvres. Vesicles from control ileum develop an 'overshoot' uptake of glucose that is 3-4 times smaller than that of jejunal vesicles, a difference that is still observed in membranes prepared from mucosa of ileal loops following proximal resection or interposition in the jejunum. Images Fig. 3 PMID:625015

  12. Basolateral chloride current in human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Itani, Omar A; Lamb, Fred S; Melvin, James E; Welsh, Michael J

    2007-10-01

    Electrolyte transport by airway epithelia regulates the quantity and composition of liquid covering the airways. Previous data indicate that airway epithelia can absorb NaCl. At the apical membrane, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) provides a pathway for Cl(-) absorption. However, the pathways for basolateral Cl(-) exit are not well understood. Earlier studies, predominantly in cell lines, have reported that the basolateral membrane contains a Cl(-) conductance. However, the properties have varied substantially in different epithelia. To better understand the basolateral Cl(-) conductance in airway epithelia, we studied primary cultures of well-differentiated human airway epithelia. The basolateral membrane contained a Cl(-) current that was inhibited by 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS). The current-voltage relationship was nearly linear, and the halide selectivity was Cl(-) > Br(-) > I(-). Several signaling pathways increased the current, including elevation of cellular levels of cAMP, activation of protein kinase C (PKC), and reduction of pH. In contrast, increasing cell Ca(2+) and inducing cell swelling had no effect. The basolateral Cl(-) current was present in both cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF airway epithelia. Likewise, airway epithelia from wild-type mice and mice with disrupted genes for ClC-2 or ClC-3 all showed similar Cl(-) currents. These data suggest that the basolateral membrane of airway epithelia possesses a Cl(-) conductance that is not due to CFTR, ClC-2, or ClC-3. Its regulation by cAMP and PKC signaling pathways suggests that coordinated regulation of Cl(-) conductance in both apical and basolateral membranes may be important in controlling transepithelial Cl(-) movement. PMID:17660331

  13. A Chemical Controller of SNARE-Driven Membrane Fusion That Primes Vesicles for Ca(2+)-Triggered Millisecond Exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Heo, Paul; Yang, Yoosoo; Han, Kyu Young; Kong, Byoungjae; Shin, Jong-Hyeok; Jung, Younghoon; Jeong, Cherlhyun; Shin, Jaeil; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Ha, Taekjip; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2016-04-01

    Membrane fusion is mediated by the SNARE complex which is formed through a zippering process. Here, we developed a chemical controller for the progress of membrane fusion. A hemifusion state was arrested by a polyphenol myricetin which binds to the SNARE complex. The arrest of membrane fusion was rescued by an enzyme laccase that removes myricetin from the SNARE complex. The rescued hemifusion state was metastable and long-lived with a decay constant of 39 min. This membrane fusion controller was applied to delineate how Ca(2+) stimulates fusion-pore formation in a millisecond time scale. We found, using a single-vesicle fusion assay, that such myricetin-primed vesicles with synaptotagmin 1 respond synchronously to physiological concentrations of Ca(2+). When 10 μM Ca(2+) was added to the hemifused vesicles, the majority of vesicles rapidly advanced to fusion pores with a time constant of 16.2 ms. Thus, the results demonstrate that a minimal exocytotic membrane fusion machinery composed of SNAREs and synaptotagmin 1 is capable of driving membrane fusion in a millisecond time scale when a proper vesicle priming is established. The chemical controller of SNARE-driven membrane fusion should serve as a versatile tool for investigating the differential roles of various synaptic proteins in discrete fusion steps. PMID:26987363

  14. Copper directs ATP7B to the apical domain of hepatic cells via basolateral endosomes.

    PubMed

    Nyasae, Lydia K; Schell, Michael J; Hubbard, Ann L

    2014-12-01

    Physiologic Cu levels regulate the intracellular location of the Cu ATPase ATP7B. Here, we determined the routes of Cu-directed trafficking of endogenous ATP7B in the polarized hepatic cell line WIF-B and in the liver in vivo. Copper (10 µm) caused ATP7B to exit the trans-Golgi network (TGN) in vesicles, which trafficked via large basolateral endosomes to the apical domain within 1 h. Although perturbants of luminal acidification had little effect on the TGN localization of ATP7B in low Cu, they blocked delivery to the apical membrane in elevated Cu. If the vesicular proton-pump inhibitor bafilomycin-A1 (Baf) was present with Cu, ATP7B still exited the TGN, but accumulated in large endosomes located near the coverslip, in the basolateral region. Baf washout restored ATP7B trafficking to the apical domain. If ATP7B was staged apically in high Cu, Baf addition promoted the accumulation of ATP7B in subapical endosomes, indicating a blockade of apical recycling, with concomitant loss of ATP7B at the apical membrane. The retrograde pathway to the TGN, induced by Cu removal, was far less affected by Baf than the anterograde (Cu-stimulated) case. Overall, loss of acidification-impaired Cu-regulated trafficking of ATP7B at two main sites: (i) sorting and exit from large basolateral endosomes and (ii) recycling via endosomes near the apical membrane. PMID:25243755

  15. Characterization of procoagulant extracellular vesicles and platelet membrane disintegration in DMSO-cryopreserved platelets

    PubMed Central

    Tegegn, Tseday Z.; De Paoli, Silvia H.; Orecna, Martina; Elhelu, Oumsalama K.; Woodle, Samuel A.; Tarandovskiy, Ivan D.; Ovanesov, Mikhail V.; Simak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Freezing is promising for extended platelet (PLT) storage for transfusion. 6% DMSO cryopreserved PLTs (CPPs) are currently in clinical development. CPPs contain significant amount of platelet membrane vesicles (PMVs). PLT-membrane changes and PMV release in CPP are poorly understood, and haemostatic effects of CPP PMVs are not fully elucidated. This study aims to investigate PLT-membrane alterations in CPPs and provide comprehensive characterization of CPP PMVs, and their contribution to procoagulant activity (PCA) of CPPs. Methods CPPs and corresponding liquid-stored PLTs (LSPs) were characterized by flow cytometry (FC), fluorescence polarization (FP), nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and thrombin-generation (TG) test. Results SEM and TEM revealed disintegration and vesiculation of the PLT-plasma membrane and loss of intracellular organization in 60% PLTs in CPPs. FP demonstrated that 6% DMSO alone and with freezing–thawing caused marked increase in PLT-membrane fluidity. The FC counts of annexin V-binding PMVs and CD41a+ PMVs were 68- and 56-folds higher, respectively, in CPPs than in LSPs. The AFM and NTA size distribution of PMVs in CPPs indicated a peak diameter of 100 nm, corresponding to exosome-size vesicles. TG-based PCA of CPPs was 2- and 9-folds higher per PLT and per volume, respectively, compared to LSPs. Differential centrifugation showed that CPP supernatant contributed 26% to CPP TG-PCA, mostly by the exosome-size PMVs and their TG-PCA was phosphatidylserine dependent. Conclusions Major portion of CPPs does not show activation phenotype but exhibits grape-like membrane disintegration with significant increase of membrane fluidity induced by 6% DMSO alone and further aggravated by freezing–thawing process. DMSO cryopreservation of PLTs is associated with the release of PMVs and marked increase of TG-PCA, as compared to LSPs. Exosome-size PMVs have significant

  16. Bacteriolytic effect of membrane vesicles from Pseudomonas aeruginosa on other bacteria including pathogens: conceptually new antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Kadurugamuwa, J L; Beveridge, T J

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa releases membrane vesicles (MVs) filled with periplasmic components during normal growth, and the quantity of these vesicles can be increased by brief exposure to gentamicin. Natural and gentamicin-induced membrane vesicles (n-MVs and g-MVs, respectively) are subtly different from one another, but both contain several important virulence factors, including hydrolytic enzyme factors (J. L. Kadurugamuwa and T. J. Beveridge, J. Bacteriol. 177:3998-4008, 1995). Peptidoglycan hydrolases (autolysins) were detected in both MV types, especially a periplasmic 26-kDa autolysin whose expression has been related to growth phase (Z. Li, A. J. Clarke, and T. J. Beveridge, J. Bacteriol. 178:2479-2488, 1996). g-MVs possessed slightly higher autolysin activity and, at the same time, small quantities of gentamicin. Both MV types hydrolyzed isolated gram-positive and gram-negative murein sacculi and were also capable of hydrolyzing several glycyl peptides. Because the MVs were bilayered, they readily fused with the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. They also adhered to the cell wall of gram-positive bacteria. g-MVs were more effective in lysing other bacteria because, in addition to the autolysins, they also contained small amounts of gentamicin. The bactericidal activity was 2.5 times the MIC of gentamicin, which demonstrates the synergistic effect of the antibiotic with the autolysins. n-MVs were capable of killing cultures of P. aeruginosa with permeability resistance against gentamicin, indicating that the fusion of n-MV to the outer membrane liberated autolysins into the periplasm, where they degraded the peptidoglycan and lysed the cells. g-MVs had even greater killing power since they liberated both gentamicin and autolysins into these resistant cells. These findings may help develop a conceptually new group of antibiotics designed to be effective against hard-to-kill bacteria. PMID:8631663

  17. Sec35p, a Novel Peripheral Membrane Protein, Is Required for ER to Golgi Vesicle Docking

    PubMed Central

    VanRheenen, Susan M.; Cao, Xiaochun; Lupashin, Vladimir V.; Barlowe, Charles; Gerard Waters, M.

    1998-01-01

    SEC35 was identified in a novel screen for temperature-sensitive mutants in the secretory pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Wuestehube et al., 1996. Genetics. 142:393–406). At the restrictive temperature, the sec35-1 strain exhibits a transport block between the ER and the Golgi apparatus and accumulates numerous vesicles. SEC35 encodes a novel cytosolic protein of 32 kD, peripherally associated with membranes. The temperature-sensitive phenotype of sec35-1 is efficiently suppressed by YPT1, which encodes the rab-like GTPase required early in the secretory pathway, or by SLY1-20, which encodes a dominant form of the ER to Golgi target -SNARE–associated protein Sly1p. Weaker suppression is evident upon overexpression of genes encoding the vesicle-SNAREs SEC22, BET1, or YKT6. The cold-sensitive lethality that results from deleting SEC35 is suppressed by YPT1 or SLY1-20. These genetic relationships suggest that Sec35p acts upstream of, or in conjunction with, Ypt1p and Sly1p as was previously found for Uso1p. Using a cell-free assay that measures distinct steps in vesicle transport from the ER to the Golgi, we find Sec35p is required for a vesicle docking stage catalyzed by Uso1p. These genetic and biochemical results suggest Sec35p acts with Uso1p to dock ER-derived vesicles to the Golgi complex. PMID:9606204

  18. Intake of silica nanoparticles by giant lipid vesicles: influence of particle size and thermodynamic membrane state

    PubMed Central

    Strobl, Florian G; Seitz, Florian; Westerhausen, Christoph; Reller, Armin; Torrano, Adriano A; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Summary The uptake of nanoparticles into cells often involves their engulfment by the plasma membrane and a fission of the latter. Understanding the physical mechanisms underlying these uptake processes may be achieved by the investigation of simple model systems that can be compared to theoretical models. Here, we present experiments on a massive uptake of silica nanoparticles by giant unilamellar lipid vesicles (GUVs). We find that this uptake process depends on the size of the particles as well as on the thermodynamic state of the lipid membrane. Our findings are discussed in the light of several theoretical models and indicate that these models have to be extended in order to capture the interaction between nanomaterials and biological membranes correctly. PMID:25671142

  19. Evidence that membrane transduction of oligoarginine does not require vesicle formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zaro, Jennica L.; Shen Weichiang . E-mail: weishen@usc.edu

    2005-07-01

    The involvement of vesicular formation processes in the membrane transduction and nuclear transport of oligoarginine is currently a subject of controversy. In this report, a novel quantitative method which allows for the selective measurement of membrane transduction excluding concurrent endocytosis was used to determine the effects of temperature, endosomal acidification, endosomolysis, and several known inhibitors of endocytic pathways on the internalization of oligoarginine. The results show that, unlike endocytosis, transduction of oligoarginine was not affected by incubation at 16 deg. C as compared to the 37 deg. C control, and was only partially inhibited at 4 deg. C incubation. Additionally, membrane transduction was not inhibited to the same extent as endocytosis following treatment with ammonium chloride, hypertonic medium, amiloride, or filipin. The endosomolytic activity of oligoarginine was investigated by examining the leakage of FITC-dextran into the cytosolic compartment, which was not higher in the presence of oligoarginine. Furthermore, ammonium chloride showed no effect on the nuclear transport of oligoarginine. The data presented in this report indicate that membrane transduction is likely to occur at the plasma membrane without the formation of membrane vesicles, and the nuclear localization involves membrane transduction, rather than endocytosis of oligoarginine.

  20. Electrostatically Driven Assembly of Charged Amphiphiles Forming Crystallized Membranes, Vesicles and Nanofiber Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Cheuk Yui Curtis

    Charged amphiphilic molecules can self-assemble into a large variety of objects including membranes, vesicles and fibers. These micro to nano-scale structures have been drawing increasing attention due to their broad applications, especially in biotechnology and biomedicine. In this dissertation, three self-assembled systems were investigated: +3/-1 self-assembled catanionic membranes, +2/-1 self-assembled catanionic membranes and +1 self-assembled nanofibers. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with synchrotron small and wide angle x-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) were used to characterize the coassembled structures from the mesoscopic to nanometer scale. We designed a system of +3 and -1 ionic amphiphiles that coassemble into crystalline ionic bilayer vesicles with large variety of geometries that resemble polyhedral cellular crystalline shells and archaea wall envelopes. The degree of ionization of the amphiphiles and their intermolecular electrostatic interactions can be controlled by varying pH. The molecular packing of these membranes showed a hexagonal to rectangular-C to hexagonal phase transition with increasing pH, resulting in significant changes to the membrane morphology. A similar mixture of +2 and -1 ionic amphiphiles was also investigated. In addition to varying pH, which controls the headgroup attractions, we also adjust the tail length of the amphiphiles to control the van der Waals interactions between the tails. A 2D phase diagram was developed to show how pH and tail length can be used to control the intermolecular packing within the membranes. Another system of self-assembled nanofiber network formed by positively charged amphiphiles was also studied. These highly charged fibers repel each other and are packed in hexagonal lattice with lattice constant at least eight times of the fiber diameter. The d-spacing and the crystal structure can be controlled by varying the solution concentration and temperature.

  1. Peptide hormone release monitored from single vesicles in "membrane lawns" of differentiated male pituitary cells: SNAREs and fusion pore widening.

    PubMed

    Stenovec, Matjaž; Gonçalves, Paula P; Zorec, Robert

    2013-03-01

    In this study we used live-cell immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy to study the release from a single vesicle in a simplified system called membrane lawns. The lawns were prepared by exposing differentiated pituitary prolactin (PRL)-secreting cells to a hypoosmotic shear stress. The density of the immunolabeled ternary soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes that bind complexin was approximately 10 times lower than the PRL-positive, lawn-resident vesicles; this indicates that some but not all vesicles are associated with ternary SNARE complexes. However, lawn-resident PRL vesicles colocalized relatively well with particular SNARE proteins: synaptobrevin 2 (35%), syntaxin 1 (22%), and 25-kDa synaptosome associated protein (6%). To study vesicle discharge, we prepared lawn-resident vesicles, derived from atrial natriuretic peptide tagged with emerald fluorescent protein (ANP.emd)-transfected cells, which label vesicles. These maintained the structural passage to the exterior because approximately 40% of ANP.emd-loaded vesicles were labeled by extracellular PRL antibodies. Cargo release from the lawn-resident vesicles, monitored by the decline in the ANP.emd fluorescence intensity, was similar to that in intact cells. It is likely that SNARE proteins are required for calcium-dependent release from these vesicles. This is because the expression of the dominant-negative SNARE peptide, which interferes with SNARE complex formation, reduced the number of PRL-positive spots per cell (PRL antibodies placed extracellularly) significantly, from 58 ± 9 to 4 ± 2. In dominant-negative SNARE-treated cells, the PRL-positive area was reduced from 0.259 ± 0.013 to 0.123 ± 0.014 μm(2), which is consistent with a hindered vesicle luminal access for extracellular PRL antibodies. These results indicate that vesicle discharge is regulated by SNARE-mediated fusion pore widening. PMID:23372020

  2. Large Plasma Membrane Disruptions Are Rapidly Resealed by Ca2+-dependent Vesicle–Vesicle Fusion Events

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Mark; Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.

    1997-01-01

    A microneedle puncture of the fibroblast or sea urchin egg surface rapidly evokes a localized exocytotic reaction that may be required for the rapid resealing that follows this breach in plasma membrane integrity (Steinhardt, R.A,. G. Bi, and J.M. Alderton. 1994. Science (Wash. DC). 263:390–393). How this exocytotic reaction facilitates the resealing process is unknown. We found that starfish oocytes and sea urchin eggs rapidly reseal much larger disruptions than those produced with a microneedle. When an ∼40 by 10 μm surface patch was torn off, entry of fluorescein stachyose (FS; 1,000 mol wt) or fluorescein dextran (FDx; 10,000 mol wt) from extracellular sea water (SW) was not detected by confocal microscopy. Moreover, only a brief (∼5–10 s) rise in cytosolic Ca2+ was detected at the wound site. Several lines of evidence indicate that intracellular membranes are the primary source of the membrane recruited for this massive resealing event. When we injected FS-containing SW deep into the cells, a vesicle formed immediately, entrapping within its confines most of the FS. DiI staining and EM confirmed that the barrier delimiting injected SW was a membrane bilayer. The threshold for vesicle formation was ∼3 mM Ca2+ (SW is ∼10 mM Ca2+). The capacity of intracellular membranes for sealing off SW was further demonstrated by extruding egg cytoplasm from a micropipet into SW. A boundary immediately formed around such cytoplasm, entrapping FDx or FS dissolved in it. This entrapment did not occur in Ca2+-free SW (CFSW). When egg cytoplasm stratified by centrifugation was exposed to SW, only the yolk platelet–rich domain formed a membrane, suggesting that the yolk platelet is a critical element in this response and that the ER is not required. We propose that plasma membrane disruption evokes Ca2+ regulated vesicle–vesicle (including endocytic compartments but possibly excluding ER) fusion reactions. The function in resealing of this cytoplasmic fusion

  3. Effects of food restriction and insulin treatment on (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase response to insulin in kidney basolateral membranes of noninsulin-dependent diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Levy, J; Grunberger, G; Karl, I; Gavin, J R

    1990-01-01

    Insulin increases (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity in cell membranes of normal rats but fails to do so in membranes of non-insulin-dependent diabetic (NIDD) rats. The loss of regulatory effect of the hormone on the enzyme might contribute to the insulin resistance observed in the NIDD animals. To further test this hypothesis, the effects of insulin treatment and acute food restriction on the ability of insulin to regulate the ATPase activity in kidney basolateral membranes (BLM) of NIDD rats were studied. Although insulin levels in NIDD and control rats were similar, plasma glucose was higher in the NIDD rats (18.3 +/- 1.5 v 19.3 +/- 1.7 microU/mL and 236 +/- 32 v 145 +/- 3 mg/dL, respectively). Insulin treatment (2 U/100 g), which increased plasma insulin in the NIDD rats (47.8 +/- 11.5 microU/mL; P less than .05), did not decrease their glucose (221 +/- 25 mg/dL). Higher insulin dose (4 U/100 g) decreased glucose level in the NIDD rats (73 +/- 3 mg/dL; P less than .001) but increased their plasma insulin 10-fold (202.5 +/- 52.5 microU/mL). Acute food restriction decreased glucose levels in the NIDD rats to levels seen in controls (135 +/- 3 mg/dL), while their insulin decreased by half (8.5 +/- 1.0 microU/mL; P less than .05). Basal (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity in BLM of all diabetic rats was higher than in controls (P less than .05). None of the treatments reversed this defect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2136760

  4. Ypq3p-dependent histidine uptake by the vacuolar membrane vesicles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Kunio; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Ikeda, Koichi; Sekito, Takayuki; Kakinuma, Yoshimi

    2016-06-01

    The vacuolar membrane proteins Ypq1p, Ypq2p, and Ypq3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are known as the members of the PQ-loop protein family. We found that the ATP-dependent uptake activities of arginine and histidine by the vacuolar membrane vesicles were decreased by ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ mutations, respectively. YPQ1 and AVT1, which are involved in the vacuolar uptake of lysine/arginine and histidine, respectively, were deleted in addition to ypq2Δ and ypq3Δ. The vacuolar membrane vesicles isolated from the resulting quadruple deletion mutant ypq1Δypq2Δypq3Δavt1Δ completely lost the uptake activity of basic amino acids, and that of histidine, but not lysine and arginine, was evidently enhanced by overexpressing YPQ3 in the mutant. These results suggest that Ypq3p is specifically involved in the vacuolar uptake of histidine in S. cerevisiae. The cellular level of Ypq3p-HA(3) was enhanced by depletion of histidine from culture medium, suggesting that it is regulated by the substrate. PMID:26928127

  5. Protein 4.1N is required for translocation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 to the basolateral membrane domain in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songbai; Mizutani, Akihiro; Hisatsune, Chihiro; Higo, Takayasu; Bannai, Hiroko; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Hattori, Mitsuharu; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2003-02-01

    Protein 4.1N was identified as a binding molecule for the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 (IP(3)R1) using a yeast two-hybrid system. 4.1N and IP(3)R1 associate in both subconfluent and confluent Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, a well studied tight polarized epithelial cell line. In subconfluent MDCK cells, 4.1N is distributed in the cytoplasm and the nucleus; IP(3)R1 is localized in the cytoplasm. In confluent MDCK cells, both 4.1N and IP(3)R1 are predominantly translocated to the basolateral membrane domain, whereas 4.1R, the prototypical homologue of 4.1N, is localized at the tight junctions (Mattagajasingh, S. N., Huang, S. C., Hartenstein, J. S., and Benz, E. J., Jr. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30573-30585), and other endoplasmic reticulum marker proteins are still present in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the 4.1N-binding region of IP(3)R1 is necessary and sufficient for the localization of IP(3)R1 at the basolateral membrane domain. A fragment of the IP(3)R1-binding region of 4.1N blocks the localization of co-expressed IP(3)R1 at the basolateral membrane domain. These data indicate that 4.1N is required for IP(3)R1 translocation to the basolateral membrane domain in polarized MDCK cells. PMID:12444087

  6. SNARE and regulatory proteins induce local membrane protrusions to prime docked vesicles for fast calcium-triggered fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Malsam, Jörg; Hagen, Wim J H; Scheutzow, Andrea; Söllner, Thomas H; Briggs, John A G

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane in response to Ca2+ influx, thereby releasing neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft. The protein machinery that mediates this process, consisting of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and regulatory proteins, is well known, but the mechanisms by which these proteins prime synaptic membranes for fusion are debated. In this study, we applied large-scale, automated cryo-electron tomography to image an in vitro system that reconstitutes synaptic fusion. Our findings suggest that upon docking and priming of vesicles for fast Ca2+-triggered fusion, SNARE proteins act in concert with regulatory proteins to induce a local protrusion in the plasma membrane, directed towards the primed vesicle. The SNAREs and regulatory proteins thereby stabilize the membrane in a high-energy state from which the activation energy for fusion is profoundly reduced, allowing synchronous and instantaneous fusion upon release of the complexin clamp. PMID:24493260

  7. Biochemical requirements for the targeting and fusion of ER-derived transport vesicles with purified yeast Golgi membranes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    In order for secretion to progress, ER-derived transport vesicles must target to, and fuse with the cis-Golgi compartment. These processes have been reconstituted using highly enriched membrane fractions and partially purified soluble components. The functionally active yeast Golgi membranes that have been purified are highly enriched in the cis- Golgi marker enzymes alpha 1,6 mannosyltransferase and GDPase. Fusion of transport vesicles with these membranes requires both GTP and ATP hydrolysis, and depends on cytosolic and peripheral membrane proteins. At least two protein fractions from yeast cytosol are required for the reconstitution of ER-derived vesicle fusion. Soluble fractions prepared from temperature-sensitive mutants revealed requirements for the Ypt1p, Sec19p, Sly1p, Sec7p, and Uso1 proteins. A model for the sequential involvement of these components in the targeting and fusion reaction is proposed. PMID:8636207

  8. Chloride permeability of rat brain membrane vesicles correlates with thiamine triphosphate content.

    PubMed

    Bettendorff, L; Hennuy, B; De Clerck, A; Wins, P

    1994-07-25

    Incubation of rat brain homogenates with thiamine or thiamine diphosphate (TDP) leads to a synthesis of thiamine triphosphate (TTP). In membrane vesicles subsequently prepared from the homogenates, increased TTP content correlates with increased 36Cl- uptake. A hyperbolic relationship was obtained with a K0.5 of 0.27 nmol TTP/mg protein. In crude mitochondrial fractions from the brains of animals previously treated with thiamine or sulbutiamine, a positive correlation between 36Cl- uptake and TTP content was found. These results, together with other results previously obtained with the patch-clamp technique, suggest that TTP is an activator of chloride channels having a large unit conductance. PMID:7953714

  9. Transport of leucine, isoleucine and valine by luminal membrane vesicles from rabbit proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, K E; Kragh-Hansen, U; Sheikh, M I

    1990-03-01

    1. Transport of L- and D-isomers of leucine, isoleucine and valine by luminal membrane vesicles prepared from either the convoluted part (pars convoluta) or the straight part (pars recta) of rabbit proximal tubule was studied by a rapid filtration technique and by a spectrophotometric method using a potential-sensitive carbocyanine dye. 2. Both types of renal membrane vesicle take up the amino acids in a Na(+)-dependent, H(+)-independent and electrogenic manner. The L-isomers are transported with higher affinities than their corresponding D-forms, of which only D-leucine is taken up to a significant extent. 3. Membrane vesicles prepared from pars convoluta take up the L-amino acids by a single and common system. Filtration studies showed that the Km values for L-leucine and L-valine transport are, on average, 0.23 and 0.83 mM, respectively. The values of KA (the concentration of amino acid producing a half-maximal optical response) are comparable to those of Km, namely 0.18 mM for L-leucine and 0.60 mM for L-valine. KA for L-isoleucine transport was found to be 0.19 mM. D-Leucine is taken up by the same system but with a much lower affinity (KA = 7.2 mM). 4. Membrane vesicles prepared from pars recta possess two, and probably common, transport systems for the L-isomers of the amino acids. The average Michaelis-Menten constants were as follows: L-leucine, K1m = 0.17 mM, K2m = 6.5 mM; L-valine, K1m = 0.19 mM, K2m = 11.5 mM. The KA values were: L-leucine, K1A = 0.12 mM, K2A = 7.4 mM; L-valine, K1A = 0.18 mM, K2A = 10.0 mM; L-isoleucine, K1A = 0.17 mM, K2A = 9.0 mM. D-Leucine is taken up by a low-affinity system only (KA = 6.5 mM), which seems to be the same as the low-affinity system transporting the L-forms of the amino acids. PMID:2352186

  10. Decoupled energy stable schemes for phase-field vesicle membrane model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui; Ji, Guanghua; Yang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    We consider the numerical approximations of the classical phase-field vesicle membrane models proposed a decade ago in Du et al. (2004) [6]. We first reformulate the model derived from an energetic variational formulation into a form which is suitable for numerical approximation, and establish the energy dissipation law. Then, we develop a stabilized, decoupled, time discretization scheme for the coupled nonlinear system. The scheme is unconditionally energy stable and leads to linear and decoupled elliptic equations to be solved at each time step. Stability analysis and ample numerical simulations are presented thereafter.

  11. LRRK2 Affects Vesicle Trafficking, Neurotransmitter Extracellular Level and Membrane Receptor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Spissu, Ylenia; Sanna, Giovanna; Xiong, Yulan; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Galioto, Manuela; Rocchitta, Gaia; Biosa, Alice; Serra, Pier Andrea; Carri, Maria Teresa; Crosio, Claudia; Iaccarino, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene was found to play a role in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). LRRK2 encodes a large multi-domain protein that is expressed in different tissues. To date, the physiological and pathological functions of LRRK2 are not clearly defined. In this study we have explored the role of LRRK2 in controlling vesicle trafficking in different cellular or animal models and using various readouts. In neuronal cells, the presence of LRRK2G2019S pathological mutant determines increased extracellular dopamine levels either under basal conditions or upon nicotine stimulation. Moreover, mutant LRRK2 affects the levels of dopamine receptor D1 on the membrane surface in neuronal cells or animal models. Ultrastructural analysis of PC12-derived cells expressing mutant LRRK2G2019S shows an altered intracellular vesicle distribution. Taken together, our results point to the key role of LRRK2 to control vesicle trafficking in neuronal cells. PMID:24167564

  12. Membrane Vesicles Nucleate Mineralo-organic Nanoparticles and Induce Carbonate Apatite Precipitation in Human Body Fluids*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Martel, Jan; Cheng, Wei-Yun; He, Chao-Chih; Ojcius, David M.; Young, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that membrane vesicles (MVs) secreted by various cells are associated with human diseases, including arthritis, atherosclerosis, cancer, and chronic kidney disease. The possibility that MVs may induce the formation of mineralo-organic nanoparticles (NPs) and ectopic calcification has not been investigated so far. Here, we isolated MVs ranging in size between 20 and 400 nm from human serum and FBS using ultracentrifugation and sucrose gradient centrifugation. The MV preparations consisted of phospholipid-bound vesicles containing the serum proteins albumin, fetuin-A, and apolipoprotein A1; the mineralization-associated enzyme alkaline phosphatase; and the exosome proteins TNFR1 and CD63. Notably, we observed that MVs induced mineral precipitation following inoculation and incubation in cell culture medium. The mineral precipitates consisted of round, mineralo-organic NPs containing carbonate hydroxyapatite, similar to previous descriptions of the so-called nanobacteria. Annexin V-immunogold staining revealed that the calcium-binding lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) was exposed on the external surface of serum MVs. Treatment of MVs with an anti-PS antibody significantly decreased their mineral seeding activity, suggesting that PS may provide nucleating sites for calcium phosphate deposition on the vesicles. These results indicate that MVs may represent nucleating agents that induce the formation of mineral NPs in body fluids. Given that mineralo-organic NPs represent precursors of calcification in vivo, our results suggest that MVs may initiate ectopic calcification in the human body. PMID:23990473

  13. Interaction of miltefosine with intercellular membranes of stratum corneum and biomimetic lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Lais; Mendanha, Sebastião Antônio; Marquezin, Cássia Alessandra; Berardi, Marina; Ito, Amando Siuiti; Acuña, A Ulises; Alonso, Antonio

    2012-09-15

    Miltefosine (MT) is an alkylphospholipid approved for breast cancer metastasis and visceral leishmaniasis treatments, although the respective action mechanisms at the molecular level remain poorly understood. In this work, the interaction of miltefosine with the lipid component of stratum corneum (SC), the uppermost skin layer, was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of several fatty acid spin-labels. In addition, the effect of miltefosine on (i) spherical lipid vesicles of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and (ii) lipids extracted from SC was also investigated, by EPR and time-resolved polarized fluorescence methods. In SC of neonatal Wistar rats, 4% (w/w) miltefosine give rise to a large increase of the fluidity of the intercellular membranes, in the temperature range from 6 to about 50°C. This effect becomes negligible at temperatures higher that ca. 60°C. In large unilamelar vesicles of DPPC no significant changes could be observed with a miltefosine concentration 25% molar, in close analogy with the behavior of biomimetic vesicles prepared with bovine brain ceramide, behenic acid and cholesterol. In these last samples, a 25 mol% molar concentration of miltefosine produced only a modest decrease in the bilayer fluidity. Although miltefosine is not a feasible skin permeation enhancer due to its toxicity, the information provided in this work could be of utility in the development of a MT topical treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:22692081

  14. Membrane vesicles nucleate mineralo-organic nanoparticles and induce carbonate apatite precipitation in human body fluids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Martel, Jan; Cheng, Wei-Yun; He, Chao-Chih; Ojcius, David M; Young, John D

    2013-10-18

    Recent studies indicate that membrane vesicles (MVs) secreted by various cells are associated with human diseases, including arthritis, atherosclerosis, cancer, and chronic kidney disease. The possibility that MVs may induce the formation of mineralo-organic nanoparticles (NPs) and ectopic calcification has not been investigated so far. Here, we isolated MVs ranging in size between 20 and 400 nm from human serum and FBS using ultracentrifugation and sucrose gradient centrifugation. The MV preparations consisted of phospholipid-bound vesicles containing the serum proteins albumin, fetuin-A, and apolipoprotein A1; the mineralization-associated enzyme alkaline phosphatase; and the exosome proteins TNFR1 and CD63. Notably, we observed that MVs induced mineral precipitation following inoculation and incubation in cell culture medium. The mineral precipitates consisted of round, mineralo-organic NPs containing carbonate hydroxyapatite, similar to previous descriptions of the so-called nanobacteria. Annexin V-immunogold staining revealed that the calcium-binding lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) was exposed on the external surface of serum MVs. Treatment of MVs with an anti-PS antibody significantly decreased their mineral seeding activity, suggesting that PS may provide nucleating sites for calcium phosphate deposition on the vesicles. These results indicate that MVs may represent nucleating agents that induce the formation of mineral NPs in body fluids. Given that mineralo-organic NPs represent precursors of calcification in vivo, our results suggest that MVs may initiate ectopic calcification in the human body. PMID:23990473

  15. Branched phospholipids render lipid vesicles more susceptible to membrane-active peptides.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Natalie J; Seaton, Pamela; Pokorny, Antje

    2016-05-01

    Iso- and anteiso-branched lipids are abundant in the cytoplasmic membranes of bacteria. Their function is assumed to be similar to that of unsaturated lipids in other organisms - to maintain the membrane in a fluid state. However, the presence of terminally branched membrane lipids is likely to impact other membrane properties as well. For instance, lipid acyl chain structure has been shown to influence the activity of antimicrobial peptides. Moreover, the development of resistance to antimicrobial agents in Staphylococcus aureus is accompanied by a shift in the fatty acid composition toward a higher fraction of anteiso-branched lipids. Little is known about how branched lipids and the location of the branch point affect the activity of membrane-active peptides. We hypothesized that bilayers containing lipids with low phase transition temperatures would tend to exclude peptides and be less susceptible to peptide-induced perturbation than those made from higher temperature melting lipids. To test this hypothesis, we synthesized a series of asymmetric phospholipids that only differ in the type of fatty acid esterified at the sn-2 position of the lipid glycerol backbone. We tested the influence of acyl chain structure on peptide activity by measuring the kinetics of release from dye-encapsulated lipid vesicles made from these synthetic lipids. The results were compared to those obtained using vesicles made from S. aureus and Staphylococcus sciuri membrane lipid extracts. Anteiso-branched phospholipids, which melt at very low temperatures, produced lipid vesicles that were only slightly less susceptible to peptide-induced dye release than those made from the iso-branched isomer. However, liposomes made from bacterial phospholipid extracts were generally much more resistant to peptide-induced perturbation than those made from any of the synthetic lipids. The results suggest that the increase in the fraction of anteiso-branched fatty acids in antibiotic-resistant strains

  16. Use of membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying auxin transport of auxin: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin regulating growth, is transported polarly in plants. IAA stimulates a rapid increase in the rate of electrogenic proton secretion by the plasma membrane. This not only increases the magnitude of the pH and electrical gradients providing the driving force for polar auxin transport and uptake of sugars, amino acids and inorganic ions, but, by acidifying the cell wall, also leads to growth. We find that auxin uptake by membrane vesicles isolated from actively growing plant tissues exhibits some of the same properties as by cells: the accumulation depends on the pH gradient, is saturable and specific for auxin, and enhanced by herbicides that inhibit polar auxin transport. We are using accumulation of a radioactive weak acid to quantify the pH gradient and distribution of fluorescent cyanine dyes to monitor the membrane potential. The magnitude of IAA accumulation exceeds that predicted from the pH gradient, and in the absence of a pH gradient, a membrane potential fails to support any auxin accumulation, leading to the conclusion that the transmembrane potential is not a significant driving force for auxin accumulation in this system. Since increasing the external ionic strength decreases saturable auxin accumulation, we are investigating how modifying the surface potential of the vesicles affects the interaction of the amphipathic IAA molecules with the membranes and whether protein modifying reagents affect the saturability and stimulation by NPA. These studies should provide information on the location and function of the auxin binding site and may enable us to identify the solubilized protein. 5 refs.

  17. In vitro study of interaction of synaptic vesicles with lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. K.; Castorph, S.; Konovalov, O.; Jahn, R.; Holt, M.; Salditt, T.

    2010-10-01

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane in neurons is a crucial step in the release of neurotransmitters, which are responsible for carrying signals between nerve cells. While many of the molecular players involved in this fusion process have been identified, a precise molecular description of their roles in the process is still lacking. A case in point is the plasma membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Although PIP2 is known to be essential for vesicle fusion, its precise role in the process remains unclear. We have re-investigated the role of this lipid in membrane structure and function using the complementary experimental techniques of x-ray reflectivity, both on lipid monolayers at an air-water interface and bilayers on a solid support, and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction on lipid monolayers. These techniques provide unprecedented access to structural information at the molecular level, and detail the profound structural changes that occur in a membrane following PIP2 incorporation. Further, we also confirm and extend previous findings that the association of SVs with membranes is enhanced by PIP2 incorporation, and reveal the structural changes that underpin this phenomenon. Further, the association is further intensified by a physiologically relevant amount of Ca2+ ions in the subphase of the monolayer, as revealed by the increase in interfacial pressure seen with the lipid monolayer system. Finally, a theoretical calculation concerning the products arising from the fusion of these SVs with proteoliposomes is presented, with which we aim to illustrate the potential future uses of this system.

  18. Characterization of membrane protein interactions in plasma membrane derived vesicles with quantitative imaging Förster resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Del Piccolo, Nuala; Hristova, Kalina

    2015-08-18

    Here we describe an experimental tool, termed quantitative imaging Förster resonance energy transfer (QI-FRET), that enables the quantitative characterization of membrane protein interactions. The QI-FRET methodology allows us to acquire binding curves and calculate association constants for complex membrane proteins in the native plasma membrane environment. The method utilizes FRET detection, and thus requires that the proteins of interest are labeled with florescent proteins, either FRET donors or FRET acceptors. Since plasma membranes of cells have complex topologies precluding the acquisition of two-dimensional binding curves, the FRET measurements are performed in plasma membrane derived vesicles that bud off cells as a result of chemical or osmotic stress. The results overviewed here are acquired in vesicles produced with an osmotic vesiculation buffer developed in our laboratory, which does not utilize harsh chemicals. The concentrations of the donor-labeled and the acceptor-labeled proteins are determined, along with the FRET efficiencies, in each vesicle. The experiments utilize transient transfection, such that a wide variety of concentrations is sampled. Then, data from hundreds of vesicles are combined to yield dimerization curves. Here we discuss recent findings about the dimerization of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), membrane proteins that control cell growth and differentiation via lateral dimerization in the plasma membrane. We focus on the dimerization of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), a RTK that plays a critically important role in skeletal development. We study the role of different FGFR3 domains in FGFR3 dimerization in the absence of ligand, and we show that FGFR3 extracellular domains inhibit unliganded dimerization, while contacts between the juxtamembrane domains, which connect the transmembrane domains to the kinase domains, stabilize the unliganded FGFR3 dimers. Since FGFR3 has been documented to harbor many pathogenic

  19. Vesicles Bearing Toxoplasma Apicoplast Membrane Proteins Persist Following Loss of the Relict Plastid or Golgi Body Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Bouchut, Anne; Geiger, Jennifer A.; DeRocher, Amy E.; Parsons, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and malaria parasites contain a unique and essential relict plastid called the apicoplast. Most apicoplast proteins are encoded in the nucleus and are transported to the organelle via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Three trafficking routes have been proposed for apicoplast membrane proteins: (i) vesicular trafficking from the ER to the Golgi and then to the apicoplast, (ii) contiguity between the ER membrane and the apicoplast allowing direct flow of proteins, and (iii) vesicular transport directly from the ER to the apicoplast. Previously, we identified a set of membrane proteins of the T. gondii apicoplast which were also detected in large vesicles near the organelle. Data presented here show that the large vesicles bearing apicoplast membrane proteins are not the major carriers of luminal proteins. The vesicles continue to appear in parasites which have lost their plastid due to mis-segregation, indicating that the vesicles are not derived from the apicoplast. To test for a role of the Golgi body in vesicle formation, parasites were treated with brefeldin A or transiently transfected with a dominant-negative mutant of Sar1, a GTPase required for ER to Golgi trafficking. The immunofluorescence patterns showed little change. These findings were confirmed using stable transfectants, which expressed the toxic dominant-negative sar1 following Cre-loxP mediated promoter juxtaposition. Our data support the hypothesis that the large vesicles do not mediate the trafficking of luminal proteins to the apicoplast. The results further show that the large vesicles bearing apicoplast membrane proteins continue to be observed in the absence of Golgi and plastid function. These data raise the possibility that the apicoplast proteome is generated by two novel ER to plastid trafficking pathways, plus the small set of proteins encoded by the apicoplast genome. PMID:25369183

  20. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K; Osvath, Sarah R; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H; Charles, Ian G; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs. PMID:27075392

  1. Proteomic analysis of the mosquito Aedes aegypti midgut brush border membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Popova-Butler, Alexandra; Dean, Donald H.

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed brush border membrane vesicle proteins from isolated midguts of the mosquito Aedes aegypti, by two proteomic methods: two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (isoelectric focusing and SDS-PAGE) and a shotgun two-dimensional liquid chromatographic (LS/LS) approach based on multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). We were interested in the most abundant proteins of the apical brush border midgut membrane. About 400 spots were detected on 2D gels and 39 spots were cored and identified by mass spectrometry. 86 proteins were identified by MudPIT. Three proteins, arginine kinase, putative allergen and actin are shown to be the most predominant proteins in the sample. The total number of 36 proteins detected by both methods represents the most abundant proteins in the BBMV. PMID:19133270

  2. Explosive cell lysis as a mechanism for the biogenesis of bacterial membrane vesicles and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Lynne; Toyofuku, Masanori; Hynen, Amelia L.; Kurosawa, Masaharu; Pessi, Gabriella; Petty, Nicola K.; Osvath, Sarah R.; Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Gloag, Erin S.; Shimoni, Raz; Omasits, Ulrich; Ito, Satoshi; Yap, Xinhui; Monahan, Leigh G.; Cavaliere, Rosalia; Ahrens, Christian H.; Charles, Ian G.; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Eberl, Leo; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacteria produce extracellular and surface-associated components such as membrane vesicles (MVs), extracellular DNA and moonlighting cytosolic proteins for which the biogenesis and export pathways are not fully understood. Here we show that the explosive cell lysis of a sub-population of cells accounts for the liberation of cytosolic content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that explosive cell lysis also produces shattered membrane fragments that rapidly form MVs. A prophage endolysin encoded within the R- and F-pyocin gene cluster is essential for explosive cell lysis. Endolysin-deficient mutants are defective in MV production and biofilm development, consistent with a crucial role in the biogenesis of MVs and liberation of extracellular DNA and other biofilm matrix components. Our findings reveal that explosive cell lysis, mediated through the activity of a cryptic prophage endolysin, acts as a mechanism for the production of bacterial MVs. PMID:27075392

  3. Protein kinase A dependent membrane protein phosphorylation and chloride conductance in endosomal vesicles from kidney cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Reenstra, W.W.; Bae, H.R.; Verkman, A.S. Univ. of California, San Francisco ); Sabolic, I. Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA )

    1992-01-14

    Regulation of Cl conductance by protein kinase A action, cell-free measurements of Cl transport and membrane protein phosphorylation were carried out in apical endocytic vesicles from rabbit kidney proximal tubule. Cl transport was measured by a stopped-flow quenching assay in endosomes labeled in vivo with the fluorescent Cl indicator 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropyl)quinolinium. Phosphorylation was studied in a purified endosomal preparation by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography of membrane proteins labeled by ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. These results suggest that, in a cell-free system, protein kinase A increases Cl conductance in endosomes from kidney proximal tubule by a phosphorylation mechanism. The labeled protein has a size similar to that of the 64-kDa putative kidney Cl channel reported by Landry et al. but is much smaller than the {approximately}170-kDa cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein.

  4. bSUM: A bead-supported unilamellar membrane system facilitating unidirectional insertion of membrane proteins into giant vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Lee, Sungsoo; Llaguno, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    Fused or giant vesicles, planar lipid bilayers, a droplet membrane system, and planar-supported membranes have been developed to incorporate membrane proteins for the electrical and biophysical analysis of such proteins or the bilayer properties. However, it remains difficult to incorporate membrane proteins, including ion channels, into reconstituted membrane systems that allow easy control of operational dimensions, incorporation orientation of the membrane proteins, and lipid composition of membranes. Here, using a newly developed chemical engineering procedure, we report on a bead-supported unilamellar membrane (bSUM) system that allows good control over membrane dimension, protein orientation, and lipid composition. Our new system uses specific ligands to facilitate the unidirectional incorporation of membrane proteins into lipid bilayers. Cryo–electron microscopic imaging demonstrates the unilamellar nature of the bSUMs. Electrical recordings from voltage-gated ion channels in bSUMs of varying diameters demonstrate the versatility of the new system. Using KvAP as a model system, we show that compared with other in vitro membrane systems, the bSUMs have the following advantages: (a) a major fraction of channels are orientated in a controlled way; (b) the channels mediate the formation of the lipid bilayer; (c) there is one and only one bilayer membrane on each bead; (d) the lipid composition can be controlled and the bSUM size is also under experimental control over a range of 0.2–20 µm; (e) the channel activity can be recorded by patch clamp using a planar electrode; and (f) the voltage-clamp speed (0.2–0.5 ms) of the bSUM on a planar electrode is fast, making it suitable to study ion channels with fast gating kinetics. Our observations suggest that the chemically engineered bSUMs afford a novel platform for studying lipid–protein interactions in membranes of varying lipid composition and may be useful for other applications, such as targeted

  5. Decoration of Outer Membrane Vesicles with Multiple Antigens by Using an Autotransporter Approach

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Tristan; Soprova, Zora; ten Hagen-Jongman, Corinne M.; Vikström, David; Majlessi, Laleh; Beskers, Joep; Follmann, Frank; de Punder, Karin; van der Wel, Nicole N.; Baumgarten, Thomas; Pham, Thang V.; Piersma, Sander R.; Jiménez, Connie R.; van Ulsen, Peter; de Gier, Jan-Willem; Leclerc, Claude; Jong, Wouter S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spherical nanoparticles that naturally shed from Gram-negative bacteria. They are rich in immunostimulatory proteins and lipopolysaccharide but do not replicate, which increases their safety profile and renders them attractive vaccine vectors. By packaging foreign polypeptides in OMVs, specific immune responses can be raised toward heterologous antigens in the context of an intrinsic adjuvant. Antigens exposed at the vesicle surface have been suggested to elicit protection superior to that from antigens concealed inside OMVs, but hitherto robust methods for targeting heterologous proteins to the OMV surface have been lacking. We have exploited our previously developed hemoglobin protease (Hbp) autotransporter platform for display of heterologous polypeptides at the OMV surface. One, two, or three of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens ESAT6, Ag85B, and Rv2660c were targeted to the surface of Escherichia coli OMVs upon fusion to Hbp. Furthermore, a hypervesiculating ΔtolR ΔtolA derivative of attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 was generated, enabling efficient release and purification of OMVs decorated with multiple heterologous antigens, exemplified by the M. tuberculosis antigens and epitopes from Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP). Also, we showed that delivery of Salmonella OMVs displaying Ag85B to antigen-presenting cells in vitro results in processing and presentation of an epitope that is functionally recognized by Ag85B-specific T cell hybridomas. In conclusion, the Hbp platform mediates efficient display of (multiple) heterologous antigens, individually or combined within one molecule, at the surface of OMVs. Detection of antigen-specific immune responses upon vesicle-mediated delivery demonstrated the potential of our system for vaccine development. PMID:25038093

  6. Characterization of tryptophan transport in human placental brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, M E; Leibach, F H; Mahesh, V B; Howard, J C; Devoe, L D; Ganapathy, V

    1986-01-01

    The characteristics of tryptophan uptake in isolated human placental brush-border membrane vesicles were investigated. Tryptophan uptake in these vesicles was predominantly Na+-independent. Uptake of tryptophan as measured with short incubations occurred exclusively by a carrier-mediated process, but significant binding of this amino acid to the membrane vesicles was observed with longer incubations. The carrier-mediated system obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with an apparent affinity constant of 12.7 +/- 1.0 microM and a maximal velocity of 91 +/- 5 pmol/15 s per mg of protein. The kinetic constants were similar in the presence and absence of a Na+ gradient. Competition experiments showed that tryptophan uptake was effectively inhibited by many neutral amino acids except proline, hydroxyproline and 2-(methylamino)isobutyric acid. The inhibitory amino acids included aromatic amino acids as well as other system-1-specific amino acids (system 1 refers to the classical L system, according to the most recent nomenclature of amino acid transport systems). The transport system showed very low affinity for D-isomers, was not affected by phloretin or glucose but was inhibited by p-azidophenylalanine and N-ethylmaleimide. The uptake rates were only minimally affected by change in pH over the range 4.5-8.0. Tryptophan uptake markedly responded to trans-stimulation, and the amino acids capable of causing trans-stimulation included all amino acids with system-1-specificity. The patterns of inhibition of uptake of tryptophan and leucine by various amino acids were very similar. We conclude that system t, which is specific for aromatic amino acids, is absent from human placenta and that tryptophan transport in this tissue occurs via system 1, which has very broad specificity. PMID:3800932

  7. Calcium transport in sealed vesicles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L. ) storage tissue. II. Characterization of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Giannini, J.L.; Ruiz-Cristin, J.; Briskin, D.P.

    1987-12-01

    Calcium uptake was examined in sealed plasma membrane vesicles isolated from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue using /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ by the vesicles was ATP-dependent and radiotracer accumulated by the vesicles could be released by the addition of the calcium ionophore A23187. The uptake was stimulated by gramicidin D but slightly inhibited by carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Although the latter result might suggest some degree of indirect coupling of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake to ATP utilization via ..delta mu..H/sup +/, no evidence for a secondary H/sup +//Ca/sup 2 +/ antiport in this vesicle system could be found. Following the imposition of an acid-interior pH gradient, proton efflux from the vesicle was not enhanced by the addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ and an imposed pH gradient could not drive /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake. Optimal uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ occurred broadly between pH 7.0 and 7.5 and the transport was inhibited by orthovanadate, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, and diethylstilbestrol but insensitive to nitrate and azide. The dependence of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake on both calcium and Mg:ATP concentration demonstrated saturation kinetics with K/sub m/ values of 6 micromolar and 0.37 millimolar, respectively. While ATP was the preferred substrate for driving /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake, GTP could drive transport at about 50% of the level observed for ATP. The results of this study demonstrate the presence of a unique primary calcium transport system associated with the plasma membrane which could drive calcium efflux from the plant cell.

  8. Sulfate uptake by crustacean hepatopancreatic brush border membrane vesicles. [Homarus americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Gerencser, G.A.; Cattey, M.A; Ahearn, G.A. Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu )

    1990-02-26

    Purified brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were prepared from Atlantic lobster (Homarus americanus) hepatopancreas using differential centrifugation and Mg{sup +2} precipitation techniques. Uptake of 0.1 mM {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} was stimulated by pre-loading vesicles with Cl{sup {minus}} leading to a transient accumulation of isotope more than twice that at equilibrium. Pre-loading with HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} or gluconate had no effect on sulfate uptake. No stimulation of {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} was observed in the presence of inwardly directed Na{sup +} or tetramethylammonium{sup +} gradients. Uptake of the divalent anion was strongly stimulated by inwardly directed proton gradients (pH{sub o} < pH{sub i}) and markedly inhibited by outwardly directed proton gradients (pH{sub o} > pH{sub i}). {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}/Cl{sup {minus}} exchange was enhanced by imposing a transmembrane inside positive K{sup +} diffusion potential and inhibited by a membrane potential of the opposite polarity (K{sup +}/valinomycin). Results suggest the presence of a proton-dependent, electrogenic anion antiport mechanism in BBMV isolated from the crustacean hepatopancreas.

  9. Outer Membrane Vesicle Biosynthesis in Salmonella: Is There More to Gram-Negative Bacteria?

    PubMed

    Reidl, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has focused on the biological role of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), which are derived from the outer membranes (OMs) of Gram-negative bacteria, and their potential exploitation as therapeutics. OMVs have been characterized in many ways and functions. Until recently, research focused on hypothetical and empirical models that addressed the molecular mechanisms of OMV biogenesis, such as vesicles bulging from the OM in various ways. The recently reported study by Elhenawy et al. (mBio 7:e00940-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00940-16) provided further insights into OMV biogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. That study showed that deacylation of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) influences the level of OMV production and, furthermore, determines a sorting of high versus low acylated LPS in OMs and OMVs, respectively. Interestingly, deacylation may inversely correlate with other LPS modifications, suggesting some synergy toward optimized host resistance via best OM compositions for S Typhimurium. PMID:27531914

  10. Spatial and temporal electroselection patterns in electric field stimulation of polarized luminescence from photosynthetic membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Rosemberg, Yosef; Rozen, Philip; Malkin, Shmuel; Korenstein, Rafi

    1992-01-01

    Electroselection processes of charge recombination are manifested in the study of electric field induced polarized emission from photosynthetic membrane vesicles. The study explores the coupled spatial-temporal characteristics of electric field induced charge recombination by examining the dependence of the integrated polarized emission and the time dependent polarization on electric field strength. The experimental results were fitted to theoretical models by computer simulations employing empirical parameters. Simulation of the dependence of the integrated polarized components of emission on electric field strength, suggests field-dependent increased ratio between radiative and nonradiative rates of charge recombination. The observation that the initial polarization values are independent of electric field strength supports the assumption that electric field induced emission originates from the pole area and then spreads away from it towards the equator. The propagation rate of this electric field induced charge recombination from the pole area towards the equator is reflected by the decay of polarization which increases upon raising the electric field strength. Simulation of the polarization's decay, based on a calculated angle of 26.3 ± 0.4° between the transition moment of emission and the plane of the membrane, establishes coupled temporal spatial patterns of electroselection in intramembrane electron transfer invoked by exposing preilluminated photosynthetic vesicles to a homogeneous electric field. PMID:19431835