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Sample records for bauru dental school

  1. [Professional profile analysis of dentists graduated at Bauru dental School - University of São Paulo between 1996 and 2000].

    PubMed

    Bastos, José Roberto de Magalhães; Aquilante, Aline Guerra; Almeida, Beatriz Simões de; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Bijella, Vitoriano Truvijo

    2003-12-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the professional profile of the 248 dentists graduated at Bauru Dental School - University of Sao Paulo between 1996 and 2000, verify if they accomplish educational and collective measures and determine the level of professional satisfaction. The material was a self-applicable questionnaire containing both multiple choice and open questions. The return rate was 39.5%. Analysis of data showed that the dentists, who were predominantly males, chose Dentistry as a profession because they felt comfortable with it, and evaluate the graduate course as good. Results showed that the practitioners still do not focus on the need of education and prevention in oral health, especially at the collective level. It was concluded that the predominant professional profile was to work at their dental office (38.8%) or at a peer's dental office, receiving an amount of the total profile (25.5%); 26.5% work with health mutual support and 12.2% work at public service. Although 63.3% are professionally realized, only 12.2% are economically realized. The great difficult is the increase in the competition between dentists and saturation of the dental work market. PMID:21394402

  2. Urgency treatment profile of 0 to 15 year-old children assisted at urgency dental service from Bauru Dental School, University of São Paulo.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Vivien Thiemy; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Pessan, Juliano Pelim; Silva, Salete Moura Bonifácio da; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira

    2005-12-01

    Dental recordings of 0 to 15-year-old patients assisted at Urgency Dental Service (UDS) from Bauru Dental School, University of São Paulo, in 2001 and 2002, were assessed in order to quantify the number of patients that used the service, to determine attendance patterns, and to record the frequency of different types of dental emergencies and their performed treatment. Data were plotted and submitted to a descriptive statistical analysis. Among the total of patients attended at UDS (6020), 1166 (19.37%) were children, with mean age of 9.24 years. Trauma was the cause for 199 (17.06%) of the recorded urgency visits. It occurred more frequently in children between 0 and 3 years of age (34.42%), and between 7 and 12 years of age (18.12%). The main treatments performed were temporary restoration (33.33%) for coronal fracture, and orientation (24.44%) for luxation. Nontraumatic events were the etiology for 967 (82.92%) of the total urgency diagnosis. The most commonly found nontraumatic diagnosis was dental caries lesions (61.75%), followed by problems of eruption or root resorption (14.27%) and bone or soft tissue lesions (6.51%), among others (17.47%). The most frequent treatments performed for caries lesions were: excavation and temporary restoration (39.39%) when there was no abscess, and coronal opening and dressing (40.95%) for caries lesions with abscess. There was an increasing trend in caries lesions prevalence according to the rising of the age, in contrast to trauma prevalence. Treatment for both situations was done according to the indicated protocol for each case. PMID:20865216

  3. Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

  4. Teaching Photography in Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuman, Ted A.; Hummel, Susan K.

    1992-01-01

    Two surveys investigated the extent of photography instruction in dental schools. The first survey of 53 schools revealed that 36% had formal dental photography programs. Of 21 photography instructors surveyed in the second study, 67% had no formal training, many knew little about texts or resources, and techniques and knowledge varied. (MSE)

  5. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  6. Dental Implantology in U.S. Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavitz, J. Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The results of a survey of 44 dental schools corroborate the belief that dental implantology is gaining widespread acceptance in U.S. dental schools. Currently, predoctoral students have limited clinical participation. Most programs have taken the position that clinical techniques are best taught within the existing specialties at a graduate…

  7. Classification schemes for dental school libraries.

    PubMed

    McMaugh, D R

    1979-12-01

    The provision of an efficient and acceptable library system for the dental literature is examined. It is suggested that an index to the dental literature is best provided by a combination of Index Medicus and Medical Subject Headings. The Library of Congress scheme would be best for an autonomous dental school and, where a dental school library is provided by a large medical library, the National Library of Medicine Classification would be suitable for dental student use. PMID:395935

  8. Dental practice network of U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Monica A; Beeson, Dennis C; Hans, Mark G

    2009-12-01

    As dental schools incorporate training in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) into their curricula, students must learn how to critically evaluate systematic reviews and meta-analyses. It is important that dental education in the United States support the American Dental Association's position statement on EBD, which defines "best evidence" as data obtained from all study designs. Given that much evidence is missing when EBD is derived from Cochrane Systematic Reviews' randomized clinical trials, we propose the creation of a dental practice network of U.S. dental schools. We developed an electronic clinical dentistry research database for EBD using Epi-Info (available at www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/downloads.htm). As a free, public use software, Epi-Info provides the foundation for the development of clinical research databases that can increase the research capacity through multisite studies designed to generate outcomes data on the effectiveness of dental treatment. The creation of a dental practice network of dental schools with their large number of patients would expand the research capacity for EBD practice and advance the EBD science regarding the effectiveness of dental treatment. The next step is to link clinical dental researchers/educators at multiple dental schools through a collaborative clinical research network, so that the findings can be applied to the EBD component of problem-based learning curricula of dental education. PMID:20007494

  9. Preparing to Enter Dental School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Shailer

    A guide for students who are seeking admission to dental school is presented. The comprehensive coverage includes basic facts about dentistry as well as specific requirements about the following areas: facts about health care providers, treating patients in dentistry, and nonpatient-oriented dentistry; historical landmarks in dentistry; the…

  10. Management Practices in Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Five articles on management practices in dental schools include: "Overview" (Robert W. Comer et al.); "Patient Support Services" (Betsy A. Hagan et al.); "Health and Financial Records" (Robert W. Comer et al.); "Support Services and Staff Responsibilities" (Wayne William Herman et al.) and "Implications and Future Challenges" (Robert W. Comer et…

  11. Sedation in Japanese dental schools.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Zac; Sano, Kimito; Fujii, Kazuyuki; Kanri, Tomio

    2004-01-01

    There is very little information about the practice of sedation in Japan. Despite the remarkable advances in dentistry, fear and anxiety continue to be significant deterrents for seeking dental services. Most dental procedures can fortunately be undertaken with the aid of sedation. A comprehensive survey of all the dental schools in Japan was carried out to determine what sedation practices were used in Japan. All 29 dental schools in Japan possessed a dedicated department of anesthesiology at the time of this survey. The survey attempted to determine the specific sedation methods (techniques, routes of administration, and agents used in sedation) as well as practices (monitoring, fasting, location, education, and fees involved in sedation). The results indicate that there was a broad range in sedation practices. The Japanese Dental Society of Anesthesiology may wish to examine the findings of this study and may wish to formulate guidelines appropriate for the practice of sedation in Japan. Others may also wish to compare their own practices with those of Japan. PMID:15497299

  12. Undergraduate dental English education in Japanese dental schools.

    PubMed

    Rodis, Omar M M; Matsumura, Seishi; Kariya, Naoyuki; Nishimura, Michiko; Yoshida, Toshiko

    2013-05-01

    Dental schools in Japan are among many worldwide whose medium of instruction is not in English. With advances in science, technology, and communication, the demand for the globalization of professions increases. At present, dental schools in Asia, the Middle East, and Europe have started revising their dental curricula to either include English courses for dentistry or offer a full English dental curriculum. In Japan, dental English courses started to be introduced into curricula in the early 1990s. However, a survey conducted in 1999 found that English courses were not offered in Japan's twenty-nine dental schools and there was no consensus as to what such courses should include or when and how they should be taught. Ten years after that survey, the survey results reported in this article found that the problems reported in the 1999 survey still exist. Additionally, there are still differences among schools offering English courses in terms of the timing and contents of the courses. Since teachers and school officials will have an important role in curriculum development, this article recommends that a fact-finding meeting with educators, school, and education officials be initiated to discuss, develop, and implement a core curriculum for these dental English courses. PMID:23658413

  13. Geriatric dentistry education in European dental schools.

    PubMed

    Preshaw, P M; Mohammad, A R

    2005-05-01

    As the numbers of elderly adults continue to grow within European populations, the need for dental students to be trained in the management of geriatric patients becomes increasingly important. Many dental schools have developed training programmes in geriatric dentistry in response to the changing oral health needs of older adults. The purpose of this on-line survey was to identify the current status of geriatric dentistry education in European dental schools. A questionnaire relating to the teaching of geriatric dentistry was posted on the Internet, and 194 dental schools in 34 European countries were invited to participate. Data from completed questionnaires were submitted to the investigators via email from 82 schools in 27 countries (42% response rate). Thirty-six percent of schools offered a specific geriatric dentistry course that included didactic teaching or seminar groups, 21% taught geriatric dentistry by means of organised presentations in the curriculum, and 36% taught the subject by occasional lectures. 7% of schools did not teach geriatric dentistry at all. A clinical component to the geriatric dentistry curriculum was reported by 61% of schools and 18% reported operating a specific geriatric dentistry clinic within the school. Of those providing clinical geriatric dentistry training, it was provided within the school in 45% of cases, with a further 29% of schools providing training both within the school and at a remote location. Seven percent of schools operated a mobile dental clinic for treating geriatric patients. Twenty-eight percent of schools had a geriatric programme director or a chairman of a geriatric section and 39% indicated that they plan to extend the teaching of geriatric dentistry in the future. Geriatric dental education has clearly established itself in the curricula of European dental schools although the format of teaching the subject varies widely. It is of concern that geriatric dentistry was not taught at all in 7% of schools

  14. Bauru School of Dentistry Tele-Health League: an educational strategy applied to research, teaching and extension among applications in tele-health

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Andressa Sharllene Carneiro; RIZZANTE, Fabio Antonio Piola; PICOLINI, Mirela Machado; de CAMPOS, Karis; CORRÊA, Camila de Castro; FRANCO, Elen Caroline; PARDO-FANTON, Cássia de Souza; BLASCA, Wanderléia Quinhoneiro; BERRETIN-FELIX, Giédre

    2011-01-01

    Tele-health is more than an innovative alternative; it is an excellent tool that enables access to health and education in health, making it possible to minimize distances, optimize time and reduce costs. Based on these advantages, some Brazilian Universities have used these actions in strategies of education, research and extension, aiming at the application of Tele-health in Brazil. In that way, the Bauru School of Dentistry - University of São Paulo (FOB-USP) has applied the use of information and communication technologies in health by means of a "Tele-Health League" (TL), in order to diagnose, prevent and treat diseases, in addition to educate the population and health services. Objective The present study aims to introduce the characteristics of the Tele-Health League of FOB-USP, as well as the development of its projects. Material and Methods The Tele-Health League consisted as a Diffusion Course approved by the Provost of Culture and Academic Extension of the University of São Paulo. It is composed as a large group enclosing professoriate coordinator, academician principal, contributing professors and league members, those, diversified between undergraduates students, graduated, health employees, technology and information areas. The participant members are evaluated by the presence frequency (minimum of 85%), and by the performance of tests and paperwork about the theoretical content provided. Results In four years of activities, the TLFOB-USP obtained a high satisfaction index (90%), an increased number of vacancies due to the interest to become a member, more commitment of the professors of the University and the accomplishment of association with other Brazilian leagues. It is emphasized that the approval percentage of the course results in approval from approximately half of its members. Also, it is important to identify and repair the causes related to the quitting of some members. Conclusions The results showed that the TLFOB-USP members, adjoining

  15. Creating a Successful School-Based Mobile Dental Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, David M.; Jahnke, Lauren R.; Kerber, Lisa; Nyer, Genie; Siemens, Kammi; Clark, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Background: Dental disease is one of the leading causes of school absenteeism for children. This article describes the creation and evolution of the St. David's Dental Program, a mobile school-based dental program for children. Methods: The dental program is a collaboration of community partners in Central Texas that provides free dental care to…

  16. Dental School Faculty Shortages Increase: An Update on Future Dental School Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haden, N. Karl; Beemsterboer, Phyllis L.; Weaver, Richard G.; Valachovic, Richard W.

    2000-01-01

    Gathered information about the shortage of dental school faculty through a survey of dental school deans. Respondents identified retirement and entry into private practice as the leading reasons for leaving faculty positions, and indicated that offering a salary competitive with private practice was the most critical factor in recruiting future…

  17. Model Teacher - School Dental Hygiene Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lowell W.

    The purpose of this study, which was carried out during the 1972-73 school year at three parochial schools in the Houston area, was to determine the effectiveness of the Toothkeeper Program, a multimedia program of oral hygiene training carefully developed and packaged to establish effective long-term dental hygiene practice. The study population…

  18. Infections Control in North American Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Elise; Dhuru, Virendra B.

    1989-01-01

    Results from 1982 and 1987 surveys of dental schools concerning infection control issues found greater recent emphasis on instrument sterilization and barrier use, but some inconsistency and confusion concerning hepatitis B and HIV virus carrier patients and personnel. The information was used to develop guidelines for school policy formation.…

  19. Career patterns of dental hygienists qualifying from the Liverpool Dental Hospital School of Dental Hygiene.

    PubMed

    Hillam, D G

    1989-04-22

    This study assesses the pattern of employment of dental hygienists who qualified from the Liverpool Dental Hospital School of Dental Hygiene between 1977 and 1986. Of the 100 students who qualified during this period, 98 responded to a questionnaire. Seventy-seven per cent were employed as dental hygienists or dental health educators at the time of the survey, which took place between October 1987 and February 1988. The results show that after an initial slight under-employment, the majority quickly found as much work as they wanted and worked for an average of 2.24 practices each. The majority chose part-time employment and there was a steady decline in the number of sessions worked from the third year after qualifying. This decline was due to domestic commitments rather than dissatisfaction with the job. Only 4% stated they would definitely not return to work as a hygienist whilst a further 10% were uncertain. PMID:2719891

  20. CPR Requirements for Dental Schools and State Licensure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrali, Mark C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A national survey of 55 dental schools, 53 state and territorial dental licensing agencies, and 4 regional dental testing agencies found that cardiopulmonary resuscitation has become much more prevalent within the dental profession since 1977, with all students certified at some point during training. However, few states require annual…

  1. A Profile of Dental School Deans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valachovic, Richard W.; Weaver, Richard G.; Haden, N. Karl; Robertson, Paul B.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 53 deans of U.S. dental schools examined: gender and ethnicity; degrees and certificates; primary discipline; age; length of time as dean; academic rank and tenure; time distribution; other responsibilities; lines of authority; job satisfaction; career paths prior to becoming dean; knowledge, skills, and experience considered essential…

  2. The Maine Sealant Manual for School-Based and School-Linked Dental Sealant Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, Kneka, Ed.

    This manual is designed for use by school personnel and dental personnel to aid in the development and maintenance of school-based or school-linked dental sealant programs. The sections include (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Guidelines" (school selection, school contacts, dental providers, target grades, and tooth selection criteria); (3) "Education and…

  3. Meta-Analysis of Predictors of Dental School Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCastro, Jeanette E.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of which candidates show the most promise of success in dental school is imperative for the candidates, the profession, and the public. Several studies suggested that predental GPAs and the Dental Admissions Test (DAT) produce a range of correlations with dental school performance measures. While there have been similarities,…

  4. Future priorities for a successful dental school.

    PubMed

    Ranney, R R

    1999-01-01

    Priorities for success for a dental school of the future are considered. University relations, demographic changes, digital information technology and functional genetic technology are emphasised as important environmental pressures that will influence the priorities. The goal advocated for university relations is creating a culture in which the dental school is viewed as integral and necessary to the University's mission. Financial stability, quality research and scholarship and provision of health care for employees may be important ingredients. Keeping an eye on demographic changes and taking the school's business where the customers are is another key to success in the future. Ethnic diversity, changing approaches with changing disease patterns, flexibility in schedule and collaborations in areas of need are strategies to be considered. The emerging field of functional genetics typifies a new biology with which currency will be needed in a health-sciences field. Necessity for faculty development, adoption of molecular diagnostic technologies, emphasis on risk assessment and preventive counselling, and a shift to a wellness model are likely consequences. Digital information technology will result in increased distance-learning opportunity. Dental schools will also need to make accommodating changes in curriculum structure available. Conversion to electronic imaging and totally electronic patient records are likely to become standard. PMID:10865371

  5. English language education in Japanese dental schools.

    PubMed

    Morse, Z; Nakahara, S

    2001-11-01

    English is the common language of international scientific and cultural exchange. As the world becomes more globalized and with increasing dependence on the Internet, English becomes increasingly important as a second language. English is the official language for all international associations, societies, organizations etc and their meetings and publications. High quality international collaboration usually requires a high standard of English language proficiency. There is very little information regarding English language education in dentistry on a global basis, particularly in Japan. In 1999 we undertook a comprehensive survey of English education in all 29 Japanese dental schools in the form of a questionnaire. Few schools had native-speaking educators or those at native speaker level and most did not have a background in dentistry or the health sciences. There are no ideal textbooks for dental students studying English. Most disciplines within dentistry have a professional society or an association with meetings and publications. Currently there is no such group for English-language education in dentistry. Closer collaboration amongst those concerned may help improve the quality of education. The level of English-language ability of current dental students will affect the quality of future dental educators and researchers. PMID:11683894

  6. Problems in Admissions in U.S. Dental Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendel, Robert W.; Tabb, W. Gary

    1977-01-01

    Dental school admission policy must direct significant attention to the number of selectees who might enter each of the dental career fields and to those who might eventually serve population segments that currently receive little dental care. Specific suggestions for improving the admissions situation are offered. (LBH)

  7. Effect of Perceived Stress on Student Performance in Dental School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Anne E.; Lushington, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship between perceived stress and academic performance in 202 dental students at an Australian dental school. Found little support for an association between increased factor stress scores on the Dental Environmental Stress (DES) questionnaire and reduced academic performance. (EV)

  8. Organizational Characteristics of Dental Schools Associated with Research Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Marilyn S.

    1987-01-01

    A study found the ideal combination of characteristics associated with dental research productivity was $420,000 or more in funding from the National Institute of Dental Research, a student/faculty ratio of 4.75 or less, a library with at least 10,000 dental-related books, and medical school faculty teaching basic science. (MSE)

  9. Utilization of Preventive Dental Practices by Graduates of One U.S. Dental School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripa, Louis W.; Johnson, Robin M.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 113 graduates of the State University of New York at Stony Brook dental school now in general practice found a high rate of self-reported use of preventive practices (oral hygiene instruction, pit-and-fissure sealants, fluorides, and diet analysis) included in the dental school's curriculum. (MSE)

  10. The Arizona model: a new paradigm for dental schools.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kneka P; Woldt, Janet L; Cottam, Wayne W; Cederberg, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    The traditional method for the delivery of didactic instruction and patient care in dental schools has come under fire from a number of sources over the past several years. The American Dental Education Association and others have outlined numerous issues impeding the swift progression of student learning through the dental curriculum. Declining state revenues allotted to dental education, the increasing shortage of dental faculty, and the management of student learning in an already overcrowded dental school curriculum have led to the investigation of strategies that address solutions to these and other shortcomings in the current milieu of dental education. To address these deficiencies, strategies for change have been suggested. This article describes the development, implementation, and assessment of a new dental school that addresses these and other challenges to the education of today's dental student, thus creating the Arizona Model. Following seven years of operation, outcomes analysis at the Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health has shown positive trends in controlling educational costs, a shift to a modular curriculum, increasing student clinical experiences, and, consistent with the mission of the school, producing dentists who are well prepared for dental public health service. PMID:21205723

  11. A Profile of Dental School Deans, 2014.

    PubMed

    Haden, N Karl; Ditmyer, Marcia M; Rodriguez, Tobias; Mobley, Connie; Beck, Lynn; Valachovic, Richard W

    2015-10-01

    To develop a profile of current U.S. dental school deans and report their perceptions, challenges, and opportunities that should be addressed in the leadership development programs of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA), data were gathered using a web-based survey organized into seven content areas. In 2014, the deans of all accredited dental schools in the U.S. including Puerto Rico were invited to participate in the survey. The response rate was 86% (56/65). A majority of the deans were male (N=44; 79%) and white/non-Hispanic (N=49; 88%); all reporting degrees held a DDS/DMD (N=54; 100%). Just over half were between the ages of 46 and 55 (N=31; 55%) when they first became a dean. The mean age of these deans was 61.4 years, with a range of 48-72. The respondents reported that school administration/management, fundraising, students, the academic environment, leadership development, and faculty had a high level of influence on their job satisfaction. Communication, conflict resolution, and finance were reported as the most important knowledge areas. A majority reported being better prepared for clinical education and student relations than fundraising and research when they took their positions. They responded that finances and faculty recruitment and retention were their greatest challenges as a dean. Among these respondents, 98% (N=55) reported being satisfied to very satisfied with their job overall. The survey results will inform ADEA’s leadership development programs for the next five to seven years. PMID:26702465

  12. Pre-admission credentials and dental school performance of dental hygienists.

    PubMed

    Mauriello, S M; George, J M; May, K N

    1993-04-01

    This study examined the effect of dental hygiene preparation prior to entering dental school on dental school performance. Study participants included 203 female students who entered a public dental school from 1980-1989. Groups 1 and 2 had completed dental school prerequisites and a dental hygiene curriculum in a community college setting (n = 19) or university setting (n = 22) respectively, and Group 3 (n = 162) were traditional students with no dental hygiene education. Preadmission variables were predental science and non-science grade point averages (GPA) and Dental Admission Test (DAT) scores. Performance variables were GPA of years one and two of dental school and National Board scores (Part 1). Results showed that Group 2 hygienists had significantly lower predental science GPAs than Group 1 or 3 and significantly lower non-science GPAs than Group 3 (p < 0). Both groups of hygienists had significantly lower DAT scores than Group 3 (p < 0). No difference was seen in first and second year GPAs or the National Board average. Adjusting performance scores to compensate for deficiencies in preadmission variables showed that Group 2 hygienists had significantly higher adjusted first-year GPAs and National Board averages than Group 3 (p < 0). Thus, hygienists performed as well as non-hygienists in spite of weaker admission credentials. PMID:8482741

  13. Declining Dental School Enrollments: Influencing an Orderly Retrenchment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Dental school enrollments and the supply and demand of dentists in the United States and the south are examined. The growth in the supply of dentists in the South is related to an improved economy in this region and a rapid population increase. In addition to producing a large number of dental school graduates, the South is attracting graduates of…

  14. A HIPAA strategy for dental schools.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rosemary

    2002-05-01

    Certain health care organizations, including dental schools, should be readying themselves to comply with the numerous requirements described within the administrative simplification section of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). The intent of administrative simplification is to streamline the management of health care transactions while protecting the privacy of certain written, oral, and electronic patient information. There are no field-tested plans for implementing the law because only recently has the health care industry begun to respond to the multitude of requirements. It is essential that each organization create a customized compliance plan that best fits its structure and needs. The purpose of this paper is to propose a five-stage theoretical strategy that could assist a dental school in achieving HIPAA compliance. The first stage involves the selection of a HIPAA task force. The second stage selects the applicable HIPAA requirements, determines the current states of confidentiality and security, manages the electronic transactions standards, and composes a gap analysis. The third stage examines risk analysis and management. The fourth stage encompasses technical modifications, policies and procedures, legal input, and training. The fifth stage addresses the maintenance of the implementation. PMID:12056767

  15. A snapshot of cultural competency education in US dental schools.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Michael L; Bean, Canise Y; Casamassimo, Paul S

    2006-09-01

    During the last decade, cultural competency has received a great deal of attention in health care and the literature of many fields, including education, social services, law, and health care. The dental education literature provides little information regarding status, strategies, or guiding principles of cultural competency education in U.S. dental schools. This study was an attempt to describe the status of cultural competency education in U.S. dental schools. A web-based thirty-question survey regarding cultural competency education coursework, teaching, course materials, and content was sent in 2005 to the assistant/associate deans for academic affairs at fifty-six U.S. dental schools, followed up by subsequent email messages. Thirty-four (61 percent) dental school officials responded to the survey. The majority of respondents (twenty-eight; 82 percent) did not have a specific stand-alone cultural competency course, but indicated it was integrated into the curriculum. Recognition of local and national community diversity needs prompted course creation in most schools. Respondents at almost two-thirds of schools indicated that their impression of students' acceptance was positive. Teachers of cultural competency were primarily white female dentists. Few schools required faculty to have similar cultural competency or diversity training. Thirty-three of the thirty-four U.S. dental schools responding to this survey offer some form of coursework in cultural competency with little standardization and a variety of methods and strategies to teach dental students. PMID:16954420

  16. U.S. Dental School Deans’ Perceptions of the Rising Cost of Dental Education and Borrowing Pressures on Dental Students: Report of Survey Results.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Dora Elías; Garrison, Gwen E; Feldman, Cecile A; Anderson, Eugene L; Cook, Bryan J; Valachovic, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    This report presents findings from a survey of U.S. dental school deans designed to capture their perceptions regarding the rising cost of dental education and its impact on borrowing by dental students to finance their education. The survey included questions about factors influencing the cost of dental education, concerns about dental student borrowing, and financial awareness resources for students. The survey was distributed to the deans of all 63 U.S. dental schools in January 2013; 42 deans responded, for a 67% response rate. The results indicate that, according to the responding deans, new clinical technologies, technology costs, and central university taxes are the main factors that contribute to the increasing cost of dental education. Coupled with reduced state appropriations at public dental schools and declines in private giving at all dental schools, dental school deans face a perplexing set of financial management challenges. Tuition and fees are a primary source of revenue for all dental schools; however, many deans do not have total control over the cost of attending their schools since tuition and fees are often tied to mandates and policies from the parent university and the state legislature. The findings of this study indicate that U.S. dental school deans are aware of and concerned about the impact of increases in tuition and fees on dental student debt and that they are using a variety of strategies to address the growth in dental student borrowing. PMID:26223058

  17. Foreign Dental Graduates: Admission Criteria and Predicted Success in an American Dental School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browder, Halbert C.

    1980-01-01

    To ensure that foreign dental graduates have the knowledge and professional skills necessary to practice dentistry in the United States, several dental schools have established international student programs. A study to determine effective predictors of the success of foreign dentists at the University of Southern California is reported.…

  18. Building community support for a school dental sealant program.

    PubMed

    Sanzi-Schaedel, S; Bruerd, B; Empey, G

    2001-01-01

    Children from low-income families experience more dental caries and are less likely to receive dental treatment than children from middle- and high-income families. An overwhelming amount of scientific evidence supports the effectiveness of pit and fissure sealants in deterring the development of dental caries. The authors describe a unique component of the Multnomah County, Oregon, sealant program in which local dentists volunteer to conduct dental screenings in schools. This program, which began in 1989, targets elementary schools with 40% or more of students on free or reduced-cost lunch programs. During the 1999-2000 school year, volunteer dentists screened 5,252 second- and third-grade students in 64 schools and other community programs. As a result of the screenings, dental hygienist/dental assistant teams placed a total of 11,087 dental sealants on 3,866 children (a mean of 2.87 per child). The dentists who conducted the screenings were asked to evaluate the dental sealants placed during the previous school year. The program is one example of how a school dental sealant program can be staffed to optimize the resources of a state or county public health department. An added benefit of this staffing pattern is that it builds linkages in the dental community and a foundation for collaboration between private-practice dentists and public health programs. This type of collaboration is essential to the practice of public health. Furthermore, the involvement of private dentists in a local school sealant program can contribute to the long-term oral health of low-income children. PMID:11813677

  19. The rural dental health program: the effect of a school-based, dental health education program on children's utilization of dental services.

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, J M; Cormier, P; Oler, J

    1983-01-01

    Eighteen-hundred rural children ages five through thirteen were randomly assigned for dental treatment to a school-based practice, and to private practitioners in the community. Simultaneously, five of the nine public schools attended by the children offered an enriched program of dental education while the remaining schools taught the regular health education courses. All children participated in a school based fluoride program and their dental treatment was provided without charge. Data indicating how the children utilized dental services were collected over the three-year treatment phase of the study. Evidence from the third treatment year indicates that children assigned to the school based practice who also attended a school offering enriched dental health education used dental services on a more regular basis than children in the other three groups. Evidence obtained from log-linear modeling supports the hypothesis that dental health education had a positive effect on children's utilization of dental service. PMID:6837813

  20. The Development and Implementation of a Dental School Strategic Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreland, Ernest F.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The University of Maryland Dental School began a comprehensive external and internal analysis of dentistry and dental education. Three analysis groups were established to review the external environment, the competitive environment, and institutional strengths and weaknesses. A strategic directions group identified directions and created a…

  1. Use of Selected Dental School Courses for Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Roger G.

    1981-01-01

    In an effort to market current predoctoral dental courses offered at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry to the practicing dentist, a 10-hour forensic odontology course was offered to both predoctoral dental students and practicing dentists and their staffs. Positive reactions and cost effectiveness of this pilot…

  2. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Orthodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines reviewed and approved by the American Association of Dental Schools and sent to the Council on Dental Education in June 1979 are outlined. Educational goals and objectives and sequence of instruction (including growth and development, preclinical orthodontics, and clinical experience) are discussed. (MLW)

  3. Implant Education Programs in North American Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbree, Nancy S.; Chapman, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 52 dental schools found that dental implant techniques were taught in 34 pre- and 34 postdoctoral curricula, involving mostly prosthodontics and oral surgery departments, with periodontology departments lagging behind. Most predoctoral programs did not have research involvement. Cooperation among specialties is recommended over implant…

  4. Women on Dental School Faculties in the 1970s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pait, Carol; Solomon, Eric

    1981-01-01

    A statistical outline is given of female dental school faculty in 1970-71, 1973-74, and 1979-80, broken down by primary teaching area, type of appointment (full- or part-time), earned degree, and academic rank. The trend is toward increased female faculty with dental degrees, especially in clinical departments and at lower ranks. (MSE)

  5. Dental caries and dental registration status in nursery school children in Newry, Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    McCabe, M; Kinirons, M J

    1995-04-01

    294 children aged 2-4 yr attending nursery schools in Northern Ireland were examined for dental caries and dental registration status under the capitation system in general dental practice. Their mean age was 3 yr 10 months. Sixty eight per cent were caries free, mean dmft was 1.10 and dt, mt and ft scores were 0.74, 0.28 and 0.09, respectively. With increasing age the prevalence of caries increased, though the very low care index (d/dmft) did improve in the older children. Seventy per cent reported being registered for dental care and their levels of dental caries were significantly higher than those who were not yet enrolled (P < 0.001). For those not enrolled for dental care the main perceived barriers to seeking care related to lack of symptoms (33.6%) and apathy (31.6%) while few reported fear as a barrier (4.5%). PMID:7781302

  6. Policy Statements of the American Association of Dental Schools[.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' policy statements on education (preprofessional, predoctoral, advanced, continuing, and auxiliary), government relations regarding education, research, delivery of care, and public health concerns as amended in March 1986 are presented. (MSE)

  7. The Implementation of a Dental School Night Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Randy L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The University of Southern California School of Dentistry opened an evening dental clinic to accommodate patient scheduling needs. It found that faculty and students overwhelmingly supported the clinic hours and that a new clientele emerged. (MSE)

  8. Ethics and the electronic health record in dental school clinics.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, Robert A; Valenza, John A

    2012-05-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are a major development in the practice of dentistry, and dental schools and dental curricula have benefitted from this technology. Patient data entry, storage, retrieval, transmission, and archiving have been streamlined, and the potential for teledentistry and improvement in epidemiological research is beginning to be realized. However, maintaining patient health information in an electronic form has also changed the environment in dental education, setting up potential ethical dilemmas for students and faculty members. The purpose of this article is to explore some of the ethical issues related to EHRs, the advantages and concerns related to the use of computers in the dental operatory, the impact of the EHR on the doctor-patient relationship, the introduction of web-based EHRs, the link between technology and ethics, and potential solutions for the management of ethical concerns related to EHRs in dental schools. PMID:22550104

  9. Academic integrity in dental school: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Pamela J; Bean, Canise Y; Duff, Renee E; Duncan, Jacqueline P; Feldman, Cecile A; Guarente, John F; Marucha, Phillip T; Pousson, Rebecca L

    2009-01-01

    Recently there has been much discussion in the media and literature pertaining to academic misconduct in higher education. Dentistry has not been immune to this discussion. Recent "scandals" involving student misconduct in U.S. dental schools have sparked dialogue within dentistry's premier professional organizations. The authors of this position paper recognize that academic misconduct can be a serious threat to dental education and the profession of dentistry as a whole. This paper addresses academic misconduct in dental school, the impact it may have on our profession, and how educators can begin to develop strategies to curtail cheating in their institutions. PMID:19743687

  10. What enhances underrepresented minority recruitment to dental schools?

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ronald M; Carreon, Daisy C; Friedman, Judith-Ann; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Afifi, Abdelmonem A; Nakazono, Terry T; Davidson, Pamela L

    2007-08-01

    This study examined the factors influencing the proportion of underrepresented minority students (URM) in dental schools. Using a comprehensive recruitment model, it considered the relative importance of community characteristics (population demographics, oral health policies, dental care system, and university environment), dental school characteristics (Pipeline-supported, mission, and financing), and community-based dental education (CBDE) characteristics of the dental school on recruitment of URM students. Data come from a national survey of dental school seniors and a variety of publicly available sources. Three outcome variables measure URM recruitment: percent URM, percent Hispanic, and percent African American in the first year of dental school. Multivariable results revealed that the most important factors predicting a higher percent URM in first-year classes were a higher proportion of URM clinical faculty and graduating students' perceptions that their clinical rotation experience improved their ability to care for diverse groups. For percent Hispanic in the first year, a higher proportion of URM clinical faculty and students spending more time in clinical rotations predicted greater Hispanic recruitment. Graduating students' perceptions that they were less prepared to treat diverse groups were directly associated with the proportion of Hispanic students in the class. For a higher percent of African Americans in the first-year class, the most important factors were a higher proportion of blacks in the county, support from the national Pipeline program, and graduating students' perceptions of better preparedness to integrate cultural differences into treatment planning. Higher total financial aid awarded by the school was negatively associated with recruitment of African Americans. Results suggest some improved URM recruitment strategies for dental schools. PMID:17687082

  11. The utilization of dental hygiene students in school-based dental sealant programs.

    PubMed

    Miller, Faith Y

    2005-01-01

    Early detection of childhood caries is important to childrens' overall health. Untreated childhood caries can lead to pain, as in abscesses from prolonged neglect; altered dietary intake; and delays in the development of the permanent teeth if the primary teeth are prematurely lost. In the summer of 2000, funds were provided to various oral health care provider organizations by the Illinois Department of Public Health, Division of Oral Health, to purchase portable equipment to deliver preventive services (i.e., exams, sealants, and oral hygiene education) to second-grade and sixth-grade children who qualified for Medicaid and/or free and reduced-cost lunch programs. The Dental Sealant Grant Program at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale was a unique program that utilized dental hygiene students as the primary human resource. Within the state, the Dental Sealant Grant Program was, at the time of this report, the only grantee sponsored by a stand-alone dental hygiene program (not affiliated with a dental school). Other positive aspects of the dental hygiene-sponsored sealant program were that the supervising dentist was the primary Medicaid provider and a member of the dental hygiene faculty; dental hygiene faculty participated actively as site coordinators and clinicians; and dental hygiene students were given the opportunity to volunteer for the program as a service-learning option. PMID:16297312

  12. Internal dental school environmental factors promoting faculty survival and success.

    PubMed

    Masella, Richard S

    2005-04-01

    A career in dental academics offers ample rewards and challenges. To promote successful careers in dental education, prospective and new dental faculty should possess a realistic view of the dental school work environment, akin to the informed consent so valuable to patients and doctors. Self-assessment of personal strengths and weaknesses provides helpful information in matching faculty applicants with appropriate dental schools. Essential prehiring information also includes a written job description detailing duties and responsibilities, professional development opportunities, and job performance evaluation protocol. Prehiring awareness of what constitutes excellence in job performance will aid new faculty in allotting time to productive venues. New faculty should not rely solely on professional expertise to advance careers. Research and regular peer-reviewed publications are necessary elements in academic career success, along with the ability to secure governmental, private foundation, and corporate grant support. Tactful self-promotion and self-definition to the dental school community are faculty responsibilities, along with substantial peer collaboration. The recruitment period is a singular opportunity to secure job benefits and privileges. It is also the time to gain knowledge of institutional culture and assess administrative and faculty willingness to collaborate on teaching, research, professional development, and attainment of change. Powerful people within dental schools and parent institutions may influence faculty careers and should be identified and carefully treated. The time may come to leave one's position for employment at a different dental school or to step down from full-time academics. Nonetheless, the world of dental and health professional education in 2005 is rapidly expanding and offers unlimited opportunities to dedicated, talented, and informed educators. PMID:15800257

  13. Retention of underrepresented minority students in dental school: one dental schools story.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Ernestine S; Miller, Barbara H; Hornback, Sheryl A; McCann, Ann L; Reuben, Jayne S

    2011-01-01

    There is a large disparity between the proportions of African-Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans in the general population and in the dental profession. While these underrepresented minorities (URMs) as a group make up almost 30% of the United States population, they constitute only about 6% of the nation's dentists. Eliminating this disparity is important in addressing access to care for underrepresented groups. Texas A&M Health Science Center Baylor College of Dentistry (TAMHSC-BCD) enrolled greater numbers and proportions of URM students than any other non-minority school from 2006-2010. Strategies used to achieve this level of diversity include a Whole File Review process; career awareness activities for elementary, junior high and high school students; and academic enrichment programs for college students and college graduates. Retaining and graduating URM students is just as important as enrolling them. TAMHSC-BCD's retention rate over the last five years is 95.7% for all students and 92.5% for URM students. A wide range of services aids in the retention process. These services are available to all students and include monitoring of students' academic performance followed up with academic advisement as appropriate, peer tutoring, an alternative five-year curriculum, professional psychological counseling, professional learning assessments, social support; and mentoring through student organizations. The retention program at TAMHSC-BCD can serve as a model for other dental and other health professions schools seeking ways to ensure the academic success of their URM students. The more of these students we enroll and graduate, the more the problem of access to dental care is addressed. PMID:22416618

  14. Who succeeds at dental school? Factors predicting students' academic performance in a dental school in republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Ihm, Jung-Joon; Lee, Gene; Kim, Kack-Kyun; Jang, Ki-Taeg; Jin, Bo-Hyoung

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine what cognitive and non-cognitive factors were responsible for predicting the academic performance of dental students in a dental school in the Republic of Korea. This school is one of those in Korea that now require applicants to have a bachelor's degree. In terms of cognitive factors, students' undergraduate grade point average (GPA) and Dental Education Eligibility Test (DEET) scores were used, while surveys were conducted to evaluate four non-cognitive measures: locus of control, self-esteem, self-directed learning, and interpersonal skills. A total of 353 students matriculating at Seoul National University School of Dentistry in 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008 consented to the collection of records and completed the surveys. The main finding was that applicants who scored higher on internal locus of control and self-efficacy were more likely to be academically successful dental students. Self-directed learning was significantly associated with students ranked in the top 50 percent in cumulative GPA. However, students' interpersonal skills were negatively related to their academic performance. In particular, students' lack of achievement could be predicted by monitoring their first-year GPA. Therefore, the identification of those factors to predict dental school performance has implications for the dental curriculum and effective pedagogy in dental education. PMID:24319133

  15. What I wish I'd learned at dental school.

    PubMed

    Oliver, G R; Lynch, C D; Chadwick, B L; Santini, A; Wilson, N H F

    2016-08-26

    Background Much concern appears to exist as to the scope and content of contemporary dental school programmes, with the oft-cited criticism being made that dental graduates are 'no longer as good as they used to be'.Aim The aim of this project was to survey the views of dentists - both new graduates and more established practitioners - on aspects of their own dental school training they felt had been deficient as well as commenting on what aspects of dental school education they would like to see improved/enhanced in current times.Methods An invitation to complete an Internet-based questionnaire was emailed to the Fellows and Members of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK). Topics in the questionnaire included the respondent's own dental education history, how well they felt their dental school training had covered certain clinical and non-clinical topics; and their opinions on areas they felt should be included in contemporary dental school programmes.Results Six hundred and forty-nine responses were received from 3,348 emailed invitations (response rate = 19.4%). Sixty-one percent (395) of respondents were qualified for 10 years or more. Among clinical skills and techniques, a majority of respondents reported they felt they had not had sufficient teaching/training in dental school in surgical endodontics (76%), conscious sedation (72%), root surface debridement (71%), fixed orthodontic appliances (68%), porcelain veneers (63%), implants (56%) and posterior composites (53%). If designing a new dental school programme, the most common topics respondents would seek to include/increase were business and practice management (21%), communication skills (including patient management and leadership skills) (10%), and increased clinical time and experience (8%).Conclusions The findings of this project are of interest and relevance to those working with student dentists and young dental practitioners. A greater emphasis is needed on the teaching of certain non

  16. Modern Management Principles Come to the Dental School.

    PubMed

    Wataha, John C; Mouradian, Wendy E; Slayton, Rebecca L; Sorensen, John A; Berg, Joel H

    2016-04-01

    The University of Washington School of Dentistry may be the first dental school in the nation to apply lean process management principles as a primary tool to re-engineer its operations and curriculum to produce the dentist of the future. The efficiencies realized through re-engineering will better enable the school to remain competitive and viable as a national leader of dental education. Several task forces conducted rigorous value stream analyses in a highly collaborative environment led by the dean of the school. The four areas undergoing evaluation and re-engineering were organizational infrastructure, organizational processes, curriculum, and clinic operations. The new educational model was derived by thoroughly analyzing the current state of dental education in order to design and achieve the closest possible ideal state. As well, the school's goal was to create a lean, sustainable operational model. This model aims to ensure continued excellence in restorative dental instruction and to serve as a blueprint for other public dental schools seeking financial stability in this era of shrinking state support and rising costs. PMID:27037446

  17. Creating an Environment for Diversity in Dental Schools: One School's Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Formicola, Allan J.; Klyvert, Marlene; McIntosh, James; Thompson, Albert; Davis, Martin; Cangialosi, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Describes how the Columbia University School of Dental and Oral Surgery strives to admit more underrepresented minority students. Discusses its D.D.S. minority admissions program, postdoctoral minority admissions program, Science and Technology Entry Program (STEP) for middle and high school students, and "zero" tuition dental assisting training…

  18. A Correlational Study of Preadmission Predictor Variables and Dental School Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kress, Gerard C.; Dogon, I. Leon

    1981-01-01

    Undergraduate performance and standardized test scores were correlated with dental school performance for 131 members of nine Harvard School of Dental Medicine classes to determine the predictive validity of the earlier variables. The only significant positive correlation was of the Dental Admission Test and dental National Board Examination, part…

  19. Dental School of Graduation in Relation to Dentist Location.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Donald W.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A statistical study is presented of the 1976 location, by region and state, of the active civilian dentists of the United States in relation to the dental schools from which they graduated. A master matrix table shows state-by-state distribution of the graduates of each school and, conversely, where each state obtained its dentists. (Author/JMD)

  20. Models for Delivering School-Based Dental Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, David A.; McManus, Joseph M.; Mitchell, Dennis A.

    2005-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) often are located in high-need schools and communities. Dental service is frequently an addition to existing comprehensive services, functioning in a variety of models, configurations, and locations. SBHCs are indicated when parents have limited financial resources or inadequate health insurance, limiting…

  1. Dental Pit and Fissure Sealants: Implications for School Health Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack-Brown, K. R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    To promote good personal hygiene practices in students, school health personnel must be informed about dental pit and fissure sealants and related programs. Adoption and maintenance of such programs may depend on the success of school health personnel in educating administrators and policymakers. (SM)

  2. A humanistic environment for dental schools: what are dental students experiencing?

    PubMed

    Quick, Karin K

    2014-12-01

    A Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) standard now requires that dental schools commit to establishing a "humanistic culture and learning environment" for all members of the academic environment. The aim of this study was to identify students' perceptions of factors that affect the dental school environment and to test differences in their experiences in terms of gender and year. This picture of the existing environment was meant to serve as a first step toward creating and supporting a more humanistic academic environment. A mixed-methods approach was used for data collection during the 2009-10 and 2010-11 academic years at one U.S. dental school. Four focus groups were first conducted to explore challenges and conflicts faced by students during their dental education. A written survey informed by the focus group results was then used to obtain quantitative data. The survey response rate was 47 percent (N=188). Faculty inconsistency, cheating, and belittlement/disrespect were experienced by many of the responding dental students during their education, similar to what has been documented in medicine. These students also reported experiencing both constructive communication (90 percent) and destructive communication (up to 32 percent). The female students reported more gender discrimination and sexual harassment than their male peers, and the clinical students reported more experience with belittlement and destructive communication than the preclinical students. The results suggest that greater effort should be directed toward creating a more humanistic environment in dental schools. Based on the issues identified, steps academic institutions can take to improve these environments and student skills are outlined. PMID:25480278

  3. PENN PASS: a program for graduates of foreign dental schools.

    PubMed

    Berthold, P; Lopez, N

    1994-01-01

    An increasing number of graduates of foreign dental schools who enroll in advanced standing programs to qualify for licensure calls for dental schools to be prepared to handle not only the curricular demands but also the growing cultural diversity among its student population. The "reeducation" of this student group not only meets the need of foreign dentists for an American degree but may also provide health professionals to service various ethnic populations whose language and culture they are able to understand and identify with. A survey of students and graduates of a two-year Program for Advanced Standing Students (PASS) for graduates of foreign dental schools representing 34 countries aimed to arrive at an understanding of this student group through characterization of the foreign dentists and identification of their attitudes and feelings toward various aspects of the program, the school and faculty and their experience of stress. This report includes description of the distinctive features of the program which cater to specific needs and concerns of this non-traditional group of dental students. PASS students are accepted on the basis of their grades in dental school in home country, scores in the National Dental Board Examination Part I, Test of English as Foreign Language (TOEFL), and ratings in personal interviews. They complete an intensive summer program consisting of didactic and laboratory courses which prepares them for integration with four-year students for the last two years of didactic and clinical curriculum. Cultural diversity seminars, a special English class, PASS class meetings and seminars are unique additions to their program and aim to assist them adjust to the educational, social and cultural systems in an American school. Results of the survey show a majority of the PASS students feel that they are part of the school and that there is someone in the school whom they can approach for problems. An understanding of their ethnic and

  4. Traumatic dental injuries in Brazilian pre-school children.

    PubMed

    Mestrinho, H D; Bezerra, A C; Carvalho, J C

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to estimate the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries in a sample of Brazilian pre-school children with limited access to dental care. The sample included 1,853 one-to-five-year-old children attending public nursery schools in the Federal District of Brazil. Dental injuries were clinically assessed as follows: 1) uncomplicated crown fracture, 2) complicated fracture, 3) crown discoloration, 4) intrusive luxation, 5) extrusive luxation, 6) exarticulation or extraction after trauma and 7) subluxation. The results showed that 10% (< 2 years), 12% (3-4 years) and 20% (5 years) of the children had suffered at least one type of injury clinically identified at the time of the examination. Boys and girls were similarly affected. Dental injuries were almost entirely restricted to the maxillary central incisors (88%). Single tooth injury was predominant in all age groups. In the youngest group the most common types of injuries were crown fracture (69%) and crown discoloration (18%). However, from the age of three, crown discoloration showed percentages ranging from 41% to 47%. Prematurely lost tooth accounted for 11% of the injuries in 5-year-old children. The observed increase of dental injuries with age indicates accumulated treatment needs due to the children's limited access to dental care. PMID:10219123

  5. Dental Student Academic Integrity in U.S. Dental Schools: Current Status and Recommendations for Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Graham, Bruce S; Knight, G William; Graham, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Cheating incidents in 2006-07 led U.S. dental schools to heighten their efforts to enhance the environment of academic integrity in their institutions. The aims of this study were to document the measures being used by U.S. dental schools to discourage student cheating, determine the current incidence of reported cheating, and make recommendations for enhancing a culture of integrity in dental education. In late 2014-early 2015, an online survey was distributed to academic deans of all 61 accredited U.S. dental schools that had four classes of dental students enrolled; 50 (82%) responded. Among measures used, 98% of respondents reported having policy statements regarding student academic integrity, 92% had an Honor Code, 96% provided student orientation to integrity policies, and most used proctoring of final exams (91%) and tests (93%). Regarding disciplinary processes, 27% reported their faculty members only rarely reported suspected cheating (though required in 76% of the schools), and 40% disseminated anonymous results of disciplinary hearings. A smaller number of schools (n=36) responded to the question about student cheating than to other questions; those results suggested that reported cheating had increased almost threefold since 1998. The authors recommend that schools add cheating case scenarios to professional ethics curricula; disseminate outcomes of cheating enforcement actions; have students sign a statement attesting to compliance with academic integrity policies at every testing activity; add curricular content on correct writing techniques to avoid plagiarism; require faculty to distribute retired test items; acquire examination-authoring software programs to enable faculty to generate new multiple-choice items and different versions of the same multiple-choice tests; avoid take-home exams when assessing independent student knowledge; and utilize student assessment methods directly relevant to clinical practice. PMID:26729679

  6. The quality of dental faculty work-life: report on the 2007 dental school faculty work environment survey.

    PubMed

    Haden, N Karl; Hendricson, William; Ranney, Richard R; Vargas, Adriana; Cardenas, Lina; Rose, William; Ross, Ridley; Funk, Edward

    2008-05-01

    This report is the third in a series of articles on the dental school work environment commissioned by the American Dental Education Association's Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education. The report is based on the most extensive research to date on faculty satisfaction in the dental school environment. The purpose of the study was to assess faculty perceptions and recommendations related to work environment, sources of job satisfaction and dissatisfaction, and professional development needs. More broadly, the study intends to provide insight into the "change readiness" of dental schools to move forward with curricular improvements and innovations. Findings are based on 1,748 responses from forty-nine U.S. dental schools obtained during the time frame of February to April 2007. The total number of respondents constituted 17 percent of all U.S. dental school faculty. The average response rate per school was thirty-six (21 percent). To elucidate the data in terms of issues related to the quality of faculty work-life based on demographics, the authors compared perceptions of various aspects of the work culture in academic dentistry among faculty with different academic ranks and academic degrees and by other variables such as age and gender, tenure versus non-tenure appointments, and full- versus part-time status. Quantitative and qualitative analyses show that the majority of faculty members described themselves as very satisfied to satisfied with their dental school overall and with their department as a place to work. Tenured associate professors expressed the greatest level of dissatisfaction. Opportunities for and support of professional development emerged as an area requiring substantially more attention from dental schools. The authors of the study suggest that dental school leaders use these findings to assess their individual dental school's work environment and to plan changes as needed. PMID:18451075

  7. Faculty Development at One Midwestern Dental School: A Program Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Smith, Deborah B; Overman, Pamela R; Bunce, Larry

    2015-10-01

    Most dental school faculty members arrive on campus with a wealth of clinical experience but little to no teacher training. For the past two decades, there has been a call for schools to educate their faculty on a wide variety of topics including educational methodology and cutting-edge educational techniques through faculty development programs. Drawing on theories of general program evaluation as well as evaluation specific to educational programming, the aim of this study was to investigate outcomes of the Faculty Development Program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry between 2007 and 2014. A mixed-methods research design gathered quantitative data via email survey sent to all eligible teaching faculty members; it received an overall response rate of 54% (N=51). Qualitative data came from open-ended survey questions and a focus group with seven volunteer faculty participants. The survey data suggested that the stated outcomes of faculty development were being met for all stakeholder groups with varying degrees of success. Focus group results indicated a need for a more formal new faculty orientation and better communication with all about the specific charge of faculty development within the school. Evaluation of faculty development activities in academic dental institutions is a necessary component of the ongoing improvement of dental education. Suggestions for future evaluations include the idea of collaborating with other dental schools to increase sample sizes, which would increase participants' perception of the level of confidentiality and make statistical analyses more robust. PMID:26427777

  8. Administrative trends in U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Fu, Martin M; Rodriguez, Angel; Chen, Rebecca Y; Fu, Earl; Liao, Shu-Yi; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the administrative trends in U.S. dental schools at the beginning and end of a thirteen-year period and to identify the predictive factors for those changes. Administrative trends were measured by the difference in the number of major administrative positions for 1997 and 2010 reported in American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and American Dental Association (ADA) publications. Secondary measures (program length, student enrollment, and tuition) were also gathered. The mean numbers of administrative positions per school significantly increased over the study period, while the mean number of clinical science departments per school significantly decreased. The change in the number of directors was positively correlated with the change in student enrollment, but inversely correlated with the change in number of vice/associate/assistant deans. The change in the number of clinical science departments was positively correlated with changes in student enrollment and out-of-state tuition, but inversely correlated with the change in in-state tuition. The number of all departments per U.S. dental school significantly decreased in this period. The schools that had consolidation of clinical science departments were less likely to have increases in student enrollment and out-of-state tuition, but more likely to have increases in in-state tuition. PMID:25362691

  9. Impact of Phase I Pew National Dental Education Program on U.S. Schools of Dental Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Cecile A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Four surveys were part of an evaluation of the Pew National Dental Education Program to help dental schools respond to the changing health care environment. Results show funded schools gained a better understanding of their environment, reported increased participation in and commitment to planning among constituencies, and implemented strategic…

  10. Improving the Fiscal Sustainability of Teaching Clinics at Dental Schools.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, John W

    2015-12-01

    Educational patient care clinics are becoming an increasingly important source of revenue for dental schools. Revenue from clinics can help offset the rising cost of dental education. In addition, those clinics represent a source of income over which the schools have reasonably direct control. Recently, a group of nine U.S. dental schools conducted a detailed financial survey of their clinics and shared the confidential results with each other. The purpose of their analysis was to develop benchmarks for key factors related to clinical financial productivity and expenses and to define best practices to guide improvements at each school. The survey found significant variations among the nine schools in revenue produced by predoctoral students and by postdoctoral residents. There were similar variations for levels of clinical staffing. By sharing the results of the survey with each other, the individual schools gained a strong understanding of the business strengths or weakness of their own clinical programs. That information gave each school's leaders the opportunity to investigate how they might improve their clinical fiscal sustainability. PMID:26632292

  11. Career transition and dental school faculty development program.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Jeffery L; Hendricson, William D; Partida, Mary N; Rugh, John D; Littlefield, John H; Jacks, Mary E

    2013-11-01

    Academic dentistry, as a career track, is not attracting sufficient numbers of new recruits to maintain a corps of skilled dental educators. The Faculty Development Program (FDP) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Dental School received federal funds to institute a 7-component program to enhance faculty recruitment and retention and provide training in skills associated with success in academics including:(1) a Teaching Excellence and Academic Skills (TExAS)Fellowship, (2) training in research methodology,evidence-based practice research, and information management, (3) an annual dental hygiene faculty development workshop for dental hygiene faculty, (4) a Teaching Honors Program and Academic Dental Careers Fellowship to cultivate students' interest in educational careers, (5) an Interprofessional Primary Care Rotation,(6) advanced education support toward a master's degree in public health, and (7) a key focus of the entire FDP, an annual Career Transition Workshop to facilitate movement from the practice arena to the educational arm of the profession.The Career Transition Workshop is a cap stone for the FDP; its goal is to build a bridge from practice to academic environment. It will provide guidance for private practice, public health, and military dentists and hygienists considering a career transition into academic dentistry. Topics will be addressed including: academic culture, preparation for the academic environment,academic responsibilities, terms of employment,compensation and benefits, career planning, and job search / interviewing. Instructors for the workshop will include dental school faculty who have transitioned from the practice, military, and public health sectors into dental education.Objectives of the Overall Faculty Development Program:• Provide training in teaching and research skills,career planning, and leadership in order to address faculty shortages in dental schools and under representation of minority

  12. Evaluation of Teaching Performance in U.S. Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scruggs, Rebecca Reavis; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A national survey found that, although most dental schools formally evaluate faculty through student ratings, they agree that peer evaluation should be included. Most valued features of evaluation include a feedback mechanism, faculty input, and standardization. Most institutions provide teaching enhancement programs but value may research…

  13. Fluoride Programs in the School Setting: Preventive Dental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebich, Theodore, Jr.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Two types of school-based programs that increase students' use of fluoride for preventive dental health are described. In fluoride mouthrinse programs, teachers give their students a fluoride solution once a week in a paper cup. In areas where the level of fluoride in the water supply is insufficient, the flouride tablet program is used. (JN)

  14. American Association of Dental Schools Annual Session & Exposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    The planned program of the 77th annual meeting of the American Association of Dental Schools, "Strengthening Alliances, Expanding Horizons," comprises this special issue, which includes information on plenary session speakers, daily programs, TechnoFair clinics and workshops, section programs and meetings, faculty development workshops, exposition…

  15. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Oral Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Oral radiology curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools are provided. The guidelines describe minimal conditions under which a satisfactory educational experience can be offered. Principles of x-radiation, radiobiological concepts, radiological health, radiographic technique, radiographic quality, and darkroom…

  16. Extent and modes of physics instruction in European dental schools.

    PubMed

    Letić, Milorad; Popović, Gorjana

    2013-01-01

    Changes in dental education towards integration of sciences and convergence of curricula have affected instruction in physics. Earlier studies of undergraduate curricula make possible comparisons in physics instruction. For this study, the websites of 245 European dental schools were explored, and information about the curriculum was found on 213 sites. Physics instruction in the form of a separate course was found in 63 percent of these schools, with eighty-two hours and 5.9 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) credits on average. Physics integrated with other subjects or into modules was found in 19 percent of these schools. Half of these schools had on average sixty-one hours and 6.9 ECTS credits devoted to physics. Eighteen percent of the schools had no noticeable obligatory physics instruction, but in half of them physics was found to be required or accepted on admission, included in other subjects, or appeared as an elective course. In 122 dental schools, the extent of physics instruction was found to be between forty and 120 contact hours. Physics instruction has been reduced by up to 14 percent in the last fourteen years in the group of eleven countries that were members of the European Union (EU) in 1997, but by approximately 30 percent in last five years in the group of ten Accession Countries to the EU. PMID:23314470

  17. Impact of a research requirement in a dental school curriculum.

    PubMed

    Nalliah, Romesh P; Lee, Min Kyeong; Da Silva, John D; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-10-01

    With reported shortages in full-time dental educators across the world, any exposure to teaching and/or research during dental school might increase a graduate's interest in an academic career. Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) has a mandatory research experience for all students enrolled in the Doctor of Dental Medicine program. Each year, the graduating class is surveyed about characteristics and outcomes of their research experience. The aim of this study was to use the resulting data for five years of graduating classes (2008 to 2012) to assess the impact of the research requirement. The results showed that 54 percent of these students had presented their research projects at a forum outside Harvard. Thirty-six percent had had their research published in peer-reviewed journals, 38 percent had manuscripts in preparation or submitted for review, and only 26 percent had no intention to publish their work. Overall, 81.5 percent felt positive about their research experience at HSDM. Only 48 percent said they would definitely have pursued research even if it was not compulsory, and 36 percent were uncertain. However, 83 percent said they would have some involvement in research during their careers, and only 10 percent were uncertain. Implementing a compulsory research experience may lead to increased numbers of graduates pursuing research in their careers and contributing to the scientific development of the dental profession. PMID:25281669

  18. What the ADEA CCI series of articles means to me: reflections of a dental school dean.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Huw F

    2009-02-01

    In this reflection article, Dr. Huw F. Thomas, a U.S. dental school dean, identifies important messages and insights he gained from a series of twenty-one articles about the future of dental education published in the Journal of Dental Education from October 2005 to February 2009. This article addresses three questions: 1) What influence have these articles had on a dental school dean's perspectives about his role and priorities? 2) What important messages are contained within these articles for fellow deans? and 3) What messages do these articles send to dental education in general? The American Dental Education Association's Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education (ADEA CCI) was established to facilitate change and innovation in dental education. Through the ADEA CCI, ADEA brought together stakeholders in academic dentistry: dental schools, the American Dental Association (ADA) Board of Trustees, the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA), the ADA Council on Dental Education and Licensure (CDEL), the Joint Commission on National Dental Examinations (JCNDE), the dental licensure community, the ADA Foundation, and advanced dental education programs. The goal of the ADEA CCI is to provide a forum to build consensus within the dental community for innovative changes in the education of general dentists. As part of the consensus-building process, the ADEA CCI commissioned a series of articles, published in the Journal of Dental Education, to raise awareness and stimulate dialogue about issues and forces shaping the future of dental education and propose strategies to achieve desired enhancements. Collectively, this series of articles is known as the Perspectives and Reflections in Dental Education (PRIDE) series to acknowledge the commitment of the academic dental community to reflect on current practices and future directions and also to represent the pride of dental school faculty members in their educational responsibilities and accomplishments

  19. Elements for an Effective Program of Dental Health for School Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haro, Michael S.

    1970-01-01

    Emphasizes the need for competent dental health education developed through cooperation between the dental profession and educators. Presented at State Conference on School Dental Health Programs by the New York State Association of Supervising Dentists for Schools, January 27 and 28, 1970. (KH)

  20. Issues of academic integrity in U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Beemsterboer, P L; Odom, J G; Pate, T D; Haden, N K

    2000-12-01

    Evidence of violations of academic integrity can be identified at all levels of education. A survey on academic integrity was mailed in 1998 to the academic deans of all fifty-five U.S. dental schools, with a response rate of 84 percent. This survey showed that reported incidents of academic dishonesty occur in most dental schools, with the average school dealing with one or two cases a year. The most common incidents of dishonest behavior involved copying or aiding another student during a written examinations; the second most common involved writing an untrue patient record entry or signing a faculty member's name in a patient chart. Respondents indicated the major reason for failure to report academic dishonesty was fear of involvement because of time and procedural hassles and fear of repercussions from students and peers. PMID:11197944

  1. Electronic textbooks as a professional resource after dental school.

    PubMed

    Bates, Michael L; Strother, Elizabeth A; Brunet, Darlene P; Gallo, John R

    2012-05-01

    In two previous studies of dental students' attitudes about the VitalSource Bookshelf, a digital library of dental textbooks, students expressed negative opinions about owning and reading electronic textbooks. With the assumption that dentists would find the digital textbooks useful for patient care, the authors surveyed recent graduates to determine if their attitude toward the VitalSource Bookshelf had changed. A brief survey was sent to 119 alumni from the classes of 2009 and 2010 of one U.S. dental school. Forty-seven (39.5 percent) completed the questionnaire. Eighteen respondents (48.3 percent) reported using the e-textbooks often or sometimes. The twenty-nine dentists who said they have not used the collection since graduation reported preferring print books or other online sources or having technical problems when downloading the books to a new computer. Only five respondents selected the VitalSource Bookshelf as a preferred source of professional information. Most of the respondents reported preferring to consult colleagues (37.8 percent), the Internet (20 percent), or hardcopy books (17.8 percent) for information. When asked in an open-ended question to state their opinion of the Bookshelf, nineteen (42.2 percent) responded positively, but almost one-third of these only liked the search feature. Six respondents reported that they never use the program. Twenty-two said they have had technical problems with the Bookshelf, including fifteen who have not been able to install it on a new computer. Many of them said they have not followed up with either the dental school or VitalSource support services to overcome this problem. Our study suggests that dentists, similar to dental students, dislike reading electronic textbooks, even with the advantage of searching a topic across more than sixty dental titles. PMID:22550109

  2. Correlation Between Students' Dental Admission Test Scores and Performance on a Dental School's Competency Exam.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Alexander M; Schuster, Gregory M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a statistically significant positive correlation between dental students' Dental Admission Test (DAT) scores, particularly on the Perceptual Ability Test (PAT), and their performance on a dental school's competency exam. Scores from the written and clinical competency exam administered in the fall quarter of the fourth year of the curriculum at Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine-Arizona were compared to DAT scores of all 216 members of the graduating classes of 2012 and 2013. It was hypothesized that students who performed highly on one or more sections of the DAT would perform highly on the competency exam. Backward stepwise regression analyses were used to analyze the data. The results showed that the PAT scores were most strongly correlated with the competency exam scores and were a positive predictor for all three clinical sections of the exam (operative dentistry, periodontics, and endodontics). Positive predictors for the written portion of the exam were total DAT score for patient assessment and treatment planning and the DAT reading comprehension score for prosthodontics; there were no predictors for periodontics. The total variance explained by the results ranged from 4% to 15%. While statistically significant relationships were found between the students' PAT scores and clinical performance, DAT scores explained relatively little variance in the competency exam scores. According to these findings, neither the PAT nor any of the DAT components contributed to predicting these students' clinical performance. PMID:26522638

  3. Factors influencing students' performance in a Brazilian dental school.

    PubMed

    Silva, Erica Tatiane da; Nunes, Maria de Fátima; Queiroz, Maria Goretti; Leles, Cláudio R

    2010-01-01

    Comprehensive assessment of students' academic performance plays an important role in educational planning. The aim of this study was to investigate variables that influence student's performance in a retrospective sample including all undergraduate students who entered in a Brazilian dental school, in a 20-year period between 1984 and 2003 (n=1182). Demographic and educational variables were used to predict performance in the overall curriculum and course groups. Cluster analysis (K-means algorithm) categorized students into groups of higher, moderate or lower performance. Clusters of overall performance showed external validity, demonstrated by Chi-square test and ANOVA. Lower performance groups had the smallest number of students in overall performance and course groups clusters, ranging from 11.8% (clinical courses) to 19.2% (basic courses). Students' performance was more satisfactory in dental and clinical courses, rather than basic and non-clinical courses (p<0.001). Better student's performance was predicted by lower time elapsed between completion of high school and dental school admission, female gender, better rank in admission test, class attendance rate and student workload hours in teaching, research and extension (R(2)=0.491). Findings give evidence about predictors of undergraduate students' performance and reinforce the need for curricular reformulation focused on with improvement of integration among courses. PMID:20464326

  4. Psychological distress and its correlates among dental students: a survey of 17 Colombian dental schools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Links between the demanding nature of studies in the health sciences, students’ personality traits and psychological distress have been well-established. While considerable amount of work has been done in medicine, evidence from the dental education arena is sparse and data from Latin America are lacking. The authors conducted a large-scale investigation of psychological distress among dental students in Colombia and sought to determine its curriculum and student-level correlates. Methods The Spanish version of the Derogatis’ Symptoms Checklist Revised (SCL-90-R) was administered to all students officially registered and attending classes or clinics in 17 dental schools in 4 geographic districts of Colombia between January and April 2012. Additional information was collected on participants’ socio-demographic information and first career choice, as well as school’s characteristics such as class size. The Global Severity Index (GSI) score, a measure of overall psychological distress, served as the primary analytical endpoint. Analyses relied on multilevel mixed-effects linear and log-binomial regression, accounting for study design and sample characteristics. Results A total of 5700 dental students completed the survey, a response rate of 67%. Pronounced gradients were noted in the association between socio-economic status and psychological distress, with students in higher strata reporting fewer problems. After adjustment for all important covariates, there was an evident pattern of increasing psychological distress corresponding to the transition from the didactic, to the preclinical and clinical phases of training, with few differences between male and female students. Independent of other factors, reliance on own funds for education and having dentistry as the first career choice were associated with lower psychological distress. Conclusions Levels of psychological distress correlated with students’ socio-economic and study

  5. Use of virtual patients in dental education: a survey of U.S. and Canadian dental schools.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, Robert A; Bentley, Dan A; Halpin, Richard; Valenza, John A

    2012-10-01

    The use of virtual patients in dental education is gaining acceptance as an adjunctive method to live patient interactions for training dental students. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which virtual patients are being utilized in dental education by conducting a survey that was sent to sixty-seven dental schools in the United States and Canada. A total of thirty dental schools responded to the web-based survey. Sixty-three percent of the responding dental schools use virtual patients for preclinical or clinical exercises. Of this group, 31.3 percent have used virtual patients in their curricula for more than ten years, and approximately one-third of those who do use virtual patients expose their students to more than ten virtual patient experiences over the entirety of their programs. Of the schools that responded, 90.5 percent rated the use of virtual patients in dental education as important or very important. An additional question addressed the utilization of interactive elements for the virtual patient. Use of virtual patients can provide an excellent method for learning and honing patient interviewing skills, medical history taking, recordkeeping, and patient treatment planning. Through the use of virtual patient interactive audio/video elements, the student can experience interaction with his or her virtual patients during a more realistic simulation encounter. PMID:23066135

  6. Dental fear in Japan: Okayama Prefecture school study of adolescents and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, P.; Shimono, T.; Domoto, P.; Wohlers, K.; Matsumura, S.; Ohmura, M.; Uchida, H.; Omachi, K.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 3,041 students and staff in middle school in Okayama Prefecture, Japan, were surveyed regarding dental fear. Over 88% reported fear, with 42.1% classified as having high fear. Almost 70% reported acquiring dental fear prior to junior high school. A majority reported being hurt at the last appointment. Delay of dental work was also reported for over 50% of the sample. Coping, pattern of physiological upset, nondental fears, and sex and age differences were also reported. Results suggest intervention is needed to address the major dental public health problems associated with dental fear. PMID:8250343

  7. Assessment of the calibration of periodontal diagnosis and treatment planning among dental students at three dental schools.

    PubMed

    Lane, Brittany A; Luepke, Paul; Chaves, Eros; Maupome, Gerardo; Eckert, George J; Blanchard, Steven; John, Vanchit

    2015-01-01

    Calibration in diagnosis and treatment planning is difficult to achieve due to variations that exist in clinical interpretation. To determine if dental faculty members are consistent in teaching how to diagnose and treat periodontal disease, variations among dental students can be evaluated. A previous study reported high variability in diagnoses and treatment plans of periodontal cases at Indiana University School of Dentistry. This study aimed to build on that one by extending the research to two additional schools: Marquette University School of Dentistry and West Virginia University School of Dentistry. Diagnosis and treatment planning by 40 third- and fourth-year dental students were assessed at each of the schools. Students were asked to select the diagnosis and treatment plans on a questionnaire pertaining to 11 cases. Their responses were compared using chi-square tests, and multirater kappa statistics were used to assess agreement between classes and between schools. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the effects of school, class year, prior experience, and GPA/class rank on correct responses. One case had a statistically significant difference in responses between third- and fourth-year dental students. Kappas for school agreement and class agreement were low. The students from Indiana University had higher diagnosis and treatment agreements than the Marquette University students, and the Marquette students fared better than the West Virginia University students. This study can help restructure future periodontal courses for a better understanding of periodontal diagnosis and treatment planning. PMID:25576548

  8. The Clinical Nurse Specialist in the School Setting: Case Management of Migrant Children with Dental Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Mary Ellen

    This paper presents strategies for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) in the school setting to use in case management of migrant children with dental disease. Although dental disease is the major health problem of all school-age children in the nation, the problem is even more severe for children of migrant farmworkers. Leininger's transcultural…

  9. A Comparison of Urban School- and Community-Based Dental Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Charles D.; Larsen, Michael D.; Handwerker, Lisa B.; Kim, Maile S.; Rosenthal, Murray

    2009-01-01

    Background: The objective of the study was to quantitatively compare school- and community-based dental clinics in New York City that provide dental services to children in need. It was hypothesized that the school-based clinics would perform better in terms of several measures. Methods: We reviewed billing and visit data derived from encounter…

  10. Survey and Analysis of Dental Caries in Students at a Deaf-Mute High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Hong; Wang, Yan-Ling; Cong, Xiao-Na; Tang, Wan-Qin; Wei, Ping-Min

    2012-01-01

    The present cross-sectional study was conducted to assess and compare the prevalence of dental caries of 229 deaf adolescents in a special senior high school and to identify factors related to dental caries, with a match group of 196 healthy adolescents in a normal senior high school, in Jiangsu province of East China. In this study the prevalence…

  11. Assessing School Effects on Dental Hygiene and Nutrition Behaviors of Canadian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin

    2007-01-01

    This study examines what school experiences influence dental hygiene and nutrition behaviors of Canadian adolescents from the 1998 Cross-national Survey on Health Behaviors in School-aged Children (HBSC). Multilevel analyses highlight the rare use of dental floss among adolescents. Females are more likely to brush and floss teeth than males.…

  12. Restructuring an undergraduate dental curriculum to global standards--a case study in an Indian dental school.

    PubMed

    Kadagad, P; Tekian, A; Pinto, P X; Jirge, V L

    2012-05-01

    Globalisation has affected all aspects of life and dentistry is no exception. In the context of today's dentist being a global citizen, undergraduate training in dentistry is set to ensure converging standards so that international recognition of dental qualifications can move forward. The decision of the Dental Council of India to expand the undergraduate dental program to five years provides an opportunity to be part of the endeavor of the Global Dental Congress to achieve converging standards which was initially for the European Union, and now spreading out globally. Economic emergence in Indian subcontinent has resulted in growing oral health care needs both in quality and quantity. To address this issue, the graduating dentist needs to be trained following a competency based curricular model. Access to Internet facilitated the goal of achieving converging standards of dental schools to be feasible because of the instant communication and capacity to share information about training strategies via technology across the globe. Upgrading the undergraduate training to global standards by dental schools in India could be a wise and strategic move both for attracting students to study in India, as well as retaining the graduates after their training. The following is a case study of an Indian dental school set to restructure the undergraduate curriculum to global standards using the 8 steps of Kotter's transformational change. Change in curriculum and the subsequent accreditation of the school in global platform not only attracts prospective students but also results in producing competent dentists. Dental education provided by the institution can result in quality assurance, benchmarking the assessment system to achieve international recognition. This paper highlights the need and importance of facilitation of international convergence with long term aspirations for mutual recognition of international degrees. PMID:22494308

  13. Evaluation of school-based dental health activities including fluoride mouth-rinsing in Hiraizumi, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohara, S; Kawaguchi, Y; Shinada, K; Sasaki, Y

    2000-06-01

    School-based dental health activities conducted in Hiraizumi over the past 20 years have remarkably improved the dental health status of schoolchildren. For example, DMFT index of 12-year-old children decreased to 1.5 in 1998, one-half that of the national average. School dental health activities, which were focused on dental health education, resulted in an increase of filled teeth rates, a decrease in the number of missing teeth, and a decline in incisor caries (1979-1986). In addition, the introduction of a school-based fluoride mouth-rinsing program (1986 - ) showed a positive effect on the prevention of dental caries; a significant decrease was observed in the overall prevalence of dental caries, particularly in the molars. In Japan it seems advantageous to promote the dental health of schoolchildren by school-based programs that combine dental health examination, dental health education and fluoride mouth-rinsing program. Especially, to prevent dental caries in the mandibular first molars more effectively, it is recommended to start fluoride mouth-rinsing at age 5. PMID:12160185

  14. Dental Occlusion among School Going Children of Maharashtra

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mukesh; Banerjee, Prasenjit; Gondhalekar, Rajesh; Gondhalekar, Rajeshri; Lall, Rajeev; Parwani, Rajkumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: A dental survey was conducted among the school going children of age group 6-13 yrs, focused to find out incidence of malocclusion so as to predict the probable time at which preventive measures can be taken. Materials and Methods: A survey was carried on 985 unrelated healthy subject, including of 575 boys and 410 girls and the population was divided into three economic group of upper, middle and lower class. Results: 1)In the study 57% of sample is found with normal occlusion.2)The proportion of malocclusion was higher in males.3)Lower income group sample showed highest proportion of malocclusion. Conclusion: In this study on school going children, it was found out that 57% of population showed normal occlusion and that malocclusion was higher in males and in lower income group population. PMID:25214733

  15. Children’s Dental Health, School Performance and Psychosocial Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Guarnizo-Herreño, Carol Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of dental health on school performance and psychosocial well-being in a nationally representative sample of children in the US. Study design We analyzed data from the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health for 40,752– 41,988 children. The effects of dental problems and maternal-rated dental health on school performance and psychosocial well-being outcomes were evaluated using regression models adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic, and health characteristics. Results Dental problems were significantly associated with reductions in school performance and psychosocial well-being. Children with dental problems were more likely to have problems at school (OR=1.52; 95% CI: 1.37–1.72) and to miss school (OR=1.42; 95% CI: 1.23–1.64) and were less likely to do all required homework (OR=0.76; 95% CI: 0.68–0.85). Dental problems were associated with shyness, unhappiness, feeling of worthlessness, and reduced friendliness. The effects of dental problems on unhappiness and feeling of worthlessness were largest for adolescents between 15 and 17 years. Conclusion Preventing and treating dental problems and improving dental health may benefit child academic achievement and cognitive and psychosocial development. PMID:22727866

  16. Student perceptions about the mission of dental schools to advance global dentistry and philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Ivanoff, Chris S; Ivanoff, Athena E; Yaneva, Krassimira; Hottel, Timothy L; Proctor, Hannah L

    2013-10-01

    In this study, 491 dental students at one dental school in the United States and one in Bulgaria were surveyed to assess their perceptions about the mission of dental schools to advance global dentistry and philanthropy. The study included questions about prior involvement in charitable dental missions. Many respondents felt that their dental school does not advance global dentistry nor adequately teaches students the virtues of philanthropy and volunteerism. The majority agreed, however, that dental schools have a moral obligation to raise the level of oral health care worldwide and help underserved communities access basic dental care. They reported that an opportunity to spend a semester at a foreign dental school would enhance their dental education in ways that are not presently fulfilled; help them better understand cultural diversity; and teach them about philanthropy and volunteerism. In their opinion, international exchange programs that provide clinical rotations and field experiences in economically challenged and underserved areas of the world would a) foster the global advancement of dentistry; b) promote an appreciation for cultural diversity and socioeconomic disparity in the communities that graduates will be serving; and c) teach students the virtues of philanthropy and volunteerism. This study may contribute to understanding factors affecting student involvement in programs to advance global dentistry. PMID:24098030

  17. Current status of patient recall in U.S. predoctoral dental school clinics.

    PubMed

    Afshari, Fatemeh S; Schelkopf, Stuart; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Marinis, Aristotelis; Syros, George; Campbell, Stephen D; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2014-10-01

    The Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA)'s revised standard 2-23, which went into effect in July 2013, requires U.S. dental graduates to be competent in "evaluation of the outcomes of treatment, recall strategies, and prognosis." To assess the way dental schools are implementing this revised recommendation, a survey was conducted to assess the existence of recall systems in the schools' clinics and factors enhancing or hindering the formation of an effective recall system. Surveys were returned from thirty-five dental schools (54.7 percent response rate). Results showed that most institutions had active recall systems and the respondents believed that program effectiveness can be further improved. Suggested improvements included patient education and tracking patient recall appointments. The results indicate that recall systems exist in predoctoral dental education programs, have high student involvement, and vary among schools. PMID:25281670

  18. A model for forensic dental education in the predoctoral dental school curriculum.

    PubMed

    Hermsen, Kenneth P; Johnson, J Dane

    2012-05-01

    Forensic odontologists play an important role locally and nationally in assisting in the identification of the victims of mass fatality incidents, whether natural or human-made. With the recent passage of legislation by Congress identifying dentists as a first-responder resource, knowledge of their expanding role in disaster response is particularly important. The purpose of this article is to describe the forensic dental course being taught at Creighton University School of Dentistry in Omaha, Nebraska, as a model for providing a fundamental education in forensic dentistry and disaster preparedness at the predoctoral dental level. This model is designed to 1) provide students with a broad view of forensic odontology; 2) give them a functional knowledge of the tools and techniques of the modern forensic dentist; 3) provide basic knowledge of their potential role in disaster preparedness and response; and 4) encourage students to pursue further forensic education, become active in national forensic organizations, and get involved in disaster preparedness/response in their home communities following graduation. This article includes lecture topics, demonstrations, and hands-on exercises being used at Creighton to teach students the fundamentals of forensic odontology and disaster preparedness. PMID:22550101

  19. A survey of social media policies in U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Henry, Rachel K; Webb, Chadleo

    2014-06-01

    Since social media sites began to appear in the 1990s, their popularity has increased dramatically, especially among younger individuals. With this widespread use of social media, institutions of higher education are finding the need to implement social media policies. The purpose of this study was to gather information from accredited U.S. dental schools on their social media policies. A survey sent to academic deans asked questions related to social media policies and violations of policies. The survey yielded a 35.9 percent (n=23) response rate. Social media policies at the university level were reported by 47.8 percent (n=11) of respondents, and 34.8 percent (n=8) had social media policies specifically in the dental school. Schools that had an institutional social media policy were more likely to have a social media policy in the dental school (p=0.01), and dental schools were more likely to have a policy if the academic dean had been in the position less than five years (p=0.01). All twenty-three responding dental schools have official social media pages. Dental educators and administrators may want to look for opportunities to raise awareness of social media professionalism in their dental schools. PMID:24882770

  20. Dental School Administrators' Attitudes Towards Providing Support Services for LGBT-Identified Students.

    PubMed

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Morris, Dustin R

    2015-08-01

    A lack of curriculum time devoted to teaching dental students about the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) health care patient needs and biases against LGBT students and faculty have been reported. Understanding dental school administrators' attitudes about LGBT students' needs might provide further insight into these long-standing issues. The aims of this study were to develop a survey to assess dental administrators' attitudes regarding the support services they believe LGBT-identified students need, to identify dental schools' current diversity inclusion policies, and to determine what types of support dental schools currently provide to LGBT students. A survey developed with the aid of a focus group, cognitive interviewing, and pilot testing was sent to 136 assistant and associate deans and deans of the 65 U.S. and Canadian dental schools. A total of 54 responses from 43 (66%) schools were received from 13 deans, 29 associate deans, and 11 assistant deans (one participant did not report a position), for a 40% response rate. The findings suggest there is a considerable lack of knowledge or acknowledgment of LGBT dental students' needs. Future studies are needed to show the importance of creating awareness about meeting the needs of all dental student groups, perhaps through awareness campaigns initiated by LGBT students. PMID:26246536

  1. The UKCAT test: developments, research and its use by dental schools in the U.K.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, R; Greatrix, R

    2014-02-01

    The United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) has now been an active part of U.K. dental admissions for seven years with the test being used by 11 dental schools within their admissions processes. This paper gives an overview on UKCAT and highlights some of the on-going work in relation to its development. This paper also highlights what UKCAT is and some developments with respect to the UKCAT. It also facilitates the process of keeping dental practitioners informed. PMID:24557393

  2. Integrating Information Services for Dental Schools into a Health Sciences Library *

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Louise

    1970-01-01

    Standards for dental school libraries are first discussed, and the actual state of such libraries described. Advantages and disadvantages of combining the dental library with the health sciences library are weighed. A description is given of the experience at UCLA of integrating dentistry into the total Biomedical Library, with details on serial and monograph selection, together with figures on the size of the collection. Services required of a dental library are detailed, and particular services offered by UCLA described. PMID:5439908

  3. Survey of Attitudinal Acceptance of a Children's Incremental Dental Care Program by Parents, Teachers and School Administrators. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guess, L. Lynn; And Others

    This report presents an analysis of the attitudes of parents, teachers, and school administrators to the Chattanooga Incremental Dental Care Program. This project provided dental care in the public elementary schools at specific intervals of time to specific age groups in order to establish and maintain a state of oral health. Dental services were…

  4. Complementary and alternative medicine usage by patients of a dental school clinic.

    PubMed

    Spector, Michael L; Fischer, Mark; Dawson, Deborah V; Holmes, David C; Kummet, Colleen; Nisly, Nicole L; Baker, Karen A K

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the prevalence and specific reasons for usage of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among patients of a dental school clinic. Four hundred and two patients completed a 30-page survey on CAM usage. A higher rate of CAM usage was found in this dental school clinic population than rates previously reported in a general population. More than three-quarters (76.1%) of the respondents reported using at least one CAM treatment in the past 12 months; 93.3% reported using at least one CAM treatment at some time in their lives. High rates of chiropractic use were found in this population. Tooth pain was the most frequently reported dental condition motivating CAM use. About 10% of dental school clinic patients use topical oral herbal and/or natural products to treat dental conditions, most frequently for preventive/oral health reasons or for tooth pain. PMID:22943769

  5. Open wide: looking into the safety culture of dental school clinics.

    PubMed

    Ramoni, Rachel; Walji, Muhammad F; Tavares, Anamaria; White, Joel; Tokede, Oluwabunmi; Vaderhobli, Ram; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2014-05-01

    Although dentists perform highly technical procedures in complex environments, patient safety has not received the same focus in dentistry as in medicine. Cultivating a robust patient safety culture is foundational to minimizing patient harm, but little is known about how dental teams view patient safety or the patient safety culture within their practice. As a step toward rectifying that omission, the goals of this study were to benchmark the patient safety culture in three U.S. dental schools, identifying areas for improvement. The extensively validated Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (MOSOPS), developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, was administered to dental faculty, dental hygienists, dental students, and staff at the three schools. Forty-seven percent of the 328 invited individuals completed the survey. The "Teamwork" category received the highest marks and "Patient Care Tracking and Follow-Up" and "Leadership Support for Patient Safety" the lowest. Only 48 percent of the respondents rated systems and processes in place to prevent/catch patient problems as good/excellent. All patient safety dimensions received lower marks than in medical practices. These findings and the inherent risk associated with dental procedures lead to the conclusion that dentistry in general, and academic dental clinics in particular, stands to benefit from an increased focus on patient safety. This first published use of the MOSOPS in a dental clinic setting highlights both clinical and educational priorities for improving the safety of care in dental school clinics. PMID:24789834

  6. FLUORIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN INDUSTRIALIZED BEVERAGES CONSUMED BY CHILDREN IN THE CITY OF BAURU, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, Carolina Simonetti; Ramires, Irene; Pessan, Juliano Pelim; Neves, Lucimara Teixeira das; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2007-01-01

    The increasing consumption of juices, soft drinks and teas among children has increased significantly fluoride ingestion at the age range of risk for development of dental fluorosis. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate fluoride concentrations in some brands of industrialized beverages consumed by children in the city of Bauru, SP, Brazil. Material and Methods: 98 brands of beverages were analyzed, divided into 3 lots, comprising 36, 32 and 30 brands, respectively, for the first, second and third lots. Fluoride concentrations were determined by HMDS-facilitated diffusion, using a fluoride ion-specific electrode (Orion 9409). Results: Fluoride concentrations ranged between 0.04 and 1.76 μg F/mL. It was observed a wide variation in fluoride concentrations among the different brands, as well as the different lots of the same brand. There was no information on fluoride concentrations on the labels of any product. Conclusions: Some of the products analyzed could contribute significantly to the total fluoride intake and, thus, be important risk factors for development of dental fluorosis, which indicates the need of controlling the production of these beverages with respect to fluoride concentration. PMID:19089131

  7. Financial management and dental school strength, Part I: Strategy.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W; Bergstrom, Roy

    2004-04-01

    The ultimate goal of financial management in a dental school is to accumulate assets that are available for strategic growth, which is a parallel objective to the profit motive in business. Budget development is often grounded in an income statement framework where the goal is to match revenues and expenses. Only when a balance sheet perspective (assets = liabilities + equity) is adopted can strategic growth be fully addressed. Four views of budgeting are presented in this article: 1) covering expenses, 2) shopping, 3) strategic support, and 4) budgeting as strategy. These perceptions of the budgeting process form a continuum, moving from a weak strategic position (covering expenses) to a strong one (budgeting as strategy) that encourages the accumulation of assets that build equity in the organization. PMID:15112920

  8. Responsibility for Teaching Pain Control in U.S. Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter B.; Campbell, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    A national survey of 53 dental schools found most were not interested in developing a separate division or department of dental anesthesiology. Of those with a dentist anesthesiologist responsible for teaching pain control, all have or favor such a division. Less than one-third employ professionals limiting their practice to anesthesiology. (MSE)

  9. U.S. Dental School Applicants and Enrollees, 2014 Entering Class.

    PubMed

    Wanchek, Tanya; Cook, Bryan J; Anderson, Eugene L; Duranleau, Lauren; Booker, Carolyn

    2015-11-01

    This report analyzes data collected annually by the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) on the characteristics of applicants to and first-year enrollees in dental schools. Among the key findings this year are that, since 2010, there has been a gradual decline in the number of individuals taking the Dental Admission Test (DAT), while the number applying to dental schools has remained relatively flat. During the same five-year time period, the number of first-year dental students has continuously increased. The result is an increasing rate of enrollment among applicants. While the overwhelming majority of dental schools utilize some aspect of a holistic admissions process, the DAT scores and grade point averages of applicants and enrollees continue to rise. Unlike a decade ago, women now account for nearly half of all applicants and enrollees. At least part of the gain has come from a decline in the number of men applicants, rather than a change in the enrollment rate. Among underrepresented minorities, there remains a relatively low number of applicants and a lower than average enrollment rate. Overall, by analyzing data about individuals applying to and matriculating in dental schools, this report provides a window into the future dental workforce. PMID:26829823

  10. An Evaluation of the School-Based Dental Disease Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Legislature, Sacramento. Office of the Legislative Analyst.

    This report analyzes the effect of the California Dental Disease Prevention Program (DDPP). The program includes education about dental health and nutrition, daily toothbrushing and flossing, and weekly application of a fluoride mouthrinse. The DDPP serves approximately 350,000 elementary school children. The implementation of the DDPP is…

  11. Qualitative Analysis of Organizational Change in One U.S. Dental School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain, Geralyn Dell

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is need for change in the way that dental schools in the United States educate their students to keep pace with the rapidly changing nature of the profession and to better address societal needs. Despite a well-documented change agenda put forth by individual authors and agencies both within and outside of dental education,…

  12. American Association of Dental Schools 1998-99 Annual Proceedings (March 6, 1998-March 10, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1999

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings of the annual meeting of the American Association of Dental Schools include the president's annual report, president-elect's and executive director's addresses, a summary of proceedings, the revised constitution, a list of competencies for entry into the dental hygiene profession, association bylaws, member administrators,…

  13. Prevalence of Dental Caries among School Children in Chennai, Based on ICDAS II

    PubMed Central

    Arangannal, Ponnudurai; Jayaprakash, Jeevarathan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental caries is a common dental disease, which occurs during childhood and continues to be a major public health problem. The prevalence of dental caries was associated with oral hygiene practice, sugar consumption and implementation of the preventive oral health program. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental caries in school children aged between 6-14 years using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS II). Materials and Methods The study population consisted of 2796 school children living in Pallikkaranai, Chennai, India and studying in government recognized schools. Each student was examined by a single examiner using ICDAS system under natural light during normal school hours. Results The prevalence of dental caries was 68.8% in the total surveyed population. The gender-wise prevalence of dental caries shows, females to have slightly higher prevalence than male. The prevalence of dental caries at the age group of 6 years was 57%, seven year 67%, eight year 63%, nine year 74%, 10 year 76%, 11 year 74%, 12 year 69%, 13 year 71%, and 14 year 69%. The distribution of CARS (Caries associated with Sealants and Restorations) in the surveyed population was only 1.4% Conclusion The distribution of non-cavitated/early enamel lesions was higher in the studied population and indicated a requirement of a sustained dental health preventive program targeting specific segments of the population. PMID:27190939

  14. Dental pain, oral impacts and perceived need for dental treatment in Tanzanian school students: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mashoto, Kijakazi O; Åstrøm, Anne N; David, Jamil; Masalu, Joyce R

    2009-01-01

    Background Dental caries, dental pain and reported oral problems influence people's oral quality of life and thus their perceived need for dental care. So far there is scant information as to the psychosocial impacts of dental diseases and the perceived treatment need in child populations of sub-Saharan Africa. Objectives Focusing on primary school students in Kilwa, Tanzania, a district deprived of dental services and with low fluoride concentration in drinking water, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of dental pain and oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP), and to describe the distribution of OIDP by socio-demographics, dental caries, dental pain and reported oral problems. The relationship of perceived need estimates with OIDP was also investigated. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008. A total of 1745 students (mean age 13.8 yr, sd = 1.67) completed an extensive personal interview and under-went clinical examination. The impacts on daily performances were assessed using a Kiswahili version of the Child-OIDP instrument and caries experience was recorded using WHO (1997) criteria. Results A total of 36.2% (41.3% urban and 31.4% rural, p < 0.001) reported at least one OIDP. The prevalence of dental caries was 17.4%, dental pain 36.4%, oral problems 54.1% and perceived need for dental treatment 46.8% in urban students. Corresponding estimates in rural students were 20.8%, 24.4%, 43.3% and 43.8%. Adjusted OR for reporting oral impacts if having dental pain ranged from 2.5 (95% CI 1.8–3.6) (problem smiling) to 4.7 (95% CI 3.4–6.5) (problem sleeping),- if having oral problems, from 1.9 (95% CI 1.3–2.6) (problem sleeping) to 3.8 (95% CI 2.7–5.2) (problem eating) and if having dental caries from 1.5 (95% CI 1.1–2.0) (problem eating) to 2.2 (95% CI 1.5–2.9) (problem sleeping). Students who perceived need for dental care were less likely to be females (OR = 0.8, 95% CI 0.6–0.9) and more likely to have impacts on eating (OR = 1

  15. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Practice Management and for Preventive Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools for use by individual educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. The guidelines were developed by the Sections on Community and Preventive Dentistry and Practice Administration. (MLW)

  16. Perspectives on the dental school learning environment: theory X, theory Y, and situational leadership applied to dental education.

    PubMed

    Connor, Joseph P; Troendle, Karen

    2007-08-01

    This article applies two well-known management and leadership models-Theory X and Theory Y, and Situational Leadership-to dental education. Theory X and Theory Y explain how assumptions may shape the behaviors of dental educators and lead to the development of "cop" and "coach" teaching styles. The Situational Leadership Model helps the educator to identify the teaching behaviors that are appropriate in a given situation to assist students as they move from beginner to advanced status. Together, these models provide a conceptual reference to assist in the understanding of the behaviors of both students and faculty and remind us to apply discretion in the education of our students. The implications of these models for assessing and enhancing the educational environment in dental school are discussed. PMID:17687079

  17. Teaching the placement of posterior resin-based composite restorations in Spanish dental schools

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Christopher; McConnell, Robert; Wilson, Nairn

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: In an area of esthetic dentistry such as posterior composites, in which new materials and techniques are being devolved continuously, it is important to confirm that dental students have a clear understanding of the basic principles of clinical application of this knowledge. Considering that the preparation of dental graduates in Spain may be of interest to competent dental authorities and employers with whom they can work worldwide, this study investigated the teaching of posterior composite restorations in Spanish dental schools. Study design: In late 2009⁄ early 2010, a questionnaire seeking information on the teaching of posterior composites was emailed to the professor responsible for teaching operative dentistry in each of the fifteen dental schools having complete undergraduate dental degree programs in Spain. Results: The response rate was 100%. Most investigated topics did not show noteworthy differences depending on whether the schools were public or private. Variations were found among Spanish dental schools in both the amount and content of the teaching programs concerning posterior composite restorations. Differences were recorded in the teaching of cavity design, contraindications to composite placement, indications for liners and bases, matrix and wedging techniques, composite and bonding systems, light curing and finishing procedures for composite restorations. More consistency was observed in teaching methods of moisture-control, indirect composites and amalgam bonding. Conclusions: As recommended in previously surveyed countries, efforts must be made to promote harmonization of dental curricula to make it easier for graduates to work elsewhere, and to ensure they meet the needs of their patients on entering independent practice. Key words:Aesthetic dentistry, composite restoration, dental education, teaching program, undergraduate dental student. PMID:22322491

  18. Widespread Legionella pneumophila contamination of dental stations in a dental school without apparent human infection.

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheim, B. A.; Sefton, A. M.; Gill, O. N.; Tyler, J. E.; O'Mahony, M. C.; Richards, J. M.; Dennis, P. J.; Harrison, T. G.

    1987-01-01

    Following isolation of Legionella pneumophila from a special dental station water circuit, used primarily to cool high-speed dental drills which produce fine aerosols, a case finding and environmental survey was undertaken. Widespread colonization of the dental stations was found and the results suggested that amplification of the background levels of L. pneumophila was taking place within the stations. However there was no evidence for transmission causing human infection. PMID:3609170

  19. Metabolic Syndrome, Lifestyle, and Dental Caries in Japanese School Children.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Hiroya; Sugihara, Naoki; Ukiya, Tokuko; Ishizuka, Yoichi; Birkhed, Dowen; Hasegawa, Masaru; Matsukubo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The number of children with Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) has recently been increasing in Japan. Few studies have investigated the relationship between MetS and oral health. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between MetS, lifestyle, and oral health status in school children. Our goal is to utilize these results in health education aimed at preventing the onset of MetS in school children and adults. A total of 689 Japanese children (365 boys and 324 girls) aged between 10 and 13 years were examined and waist circumference (WC), ratio of WC to height, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar (FBS), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglyceride values determined together with oral health status, including dental caries experience (DMFT). The results revealed that 6.5% of the children fell under the health board recognized "MetS or high risk of MetS" (MetS/HR) classification. A total of 140 (20%) children had a high Streptococcus mutans count. The mean WC, FBS, and DMFT values were significantly greater in children with a high salivary S. mutans count (p<0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed a statistically significance association between MetS/HR, non-breakfast eaters (odds ratio (OR): 2.70), no regular exercise (OR: 2.60), and a high salivary S. mutans count (≥10(5) CFU/ml; OR: 2.18; p<0.05). The present results indicate that lifestyle and salivary S. mutans count could be useful in screening children for MetS/HR. These variables may be useful in targeting interventions aimed at preventing MetS in school children. PMID:26657522

  20. Patient satisfaction surveys in dental school clinics: a review and comparison.

    PubMed

    Ebn Ahmady, Arezoo; Pakkhesal, Mina; Zafarmand, A Hamid; Lando, Harry Alan

    2015-04-01

    Health care is becoming more patient-centered and, as a result, patients' experiences of care and assessment of satisfaction are taken more seriously. Patient satisfaction influences treatment cooperation, and better cooperation leads to healthier patients in the long term. This generalization clearly applies in the dental school clinic setting. Furthermore, dental school clinics' administrators and clinicians should know about the dimensions of their patient satisfaction in order to provide the highest quality of care. The aim of this study was to review studies published between 1980 and March 2014 to identify the dimensions used to measure patients' satisfaction when they receive services in dental school clinics. The PubMed database was used to access published studies using patient satisfaction surveys in dental school clinics, and the dimensions used in these surveys were then categorized. Through several stages of searching in PubMed, the authors selected 41 articles from a total of 730; after further critical appraisal, nine articles were retained. Five dimensions included in patient surveys were identified: quality, interaction, access, environment, and cost. Determining the dimensions used in patient satisfaction surveys in dental school clinics can assist academic dental institutions in providing the highest quality of care. PMID:25838009

  1. [Occurence of dental plaque among Norwegian children with systematic school dental care. A method for identification of patients with special need for dental plaque control].

    PubMed

    Jorkjend, L

    1975-02-01

    The prevalence of dental plaque was assessed in 1534 school children 7-12 years old in Porsgrunn, Norway. Only the first molars and the incisors were examined. In each child 48 scorings were carried out by the Plaque Index (Pl I) (Silness & Löe 1964). The frequencies of Pl I score 0, 1 and 2 were calculated per individual, school class and school. Score 0 expresses an optimal situation whereas score 2 is assumed to indicate the need for treatment. These features have been visualized, and the distribution pattern seems to be suitable for dental public health workers. Mean Pl I was 1.50. Score 3 was not observed. 55% of the tooth surfaces was covered with dental plaque corresponding to score 2, whereas score 1 was observed in 40%. Children with score 0 on all tooth surfaces were not registered. Great variation in plaque prevalence was found between the school classes. The 6. grade (aged 12 years) children showed the best condition. PMID:1056591

  2. Knowledge and perception of oral health promotion in schools among dental nurses in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chen, C J; Jallaludin, R L

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of a Health-Promoting School has received much interest. In Malaysia, dental nurses are ideally placed to play a lead role in promoting Oral Health within the school setting. This study aims to provide information on the knowledge, perception and perceived role of Oral Health Promotion in schools, among dental nurses. A postal questionnaire was used to measure dental nurses' knowledge, perception and perceived role of Oral Health Promotion. The majority (60%) of dental nurses had good knowledge of Oral Health Promotion. Generally, they perceived that they play an important role in promoting Oral Health in schools. However, a sizeable proportion (25%) did not think they had a role to play in working together with school authorities to provide children with healthy food choices in school canteens. The majority (60%) of dental nurses did not perceive Oral Health Promotion to be important as a whole. They had a good perception of the concepts: it supports behaviour change, it has appropriate goals, it integrates oral health and general health and relieves anxiety. However, they had a poorer perception of the concepts; diverse educational approaches, participation, focus on prevention, early intervention, "spread of effect" of dental health education and "make healthier choices the easier choices". Years of service was not significantly associated with knowledge and perception of Oral Health Promotion. Dental nurses should be reoriented towards a more holistic practice of Oral Health Promotion. Workshops that invite active participation from dental nurses should be conducted to equip them with the necessary knowledge and skills. PMID:11200211

  3. Evolution and palaeoenvironment of the Bauru Basin (Upper Cretaceous, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Luiz Alberto; Magalhães Ribeiro, Claudia Maria

    2015-08-01

    The Bauru Basin was one of the great Cretaceous desert basins of the world, evolved in arid zone called Southern Hot Arid Belt. Its paleobiological record consists mainly of dinosaurs, crocodiles and turtles. The Bauru Basin is an extensive region of the South American continent that includes parts of the southeast and south of Brazil, covering an area of 370,000 km2. It is an interior continental basin that developed as a result of subsidence of the central-southern part of the South-American Platform during the Late Cretaceous (Coniacian-Maastrichtian). This sag basin is filled by a sandy siliciclastic sequence with a preserved maximum thickness of 480 m, deposited in semiarid to desert conditions. Its basement consists of volcanic rocks (mainly basalts) of the Lower Cretaceous (Hauterivian) Serra Geral basalt flows, of the Paraná-Etendeka Continental Flood Basalt Province. The sag basin was filled by an essentially siliciclastic psammitic sequence. In lithostratigraphic terms the sequence consists of the Caiuá and Bauru groups. The northern and northeastern edges of the basin provide a record of more proximal original deposits, such as associations of conglomeratic sand facies from alluvial fans, lakes, and intertwined distributary river systems. The progressive basin filling led to the burial of the basaltic substrate by extensive blanket sand sheets, associated with deposits of small dunes and small shallow lakes that retained mud (such as loess). Also in this intermediate context between the edges (more humid) and the interior (dry), wide sand sheet areas crossed by unconfined desert rivers (wadis) occurred. In the central axis of the elliptical basin a regional drainage system formed, flowing from northeast to southwest between the edges of the basin and the hot and dry inner periphery of the Caiuá desert (southwest). Life in the Bauru Basin flourished most in the areas with the greatest water availability, in which dinosaurs, crocodiles, turtles, fish

  4. Penalties for academic dishonesty in a Greek dental school environment.

    PubMed

    Koletsi-Kounari, Haroula; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Reppa, Christina; Teplitsky, Paul E

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the opinions of the faculty and students of the University of Athens Dental School in Greece regarding the appropriate penalty for specific academic offenses. In addition, faculty and student opinions were compared. A questionnaire was distributed to officially registered seniors and full-time faculty members, and 177 individuals responded anonymously and voluntarily. The respondents were asked to select one from a set of nine penalties for each of fifteen hypothetical academic offenses and three cases with extenuating circumstances. Non-parametric Mann-Whitney U tests and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test, depending on the nature of variables, were used to detect significant differences in penalty scores between faculty and students. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. The penalty scores for the fifteen offenses ranged from a mean of 2.23±1.55 to 7.25±2.64. Faculty respondents gave more severe penalties than students did for all offenses, and the finding was statistically significant (p<0.05) for eleven of the fifteen offenses. Where extenuating circumstances were added, the penalty selection altered in two of the three cases. A significantly more lenient penalty was selected by both faculty and students in these two cases. The results of this study suggest that faculty members are harsher than students for the same offenses and that extenuating circumstances can sometimes significantly change recommended penalties. PMID:22012783

  5. The teaching of temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain at undergraduate level in Brazilian dental schools

    PubMed Central

    SIMM, Wagner; GUIMARÃES, Antônio Sérgio

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate the way the topics for the study of pain mechanisms in general, and Orofacial Pain (OFP) and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) more specifically, are addressed in undergraduate courses curricula, and also to verify the existence of specialist OFP/TMD teachers in Brazilian dental schools. Methods Between July 2010 and January 2011, course Coordinators/Directors of all dental schools duly registered at the Ministry of Education were invited to answer a questionnaire on topics related to OFP/TMD teaching in their institutions. Results Fifty-three dental schools representatives answered the questionnaire. The study of pain mechanisms was found to cover an average of less than 10% of the courses' total time. Pharmacology, Endodontics and Physiology were identified as the departments usually responsible for addressing pain mechanisms in dental courses. Psychosocial aspects were found to occupy a very small proportion in the syllabi, while most of the content referred to biological or somatic aspects. OFP/TMD is addressed by a specific department in only 28.4% of the participating dental schools, while in most cases (46.3%), OFP/TMD is under the responsibility of the Prosthodontics department. Only 38.5% of respondents indicated that they had a specialist OFP/TMD teacher in their Schools. Conclusion Among the Brazilian dental schools participating in the study, the teaching of OFP/TMD was found to be insufficient, segmented or with an extremely restricted focus. This initial assessment indicates that Curricular Guidelines for the study of OFP/TMD at undergraduate dental schools should be developed and implemented to facilitate their appropriate inclusion into the curricula and in specific pedagogical projects. PMID:24473717

  6. [Dynamics of tooth decay prevalence in children receiving long-term preventive program in school dental facilities].

    PubMed

    Avraamova, O G; Kulazhenko, T V; Gabitova, K F

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the assessment of tooth decay prevalence in clinically homogenous groups of children receiving long-term preventive program (PP) in school dental facilities. Five-years PP were introduced in clinical practice in 2 Moscow schools. Preventive treatment was performed by dental hygienist. The results show that systematic preventive treatment in school dental offices starting from elementary school allows reducing dental caries incidence 46-53% and stabilize the incidence of caries complications. It should be mentioned though that analysis of individualized outcomes proves heterogeneity of study results despite of equal conditions of PP. Potentially significant hence is early diagnostics and treatment of initial caries forms as demineralization foci, especially in children with intensive tooth decay. Optimization of pediatric dentist and dental hygienist activity in school dental facilities is the main factor of caries prevention efficiency. PMID:27239995

  7. Complementary and alternative medicine in predoctoral dental curricula: an exploratory survey of U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Spector, Michael L; Kummet, Colleen M; Holmes, David C

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) education in U.S. dental schools. A survey was administered via e-mail to each U.S. dental school's academic dean, and data were collected from respondents in a fillable PDF form submitted electronically to the study investigators. The survey asked respondents whether CAM was taught at the institution; if the response was yes, information was requested regarding the CAM therapies included, credentials of the instructor, number of hours taught, reason for teaching CAM, and format in which CAM was taught. Of the sixty dental schools contacted, twenty-two responded to the survey (37 percent response rate). Of these respondents, ten (45.5 percent) reported offering instruction in CAM as part of their predoctoral curricula. Herb/drug interactions were found to be taught with more frequency than any other CAM topic (in six out of the ten institutions). Limitations of the study are discussed, and suggestions for future studies are made. PMID:24319132

  8. Community-based dental programs: University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Dental School.

    PubMed

    Cinotti, W R; Saporito, R A; Feldman, C A; Mardirossian, G; DeCastro, J

    1999-12-01

    The dental school plans to incorporate CODE into the curriculum so that more students have community-based dental educational experiences. Future plans also include increasing standardization of reports, clinical and administrative procedures, resources, and processes across the sites in order to lower managerial overhead. This process will be aided by further enhancement of computerized information systems and electronic links. The major lesson learned is that new extramural programs can be created and sustained by pooling school resources with those from the private and public sectors. Funding sources and opportunities available to one party alone are insufficient. While one-time funding was used to build and furnish the NJDS extramural sites, the clinics were established only after business plans demonstrated the availability of funds to sustain their operations. The Statewide Network of Community Oral Health Care and CODE models are still evolving, but they are replicable not only in dental education but in other types of health services. The details of the partnerships and funding streams will vary from site to site, but through outreach and careful negotiation with potential partners and detailed contracts, the community service and educational missions of a health professions school can have a successful outcome. PMID:10650426

  9. Relationship between hand-skill exercises and other admissions criteria and students' performance in dental school.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L; Cheramie, Toby

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of correlations between dental admissions criteria, including a chalk carving exercise, and students' subsequent academic performance. The retrospective cohort study examined the records of dental students at Louisiana State University Health Science Center School of Dentistry for the years 1998 to 2008. Only those students who could be categorized into the following four groups were included: 1) those who graduated in the top 10% of their class, 2) those who graduated in the bottom 10% of their class, 3) those who repeated a year of dental school, and 4) those who were dismissed or resigned. The study sample consisted of 176 students: 62 in the first group, 62 in the second group, 25 in the third group, and 27 in the fourth group. Data collected were each student's undergraduate grade point average (GPA); chalk carving score; undergraduate biology, chemistry, physics (BCP) GPA; Dental Admission Test (DAT) Academic Average; Perceptual Ability Test (PAT) score of the DAT; total DAT score; grade in preclinical operative dentistry class; grade in morphology and occlusion class; and dental school GPA at graduation. The results showed that only the undergraduate GPA and BCP GPA were significantly higher for students in the top 10% of their class than for other groups. The only positive correlation involving the chalk carving scores was with the preclinical operative dentistry course grade. This study thus found limited correlations between this institution's admissions criteria and its students' success in dental school. PMID:25941149

  10. Dental school vacant budgeted faculty positions, academic years 2005-06 and 2006-07.

    PubMed

    Chmar, Jacqueline E; Weaver, Richard G; Valachovic, Richard W

    2008-03-01

    The annual turnover of dental school faculty creates a varying number of vacant budgeted positions at any given time. The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) conducts an annual survey to determine the status and characteristics of these vacant faculty positions. In addition, ADEA conducts an annual survey of dental educators to maintain a database on the size and characteristics of dental school faculty, including data on the distribution of full-time, part-time, and volunteer faculty, reasons for faculty separations, and sources of new faculty. The number of vacant budgeted faculty positions within U.S. dental schools increased throughout the 1990s, with a peak of 358 positions in 2000. Following this peak, the number of vacancies declined, falling to 275 in 2004-05. Since that time, there has been a rapid increase in the number of estimated vacancies, reaching 417 in 2005-06, then falling slightly to 406 in 2006-07. The 2005-06 and 2006-07 faculty vacancies surveys explore these increases, along with information relevant to trends in the faculty workforce, factors influencing faculty vacancies, and the impact of vacant positions on dental schools. PMID:18383641

  11. Dental education about patients with special needs: a survey of U.S. and Canadian dental schools.

    PubMed

    Krause, Meggan; Vainio, Lauren; Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel; Inglehart, Marita R

    2010-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore how U.S. and Canadian dental schools educate students about special needs patients and which challenges and intentions for curricular changes they perceive. Data were collected from twenty-two dental schools in the United States and Canada with a web-based survey. While 91 percent of the programs covered this topic in their clinical education, only 64 percent offered a separate course about special needs patients. The clinical education varied widely. Thirty-seven percent of the responding schools had a special clinical area in their school for treating these patients. These areas had between three and twenty-two chairs and were funded and staffed quite differently. Most programs covered the treatment of patients with more prevalent impairments such as Down syndrome (91 percent), autism spectrum disorders (91 percent), and motion impairments (86 percent). Written exams were the most common outcome assessments (91 percent), while objective structured clinical examinations (18 percent) and standardized patient experiences (9 percent) were used less frequently. The most commonly reported challenge was curriculum overload (55 percent). The majority (77 percent) planned educational changes over the next three years, with 36 percent of schools planning to increase clinical and 27 percent extramural experiences. The findings showed that the responding U.S. and Canadian dental schools had a wide range of approaches to educating predoctoral students about treating special needs patients. In order to eliminate oral health disparities and access to care issues for these patients, future research should focus on developing best practices for educational efforts in this context. PMID:21045222

  12. Recruiting underrepresented minority and low-income high school students into dentistry while educating dental and dental hygiene students about academic careers.

    PubMed

    Inglehart, Marita R; Stefanac, Stephen J; Johnson, Kimberly P; Gwozdek, Anne E; May, Kenneth B; Piskorowski, William; Woolfolk, Marilyn W

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of this project were to create a program that would expose underrepresented minority (URM) and low income (LI) high school students to dental professions and provide an opportunity for dental and dental hygiene students from URM/LI groups to be engaged in teaching activities. Data were collected from participants during the school years 2009-10 (high school students: N=23, dental students: N=21, dental hygiene students: N=5) and 2010-11 (N=27, N=11, N=3, respectively). The students participated in fifteen Saturday sessions from October through March each year. The data showed that, from the beginning, mentees and mentors were very interested in participating in the program and getting to know each other. Lectures, general program activities, and patient-related events such as organizing a health fair and shadowing during two outreach clinics were evaluated positively by mentees and mentors. The end of program evaluations showed that the program and the mentee-mentor relationships were rated very positively and that the mentees had an increased interest in oral health-related careers. In conclusion, creating opportunities for URM/LI high school students to explore dental careers and for dental and dental hygiene students to engage in teaching resulted in positive experiences for both groups. PMID:24609344

  13. The Cost and Effectiveness of School-Based Preventive Dental Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Stephen P.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The cost and effectiveness of various types and combinations of school-based preventive dental care procedures were assessed in the National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program, a four-year study involving more than 20,000 students, from ten schools nationwide. Communal water fluoridation was reaffirmed as the most cost-effective means of…

  14. An assessment of cross-cultural education in U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Linda; Kuthy, Raymond A; Chalkley, Yvonne; Mescher, Kay M

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the status of cross-cultural education in U.S. dental schools and to identify characteristics associated with having a formal cross-cultural curriculum. An eighteen-item survey, which included questions about curricular format, teaching and evaluation methods, time, and course content, was sent to all U.S. dental schools. Comparisons were made using whether or not institutions had formal cross-cultural curricula. Forty-five of fifty-six schools responded. Twenty-nine schools reported having formal cross-cultural curricula in a separate course and/or integrated with other courses with specific goals and objectives. Schools that have formal cross-cultural curricula had higher scores on depth of curricula and spent more time than schools that reported having informal curricula (p=0.03). Competing curricular time and lack of faculty expertise were the most frequently cited impeding factors for inclusion of cross-cultural issues (87.8 percent and 68.3 percent, respectively), while diverse patient population and leadership commitment were the most frequently cited facilitating factors (92.5 percent and 67.5 percent, respectively). There is wide variation among dental schools regarding how they teach these issues and how students are evaluated. Dental schools lack guidance about how to best incorporate this curricular content. PMID:16741129

  15. Quality Assurance and Risk Management: A Survey of Dental Schools and Recommendations for Integrated Program Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredekind, Richard E.; Cuny, Eve J.; Nadershahi, Nader A.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed U.S. and Canadian dental schools about integration of quality assurance (QA) and risk management (RM) and what mechanisms have been most effective in measuring accomplishments. Main findings included that a majority of schools had a written QA program and committee and many reported significant changes resulting from the program; over…

  16. A Nine Year Follow-Up Survey of Medical Emergency Education in Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Morris S.; Fryer, George E., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 51 dental schools found that 39% offered a separate course for medical emergency instruction, findings similar to those of a 1983 survey. Most schools provide at least 10 hours of instruction in medical emergencies, more than were found in the earlier study. Related policy is better delineated, but routine measurement of vital signs…

  17. Genre Analysis of Personal Statements: Analysis of Moves in Application Essays to Medical and Dental Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Huiling

    2007-01-01

    Despite the important role the personal statement plays in the graduate school application processes, little research has been done on its functional features and little instruction has been given about it in academic writing courses. The author conducted a multi-level discourse analysis on a corpus of 30 medical/dental school application letters,…

  18. American Association for Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy (General and Oral).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susi, Frank; Mundell, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Anatomical Sciences of the American Association for Dental Schools are presented. These guidelines were drawn up as an effort to provide a general criterion-referenced standard against which a school can measure its course content in histology. (MLW)

  19. A Successful Hepatitis B Vaccination Program in a Dental School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, David; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A carefully controlled hepatitis B immunization program among the University of Pittsburgh's dental students and faculty resulted in 96 percent of tested recipients having positive protective antibody titers. A direct relationship between age and positive titers emerged, supporting vaccination early in the dental career. (MSE)

  20. Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and Dental School Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anne C.; Courts, Frank J.; Sandow, Pamela L.; Watson, Ronald E.

    1997-01-01

    A study, using Myers-Briggs Type Indicators, of 256 dental students in four classes found introverted students performed better on the National Dental Board Examinations but had progressively lower class rank over four years and experienced more major academic difficulties. Judging and sensing students had higher rank than perceiving and intuitive…

  1. Dental School Vacant Budgeted Faculty Positions, Academic Years 2011-12 Through 2013-14.

    PubMed

    Wanchek, Tanya; Cook, Bryan J; Anderson, Eugene L; Duranleau, Lauren; Valachovic, Richard W

    2015-10-01

    The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Survey of Dental School Faculty is conducted annually to provide an overview of the hiring and retention activity of U.S. dental school faculty. The survey collects data on the dental faculty workforce, including vacant budgeted positions by appointment and discipline, number of new and lost positions, sources of new hires, and reasons for faculty separations. This report highlights the results of three years of survey data, from the 2011-12 academic year through the 2013-14 academic year. After declining in previous years, the number of vacant faculty positions in U.S. dental schools has begun to increase, rising to 242 full-time and 55 part-time positions in 2013-14. Additionally, the number of schools having more than ten vacancies increased from five to 12. Although the number of vacancies has increased, the length of faculty searches that took more than one year declined from 25% to 16% in the same period. Retirements as a share of full-time faculty separations increased from 14% in 2008-09 to 31% in 2013-14. The current average retirement age of dental school faculty members is 69.7 years. The percentage of full-time faculty members leaving for the private sector remained constant over the last three years at approximately 16%. Full-time faculty members were more likely to be recruited from other dental schools, while part-time faculty members were more likely to come from the private sector. PMID:26702464

  2. Factors influencing patients seeking oral health care in the oncology dental support clinic at an urban university dental school setting.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Dale M; Walker, Mary P; Liu, Ying; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors and/or factors associated with medically compromised patients seeking dental care in the oncology dental support clinic (ODSC) at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Dentistry. An 18-item survey was mailed to 2,541 patients who were new patients to the clinic from 2006 to 2011. The response rate was approximately 18% (n = 450). Analyses included descriptive statistics of percentages/frequencies as well as predictors based on correlations. Fifty percent of participants, 100 females and 119 males, identified their primary medical diagnosis as cancer. Total household income (p < .001) and the importance of receiving dental care (p < .001) were significant factors in relation to self-rated dental health. Perceived overall health (p < .001) also had a significant association with cancer status and the need for organ transplants. This study provided the ODSC at UMKC and other specialty clinics with vital information that can contribute to future planning efforts. PMID:24712504

  3. The association of patients' oral health literacy and dental school communication tools: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tam, Amy; Yue, Olivia; Atchison, Kathryn A; Richards, Jessica K; Holtzman, Jennifer S

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess adult patients' ability to read and understand two communication tools at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry: the dental school clinic website and a patient education brochure pertaining to sedation in children that was written by dental school personnel. A convenience sample of 100 adults seeking treatment at the school's general dental clinic during 2012-13 completed a health literacy screening instrument. They were then asked to read clinic educational and informational materials and complete a survey. Analyses were conducted to determine the association between the subjects' oral health literacy and sociodemographics and their ability to locate and interpret information in written oral health information materials. SMOG and Flesch-Kincade formulas were used to assess the readability level of the electronic and written communication tools. The results demonstrated an association between these adults' oral health literacy and their dental knowledge and ability to navigate health information website resources and understand health education materials. Health literacy was not associated with age or gender, but was associated with education and race/ethnicity. The SMOG Readability Index determined that the website and the sedation form were written at a ninth grade reading level. These results suggest that dental schools and other health care organizations should incorporate a health-literate approach for their digital and written materials to enhance patients' ability to navigate and understand health information, regardless of their health literacy. PMID:25941146

  4. Current trends in community-based clinical teaching programs in U.K.and Ireland dental schools.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Christopher D; Ash, Peter J; Chadwick, Barbara L

    2013-05-01

    Community-based clinical teaching/outreach programs using a variety of approaches have been established in many predoctoral dental schools around the world. The aim of this article is to report current trends in the teaching of community-based clinical teaching/outreach teaching in dental schools in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In late 2010-early 2011, a questionnaire was distributed by e-mail to deans of the eighteen established dental schools in the United Kingdom and Ireland. The questionnaire included both open and closed questions relating to current and anticipated trends in community-based clinical teaching. Fourteen responses were received (response rate=78 percent). All fourteen responding schools reported inclusion of a community-based clinical teaching program. Ten schools indicated that their program was based on total patient (comprehensive) care including the treatment of child patients. In nine schools, the program is directed by a senior clinical academic in restorative dentistry. As well as student dentists, ten schools and seven schools include teaching of student dental therapists and student dental hygienists, respectively. There is a varied experience within the schools surveyed in terms of the extent, nature, and content of these programs. Overall, however, community-based clinical teaching was seen as part of the future of dental school education in many schools as an ideal way of preparing graduates for Dental Foundation Training and subsequent independent practice. PMID:23658406

  5. Exponential growth of dental schools in Chile: effects on academic, economic and workforce issues.

    PubMed

    Cartes-Velásquez, Ricardo Andrés

    2013-01-01

    In the last 30 years, Chile has undergone noteworthy economic development and an exponential growth in the access of its population to higher education. The aim of this paper was to review the changes in academic, economic and workforce issues that occurred as a consequence of the growth in supply of undergraduate dental vacancies between 1997 and 2011. Data collected from the Consejo de Educación Superior - CES, Comisión Nacional de Acreditación - CNA, and Instituto Nacional de Estadísticas de Chile - INE included these variables: number of dental schools, school type (private or traditional, see explanation below), city where the school is located, entry vacancies, total student enrollment, admission scores, percentile rank of dentistry as a university career, tuition fees, accreditation status, and number of inhabitants. There was an exponential increase in dental schools in Chile (5 to 34) that occurred in association with the rise in tuition fees (US$ 3900 to US$ 9800), a deterioration in the academic level of dental students (650 to 550 points in admission scores) and a predicted 77.5% oversupply of dentists by 2025, according to WHO criteria. The exponential increase in dental schools in Chile brought about negative consequences, such as increasing career costs, deterioration in the academic level of dental students, and an oversupply of dentists, associated with lower incomes and possibly leading to unemployment. Additional research should be conducted to determine whether an increase in the number of dentists can improve the population's access to dental care and reduce the oral disease burden. PMID:24346044

  6. The role of the dental school environment in promoting greater student diversity.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Darryl D; Graham, Bruce S

    2010-10-01

    This chapter describes the strategies implemented by one dental school during the past decade to establish an environment that supports a culture of diversity. The school audited its initial diversity milieu, authored a strategic plan for diversity, fully participated in university-wide diversity initiatives, and created an administrative infrastructure for underrepresented minority (URM) student support. Mentoring and counseling programs were established for URM students, and a schoolwide diversity committee was formed to make cultural competence a high priority for all students, faculty, and staff. URM faculty members were recruited and retained through a minority faculty development program. Student professional organizations were established and supported by mentoring partnerships with members of the corresponding organizations in the practicing community. The school's diversity culture is continuously evaluated and nurtured within the context of evolving human interactions in society, dental education, and dental practice. PMID:20930235

  7. Brazilian primary school teachers' knowledge about immediate management of dental trauma

    PubMed Central

    Pithon, Matheus Melo; dos Santos, Rogério Lacerda; Magalhães, Pedro Henrique Bomfim; Coqueiro, Raildo da Silva

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the level of knowledge of primary school teachers in the public school network of Northeastern Brazil with respect to management of dental trauma and its relationship with prognosis. METHODS: A questionnaire was applied to 195 school teachers of public schools in Northeastern Brazil. The questionnaire comprised 12 objective questions about dental trauma and methods for its prevention and management. Data were submitted to chi-square test and Poisson regression test (P > 0.05). RESULTS: Out of the 141 teachers who responded the questionnaires, the majority were women (70.2%) and most of them had experienced previous dental accidents involving a child (53.2%). The majority (84.4%) had incomplete college education and few were given some training on how to deal with emergency situations during their undergraduate course (13.5%) or after it (38.3%). Their level of knowledge about dental trauma and emergency protocols showed that unsatisfactory knowledge level was associated with the male sex: 46% higher for men in comparison to women (P = 0.025). CONCLUSIONS: Approximately half of teachers evaluated had unsatisfactory knowledge about dental trauma and emergency protocols, with female teachers showing more knowledge than men. PMID:25715724

  8. Peer review of teaching in UK dental schools. Is it happening? How successful is it?

    PubMed

    Cunningham, I M; Lynch, C D

    2016-06-24

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the utilisation of peer review of teaching (PRT) within UK dental schools.Method A structured questionnaire was emailed to all sixteen UK dental schools seeking information on existing PRT schemes, level of staff engagement, and the success of schemes in relation to extent of operation and perceived benefit.Results A 100% response rate was achieved. Fourteen schools (88%) operate PRT schemes. For most, the expected frequency of staff engagement is annually, although there was a wide range between schools (minimum = once every five years, maximum = three times per year). Nine schools (64%) consider their schemes to be fully operational. Twelve schools (86%) feel their staff are either mostly or fully engaged. Reasons for sub-optimal operation and/or engagement include: newly introduced schemes, problems with compliance for off-campus staff, and loss of momentum. Thirteen schools (93%) consider that PRT benefits their teaching staff. Ten schools (71%) stated that changes are required to their schemes.Conclusion PRT is operating within the majority of U.K dental schools but the format and success of schemes varies. Schemes will benefit from ongoing development but changes should take into account evidence from the literature, particularly recognised models of PRT. PMID:27338908

  9. In the students' own words: what are the strengths and weaknesses of the dental school curriculum?

    PubMed

    Henzi, David; Davis, Elaine; Jasinevicius, Roma; Hendricson, William

    2007-05-01

    Dental students have little input into the selection of course topics and subject matter included in their dental curricula. Curriculum requirements are framed by the Commission on Dental Accreditation, which has stipulated competencies and associated biomedical and clinical knowledge that must be addressed during dental school. Although these competency requirements restrict the variance of educational experiences, students are eager to share their views on the curriculum within the realm of their educational experience. The objective of this research project was to elicit the perspectives of dental students from a broad cross-section of U.S. and Canadian dental schools about their education. A total of 605 students (285 sophomores, 220 seniors, 100 residents) from twenty North American dental schools completed a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis to communicate their perceptions of the curriculum. Students were also asked to provide their impressions of the overall quality of the educational program in an open-ended written format. The students' qualitative comments were then reviewed and categorized into key issues or themes. Resulting themes for each category of the Curriculum SWOT (C-SWOT) analysis were the following. Strengths: 1) clinical learning experience, and 2) opportunity to work with knowledgeable faculty. Weaknesses: 1) disorganized and inefficient clinical learning environment, 2) teaching and testing that focus on memorization, 3) poor quality instruction characterized by curricular disorganization, and 4) inconsistency among instructors during student evaluations. Opportunities: 1) develop strategies to provide students with more exposure to patients, especially early in the curriculum, and 2) opportunities to learn new technology/techniques. Threats: 1) cost of dental education, 2) students' concerns about faculty "brain drain," i.e., lack of sufficient numbers of dental faculty capable of providing high

  10. Dental Hygienists

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy, patient management, and periodontics, which is the study of gum disease. High school students interested in becoming dental hygienists should take courses in biology, chemistry, and math. Most dental hygiene programs also require applicants to have completed at ...

  11. Access to Interpreter Services at U.S. Dental School Clinics.

    PubMed

    Simon, Lisa; Hum, Lauren; Nalliah, Romesh

    2016-01-01

    The number of Americans with limited English proficiency (LEP) is growing, and legal protections mandate that LEP individuals have equal access to health care services. The aim of this study was to determine the availability of interpretation services in U.S. dental school clinics and the kinds of instruction dental students are given regarding treatment of LEP patients. A survey was distributed to the academic deans of all U.S. dental schools; 35 completed the survey for a response rate of 58%. Respondents were asked to report on the number of LEP patients treated in their student clinics, the resources available to students working with LEP patients, and the extent of instruction offered. Descriptive statistics were calculated. The results indicated that the proportion of LEP patients treated at U.S. dental schools was perceived to be higher than that of the general population. The availability of interpreter services and the extent of student education about LEP individuals varied widely. Among the responding schools, the most common language spoken by LEP patients was Spanish, followed by Chinese (Mandarin and Cantonese) and Russian. Most of the responding dental schools reported offering fewer than two hours of instruction to their predoctoral students on treating LEP patients. Although almost 90% of the respondents indicated believing LEP patients received care equal in quality to that of non-LEP patients in their clinics, only 61.9% indicated that their students were adequately prepared to manage LEP patients following graduation. These findings suggest that dental schools should consider curricular innovations that will prepare students to work with LEP populations and improve the ability of LEP patients to receive care in the teaching clinic setting. PMID:26729684

  12. Development of a Core Curriculum Framework in Cariology for U.S. Dental Schools.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Margherita; Guzmán-Armstrong, Sandra; Schenkel, Andrew B; Allen, Kennneth L; Featherstone, John; Goolsby, Susie; Kanjirath, Preetha; Kolker, Justine; Martignon, Stefania; Pitts, Nigel; Schulte, Andreas; Slayton, Rebecca L; Young, Douglas; Wolff, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of health and preservation of tooth structure through risk-based prevention and patient-centered, evidence-based disease management, reassessed at regular intervals over time, are the cornerstones of present-day caries management. Yet management of caries based on risk assessment that goes beyond restorative care has not had a strong place in curriculum development and competency assessment in U.S. dental schools. The aim of this study was to develop a competency-based core cariology curriculum framework for use in U.S. dental schools. The Section on Cariology of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) organized a one-day consensus workshop, followed by a meeting program, to adapt the European Core Cariology Curriculum to the needs of U.S. dental education. Participants in the workshop were 73 faculty members from 35 U.S., three Canadian, and four international dental schools. Representatives from all 65 U.S. dental schools were then invited to review and provide feedback on a draft document. A recommended competency statement on caries management was also developed: "Upon graduation, a dentist must be competent in evidence-based detection, diagnosis, risk assessment, prevention, and nonsurgical and surgical management of dental caries, both at the individual and community levels, and be able to reassess the outcomes of interventions over time." This competency statement supports a curriculum framework built around five domains: 1) knowledge base; 2) risk assessment, diagnosis, and synthesis; 3) treatment decision making: preventive strategies and nonsurgical management; 4) treatment decision making: surgical therapy; and 5) evidence-based cariology in clinical and public health practice. Each domain includes objectives and learning outcomes. PMID:27251353

  13. 20 Years Beyond the Crossroads: The Path to Interprofessional Education at U.S. Dental Schools.

    PubMed

    Palatta, Anthony; Cook, Bryan J; Anderson, Eugene L; Valachovic, Richard W

    2015-08-01

    In 2003, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) called for interprofessional education (IPE) to be adopted by the health professions education community as the pedagogical approach to educating future practitioners for practice in multidisciplinary teams. In dentistry, this call built on points made in the key 1995 IOM report Dental Education at the Crossroads. Currently, IPE and collaborative practice are among the most significant changes to health care education and delivery in the 21st century. This report describes the path that dental education has taken regarding IPE since the first national report on the subject was released in 1995. It also reports the results of a 2014 survey of U.S. dental schools to ascertain their progress in adopting and implementing IPE, as well as perceived obstacles that persist. Of the 63 dental schools, 62 participated, for a response rate of 98%. While over 90% of the respondents reported that their schools offer IPE experiences, only 58.1% had formal university-led and -promoted IPE programs. Formal IPE experiences were more prevalent at public institutions (67.6%, compared with 44% of private institutions). In 2012, a previous study reported that 66% of the IPE experiences offered to dental students were voluntary; today, 69.1% of these activities are required. Interprofessional core competencies occupy four of the top five content areas of IPE programming, providing a framework for schools to implement IPE activities. However, finding the bandwidth within the dental curriculum to accommodate IPE competencies, identifying adequate time in the schedule, providing faculty training, and assessing IPE activities were the most frequently reported challenges. The results of this survey lead to recommendations for academic dental institutions moving through this transitional phase in adopting IPE. PMID:26466391

  14. Dental students' regard for patients from often-stigmatized populations: findings from an Indian dental school.

    PubMed

    Madhan, Balasubramanian; Gayathri, Haritheertham; Garhnayak, Lokanath; Naik, Eslavath Seena

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare a group of Indian dental students' attitudes toward HIV-positive status, substance misuse, intellectual disability, acute mental illness, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) orientation. Two hundred and twelve students at various stages in the dental curriculum anonymously completed the Medical Condition Regard Scale (MCRS) for these conditions. Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used, respectively, to analyze the intrastage and interstage differences in MCRS scores. The results revealed that the regard of dental students was considerably positive for all the conditions except LGBT, for which it was just borderline positive. Intellectual disability received the highest regard among all the conditions and LGBT the least. An intermediary and comparable regard was noted for acute mental illness and HIV-positive status followed by substance misuse. While the regard for LGBT remained consistent throughout the curriculum, those for other conditions showed a marginal decrease at the completion of the clinical training. Active curricular reforms are required to ensure a more inclusive and nondiscriminatory dental care environment for patients from such often-stigmatized populations, especially those with LGBT orientation and substance misuse. PMID:22319086

  15. The status of undergraduate implant education in dental schools outside the United States.

    PubMed

    Seckinger, R J; Weintraub, A M; Berthold, P; Weintraub, G S

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the incorporation of implant dentistry into academia has been documented in some detail for North American dental schools but has not been pursued on an international level. In June of 1993, we surveyed 51 dental schools outside of the United States affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine's Office of International Relations concerning their teaching involvement with implant dentistry. Results from the 44 (86 percent) responding schools suggest that implant dentistry is being incorporated into predoctoral curriculums. Industrialized countries were more inclined to provide implant education. Insufficient time and the thought that the predoctoral level was not the place for implant dentistry were cited as some of the reasons for not incorporating implant dentistry into the curriculum. Oral surgery, prosthodontics, and periodontics departments developed and administered the implant curriculum. Formats varied among schools with respect to allotted time, curricular placement, laboratory experience, and clinical participation. Didactic material most frequently presented included a historical overview, diagnosis and treatment planning, classification of dental implants, and surgical and prosthetic concepts. Clinical involvement varied from actual implant placement to observation of prosthodontic procedures. Results were categorized based on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) classification of countries in six regions. PMID:7581232

  16. Musculoskeletal neck and back pain in undergraduate dental students at a UK dental school - a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Vijay, S; Ide, M

    2016-09-01

    Objective Limited data exist on musculoskeletal problems within dental students: we aimed to determine the prevalence of these disorders.Design Single centre cross-sectional study.Setting A UK Dental School 2015.Methods Students completed a modified Nordic pain questionnaire.Main outcome measures Self-reported frequency and severity of pain, fitness and coping strategies.Results 63% of 390 respondents were female and 75% aged under 23. Seventy-nine percent experienced pain with 42% experiencing pain for 30 or more days in the past year. Lower back pain was most common (54%) and was most frequently the worst area of pain (48%). Thirty-six percent reported pain lasting at least four hours. The mean 'average pain intensity' VAS score was 3.81/10 (sd = 1.75) and mean 'worst pain intensity' was 5.56 (sd = 2.10). More females reported neck pain (58% versus 37%, P <0.001) and higher 'average pain intensity' (mean 4.02, sd 1.82 versus 3.43 sd 1.55, P = 0.012. Daily stretching was used by 55.7% of respondents, and this positively correlated with 'average' and 'worst pain intensity' (P = 0.096 and P = 0.001) scores. Eighteen percent sought professional help to manage pain.Conclusion Musculoskeletal pain is a problem for dental students. Education in self-care may be helpful; however, assessments of possible interventions are needed. PMID:27608577

  17. Survey of special patient care programs at U.S. and Canadian dental schools.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Debra M; Stoeckel, Daniel C; Rieken, Susan E

    2007-09-01

    This article describes the results of a survey of U.S. and Canadian dental schools regarding the delivery of dental care to special needs patients. The purposes of the fifteen-item survey were to identify the percentage of dental schools that operate special patient care (SPC) clinics, gain information as to how care is being provided in those clinics, and identify how this patient population is managed in institutions without designated SPC clinics. Forty percent of the respondent institutions had designated SPC clinics. Institutions without SPC clinics tend to mainstream these patients into their predoctoral clinics or refer them to residency programs such as GPR or pediatric programs within their university. PMID:17761621

  18. Dental caries affects body weight, growth and quality of life in pre-school children.

    PubMed

    Sheiham, A

    2006-11-25

    The effect of a relatively common chronic disease, severe dental caries, affects young childrens' growth and well-being. Treating dental caries in pre-school children would increase growth rates and the quality of life of millions of children. Severe untreated dental caries is common in pre-school children in many countries. Children with severe caries weighed less than controls, and after treatment of decayed teeth there was more rapid weight gain and improvements in their quality of life. This may be due to dietary intake improving because pain affected the quantity and variety of food eaten, and second, chronic inflammation from caries related pulpitis and abscesses is known to suppress growth through a metabolic pathway and to reduce haemoglobin as a result of depressed erythrocyte production. PMID:17128231

  19. A Survey on Hong Kong Secondary School Students' Knowledge of Emergency Management of Dental Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Young, Cecilia; Wong, Kin Yau; Cheung, Lim K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate Hong Kong secondary school students' knowledge of emergency management of dental trauma. Method A questionnaire survey on randomly selected secondary school students using cluster sampling. Results Only 36.6% (209/571) of the respondents were able to correctly identify the appropriate place for treatment of dental injury. 55.2% of the respondents knew the suitable time for treatment. Only 24.7% of the respondents possessed the knowledge of how to correctly manage fractured teeth. Only 23.6% of them knew how to manage displaced teeth. 62.5% of them correctly answered that knocked-out deciduous teeth should not be replanted to the original position, but few of them (23.6%) knew that permanent teeth should be replanted. Moreover, 37.1% of the respondents correctly identified at least one of the appropriate media for storing a knocked-out tooth. First-aid training and acquisition of dental injury information from other sources were significant factors that positive responses from these questions would lead to higher scores. Conclusion Hong Kong secondary school students' knowledge of emergency management of dental trauma is considered insufficient. An educational campaign in secondary schools dedicated to students is recommended. Prior first-aid training and acquisition of dental injury information from other sources positively relate to the level of knowledge. Dental trauma emergency management is recommended to be added to first-aid publications and be taught to students and health professionals.Trial Registration: Hong Kong Clinical Trial Centre HKCTR-1344 PMID:24400088

  20. THE SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE NEW RESEARCH AND TEACHING BUILDING FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia.

    IN PLANNING A NEW RESEARCH AND TEACHING BUILDING FOR THE SCHOOL OF DENTAL MEDICINE, A PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED OUTLINING THE DESIGN NEEDS AND THE SPACE AND FACILITY REQUIREMENTS. MAJOR AREAS OF THE PROGRAM WERE--(1) GENERAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION COMPONENTS, (2) THE RESEARCH COMPONENT, AND (3) THE BASIC SCIENCE TEACHING COMPONENTS. SPACE…

  1. Caries Risk Assessment for Determination of Focus and Intensity of Prevention in a Dental School Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Michael W. J.; Suddick, Richard P.

    1995-01-01

    A study at the University of Texas, San Antonio's dental school resulted in development of a system of caries risk assessment, applied to all undergraduate clinic patients. The rationale, structure, elements, and application of the system are outlined, and course content supporting the system is noted. Need for validation and other improvements is…

  2. Caries Risk Assessment/Treatment Programs in U.S. Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yorty, Jack S.; Brown, K. Birgitta

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 42 U.S. dental schools was conducted to identify the number and characteristics of caries risk- assessment/treatment programs. Findings address lectures about caries risk, use of variable recall programs, categorization of risk level, early detection and treatment of lesions, and restoration of radiographically visible lesions. (DB)

  3. The Cost and Effectiveness of School-Based Preventive Dental Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Stephen P.; And Others

    The National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program assessed the cost and effectiveness of various types and combinations of school-based preventive dental care procedures. The program involved 20,052 first, second, and fifth graders from five fluoridated and five non-fluoridated communities. These children were examined at baseline and…

  4. Assignment of Dental School Patients Using Periodontal Treatment Need Indices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mubarak, Ala

    1990-01-01

    The validity of the Periodontal Treatment Need System and the Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Need as screening tests for allocation of patients to dental students was assessed and compared. Sixty-one patients reporting to the Department of Periodontology at the University of Oslo were studied. (MLW)

  5. Changing Health Care Education: The Challenge to Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trani, Eugene P.

    1993-01-01

    This keynote address offers suggestions for structural change in dental education to meet changing societal needs including programs tailored to specific local community needs, interdisciplinary efforts, public-private cooperative projects building on local health care community strengths, and international collaboration supporting both health…

  6. Relevance of social and behavioral factors in the evaluation of dental health care for school children.

    PubMed

    Hamp, S E; Nilsson, T; Faresjö, T; Gamsäter, G

    1984-04-01

    An interdisciplinary strategy based on a theoretical model for studying dental health was used to analyze the relevance of social and behavioral factors in the evaluation of dental health care for school children. The study comprised pupils who, after a total period of 5 years, differed in their experience with preventive regimens applying different principles of dental prevention. In 1979-80 social and behavioral data were collected by means of a postal questionnaire from altogether 234 pupils, aged 15-16 years, from two school areas. Clinical data, comprising scores for prevalence of plaque, gingivitis, and caries, were available from examinations in 1974, 1978, and 1979. The analysis of factors influencing the subjects' oral status demonstrated that material factors--the parents' education and employment, type of housing, and line of education--and physical factors--sex and prevalence of plaque, gingivitis, and caries at base line--all were of significance for the results obtained. No significant influence of home care climate (social/political factors), dental knowledge and attitudes, general foresightedness or carelessness (mental factors), or tooth-cleaning and sweet-eating habits (action factors) was found. Social and behavioral factors of significance exerted their influence regardless of the type and scope of the dental health care provided. Gingival health was far more a consequence of the professional tooth-cleaning regimen than dependent on the social and behavioral factors tested. No superior effect on caries status was demonstrated for any of the preventive regimens tested. PMID:6588720

  7. Mobile phone hygiene: potential risks posed by use in the clinics of an Indian dental school.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sweta; Acharya, Shashidhar; Bhat, Meghashyam; Rao, SreeVidya Krishna; Pentapati, Kalyana Chakravarthy

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to determine the level and type of bacterial contamination of the mobile phones of dental personnel involved in direct patient care and to determine the usefulness of cleaning with 70 percent isopropyl alcohol for decontamination. Dental faculty and trainees in an Indian dental school were asked to participate in a study in which a questionnaire concerning patterns of mobile phone use and disinfection was administered. Swabs from mobile phones of the participants were taken using moist sterile swabs and plated on blood agar plates. The bacteria isolated were identified by biochemical tests. Eighteen percent of the participants (n=9) reported using their phones while attending patients. Nearly 64 percent (n=32) used their mobiles for checking time, and 64 percent (n=42) reported never cleaning their phones. In total, fifty mobile phones were cultured for microorganisms: 98 percent (n=49) were culture-positive, and 34 percent (n=17) grew potentially pathogenic bacteria. There was significant reduction in the mean number of colony-forming units after decontamination with alcohol (p<0.001). The bacterial load was reduced by around 87 percent. The results of this study show that mobile phones may act as an important source of nosocomial pathogens in the dental setting. Therefore, it is important for dental school administrators to encourage higher compliance with hand-washing practices and routine surface disinfection through framing of strict protocols to reduce the chances of occurrence of nosocomial infections. PMID:20930247

  8. Attributes of Dental Trauma in a School Population with Active Sports Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Anand; Rao, Arun Prasad; Govindarajan, Mohan; Reddy, Venugopal; Krishnakumar, Ramalingam; Kaliyamoorthy, Sugumaran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Dental trauma has become an important aspect of dental public health. The primary requisite before actively dealing with such problems is to describe the extent, distribution, and variables associated with the specific condition. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and role of socioeconomic status and anatomic risk factors in traumatic dental injuries (TDI) to permanent anterior teeth in 10 to 16 year old Sainik (Army) school, children in India. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data was collected through a survey form and clinical examination. The permanent anterior teeth of four hundred and forty six male school children were examined for TDI. The socio-economic status, lip coverage and overjet were recorded. Statistical significance for the association between occurrence of TDI and the various risk factors was carried out. Results The prevalence of TDI to permanent anterior teeth was 23.8%. A large number of injuries occurred during participation in sports. Inadequate lip coverage and a large maxillary overjet were identified as important predictors for dental trauma. Conclusion A high prevalence of dental trauma was observed in the study population suggestive of low awareness regarding the cause, effects and prevention of the condition. PMID:24427477

  9. Improving access to dental care for vulnerable children; further development of the Back2School programme in 2013.

    PubMed

    Simons, D; Pearson, N; Evans, P; Wallace, T; Eke, M; Wright, D

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a service evaluation of a dental treatment programme providing care to children not normally taken to the dentist. It explains the extension of the Back2School programme from the pilot phase and assesses if a mobile dental unit (MDU) can provide a high quality service. The public health competencies it illustrates include oral health improvement, developing and monitoring quality dental services, and collaborative working. PMID:26263597

  10. A comprehensive school-based/linked dental program: an essential piece of the California access to care puzzle.

    PubMed

    Fine, Jared I; Isman, Robert E; Grant, Catherine B

    2012-03-01

    California children suffer more from dental disease than any other chronic childhood disease. Disparities in access and oral health are disproportionately represented among children from minority and low-income families. A comprehensive school-based/linked dental program is one essential ingredient in addressing these problems. Described here are the goals, program elements, and challenges of building a seamless dental services system that could reduce barriers care, maximize resources, and employ best practices to improve oral health. PMID:22655421

  11. Physiology education in North American dental schools: the basic science survey series.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Medha; Shaw, David H; Pate, Ted D; Lambert, H Wayne

    2014-06-01

    As part of the Basic Science Survey Series for Dentistry, members of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Physiology, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics Section surveyed directors of physiology courses in North American dental schools. The survey was designed to assess, among other things, faculty affiliation and experience of course directors, teaching methods, general course content and emphasis, extent of interdisciplinary (shared) instruction, and impact of recent curricular changes. Responses were received from forty-four of sixty-seven (65.7 percent) U.S. and Canadian dental schools. The findings suggest the following: substantial variation exists in instructional hours, faculty affiliation, class size, and interdisciplinary nature of physiology courses; physiology course content emphasis is similar between schools; student contact hours in physiology, which have remained relatively stable in the past fifteen years, are starting to be reduced; recent curricular changes have often been directed towards enhancing the integrative and clinically relevant aspects of physiology instruction; and a trend toward innovative content delivery, such as use of computer-assisted instruction, is evident. Data from this study may be useful to physiology course directors, curriculum committees, and other dental educators with an interest in integrative and interprofessional education. PMID:24882774

  12. Requirements for Faculty Scholarship in Universities and Dental Schools: Implications for Promotion, Tenure, and the Dual-Track System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard J.

    1984-01-01

    Scholarship may decrease the quality of dental education when gifted and enthusiastic clinical faculty members do not meet scholarly requirements for tenure or promotion and leave full-time teaching for private practice. The loss of outstanding clinical faculty is a consequence of dental schools' affiliation with universities. (MLW)

  13. The Relationship of Bi/Polar Personality Patterns with Self-esteem, Stress, and Satisfaction in Dental School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozer, James E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The Bi/Polar Inventory of Core Strength was administered to two senior dental classes. This inventory identifies preferences on three fundamental underlying dimensions of personality and yields eight personality patterns, which were subsequently correlated with the students' self-assessment of various aspects of the dental school experience.…

  14. The opinions and attitudes of dental school academic staff towards oral healthcare education for older adults.

    PubMed

    Haresaku, S; Mariño, R; Naito, T; Morgan, M V

    2016-08-01

    The term 'oral health care for older adults' has various interpretations, and its meaning is not clear among dental school academic staff. Additionally, there are no theoretical or practical stand-alone courses on oral health care for older adults in Japanese dental schools. To improve oral health care education, we investigated the opinions and attitudes toward oral health care education for older adults among academic staff in dental schools. Data were collected in seven dental schools from May to September 2013 via an online questionnaire survey. Five-hundred-fifty-eight academics (428 male, 130 female) participated (response rate 57%). The average number of years since they had completed a university degree was 20.2 (SD 10.2) years. The majority (Over 90%) of participants perceived that oral health care should be provided in nursing facilities, hospitals, and at home. Its treatments and instructions should include, not only methods of keeping good oral hygiene, but also improvement of oral function such as swallowing training and salivary glands massage. The majority (84.2%) suggested oral health care education should be combined as a one-credit, stand-alone course. Findings indicate that dental academics have an understanding the need for a course in oral health care for older adults. Participants supported the need for further development of education in oral health care for older adults' in Japan, as a separate course on its own right. However there were some different views about content by teaching field. The need for a national core program for teaching oral health care education was suggested. PMID:26083002

  15. Dental pain among 10–15 year old children attending oral health promoting schools: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Saheer, Abdul; Kousalya, Pallavi Swami; Raju, Rekha; Gubbihal, Radha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dental pain is a major public health problem and one of the consequences of oral diseases which requires significant adjustments in life management leading to decreased quality of life. Objective: To assess prevalence of dental pain and its impact on daily life and to explore its relationship with oral health behavior and clinical oral status among 10-15 year old school children attending oral health promoting schools. Method: This cross sectional study was conducted in 6 schools serving low -middle socio economic strata in Bangalore, India. A total of 1237 children were surveyed for history of dental pain during past 3 month. Participants who reported dental pain completed self-reported oral health behaviour and Child dental pain questionnaire. Clinical oral examination included assessment of dental caries, periodontal status. Data was analyzed using t - test, Chi-square test, ANOVA and Regression Analysis. Results: Prevalence of dental pain was 15.6% (n = 194). Among children with pain, 17%, 43% and 40% reported mild, moderate and severe pain. Impact on daily activities was reported by 66%. Mean DMFT and DMFS was 1.80 and 2.11 Mean deft and defs was 2.47 and 3.41. Multiple logistic regression revealed that severity and impact of dental pain was associated with gender, frequency of tooth brushing, consumption of sweets and deciduous dental caries experience. Conclusion: Prevalence of Dental pain is associated with brushing behavior, consumption of sweets and deciduous dental caries experience, showing need for further attention to these conditions and a need to strengthen preventive and therapeutic dental services. PMID:26942112

  16. Perception of tobacco use prevention and cessation among faculty members in Latin American and Caribbean dental schools

    PubMed Central

    Tamí-Maury, Irene; Aigner, Carrie J.; Hong, Judy; Strom, Sara; Chambers, Mark S.; Gritz, Ellen R.

    2014-01-01

    Rates of tobacco use are increasing in regions of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Unfortunately, tobacco cessation education is not a standard component of dental curriculum in LAC dental schools. The objective of this study was to identify the perceptions of LAC dental faculty members regarding the tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) competencies that should be addressed in dental curricula. Dental deans and faculty completed a web-based questionnaire in Spanish, Portuguese, French, or English. The questionnaire contained 32 competencies grouped into the 5A’s (Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, and Arrange) of tobacco cessation and 6 supplementary questions for identifying barriers to providing TUPAC education to dental students. Respondents indicated the degree to which they believed each competency should be incorporated into dental curricula using a 5-point Likert scale (“1”= strongly disagree to “5”=strongly agree). Responses were obtained from 390 faculty members (66% South America, 18% Mexico/Central America, 16% the Caribbean). Two%, 12%, and 83% of respondents reported that smoking was allowed in clinical environments, other indoor environments, and outdoor environments of their dental schools, respectively. Mean importance ratings for each of the competencies were as follows: Ask (4.71), Advise (4.54), Assess (4.41), Assist (4.07), and Arrange (4.01). Overall, LAC dental educators agree that TUPAC training should be incorporated in dental curricula. Assist and Arrange competencies were rated lower, relative to other competencies. Tobacco use among dental educators and high rates of on-campus smoking could potentially pose barriers to promoting cessation interventions in the LAC dental schools. PMID:24385339

  17. Epidemiology of dental caries in Chandigarh school children and trends over the last 25 years.

    PubMed

    Goyal, A; Gauba, K; Chawla, H S; Kaur, M; Kapur, A

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of dental caries in 6, 9, 12 and 15-year-old school children of Chandigarh, selected on a randomized basis was evaluated using Moller's criteria (1966) and correlated with the various risk factors. The mean deft was found to be 4.0 +/- 3.6 in 6 year old and 4.61 +/- 3.14 in 9 year old, whereas the mean DMFT in 12 and 15 year old was found to be 3.03 +/- 2.52 and 3.82 +/- 2.85 respectively. The high prevalence of dental caries in these children was attributed to the lack of use of fluoride toothpaste (80% children), lack of knowledge about etiology of dental caries (98%) and frequency of sugar exposures up to more than five times per day (30%). PMID:17951925

  18. Expanding services in a shrinking economy: desktop document delivery in a dental school library

    PubMed Central

    Gushrowski, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    Question: How can library staff develop and promote a document delivery service and then expand the service to a wide audience? Setting: The setting is the library at the Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD), Indianapolis. Method: A faculty survey and a citation analysis were conducted to determine potential use of the service. Volume of interlibrary loan transactions and staff and equipment capacity were also studied. Main results: IUSD Library staff created a desktop delivery service (DDSXpress) for faculty and then expanded the service to practicing dental professionals and graduate students. The number of faculty using DDSXpress remains consistent. The number of practicing dental professionals using the service is low. Graduate students have been quick to adopt the service. Conclusion: Through careful analysis of capacity and need for the service, staff successfully expanded document delivery service without incurring additional costs. Use of DDSXpress is continually monitored, and opportunities to market the service to practicing dental professionals are being investigated. PMID:21753911

  19. Seven years of external control of fluoride levels in the public water supply in Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; MORAES, Camila Mascarenhas; OLYMPIO, Kelly Polido Kaneshiro; PESSAN, Juliano Pelim; GRIZZO, Larissa Tercília; SILVA, Thelma Lopes; MAGALHÃES, Ana Carolina; de OLIVEIRA, Rodrigo Cardoso; GROISMAN, Sonia; RAMIRES, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Fluoridation of the public water supplies is recognized as among the top ten public health achievements of the twentieth century. However, the positive aspects of this measure depend on the maintenance of fluoride concentrations within adequate levels. Objective: To report the results of seven years of external control of the fluoride (F) concentrations in the public water supply in Bauru, SP, Brazil in an attempt to verify, on the basis of risk/benefit balance, whether the levels are appropriate. Material and Methods: From March 2004 to February 2011, 60 samples were collected every month from the 19 supply sectors of the city, totaling 4,641 samples. F concentrations in water samples were determined in duplicate, using an ion-specific electrode (Orion 9609) coupled to a potentiometer after buffering with TISAB II. After the analysis, the samples were classified according to the best risk-benefit adjustment. Results: Means (±standard deviation) of F concentrations ranged between 0.73±0.06 and 0.81±0.10 mg/L for the different sectors during the seven years. The individual values ranged between 0.03 and 2.63 mg/L. The percentages of the samples considered "low risk" for dental fluorosis development and of "maximum benefit" for dental caries prevention (0.55-0.84 mg F/L) in the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh years of the study were 82.0, 58.5, 37.4, 61.0, 89.9, 77.3, and 72.4%, respectively, and 69.0% for the entire period. Conclusions: Fluctuations of F levels were found in the public water supply in Bauru during the seven years of evaluation. These results suggest that external monitoring of water fluoridation by an independent assessor should be implemented in cities where there is adjusted fluoridation. This measure should be continued in order to verify that fluoride levels are suitable and, if not, to provide support for the appropriate adjustments. PMID:23559119

  20. Noncognitive Indicators as Critical Predictors of Students' Performance in Dental School.

    PubMed

    Stacey, D Graham; Kurunathan, Tania M

    2015-12-01

    Dental educators have traditionally prioritized cognitive indicators (especially undergraduate grade point average and Dental Admission Test scores) in choosing students for admission to dental school. These indicators' role in predicting academic outcomes, including coursework and examination success, is well documented. However, noncognitive predictors including conscientiousness, self-discipline, achievement-striving, task orientation, deliberation, resilience, and situational judgment have also been identified. This study's aims were to assess the significance of noncognitive indicators measured by the version of the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness Personality Inventory (NEO PI) known as the NEO-PI-3, determine the place in the curriculum when these indicators' impact was most influential, and compare their influence with that of the cognitive indicators. Analysis was performed on stored data for three classes of dental students from admission through clinical exams at one U.S. dental school. Significant associations were found between NEO-PI-3 domains and facets (especially Conscientiousness) and the outcomes of coursework grades, standardized exam scores, and clinical behavior scores. Multiple regression analyses identified that the noncognitive indicators enhanced the prediction of students' academic and clinical performance early in the curriculum and then equaled or surpassed the predictive impact of cognitive indicators as they progressed through the curriculum sequence. The implications of noncognitive predictors for dental education are discussed including the challenge to identify and then weight the indicators, whether to include them as admissions criteria, how to assess their impact as compared with cognitive measures, the necessity of standardization of assessment, and if and when to evaluate their relevance to professional practice. PMID:26632294

  1. The Prevalence of Pulp stones in Adult Patients of Shiraz Dental School, a Radiographic Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Ravanshad, Shohreh; Khayat, Shideh; Freidonpour, Najmeh

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Pulp stones are calcifications found in the pulp chamber or pulp canals of the teeth. Its different prevalence in different population is a matter of concern. Purpose This study aimed to assess the prevalence of pulp stones in a sample of Iranian population and to report its occurrence regarding gender, dental arch, tooth type and dental status. Materials and Methods Dental records of patients who attended Shiraz Dental School were selected randomly. Only bitewing and periapical radiographs of maxillary and mandibular permanent posterior teeth were studied. Teeth were classified in the case of presence or absence of pulp stones, and the prevalence was analyzed in different gender, tooth types, dental arch, and dental status (intact, carious, or restored) groups. Statistical analysis was performed using X2 test. Results Of the 652examined subjects, 306 (46.9%) had one or more teeth with pulp stones. Of the 8244 posterior teeth examined, 928 (11.25%) had pulp stones in the pulp chamber. These pulp stones were detected in 76(37.6%) of males and 230 (51%) of females. The frequency of pulp stones among different teeth between maxillary and mandibular arches had almost a similar pattern. Among teeth demonstrating the condition, first molars were the most prevalent, followed by second molars. In maxillary molars the frequency of occurrence (26%) was higher than mandibular molars (18.7%). No Significant difference was found between dental status and pulp stones occurrence. Conclusion The occurrence of pulp stones noted in this study was significantly higher in female, molar teeth than premolar and 1st maxillary molar than mandibular. There was no significant association between pulp stone and condition of the crown. PMID:26636125

  2. Relationship of selection criteria to subsequent academic performance in an Australian undergraduate dental school.

    PubMed

    Mercer, A; Abbott, P V; Puddey, I B

    2013-02-01

    In 1998, in addition to previous academic achievement, an aptitude test (UMAT) and a structured interview were introduced into selection for the Bachelor of Dental Science (BDSc), the undergraduate dental course at the University of Western Australia. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the combination of school-leaver dental students' entry scores, some demographic characteristics and subsequent student performance in the undergraduate course. Three hundred and ninety-eight school-leavers who enrolled in the BDSc from 1999 through 2011 were studied. Regression models were constructed comprising entry scores, gender and age as predictors in relation to subsequent academic performance. The main outcome measure was the weighted average mark (WAM) for each of five academic year levels as well as results in specific units, defined as either 'knowledge' based or 'clinically' based. Of the variables studied, previous academic performance and female gender had the strongest relationship with yearly WAM for Years 1 through 4 and for both 'knowledge' based and 'clinically' based units. The interview score showed a strong relationship in the major clinical years and in a range of 'clinically' based units. UMAT scores were less consistent in relationship to WAM. These results support assessment through a highly structured interview together with prior academic achievement as an evidence-based approach to selection of students for this undergraduate dental course. PMID:23279391

  3. A twenty-year follow-up survey of medical emergency education in U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Clark, Morris S; Wall, Benjamin E; Tholström, Tad C; Christensen, Edward H; Payne, Brandon C

    2006-12-01

    This article reports the results of a 2003 survey of medical emergency education taught in U.S. dental schools and compares the results to findings from surveys conducted in 1983 and 1992. A questionnaire was sent to the deans of all U.S. dental schools, requesting completion of the survey by the faculty member responsible for medical emergency education. Forty-three of fifty-four U.S. dental schools responded, and the data were compared to similar surveys conducted in 1983 and 1992. Special attention was given to changes in technology (pulse oximetry and automated external defibrillators), teaching methods (audiovisual, role-playing, and simulation), and subject matter (CPR, venipuncture, and endotracheal intubation) that affect medical emergency education. The study found a large disparity in number of hours dedicated to medical emergency training among dental schools. Surprisingly, CPR certification/recertification for both students and faculty was not provided at three of the reporting U.S. dental schools. Most schools included venipuncture and endotracheal intubation in their curriculum. Routine monitoring of vital signs remained fairly consistent over the past twenty years with a slight dip in the 1992 survey. A standardization of medical emergency education needs to take place to ensure an appropriate level of training for all dental students. PMID:17170322

  4. Preparing faculty members for significant curricular revisions in a school of dental medicine.

    PubMed

    Spallek, Heiko; O'Donnell, Jean A; Yoo, Young Im J

    2010-03-01

    Resistance to change is expected, especially when change involves and impacts many stakeholders. During the past year, the Curriculum Committee at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine has been preparing the dental school for a major curricular revision of its predoctoral program. This article describes how a faculty retreat was designed to gain support for and involvement in this reform process. In particular, it examines the results of a faculty survey that was used to shape the retreat and was developed to determine the faculty's perceived knowledge about instructional design, barriers to innovations in teaching, and the influence of student evaluations and evidence-based dentistry principles on faculty teaching. Having identified strengths and weaknesses and areas of concern among faculty members through the survey, the Curriculum Committee was able to prepare a retreat that addressed faculty needs while simultaneously advancing the movement towards curriculum reform. PMID:20203328

  5. Dental care and dentistry practice in the Medieval Medical School of Salerno.

    PubMed

    Bifulco, M; Amato, M; Gangemi, G; Marasco, M; Caggiano, M; Amato, A; Pisanti, S

    2016-07-22

    Even though dental care is sometimes erroneously considered a modern practice, written records from major ancient civilisation all around the world date back to several millennia BC. In particular, in the Middle Ages, among the tenth and thirteenth centuries, the illustrious Medical School of Salerno in Italy, the most important institution in the Western world for the diffusion of medical knowledge, disseminated through its precepts the importance of oral hygiene and practiced specific dental therapies for tooth decay, gingivitis, paradentosis and halitosis among others. Interestingly, several of the officinal plants and natural ingredients proposed for oral care by the school's most famous physicians recipes, notably those of the legendary Trotula De Ruggiero, considered the first female physician in history, are still in vogue in the twenty-first century. PMID:27444600

  6. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  7. How do U.S. and Canadian dental schools teach interpersonal communication skills?

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toshiko; Milgrom, Peter; Coldwell, Susan

    2002-11-01

    The status of instruction in interpersonal communication was surveyed in forty U.S and Canadian dental schools. Key faculty members were identified, and syllabi and course descriptions were collected and content-analyzed. The following findings were obtained for responding schools: 1) only one-third of schools had courses specifically focusing on interpersonal communication; 2) more than half of the schools offered these types of courses only during the first two years; 3) the most common topics were communication skills, patient interviewing, and patient education/consultation; 4) the most frequently used method of teaching was lectures; active practice was used less often; 5) written examination was the primary instructional evaluation tool, whereas more sophisticated performance-oriented assessments were used less often; and 6) about half of the teachers did not have a D.D.S. degree; those not dentists were primarily psychologists. At least eight of the forty dental schools surveyed do not appear to meet the accreditation guidelines for predoctoral programs in this area of instruction. Some could not identify a faculty member responsible for such instruction. Schools offering more extensive instruction were more likely to offer active rather than passive teaching and use more sophisticated student evaluation strategies. This research suggests a need for reevaluation of teaching in this subject area. PMID:12484681

  8. Teaching physiology to dental students: matching teaching and learning styles in a South African dental school.

    PubMed

    Allers, Nico

    2010-09-01

    This study compared the preference for learning styles of dental students in a small class in physiology at a South African university with the preference for teaching styles of the lecturers. It also analyzed and evaluated the teaching methods and aids the lecturers used. The study was done in the last teaching block of the year after students have been exposed to all the lecturing styles in the same premedical subject. Two separate questionnaires were used in the study in order to evaluate teaching methods and teaching media used by the lecturers and to measure the teaching methods and teaching media that students preferred. Through a critical analysis of the data, it was found that the students preferred cooperative and active teaching/learning experiences more than the lecturers are using them. The study emphasizes the importance of students being actively involved in the teaching-learning process through cooperative methods. This may enhance their ability to utilize cognitive skills such as creative thinking, interpretation, critical thinking, and problem-solving. PMID:20837740

  9. Financial management and dental school equity, Part II: Tactics.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W; Bergstrom, Roy

    2004-04-01

    Financial management includes all processes that build organizations' equity through accumulating assets in strategically important areas. The tactical aspects of financial management are budget deployment and monitoring. Budget deployment is the process of making sure that costs are fairly allocated. Budget monitoring addresses issues of effective uses and outcomes of resources. This article describes contemporary deployment and monitoring mechanisms, including revenue positive and marginal analysis, present value, program phases, options logic, activity-based costing, economic value added, cost of quality, variance reconciliation, and balanced scorecards. The way financial decisions are framed affects comparative decision-making and even influences the arithmetic of accounting. Familiarity with these concepts should make it possible for dental educators to more fully participate in discussions about the relationships between budgeting and program strategy. PMID:15112921

  10. Comparison of student satisfaction in public versus private dental schools in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chapper, Ana; Campani, Simone A; Paiva, Verônica da S; de Assis, Camila de A; Garcia, Eduardo; Abreu e Silva, Fernando A

    2007-10-01

    This study compared perceptions of the teaching and learning process of twenty-four senior dental students from a public school and fifteen from a private school by means of a questionnaire with direct questions. Another five students in each group completed a qualitative survey with five open-ended questions. The questionnaires assessed perceptions of the interaction between didactic and clinical content, the role of professors during the course, and their future professional practice in Brazil. Quantitative data were summarized as means and standard deviations and statistically analyzed with the Student t test, P<0.05. Qualitative data were analyzed using a content analysis method. The results revealed that the students in the private school had more positive perceptions than those in the public school of how much the didactic classes contributed to professional practice, the level of motivation for the topics discussed, and how well coursework related to clinical practice. Both groups mentioned the importance of the clinical component of learning and perceived that professors showed little commitment to the professional preparation of dental students. Students' perceptions of their preparation to work in different Brazilian communities and with different segments of society varied widely. The qualitative analyses confirmed students' dissatisfaction with their learning. No difference was found between students in the public and private schools in their assessment of how well prepared they were to enter the working market. These findings indicate that measures should be taken to improve the quality of teaching and the satisfaction of dental school students in Brazil. PMID:17923715

  11. Policies and Procedures That Facilitate Implementation of Evidence-Based Clinical Guidelines in U.S. Dental Schools.

    PubMed

    Polk, Deborah E; Nolan, Beth A D; Shah, Nilesh H; Weyant, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the degree to which dental schools in the United States have policies and procedures in place that facilitate the implementation of evidence-based clinical guidelines. The authors sent surveys to all 65 U.S. dental schools in 2014; responses were obtained from 38 (58%). The results showed that, of the nine policies and procedures examined, only two were fully implemented by 50% or more of the responding schools: guidelines supported through clinical faculty education or available chairside (50%), and students informed of guidelines in both the classroom and clinic (65.8%). Although 92% of the respondents reported having an electronic health record, 80% of those were not using it to track compliance with guidelines. Five schools reported implementing more policies than the rest of the schools. The study found that the approach to implementing guidelines at most of the responding schools did not follow best practices although five schools had an exemplary set of policies and procedures to support guideline implementation. These results suggest that most dental schools are currently not implementing guidelines effectively and efficiently, but that the goal of schools' having a comprehensive implementation program for clinical guidelines is achievable since some are doing so. Future studies should determine whether interventions to improve implementation in dental schools are needed. PMID:26729681

  12. Are more endodontic consultations needed in dental school clinic settings? A study of treatment decisions at one school.

    PubMed

    Aminoshariae, Anita; Tulunoglu, Ibrahim; Demko, Catherine; Galsterer, Mark; Montagnese, Thomas A; Mickel, Andre

    2015-04-01

    With no previous studies of the occurrence of interdisciplinary consultations for tooth extraction in a dental school clinic setting, the aim of this cross-sectional descriptive investigation was to measure and compare the consultation process that occurred among departments at one U.S. dental school for making treatment decisions on tooth extraction. A comprehensive computerized retrieval (Crystal Reports) was used to identify and gather data from patient records from July 1, 2007, to July 1, 2011. Treatment plans and progress notes were analyzed to determine why each tooth had been extracted and which department had recommended the extraction. Results showed that the clinical departments involved in treatment planning decisions were the DMD dental student clinic, Department of Periodontics, and Department of Endodontics. The narrative records of 227 patients who had 516 teeth extracted were examined. About three-fourths (73.26%) of the extracted teeth were extracted based on the recommendation of only one department. Of these extracted teeth, 22.0% (n=114) were previously endodontically treated, and only four were recommended for endodontic consultation prior to extraction. The study found that most extractions were performed without specialty consultations and that the Department of Endodontics was consulted the least of all departments. To foster interdisciplinary collaboration in dental school clinics and help students develop expertise in such collaborations, more specialty consultations are needed for teeth that are treatment planned for extraction in order to preclude needless extraction of potentially salvageable teeth. Doing so will provide benefits for both patient care and students' education. PMID:25838010

  13. Patients' Perceptions of Dehumanization of Patients in Dental School Settings: Implications for Clinic Management and Curriculum Planning.

    PubMed

    Raja, Sheela; Shah, Raveena; Hamad, Judy; Van Kanegan, Mona; Kupershmidt, Alexandra; Kruthoff, Mariela

    2015-10-01

    Although the importance of empathy, rapport, and anxiety/pain awareness in dentist-patient relations has been well documented, these factors continue to be an issue with patients in many dental school clinics. The aim of this study was to develop an in-depth understanding of how patients at an urban, university-affiliated medical center and its dental school's clinic experienced oral health care and to generate ideas for improving the dental school's clinical curriculum and management of the clinic. Although patient satisfaction surveys are common, in-depth patient narratives are an underutilized resource for improving dental education. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 uninsured or underinsured dental patients at these sites, and the results were analyzed using content analysis. Major phenomena that participants discussed were the importance of empathy and good rapport with their oral health providers and provider awareness of dental pain and anxiety. Many patients also discussed feeling dehumanized during dental visits. Based on their positive and negative experiences, the participants made suggestions for how oral health professionals can successfully engage patients in treatment. PMID:26427779

  14. Postbaccalaureate Medical/Dental Education Preparatory Program (MEDPREP) at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    McGlinn, S; Jackson, E W; Bardo, H R

    1999-04-01

    Between 1972 and 1998, the state and federally funded Medical/Dental Education Preparatory Program (MEDPREP) at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine served approximately 900 qualified minority and disadvantaged students, in an effort to increase the number of underrepresented-minority (URM) students accepted into and retained in health professions schools. To help students improve their application credentials, this post-baccalaureate program establishes high expectations for student progress, designs individual curricula, offers extensive academic and personal counseling, has its own teaching faculty, and operates in a specially equipped, designated facility. This supportive educational environment has demonstrated success. By 1998 over 500 MEDPREP students had been accepted into medical or other health professions schools, and 86% of them had graduated or were scheduled to graduate. And while the number of new URM entrants to medical schools declined nationwide from 1995 to 1997, 70 URM students from MEDPREP matriculated to 28 different allopathic medical schools, eight entered three different osteopathic medical schools, and two entered dental schools. Recent data indicate that the score changes of Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) repeaters who were MEDPREP students were larger than those of all MCAT repeaters reported by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). In fact, the MEDPREP repeaters' score changes were two to nearly six times greater than the overall changes reported by the AAMC. These gains suggest that a carefully designed, long-term post-baccalaureate intervention such as MEDPREP can increase the pool of qualified URM and disadvantaged students accepted into and retained in health professions schools. PMID:10219216

  15. Students' perceptions of materials and techniques used at European dental schools in the education of fixed prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Brand, Henk S; Kamell, Hassib; Kharbanda, Aron K; Dozic, Alma

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the materials and procedures used by students in dental schools across Europe for teaching fixed prosthodontics. An online questionnaire, containing twenty-eight dichotomous, multiple-choice, and Likert scale rating questions, was sent to students in forty dental schools. After excluding dental schools in which less than 10 percent of the students responded, 775 questionnaires from ten schools remained for statistical analysis. Among these respondents, acrylic resin teeth were said to be the most commonly used material during preclinical practice (46-96 percent), and use of extracted teeth varied from 8 to 65 percent. At nine of the ten institutions, metal-ceramic was reported to be most commonly used for fixed dental prostheses. There was large variation in the type of finish line for a metal-ceramic fixed dental prosthesis: students at five institutions reported using a shoulder finish line, three a chamfer finish line, and two a shoulder-bevel finish line. A similar variation was observed with regard to the final cementation of metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses: students at four institutions reporting most frequently using glass ionomer cement, with three using zinc phosphate cement and three using carboxylate cement. The responding European dental students varied considerably in their opinions about whether they were preclinically properly trained for the first preparation on a patient and in their overall rating of their education in fixed prosthodontics. Responding students in the United Kingdom, Sweden, and Nijmegen, The Netherlands, rated their fixed prosthodontics training overall the highest. Overall, this study found a wide variation amongst dental schools with regard to their education in fixed prosthodontics and their rating of this teaching. PMID:24002851

  16. Adequacy of patient pools to support predoctoral students' achievement of competence in pediatric dentistry in U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Casamassimo, Paul S; Seale, N Sue

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the current status of predoctoral pediatric dentistry patient pools in U.S. dental schools and compare their status to that in 2001. A 2014 survey of school clinic-based and community-based dental patient pools was developed, piloted, and sent to pediatric predoctoral program directors in 57 U.S. dental schools via SurveyMonkey. Two follow-up contacts were made to increase the response rate. A total of 49 surveys were returned for a response rate of 86%. The responding program directors reported that their programs' patient pools had declined in number and had changed in character with more diversity and fewer procedures. They attributed the changes to competition, cost, and location of the dental school. The respondents reported that community-based dental education clinical sites continued to provide additional service experiences for dental students, with contributions varying by the nature of the site. A large number of the respondents felt that their graduates lacked some basic pediatric dentistry clinical skills and were not ready for independent practice with children. The results of this study suggest that the predoctoral pediatric dentistry patient pool has changed and general dentists may be graduating with inadequate experiences to practice dentistry for children. PMID:26034028

  17. Awareness in Primary School Teachers regarding Traumatic Dental Injuries in Children and Their Emergency Management: A Survey in South Jaipur

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Ather Ahmed; Chaturvedi, Shefali; Goenka, Puneet; Sharma, Swati

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Trauma to primary and permanent teeth and their supporting structures is one of the most common dental problems seen in children. The prognosis of traumatized teeth depends on timely attention with prompt and appropriate treatment, which often relies on knowledge of the teachers who may be present at the place of accidents. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate via a questionnaire the knowledge level of primary school teachers in South Jaipur regarding dental trauma. Design: Questionnaire survey. Materials and methods: A self-designed questionnaire was administered to 300 primary school teachers from 20 randomly selected private and semi-aided schools of South Jaipur. Results: A total of 278 teachers responded to the survey. The collected data were subjected to statistical analysis. It was found that most of the respondents had accepted poor knowledge regarding dental trauma, with a mean knowledge of 10.56 ± 2.58. Conclusion: This study highlighted inadequate knowledge regarding emergency management of traumatic dental injuries, and teachers felt the need for training in the management of dental trauma as part of their training program. How to cite this article: Nirwan M, Syed AA, Chaturvedi S, Goenka P, Sharma S. Awareness in Primary School Teachers regarding Traumatic Dental Injuries in Children and Their Emergency Management: A Survey in South Jaipur. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):62-66. PMID:27274158

  18. Evaluation of knowledge and attitude of school teachers about emergency management of traumatic dental injury

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mala; Ingle, Navin Anand; Kaur, Navpreet; Yadav, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) are widespread in the population and are a serious dental public health problem among children. Dental trauma may cause both functional and esthetic problems, with possible impacts on the patient's quality of life. Aim: To investigate teacher's knowledge and attitudes of Mathura city about emergency management of TDIs in children. Materials and Methods: A total of 352 teachers from total 23 schools of Mathura city were included in the study. Data were collected through a survey, which included a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of three major parts containing multiple-choice questions. Results: Among the teachers 51.1% were males and 48.9% were females. Majority of the respondents, that is, 33.5% were between 31 and 40 years of age. Most respondents (34%) had more than 10 years of teaching experience. Majority of the teachers (39.2%) had educational qualification other than B.Ed. and M.Ed. degrees. Physical education teachers comprised the largest group of school teachers. Regarding knowledge and attitude, the teachers with 10–20 years of teaching experience, physical education teachers, and the teachers other than B.Ed. and M.Ed. qualifications had given more correct answers to the questions when compared with other groups. Conclusion: For the teachers having a low level of knowledge, there is a need for greater awareness to improve teachers’ knowledge and attitudes related to the emergency management of TDIs in children by organizing educative and motivational programs. PMID:25992335

  19. Strategies for student services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students in dental schools.

    PubMed

    More, Frederick G; Whitehead, Albert W; Gonthier, Mark

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore issues that pertain to the needs of gay men, lesbians, and bisexual and transgender (GLBT) students as a subgroup in U.S. dental schools. The increasing visibility of GLBT persons in all aspects of life is one aspect of the changing face of the U.S. population. Increasingly, there is dialogue about issues related to GLBT persons, their nontraditional families, and their full engagement in society. Recent court decisions, changing policies in states and municipalities, and increasing acceptance in society promote inclusion. Likewise, this dialogue has extended into academic life. In medicine and nursing, GLBT issues include the needs of GLBT patients, the mentoring of faculty and administration, and acculturation of students in a dynamic college environment. Increasing the acceptance of GLBT persons and enhancing the value of diversity throughout the community and within the profession are challenges that must be met. In addition, fostering positive behaviors in a multicultural environment is a priority that is recognized in business and academe. In an effort to assess the present situation in U.S. dental schools, a survey was developed to gather data about support services provided for GLBT students. Based on the results of the survey, a series of recommendations are made to meet the needs of GLBT students, faculty, staff, and administrators in dental education institutions. PMID:15217081

  20. The Impact of Dietary and Tooth-Brushing Habits to Dental Caries of Special School Children with Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Chun-Chih; Hu, Wen-Chia; Tang, Ru-Ching; Chen, Cheng-Chin; Tsai, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shun-Te

    2010-01-01

    The daily oral activities may severely influence oral health of children with disabilities. In this survey, we analyzed the impact of dietary and tooth-brushing habits to dental caries in special school children with disabilities. This cross-sectional survey investigated 535 special school children with disabilities aged 6-12 years, 60.93% males,…

  1. Forensic Luminol Blood Test for Preventing Cross-contamination in Dentistry: An Evaluation of a Dental School Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Cadore, Peterson; Gallon, Andrea; Imanishi, Soraia Almeida Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Background: More than 200 different diseases may be transmitted from exposure to blood in the dental setting. The aim of this study is to identify possible faults in the crosscontamination chain control in a dental school clinic searching for traces of blood in the clinical contact surfaces (CCS) through forensic luminol blood test. Methods: Traces of invisible blood where randomly searched in CCS of one dental school clinic. Results: Forty eight surfaces areas in the CCS were tested and the presence of invisible and remnant blood was identified in 28 (58.3%) items. Conclusions: We suggest that the luminol method is suitable for identifying contamination with invisible blood traces and this method may be a useful tool to prevent cross-contamination in the dental care setting. PMID:25400895

  2. Oral Microbiota of Children in a School-based Dental Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Soncini, Jennifer A; Kanasi, Eleni; Lu, Shulin C.; Nunn, Martha E.; Henshaw, Michelle M; Tanner, Anne CR

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Dental caries disproportionately affects disadvantaged subjects. This study hypothesized that there were greater caries extent and higher levels of caries-associated and anaerobic subgingival bacterial species in oral samples of Hispanic and immigrant children compared with non-Hispanic and US born children. Methods Children from a school-based dental clinic serving a community with a large Hispanic component were examined, and the extent of caries was recorded. Microbial samples were taken from teeth and the tongues of children. Samples were analyzed using DNA probes to 18 oral bacterial species. Results Seventy five children were examined. Extent of caries increased with child age in immigrant, but not in US born or Hispanic children. There were no differences in the microbiota based on ethnicity or whether the child was born in US or not. There was a higher species detection frequency from teeth than tongue samples. Levels of Streptococcus mutans and other Streptococcus species increased with caries extent. Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia and Selenomonas species were detected at low levels in these children. Conclusions We conclude that, while there was a high rate of dental caries in disadvantaged school children, there were no differences in the caries-associated microbiota, including S. mutans, based on ethnicity or immigration status. Furthermore, while anaerobic subgingival, periodontal pathogens were also detected in children, there was no difference in species detection based on ethnicity or immigration status. Increased levels of streptococci, including S. mutans, however, were detected with high caries levels. This suggested that while it is beneficial to target preventive and treatment programs to disadvantaged populations, there is likely no additional benefit to focus on subgroups within a population already at high risk for dental disease. PMID:19879369

  3. [Profile of patients seeking care at the UCV Dental School].

    PubMed

    Pereza, C R

    1990-01-01

    In order to elaborate an attitude model of patients that come over to the School of Odontology of the Central University of Venezuela, asking for odontological treatment, from the subject's point of view about the general odontology health and his own odontology health, we have done this investigation work, where we interviewed 250 persons that came over to our service and each of them were assigned to the students, from there and on we do our suggestions and to be considered in order to assist this people. PMID:2131727

  4. Dental education in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, David; Komabayashi, Takashi; Reyes-Vela, Enrique

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this article is to provide information about dental education in Mexico, including its history, the dental school system, curriculum and dental licensure. In 1977, there were only 59 Mexican dental schools; however, there were 83 schools registered in the last official national count in 2007. Forty-one dental schools are public, and the other 42 are private. Every year the number of private dental schools increases. Admission to dental schools in Mexico requires a high school diploma. All classes are conducted in Spanish. To obtain licensure in Mexico, dental students must complete a 3 to 5-year program plus a year of community service. No formal nationwide standard clinical/didactic curriculum exists in Mexico. There are approximately 153,000 dentists in Mexico, a number that increases each year. The dentist-patient ratio is approximately 1:700. However, the high percentage of inactive licensed dentists in Mexico points to a serious problem. PMID:24984634

  5. Effect of school-based fluoride mouth-rinsing on dental caries incidence among schoolchildren in the Kingdom of Tonga.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Reiri; Kawamura, Kohji; Kawamura, Sayuri; Endoh, Mami; Tomiki, Sililo; Taguchi, Chieko; Kobayashi, Seigo

    2012-01-01

    Since 1998, the authors have been working to improve the oral health of children at kindergartens and primary schools in the Kingdom of Tonga (Tonga). Our primary activity has been a school-based fluoride mouth-rinsing (FMR) program. FMR is performed using 7-10 mL of a 0.2% NaF solution for 1 min once per week at each school. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of school-based FMR on dental caries incidence among Tongan schoolchildren. A total of 109 children aged 10 years were evaluated at six primary schools on Tongatapu Island. The FMR group comprised 46 children who had participated in the school-based FMR program for at least 5 years 6 months; the control group comprised 63 children who had participated in the school-based FMR program for 1 year or less. During standardized dental examinations, decayed, missing, and filled teeth were counted by a single dentist at each school. The school-based FMR program effectively decreased the number of dental caries. A school-based FMR program may thus be very beneficial in preventing caries among children in Tonga. PMID:23221160

  6. Problem-based learning and the dental school library.

    PubMed

    Lennon, A M; Anderson, P F; McDonald, J L; Stookey, G K

    2001-11-01

    A major curriculum revision involving the utilization of problem-based learning was implemented at Indiana University School of Dentistry in the summer of 1997. Two of the main goals of this new student-centered curriculum were to promote critical thinking skills and to encourage a desire for lifelong learning, both of which were anticipated to increase student use of the library. This study examined circulation at the library for three years immediately prior to, and for three years immediately following, the curricular change. Results show that library circulation has increased significantly since the pedagogical change. This suggests that students in the new curriculum place more emphasis on the library as a learning resource than did their traditional curriculum counterparts. PMID:11765867

  7. Dental school faculty and the academic environment from 1936 to 2011: familiar features in a new context.

    PubMed

    Drisko, Connie L; Whittaker, Lynn Page

    2012-01-01

    From its first issue in 1936 until today, no subject has been more central to the work published in the Journal of Dental Education (JDE) and to dental education itself than the dental school faculty. William Gies's vision in 1926 of the professionalization of dental educators was key to the professionalization of dental education. His focus on the need to develop these teachers as both instructors and researchers established the model by which a "dental educator" became a distinct professional, different from a dentist who happens to teach. This article for the seventy-fifth anniversary issue of the JDE thus starts from the obvious but not always acknowledged point that faculty members are central to the entire enterprise of dental education and relate to change over time as both cause and effect. Whether the profession today is evolving to incorporate new science and curricular models or becoming more interprofessional or meeting the needs of diverse patient populations or adopting new educational methodologies and technologies, developments in these areas will have a direct impact on the way individual faculty members do their jobs. To give a taste of the rich variety published over the past seventy-five years, the first section touches briefly on three significant types of research regarding faculty as exemplified by articles published in the JDE. These three are faculty development, educational methodologies, and faculty recruitment and retention. The second section addresses an increasingly important area of research: faculty members' perceptions of the academic work environment. After considering some trends that will affect this environment over the next decade, the article concludes with additional reasons the JDE is a valuable resource for faculty members in dental schools and allied and advanced dental education programs. PMID:22262551

  8. A survey of dental school's emergency departments in Ireland and the UK: provision of undergraduate teaching and emergency care

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, S.; Nunn, J.; Stassen, L. F. A.; McLoughlin, J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Emergency dental care is a vital service that new graduates should be prepared to offer. There are few published data relating to emergency dental care education. To assess this, and to gain a profile of accident and emergency departments (A&E) in dental schools, an online survey was sent to all of the dental schools in the Republic of Ireland and the UK. Setting The survey addressed the school's A&E curriculum, teaching methods, undergraduate exposure and departmental details. Results The majority of A&E departments operated during normal working hours with a minority offering an out-of-hours service. Teaching of A&E topics, and undergraduate experience, vary significantly between schools. A&E departments were diversely named and exhibited significant regional variation. Approximately half employed a triage system. It is unclear what represents an adequate level of undergraduate exposure, and more research is required in this area. Conclusions Assessment of undergraduates following time in clinic is an important component of any A&E module. We consider a reflective portfolio to represent a suitable form of assessment, and would recommend their introduction. In addition, we recommend that dental hospitals consider a nurse-led triage system. PMID:26067892

  9. U.S. Dental School Deans' Views on the Value of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Evan B; Donoff, R Bruce; Riedy, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    There has historically been limited development and utilization of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in clinical dentistry. However, in recent years PROMs have been recognized by other health care fields as valuable in the comprehensive assessment of patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to survey deans of U.S. dental schools to better understand their vision for the role of PROMs in the field of dentistry. A 13-question online survey was emailed to the deans of the 64 accredited U.S. dental schools at the time to gather their opinions about the value of patient-reported outcomes in dentistry. The survey consisted of questions in 12 domains such as treatment planning, perceived success/complications of surgery, identification/management of dental pain, psychological and oral function, and insurance payment/reimbursement. Of the 64 deans, 33 responses were received (51.5% response rate), but three surveys were excluded due to incomplete answers, resulting in a final response rate of 46.8%. All respondents reported there was value in utilization of PROMs for understanding a patient's satisfaction of a procedure, a patient's perceived success of dental surgery, identifying dental pain, and managing dental pain. However, there was disagreement among the respondents about utilization of PROMs for the purpose of determining insurance payment and/or reimbursement. Additional steps should be taken to develop clinically appropriate PROMs for dentistry and to determine the appropriate situations in which to use dental PROMs. This study suggests that PROMs should be incorporated into dental school curricula as they will likely play a role in future comprehensive treatment assessment. PMID:27251354

  10. Structured student-generated videos for first-year students at a dental school in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Omar, Hanan; Khan, Saad A; Toh, Chooi G

    2013-05-01

    Student-generated videos provide an authentic learning experience for students, enhance motivation and engagement, improve communication skills, and improve collaborative learning skills. This article describes the development and implementation of a student-generated video activity as part of a knowledge, observation, simulation, and experience (KOSE) program at the School of Dentistry, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It also reports the students' perceptions of an activity that introduced first-year dental students (n=44) to clinical scenarios involving patients and dental team aiming to improve professional behavior and communication skills. The learning activity was divided into three phases: preparatory phase, video production phase, and video-watching. Students were organized into five groups and were instructed to generate videos addressing given clinical scenarios. Following the activity, students' perceptions were assessed with a questionnaire. The results showed that 86 percent and 88 percent, respectively, of the students agreed that preparation of the activity enhanced their understanding of the role of dentists in provision of health care and the role of enhanced teamwork. In addition, 86 percent and 75 percent, respectively, agreed that the activity improved their communication and project management skills. Overall, the dental students perceived that the student-generated video activity was a positive experience and enabled them to play the major role in driving their learning process. PMID:23658411

  11. The teaching of denture marking methods in dental schools in the United Kingdom and the United States.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Raymond; Pretty, Iain A

    2009-11-01

    Forensic organizations worldwide have recommended that dental prostheses should be marked with, at a minimum, the patient's name and preferably with further unique identifiers such as a social security number. The current study aimed to assess the denture marking practice of dental schools within the United States and the United Kingdom. A questionnaire-based survey was employed to gain both quantitative and qualitative data on the methods, practices, and ethos behind denture marking in 14 U.K. and 32 U.S. dental schools. One hundred percent of U.K. and 87.5% of U.S. schools returned surveys and the results suggest that, for dental schools where there is no legal or legislative need for denture marking, the practice is inconsistently taught and appears to be reliant on internal forces within the school to increase awareness. Among those schools practicing marking, only 18% employ a technique likely to withstand common postmortem assaults; this is a concern. PMID:19804522

  12. Dental education in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people. PMID:18265775

  13. Students' clinical learning in an emerging dental school: an investigation in international collaboration between Michigan and Ghana.

    PubMed

    Peters, Mathilde C; Adu-Ababio, Francis; Jarrett-Ananaba, Nejay P; Johnson, Lynn A

    2013-12-01

    The dearth of dental faculty members is a widely known problem that is exacerbated in countries that are attempting to begin dental education programs. This collaboration between Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology and the University of Michigan investigated if dental students who have just started their clinical dental education can learn the knowledge and skills required for identifying and restoring cavitated caries lesions through compact course delivery. There were three instructional blocks: 1) didactic seminar; 2) seminar, simulated hands-on skills instruction, and clinical observation/assisting with treatment of schoolchildren; and 3) seminar, simulated skills training, and application to schoolchildren. Each dental student completed a questionnaire measuring knowledge and perceptions of knowledge, experience, and confidence at five points in time. The dental students' knowledge increased significantly as well as their perceived knowledge, experience, and confidence (p<0.0001). In general, the students showed proficiency in delivering simple treatments. The project showed that an integrated compact course delivery model may assist emerging dental schools to cope with the challenging shortage of resident faculty members. PMID:24319137

  14. Longitudinal study of dental caries increment in Malaysian school children: a 5-year cohort study.

    PubMed

    Masood, Mohd; Yusof, Norashikin; Hassan, Mohamed I A; Jaafar, Nasaruddin

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this 5-year longitudinal cohort study was to assess the prevalence, severity, and trends in caries increment and impact of the School Dental Incremental Care Programme (SDICP). Data were gathered from school dental records as part of the SDICP. A sample of 1830 children were included and checked for caries experience annually using World Health Organization criteria. In total, 95.4% of the children were caries free in 2004, and caries experience declined to 70.5% in 2009 with an average of 4.9% annually. At baseline, the mean DMFT (confidence interval [CI]) was 0.06 (0.05-0.08) and increased to 0.58 (0.53-0.63) in 2009. Children with active caries were 4.4% in 2004, and figures rose to 9.6% in 2009. The FT component increased most rapidly during these 5 years from 0.2% to 25.1%. Overall caries prevalence and increment was low in this study. Proportions of FT component were higher as compared with DT component with low rate of extractions during the latter years of the study. PMID:22218936

  15. Where is Leadership Training Being Taught in U.S. Dental Schools

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, Russell S.; Parkinson, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Leadership is vital in all professions and organizations. Our purpose was to determine where in dental schools leadership is taught, and to what degree it is emphasized so that we could establish a base line from which to generate recommendations for best practices. Therefore we surveyed all US Deans of Academic Affairs in Dental Schools to determine where in the curriculum leadership is taught and emphasized. Our results showed that leadership training is delivered in many different parts of the curriculum, and at various levels. Generally, respondents indicated that leadership education is delivered either in the setting of practice management, community outreach or in public health settings. In some cases, specific training programs are dedicated specifically to leadership development. Thus several models for leadership development were identified showing design and flexibility to address regional and national needs. In the future it would be of value to assess the effectiveness of the different models and whether single or multiple pathways for leadership training are most beneficial. PMID:22659699

  16. Noise levels in the learning-teaching activities in a dental medicine school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Andreia; Carvalho, Antonio P. O.; Fernandes, Joao C. S.

    2002-11-01

    The noise levels made by different clinical handpieces and laboratory engines are considered to be the main descriptors of acoustical comfort in learning spaces in a dental medicine school. Sound levels were measured in five types of classrooms and teaching laboratories at the University of Porto Dental Medicine School. Handpiece noise measurements were made while instruments were running free and during operations with cutting tools (tooth, metal, and acrylic). Noise levels were determined using a precision sound level meter, which was positioned at ear level and also at one-meter distance from the operator. Some of the handpieces were brand new and the others had a few years of use. The sound levels encountered were between 60 and 99 dB(A) and were compared with the noise limits in A-weighted sound pressure level for mechanical equipments installed in educational buildings included in the Portuguese Noise Code and in other European countries codes. The daily personal noise exposure levels (LEP,d) of the students and professors were calculated to be between 85 and 90 dB(A) and were compared with the European legal limits. Some noise limits for this type of environment are proposed and suggestions for the improvement of the acoustical environment are given.

  17. Perspectives on the dental school learning environment: putting theory X and theory Y into action in dental education.

    PubMed

    Connor, Joseph P; Troendle, Karen

    2008-12-01

    Theory X and Theory Y are terms coined by Douglas McGregor to express the belief that managers' behaviors are shaped by their assumptions about the motivation of their subordinates. The theories were applied to dental education in a Perspectives article published in the August 2007 issue of the Journal of Dental Education. This article explains how those seemingly contradictory theories can be reconciled using the concept of the "emotional bank account" introduced by Stephen Covey in The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. Understanding the underlying concept of an emotional bank account helps dental educators to bridge the generation gap between instructors, born during the baby boom period of 1946-63, and dental students, born after 1980, who are referred to as "Generation Y" or "millennials." PMID:19056621

  18. Teaching atraumatic restorative treatment in U.S. dental schools: a survey of predoctoral pediatric dentistry program directors.

    PubMed

    Kateeb, Elham T; Warren, John J; Damiano, Peter; Momany, Elizabeth; Kanellis, Michael; Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Ansley, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The International Dental Federation and World Health Organization have promoted the use of Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) in modern clinical settings worldwide. In the United States, the practice of ART is not believed to be widely used, which may be a result of little attention given to ART training in predoctoral pediatric dentistry curricula in U.S. dental schools. This study investigated the extent of clinical and didactic instruction on ART provided in U.S. dental schools by surveying the predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs in 2010. Of the fifty-seven directors asked to complete the survey, forty-four responded for a response rate of 77 percent. Of these forty-four programs, 66 percent reported providing clinical training on ART, though only 14 percent provide this training often or very often. The types of ART training provided often or very often included interim treatment (18 percent) and single-surface cavities (14 percent) in primary teeth. However, ART was said to be rarely taught as a definitive treatment in permanent teeth (2 percent). Attitude was a major predictor, for clinical training provided and using professional guidelines in treatment decisions were associated with a positive attitude towards ART. These predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs used ART mainly in primary, anterior, and single-surface cavities and as interim treatment. As ART increases access of children to dental care, the incorporation of the ART approach into the curricula of U.S. dental schools should be facilitated by professional organizations. PMID:24098034

  19. Geologic mapping of the Bauru Group in Sao Paulo state by LANDSAT images. [Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Godoy, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    The occurrence of the Bauru Group in Sao Paulo State was studied, with emphasis on the western plateau. Regional geological mapping was carried out on a 1:250.000 scale with the help of MSS/LANDSAT images. The visual interpretation of images consisted basically of identifying different spectral characteristics of the geological units using channels 5 and 7. Complementary studies were made for treatment of data with an Interative Image (I-100) analyser in order to facilitate the extraction of information, particularly for areas where visual interpretation proved to be difficult. Regional characteristics provided by MSS/LANDSAT images, coupled with lithostratigraphic studies carried out in the areas of occurrence of Bauru Group sediments, enabled the homogenization of criteria for the subdivision of this group. A spatial distribution of the mapped units was obtained for the entire State of Sao Paulo and results were correlated with proposed stratigraphic divisions.

  20. Allied Health Occupations II. Dental Assistant Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by dentists, dental hygienists, dental laboratory technicians, and dental assistants and also to help students acquire some basic dental assistant…

  1. A new curriculum framework for clinical prevention and population health, with a review of clinical caries prevention teaching in U.S. and Canadian dental schools.

    PubMed

    Brown, John P

    2007-05-01

    To fulfill the Healthy People 2010 Objective 1.7, "Increase the proportion of . . . health professional training schools whose basic curriculum for health care providers includes the core competencies in health promotion and disease prevention," the Healthy People Curriculum Task Force has developed a curriculum framework for clinical prevention and population health for all the health professions. This framework has four components: 1) evidence base for practice; 2) clinical preventive services, including health promotion; 3) health systems and health policy; and 4) community aspects of practice. Within these four common components are nineteen domains, for which each health profession is identifying its own educational objectives. An inventory of knowledge and skills is being developed. A prerequisite to promoting change in the teaching of dental prevention and population oral health is to better understand the current status. Sixty-six of sixty-eight U.S. and Canadian dental schools provided input on the teaching of one important aspect of this wider topic--dental caries prevention--before a December 2002 Clinical Preventive Dentistry Leadership Conference in Cincinnati, OH. In clinical teaching, 68 percent of dental schools included caries risk assessment and also reevaluated preventive outcomes, but while 65 percent included remineralization procedures, only 38 percent specifically reevaluated this outcome. Faculty members have commonalities in attitudes about the advantages and problems in improving teaching in clinical prevention, yet dental schools act individually in curricular design and implementation. The conference introduced a method of conceptualizing change, so that dental schools might address organizational barriers in clinical curriculum development. Even with the new common curriculum framework, other barriers to improved dental prevention and population oral health exist: these include organizational change in dental schools, dental practices

  2. Current cariology education in dental schools in Spanish-speaking Latin American countries.

    PubMed

    Martignon, Stefania; Gomez, Juliana; Tellez, Marisol; Ruiz, Jaime A; Marin, Lina M; Rangel, Maria C

    2013-10-01

    This study sought to provide an overview of current cariology education in Spanish-speaking Latin American dental schools. Data collection was via an eighteen-item survey with questions about curriculum, methods of diagnosis and treatment, and instructors' perceptions about cariology teaching. The response rate was 62.1 percent (n=54), and distribution of participating schools by country was as follows: Bolivia (four), Chile (four), Colombia (twenty-four), Costa Rica (one), Cuba (one), Dominican Republic (two), El Salvador (two), Mexico (six), Panama (two), Peru (four), Puerto Rico (one), Uruguay (two), and Venezuela (one). Forty percent of the responding schools considered cariology the key axis of a course, with a cariology department in 16.7 percent. All schools reported teaching cariology, but with varying hours and at varying times in the curriculum, and 77.8 percent reported having preclinical practices. The majority reported teaching most main teaching topics, except for behavioral sciences, microbiology, saliva and systemic diseases, caries-risk factors, root caries, erosion, and early caries management strategies. The most frequently taught caries detection methods were visual-tactile (96.3 percent), radiographic (92.6 percent), and the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) (61.1 percent). Respondents said their schools' clinics make an operative treatment decision when radiolucency is in the inner half of enamel (42.3 percent) for radiographic criteria and when the lesion is visually non-cavitated (5.8 percent). All respondents reported that their schools teach preventive strategies, but only 43.4 percent said they tie it to risk assessment and 40.7 percent said they implement nonsurgical management regularly. PMID:24098037

  3. American Dental Education Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... work hard to help your students fulfill their dreams, and play a crucial... Learn more Dental School ... Terms of Use | Website Feedback | Website Help ©2016 American Dental Education Association® (ADEA), 655 K Street, NW, ...

  4. Mexican dental school deans' opinions and practices regarding oral cancer, 2007.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Mayoral, E E; Sánchez-Pérez, L; Olguín-Barreto, Y; Acosta-Gío, A E

    2008-12-01

    Dentists must be trained in oral cancer (OC) screening and counseling. However, educational gaps exist in OC prevention worldwide. The objective of this investigation was to assess self-reported perceptions and practices relevant to OC education among Mexican dental school deans. At a leadership meeting in 2007, deans were given a questionnaire containing Likert-type scale evaluations of agreement with statements. Associations between variables were analyzed with Pearson's chi-square test. Of thirty-four deans attending, twenty-three (68 percent response rate) answered the questionnaire in full. Among the respondents, 83 percent believed "very strongly" that dentists must look for OC, but only 52 percent believed "very strongly" that OC screening must be adopted as a standard practice. Fifty-two percent ranked dentists' responsibility in looking after their patients' overall health as "very strong." The deans indicated less support for dentists' roles to intervene in tobacco and alcohol cessation. Participant deans lead institutions that provide education for over 12,000 dental students; their low awareness on OC screening and counseling may hinder the establishment of routine standardized screening and health promotion that help save human lives. PMID:19056627

  5. What dental schools can learn from college experiences of American Indian students.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Naty

    2010-04-01

    American Indians continue to be underrepresented in dental education. They also remain an understudied group. This qualitative study used interviews to explore the positive and negative experiences of thirty American Indian college students studying at a large public university; these students from eighteen tribal nations ranged from eighteen to forty-four years of age. The intent was to identify challenges they face and factors that contribute to their resilience and persistence in their education. Results show that these students deal with issues related to financing their education, absence from family, alienation from friends, large classes, and lack of guidance and direction. A desire for improvement in their personal lives, parental involvement and encouragement, integration into a community of fellow American Indian students, and having a place of meeting and support were reported as contributing to their persistence. Students expressed preferences for smaller classes and closer relations with faculty members, as well as the need for advisors and orientation at the start of college life. To improve their recruitment and retention programs for American Indian students, dental schools should utilize the high value these students place on education and learn to involve their parents and communities in their efforts. PMID:20388810

  6. Perceptions and practices of U.S. dental schools regarding curriculum integrated format and traditional format licensure exams.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shamik; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Donoff, R Bruce; Howell, T Howard; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2013-08-01

    The dental licensure exam in the United States has evolved over the past ten years, and two formats-the traditional format and curriculum integrated format-are now available for students to satisfy licensure requirements. The objective of this study was to examine the differences and relative merits of the two formats. A twenty-five-question survey was distributed to the fifty-seven U.S. dental schools at the time. The survey included both quantitative and discrete variables and followed a strategic sequential order. The first set of questions sought to determine what type of board preparatory/mock exam each dental school offered, and the next set of questions asked which licensure exam each school formally offered. The final questions were qualitative in nature and aimed to determine the school representatives' opinions about the curriculum integrated format versus traditional format. Of the fifty-seven schools contacted, thirty-seven agreed to participate (response rate=64.9 percent). Fourteen schools reported that they administer the traditional format only and twelve administer the curriculum integrated format only, while eleven offer both. Thirty-two schools offered mock board exams to their graduating students, and twenty-four of those said their mock exams were identical in format to the actual qualifying clinical exams offered at their institution. The respondents reported no significant advantage to preparing for the curriculum integrated format examination as compared to the traditional format examination with regards to number of clock hours taken from regular curriculum time. In reporting on this study, this article provides an overview of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the two examination formats used for the dental licensure process in the United States. PMID:23929575

  7. Susceptibility and immunity to hepatitis B and rubella in a dental school population.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Miller, R W; Graham, W L; Bowers, D C

    1984-04-01

    The incidence of hepatitis B infections and the rubella susceptibility of females was assessed in a dental school population, utilizing a commercially available enzyme immunosorbent assay. Surface antibody to hepatitis B virus was found in 8 percent of those individuals who provide direct patient care. The number of subjects nonimmune to rubella virus was 9 percent. Ninety percent of the individuals tested for past hepatitis B infection gave no knowledge of previous illness. More than half of the nonimmune rubella subjects gave a positive history of previous vaccinations or actual measles infection. This study supports the concern that patient histories present some shortcomings when used as monitors of disease history with regard to the rubella and hepatitis B viruses, and demonstrates the value of low-cost, expedient screening in institutions involved in educating health professionals. PMID:6585389

  8. Caring for Kids Is Fighting Back by Giving Kids the Dental Care They Need at School. This Is How It Works...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. School of Public Health and Health Services.

    For more than 30 years, school-based health centers have been making an important difference in the health of millions of children by providing an array of medical and other health services at school. This brochure addresses school-based dental care as part of the Caring for Kids program, a multi-site grant program funded through the Robert Wood…

  9. DENTAL FLUOROSIS AND ITS RELATION TO SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS, PARENTS' KNOWLEDGE AND AWARENESS AMONG 12-YEAR-OLD SCHOOL CHILDREN IN QUETTA, PAKISTAN.

    PubMed

    Sami, Erum; Vichayanrat, Tippanart; Satitvipawee, Pratana

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of dental fluorosis and its relationship to socioeconomic status, knowledge, and awareness among 12-year-old school children in Quetta, Pakistan. A cross sectional study was conducted among 349 school children aged 12 years in Quetta, Pakistan. By interviewing children and questionnaire for parents, socioeconomic status, knowledge, and awareness of fluorosis were collected. Dental fluorosis was examined using Dean's Index and Community Fluorosis Index. Prevalence of dental fluorosis was high (63.6%) among children with a majority of moderate and mild degree at 32.1% and 27.5%, respectively. The community fluorosis index was 1.6. While most children and parents had low-to-moderate levels of fluorosis knowledge, the majority of them worried about dental fluorosis. Most parents (84.8%) were uncertain about the condition of fluorosis in their children, and 87.4% did not know about fluorosis before. Dental fluorosis was found significantly associated with gender, family income, and parents' awareness (p ≤ 0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that gender, and parent's awareness significantly predicted children's dental fluorosis. Knowledge and basic information regarding dental fluorosis is lacking in the community. Efforts in dissemination and communication about dental fluorosis should be increased in order to raise awareness and prevent the dental fluorosis in Pakistan. PMID:26513940

  10. Computer literacy and attitudes among students in 16 European dental schools: current aspects, regional differences and future trends.

    PubMed

    Mattheos, N; Nattestad, A; Schittek, M; Attström, R

    2002-02-01

    A questionnaire survey was carried out to investigate the competence and attitude of dental students towards computers. The current study presents the findings deriving from 590 questionnaires collected from 16 European dental schools from 9 countries between October 1998 and October 1999. The results suggest that 60% of students use computers for their education, while 72% have access to the Internet. The overall figures, however, disguise major differences between the various universities. Students in Northern and Western Europe seem to rely mostly on university facilities to access the Internet. The same however, is not true for students in Greece and Spain, who appear to depend on home computers. Less than half the students have been exposed to some form of computer literacy education in their universities, with the great majority acquiring their competence in other ways. The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills of the average dental student, within this limited sample of dental schools, do not facilitate full use of new media available. In addition, if the observed regional differences are valid, there may be an educational and political problem that could intensify inequalities among professionals in the future. To minimize this potential problem, closer cooperation between academic institutions, with sharing of resources and expertise, is recommended. PMID:11872071

  11. Prevalence and Association of Developmental Defects of Enamel with, Dental- Caries and Nutritional Status in Pre-School Children, Lucknow

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sabyasachi; Jagannath, G.V.; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background Developmental Defects of Enamel in the primary dentition may be associated and predictors of dental caries and nutritional status. The aim of the present study was to assess the Prevalence of Developmental Defects of Enamel and its Association with, Dental-Caries and Nutritional Status in Pre-School Children of Lucknow, India. Materials and Methods Multistage Sampling was done. A total of 302 pre-school (Rural and Urban) children were examined. Type III examination was conducted with WHO Probe. Developmental Enamel Defects (DED) and Dental Caries were assessed using WHO (1997) Proforma. Results The prevalence of DED of any type was 39.9% with that of demarcated opacities being the highest, followed by hypoplasia. The most frequently affected teeth were maxillary anterior teeth, while the least affected teeth were mandibular incisors. The mean dmft was 3.5. A positive association between DED and caries was observed. Association between Dental Caries & BMI was non-significant whereas Pearson correlation showed a negative correlation between the two. Conclusion The prevalence of enamel defects and caries was high, as the enamel defects were strongly associated with caries. PMID:26557622

  12. Health Information Technology Systems profoundly impact users: a case study in a dental school.

    PubMed

    Hill, Heather K; Stewart, Denice C L; Ash, Joan S

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to increase our understanding of the impact of Health Information Technology Systems (HITS) on dental school users when the systems are integrated into chair-side patient care. We used qualitative research methods, including interviews, focus groups, and observations, to capture the experiences of HITS users at a single institution. Users included administrators, clinical faculty members, predoctoral students, support staff, and residents. The data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach, and nine themes emerged: 1) HITS benefits were disproportionate among users; 2) communicating about the HITS was challenging; 3) users experienced a range of strong emotions; 4) the instructor persona diminished; 5) there were shifts in the school's power structure; 6) allocation of end-users' time shifted; 7) the training and support needs of end-users were significant; 8) perceived lack of HITS usability made documentation cumbersome for clinicians; and 9) clinicians' workflow was disrupted. HITS integration into patient care impacts the work of all system users, especially end-users. The themes highlight areas of potential concern for implementers and users in integrating a HITS into patient care. PMID:20388817

  13. Assessment of implementation of a CAMBRA-based program in a dental school environment.

    PubMed

    Teich, Sorin T; Demko, Catherine; Al-Rawi, Wisam; Gutberg, Tom

    2013-04-01

    Caries development is determined by a balance of protective and pathological factors, so the clinician should be able to identify and document those factors, understand their relative weight in disease development or reversal, and make recommendations to patients that will lead to risk reduction. The caries management by risk assessment (CAMBRA) protocol frames these factors into an easy-to-follow template that also guides the clinician in making recommendations. The purposes of this study were to examine implementation of the CAMBRA-based risk assessment program in a predoctoral clinic at one dental school, assess the accuracy of caries risk evaluation by the students, and evaluate the utilization of professionally applied fluoride varnish in a moderate- and high-risk patient cohort. After dental clinic patients were screened for previous caries risk status, sixty-eight moderate- or high-risk patients were invited to participate in the study. At the study visit that included four bite-wing radiographs, a new caries risk assessment (CRA) form was completed. Our results showed that students underestimated the risk in 25 percent of the cases; the underestimation occurred especially when visible cavitation or caries into dentin by radiograph was the only risk factor or when caries were not identified at the initial visit when the CRA form was completed for the first time despite the presence of other high-risk factors. Students also underestimated both risk and protective factors at the initial evaluation visit compared with the study visit. The results show that students were not rigorous enough in documenting these factors and determining the patient's risk. In order to increase the sensitivity of risk assessment, training and recalibration for students and faculty members should be an ongoing process. PMID:23576589

  14. Clinical Teaching of Prosthodontics in Undergraduate Courses in a German Dental School: Patients, Visits, Efforts, and Incentives.

    PubMed

    Huettig, Fabian; Behrend, Florian

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown what disadvantages are faced by patients deciding for a prosthodontic treatment by inexperienced students. Commonly, the related extra effort and time are compensated by cost reduction of treatment fees. Thereby, the dental schools subsidize treatments to teach clinical prosthodontics. The aim of this study was to clarify the benefits to patients as well as the efforts of the dental school. Data collected from three courses in a dental school in Germany were patient gender, age, occupation, zip code, number of visits, scope of treatment including costs, financial discount, and remaining copayment. Travel costs were calculated based on zip code. Balance of travel costs and treatment discount was defined as financial benefit. The results showed that 185 patients (95 male) aged 32 to 82 years (median=58) were treated with fixed restorations (FR, n=110), telescopic dentures (TD, n=87), complete dentures (CD, n=17), or other (RD, n=3). The mean number of visits was 11 for FR, 12 for TD, and 9 for CD. Single distance to the clinic ranged from 0.6 to 65 miles (median=12). Total costs of prosthodontics were reduced by 19% on average. The mean financial benefit was 429 USD (median=298, min=-482, max=4025). The financial benefits were found to differ widely, including additional expenditures of patients. Participation, travel burden, and copayment did not depend on age, gender, or occupation. The financial benefit was relativized because students needed at least twice the sessions of a dentist. As a result, the financial efforts of dental schools are significant and compromise a cost-covering education. PMID:26729683

  15. A school-wide assessment of social media usage by students in a US dental school.

    PubMed

    Arnett, M R; Christensen, H L; Nelson, B A

    2014-11-01

    Social media sites have become an established means of communication due to the exponential growth in number of users across the world and the encouragement of interaction between users through site features. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which Loma Linda University School of Dentistry students use social media accounts, the types of accounts they prefer, their interest in incorporating social media into courses and their perceptions of the usefulness of social media in private practice. In addition, we wanted to determine the degree of student interest in the integration of these social tools into their instruction. One thousand one hundred and sixty-two students from Loma Linda University School of Dentistry were invited by e-mail to complete a confidential 18 item multiple choice survey through Surveymonkey.com. The overall response rate was 30% (n = 351) from the pooled response periods; the first in 2011 and the second in 2013. Similar to other studies, Facebook was used by 91% of the School of Dentistry students, and less than half used Google+, Twitter and LinkedIn. Of the respondents, 68% of students reported communicating on social media daily and 80% saw value for practising dentists to operate accounts. Time and privacy concerns were the largest barriers to usage at 16% and 12% respectively. One third of respondents were in favour of the incorporation of social media in their courses. PMID:25377826

  16. A follow-up survey of the teaching of conscious sedation in dental schools of the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Leitch, J; Jauhar, S

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this follow-up study was to assess and compare the quantity and quality of dental undergraduate teaching in conscious sedation with comparisons to a previous study conducted in 1998. Questionnaires were designed to collect information about undergraduate sedation education from teaching staff and final-year dental undergraduates at the 15 dental schools in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Staff responses from 9 schools (60%) and student responses from 11 schools (73%) were received. From the students' responses, the mean (range) number of cases observed in inhalational sedation was 7 (0-17) and the mean (range) number performed in inhalational sedation was 4 (0-8). The mean (range) number of cases observed in intravenous sedation was 9 (2-19), and the mean (range) number performed was 5 (0-8). There has been an increase in didactic teaching. There has been a decrease in the observing of inhalational cases, but an increase in the hands-on performance of this type of sedation. There is an increase in the hands-on teaching of intravenous sedation. PMID:16863392

  17. Dental caries and oral health practice among 12 year old school children from low socio-economic status background in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mafuvadze, Brighton Tasara; Mahachi, Lovemore; Mafuvadze, Benford

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Dental caries is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases affecting children in Sub-Saharan Africa. Previous studies show a higher prevalence of dental caries in children from low socio-economic status backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of dental caries among 12 year old children in urban and rural areas of Zimbabwe and establish preliminary baseline data. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 12 year old children at primary schools in Harare and Bikita district. A Pre-tested questionnaire was administered to elicit information from the participants on tooth cleaning, dietary habits and dental experience. Dental caries status was assessed using the DMFT index following World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Results Our results showed a high prevalence of dental caries in both urban (59.5%) and rural (40.8%) children. The mean DMFT in urban and rural areas was 1.29 and 0.66, respectively. Furthermore, our data showed a general lack of knowledge on oral health issues by the participants. Conclusion There is high prevalence of dental caries among 12 years old school children in both urban and rural areas of Zimbabwe. This calls for early preventive strategies and treatment services. We recommend incorporation of oral health education in the elementary school curricula. PMID:23819006

  18. U.S. Dental students' and faculty members' attitudes about technology, instructional strategies, student diversity, and school duration: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Abdelkarim, Ahmad; Benghuzzi, Hamed; Hamadain, Elgenaid; Tucci, Michelle; Ford, Timothy; Sullivan, Donna

    2014-04-01

    In this study, attitudes and perceptions of U.S. dental students and faculty members were evaluated regarding four aspects of dental education: technology integration, instructional strategies, student diversity, and school duration. A survey instrument with eight statements using a five-point Likert scale and a free-text comment section was developed and distributed through Survey Monkey. A total of 426 students and 187 faculty members from ten U.S. dental schools participated, a response rate of 17 percent of those surveyed. Faculty and student responses were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The results of this analytic procedure revealed that the groups differed in their average responses for seven of the eight statements. Analysis of the faculty and student comments revealed similar themes between the two groups. Both dental students and dental faculty members stated that technology integration should be viewed as only a supplement to conventional instruction and showed mixed opinions about electronic textbooks. Further, both groups had positive views of the roles of problem-based learning, community service, and the integration of research practice into dental education. Both groups also valued diversity in the student body and supported the current four-year duration of dental school. PMID:24706692

  19. Appointments failure among female patients at a dental school clinic in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Albarakati, Sahar F

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the factors and reasons responsible for failed appointments among female patients attending a dental school clinic. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at the College of Dentistry in Riyadh city on 200 patients who failed to keep their appointments at least one time. The data were collected using a structured, pretested questionnaire through a telephone interview method from January through May 2007. The selected sample was in the age group of fourteen years and older. The response rate was 86 percent. The results illustrated that most of the patients who broke their appointments were married, housewives, above forty years in age, and of low to middle socioeconomic status. It was found that the most common reasons for failed appointments were fasting in the Holy Month of Ramadan (79.1 percent) followed by transportation difficulty (76.2 percent), inconvenient appointment time (65.1 percent), and dissatisfaction of communication with booking area (54.1 percent). PMID:19734254

  20. Taking a quality assurance program from paper to electronic health records: one dental school's experience.

    PubMed

    Filker, Phyllis J; Muckey, Erin Joy; Kelner, Steven M; Kodish-Stav, Jodi

    2009-09-01

    The Obama administration is seeking to increase access to and improve the efficiency of the health care system in the United States. One aspect of those efforts is a push towards the utilization of electronic health records (EHRs) by health care providers. Nova Southeastern University College of Dental Medicine (NSU-CDM) opened its doors in 1997 and began its evolution from paper charts to EHRs in 2006. AxiUm, a computer-run patient record and clinical management system, has become an integral part of the college's quality assurance program and its students' clinical education. Since the introduction of axiUm, the school has already noticed an increase in the quality of patient care due to improved oversight of patient management and the ability to more efficiently track treatment outcomes. Over time, the system will enable data collected by students providing care in the clinics to be quantified. Opposition to EHRs tends to stem primarily from the amount of time required for users to gain proficiency in the new technology, as well as from the initial cost to the provider. But there is no better place to begin this learning process regarding the importance and utilization of EHR systems than universities, where health professions students can acquire a comfort level with EHRs in an academic environment that they may then implement in their future practice. PMID:19734251

  1. Interactional Patterns Among Dental School Students and the Influence of Building Design. Final Progress Report on the Planning Study: Behavioral Factors in Dental School Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myrick, Richard; Marx, Barbara S.

    The relationship of architecture to human behavior is a topic of increasing concern both to designers and behavioral scientists. To further evaluate the extent of the relationship a series of preliminary investigations has been undertaken. The primary means of measurement was informal conversations of dental students as related to the…

  2. Culture and Dental Health among African Immigrant School-Aged Children in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obeng, Cecilia S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper examines African immigrant parents' views on dental decay and whether such views affect their decision to obtain dental insurance for their children. The paper also examines the cultural underpinnings of the immigrants' oral health care practices. Design/methodology/approach: The data for the study were collected in the states…

  3. The emerging dental workforce: long-term career expectations and influences. A quantitative study of final year dental students' views on their long-term career from one London Dental School

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    .02), 'retraining facilities after career break' (p = 0.01), 'assistance with student debt' (p = 0.01) and 'incentives to work in deprived areas'. Conclusion Long-term career plans of new graduates from this London Dental School commonly embrace opportunities for professional development as well as personal issues such as work/life balance and financial income. Significant differences were identified between male and females long-term plans and influences. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:20030814

  4. e-Assessment in a Limited-Resources Dental School Using an Open-Source Learning Management System.

    PubMed

    El Tantawi, Maha M A; Abdelsalam, Maha M; Mourady, Ahmed M; Elrifae, Ismail M B

    2015-05-01

    e-Assessment provides solutions to some problems encountered in dental students' evaluation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the experience of a limited-resources dental school with e-assessment provided through an open-source learning management system (LMS). Data about users' access and types of e-assessment activities at the Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Egypt, were obtained from the web-based LMS Moodle. A questionnaire developed to assess students' perceptions of the e-assessment was also sent to students registered in two courses (undergraduate and postgraduate) with the same instructor. The results showed that most e-courses at the school had one form of e-assessment (82%) and, of these, 16.7% had summative assessment activities. There were significant differences among departments in the number of e-courses with e-assessment. One-quarter of e-courses with e-assessment used Moodle quizzes. Of 285 students registered in the two courses that included the questionnaire, 170 responded (response rate=59.6%). The responding students positively perceived the impact of e-assessment on learning and its reliability and security, whereas technical issues and related stresses were negatively perceived. This study suggests that e-assessment can be used at minimal cost in dental schools with limited resources and large class sizes with the least demands on faculty members and teaching staff time. For these schools, an open-source LMS such as Moodle provides formative e-assessment not available otherwise and accommodates various question formats and varying levels of instructors' technical skills. These students seemed to have a positive impression of the e-assessment although technical problems and related stresses are issues that need to be addressed. PMID:25941151

  5. Comparison of A level and UKCAT performance in students applying to UK medical and dental schools in 2006: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Janet; Nicholson, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) adds value to the selection process for school leaver applicants to medical and dental school, and in particular whether UKCAT can reduce the socioeconomic bias known to affect A levels. Design Cohort study Setting Applicants to 23 UK medical and dental schools in 2006. Participants 9884 applicants who took the UKCAT in the UK and who achieved at least three passes at A level in their school leaving examinations (53% of all applicants). Main outcome measures Independent predictors of obtaining at least AAB at A level and UKCAT scores at or above the 30th centile for the cohort, for the subsections and the entire test. Results Independent predictors of obtaining at least AAB at A level were white ethnicity (odds ratio 1.58, 95% confidence interval 1.41 to 1.77), professional or managerial background (1.39, 1.22 to 1.59), and independent or grammar schooling (2.26, 2.02 to 2.52) (all P<0.001). Independent predictors of achieving UKCAT scores at or above the 30th centile for the whole test were male sex (odd ratio 1.48, 1.32 to 1.66), white ethnicity (2.17, 1.94 to 2.43), professional or managerial background (1.34, 1.17 to 1.54), and independent or grammar schooling (1.91, 1.70 to 2.14) (all P<0.001). One major limitation of the study was that socioeconomic status was not volunteered by approximately 30% of the applicants. Those who withheld socioeconomic status data were significantly different from those who provided that information, which may have caused bias in the analysis. Conclusions UKCAT was introduced with a high expectation of increasing the diversity and fairness in selection for UK medical and dental schools. This study of a major subgroup of applicants in the first year of operation suggests that it has an inherent favourable bias to men and students from a higher socioeconomic class or independent or grammar schools. However, it does provide a reasonable proxy for A levels in the

  6. Effectiveness of Educational Poster on Knowledge of Emergency Management of Dental Trauma - Part 2: Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial for Secondary School Students

    PubMed Central

    Young, Cecilia; Wong, Kin Yau; Cheung, Lim K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of educational poster on improving secondary school students' knowledge of emergency management of dental trauma. Methods A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted. 16 schools with total 671 secondary students who can read Chinese or English were randomised into intervention (poster, 8 schools, 364 students) and control groups (8 schools, 305 students) at the school level. Baseline knowledge of dental trauma was obtained by a questionnaire. Poster containing information of dental trauma management was displayed in a classroom for 2 weeks in each school in the intervention group whereas in the control group there was no display of such posters. Students of both groups completed the same questionnarie after 2 weeks. Results Two-week display of posters improved the knowledge score by 1.25 (p-value = 0.0407) on average. Conclusion Educational poster on dental trauma management significantly improved the level of knowledge of secondary school students in Hong Kong. Trial Registration HKClinicalTrial.com HKCTR-1343 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01809457 PMID:25093728

  7. Trajectory and contribution of geoscientists (1906-1961) to dinosaur research in the Bauru Group (Cretaceous) in the Triângulo Mineiro region of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyerl, Drielli; Candeiro, Carlos Roberto A.; Mendonça Figueirôa, Silvia Fernanda

    2015-08-01

    The present study discusses geological and paleontological research conducted by geoscientists in the Late Cretaceous Bauru Group, of the Triângulo Mineiro region, Brazil. This analysis based largely on historical documentary sources focuses on the pioneering work of geoscientists, who made numerous discoveries of dinosaur fossils. This work contributes to a chronological survey that has been compiled on the geological studies in the Bauru Group, and describes the importance of the paleontological discoveries made during the twentieth century.

  8. Study on frequency of dental developmental alterations in a Mexican school-based population

    PubMed Central

    Garcés-Ortíz, Maricela; Salcido-García, Juan-Francisco; Hernández-Flores, Florentino

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to know the distribution of dental developmental alterations in the population requesting stomatological attention at the Admission and Diagnosis Clinic of our institution in Mexico City. Material and Methods We reviewed the archives and selected those files with developmental dental alterations. Analyzed data were diagnoses, age, gender, location and number of involved teeth. Results Of the 3.522 patients reviewed, 179 (5.1%) harbored 394 developmental dental alterations. Of them, 45.2% were males and 54.8% were females with a mean age of 16.7 years. The most common were supernumeraries, dental agenesia and dilaceration. Adults were 30.7% of the patients with dental developmental alterations. In them, the most common lesions were agenesia and supernumeraries. Mesiodens was the most frequently found supernumerary teeth (14.7%). Conclusions Our finding that 30.7% of the affected patients were adults is an undescribed and unusually high proportion of patients that have implications on planning and prognosis of their stomatological treatment. Key words:Developmental dental alterations, developmental alterations, supernumerary teeth, dental agenesia, root dilaceration. PMID:26946196

  9. Dental Caries and the Associated Factors Influencing It in Tribal, Suburban and Urban School Children of Tamil Nadu, India: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    John, J. Baby; Asokan, Sharath; Aswanth, KP; Priya, P.R. Geetha; Shanmugaavel, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background The study was planned to assess the prevalence of dental caries among tribal, suburban and urban children of Tiruchengode and Erode of Tamil Nadu state, India. The objective of the study was to assess the association of dental caries with family background, dental service availability, transportation and knowledge on preventive dental measures among these three groups Design and methods Cross-sectional study. A total of 1028 school children in the age range of 9-12 years from various government schools located in Palamalai and Kolli Hills (tribal), Tiruchengode (suburban) and Erode (urban), Tamil Nadu, were included in the study. Decayed, filled, and missing teeth (DMFT), decayed and filled teeth (dft) and Significant Caries Index were recorded. A specially prepared questionnaire was used to record all the data regarding oral hygiene practices, socioeconomic background, dental treatment availability, parent’s education level were used for the study. ANOVA t-test and post hoc test were used for comparing quantitative variables between the 3 subgroups. Results The tribal school children had 89.3% caries prevalence, where as it was 77% in suburban and 55% in urban school children. The mean DMFT score among tribal, suburban and urban school children were statistically significant different (P=0.001) between the three groups. There was a highly significant difference (P=0.001) in the mean DMFT score based on brushing frequency. There was a statistically significant difference (P=0.018) in the mean DMFT scores in the urban group based on the mothers education status. There were no statistically significant differences in the mean DMFT scores based on the presence or absence of television in their house and the parents’ income. Conclusions Oral hygiene practices, dietary habits and access to dental care services played an important role in prevalence of dental caries. It was observed that the socioeconomic status, parents’ educational status and mass

  10. Meeting the Demand for Future Dental School Faculty: Trends, Challenges, and Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haden, N. Karl; Weaver, Richard G.; Valachovic, Richard W.

    2002-01-01

    Presents data from the American Dental Education Association's 2001-02 survey of vacant budgeted faculty positions and examines challenges likely to exacerbate faculty shortages in the immediate future. (EV)

  11. Relationship Between Drinking Water Fluoride Levels, Dental Fluorosis, Dental Caries and Associated Risk Factors in 9-12 Years Old School Children of Nelakondapally Mandal of Khammam District, Andhra Pradesh, India: A Cross-sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Shanthi, M; Reddy, B Vishnuvardhan; Venkataramana, V; Gowrisankar, S; Reddy, B V Thimma; Chennupati, Sireesha

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study was conducted to assess the relationship between drinking water fluoride (F) levels, dental fluorosis and dental caries among 9-12 years old school children of Nelakondapally Mandal, Khammam district, Andhra Pradesh. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted on 1500 school children aged 9-12 years, selected by stratified random sampling from different areas with different levels of naturally occurring F in drinking water. The children were assessed for dental fluorosis according to WHO basic survey guidelines. The overall oral health status of the child was assessed by decayed missing filled teeth (DMFT)/dmft index. Statistical analysis was done using mean, standard deviation, standard error, Z-test, ANOVA test, and Chi-square test. Results: The results of the present study revealed that the prevalence of fluorosis was 74.9%. Number of children having dental fluorosis was highest in children who consume water from bore wells. Caries prevalence in the study population was about 56.5%. Caries prevalence and mean DMFT/dmft scores were least in children with optimal F areas and highest in children with below optimal F areas. Conclusion: There was moderate prevalence of fluorosis in Nelakondapally Mandal of Khammam district, and caries prevalence is high in areas below optimal F areas. How to cite the article: Shanthi M, Reddy BV, Venkataramana V, Gowrisankar S, Reddy BV, Chennupati S. Relationship between drinking water fluoride levels, dental fluorosis, dental caries and associated risk factors in 9-12 year old school children of Nelakondapally Mandal of Khammam district, Andhra Pradesh, India: A cross-sectional survey. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):106-10. PMID:25083044

  12. Dietary Fluoride Intake and Associated Skeletal and Dental Fluorosis in School Age Children in Rural Ethiopian Rift Valley

    PubMed Central

    Kebede, Aweke; Retta, Negussie; Abuye, Cherinet; Whiting, Susan J.; Kassaw, Melkitu; Zeru, Tesfaye; Tessema, Masresha; Kjellevold, Marian

    2016-01-01

    An observational study was conducted to determine dietary fluoride intake, diet, and prevalence of dental and skeletal fluorosis of school age children in three fluorosis endemic districts of the Ethiopian Rift Valley having similar concentrations of fluoride (F) in drinking water (~5 mg F/L). The duplicate plate method was used to collect foods consumed by children over 24 h from 20 households in each community (n = 60) and the foods, along with water and beverages, were analyzed for fluoride (F) content. Prevalence of dental and skeletal fluorosis was determined using presence of clinical symptoms in children (n = 220). Daily dietary fluoride intake was at or above tolerable upper intake level (UL) of 10 mg F/day and the dietary sources (water, prepared food and beverages) all contributed to the daily fluoride burden. Urinary fluoride in children from Fentale and Adamitulu was almost twice (>5 mg/L) the concentration found in urine from children from Alaba, where rain water harvesting was most common. Severe and moderate dental fluorosis was found in Alaba and Adamitulu, the highest severity and prevalence being in the latter district where staple foods were lowest in calcium. Children in all three areas showed evidence of both skeletal and non-skeletal fluorosis. Our data support the hypothesis that intake of calcium rich foods in addition to using rain water for household consumption and preparation of food, may help in reducing risk of fluorosis in Ethiopia, but prospective studies are needed. PMID:27472351

  13. Dietary Fluoride Intake and Associated Skeletal and Dental Fluorosis in School Age Children in Rural Ethiopian Rift Valley.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Aweke; Retta, Negussie; Abuye, Cherinet; Whiting, Susan J; Kassaw, Melkitu; Zeru, Tesfaye; Tessema, Masresha; Kjellevold, Marian

    2016-01-01

    An observational study was conducted to determine dietary fluoride intake, diet, and prevalence of dental and skeletal fluorosis of school age children in three fluorosis endemic districts of the Ethiopian Rift Valley having similar concentrations of fluoride (F) in drinking water (~5 mg F/L). The duplicate plate method was used to collect foods consumed by children over 24 h from 20 households in each community (n = 60) and the foods, along with water and beverages, were analyzed for fluoride (F) content. Prevalence of dental and skeletal fluorosis was determined using presence of clinical symptoms in children (n = 220). Daily dietary fluoride intake was at or above tolerable upper intake level (UL) of 10 mg F/day and the dietary sources (water, prepared food and beverages) all contributed to the daily fluoride burden. Urinary fluoride in children from Fentale and Adamitulu was almost twice (>5 mg/L) the concentration found in urine from children from Alaba, where rain water harvesting was most common. Severe and moderate dental fluorosis was found in Alaba and Adamitulu, the highest severity and prevalence being in the latter district where staple foods were lowest in calcium. Children in all three areas showed evidence of both skeletal and non-skeletal fluorosis. Our data support the hypothesis that intake of calcium rich foods in addition to using rain water for household consumption and preparation of food, may help in reducing risk of fluorosis in Ethiopia, but prospective studies are needed. PMID:27472351

  14. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  15. Association of traumatic dental injuries with individual-, sociodemographic- and school-related factors among schoolchildren in midwest Brazil.

    PubMed

    Freire, Maria do Carmo Matias; Vasconcelos, Daniela Nobre; dos Santos Vieira, Alessandra; Araújo, Júlia Arantes; da Silveira Moreira, Rafael; de Fátima Nunes, Maria

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the association of untreated traumatic dental injuries (TDI) with individual-, sociodemographic- and school-related factors among 12-year-old schoolchildren in Midwest Brazil. This cross-sectional study was carried out in 2010 in the city of Goiania, Brazil. A random sample of 2075 schoolchildren was examined and interviewed. Untreated TDI in the permanent incisors was assessed using the methodology of the Brazilian National Oral Health Survey. Rao-Scott test and multinomial logistic regression were used to analyze the associations between independent variables and three categories of TDI, using a hierarchical method. Independent variables were children's sex, self rated color/race and size of incisal overjet, their mother's level of schooling, and the schools' type and geographic location. The prevalence of trauma was 17.3% (CI 95% = 15.2-19.4); enamel fractures were the most common TDI (13.1%). In the adjusted model, a higher chance of having two or more teeth with TDI was found among boys, those whose mothers had lowest level of schooling, and those attending schools located in health districts with lower socioeconomic indicators. It was concluded that the prevalence of TDI was low and that it was associated with individual factors as well as the school environments. PMID:25247429

  16. Prevalence of Traumatic Dental Injuries to Anterior Teeth of 12-Year-Old School Children in Kashmir, India

    PubMed Central

    Ain, Tasneem S.; Lingesha Telgi, Ravishankar; Sultan, Saima; Tangade, Pradeep; Ravishankar Telgi, Chaitra; Tirth, Amit; Kumar Pal, Sumit; Gowhar, Owais; Tandon, Vaibhav

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic dental injuries to anterior teeth are a significant public health problem, not only because their prevalence is relatively high, but also because they have considerable impact on children’s daily lives. Traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) cause physical and psychological discomfort, pain and other negative impacts, such as tendency to avoid laughing or smiling, which can affect social relationships. Objectives This study aimed to assess the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries to anterior teeth among 12-year-old school children in Kashmir, India. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in private and government schools of India among 1600 schoolchildren aged 12 years. In addition to recording of the type of trauma (using Ellis and Davey classification of fractures, 1970), over jet, Angle’s molar relation and lip competence were also recorded. The socioeconomic status and academic performance of the study subjects were registered. The data obtained were compiled systematically and then statistically analyzed. The statistical significance for the association between the traumatic injury and the variables was analyzed using the chi-square test. Logistic regression was used to identify potential risk predictors of TDIs. Results The overall prevalence of TDI to anterior teeth was found to be 9.3%. The TDI to anterior teeth in male was more than female, but the difference was statistically nonsignificant (P < 0.01). Falls and sports were the most common causes of trauma in the present study. The highest potential risk factor for the occurrence of trauma was over jet. Academic performance was found to be significantly associated to TDI to anterior teeth, when analyzed in a multiple regression model. Conclusions It was concluded that the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries was 9.3%. Traumatic dental injuries among children exhibit complex interaction between the victims’ oral conditions and their behavior. Therefore

  17. The Training and Support Needs of Faculty And Students Using A Health Information Technology System Were Significant: A Case Study in a Dental School

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Heather K.; Stewart, Denice C. L.; Ash, Joan S.

    2010-01-01

    Health Information Technology Systems (HITS) are becoming more widely integrated into patient care in the dental school setting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a chairside HITS on users in the dental school setting. Qualitative techniques, including interviews, focus groups and observations, were used. Using grounded theory, we saw 9 themes emerge. One theme of particular interest was that “training and support needs of end-users were significant.” This paper explores this theme in detail and discusses the implications. PMID:21346989

  18. Overview of the Late Cretaceous Biota of the western São Paulo State, Brazil, Bauru Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candeiro, Carlos Roberto A.; Rich, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    The Turonian-Maastrichtian beds of the Bauru Group, western São Paulo State (Brazil), have yielded a diverse biota. The nine species of mesoecrocodilians are all mesosuchians. There is a single frog, a Neubatrachia. The vertebrates include, four types of fishes, a neobatrachian frog, an anilioid snake, two lizard, six species of podocnemid turtles, nine species of mesosuchian mesoecrocodilians three theropods, two birds, five titanosaurid sauropods, and one mammalian. The invertebrates include one cyclo, one cyclophoroid and eight pulmonates. Plants are represented by only two carophyte species. The biota from western São Paulo State is one the most diverse of the Late Cretaceous in Brazil. The biota from this area confirms that Bauru Group was connected to Patagonia and other Gondwanan areas during the Late Cretaceous.

  19. Social Media in the Dental School Environment, Part A: Benefits, Challenges, and Recommendations for Use.

    PubMed

    Spallek, Heiko; Turner, Sharon P; Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Chambers, David; McAndrew, Maureen; Zarkowski, Pamela; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2015-10-01

    Social media consist of powerful tools that impact not only communication but relationships among people, thus posing an inherent challenge to the traditional standards of who we are as dental educators and what we can expect of each other. This article examines how the world of social media has changed dental education. Its goal is to outline the complex issues that social media use presents for academic dental institutions and to examine these issues from personal, professional, and legal perspectives. After providing an update on social media, the article considers the advantages and risks associated with the use of social media at the interpersonal, professional, and institutional levels. Policies and legal issues of which academic dental institutions need to be aware from a compliance perspective are examined, along with considerations and resources needed to develop effective social media policies. The challenge facing dental educators is how to capitalize on the benefits that social media offer, while minimizing risks and complying with the various forms of legal constraint. PMID:26427774

  20. Factors affecting student participation in extra-curricular activities: A comparison between two Middle Eastern dental schools

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ansari, Asim; Al-Harbi, Fahad; AbdelAziz, Wafaa; AbdelSalam, Maha; El Tantawi, Maha M.; ElRefae, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to assess the level of participation of dental undergraduate students in extracurricular activities (ECAs) and the factors affecting this participation. Methods The study included dental students enrolled in undergraduate programs at the Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Egypt, and the College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was developed to collect background information about students, their participation in ECAs, and time allocated for these activities. Students were asked about their perceptions of the relationship between ECAs and academic studies, and their reasons for participating in and satisfaction with ECAs. Results The study included 199 students from Alexandria and 146 students from Dammam, with response rates of 99.5% and 73%, respectively. The percentages of those reporting ECA participation were 27.1% and 43.8%, respectively, mostly in community service, sports, and social activities. About 60% of students did not think that ECAs affected their studies, although the perceived difficulty of balancing ECAs and academics was associated with lower odds of participation (odds ratio = 0.51). Most students participated in ECAs to socialize and make friends, and the majority was dissatisfied with school-organized ECAs (52% and 59%, respectively). Gender and/or perceived relation between ECAs and academic studies affected actual participation in ECAs in one school but not the other. Conclusions ECA participation among these students was low. Gender and perception of ECAs in relation to academic studies affected ECA participation differently in the two schools. Better planning and management of ECAs that incorporate students’ preferences and reasons for participation is needed. Gender issues and the relationship between ECAs and academic performance should be addressed in relation to school and social characteristics. PMID:26792968

  1. Stratigraphic framework and evolution of the Cretaceous continental sequences of the Bauru, Sanfranciscana, and Parecis basins, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batezelli, Alessandro; Ladeira, Francisco Sergio Bernardes

    2016-01-01

    With the breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana, the South American Plate has undergone an intense process of tectonic restructuring that led to the genesis of the interior basins that encompassed continental sedimentary sequences. The Brazilian Bauru, Sanfranciscana and Parecis basins during Late Cretaceous have had their evolution linked to this process of structuring and therefore have very similar sedimentary characteristics. The purpose of this study is to establish a detailed understanding of alluvial sedimentary processes and architecture within a stratigraphic sequence framework using the concept of the stratigraphic base level or the ratio between the accommodation space and sediment supply. The integration of the stratigraphic and facies data contributed to defining the stratigraphic architecture of the Bauru, Sanfranciscana and Parecis Basins, supporting a model for continental sequences that depicts qualitative changes in the sedimentation rate (S) and accommodation space (A) that occurred during the Cretaceous. This study discusses the origin of the unconformity surfaces (K-0, K-1 and K-1A) that separate Sequences 1, 2A and 2B and the sedimentary characteristics of the Bauru, Sanfranciscana and Parecis Basins from the Aptian to the Maastrichtian, comparing the results with other Cretaceous Brazilian basins. The lower Cretaceous Sequence 1 (Caiuá and Areado groups) is interpreted as a low-accommodation systems tract compound by fluvial and aeolian systems. The upper Cretaceous lacustrine, braided river-dominated alluvial fan and aeolian systems display characteristics of the evolution from high-to low-accommodation systems tracts (Sequences 2A and 2B). Unconformity K-0 is related to the origin of the Bauru Basin itself in the Early Cretaceous. In Sanfranciscana and Parecis basins, the unconformity K-0 marks the contact between aeolian deposits from Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous alluvial systems (Sequences 1 and 2). Unconformity K-1, which was

  2. American Association of Dental Schools Annual Session and Exposition. Poster Presentation Abstracts (78th, Chicago, IL, March 3-8, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This issue introduces the poster presentations for the American Association of Dental Schools annual conference. The issue contains a list of poster presentations, poster abstracts for each of four time blocks, a list of poster session authors, and a keyword index. (EV)

  3. Collateral Opportunity for Increased Faculty Collaboration and Development through a Mentored Critical Thinking and Writing Exercise in a Dental School Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Terry E.; Lyon, Lucinda J.

    2011-01-01

    This essay examines the collateral benefits to faculty from a guided learning literature review project for students. We describe a 3-year continuum of project creation and refinement designed to foster critical thinking and writing for second year dental students at the University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry. We discuss…

  4. Variables predicting students' first semester achievement in a graduate-entry dental school in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minkang; Lee, Jae Il

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore factors that influence academic achievement for dental students during their first semester of graduate-entry programs. Nine variables were considered, including students' age, gender, undergraduate grade point averages (UGPAs), Dental Education Eligibility Test (DEET) scores, oral exam, and interview selection scores. DEET is a standardized aptitude test developed for graduate-entry dental programs in Korea. The test consists of four separate sections: reading comprehension, scientific reasoning parts I and II, and perceptual ability. GPA scores were obtained as a measure of academic achievement from ninety students at the graduate-entry dental program at Seoul National University, Korea. Path analysis was used to test the hypothetical model of causal influence. The most significant predictors with direct influence on achievement were scores from both scientific reasoning parts I and II, undergraduate GPAs, and gender. Age, scores from the other subjects in DEET (reading comprehension and perceptual ability), and oral exam scores were found to bear no relation to the students' achievement. PMID:17468318

  5. Social Media in the Dental School Environment, Part B: Curricular Considerations.

    PubMed

    Spallek, Heiko; Turner, Sharon P; Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Chambers, David; McAndrew, Maureen; Zarkowski, Pamela; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this article is to describe the broad curricular constructs surrounding teaching and learning about social media in dental education. This analysis takes into account timing, development, and assessment of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors needed to effectively use social media tools as a contemporary dentist. Three developmental stages in a student's path to becoming a competent professional are described: from undergraduate to dental student, from the classroom and preclinical simulation laboratory to the clinical setting, and from dental student to licensed practitioner. Considerations for developing the dental curriculum and suggestions for effective instruction at each stage are offered. In all three stages in the future dentist's evolution, faculty members need to educate students about appropriate professional uses of social media. Faculty members should provide instruction on the beneficial aspects of this communication medium and help students recognize the potential pitfalls associated with its use. The authors provide guidelines for customizing instruction to complement each stage of development, recognizing that careful timing is not only important for optimal learning but can prevent inappropriate use of social media as students are introduced to novel situations. PMID:26427775

  6. Assessment of awareness amongst school teachers regarding prevention and emergency management of dentoalveolar traumatic injuries in school children in Pune City, before and 3 months after dental educational program.

    PubMed

    Karande, Namrata; Shah, Preetam; Bhatia, Mitali; Lakade, Laxmi; Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed; Arora, Nitin; Bhalla, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Children have boundless energy, so, they are continuously engaged in some or the other physical activity. It is seen that when child reaches school age, accidents in the school environment in the form of falls, injuries due to contact sports, fights, abuse, etc. are very common and the main cause of traumatic dental injuries. Trauma may vary from minor enamel chipping or avulsion to extensive maxillofacial damage, more serious neck and brain injury, which may cause pain, disfigurement and mental agony, having immediate and long lasting effects. In such cases, a school teacher is in the right position to handle such an emergency and refer the child to the concerned dental surgeon or a pedodontist for further needful care. The main reason for delayed treatment of dental trauma is that people present at the site of injury are unaware of protocol of rapid and appropriate management leading to improper first aid treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the awareness of a group of school teachers from different schools about the prevention and emergency management of dental trauma in school children, by means of a questionnaire. Then educating them and reassessing their knowledge after a period of 3 months. Unfortunately, the public is unaware of the risks and does not have enough information about first aid emergency treatment or to avoid traumatic injuries. PMID:23404018

  7. Oral health care for children in countries using dental therapists in public, school-based programs, contrasted with that of the United States, using dentists in a private practice model.

    PubMed

    Mathu-Muju, Kavita R; Friedman, Jay W; Nash, David A

    2013-09-01

    The United States faces a significant problem with access to oral health care, particularly for children. More than 50 countries have developed an alternative dental provider, a dental therapist, practicing in public, school-based programs, to address children's access to care. This delivery model has been demonstrated to improve access to care and oral health outcomes while providing quality care economically. We summarize elements of a recent major review of the global literature on the use of dental therapists, "A Review of the Global Literature on Dental Therapists: In the Context of the Movement to Add Dental Therapists to the Oral Health Workforce in the United States." We contrast the success of a school-based model of caring for children by dental therapists with that of the US model of dentists providing care for children in private practices. PMID:23865650

  8. Oral Health Care for Children in Countries Using Dental Therapists in Public, School-Based Programs, Contrasted with That of the United States, Using Dentists in a Private Practice Model

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jay W.; Nash, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The United States faces a significant problem with access to oral health care, particularly for children. More than 50 countries have developed an alternative dental provider, a dental therapist, practicing in public, school-based programs, to address children’s access to care. This delivery model has been demonstrated to improve access to care and oral health outcomes while providing quality care economically. We summarize elements of a recent major review of the global literature on the use of dental therapists, “A Review of the Global Literature on Dental Therapists: In the Context of the Movement to Add Dental Therapists to the Oral Health Workforce in the United States.” We contrast the success of a school-based model of caring for children by dental therapists with that of the US model of dentists providing care for children in private practices. PMID:23865650

  9. The response of 1578 school leavers to a campaign combining commercial, Health Boards' and GDPs' sponsorship in an effort to improve dental attendance.

    PubMed

    Craven, R; Blinkhorn, A S; Schou, L

    1993-03-20

    A dental health promotion campaign was developed by Forth Valley Health Board in conjunction with the Scottish Health Education Group and the Department of Marketing at Strathclyde University. The aim was to encourage dental attendance among early school leavers. The emphasis was on the contribution of dental care to appearance and attractiveness. To highlight the importance of appearance, a major clothing retailer offered discounts on clothes to participants who made a dental visit. The impact of the campaign was evaluated by a questionnaire 3 months after its close. Recall of the campaign was high at 62% and 16% actually initiated a dental visit. However, only 2% claimed that the campaign was their main reason for attending. The project demonstrated the feasibility of collaboration between a commercial company and a health board in a health promotion effort. The results underline the difficulties in initiating a behaviour change, overcoming apathy and modifying the lack of felt need for dental care among the age group concerned. It does, however, suggest that there is potential for a more prolonged marketing effort. PMID:8448061

  10. "Meaningful use" of EHR in dental school clinics: how to benefit from the U.S. HITECH Act's financial and quality improvement incentives.

    PubMed

    Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Walji, Muhammad; Ramoni, Rachel B

    2013-04-01

    Through the 2009 HITECH (Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health) Act, the U.S. government committed $27 billion to incentivize the adoption and "meaningful use" of certified electronic health records (EHRs) by providers, including dentists. Given their patient profiles, dental school clinics are in a position to benefit from this time-delimited commitment to support the adoption and use of certified EHR technology under the Medicaid-based incentive. The benefits are not merely financial: rather, the meaningful use objectives and clinical quality measures can drive quality improvement initiatives within dental practices and help develop a community of medical and dental professionals focused on quality. This article describes how dentists can qualify as eligible providers and the set of activities that must be undertaken and attested to in order to obtain this incentive. Two case studies describe the approaches that can be used to meet the Medicaid threshold necessary to be eligible for the incentive. Dentists can and have successfully applied for meaningful use incentive payments. Given the diverse set of patients who are treated at dental schools, these dental practices are among those most likely to benefit from the incentive programs. PMID:23576586

  11. Validity and reliability of portfolio assessment of student competence in two dental school populations: a four-year study.

    PubMed

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; McCracken, Michael S; Woldt, Janet L; Brennan, Robert L

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically investigate the validity and reliability of portfolio assessment in two U.S. dental schools using a unified framework for validity. In the process of validation, it is not the test that is validated but rather the claims (interpretations and uses) about test scores that are validated. Kane's argument-based validation framework provided the structure for reporting results where validity claims are followed by evidence to support the argument. This multivariate generalizability theory study found that the greatest source of variance was attributable to faculty raters, suggesting that portfolio assessment would benefit from two raters' evaluating each portfolio independently. The results are generally supportive of holistic scoring, but analytical scoring deserves further research. Correlational analyses between student portfolios and traditional measures of student competence and readiness for licensure resulted in significant correlations between portfolios and National Board Dental Examination Part I (r=0.323, p<0.01) and Part II scores (r=0.268, p<0.05) and small and non-significant correlations with grade point average and scores on the Western Regional Examining Board (WREB) exam. It is incumbent upon the users of portfolio assessment to determine if the claims and evidence arguments set forth in this study support the proposed claims for and decisions about portfolio assessment in their respective institutions. PMID:24789826

  12. Integration of Basic-Clinical Sciences, PBL, CBL, and IPE in U.S. Dental Schools' Curricula and a Proposed Integrated Curriculum Model for the Future.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Satheesh; Venugopalan, Shankar Rengasamy; Srinivasan, Sreedevi; Karimbux, Nadeem Y; Weistroffer, Paula; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2016-03-01

    The integration of basic and clinical sciences in dental curricula enhances the application of basic science principles to clinical decision making and improves students' critical thinking. The aim of this study was to define the characteristics of U.S. dental schools' curricula with regard to level of course integration and degree of incorporation of problem-based and case-based learning. A second aim was to propose a dental curriculum that supports effective integration of courses and addresses some of the concerns facing academic dentistry. A survey was sent to 58 academic deans in U.S. dental schools. The survey included questions about integrating courses in the schools' curricula and major changes in curricular structure or teaching pedagogy that respondents anticipated in the immediate future. A total of 31 schools responded to the survey, for a 53.4% response rate. The results showed that three-quarters of the responding schools still teach basic and clinical sciences separately, although 61.3% reported having an integrated curriculum. Among the responding schools, 16 had a PBL component integrated into their curricula (two had integrated PBL in all courses and 14 used a hybrid PBL approach). Two schools had CBL integrated in all courses, and ten had CBL integrated in >75% of courses. Only slightly more than half agreed that their curricula foster students' thinking "outside the box." Faculty shortages and lack of protected time and resources were the most frequent reasons given for a lack of integrated courses. The integrated model proposed in this article has the potential to provide a low stress environment for students and to address important issues like faculty shortages. PMID:26933103

  13. Reliability of CAD CAM technology in assessing crown preparations in a preclinical dental school environment.

    PubMed

    Callan, Richard S; Blalock, John S; Cooper, Jeril R; Coleman, John F; Looney, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    In order to use CAD CAM (Computer Aided Design, Computer Aided Manufacturing) technology as an assessment tool when evaluating the preclinical performance of dental students, it is imperative that one has confidence in the reliability of the process. In this study, a variety of alignment methods were compared to determine both the consistency and accuracy of each method. Although the "Tooth Dots Diagonal" method exhibited the best precision (coefficient of variation=5.4 percent), it also represented the least accurate method when compared to the other methods tested. Using "Small Dots Diagonal" on the gingiva appears to be the best option, exhibiting an acceptable coefficient of variation (17.6 percent) and a high degree of accuracy in terms of tolerance (mean ± standard deviation=0.163 ± 0.029). Based on the results of this study, further investigation of CAD CAM technology for the purpose of assessment and education of dental students is recommended. PMID:24385523

  14. Sources of Dental Health Teaching Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Jean H.

    1982-01-01

    Sources of dental health education teaching aids which are available for free or at minimal cost include: (1) The American Dental Health Association; (2) state and local departments of public health; (3) schools of dentistry, dental hygiene, and dental assisting; and (4) the Educator's International Guide. (JN)

  15. Oral hygiene habits and dental health awareness of Kenyan children aged 9-15 years in a peri-urban and urban school.

    PubMed

    Kaimenyi, J T; Ndungu, F L; Maina, S W; Chindia, M

    1993-02-01

    The oral hygiene habits and dental health awareness of 541 Kenyan children from a peri-urban and urban school and aged 9-15 years, were investigated. 80.2% of the urban children and 43.1% of the peri-urban children had visited a dentist before. 12.4% of the urban children and 9.2% of the peri-urban children knew that bacteria cause dental caries. Over 87% of the children from either school knew that dental caries and periodontitis can be prevented. The main reason for visiting a dentist was to have tooth extraction. Failure to brush teeth was believed to be the cause of gingival bleeding by 38.9% of the peri-urban children and 37.6% of the urban children. 67.2% of the peri-urban children and 39.5% of the urban children brushed their teeth thrice daily. 21.1% of the peri-urban children and 2% of the urban children used a chewing stick to brush their teeth. More urban children (96.5%) used a toothbrush than peri-urban children (64.8%). None of the children from either school admitted using traditional cleaning aids such as the finger and charcoal. It is concluded that there were no consistent differences in oral hygiene habits and dental health awareness between peri-urban and urban children. PMID:8513743

  16. X-Ray Equipment and Protective Devices of Dental Assistant Programs in Pennsylvania Vocational Technical Schools. Vocational-Technical Education Research Report, Health Occupations, Monograph No. 7, Vol. 16, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hominsky, Dolores J.; Hole, F. Marvin

    Objectives of a Pennsylvania study were (1) to investigate the ways in which the vocational technical schools of the state have met the recommendations of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources for classroom structural design and dental x-ray machines in dental assistant training programs and (2) to collect data on the methods by…

  17. Prevalence and factors related to dental caries among pre-school children of Saddar town, Karachi, Pakistan: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dental caries is highly prevalent and a significant public health problem among children throughout the world. Epidemiological data regarding prevalence of dental caries amongst Pakistani pre-school children is very limited. The objective of this study is to determine the frequency of dental caries among pre-school children of Saddar Town, Karachi, Pakistan and the factors related to caries. Methods A cross-sectional study of 1000 preschool children was conducted in Saddar town, Karachi. Two-stage cluster sampling was used to select the sample. At first stage, eight clusters were selected randomly from total 11 clusters. In second stage, from the eight selected clusters, preschools were identified and children between 3- to 6-years age group were assessed for dental caries. Results Caries prevalence was 51% with a mean dmft score being 2.08 (±2.97) of which decayed teeth constituted 1.95. The mean dmft of males was 2.3 (±3.08) and of females was 1.90 (±2.90). The mean dmft of 3, 4, 5 and 6- year olds was 1.65, 2.11, 2.16 and 3.11 respectively. A significant association was found between dental caries and following variables: age group of 4-years (p-value ² 0.029, RR = 1.248, 95% Bias corrected CI 0.029-0.437) and 5-years (p-value ² 0.009, RR = 1.545, 95% Bias corrected CI 0.047-0.739), presence of dental plaque (p-value ² 0.003, RR = 0.744, 95% Bias corrected CI (−0.433)-(−0.169)), poor oral hygiene (p-value ² 0.000, RR = 0.661, 95% Bias corrected CI (−0.532)-(−0.284)), as well as consumption of non-sweetened milk (p-value ² 0.049, RR = 1.232, 95% Bias corrected CI 0.061-0.367). Conclusion Half of the preschoolers had dental caries coupled with a high prevalence of unmet dental treatment needs. Association between caries experience and age of child, consumption of non-sweetened milk, dental plaque and poor oral hygiene had been established. PMID:23270546

  18. Effect of Emergency Primary Care Training Workshops: A Survey on 45 Iranian Dental School Interns

    PubMed Central

    Khorasani, M; Tofangchiha, Maryam; Hamadzadeh, H; Bakhshi, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dentistry is a therapeutic health care profession that is related to people’s health. Moreover medical emergencies often occur in dental offices that little awareness of the professional workers can have unpleasant consequences. Materials and Methods: In this interventional study, a survey of 45 final year dental students was examined. To do so, a test in terms of knowledge was taken as a standard questionnaire, and in the practical part a test was taken as on objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE) test in three stations, before and after the workshop; identification of emergency instruments, the performance of intramuscular and intravenous injections and cardiopulmonary resuscitations before and after the workshop obtained data were analyzed using, SPSS version 16, Student’s t-test and paired T. Results: Using the t-test, mean score of the students’ knowledge prior to and after the workshop were 51 ± 13.08 and 83.41 ± 8.65 respectively (P = 0.000). The practical score (OSCE) of dental students was 50.85 ± 13.09, which after the workshop came up to 85.73 ± 7.06 came up (P = 0.000). T-test of the performance before and after the workshop had a significant difference in each of the three stations. Significant differences between male and female students’ knowledge and performance scores don’t exist before and after the workshop (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The level of knowledge and performance of students were assessed as average, therefore, training courses and revised the curriculum units are required. PMID:26225099

  19. Blood lead level and dental caries in school-age children.

    PubMed Central

    Gemmel, Allison; Tavares, Mary; Alperin, Susan; Soncini, Jennifer; Daniel, David; Dunn, Julie; Crawford, Sybil; Braveman, Norman; Clarkson, Thomas W; McKinlay, Sonja; Bellinger, David C

    2002-01-01

    The association between blood lead level and dental caries was evaluated in cross-sectional analyses of baseline data for 543 children 6-10 years old screened for enrollment in the Children's Amalgam Trial, a study designed to assess potential health effects of mercury in silver fillings. Approximately half of the children were recruited from an urban setting (Boston/Cambridge, MA, USA) and approximately half from a rural setting (Farmington, ME, USA). Mean blood lead level was significantly greater among the urban subgroup, as was the mean number of carious tooth surfaces. Blood lead level was positively associated with number of caries among urban children, even with adjustment for demographic and maternal factors and child dental practices. This association was stronger in primary than in permanent dentition and stronger for occlusal, lingual, and buccal tooth surfaces than for mesial or distal surfaces. In general, blood lead was not associated with caries in the rural subgroup. The difference between the strength of the associations in the urban and rural settings might reflect the presence of residual confounding in the former setting, the presence of greater variability in the latter setting in terms of important caries risk factors (e.g., fluoride exposure), or greater exposure misclassification in the rural setting. These findings add to the evidence supporting a weak association between children's lead exposure and caries prevalence. A biologic mechanism for lead cariogenicity has not been identified, however. Our data are also consistent with residual confounding by factors associated with both elevated lead exposure and dental caries. PMID:12361944

  20. First-Aid Algorithms in Dental Avulsion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baginska, Joanna; Wilczynska-Borawska, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Almost one fourth of traumatic dental injuries occur at schools or in their surroundings. Prevalence of tooth avulsion varies from 0.5% to 16% of all cases of dental trauma. Children with dental avulsion may seek help from school nurses so they should be able to provide first-aid treatment. However, many studies showed that the general level of…

  1. Women Dental Students: Preferences in Support Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Grace; Tenzer, Amy

    1980-01-01

    Female dental students in 68 American and Canadian dental schools were surveyed regarding women in dental school. It was found that almost 80 percent do not believe their sex hinders them, that qualifications should be the primary consideration in admission and hiring, and that special seminars would be a beneficial support service. (JSR)

  2. Frequency and location of artificial crowns and fixed partial dentures constructed at a dental school.

    PubMed

    Valderhaug, J; Karlsen, K

    1976-01-01

    The material consists of patients who received single crowns and fixed partial dentures at the Department of Prosthetics, Dental Faculty, University of Oslo in the period 1967-73. Two-thirds of the patients were women, and about two-thirds of the restorations were made in the maxilla. A total of 3275 crowns were received by 2145 patients. On average, maxillary teeth were crowned 7 years earlier than mandibular teeth. A total of 1393 fixed partial dentures, consisting of 6835 units, were made for 1368 patients. PMID:1063259

  3. Study of Risk Factors Associated with Peripheral Arteriopathy in Japanese-Brazilians from Bauru (SP)

    PubMed Central

    Garofolo, Luciana; Ferreira, Sandra Roberta G.; Miranda, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed and emerging countries. Their main etiology, atherosclerosis, is a disseminated disease that affects the coronary, cerebral and peripheral territories. The peripheral arterial disease (PAD), as well as its consequences, indicates the involvement of the coronary territory. Therefore, its better understanding enables proper treatment, delaying local and long-term complications, reducing the cost to the health system. Objective This study estimates the percentage of PAD in Japanese-Brazilians from Bauru (SP), recognized by the high prevalence of metabolic disorders such as hypertension (43%), diabetes mellitus (33%) and hypercholesterolemia (60%), and examines the association with risk biomarkers. Methods This cross-sectional population study evaluated 1,330 Japanese-Brazilians of both genders aged ≥ 30 who underwent a complete physical examination, anthropometric measurements, laboratory tests and ankle-brachial index (ABI). Participants with ABI ≤ 0.90 were diagnosed as having PAD. After applying the exclusion criteria, 1,038 individuals were part of the analysis. We used Poisson regression to analyze associations with PAD. Results The mean age was 56.8 years and the percentage of PAD was 21.1%, equal among the genders. PAD was associated with smoking (PR 2.16 [1.33 to 3.48]) and hypertension (PR 1.56 [1.12-2.22]). Conclusion The percentage of PAD in Japanese-Brazilians was similar to other populations of adverse cardiometabolic profile (US PARTNERS and POPADAD). The independent association of PAD with smoking and hypertension, but not with other classical risk factors, may depend on the very high frequencies of metabolic disorders in this population. PMID:24676369

  4. Effectiveness of an Alternative Dental Workforce Model on the Oral Health of Low-Income Children in a School-Based Setting

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Mary; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia; Liu, Ying; Kelly, Patricia; Branson, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the effect of an alternative dental workforce program—Kansas’s Extended Care Permit (ECP) program—as a function of changes in oral health. Methods. We examined data from the 2008 to 2012 electronic medical records of children (n = 295) in a Midwestern US suburb who participated in a school-based oral health program in which preventive oral health care was delivered by ECP dental hygienists. We examined changes in oral health status as a function of sealants, caries, restorations, and treatment urgency with descriptive statistics, multivariate analysis of variance, Kruskal–Wallis test, and Pearson correlations. Results. The number of encounters with the ECP dental hygienist had a statistically significant effect on changes in decay (P = .014), restorations (P = .002), and treatment urgency (P = .038). Based on Pearson correlations, as encounters increased, there was a significant decrease in decay (–0.12), increase in restorations (0.21), and decrease in treatment urgency (–0.15). Conclusions. Increasing numbers of encounters with alternative providers (ECP dental hygienists), such as with school-based oral health programs, can improve the oral health status of low-income children who would not otherwise have received oral health services. PMID:26180957

  5. Review of outcomes from a change in faculty clinic management in a U.S. dental school.

    PubMed

    Nadershahi, Nader A; Salmon, Eric S; Fathi, Nava; Schmedders, Karl; Hargis, Jace

    2010-09-01

    Dental schools use a variety of clinic management models with the goals of promoting patient care, student education, and fiscal responsibility. In 2004, the University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry transitioned to a more generalist model with these goals in mind. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of this clinic model change relative to the quantity of specific procedures completed by students. The quantity of procedures completed by each student from the classes of 1995 through 2009 were compiled from our electronic clinic management system and analyzed. The post-transition group (2004-09) showed a greater number of completed oral diagnosis and treatment planning and root planing procedures per student compared to the pre-transition group (1995-2003), but fewer crowns, root canals, operative procedures, and dentures. Because the higher procedure numbers were for low-cost procedures, our transition to a generalist model did not necessarily enhance clinic income but may support student learning and enhanced patient care. PMID:20837737

  6. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of oral tori in 1,520 Chulalongkorn University Dental School patients.

    PubMed

    Jainkittivong, A; Apinhasmit, W; Swasdison, S

    2007-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, size, shape and location of the oral tori in 1,520 Thai dental patients and to investigate the relationship between the findings with age and gender. The prevalence rates were 60.5% for torus palatinus (TP) and 32.2% for torus mandibularis (TM). The concurrence of TP and TM was noted in 23.2% subjects. The peak incidence of TP and TM was in the third decade of life. TP affected more women than men (70.5 vs. 48.8%, P < 0.001). Most TP were found in spindle shape (56%), small size (52.1%) and located at premolar region (47.4%). The occurrence of TM was higher in men than in women (36.3 vs. 28.6%, P = 0.002). TM was found most common in small size (65.6%), as bilateral multiple nodes (59.3%) and usually located at the premolars (89.2%). The age and gender-related differences with the size of tori were noted. Subjects who had larger TP or TM were older than those who had smaller TP or TM (P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively). Women were more likely to have larger TP whereas men tended to have larger TM. This study showed high prevalence rates of TP and TM in dental patients and the occurrences were related to gender. PMID:17340055

  7. Use of social media in dental schools: pluses, perils, and pitfalls from a legal perspective.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Joseph W; Turner, Sharon P

    2014-11-01

    One of the ways dental education is changing the way it is preparing the next generation of learners is through efficient utilization of interactive social media. Social media, which facilitates interaction and sharing of new ideas, is being utilized to educate students, residents, and faculty. Unfortunately, as with most improvements in technology, there are growing pains. Faculty, student, and patient interaction on social media platforms, such as Facebook and Twitter, can lead to inappropriate or embarrassing situations. Striking the appropriate balance between free speech rights of students and faculty and the need for colleges and universities to have efficient operations is often left to the judicial system. The concepts of free speech and contract law and how each is applied in educational settings should be understood by students, faculty, and administrators. This article provides a review of legal cases that led to current social media policies, as well as present-day cases that exemplify the application of these principles, to help dental educators gain a greater understanding of the boundaries of protected speech. It also provides a set of sample guidelines for communicating through these media. PMID:25362698

  8. Dental therapists: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Nash, David A; Friedman, Jay W; Kardos, Thomas B; Kardos, Rosemary L; Schwarz, Eli; Satur, Julie; Berg, Darren G; Nasruddin, Jaafar; Mumghamba, Elifuraha G; Davenport, Elizabeth S; Nagel, Ron

    2008-04-01

    In 1921, New Zealand began training school dental nurses, subsequently deploying them throughout the country in school-based clinics providing basic dental care for children. The concept of training dental nurses, later to be designated dental therapists, was adopted by other countries as a means of improving access to care, particularly for children. This paper profiles six countries that utilise dental therapists, with a description of the training that therapists receive in these countries, and the context in which they practice. Based on available demographic information, it also updates the number of dental therapists practising globally, as well as the countries in which they practice. In several countries, dental therapy is now being integrated with dental hygiene in training and practice to create a new type of professional complementary to a dentist. Increasingly, dental therapists are permitted to treat adults as well as children. The paper also describes the status of a current initiative to introduce dental therapy to the United States. It concludes by suggesting that dental therapists can become valued members of the dental team throughout the world, helping to improve access to care and reducing existing disparities in oral health. PMID:18478885

  9. Problem-based learning at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine: self-assessment of performance in postdoctoral training.

    PubMed

    Thammasitboon, Kewalin; Sukotjo, Cortino; Howell, Howard; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2007-08-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) was implemented into the dental curriculum at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) in 1994 with an expectation that this pedagogy would enhance students' critical thinking and communication skills as well as general professional competencies. Previous studies have described several aspects of the outcome of PBL curricula at the predoctoral level. However, there is no information available on the perceptions and performance of PBL graduates during their postdoctoral training in dentistry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of PBL methodology on the performance of HSDM graduates during their postdoctoral training in comparison with their non-HSDM (traditional) co-residents. Surveys containing traditional knowledge-based criteria, preclinical and clinical criteria, and PBL criteria were sent to HSDM graduates from the classes of 2002 through 2004 who were in postgraduate training programs. The HSDM and traditional graduates were asked to evaluate and compare their performance in selected areas with those of their co-residents from either a PBL curriculum or a traditional curriculum. The directors of each program were also asked to assess HSDM graduates relative to other graduates in the program based on the same aspects. Overall, HSDM graduates rated themselves more highly than non-HSDM graduates on all competencies. No significant difference between HSDM and non-HSDM responses was found in general dental knowledge, specialty specific knowledge, preclinical skills, clinical skills, communication with staff, and patient education, whereas significant differences (p<0.05) were found for communication with patients, critical thinking, independent learning, performance in small group settings, self-assessment, and teamwork. The data obtained from the program directors revealed corresponding results. The HSDM graduates' capacity for independent learning was rated as "excellent" by 65.31 percent of the directors and 80

  10. Curriculum Guidelines for Clinical Dental Hygiene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools curriculum guidelines for clinical dental hygiene include definitions, notes on the interrelationship of courses, an overview of course objectives, and suggested primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific objectives, sequencing, faculty, and facilities. (MSE)

  11. Frequency of alleles and haplotypes of the human leukocyte antigen system in Bauru São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Luana de Cassia; Santana, Fabiana Covolo de Souza; Marcos, Elaine Valim Camarinha

    2014-01-01

    Background HLA allele identification is used in bone marrow transplant programs as HLA compatibility between the donor and recipient may prevent graft rejection. Objective This study aimed to estimate the frequency of alleles and haplotypes of the HLA system in the region of Bauru and compare these with the frequencies found in other regions of the country. Methods HLA-A*, HLA-B*, and HLA-DRB1* allele frequencies and haplotypes were analyzed in a sample of 3542 volunteer donors at the National Registry of Voluntary Bone Marrow Donors (REDOME) in Bauru. HLA low resolution typing was performed using reverse line blot with the Dynal Reli™ SSO-HLA Typing Kit and automated Dynal AutoReli™48 device (Invitrogen, USA). Results Twenty, 36, and 13 HLA-A*, HLA-B*, and HLA-DRB1* allele groups, respectively, were identified. The most common alleles for each locus were HLA-A*02, HLA-B*35, and HLA-DRB1*07. The most frequent haplotype was A*01-B*08-DRB1*03. Allele and haplotype frequencies were compared to other regions in Brazil and the similarities and differences among populations are shown. Conclusion The knowledge of the immunogenic profile of a population contributes to the comprehension of the historical and anthropological aspects of different regions. Moreover, this helps to find suitable donors quickly, thereby shortening waiting lists for transplants and thus increasing survival rates among recipients.

  12. A new squamate lizard from the Upper Cretaceous Adamantina Formation (Bauru Group), São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nava, William R; Martinelli, Agustín G

    2011-03-01

    The record of non-mosasaur squamates (Reptilia, Squamata) is sparse in the Cretaceus fossil record of Brazil and include six putative reports, three from the Aptian-Albian of the Araripe Basin (Tijubina pontei Bonfim-Júnior and Marques, Olindalacerta brasiliensis Evans and Yabumoto, and a lizard indet.) and three from the Upper Cretaceous of the Bauru Group (Pristiguana brasiliensis Estes and Price, Anilioidae gen. et sp. indet., and Squamata gen. et sp. indet.). In this contribution, a new genus and species of lizard, Brasiliguana prudentis gen. et sp. nov., is described based on an isolated left maxilla with teeth. The material was discovered in an outcrop of the Upper Cretaceous Adamantina Formation (Bauru Group) located in the proximity of Presidente Prudente Municipality, São Paulo State, Brazil. The new taxon is considered a basal non-Priscagamidae+Acrodonta iguanian based on the presence of a weakly inclined anterior margin of the maxillary nasal process and maxillary tooth shape and tooth implantation similar to that of iguanians rather than of other lizard groups (e.g. teiids). This finding significantly increases the squamate lizard diversity of South America, which is still poorly understood and sparsely represented in the fossil record. PMID:21437386

  13. Association of sweet taste receptor gene polymorphisms with dental caries experience in school children.

    PubMed

    Haznedaroğlu, Eda; Koldemir-Gündüz, Meliha; Bakır-Coşkun, Nur; Bozkuş, Hasan M; Çağatay, Penbe; Süsleyici-Duman, Belgin; Menteş, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Sweet taste is a powerful factor influencing food acceptance. The peripheral taste response to sugar is mediated by the TAS1R2/TAS1R3 taste receptors. The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between TAS1R2 (rs35874116 or rs9701796) and/or TAS1R3 (rs307355) single nucleotide polymorphisms with dental caries experience in schoolchildren. A total of 184 schoolchildren aged between 7 and 12 years (101 girls, 83 boys) were included in the study. Genomic DNA was extracted from saliva samples and the genotypes were identified by qPCR. The genotype frequencies were as follows: 6.6% for homozygous wild type, 41.8% for heterozygous and 51.6% for homozygous polymorphic genotype carriers of TAS1R2 gene rs35874116; 27.8% for heterozygous and 72.2% for homozygous polymorphic genotype carriers of TAS1R2 gene rs9701796, and 83.1% for homozygous wild type and 16.9% for heterozygous genotype carriers of TAS1R3 gene rs307355 polymorphism. A significant association was observed between total caries experience (dft + DMFT - decayed filled primary teeth + decayed, missing and filled permanent teeth) and TAS1R2 rs35874116 (p = 0.008) and TAS1R3 rs307355 (p = 0.04) gene polymorphisms but not for TAS1R2 gene rs9701796 polymorphism. TAS1R3 gene rs307355 polymorphism has been found to be an independent risk factor for dental caries experience by logistic regression analysis and to have increased the risk of caries. Moderate caries experience (4-7 caries) was found to be associated with TAS1R3 rs307355 heterozygous genotype, whereas high-risk caries experience (>8 caries) was found to be associated with TAS1R2 rs35874116 homozygous polymorphic genotype. PMID:25924601

  14. A new turtle from the Upper Cretaceous Bauru Group of Brazil, updated phylogeny and implications for age of the Santo Anastácio Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegazzo, Mirian Costa; Bertini, Reinaldo José; Manzini, Flávio Fernando

    2015-03-01

    A new Podocnemidinura specimen from the Upper Cretaceous Bauru Group (Paraná Basin) of southeastern Brazil was described. The Bauru Group provided an important portrait of the Brazilian Mesozoic terrestrial biota, which boasts a vertebrate fauna formed from fishes, frogs, lacertilians, crocodyliforms, dinosaurs and mammals; records of palynomorphs; and invertebrate fauna consisted of gastropods, bivalves, ostracods and conchostracans. Nevertheless, the age of these continental deposits is not precisely estimated, which prevents global correlations, and its fauna is argued to be endemic. The new specimen described is the first turtle from the Santo Anastácio Formation, and its morphological comparison with other South American forms provided a significant advancement in the understanding of the age of this unit (Late Cretaceous). This study permitted a revision of the turtle taxa of the Bauru Group. As a result, some taxa were considered synonym, including the new Santo Anastácio form. The specimen is still unnamed due to the absence of skull characters that preclude its accurate positioning within the Bauru Group skull-based taxa. In addition, the phylogenetic affinities of this taxon were analyzed into Podocnemidinura clade.

  15. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants Main Content Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings that protect the chewing surfaces of children’s back teeth from tooth decay. Overall, the prevalence of sealants ...

  16. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures. PMID:27482994

  17. Stakeholders' Perceptions About a Newly Established Dental School with a Problem-Based, Student-Led, Patient-Centered Curriculum: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Kamran; Tredwin, Christopher; Kay, Elizabeth; Slade, Anita

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of stakeholders regarding a newly established dental school with a problem-based, student-led, patient-centered curriculum in a community setting. Qualitative methods using 16 semistructured interviews and two focus groups were used to engage a range of stakeholders from students to faculty members to practitioners. Purposive sampling was employed with participants contacted through professional channels. Interview and focus group transcripts were transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed thematically using an inductive approach. Themes related to preparedness of dental graduates were identified during data analyses. Early clinical exposure with patients in the first year of the course, holistic care using a patient-centered approach, and the acquisition of communication skills, professionalism, team-working skills, reflective practice, and evidence-informed clinical practice were perceived to be key strengths of the curriculum. The participants also expressed the need to strengthen teaching of life sciences and provide additional clinical experience in simulated general dental practice clinics. This study provides insight into the perceptions of a wide range of stakeholders and provides a deeper understanding of the merits and challenges of an innovative undergraduate dental curriculum. PMID:26933104

  18. Evolution of a tobacco cessation curriculum for dental hygiene students at Indiana University School of Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Coan, Lorinda L; Christen, Arden; Romito, Laura

    2007-06-01

    Barriers to consistent implementation of tobacco cessation strategies by dental hygiene students in practice may be overcome through mentoring by expert faculty members. This article describes a pilot study using an innovative method to achieve higher levels of student-perceived confidence and skill in delivering cessation messages to patients. Following completion of the didactic course content, each student selected a tobacco user to complete the Indiana University Nicotine Dependence Program Patient Assessment Questionnaire (PAQ). Detailed analysis of the questionnaire and development of specific cessation strategies were accomplished in a one-to-one interchange with expert faculty members. Students provided suggestions to patients, wrote papers summarizing their experiences, and were asked to complete an anonymous survey. Forty-four of forty-six students completed the survey. Eighty percent reported the mentored session was useful in learning specific cessation strategies; 83 percent reported the session helped to boost their confidence levels in approaching patients in tobacco cessation; 83 percent believed they would use learned strategies with other patients; and 86 percent recommended this educational approach for future students. Additional mentoring may overcome barriers to approaching patients in tobacco cessation by increasing levels of confidence and skill when delivering cessation messages. This may translate into continued application of these strategies in private practice, resulting in potential benefits to the health of the public. PMID:17554095

  19. A case study examining classroom instructional practices at a U.S. dental school.

    PubMed

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Mitchell, Gail S; Dolan, Teresa A

    2005-06-01

    A case study is used to illustrate how an evaluation strategy was used to assess classroom instructional practices following a multiyear institutional curriculum revision process. From January through April of 2003, twelve faculty in medicine and three faculty in dentistry who taught in the first- and second-year basic science courses within the dental curriculum participated in a qualitative study. The purpose was to use a formative evaluation process to assess the impact of the curriculum revision at the level of classroom instruction. The observations revealed that seventeen of the twenty classes observed were teacher-centered, passive, and lacked observable effort to help students understand the relationship of the lecture content to the oral health problems. Findings illustrate the importance of using formative evaluation as a mechanism to assess change efforts and how evidence-based study can be used to support initiatives directed toward assessing active student learning and problem solving. Raising faculty awareness about the importance of acquiring evidence-based educational skills, aligning instruction with course goals and objectives, formatively assessing teaching, and providing learning experiences that will actually be used in practice are essential to ensuring that active learning and critical thinking are demonstrated in the curriculum. PMID:15947210

  20. Factors affecting the placement or replacement of direct restorations in a dental school

    PubMed Central

    Silvani, Samara; Trivelato, Roberta Ferreira; Nogueira, Ruchele Dias; Gonçalves, Luciano de Souza; Geraldo-Martins, Vinícius Rangel

    2014-01-01

    Context: The knowledge of the reasons for the placement of direct restorations makes possible to trace an epidemiological profile of a specific population and to direct the teaching of dentistry to techniques that are commonly used today and will be continued performed in the future. Purpose: The aim of this study was to verify the reasons for placement and replacement of direct restorations in patients treated in the Dental Clinic of the Uberaba University – Brazil. Materials and Methods: This study evaluated 306 restorative procedures carried out on 60 patients. During the treatment planning, a form that contained information about the patient's gender, tooth number, the classification of restorations, the reasons for placement and replacement of amalgam and tooth-colored restorations, the material that had to be removed and the new material used to fill the cavities was filled for each patient. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test (α = 0.05). Results: The data showed that most of the patients were female (66.7%). Of all the restorations placed, 60.45% were 1st-time placements, while 39.55% were replacements. For 1st-time restorations, the main reason for placement was primary caries (76.76%), followed by non-carious cervical lesions (15.14%). The amalgam restorations were replaced more frequently (67.77%). The primary reason for replacements was the presence of secondary caries (for both previous amalgam (42.68%) and composite (66.67%) restorations (P < 0.05). The resin composite was the most indicated material for the new restorations (98.04%) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The main reason for placement of direct restorations was primary caries, while secondary caries was the main reason for replacements. In almost all cases, the material used to fill the cavities was the resin composite. PMID:24808696

  1. Evaluating the clinical quality of departments as viewed by juniors and seniors of Shiraz dental school

    PubMed Central

    Danaei, Shahla Momeni; Mazareie, Elham; Hosseininezhad, Sahar; Nili, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Assessment of students’ perspective is an essential element in effective educational quality evaluation. By identifying strengths and weaknesses, it leads to improvement in future performance. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed through a questionnaire comprising 23 questions. Reliability was assessed using α-Chronbach (α =0.87), and validity was confirmed by a group of five experts. Tukey test, Pearson correlation coefficient, and two sample t-tests were used for data analysis. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed through a questionnaire comprising 23 questions. Reliability was assessed using α-Chronbach (α =0.87), and validity was confirmed by a group of five experts. Tukey test, Pearson correlation coefficient, and two sample t-tests were used for data analysis. Results: A total of 168 answered questionnaires were entered in our study. Maximum satisfaction in most items was shown in removable prosthodontics and orthodontics departments whereas oral surgery and comprehensive treatment departments acquired the least scores. In all departments, personnels’ respectful attitude had the highest score whereas minimum grade was given to stressful workload and overall satisfaction in each department. In comparison with a similar study, conducted 3 years ago, level of satisfaction was raised for orthodontics and removable prosthodontics departments though it was declined for the pediatrics department. Conclusion: The special cadre of clinical instructors comprising both experienced and young members is considered as an important factor leading to high student satisfaction in the orthodontics department. Promotion of a removable prosthodontics department is related to the high relevance between the implemented educational program and the curriculum. The moderate performance of oral surgery and restorative departments is indicative of the need for more attention from ministry authorities to major dental departments such as

  2. Student apathy for classroom learning and need of repositioning in present andragogy in Indian dental schools

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the world of technology, when today's student is approaching the on-line /distance learning in the open universities and doing on-line self-assessment, the classroom learning is vanishing slowly. Globally, teachers are taking efforts to improve the pedagogy by implementing effective methods to retain the classroom teaching and student attendance. The present study aims at shedding some light on the need of changing the adult education strategies (andragogy), which can effectively improve the student attendance for lectures. Methods It is an observational study, and the conceptual framework of it is based on beliefs, opinions and personal experiences of the respondents. Triangulation method is used for collecting the data. The data is achieved from three groups of concerned population who could provide valid results to support the study. It is collected by interviewing 10 senior faculty members who are/were the 'education experts' in the universities, while the main concerned groups of present educational stream, i.e. 'institution-teachers' and the 'students', were given questionnaires. 570 teacher respondents and 200 student respondents are the main participants of this study. Results As per data, it has been observed that senior faculty (90%) and students (93.25%) feel need of student motivation more than the institutional teachers (52.44%). P-values were obtained using Chi-Square test for testing the significance of difference between agreement and disagreement for a specific question. Conclusions In India, Universities have already sensed the need of 'teacher development programmes'. But teachers in dental colleges, demand more efforts to be taken by universities and managements in this regard and expect better educational policies to give them accessibility to prove themselves. PMID:23176285

  3. The first Pan-Podocnemididae turtle egg from the Presidente Prudente Formation (Late Cretaceous, Bauru Group), Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marsola, Júlio C De A; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Montefeltro, Felipe C; Langer, Max C

    2014-01-01

    Pan-Podocnemididae turtles are ubiquitous in Late Cretaceous rocks of the Bauru Group in southeastern Brazil. This group of side-necked turtles is particularly abundant in a turtle-bearing site of the Presidente Prudente Formation known as Tartaruguito. Here, we describe the first turtle egg (LPRP-USP 0052) from the Tartaruguito site. LPRP-USP 0052 is nearly complete but misses a pole and measures 5,1 and 2,9-2,2 centimeters due to its flattened minor axis. The egg morphology and microstructure were analyzed by observations performed with CT, Optic Microscopy, Scanning Electronic Microscopy and Wave Dispersion Energy analyses. The eggshell ranges from 145 to160 micrometers thick. Considering the matching morphology of the new specimen and its provenance from the stratigraphic horizon that yielded only the podocnemidids Bauruemys and Roxochelys, it is most likely that LPRP-USP 0052 was produced by a podocnemidid turtle.  PMID:25544080

  4. Dental Education at the Crossroads--Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1995

    1995-01-01

    An Institute of Medicine study concerning dental education's future is summarized. Eight principles guiding the study are outlined, and findings/recommendations in each area (oral health status, dental education's mission, focus on health outcomes, research role, patient care, dental school's role in the university, accreditation, dental…

  5. Developing Teaching Expertise in Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Lucinda J.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to develop a baseline model of expertise in dental education utilizing the Dreyfus and Dreyfus continuum of skill acquisition. The goal was the development of a baseline model of expertise, which will contribute to the body of knowledge about dental faculty skill acquisition and may enable dental schools to…

  6. DENTAL REIMBURSEMENT PROGRAM (DPR) - HIV/AIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dental Reimbursement Program (DPR) under Part F of the Ryan White CARE Act is intended to help accredited dental schools and post-doctoral dental education program cover their non-reimbursed costs of providing oral health care to individuals with HIV.

  7. Predictive Validity of the Dental Admission Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Gene A.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship of Dental Admission Test (DAT) scales and predental grade point averages with freshman and sophomore dental school performance measures and National Board Dental Examination (NBDE) Part I averages were examined. The results indicated that the DAT scales had limited predictive validity. (Author/MLW)

  8. Increasing dental student diversity through the UNLV Dental Prospects Program.

    PubMed

    McClain, Mildred A; Jones, Francis R; McClain, Clifford R; Curd, Francis M

    2013-05-01

    Adequately providing for the health care of the growing minority population in the United States requires increased racial and ethnic diversity of the health care workforce. Long-term diversity in the dental profession depends on a more diverse student population in dental schools. The University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Dental Medicine's (UNLV SDM) Dental Prospects Club is a predental education program that has increased the number of underrepresented minority and disadvantaged students in the school by concentrating on outreach, recruitment, and retention initiatives. The approaches used by the club members and faculty advisors to increase the number of underrepresented minority students recruited to and enrolled in the UNLV SDM are discussed in this report. Also described are the strategies, methods, internal infrastructure, and organizational support used to increase the number of underrepresented minority students at the school. PMID:23658399

  9. Informing a culturally appropriate approach to oral health and dental care for pre-school refugee children: a community participatory study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pre-school children in families of recently settled refugees often have very high rates of early childhood caries (ECC). ECC is associated with a high level of morbidity and is largely preventable, however effective culturally appropriate models of care are lacking. This study aimed to provide a deeper understanding of the refugee experience related to early oral health by exploring pre-school refugee families (i) understanding of ECC and child oral health, (ii) experiences of accessing dental services and (iii) barriers and enablers for achieving improved oral health. The knowledge gained will be critical to the development of effective early oral health programs in refugee children. Methods Community based participatory qualitative methodology using focus groups of resettled refugee families and community refugee nurse interviews. A community reference group was established and a bi-lingual community research associate was employed. Transcripts were analysed for thematic content using NVivo software. Results There were 44 participants: eight focus groups (nine countries of origin) and five interviews. Emergent themes were (i) the major influence of parents’ previous experience, including their beliefs about deciduous (baby) teeth, traditional feeding practices and poverty; and a consequent lack of understanding of the importance of early oral health and early dental caries, (ii) the burden of resettlement including prioritising, parenting, learning about new foods and how to assimilate into the community, and (iii) refugees’ difficulties in accessing both information and dental services, and the role of schools in addressing these issues. An Opportunities for Change Model was proposed. Conclusions The main implication of the study is the demonstration of how enhanced understanding of the refugee experience can inform improvement in early oral prevention and treatment. The community participatory methodology of the study provided a basis for cross

  10. Evaluating a blended-learning course taught to different groups of learners in a dental school.

    PubMed

    Pahinis, Kimon; Stokes, Christopher W; Walsh, Trevor F; Cannavina, Giuseppe

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to present and evaluate a blended-learning course developed for undergraduate (B.D.S.), postgraduate, and diploma (hygiene and therapy) students at the University of Sheffield School of Clinical Dentistry. Blended learning is the integration of classroom face-to-face learning with online learning. The overall methodology used for this study was action research. The data were collected using three processes: questionnaires to collect contextual data from the students taking the course; a student-led, nominal group technique to collect group data from the participants; and a non-participant observer technique to record the context in which certain group and individual behaviors occurred. The online component of the course was accepted as a valuable resource by 65 percent of those responding. While online information-sharing occurred (31 percent of the students posted in forums), there was no evidence of online collaboration, with only 8 percent replying to forum postings. Accessibility of the online environment was one of the main concerns of the students at the nominal group sessions. Differences regarding overall engagement with the course between the student groups (years) were observed during the sessions. The majority of the students were satisfied with the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) course. No statistically significant differences between males and females were found, but there were differences between different student cohorts (year groups). PMID:17314389

  11. Use of Case-Based Learning in Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Dina Agnone; DeBiase, Christina B.; Gibson-Howell, Joan C.

    1998-01-01

    A survey investigated the extent of use of case-based learning in 141 dental hygiene programs. A majority of responding schools use the approach, most frequently in clinical dental hygiene, community dental health, and dental science courses. Proportion of instructional time was greatest in the content areas of special needs, ethics, medical…

  12. Distribution of palaeosols and deposits in the temporal evolution of a semiarid fluvial distributary system (Bauru Group, Upper Cretaceous, SE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilici, Giorgio; Bo, Patrick Führ Dal'; de Oliveira, Emerson Ferreira

    2016-07-01

    The stratigraphic and sedimentological knowledge of the Bauru Group (Upper Cretaceous, SE Brazil) is still generally insufficient and controversial. A sedimentological and palaeopedological study allowed to interpret the south-eastern portion of the Bauru Group according to the model of a fluvial distributary system. This work has two objectives: (1) to include palaeosols in the interpretation of a fluvial distributary system and (2) to give detailed information on the sedimentological and stratigraphic features of the SE portion of the Bauru Group in order to support biostratigraphical, taphonomic and palaeoecological studies. In the south-eastern portion of the Bauru Group, three genetic stratigraphic units were described and interpreted, here informally called lower, intermediate and upper units. The lower unit is constituted of muddy sandstone salt flat deposits and sandstone sheet deltas deposits and is interpreted as a basinal part of a fluvial distributary system. The intermediate unit is formed of very fine to fine-grained sandstone-filled ribbon channel and sandy sheet-shaped beds, suggesting a distal or medial portion of a fluvial distributary system. The upper unit does not match with the present models of the fluvial distributary system because mostly constituted of moderately developed, well-drained, medium- to fine-grained sandstone palaeosols, which testify pauses of sedimentation to the order of 104 years. Preserved features of sedimentary structures suggest that the parent material was formed by occasional catastrophic unconfined flows. This unit may represent the most distal portion of a fluvial distributary system generated by retrogradation of the alluvial system due to aridification of the climate. The upper unit may be interpreted also as proximal portion of fluvial distributary system if considering the coarser-grained and the well-drained palaeosols. However, the absence of channel deposits makes this interpretation unconvincing.

  13. Dental sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants Are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  14. Relationship Between Dental Fluorosis and Intelligence Quotient of School Going Children In and Around Lucknow District: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Suleman Abbas; Navit, Saumya; Chadha, Dheera; Johri, Nikita; Navit, Pragati; Sharma, Anshul; Bahuguna, Rachana

    2015-01-01

    Background Fluoridation of drinking water, despite being regarded as one of the top ten public health achievements of the twentieth century, has remained a much debated concept. Various studies on animals and aborted human fetuses have confirmed that excessive fluoride intake during infancy and early childhood, causes a number of irreversible structural and functional changes in the CNS leading to memory, learning and intellectual deficits. Aim To compare the IQ levels of school children of two different locations, having different fluoride levels in water, and to establish a relationship between fluoride levels, prevalence of fluorosis and its effect on IQ levels. Materials and Methods A cross–sectional study was conducted among 429 children aged 6 – 12 years, selected by stratified random sampling from two different areas with different levels of fluoride in drinking water in and around Lucknow district. Dental fluorosis was measured using Dean’s Fluorosis Index. Intelligence Quotient was measured using Raven’s Coloured Progressive Matrices (1998 edition). Results Majority of the fluorosis free children (76.3%) had an IQ grade 2 (definitely above the average). Majority of the children suffering from very mild and mild dental fluorosis were found to have IQ grade 3 (Intellectually average). Children with moderate cases of dental fluorosis were found to have IQ grade 4 (Definitely below average). Only 5 children with severe fluorosis were included in the study and they all were found to have an IQ grade 5. Hence, a trend of increase in the IQ grade (decrease in intellectual capacity) was observed indicating a strong correlation between fluorosis grade and IQ grade. Conclusion Findings of this study suggest that the overall IQ of the children exposed to high fluoride levels in drinking water and hence suffering from dental fluorosis were significantly lower than those of the low fluoride area. PMID:26673535

  15. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... dental school, has extra training in caring for patients with disabilities. The Special Care Dentistry Association is a resource to find a dentist ... for children who grind their teeth, because the risk of the child choking on the mouthguard if it breaks ... Academy of Pediatric Dentistry www.aapd.org Find a dentist at www. ...

  16. Adults with Disabilities and Proper Dental Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Cinotti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    Repeated studies of graduating dental students indicate limited preparation to provide services for individuals with special healthcare needs. By the end of the 1990s and into the present decade, more than half of the U.S. dental schools provided less than five hours of class room presentations and about three quarters of the schools provided 0-5…

  17. Attitudes of Dental and Medical Students toward Death and Dying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundin, Robert H.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Explores attitudes of dental and medical students toward death and dying. Attitudes toward death influencing choice between dental school and medical school are latent. Attitudes of dental and medical students toward death may be differentially affected by their professional experiences. (Author/BEF)

  18. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  19. Impact of land convection on the water vapor and temperature variability in the TTL with an emphasis over Bauru (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Fabien; Ricaud, Philippe; Pommereau, Jean Pierre; Khaykin, Serguey; Rivière, Emmanuel; Warner, Juying; Attié, Jean-Luc; Saint-Martin, David; Michou, Martine; August, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    A highly debated issue in the troposphere-to-stratosphere transport and processes controlling the water vapor (H2O) balance in the stratosphere is the role of deep overshooting over intense convective regions and interplay between hydration and dehydration processes in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). TRO-Pico is a 5-year project aiming to monitor the H2O amount during the wet season. The project relies on field campaigns held in Bauru (22.3°S; 49.1°W), Brazil, and involves a combination of balloon-borne measurements, ground-based and space-borne observations and modeling. More specifically, the MetOp-IASI and Aqua-AIRS nadir sounders datasets in the Upper Troposphere (UT) and the Aura-MLS limb sounder datasets in the Lower Stratosphere (LS) are inter-compared over long time ranges and different spatial scales to the Chemistry-Climate Model CNRM-CCM and the ECMWF analysis datasets, together with the balloon-borne sensors: Vaisala RS-92GDP radiosondes, Pico-SDLA and Flash-B hygrometers. In the tropical band (30°S-30°N), during convective seasons, we show in the UT strong negative day-night variations of H2O over Southern continents, consistent with the diurnal cycle of convective events, and, to a lesser extent, also over Northern continents. In the LS, during convective periods, the H2O signal becomes slightly positive over Southern continents and of an opposite sign over the Northern continents. The temperature fields show positive day-night variations over land increasing with altitude, with a maximum amplitude above the Cold Point (CP) around 80 hPa. At the local scale over Bauru, we sampled the different datasets over 24 hours to highlight the shape of the diurnal cycle of H2O. An early afternoon minimum is observed in the UT, consistent with the late afternoon maximum of convection. The diurnal cycle of temperature has a late morning minimum in the UT, shifted to the night at the CP level, also consistent with the injection of cold air by deep

  20. Rethinking tenure in dental education.

    PubMed

    Slayton, Rebecca L; Kachalia, Parag R; Lozano-Pineda, Juanita; Rolf, David D; Kovarik, Robert E; Dillon, Joycelyn A

    2012-05-01

    In the midst of changes in the environment of academic dentistry over the past two decades, reform of traditional tenure is one way for dental schools to respond to these changes while maintaining scholarly, evidence-based learning environments. Challenges facing academic dentistry today and in the future include a crisis in workforce capacity, difficulty attracting recent graduates into academic positions, overburdened faculty members with limited time for scholarly activity, loss of tenured faculty members due to retirement, and a potentially diminished voice for dental schools within the parent university. The purpose of this opinion article is to suggest ways to reform the current tenure system in dental education as a means of improving recruitment and retention of new faculty members while maintaining or increasing scholarly activity within dental schools. PMID:22550103

  1. An investigation into factors influencing the amount of orthodontic treatment attempted by the recent graduates of two dental schools.

    PubMed

    Brown, I D; Stephens, C D; Usiskin, L A

    1982-04-01

    A questionnaire was sent to Bristol and Guy's Dental Graduates who had been qualified for between 3 and 5 years. This showed that three-quarters of those who were currently in general dental practice had treated six or more orthodontic patients since qualification. A fifth claimed to have treated more than 45. An important factor in determining whether a practitioner carries out orthodontic treatment himself, or refers patients to a specialist, is the confidence he has in his own ability to adjust and monitor orthodontic appliances. The convenience of alternative orthodontic services would appear to have no influence in such decisions. PMID:6952930

  2. A Survey of Predoctoral Dental Basic Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Lee T.

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 51 of the 53 dental schools in the continental United States investigated pharmacology curriculum content and time allocation. Found that most schools offered a traditional didactic course in basic pharmacology, with half of the medical school-based and three-fourths of the dental school-based programs providing additional pharmacology…

  3. Curriculum Guidelines on Biochemistry and Nutrition for Dental Hygienists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Sections of Biochemistry and Nutrition and Dental Hygiene Education of the American Association of Dental Schools are intended for use by individual educational institutions as curriculum development aids. (MLW)

  4. Practice Options and Decision Making for Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manski, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    One dental school implemented in its fourth-year curriculum an intensive simulation exercise to teach students the application of fundamental economic concepts such as capital costs, leasehold improvements, operating expenses, working capital, and financial risk in dental practice. (MSE)

  5. Task Force on Innovation in Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bader, James; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The background, origins, functions, and recommendations of the American Association of Dental Schools' task force investigating improvement of access to dental hygiene training programs and of curriculum and program design are presented. (MSE)

  6. [Relation between oral health conditions and diabetes mellitus in a japanese population from Bauru-SP-Brazil].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Nilce Emy; Chinellato, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro; Franco, Laércio Joel; Iunes, Magid; Freitas, José Alberto de Souza; Lopes, Eymar Sampaio

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the oral health condition in a Japanese population aged 40 to 79, in Bauru, Brazil as well as its association with the occurrence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance. It involved 530 subjects, from both sexes. All persons of first generation (Issei) and a random sample of one third of second generation (Nisei) were submitted to a home interview. A clinical examination, oral glucose tolerance test, and examination of oral health conditions took place at the Hospital of Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomaly - USP. The data were processed by Epi-Info program and 22.9% of the individuals presented diabetes mellitus (group I), 15.1% impaired glucose tolerance (group II), and 61.9% were considered normoglycemics (group III). The percentage of edentulous subjects was 45.9% for the total sample, and values of 58.4%, 46.7%, and 41.2% were observed for groups I, II, and III, respectively. Among the edentulous subjects, no one showed necessity of making a total prothesis. These data indicate that tooth loss showed significant association with the occurrence of diabetes mellitus, but there was no significant association with glucose intolerance. PMID:21409334

  7. Strategies for Recruitment and Retention of Underrepresented Minority Students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadenya, Rose O.; Schwartz, Susan; Lopez, Naty; Fonseca, Raymond

    2003-01-01

    Describes the university's focus on leadership, financial support, institutional commitment, and creation of an inclusive environment for minority students; an accelerated program leading to combined bachelor's and dental degrees, which includes agreements with Xavier University and Hampton University; and peer mentorship and minority mentorship…

  8. Dental Caries and its Relationship to Malocclusion in Permanent Dentition Among 12-15 Year Old School Going Children

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Shashank S; Gheware, Anjali; Kamatagi, Laxmikant; Pasumarthy, Sandeep; Pawar, Vivek; Fatangare, Madhura

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to know the prevalence of dental caries among children having malocclusion. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 880 students aged 1215 years, among whom 488 were boys and 392 were girls. A proforma was prepared to record dental caries status and dental esthetic index (DAI) using the WHO Oral Health Assessment Form (1997). Data were analyzed using Student’s t-test and ANOVA. The P value of 0.05 or less was considered as statistically significant. Results: It was found that 644 (73.2%) had no abnormality or minor malocclusion, whereas 115 (13.0%), 100 (11.4%) and 21 (2.4%) had definite, severe and very severe or handicapping malocclusion, respectively. Overall mean of decayed teeth (DT) component was found to be 0.95 ± 1.006, missing teeth 0.23 ± 0.670 and filled teeth 0.23 ± 0.559 and decayed, missing, filled tooth (DMFT) was 1.41 ± 1.483. DT and overall DMFT component significantly increased with increasing DAI of malocclusion (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: The severity of dental caries showed positive relation with DAI and age. PMID:25395789

  9. Prediction of Future High Caries Increments for Children in a School Dental Service and in Private Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imfeld, Thomas N.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A method for predicting high dental caries increments for children, based on previous research, is presented. Three clinical findings were identified as predictors: number of sound primary molars, number of discolored pits/fissures on first permanent molars, and number of buccal and lingual smooth surfaces of first permanent molars with white…

  10. Dental school volunteerism.

    PubMed

    Blake, Amy; March, Peter; Miller, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Student Community Outreach for Public Education, SCOPE, is a student-led community outreach program at the University of the Pacific that provides leadership opportunities, service experiences, and a chance to understand the oral needs of all Americans. The organization and activities of the program are detailed, along with a description of the type of individuals served. The complex range of motives for community service and the relationship between the private system and the safety-net system are explored. PMID:25219188

  11. Trends in allied dental education: an analysis of the past and a look to the future.

    PubMed

    Haden, N K; Morr, K E; Valachovic, R W

    2001-05-01

    Allied dental healthcare providers have been an integral part of the dental team since the turn of the 19th century. Like dental education, allied dental education's history includes a transition from apprenticeships and proprietary school settings to dental schools and community and technical colleges. There are currently 258 dental assisting programs, 255 dental hygiene programs, and 28 dental laboratory technology programs according to the American Dental Association's Commission on Dental Accreditation. First-year enrollment increased 9.5 percent in dental hygiene education from 1994/95 to 1998/99, while enrollment in dental assisting programs declined 7 percent and declined 31 percent in dental laboratory technology programs during the same period. Program capacity exceeds enrollment in all three areas of allied dental education. Challenges facing allied dental education include addressing the dental practicing community's perception of a shortage of dental assistants and dental hygienists and increasing pressure for career tracks that do not require education in ADA Commission on Dental Accreditation accredited programs. The allied dental workforce may also be called upon for innovative approaches to improve access to oral health care and reduce oral health care disparities. In addition, allied dental education programs may face challenges in recruiting faculty with the desired academic credentials. ADEA is currently pursuing initiatives in these and other areas to address the current and emerging needs of allied dental education. PMID:11425252

  12. Measuring team-based interprofessional education outcomes in clinical dentistry: psychometric evaluation of a new scale at an Australian dental school.

    PubMed

    Storrs, Mark J; Alexander, Heather; Sun, Jing; Kroon, Jeroen; Evans, Jane L

    2015-03-01

    Previous research on interprofessional education (IPE) assessment has shown the need to evaluate the influence of team-based processes on the quality of clinical education. This study aimed to develop a valid and reliable instrument to evaluate the effectiveness of interprofessional team-based treatment planning (TBTP) on the quality of clinical education at the Griffith University School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Queensland, Australia. A scale was developed and evaluated to measure interprofessional student team processes and their effect on the quality of clinical education for dental, oral health therapy, and dental technology students (known more frequently as intraprofessional education). A face validity analysis by IPE experts confirmed that items on the scale reflected the meaning of relevant concepts. After piloting, 158 students (61% response rate) involved with TBTP participated in a survey. An exploratory factor analysis using the principal component method retained 23 items with a total variance of 64.6%, suggesting high content validity. Three subscales accounted for 45.7%, 11.4%, and 7.5% of the variance. Internal consistency of the scale (α=0.943) and subscales 1 (α=0.953), 2 (α=0.897), and 3 (α=0.813) was high. A reliability analysis yielded moderate (rs=0.43) to high correlations (0.81) with the remaining scale items. Confirmatory factor analyses verified convergent validity and confirmed that this structure had a good model fit. This study suggests that the instrument might be useful in evaluating interprofessional or intraprofessional team-based processes and their influence on the quality of clinical education in academic dental institutions. PMID:25729018

  13. [A new protocol for use and storage of tooth-brushing material for school children].

    PubMed

    Vilhena, Fabiano Vieira; Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho; Caldana, Magali de Lourdes; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the storage and distribution of toothbrushing material for school children. Twenty individuals responsible for the collective oral hygiene of school children from Bauru - SP and São José dos Campos - SP participated in the first stage of the study, answering 2 questionnaires about five different kits for use by school children. The statistical analysis was performed using Wilcoxon (p<0,05). In the second stage, the amount of toothpaste or liquid cleanser applied to the toothbrush by 178 school children aged 4 to 8 years from 2 cities from the state of São Paulo (Bauru e Bariri) was weighed using a portable balance. The statistical analysis was obtained by using Pearson's correlation coefficient and analysis of covariance (p <0,05). Kit 5 obtained levels of satisfaction and high satisfaction when compared with the others kits (1 - 4). The school children from Bauru (0.41g) used smaller amounts of toothpaste than the school children from Bariri (0.48g). The average of the amount of liquid cleanser applied by the sample was 0.15g. The "drop technique" (liquid cleanser) was considered practical for dispensing a small, standardized quantity of the product. Kit 5 was considered a good alternative for establishing a collective oral health protocol in the Brazilian health system. PMID:19039393

  14. Instructional Design for Assessment of Dental Esthetic Treatment Needs in a Indian Undergraduate School: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Sangappa, Sunila B; Mehendale, Avinash V

    2014-12-01

    In the recent years esthetic dentistry has been the area of focus amongst the public. Esthetics is an important dimension in dental practice and the upcoming dentists need to be enabled to demonstrate their competencies for an efficient clinical outcome. The purpose of this study was to institute a cultural change within traditional didactic dental education towards student centred learning to cope up with the accelerating pace of medical technological change and achieving positive impact on patient care and patient satisfaction. Intervention that was considered for the project included David Merrill's first principles of instruction. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with all the students from four cohorts of final year dental undergraduate students, divided into an intervention group (n = 40) and a control group (n = 40). A professional assessment questionnaire is used to evaluate the relationship between the students and professional's assessment of esthetic treatment needs. The results of the study indicated that the ranking of the most and least noticeable dental features differed significantly (p = 0.0061) between the intervention and non intervention group and the indicates the intervention group to be in better agreement with professional assessment than the non intervention group of students with z value of 2.7435. The relative agreement between intervention group of undergraduate students and the professional assessment of esthetic treatment need shows the importance of intervention of Merrill's first principles of instruction in learning, emphasising the significance of PBL and therefore indicating a positive impact on successful esthetic treatment for patients. PMID:26199504

  15. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed. PMID:19410234

  16. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  17. Reforming the mission of public dental services.

    PubMed

    Wright, F A C; List, P F

    2012-10-01

    Australia has a complex history of providing public dental services to its communities. From the early days of Colonial settlement, the provision of dental care to the Australian public has largely been driven and influenced by organized groups and associations of dentists. The Constitution of Australia, under Section 51 xxiii A, allows for the Commonwealth to provide for medical and dental services. Unlike the United Kingdom, however, dental services have not been embedded into a universal national health service agenda. In 1974, that the Australian Government through the Australian School Dental Program provided the first funding and national direction for public dental services - and that, limited to children. The Commonwealth Dental Health Program 1993-1997 was the second national endeavor to provide public dental services, this time to financially disadvantaged adults. Since that time, public dental service responsibility has been shuttled between States/Territories and the Commonwealth. A new paradigm for public dental services in Australia requires strong Commonwealth leadership, as well as the commitment of State and Territories and the organized dental profession. The National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission provided the most recent scenario for a radical change in mission. This paper canvases the competing roles of strategic, functional, and structural issues in relationship to social network and policy issues, which must be recognized if Australians truly seek to reform public dental services. PMID:22998313

  18. Fluorides in groundwater, soil and infused black tea and the occurrence of dental fluorosis among school children of the Gaza strip.

    PubMed

    Shomar, B; Müller, G; Yahya, A; Askar, S; Sansur, R

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the fluoride levels in water, soil and tea, and to identify the major fluoride minerals in soil that supply water with fluoride ions. Another aim was to study the prevalence of dental fluorosis in permanent dentition of the school children of the Gaza Strip. Monitoring of fluoride levels in 73 groundwater wells and 20 topsoil samples for the last three years revealed a general trend of increasing from north to south of the Gaza Strip. A linear regression analysis found a correlation coefficient of r=0.93 between the fluoride concentrations in groundwater and soil for the same geographic areas. However, the X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) results showed that none of the four major fluoride minerals were detected in the tested soil samples; the PHREEQC model showed that fluorite (CaF2) was the main donating mineral of fluoride ions to groundwater. A high positive correlation was found between fluoride concentrations in groundwater and occurrence of dental fluorosis. Among 353 school children of the five geographic areas of the Gaza Strip the prevalence of dental fluorosis was 60%, and 40% had no signs of fluorosis in their permanent dentitions. The highest occurrence, 94%, was in Khan Yunis, followed by 82% in Rafah, 68% in the middle area, 29% in Gaza and the lowest occurrence of 9% was in the northern area. These percentages were directly proportional to the average content of fluoride in groundwater of each area: 2.6, 0.9, 1.7, 1.2, and 0.7 ppm, respectively. The exception was Rafah where people drank from new groundwater wells that have been dug in the last 10 years. The occurrence of the disease was due to intake of high amounts of fluorides in drinking water, tea and fish. Communication with population indicated a heavy intake of tea starting from a very young age; not uncommonly tea is put in nursing bottles. No significant correlation was found between prevalence figures and gender or age groups. This high

  19. Characterization of the lower boundary layer based on Sodar observations (2010-2013) in Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Gerhard; Cruz, Felipe

    2014-05-01

    Continuous Sodar observations from Bauru, located in the central State of São Paulo, are presented in this paper for a 4-year period (January 2010 - December 2013). The data were collected at the Meteorological Research Institute (IPMet) of the Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho" (UNESP), Campus Bauru, which is situated at the southeastern outskirts of the town, in a pristine environment with mostly indigenous vegetation. The medium-sized Sodar was programmed to record 60-minute averages of the vertical wind profiles (u, v, w) between 30 and 800 m above ground level (AGL, station height 624 m above mean sea level) at 30-minute intervals with a vertical resolution of 10 m. The data recovery was almost 100% in the first 160 m, subsequently diminishing gradually to 50% at 370 m, 20% at 500 m and then tailing off to only 1% at 800 m AGL. Since the Sodar is an acoustic sensor, the reception of the backscattered signals is strongly dependent on meteorological conditions. The maximum height of 800 m was maintained, despite the low recovery rate, because it is important for individual case studies. However, mean wind roses will only be presented up to 500 m AGL, to avoid a possible bias in sampling wind directions. In this paper wind roses at selected heights are presented to document the variation of the wind direction and speed with height, as well as their seasonal variation. Besides the standard primary data of the 3 wind components, the scalar hourly mean wind speed and the mean vector direction, the Sodar also generates their standard deviations. Furthermore, a variety of derived parameters, such as shear, shear direction, sigma speed, sigma Phi, sigma Theta, turbulence intensity, Pasquill-Gifford (PG) stability class, turbulent kinetic energy and eddy dissipation rate are generated as hourly means at each height level and recorded as sliding means every 30 min. The Software also offers the facility to generate a separate daily file with so

  20. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  1. Prevalence of precancerous skin lesions and non-melanoma skin cancer in Japanese-Brazilians in Bauru, São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ishioka, Priscila; Marques, Sílvio Alencar; Hirai, Amélia Toyomi; Marques, Mariangela E A; Hirata, Sérgio Henrique; Yamada, Sérgio

    2009-05-01

    Precancerous lesions and skin cancer are infrequent in Asians, and have received little documentation in the literature. Brazil has the world's largest contingent of Japanese immigrants and their descendants, and 70% live in the State of São Paulo. The prevalence of such skin lesions in Japanese-Brazilians is unknown. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of actinic keratoses and non-melanoma skin cancer in first and second-generation Japanese-Brazilians over 30 years of age, without miscegenation, living in the city of Bauru, São Paulo State, in 2006. Of the 567 Japanese-Brazilians that underwent dermatological examination, actinic keratosis was diagnosed in 76, with a mean age of 68.9 years, and a single case of basal cell carcinoma was detected in a 39-year-old female patient. In Japan, prevalence of actinic keratosis varies from 0.76% to 5%, and the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer is 1.2 to 5.4/100 thousand. Japanese-Brazilians from Bauru showed a 13.4% prevalence of actinic keratoses and earlier age at onset. Proximity to the Equator and a history of farming contribute to these higher rates. Presence of solar melanosis was associated with a 1.9-fold risk of developing actinic keratosis. PMID:19488481

  2. Revisiting the Status of Dental Ethics Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, John G.; Beemsterboer, Phyllis L.; Pate, Ted D.; Haden, N. Karl

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed dental educators responsible for academic integrity about their school's methods of ethics instruction. Findings indicated that there is a continuing emphasis on dental ethics instruction, with 91 percent of respondents reporting the offering of at least one ethics course and an increased percentage of faculty trained in ethics or…

  3. Involving Dental Students in Cancer Research and Patient Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiller, Timothy F.; Peterson, Douglas E.

    1981-01-01

    The valuable role that predoctoral dental and dental hygiene student involvement in specialized hospital programs can play in the educational process is described. The University of Maryland Dental School program emphasizes the involvement of students in major clinical research related to cancer patients. (Author/MLW)

  4. The Effects of Educational Intervention & Parental Support on Dental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Edward J.; Behr, Mary T.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to determine the effectiveness of a school-based dental health education program which included a parental support component. It was hypothesized that changes in dental health attitudes would be positively affected by the outreach effort to educate parents on the importance of dental health. (JN)

  5. Dental Fluorosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when children regularly consume fluoride during the teeth-forming years, age 8 and younger. Most dental fluorosis ... over a long period when the teeth are forming under the gums. Only children aged 8 years ...

  6. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your ... the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , but functions just the same. ...

  7. Dental Caries in High-Risk School-Aged African-American Children in Alabama: A Six-Year Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghazal, Tariq S.; Levy, Steven M.; Childers, Noel K.; Broffitt, Barbara A.; Caplan, Daniel J; Warren, John J.; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Kolker, Justine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence and incidence of dental caries in school-aged African-American children who received semi-annual fluoride varnish applications. Methods A cohort of six-year-old high caries-risk African-American children (n=98) was recruited in Uniontown, Alabama and followed for six years. Oral examinations were done annually by three trained/calibrated dentists. Tooth surfaces with cavitated caries, missing due to caries and with filled surfaces were recorded, using WHO criteria. Also, as part of the study, children received periodic oral health instruction, fluoride varnish applications and referral to dentists starting at baseline. Results The person-level prevalence of dmfs/DMFS was: 61.2 percent at mean age 5.9 (n=98, mean dmfs/DMFS=11.6); 63.8 percent at age 6.7 (n=80, mean dmfs/DMFS=13.2); 70.6 percent at age 7.8 (n=68, mean dmfs/DMFS=14.2); 65.7 percent at age 8.8 (n=68, mean dmfs/DMFS=11.8); 55.6 percent at age 9.7 (n=63, mean dmfs/DMFS=8.8); 40.3 percent at age 10.7 (n=62, mean dmfs/DMFS=3.4); and 37.1 percent at age 11.7 (n=62, mean dmfs/DMFS=2.3). The six-year person-level incidence of dmfs/DMFS was 32.3 percent (mean dmfs/DMFS=1.6) from age 5.9 to age 11.7 (n=62). Conclusion In spite of the oral health education and fluoride varnish applications, there was substantial new dental caries in this high-risk sample. Additional studies evaluating risk factors for caries development are ongoing. PMID:27306247

  8. Relationship Between Dietary Sugar Intake and Dental Caries Among Japanese Preschool Children with Relatively Low Sugar Intake (Japan Nursery School SHOKUIKU Study): A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Saido, Miyuki; Asakura, Keiko; Masayasu, Shizuko; Sasaki, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    Objectives The WHO has recently proposed to halve the recommendation for free sugar intake from 10 to 5 % of energy intake to reduce the incidence of diseases such as obesity and dental caries. The Japanese population is suitable to confirm the appropriateness of this proposal, because dietary sugar intake in Japan is exceptionally low among developed countries. We sought to establish a method to estimate dietary sugar intake in Japan and to examine the relationship between sugar and the number of dental caries using data obtained from the Japan Nursery School SHOKUIKU study. Methods Dietary intake during the preceding month and the number of caries was examined in children aged 5-6 years using a brief-type self-administered diet history questionnaire for Japanese preschool children completed by their guardians and another questionnaire on lifestyle. Multivariate Poisson regression models were used for the analysis. Results When subjects were ranked into quintiles by the proportion of energy from free sugar, those in higher quintiles had more caries than those in the lowest quintile. On close analysis, the number of caries among children with a relatively small proportion of energy intake from free sugar (3.18-3.77 %) was not significantly different from that in the lowest group (0.95-3.17 %). Conclusions The recent proposition of WHO might be valid, because the adverse effect of relatively small proportion (approximately less than 5 %) of energy intake from free sugar on caries was not detected among the subjects in this study. However, more study will be necessary to reach a conclusion. PMID:26576592

  9. A review of paleogeographical and chronostratigraphical distribution of mesoeucrocodylian species from the upper Cretaceous beds from the Bauru (Brazil) and Neuquén (Argentina) groups, Southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candeiro, Carlos Roberto A.; Martinelli, Agustín G.

    2006-11-01

    This article offers a detailed overview of mesoeucrocodylian assemblages recovered from the Late Cretaceous southern South America Bauru and Neuquén groups as a result of extensive research during the past 110 years. The Bauru (Brazil) and Neuquén (Argentina) groups yield numerous mesoeucrocodylian remains, mainly of Turonian-late Maastrichtian (Late Cretaceous) age. The majority of the discoveries were made in the Adamantina and Marília formations of Minas Gerais and São Paulo states, Brazil, and Candeleros and Bajo de la Carpa formations of Neuquén and Río Negro provinces, Argentina. Sixty formally described species of mesoeucrocodylians are recognized on the basis of disarticulated materials; among them, notosuchians, sebecosuchians, and peirosaurids are the best represented. At least one species is common to the Bauru and Neuquén groups, and close phylogenetic affinities are postulated for the remaining taxa. The fossil record of these two South American units shows three main peaks of diversity: in the Cenomanian of Argentina, the Santonian of Argentina and Brazil, and the Maastrichtian of Brazil. The absence of notosuchians and sebecosuchians in the late Campanian-Maastrichtian of Patagonia is coincident with the paleoenvironmental changes in that landmass by that time, as well as with the increase in diversity of several groups of theropod dinosaurs. In contrast, highly specialized carnivorous mesoeucrocodylians are abundant in the Maastrichtian of the Bauru group of Brazil, whereas other tetrapod carnivorous groups are scarcely represented.

  10. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  11. Dental and allied dental students' attitudes towards and perceptions of intraprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Brame, Jennifer L; Mitchell, Shannon H; Wilder, Rebecca S; Sams, Lattice D

    2015-06-01

    Interprofessional and intraprofessional learning opportunities in health professions education are vital to emphasize evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and cost-effectiveness in patients' oral health care. The aim of this study was to assess dental, dental hygiene, and dental assisting students' readiness for intraprofessional education and to evaluate their attitudes towards and perceptions of intraprofessional teamwork, communication, respect, and understanding of professional roles. In 2013, students at one dental school (N=247) were surveyed, and focus groups were conducted for this convergent parallel mixed-methods study. Survey response rates were as follows: senior dental students 54.4% (N=43), senior dental hygiene students 100% (N=32), dental assisting students 95% (N=19), junior dental students 51.8% (N=42), and junior dental hygiene students 100% (N=33). The results showed that the dental hygiene students had more positive responses about intraprofessional education than the dental and dental assisting students (p<0.05). Most (94%, N=160) of the respondents in the combined groups agreed that intraprofessional learning would help them become more effective members of the oral health care team. The three focus group sessions (N=17) revealed consistency among the groups regarding the value of an integrated clinical design and intraprofessional education. These students were eager and positive about intraprofessional learning and agreed that a shared learning model can improve communication and respect among team members, provide a better understanding of roles, and ultimately enhance patient care. PMID:26034025

  12. The National Institute of Dental Research Clinical Dental Staff Fellowship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Bruce J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A program in one of the National Institutes of Health offers clinical training fellowships as a means of training potential dental school faculty by providing both unique clinical skills and high-quality research experience. The program was developed in response to a perceived need for change in academic dentistry. (MSE)

  13. Industry support for dental education.

    PubMed

    Sudzina, Michael R

    2005-01-01

    The relationships between industry and dental education are multiple and mutually beneficial. Perhaps most prominent are collaboration on research and development of products and technologies and the knowledge and public credibility that accompany them. Industry is also looked to for product and equipment support in schools and increasingly for help with outreach and access programs schools provide for underserved populations. Not as widely recognized, but still quite important, are the programs for support of student research and sharing of management expertise through exchange of board members. A quarter century ago, the relationship between schools and industry was at arm's length. There was a mistrust in schools that feared exposing their students to commercial contact. Today the relationship has evolved into a mutual search for joint benefits with an eye on the future of the profession and its relationship with patients. This is illustrated in the American Dental Education Association Corporate Council. PMID:16350924

  14. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  15. Symposium on Dental Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lawrence W., Ed.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This document presents papers, critiques, and comments from a symposium which assessed the current status of preventive dental behavior. The field was divided into the following three major areas: (a) mass media programs, (b) school health programs, and (c) effect of the private practitioner. Each author was asked to review the literature, provide…

  16. Concerns of Entering Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Robert H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    First-year dental students from three schools were surveyed to assess their concern about psychosocial, academic, time, isolation, and money issues. Similarity in ranking of concerns, and differences in intensity of concern are examined for implications for research in stress management. (MSE)

  17. Clinical Evaluation of Reasons for Replacement of Amalgam Restorations in Patients Referring to a Dental School in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pouralibaba, Firoz; Joulaei, Mohammad; Kashefimehr, Atabak; Pakdel, Farzaneh; Jamali, Zahra; Esmaeili, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims The present study evaluated the most common reasons for replacing amalgam restorations in a university clinic. Materials and methods A total of 217 restorations which needed to be replaced were clinically and radiographically evaluated in a period of 4 months. The frequencies of reasons for replacing amalgam restorations were calculated: The assessed items included recurrent caries, tooth structure fracture (functional or non-functional cusps), amalgam bulk fracture, amalgam marginal fracture, proximal overhangs, and esthetics. Data were analyzed using Fischer’s exact test. Results Both in vital teeth and teeth which had undergone root canal therapy, the most common reason for amalgam replacement was cusp fracture, with the fracture of non-functional cusps being statistically significant. Recurrent caries was the second most common reason for amalgam replacement. In Class I restorations, the most common reasons were recurrent caries and esthetics, with no statistical significance. The most frequent problem in Class II restorations was fracture of non-functional cusps, with a statistical significance in three-surface restorations. Conclusion According to the results, failing to reduce undermined cusps and neglectful caries removal are the reasons for majority of amalgam restoration replacements. These issues should be emphasized in the curriculum for dental students and continuing education courses. PMID:22991598

  18. Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ralph C.

    1988-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most prevalent diseases afflicting mankind. It reached a peak in the 1950s but has been declining drastically in recent years in children and young adults. This article describes the three contributing factors in dental caries: microbial plaque, tooth susceptibility, and diet, and discusses practical preventive measures which help to reduce caries incidence. Some of these, such as vaccines and antimicrobial varnishes, are still in the research stages, while others, such as sucrose substitutes, low-calorie sweeteners, and limitation of frequency of sugar snacks are well established and can be promoted by family physicians. PMID:21253193

  19. The Patient as a Declining Resource in Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colman, Harvey L.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the patient in dental education is examined from several perspectives, including factors influencing the patient population within dental school clinics, the role that patient care plays in schools, and opportunities for attracting and maintaining sufficient patients to provide educational experiences for students. (Author/MLW)

  20. The Impact of Research and Technological Advances on Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loe, Harald

    1981-01-01

    To arrive at a learning situation conducive to a scientific approach in dental school teaching of diagnosis, treatment, prescription, and judgment of prognosis, it is necessary to strengthen the scientific environment in dental schools, increase scientifically trained faculty, and guarantee student involvement in research. (MLW)

  1. Proceedings of Symposium on the Implementation of Contemporary Biology in Dental Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, S. S., Ed.

    Presented are the proceedings of a symposium on the implementation of contemporary biology in dental curriculum, sponsored by the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. Approximately 180 dental educators, including 69 official delegates from every dental school in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico attended. The program aimed…

  2. Dental Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide, developed for use in dental assistant education programs in Michigan, describes a task-based curriculum that can help a teacher to develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. It is based on task analysis and reflects the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that employers expect entry-level dental…

  3. Dental crowns

    MedlinePlus

    ... cover a tooth Replace a misshapen tooth or dental implant Correct a misaligned tooth Talk to your dentist ... the tooth pulled and replaced with a tooth implant. Your crown could chip or crack: If you grind your teeth or clench your jaw, you may need to ...

  4. Dental Training Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  5. Dental education and dental practice.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J R

    1984-01-01

    This paper relates recent modes of dental practice to changes that the public and government are likely to ask the health care professions to make in the future. As usual they are asking for the best of all worlds. First, that we maintain the clinical model to the highest standards of personal dental care based and tested against the best research at our disposal, whilst we ensure there is no reduction in the high technical standards for which british dentists have a reputation. Second, that the profession is required to consider ways of providing care on the medicosocial model for the whole community at an economic level the country will afford. The broad changes in dental education have been reviewed, from the technical apprenticeship to the establishment of strong university departments in teaching hospitals. The importance of a sound biomedical foundation and of research both to education and the credibility of dental practice as a primary health care profession is stressed if the profession is to retain its position as a sister to medicine and not slide down to that of a technical ancillary. PMID:6374141

  6. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... or impacted teeth The presence and extent of dental caries (cavities) Bone damage (such as from periodontitis ) Abscessed ... Dental x-rays can reveal dental cavities (tooth decay) before they ... take yearly bitewings for the early development of cavities.

  7. A School Flouride Mouthrinse Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchel, Karen A.; Mello, Arthur F.

    1977-01-01

    A weekly "swish and spit" program takes about ten minutes of class time, effectively prevents dental caries, and promotes an awareness and greater concern for good dental practices in the school community. (MJB)

  8. Dental Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  9. Dental service utilization of disabled children.

    PubMed

    Lo, G L; Soh, G; Vignehsa, H; Chellappah, N K

    1991-01-01

    This study examines factors influencing the use of dental services by disabled children. A total of 322 disabled children, aged 6 to 18 years, attending nine special schools were randomly selected for a clinical examination. Their parents or guardians were interviewed to determine the child's pattern of dental service use, parental perception of the child's dental needs, and special problems encountered with seeking care. It was found that 68.3% of the children had never visited a dentist within the previous year. The most common reason given for no care was an assumption that "nothing was wrong." The results indicated a low rate of dental service use among the disabled children. A lack of parental dental awareness appeared to be a major contributory factor. PMID:1839867

  10. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, H.; Razak, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS) questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht's DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates' of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%). However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%). Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P = 0.004). “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services. PMID:25386615

  11. Dental Therapists: Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Underserved Children

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jay W.; Mathu-Muju, Kavita R.

    2014-01-01

    Disparities in dental health care that characterize poor populations are well known. Children suffer disproportionately and most severely from dental diseases. Many countries have school-based dental therapist programs to meet children’s primary oral health care needs. Although dental therapists in the United States face opposition from national and state dental associations, many state governments are considering funding the training and deployment of dental therapists to care for underserved populations. Dental therapists care for American Indians/Alaska Natives in Alaska, and Minnesota became the first state to legislate dental therapist training. Children should receive priority preference; therefore, the most effective and economical utilization of dental therapists will be as salaried employees in school-based programs, beginning in underserved rural areas and inner cities. PMID:24825199

  12. Ethical obliqations and the dental office team.

    PubMed

    Roucka, Toni M; Zarkowski, Pamela; Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Patthoff, Donald E

    2013-01-01

    A hypothetical case of alleged sexual misconduct in a practice with high employee turnover and stress is analyzed by three experts. This case commentary examines the ethical role expectations of an office manager who is not directly involved but becomes aware of the activities. The commentators bring the perspectives of a dental hygienist, academic administrator, and attorney; a teacher of behavioral sciences in a dental school; and a general dentist with many years of practice experience. PMID:24761582

  13. New leaders in dentistry: dental students.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Leadership opportunities for dental students have opened dramatically in recent decades because of the humanistic approach to education that shares responsibility for learning between students and faculty and that values mutual respect. Technology has also had an effect because it creates instant access and global communities. This new student leadership is most apparent in the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), which recently developed a White Paper on ethics, assisted in the establishment of Student Professionalism and Ethics Clubs at schools, and is developing a policy on unsupervised dental care. Students are also demonstrating leadership in research; in dual degrees that enhance teaching and policy; and in community service and outreach. PMID:21314045

  14. Optical approach in characterizing dental biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoli, Nazif; Vučić, Zlatko; Milat, Ognjen; Gladić, Jadranko; Lovrić, Davorin; Pandurić, Vlatko; Marović, Danijela; Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Ristić, Mira; Čalogović, Marina; Tarle, Zrinka

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the current activities of a research collaborative program between three institutions from Zagreb (School of Dental Medicine, Institute of Physics, and Institute Ruđer Bo\\vsković). Within the scope of this program, it is planned to investigate and find guidelines for the refinement of the properties of dental biomaterials (DBs) and of procedures in restorative dental medicine. It is also planned to identify and model the dominant mechanisms which control polymerization of DBs. The materials to be investigated include methacrylate based composite resins, new composite materials with amorphous calcium phosphate, silorane based composite resins, glass-ionomer cements, and giomer.

  15. Tobacco use prevention and cessation in dental and dental hygiene undergraduate education.

    PubMed

    Ramseier, Christoph A; Christen, Arden; McGowan, Joan; McCartan, Bernard; Minenna, Luigi; Ohrn, Kerstin; Walter, Clemens

    2006-01-01

    Oral health care professionals are aware of their responsibility to advise patients to stop using tobacco. However, they do not feel sufficiently prepared to help their patients to quit, and consequently are not confident in providing these preventive measures. This fact reflects the lack of emphasis on tobacco cessation in both dental and dental hygiene undergraduate education. It may therefore be assumed that improvement of dental and dental hygiene education in tobacco use cessation counselling may result in increased self-confidence and frequency of its provision. The importance of making space in the curriculum for tobacco use prevention and cessation has to be emphasised. Dental schools and dental hygiene programmes have to be reminded of the key role the dental profession has in tobacco control. Next to the public health aspect of tobacco control, such involvement may be both an ethical and a legal responsibility. The implementation of effective tobacco use prevention and cessation in a dental educational setting requires a multidisciplinary approach involving the school's entire teaching personnel and external experts. In general, a knowledge base attained through lecture, Problem-Based Learning (PBL), or E-Learning, and clinical skills attained through clinical instructions and practices is required. It is suggested that curriculum content should include (1) the biological effects of tobacco use, (2) the history of tobacco culture and psychosocial aspects of tobacco use, (3) prevention and treatment of tobacco use and dependence, and (4) development of clinical skills for tobacco use prevention and cessation. PMID:16683397

  16. U.S. dental students' attitudes toward research and science: impact of research experience.

    PubMed

    Holman, Shaina Devi; Wietecha, Mateusz S; Gullard, Angela; Peterson, Jon M B

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to provide a first nationwide assessment of dental students' attitudes toward the importance of research and its integration into the dental curriculum. For this purpose, the American Association for Dental Research National Student Research Group developed an online survey that was distributed to 89 percent of U.S. dental students in May 2012. The survey consisted of twenty-one Likert-type items divided into three groups: importance of research in dentistry, barriers to research involvement, and exposure to research in the dental curriculum. There were 733 responses (3.9 percent response rate), including students in all stages of education representing fifty-eight out of sixty-one dental schools. Age and race/ethnic distributions corresponded with U.S. dental school enrollees. Results showed that 63 percent of respondents had conducted research before matriculation, and of the 34 percent that participated in research during dental school, only 27 percent were newcomers. Respondents strongly agreed that scientific research enabled their progress in dentistry. Inadequate time in the curriculum was an obstacle they perceived to research involvement during dental school. Respondents agreed that dental curricula emphasize evidence-based practices but may be inadequately teaching biostatistics and research methodologies. Students with research experience tended to have stronger positive opinions about the importance of research in dental education. Efforts to foster research in schools have been well received by students, but several issues remain for enriching dental education through greater involvement of students in research. PMID:24609336

  17. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... child to bed with a bottle of milk, juice, or sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma ...

  18. Use of Preventive Dental Care Among Medicaid-Enrolled, School-Aged US Children in Immigrant and Nonimmigrant Families: Trends in Pennsylvania From 2005 Through 2010

    PubMed Central

    Chesnokova, Arina; Shults, Justine; Pinto, Andres; Rubin, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We describe trends in receipt of preventive dental care among Medicaid-enrolled children in Pennsylvania between 2005 and 2010, comparing the US children of immigrants with their co-ethnic peers in nonimmigrant families. Methods. We analyzed Pennsylvania Medicaid claims, birth records, and census data for children born in Pennsylvania and enrolled in Medicaid for 10 or more months during any of the calendar years assessed. Results. Receipt of preventive dental care was more likely among Latino children in immigrant families than among their peers in nonimmigrant families; also, it was more likely among White children in immigrant families than among their peers in nonimmigrant families. Rates of preventive dental care use among African American and Asian children in immigrant and nonimmigrant families were comparable. From 2005 to 2010, the percentage of Latino children in nonimmigrant families who received preventive dental care increased from 33% to 61%. Changes in other groups were significant but less dramatic. Conclusions. Receipt of preventive dental care has increased among Medicaid-enrolled children in Pennsylvania, with marked gains among Latino children. Within each racial/ethnic group, the children of immigrants were either more likely than or equally likely as children in nonimmigrant families to receive care. PMID:25322290

  19. Dental and dental hygiene students' perceptions of a standardized patient instructor conflict resolution program.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Bridget E; Kinney, Janet; Fitzgerald, Mark; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol Anne; Guenther, Marilyn K; Ridley, Karen; Whitman, Laurie; Ramaswamy, Vidya

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine students' perceptions of the value of a standardized patient instructor conflict resolution program designed to strengthen their communication and confidence during difficult patient conversations. Three cohorts of students at one dental school were part of the study: the dental class of 2013, the dental class of 2014, and the dental hygiene class of 2013. The same groups of students completed surveys immediately following the program and one, two, or three years afterwards. Response rates for the survey immediately after the program were 98 percent (n=99) of the dental class of 2013, 97 percent (n=103) of the dental class of 2014, and 100 percent (n=25) of the dental hygiene class of 2013. Response rates for the subsequent survey were 41.5 percent (n=42) of the dental class of 2013, 74.5 percent (n=79) of the dental class of 2014, and 100 percent (n=25) of the dental hygiene class of 2013. In the results, all students reported a high level of satisfaction in their immediate assessment of the program and its ability to prepare them for conflict situations. They also reported a high level of satisfaction in their retrospective self-assessment of conflict resolution skills. However, their assessment of the program's value and applicability appeared to have diminished over time. This study suggests that the program should continue being a part of both dental and dental hygiene curricula, with more training and guided experiences in self-assessment and perhaps supplemental experiences added. PMID:25281673

  20. Atypical Forensic Dental Identifications.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Anthony R; Wood, James D

    2015-06-01

    Forensic dental identification specialists are typically the last conventional option for postmortem identification. Forensic dental identification is most often accomplished by comparing radiographs of the decedent's teeth with the dental radiographs obtained from the dentist of the suspected victim. Unfortunately, antemortem dental radiographs are not always available. When presented with this challenge, the authors of this article have been successful in completing identifications using means other than dental radiographic comparison. PMID:26126345

  1. Dental stem cell patents.

    PubMed

    Morsczeck, Christian; Frerich, Bernhard; Driemel, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    A complex human tissue harbors stem cells that are responsible for its maintenance or repair. These stem cells have been isolated also from dental tissues such as the periodontal ligament, dental papilla or dental follicle and they may offer novel applications in dentistry. This following review summarizes patents about dental stem cells for dental tissue engineering and considers their value for regenerative dentistry. PMID:19149737

  2. Oral health and dental care in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chu, C H; Wong, S S S; Suen, R P C; Lo, E C M

    2013-06-01

    Hong Kong, a Special Administrative Region of People's Republic of China, is a metropolitan city in Asia with a population of over 7 million people. This paper reflects the current oral health and dental care situations in Hong Kong. Water fluoridation was commenced in 1961, with a current level at 0.5 ppm. And there has continuously been lower caries prevalence thereafter. Dental care is mainly provided by private practitioners. The School Dental Care Service, run by the Department of Health, provides dental care to enrolled primary school children through treatments by dental therapists. An Oral Health Education Unit is set up to promote dental health among the public, particularly preschool children. Government dentists serve mainly civil servants and their dependents. Limited emergency dental care is available to the public at designated government clinics for pain relief, most commonly in the form of extractions. There are about 2200 registered dentists and the dentist to population ratio is about 1:3200. Amongst the dental team, dental hygienists are trained in limited numbers. There are only less than 320 dental hygienists registered, working under the supervision of dentists. The Faculty of Dentistry of the University of Hong Kong has been providing 5-year undergraduate training in dentistry since 1981, and this is lengthened to 6 years from 2012 onwards. Specialty training requires at least a further 6 years. There are 8 specialties, which are Community Dentistry, Endodontics, Family Dentistry, Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral Rehabilitation, Orthodontics, Pediatric Dentistry, and Periodontics. PMID:23507329

  3. Leadership, governance and management in dental education - new societal challenges.

    PubMed

    Townsend, G; Thomas, R; Skinner, V; Bissell, V; Cohen, L; Cowpe, J; Giuliani, M; Gomez-Roman, G; Hovland, E; Imtiaz, A; Kalkwarf, K; Kim, K-K; Lamster, I; Marley, J; Mattsson, L; Paganelli, C; Quintao, C; Swift, J; Thirawat, J; Williams, J; Soekanto, S; Jones, M

    2008-02-01

    Dental schools around the world face new challenges that raise issues with regard to how they are governed, led and managed. With rapid societal changes, including globalization and consumerism, the roles of universities and their funding have become intensely debated topics. When financial burdens on universities increase, so does the pressure on dental schools. This is exacerbated by the relative expense of running dental schools and also by the limited understanding of both university managers and the public of the nature and scope of dentistry as a profession. In these circumstances, it is essential for dental schools to have good systems of leadership and management in place so that they can not only survive in difficult times, but flourish in the longer term. This paper discusses the concept of governance and how it relates to leadership, management and administration in dental schools and hospitals. Various approaches to governance and management in dental schools on different continents and regions are summarized and contrasted. A number of general governance and leadership issues are addressed. For example, a basic principle supported by the Working Group is that an effective governance structure must link authority and responsibility to performance and review, i.e. accountability, and that the mechanism for achieving this should be transparent. The paper also addresses issues specific to governing, leading and managing dental schools. Being a dean of a modern dental school is a very demanding role and some issues relating to this role are raised, including: dilemmas facing deans, preparing to be dean and succession planning. The importance of establishing a shared vision and mission, and creating the right culture and climate within a dental school, are emphasized. The Working Group advocates establishing a culture of scholarship in dental schools for both teaching and research. The paper addresses the need for effective staff management, motivation and

  4. Requirements for an Accredited Program in Dental Hygiene Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Dental Association, Washington, DC. Council on Dental Education.

    Dental hygiene programs should operate on a nonprofit basis as departments, divisions, schools, or colleges of a parent institution of higher learning approved or eligible for approval by agencies recognized by the National Commission on Accreditation. Provision should be made for liaison with the dental profession. The physical plant should meet…

  5. Use and Application of Structural Models in Dental Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Rosario H. Yap; McDonald, Ralph E.

    1985-01-01

    Latent abilities of dental students were analyzed as causes and professional achievements as effects, with preadmission performances as indicators of latent abilities. The results demonstrate that structural analysis focuses on the direct impact of the quality of dental school education. (Author/MLW)

  6. Teaching a Comprehensive Orofacial Pain Course in the Dental Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonty, Arthur A.

    1990-01-01

    Two surveys about the teaching of orofacial pain in the dental curriculum are reported, and the comprehensive course taught at the University of Kentucky is described. The first survey was of 89 Kentucky course alumni. The second was of 57 dental schools concerning the status of their orofacial pain curricula. (MSE)

  7. The Changing Face of Dental Education: The Impact of PBL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincham, Alan G.; Shuler, Charles F.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for the introduction of problem-based learning (PBL) pedagogy into dental education, the modalities of PBL being introduced, and the implications of its introduction into dental schools. Addresses implementation, faculty development, admissions, and assessment. Presents and discusses observations from a parallel-track…

  8. Dental Education in Europe: The Challenges of Variety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, John

    2003-01-01

    Finds that dental education varies considerably across Europe, with differing traditions of stomatology and odontology. The European Union's Dental Directives are often poorly followed by individual schools, and differences will likely intensify as Eastern/Central European countries join. The DentEd Thematic Network Project, which aims to promote…

  9. The Influence of Dentist and Nondentist Parents on Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romberg, Elaine; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A study supported three hypotheses, that students with dentist parents: (1) receive greater reinforcement of their education; (2) interact more with their parents on dentally related material; and (3) perceive greater well-being during their dental school years. A fourth hypothesis, that students with dentist parents earn better grades, was not…

  10. Curriculum Guidelines for Periodontics for Dental Hygiene Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    American Association of Dental Schools guidelines consist of an introduction to the field and its interrelationships with other fields of dental hygiene; an overview of the curriculum; outlines of primary educational goals, prerequisites, and specific content-related and clinical behavioral objectives; and recommendations concerning sequencing,…

  11. Australian Dental Students Views on a Compulsory Internship Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalloo, Ratilal; Johnson, Newell W.; Blinkhorn, Anthony S.; Ichim, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission Report suggests introducing an internship period for all newly qualified dental/oral health practitioners in Australia. This study gauged the opinions of undergraduates from three dental schools in Australia. Methods: An online survey collected demographic information on gender and…

  12. Loss of Alloy in Cast Restorations Fabricated by Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soh, George

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated the quantity of alloy lost in the fabrication of three types of cast restoration by dental students, and identified the proportion of loss at each of the four principal stages of the fabrication process. Suggestions for reducing metal loss and related costs in dental schools are offered. (MSE)

  13. Responsibility in Dental Praxis: An Activity Theoretical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardenghi, Diego Machado; Roth, Wolff-Michael; Pozzer-Ardenghi, Lilian

    2007-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this paper is to investigate the transitions practitioners undergo as they move from dental school to their first job in a dental clinic and their learning in the workplace. The paper aims to investigate their use of ethical principles as they engage in practice, providing a theoretical explanation for the gap practitioners…

  14. REQUIREMENTS FOR AN ACCREDITED PROGRAM IN DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Dental Association, Chicago, IL.

    THE COUNCIL WORKS WITHIN THE AUTHORITY OF THE "BYLAWS" OF THE AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION AND THE NATIONAL COMMISSION ON ACCREDITING. IT PREFERS THAT AN ACCREDITED CURRICULUM IN DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY BE CONDUCTED IN 2- OR 4-YEAR COLLEGE OR POST-HIGH SCHOOL INSTITUTIONS WHICH ARE ACCREDITED OR ELIGIBLE FOR ACCREDITATION. AT AN EARLY STAGE OF…

  15. Dental Hygienists' Perceptions of Preparation and Importance of Curriculum Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Dorothy A.; Gerbert, Barbara

    1995-01-01

    A mail survey investigated dental hygiene graduates' perceptions of their preparation for practice with respect to certain curriculum areas, the importance of those topics to practice, and demographic characteristics. Subjects were 64 graduates of the San Francisco University (California) dental school from 1985-89. Results are analyzed and…

  16. Humanities in Dental Education: A Focus on Understanding the Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balis, Sophia A.; Rule, James T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a seminar program at the University of Maryland Dental School, which uses books, short stories, and films that integrate human values into dental education, specifically in pediatric dentistry, for residents, clerks, and faculty. Results of initial evaluation and changes in the program over time are detailed. (DB)

  17. Pointing the profession in the right direction: positive ethical movements among dental students and education.

    PubMed

    Loftis, Brooke

    2008-01-01

    The American Student Dental Association has a substantial stake in the future of the dental profession. ASDA is taking a proactive role in addressing recently publicized cases of academic dishonesty and other ethical problems. Some of these initiatives and a sampling of the positive efforts in dental schools to build sound ethical climates are reviewed. PMID:18777888

  18. Providing Dental Services for People with Disabilities: Why Is It So Difficult?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.

    2002-01-01

    This article examines why it is difficult for individuals with disabilities to obtain dental services. It discusses inadequate preparation of dentists, cultural norms that create social, attitudinal, economic, and environmental barriers, and limited participation in the Medicaid dental program. The need for changes in dental school curricula is…

  19. The Impact of an Experiential/Feedback-Oriented Curricula on Levels of Confidence of Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanoff, Jay M.; And Others

    The impact of an experiential/feedback oriented curricula on levels of confidence of dental students was examined. The study was conducted in the TEAM (Training in Expanded Auxiliary Management) program at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine. The subjects were 31 senior dental students (fourth year) who had completed a…

  20. Dental hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R M

    2011-08-01

    A 14-year-old girl developed dental pain and was treated for acute infected pulpitis of her right upper lateral incisor with drilling and filling. The pain continued and was helped by analgesia, sucking ice cubes and drinking cold water. Forty-eight hours later, she became confused and disoriented. She started to vomit and complained of headache. Investigations revealed hyponatraemia with normal serum potassium levels and initially normal urinary sodium excretion. Over the next 24 hours, she passed 5.45 L of urine and her serum sodium rose from 125 to 143 mmol/L. Self-induced water intoxication has been described during drinking games and initiation ceremonies, but this would appear to an unusual cause. Conservative management proved successful in allowing this girl to recover without sequelae. PMID:21873727

  1. Surface dental enamel lead levels and antisocial behavior in Brazilian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Olympio, Kelly P K; Oliveira, Pedro V; Naozuka, Juliana; Cardoso, Maria R A; Marques, Antonio F; Günther, Wanda M R; Bechara, Etelvino J H

    2010-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been reportedly linked to a high risk of learning disabilities, aggression and criminal offenses. To study the association between lead exposure and antisocial/delinquent behavior, a cross-sectional study was conducted with 173 Brazilian youths aged 14-18 and their parents (n=93), living in impoverished neighborhoods of Bauru-SP, with high criminality indices. Self-Reported Delinquency (SRD) and Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) questionnaires were used to evaluate delinquent/antisocial behavior. Body lead burdens were evaluated in surface dental enamel acid microbiopsies. The dental enamel lead levels (DELL) were quantified by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and phosphorus content was measured using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Logistic regression was used to identify associations between DELL and each scale defined by CBCL and SRD scores. Odd ratios adjusted for familial and social covariates, considering a group of youths exposed to high lead levels (>or=75 percentile), indicated that high DELL is associated with increased risk of exceeding the clinical score for somatic complaints, social problems, rule-breaking behavior and externalizing problems (CI 95%). High DELL was not found to be associated with elevated SRD scores. In conclusion, our data support the hypothesis that high-level lead exposure can trigger antisocial behavior, which calls for public policies to prevent lead poisoning. PMID:20005947

  2. Long-Term Outcomes of a Dental Postbaccalaureate Program: Increasing Dental Student Diversity and Oral Health Care Access

    PubMed Central

    Wides, Cynthia D.; Brody, Harvey A.; Alexander, Charles J.; Gansky, Stuart A.; Mertz, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    The University of California, San Francisco School of Dentistry established the Dental Postbaccalaureate Program in 1998 to provide reapplication assistance to students from economically and/or educationally disadvantaged backgrounds who were previously denied admission to dental school. The goals were to increase diversity in the dental school student population and improve access to dental services for underserved populations. This article assesses the program’s short-, mid-, and long-term outcomes and is the first to examine long-term practice patterns after a dental postbaccalaureate program. Data collected on all participant (n=94) demographics, pre/post-program DAT scores, and post-program dental school admission results were used to assess short- and mid-term outcomes. Long-term outcomes and practice patterns were assessed using results of a census survey administered between 2009 and 2011 to the participants who had completed dental school and been in practice for at least two years (n=57). The survey had a response rate of 93 percent (n=53). Descriptive statistical techniques were used to examine the responses and to compare them to U.S. Census Bureau data and nationally available practice data for new dental graduates. Program participants’ DAT scores improved by an average of two points, and 98 percent were accepted to dental school. All survey respondents were practicing dentistry, and 81 percent reported serving underserved populations. These participants treat more Medicaid recipients than do most dentists, and their patient population is more diverse than the general population. The outcomes demonstrate that the program’s graduates are increasing diversity in the dental student population and that their practices are providing access to care for underserved populations. PMID:23658398

  3. Yes, You Can Teach Dental Health: Correlation of Dental Health Education with Other Classroom Subjects, K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulos, Teresa Mae Perkins

    Dental health education can be an integral part of the school curriculum, even when there are constraints on time and money and a formal health instruction program is lacking. Under these less than ideal circumstances, dental health education may be correlated at all grade levels with instruction in other subjects including, but not limited to,…

  4. [Current challenges and reforms for dental education in the United States of America].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Chun-yu; Sun, Yu; Zheng, Jia-wei

    2012-06-01

    American dental education development has been more mature from both the breadth and depth up to date. But there are some challenges and problems needing to be solved. These challenges include :attracting the best students into dental schools; maintaining high academic standards through the continuous training and development of new faculty; and improving dental curriculum, teaching methods, and assessing outcomes, in order to meet present and future public health care needs, and to incorporate new scientific developments into dental practice. This article was aimed to provide a reference for dental education reform in China by delivering the problems faced by the American Dental Education. PMID:22885501

  5. Dental students' perceptions of dental specialties and factors influencing specialty and career choices.

    PubMed

    Dhima, Matilda; Petropoulos, Vicki C; Han, Rita K; Kinnunen, Taru; Wright, Robert F

    2012-05-01

    The goals of this study were to 1) evaluate dental students' perceptions of dental specialties, 2) identify factors that play an important role in students' decision to pursue specialty training or career choices, and 3) establish a baseline of students' perceptions of the dental fields with the best future in terms of salary, personal and patient quality of life, and overall impact on the dental profession. Surveys were distributed to 494 students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine. Data were collected from 380 traditional four-year students and thirty advanced standing students. Chi-square tests, multivariate analysis, and logistic regressions were used to determine associations and independent contributions of student demographics to their perceptions of dental specialties and factors influencing specialty training or career choices. Debt was a statistically significant factor (p<0.001) in choosing specialty training or career independent of gender, age, or class year. Enjoyment of providing care in a specialty or field was identified as the single most important factor in choosing a specialty career. Half of the respondents had decided not to specialize. Pursuing postdoctoral general dentistry training and private practice in general dentistry were the most commonly reported plans after completion of dental school. Suggestions are made for ways to inform students about specialty training. PMID:22550102

  6. Moral reasoning in dental hygiene students.

    PubMed

    Newell, K J; Young, L J; Yamoor, C M

    1985-02-01

    Sixty-five students participated in a study designed to identify the level of moral reasoning of dental hygiene students. Comparisons were made with typical college students and a normative group composed of individuals representing a cross-section of ages and educational levels. The relationships among level of moral reasoning and clinical performance, other selected academic measures, and cognitive style were also assessed. The results indicated that post-certificate dental hygiene students reasoned about moral dilemmas at a higher level than the normative group and at the same level as the college student group. In addition, clinical performance, National Board Dental Hygiene Examination scores, Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test (reading scores), high school rank, and cognitive style correlated positively with level of moral reasoning and specific stages of moral development for postcertificate students. PMID:3855430

  7. Tooth Avulsion in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause-Parello, Cheryl A.

    2005-01-01

    Tooth avulsions occur when a tooth is displaced from its socket. Tooth avulsions are common dental injuries that may occur before, during, or after school. Therefore, it is essential that school nurses be well prepared to intervene when such a dental emergency arises. It is also imperative that school nurses and school personnel are fully equipped…

  8. [Dental records and responsibility].

    PubMed

    Brands, W G

    2006-03-01

    Dental records are more than a small part of the bookkeeping. In most dental practises, keeping records is the task of a dental assistant. In civil court, the dentist is in most countries liable for the mistakes of his employees. In disciplinary court however there may be doubt whether the dentist is responsible for the mistakes of his assistant. Contrary to their American colleagues, Dutch dental assistants and dental hygienists cannot be summoned before a disciplinary court. As these para-medics perform more and more dental treatment, independently or after delegation, they should be assigned there own disciplinary responsibility. PMID:16566401

  9. Attitudes of Dental Faculty toward Individuals with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Leonard A.; Grace, Edward G., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of one dental school's faculty concerning attitudes toward homosexual or heterosexual patients with either Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) or leukemia found significant negative biases both toward individuals with AIDS and toward homosexuals. (MSE)

  10. Dental Auxiliary Occupations. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Richard D.

    As part of a dental auxiliaries project, a Dental Auxiliary National Technical Advisory Committee was established, and its major undertaking was to assist in the development of a functional inventory for each of the three dental auxiliary occupations (dental assisting, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology). The analysis consisted of…

  11. The relationship of dental caries and dental fear in Malaysian adolescents: a latent variable approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate the role of geography (place of residence) as a moderator in the relationship between dental caries disease and treatment experience and dental fear in 16-year-olds living in Malaysia. Methods A multi-stage-stratified sampling method was employed. Five hundred and three, 16-year-olds from 6 government secondary schools participated in this study. The questionnaire examined participants’ demographic profile and assessed their dental fear using the Dental Fear Survey (DFS). The clinical examination consisted of the DMFT as the outcome measure of dental caries disease and treatment experience by a single examiner (ICC = 0.98). Structural equation modelling inspected the relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience. Results The mean DMFT was 2.76 (SD 3.25). The DT, MT and FT components were 0.64 (SD 1.25), 0.14 (SD 0.56) and 1.98 (SD 2.43) respectively. Rural compared with urban adolescents had significantly greater mean numbers of decayed and missing teeth. The mean DFS score was 40.8 (SD 12.4). Rural compared with urban adolescents had significantly higher mean scores for physical symptoms of dental fear. The correlation between dental fear (DFS) and dental caries disease and treatment experience (DMFT) was 0.29, p < 0.0001. The structural equation model fitted the raw data well (χ2 = 9.20, df = 8, p = 0.34). All components of DMFT were closely associated in equal strength to the unidimensional hypothetical latent variable of dental caries disease and treatment experience. The strength of the relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience varied in accordance with place of residence. Conclusion In conclusion a relationship between dental fear and dental caries disease and treatment experience was shown to exist in 16-year-old adolescents living in Malaysia. This study showed that the rural–urban dichotomy acted as a moderator upon this

  12. The changing face of dental education: the impact of PBL.

    PubMed

    Fincham, A G; Shuler, C F

    2001-05-01

    The past decade has seen increasing demands for reform of dental education that would produce a graduate better equipped to work in the rapidly changing world of the twenty-first century. Among the most notable curriculum changes implemented in dental schools is a move toward Problem-Based Learning (PBL). PBL, in some form, has been a feature of medical education for several decades, but has only recently been introduced into dental schools. This paper discusses the rationale for the introduction of a PBL pedagogy into dental education, the modalities of PBL being introduced, and the implications of the introduction of PBL into dental schools. Matters related to implementation, faculty development, admissions, and assessment are addressed. Observations derived from a parallel-track dental PBL curriculum at the University of Southern California (USC) are presented and discussed. This program conforms to the Barrows (1998) concept of "authentic PBL" in that the program has no scheduled lectures and maintains a PBL pedagogy for all four years of the curriculum. The USC dental students working in the PBL curriculum have attained a high level of achievement on U.S. National Dental Boards (Part I) examinations, significantly superior to their peers working in a traditional lecture-based curriculum. PMID:11425245

  13. Dental students' personality: a Jungian perspective.

    PubMed

    Silberman, S L; Cain, M J; Mahan, J M

    1982-11-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was employed to measure the nature and strength of dental students' various basic preference in perceiving and making judgments. The MBTI yields four sets of scores--extrovert-introvert (E-l), sensing-intuitive (S-N), thinking-feeling (T-F), and judging-perceptive (J-P)--and represents 16 personality types that define these preferences. The sample consisted of five classes at the University of Mississippi School of Dentistry (n = 217). The data indicated that the largest group (32 students) was ESFJ, while the next largest (30) was ESTJ. The least frequently represented groups were the INTP (3), the INFP (7), the INTP (7), and the ENTP (7). Dental students exhibited characteristics different from those of students in business, engineering, social work, medicine, and other fields. These findings have implications for admissions committee decisions as well as for the organization and curriculum of the dental school. PMID:6957437

  14. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  15. Dental Caries and Periodontal Status of Mentally Handicapped Institutilized Children

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sarika; Arya, Astha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental caries and periodontal disease are the most prevalent dental disease among mentally retarded children worldwide. Aims and Objectives: A study was carried out in Jodhpur city of Rajasthan state of India to assess the Dental caries and periodontal Status of Mentally handicapped attending special schools children in Jodhpur city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted in 80 mentally handicapped subjects, attending a Special Needs school in Jodhpur City. Dental caries and Periodontal Status were recorded following the WHO basic oral health survey. Results: None of the subject had healthy periodontal status, dental caries was found in 79.2% of the subjects, Lymphadenopathy was observed in highest number of subjects 55 (76.3%). Conclusion: Health professionals should therefore be aware of the impact of mental illness and its treatment on oral health, Health personnel should receive training to support and provide all possible services to this population. PMID:25177632

  16. Relating admissions criteria to dental hygiene student retention.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Tammy R

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE. The purpose of this study was to identify preadmission variables that relate to dental hygiene student retention. METHODS. An online survey was sent by email to 309 dental hygiene chairs/program directors. The survey comprised 18 questions to collect program demographic information, program admissions requirements, and program student retention rates. RESULTS. There were 139 respondents who participated in the survey for a 45% return rate. The mean for program retention of participating accredited dental hygiene programs was 91%. Stepwise regression analysis discovered three independent variables (aE=0.15) that relate to dental hygiene program retention rates. These independent variables include interviews (p=0.054), overall college GPA (p=0.029), and overall high school GPA (p=0.141). CONCLUSION. Preadmission requirements that include overall high school GPA, overall college GPA, and interviews can be used by admissions committees to predict dental hygiene student retention. PMID:25433188

  17. Validating use of a critical thinking test for the dental admission test.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Hsun

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the use of a test to assess dental school applicants' critical thinking abilities. The intent was to include this test on the Dental Admission Test (DAT) if it was shown to enhance the DAT's validity. Correlation and regression analyses of undergraduate and dental school performance with scores on each of the tests on the DAT battery and the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) were performed. Data were collected from 439 third- and fourth-year dental students who consented to participate and were enrolled at one of the ten accredited dental schools included in the study. These ten dental schools were from most regions of the United States. This study concluded that including the CCTST on the DAT did not significantly enhance the DAT's validity. PMID:24706684

  18. Anatomy and controlling factors of a Late Cretaceous Aeolian sand sheet: The Marília and the Adamantina formations, NW Bauru Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilici, Giorgio; Führ Dal'Bó, Patrick Francisco

    2010-04-01

    Few previous studies have given significant consideration to the palaeosols in aeolian sand sheet sedimentary successions and, mainly, to their palaeoenvironmental and stratigraphic meaning in interaction with the deposits. These themes are considered in this study that deals with the depositional architecture and the factors controlling the construction, accumulation and preservation of an ancient aeolian sand sheet, that forms part of the Adamantina and Marília formations, in the Bauru Basin (Late Cretaceous, Brazil). In the NW portion of the Bauru Basin, these two units, ca 220 m thick, consist of sandstone, and secondarily of sandy conglomerate and mudstone, and are characterised by vertically alternated palaeosols and deposits. Facies analyses of the deposits and macroscopic characterisation of the palaeosols in 45 outcrops were integrated with laboratory analyses that consisted in descriptions of slabs of rock samples, petrographic analyses, clay mineralogy determination, geochemical analyses of the major oxides, and micromorphological characterisation of the palaeosols. Three architectural elements were recognised: palaeosols, wind-ripple-dominated aeolian sand sheet deposits, and ephemeral river deposits. The palaeosols constitute 66% of the entire sedimentary succession, and consist principally of Aridisols and, subordinately, of Alfisols, Vertisols, and Entisols. The wind-ripple-dominated aeolian sand sheet deposits (25%) are composed of sandstone, organised in translatent climbing wind-ripple strata, and secondarily of sandstone and mudstone deposited by infrequent floods. The ephemeral river deposits (9%) consist of sandy conglomerates 4 m thick and ca 2 km wide. Wind-ripple-dominated aeolian sand sheet deposits formed during relatively dry climate period on an unstable topographic surface of an aeolian sand sheet, where aeolian deposition or erosion prevailed. Palaeosols and ephemeral river deposits formed in a more humid climate period on a stable

  19. Dental Laboratory Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

    The Air Force dental laboratory technology manual is designed as a basic training text as well as a reference source for dental laboratory technicians, a specialty occupation concerned with the design, fabrication, and repair of dental prostheses. Numerous instructive diagrams and photographs are included throughout the manual. The comprehensive…

  20. Perspectives from Dental Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Bruce J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper responds to the Institute of Medicine's 1995 report concerning the present status and future needs of dental education in the United States. It examines whether real reform is occurring at the National Institute of Dental Research, within the academic dental community, and within the practicing profession. It concludes that very little…

  1. Dental Manpower Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ake, James N.; Johnson, Donald W.

    Statistical data on many aspects of dental and allied dental personnel supply, distribution, characteristics, and education and on certain other aspects of dental services are presented and discussed. The data on dentist supply show the national trend in the supply of active dentists since 1950 and the concurrent changes in dentist-to-population…

  2. Achieving health outcomes through professional dental care: comparing the cost of dental treatment for children in three practice modes.

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, J M; Green, P; Ship, I I

    1984-01-01

    The search for effective strategies to deal with prevention and treatment of oral disease focuses on children as a natural target population. This article reports data on the comparative costs of delivering dental care to children via (1) a school-based practice using Expanded Function Dental Auxiliaries, (2) a school-based practice without EFDAs, and (3) a group of unrelated private dental practices operating independent of the school system. Utilization of a dentist's services varied significantly between the children assigned to private care and those assigned to the school-based programs, but it cost less per patient to provide dental treatment through the private practitioners. If school-based practices are clearly more effective in reducing dental disease, in the long run the need for manpower and resources in these programs might be lowered to a point where they will become more cost-effective than private practices. If the two delivery modes are equally effective in reducing dental disease, however, results from the study indicate that private practices are more cost-effective and will probably maintain their cost-effective advantage over school-based programs. PMID:6234261

  3. Interhealth Science Relationships in Fostering Dental Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallum, Charles A.

    1983-01-01

    The current state of research involving dental schools is examined, and institutional and administrative factors fostering an interdisciplinary approach to health science research are outlined and discussed, including communication, participation, financial support, and management. Cooperation is seen as a growing necessity. (MSE)

  4. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  5. Contrasting Perspectives of Dental Faculty and Their Students Concerning Dental Academia.

    PubMed

    Abdelkarim, Ahmad; Sullivan, Donna

    2015-11-01

    Attitudes of dental students and faculty towards research, faculty recruitment, new school openings, and academic career rewards and disadvantages were evaluated. Both groups believe that research should be discretionary. Faculty had significantly higher support for supervising and encouraging students to conduct research. Students favored recruitment of better quality (not more) faculty, and some displayed concerns about a tuition increase if additional faculty members were recruited. Both groups said there is no significant need for new dental schools. Faculty displayed a more favorable view toward an academic career and a significantly more favorable view of faculty recruitment. PMID:26749780

  6. Blending public health into dental education: A.T. Still university's D.M.D./M.P.H. program.

    PubMed

    Altman, Donald S; Shantinath, Shachi D; Presley, Marsha A; Turner, Aesha C

    2014-08-01

    As dental education across the United States undergoes growth and change in an effort to improve access to dental care, one dental school, the Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health, established in 2003, designed its initial curriculum with innovation in mind. One of those innovations was the introduction of an online certificate in public health that can be used as the foundation for a Master's in Public Health (M.P.H.) degree with a dental emphasis, which students may complete concurrent with their dental education. This article discusses the educational intersection between dentistry and public health and describes how this dental school uses an online public health curriculum to accomplish this integration. It also presents the potential advantages and disadvantages of obtaining the M.P.H. degree concurrent with the dental school training. PMID:25086154

  7. Assessment formats in dental medicine: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard-Szep, Susanne; Güntsch, Arndt; Pospiech, Peter; Söhnel, Andreas; Scheutzel, Petra; Wassmann, Torsten; Zahn, Tugba

    2016-01-01

    Aim: At the annual meeting of German dentists in Frankfurt am Main in 2013, the Working Group for the Advancement of Dental Education (AKWLZ) initiated an interdisciplinary working group to address assessments in dental education. This paper presents an overview of the current work being done by this working group, some of whose members are also actively involved in the German Association for Medical Education's (GMA) working group for dental education. The aim is to present a summary of the current state of research on this topic for all those who participate in the design, administration and evaluation of university-specific assessments in dentistry. Method: Based on systematic literature research, the testing scenarios listed in the National Competency-based Catalogue of Learning Objectives (NKLZ) have been compiled and presented in tables according to assessment value. Results: Different assessment scenarios are described briefly in table form addressing validity (V), reliability (R), acceptance (A), cost (C), feasibility (F), and the influence on teaching and learning (EI) as presented in the current literature. Infoboxes were deliberately chosen to allow readers quick access to the information and to facilitate comparisons between the various assessment formats. Following each description is a list summarizing the uses in dental and medical education. Conclusion: This overview provides a summary of competency-based testing formats. It is meant to have a formative effect on dental and medical schools and provide support for developing workplace-based strategies in dental education for learning, teaching and testing in the future. PMID:27579365

  8. Dental Caries Vaccine – A Possible Option?

    PubMed Central

    KT, Shanmugam; KMK, Masthan; N, Balachander; Jimson, Sudha; R, Sarangarajan

    2013-01-01

    Dental caries is an irreversible microbial disease of the calcified tissues of the teeth and it has a multifactorial origin. In India, the dental caries prevalence in 35-44 year olds was reported to be 80-95% in a DCI survey. Among the elderly in the 65-74 years age group, the DCI survey reported the caries prevalence to be about 70%, while the present survey reported it to be 51- 95% in various states. Surveys which were done on school children in India showed a carie prevalence of approximately 58%.Among the U.S. population, a survey showed an incidence of 93.8% in adults with either past or present coronal caries and an incidence of 45.3% in children 23. In countries like Brazil and China, it is reaching epidemic proportions. Thus, more effective public-health measures are needed to combat dental caries. Mutans streptococci is one of the main microorganisms which are associated with the aetiology of dental caries. Preclinical studies of immunological interventions have shown that the disease can be interrupted. Clinical trials have indicated that a mucosal immune response to Streptococcus mutans crucial antigens can influence the pathogenesis of dental caries. The dental caries vaccine, when it is used in appropriate individuals at the appropriate time, can reduce the reemergence of the disease. PMID:23905153

  9. Use of social media by dental educators.

    PubMed

    Arnett, M R; Loewen, J M; Romito, L M

    2013-11-01

    Social networking applications have become an established means of communication; applications that did not exist ten years ago are now used daily. Social media can be used for a myriad of reasons including instructional tools to supplement learning. This project was designed to assess the usage of social media applications by dental school faculty members and identify the types of accounts they prefer. Four hundred forty-three full-time dental and dental hygiene faculty members from five U.S. dental schools were invited to complete a twelve-item online survey regarding their social media usage. The response rate was 50 percent (n=221). Of the respondents, nearly half were dentists, and 62 percent were ≥51 years of age. Facebook was the most popular social network, reportedly used by 111 respondents. The most often reported frequency of use was weekly (20.4 percent, n=221); users indicated utilizing a network primarily for personal rather than professional purposes. However, 37 percent of the respondents reported not using any social media. The most frequently cited barriers to the use of social media were time (48 percent) and privacy concerns (48 percent). Although few would dispute the influence social media has on today's students, the suitability and appropriateness of social media technology and its integration into dental curricula require further evaluation. PMID:24192405

  10. A dental radiologic health laboratory teaching method.

    PubMed

    Hallisey, R M; Darzenta, N C

    1976-07-01

    The School of Dental Medicine at Tufts University has given new direction to the understanding of radiologic health through a program in which all students participate in some laboratory activities directly related to the problems of radiologic health in dental practice. This article presents an explanation of the background of this program and the experiments performed and discusses the interest in the program and its effect on the dental students. The laboratory program described is held for 3 1/2 hours on Wednesday afternoons at the Dental School, since this is a period of minimum patient load in the Radiology Department. The course is presented for third-year dental students who already have takin a lecture course in the fundamentals and techniques of radiology and have received training in the proper procedures for taking radiographs. The program is designed as a series of experiments dealing with machine output, filtration, collimation, exposure factors, scatter radiation, film density, patient protection, and shielding. The students are introduced to various radiation-detection instruments and given the opportunity to use these instruments to measure output and scatter-radiation levels under varying conditions. The laboratory teaching method presented can also be reprogrammed for different group sizes and time schedules. PMID:1065831

  11. Conceptualization of dental caries by undergraduate dental students from the first to the last year.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Nóbilo, Naiara de Paula; Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosário de; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries, still one of the most common diseases affecting people around the world, has a multifactorial nature encompassing necessary (biofilm accumulation), determinant (exposure to sugars and fluoride) and modulating factors (biological and social). The concepts about caries learned at dental schools may directly influence the conduct of the future dentists regarding the control and treatment of this disease. The aim of this study was to determine the concept that students at the Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Brazil, have about dental caries. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 274 students answered the discursive question "Conceptualize dental caries". Students' answers were analyzed by a content analysis technique that allowed the creation of response categories and classification of the concepts in categories. Frequencies were expressed as absolute numbers and percentages. Differences between the responses according to the students' class years were tested by the chi-square test. Differences with p<0.05 were considered statistically significant. The response categories were: biological concept (53.6%), restrictive multifactorial concept (12.1%), comprehensive multifactorial concept (8.1%), transmissibility concept (15.8%), and other (10.4%). Differences in response category frequencies were seen between the class years (p<0.001). There was no consensus on the disease definition, although students predominantly had a biological concept of dental caries. PMID:24789294

  12. Service-learning in dental education: meeting needs and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hood, Janet Grobe

    2009-04-01

    Community-based service-learning is increasingly common in dental education. By definition, service-learning combines educational goals with service to the community, and the community and school are equal partners. The three main goals of service-learning are improving learning, promoting civic engagement, and strengthening communities. There have been calls from many groups to reform dental education to better serve the public, and service-learning is one of the most often recommended methods to help meet this goal. One of the key attributes of service-learning is its potential to promote civic engagement and social responsibility during the student's education. The social responsibility of dentists and aspects of professionalism can be learned by students through participation in well-structured service-learning programs. Community-based service-learning programs can also address societal needs by improving the public's access to oral health care through partnerships among dental schools, oral health providers, and communities. This article describes service-learning programs at several dental schools to illustrate application of this educational strategy in predoctoral dental education. This article also describes challenges that confront schools desiring to implement and sustain service-learning programs, including academic quality, faculty development and training, interprofessionalism, making time in the curriculum, budget, faculty shortages and time, student credit, quality control, and remote sites away from the dental school. PMID:19339432

  13. Mosquitoes, flies and dental cavities: Dr. Howard Riley Raper's public campaign to prevent toothache.

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2010-01-01

    Dr. Howard Riley Raper (1886-1978) was an early oral health pioneer and dental roentgenology faculty member of the Indiana Dental College (IDC) who single-handedly introduced key concepts in radiology to dentistry. Due to his efforts, IDC became in 1910-11 the first dental school to have a regular course in dental radiology. Virtually all American dental schools soon added this subject to their regular curriculum. Raper's text, Elementary and Dental Radiography (1913) became the first comprehensive student textbook of dental X-ray diagnosis. In his 1933 Blue Book entitled, The New Aim in the Care of the Teeth, Raper elaborated upon his mission to prevent caries, by comparing the insidious damages of tooth decay with the threat of insect-borne disease. PMID:20968230

  14. Program Design Considerations for Leadership Training for Dental and Dental Hygiene Students

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, Russell S.; Parkinson, Joseph W.; Nelson, Bonnie A.; Nordquist, Barbara; Ferguson-Young, Daphne C.; Thompson, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Since leadership is an essential part of the oral health professions, oral health educators can play an essential role in establishing a culture of leadership and in mentoring students to prepare them for future leadership roles within the profession. However, leadership training for oral health professionals is a relatively new concept and is frequently not found within dental and dental hygiene curricula. The purpose of this article is to propose several models for leadership training that are specific to the oral health professions. The authors hope that providing an overview of leadership programs in academic dental institutions will encourage all U.S. and Canadian dental schools to begin developing a culture that promotes leadership development. PMID:22319084

  15. Program design considerations for leadership training for dental and dental hygiene students.

    PubMed

    Taichman, Russell S; Parkinson, Joseph W; Nelson, Bonnie A; Nordquist, Barbara; Ferguson-Young, Daphne C; Thompson, Joseph F

    2012-02-01

    Since leadership is an essential part of the oral health professions, oral health educators can play an essential role in establishing a culture of leadership and in mentoring students to prepare them for future leadership roles within the profession. However, leadership training for oral health professionals is a relatively new concept and is frequently not found within dental and dental hygiene curricula. The purpose of this article is to propose several models for leadership training that are specific to the oral health professions. The authors hope that providing an overview of leadership programs in academic dental institutions will encourage all U.S. and Canadian dental schools to begin developing a culture that promotes leadership development. PMID:22319084

  16. Shaking Up the Dental Safety-net: Elimination of Optional Adult Dental Medicaid Benefits in California

    PubMed Central

    Wides, Cynthia; Alam, Sonia Rab; Mertz, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In July 2009, California eliminated funding for most adult non-emergency Medicaid dental benefits (Denti-Cal). This paper presents the findings from a qualitative assessment of the impacts of the Denti-Cal cuts on California's oral health safety-net. Interviews were conducted with dental safety-net providers throughout the state, including public health departments, community health centers, dental schools, Native American health clinics, and private providers, and were coded thematically using Atlas.ti. Safety-net providers reported decreased utilization by Denti-Cal-eligible adults, who now primarily seek emergency dental services, and reported shifting to focus on pediatric and privately-insured patients. Significant changes were reported in safety-net clinic finances, operations, and ability to refer. The impact of the Denti-Cal cuts has been distributed unevenly across the safety-net, with private providers and County Health Departments bearing the highest burden. PMID:24583494

  17. Nine years of DentEd--a global perspective on dental education.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, P A; Eaton, K A; Paganelli, C; Shanley, D

    2008-08-23

    This paper describes the three successive and successful DentEd projects, funded by the European Union, that established a productive thematic network which identified common content within the dental curriculum. It then developed an agreed professional profile, with a defined set of competences and a modular curriculum for all new dental graduates based on the European Credit Transfer System and trends in learning and assessment. The three phases took nine years to complete. Phase one investigated all aspects of dental undergraduate education and included over 30 visits to different dental schools by teams of dental educators. Phase two built on this work and included further visits to dental schools. Phase three refined the competency framework that had been developed in phase two and culminated in a global dental conference which finalised position papers on all aspects of dental education. The work and recommendations of the ICT in dental education group are considered in detail in the paper. The projects provided the stimulus for a number of European and international collaborations, including the web-based International Federation of Dental Education and Associations (IFDEA) Knowledge Centre and the International Virtual Dental School (IVIDENT), both of which aim to make increasingly sophisticated ICT-based educational material available worldwide and to promote international understanding. PMID:18724340

  18. The Health of Texans. A Study of Medical and Dental Education 1974-1980. CB Study Paper No. 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Coll. and Univ. System, Austin. Coordinating Board.

    This document reviews the state of medical and dental education in Texas, 1974-80. Recommendations suggest: (1) The Advisory Committee and the Task Force for Medical and Dental Education would be continued as planning bodies to be convened at least once every two years. (2) No new medical or dental schools are recommended since the state will be…

  19. Providing Preventive Dental Care in the Community Using the Team Approach: A Comparison of Five Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balzer, Jay A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Five dental schools were given grants to design and implement a training program for dental students in planning and delivering preventive dental services. These programs are described and compared, and it is concluded that all were generally successful and worthy of continuation. (JSR)

  20. Challenges of Iranian Adolescents for Preventing Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi, Arezoo; Ghofranipour, Fazlollah; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Malekafzali, Beheshteh; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral health plays a vital role in people’s general health and well-being. With regard to the costly treatments of oral diseases, preventive programs need to be designed for dental caries based on children’s perspectives. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to describe and explore challenges for caring dental health based on children’s perspectives. Patients and Methods: A qualitative design with content analysis approach was applied to collect and analyze the perspectives of students about factors influencing oral and dental care. Eighteen Iranian students in 8 guidance schools were chosen through the purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews were held for data gathering. In order to support the validity and rigor of the data, different criteria such as acceptability, confirmability, and transferability were utilized. Results: During data analysis, four main themes developed: “barriers to dental health,” “maintaining dental health,” “uncertainty in decision-making” and “supportive factors”. “Uncertainty in decision-making” and “barriers to dental health” were the main challenges for preventing dental caries among adolescents. Conclusions: “Certainty in decision-making” to maintain dental health depends on overcoming the barriers of dental health. Further research is needed to confirm the findings of this study. PMID:25593720

  1. Employment of Dental Hygienists as Dental Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Cynthia; Odrich, Johanna

    1987-01-01

    A study of the use of dental hygienists to teach periodontics, preventive dentistry, community dentistry, and public health courses looked at employment patterns and practices and the qualifications of the teachers. (MSE)

  2. Meeting Dental Health Needs Through Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1972-01-01

    Dental health needs of the country cannot be met through education of more dentists. Rather, we must educate auxiliaries to perform many of the intraoral procedures now regarded the sole responsibility of dentists. (SB)

  3. Practice Location Characteristics of Non-Traditional Dental Practices.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Eric S; Jones, Daniel L

    2016-04-01

    Current and future dental school graduates are increasingly likely to choose a non-traditional dental practice-a group practice managed by a dental service organization or a corporate practice with employed dentists-for their initial practice experience. In addition, the growth of non-traditional practices, which are located primarily in major urban areas, could accelerate the movement of dentists to those areas and contribute to geographic disparities in the distribution of dental services. To help the profession understand the implications of these developments, the aim of this study was to compare the location characteristics of non-traditional practices and traditional dental practices. After identifying non-traditional practices across the United States, the authors located those practices and traditional dental practices geographically by zip code. Non-traditional dental practices were found to represent about 3.1% of all dental practices, but they had a greater impact on the marketplace with almost twice the average number of staff and annual revenue. Virtually all non-traditional dental practices were located in zip codes that also had a traditional dental practice. Zip codes with non-traditional practices had significant differences from zip codes with only a traditional dental practice: the populations in areas with non-traditional practices had higher income levels and higher education and were slightly younger and proportionally more Hispanic; those practices also had a much higher likelihood of being located in a major metropolitan area. Dental educators and leaders need to understand the impact of these trends in the practice environment in order to both prepare graduates for practice and make decisions about planning for the workforce of the future. PMID:27037447

  4. Reflections on the dental Pipeline program's efforts regarding community-based dental education.

    PubMed

    Hood, Janet Grobe

    2010-10-01

    Although many changes are being made, many are still needed in educating future dental professionals about prevention programs, ethics, professionalism, communication, cultural competence, and access to care. It is not yet clear if producing more dentists will put these professionals into underserved areas where they are needed, with the skills they need. The achievements of the Pipeline, Profession, and Practice: Community-Based Dental Education program schools in increasing the amount of time students spend in community-based education and service-learning programs result from a widespread, national effort to meet this challenge. This article is a personal reflection and review of these programs, considering what has been learned and still needs to be learned about student educational impact and quality, faculty issues, program management, infrastructure and logistics, and financial impact, with suggestions for future study that can help dental schools design the most effective programs. PMID:20930229

  5. Taphonomy of a Baurusuchus (Crocodyliformes, Baurusuchidae) from the Adamantina Formation (Upper Cretaceous, Bauru Basin), Brazil: Implications for preservational modes, time resolution and paleoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo Júnior, Hermínio Ismael de; Silva Marinho, Thiago da

    2013-11-01

    Upper Cretaceous vertebrate accumulations from the Adamantina Formation are known due to their high taxonomic diversity. On the other hand, taphonomic analyses still are rare, limiting the understanding of processes related to the biostratinomic and fossildiagenetic histories of this lithostratigraphic unit. In 2005, fossils were collected from an outcrop located at Jales municipality, state of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil. From this outcrop, a well-preserved Baurusuchus was recovered, which displays a peculiar set of taphonomic signatures. This paper identifies and interprets taphonomic features of a specimen of Baurusuchus (Crocodyliformes, Baurusuchidae; UFRJ DG 418-R) from the Adamantina Formation (Upper Cretaceous of the Bauru Basin), in Jales municipality, state of São Paulo. Brief taphonomic comparisons with other specimens previously studied (crocodiles and dinosaurs) and a lithofaciological analysis of the outcrop were undertaken in order to enhance the knowledge of the stratigraphy and paleoenvironment and improve the time resolution for the Adamantina Formation in the region of Jales. Furthermore, paleoecological data were interpreted based on the taphonomic analysis. The fossil is composed of an articulated segment of vertebral column, ribs, part of the pelvic girdle and gastralia. There is no hydraulic equivalence between both the specimen of Baurusuchus and the size of quartz grain predominant in the fossiliferous layer, suggesting death in situ or short transport as a “water carcass”. Teeth marks identified on the pubes were assigned to a small/juvenile baurusuchid crocodyliform or a theropod dinosaur. The repositioning of some elements (ribs and dorsal osteoderms) is suggestive of mummification. Desiccation marks were observed and attributed to the stage 1 of weathering. These features suggest subaerial exposure of the carcass prior to burial, however, probably after the mummification. On the other hand, the subaerial exposure was short

  6. Tobacco use and dental disease.

    PubMed

    Hart, G T; Brown, D M; Mincer, H H

    1995-04-01

    The previously cited Indiana University School of Dentistry teaching monograph, "The Impact of Tobacco Use and Cessation on Nonmalignant and Precancerous Oral and Dental Diseases and Conditions," reviewed over 800 articles and concluded that tobacco use is strongly associated with many dental and oral mucosal diseases, and may contribute to others. Our study of a relatively small sample of 200 patients, of whom 33 percent were tobacco users, found statistically significant data correlating tobacco use with a higher Decayed, Missing and Filled Index (a measurement of caries and tooth loss experience of patients) and relating periodontal bone loss to smokeless tobacco use. And, while this investigation did not find a statistically significant correlation between smoking and periodontitis severity, there was a data trend in that direction. Conclusions about tooth loss in the Indiana monograph were limited to smokers; however, there was an association of ST use with gingival recession, which can become quite severe in the area in which the smokeless tobacco is placed. It might be theorized that the significantly larger number of missing teeth among ST users in our study is associated with the generally poor oral hygiene and less sophisticated outlook on health care that tobacco users often display. Indeed, of the 65 denture wearers in our study, 7.7 percent were ST users and 40.0 percent were tobacco users of some type. In view of the large amount of data in the scientific literature associating tobacco with dental diseases as summarized by the Indiana monograph, and the position of several groups such as the American Cancer Society that tobacco is one of the risk factors most associated with intraoral cancer, it would appear that dentists have a vested professional interest in promoting tobacco use cessation among their patients. Dentists should take every reasonable opportunity to persuade patients to discontinue the tobacco habit, thus preventing life

  7. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  8. The Student-Teacher Shuttle Card for Japanese Dental Students Taking a Dental English Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodis, Omar M.; Kariya Naoyuki; Nishimura, Michiko; Matsumura, Seishi

    2011-01-01

    There has been a noticeable change of curricula in specialized and technical courses offered in Japanese schools and universities. One of these is the integration of English for general and specific purposes in the dental curriculum. Although a number of studies have assessed the former, very few have assessed English for specific purposes…

  9. Curricular Guidelines for Clinical Competency by Dental Auxiliaries in Dental Radiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Guidelines developed for educational institutions as curriculum development aids are presented. They are the result of efforts within the American Association of Dental Schools (AADS) by the Section on Oral Radiology. Their use as course development aids is suggested by AADS policy. (MLW)

  10. Assessment of Dental Needs in a Multicultural Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solis, Enrique, Jr.; Pettibone, Timothy J.

    The purpose of the study was to develop cultural models that describe dental care practices among the primary ethnic cultures of the Southwest. The pilot study sample, of Mexican Americans and Anglo Americans, was obtained through the Las Cruces Schools. Sampling was stratified random sampling using elementary school (grades 1-6) records. Initial…

  11. Innovation and the Professionalization Process: An Analysis of Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Larry A.; Branch, Roger G.

    One of the results of almost 2 decades of research and theoretical development in the area of professional socialization has been the focusing of interest on the evaluation of interpersonal influences upon students in professional schools. Based on data from the first 2 years of a 6-year longitudinal study of students at a new dental school, this…

  12. Contextual and individual assessment of dental pain period prevalence in adolescents: a multilevel approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite evidence that health and disease occur in social contexts, the vast majority of studies addressing dental pain exclusively assessed information gathered at individual level. Objectives To assess the association between dental pain and contextual and individual characteristics in Brazilian adolescents. In addition, we aimed to test whether contextual Human Development Index is independently associated with dental pain after adjusting for individual level variables of socio-demographics and dental characteristics. Methods The study used data from an oral health survey carried out in São Paulo, Brazil, which included dental pain, dental exams, individual socioeconomic and demographic conditions, and Human Development Index at area level of 4,249 12-year-old and 1,566 15-year-old schoolchildren. The Poisson multilevel analysis was performed. Results Dental pain was found among 25.6% (95%CI = 24.5-26.7) of the adolescents and was 33% less prevalent among those living in more developed areas of the city than among those living in less developed areas. Girls, blacks, those whose parents earn low income and have low schooling, those studying at public schools, and those with dental treatment needs presented higher dental-pain prevalence than their counterparts. Area HDI remained associated with dental pain after adjusting for individual level variables of socio demographic and dental characteristics. Conclusions Girls, students whose parents have low schooling, those with low per capita income, those classified as having black skin color and those with dental treatment needs had higher dental pain prevalence than their counterparts. Students from areas with low Human Development Index had higher prevalence of dental pain than those from the more developed areas regardless of individual characteristics. PMID:20707920

  13. Exposure to high-fluoride drinking water and risk of dental caries and dental fluorosis in Haryana, India.

    PubMed

    Marya, Charu Mohan; Ashokkumar, B R; Dhingra, Sonal; Dahiya, Vandana; Gupta, Anil

    2014-05-01

    The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of and relationship between dental caries and dental fluorosis at varying levels of fluoride in drinking water. The study was conducted among 3007 school children in the age group of 12 to 16 years in 2 districts of Haryana having varying fluoride levels in drinking water. Type III examination for dental caries according to the WHO index and dental fluorosis estimation according to Dean's index was done. The prevalence of dental caries decreased from 48.02% to 28.07% as fluoride levels increased from 0.5 to 1.13 ppm, but as the fluoride level increased further to 1.51 ppm, there was no further reduction in caries prevalence, but there was a substantial increase in fluorosis prevalence. The optimum level of fluoride in drinking water was found to be 1.13 ppm, at which there was maximum caries reduction with minimum amount of esthetically objectionable fluorosis. PMID:23070755

  14. Esthetic dental anomalies as motive for bullying in schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Scheffel, Débora Lopes Salles; Jeremias, Fabiano; Fragelli, Camila Maria Bullio; dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes Aparecida Martins; Hebling, Josimeri; de Oliveira, Osmir Batista

    2014-01-01

    Facial esthetics, including oral esthetics, can severely affect children's quality-of-life, causing physical, social and psychological impairment. Children and adolescents with esthetic-related dental malformations are potential targets for bullies. This study was aimed to present and discuss patients who suffered from bullying at school and family environment due to esthetic-related teeth anomalies. Providing an adequate esthetic dental treatment is an important step in their rehabilitation when the lack of esthetic is the main source of bullying. After dental treatment, we noted significant improvement in self-esteem, self-confidence, socialization and academic performance of all patients and improvement in parental satisfaction regarding the appearance of their children. It is imperative that both family and school care providers be constantly alert about bullying in order to prevent or interrupt aggressive and discriminatory practices against children and adolescents. Clearly, dental anomalies may be a motive for bullying. PMID:24966759

  15. Esthetic dental anomalies as motive for bullying in schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Scheffel, Débora Lopes Salles; Jeremias, Fabiano; Fragelli, Camila Maria Bullio; Dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes Aparecida Martins; Hebling, Josimeri; de Oliveira, Osmir Batista

    2014-01-01

    Facial esthetics, including oral esthetics, can severely affect children's quality-of-life, causing physical, social and psychological impairment. Children and adolescents with esthetic-related dental malformations are potential targets for bullies. This study was aimed to present and discuss patients who suffered from bullying at school and family environment due to esthetic-related teeth anomalies. Providing an adequate esthetic dental treatment is an important step in their rehabilitation when the lack of esthetic is the main source of bullying. After dental treatment, we noted significant improvement in self-esteem, self-confidence, socialization and academic performance of all patients and improvement in parental satisfaction regarding the appearance of their children. It is imperative that both family and school care providers be constantly alert about bullying in order to prevent or interrupt aggressive and discriminatory practices against children and adolescents. Clearly, dental anomalies may be a motive for bullying. PMID:24966759

  16. Evidence-informed dental student recruitment techniques.

    PubMed

    Kay, E; Bennett, J; Allison, P; Coombes, L R

    2010-02-13

    The aim of the study described was to measure the performance of potential dental students in an evidence-based, objective, structured admission interview, and to compare that performance to student achievement in aptitude tests, tests of scientific knowledge, and tests of ability to apply knowledge to dentistry. A list of desirable attributes of dental professionals was drawn from the literature, omitting those which were considered to be learnt within the dental school curriculum. Possession of these attributes were then measured by objectively scoring responses to questions framed around a challenging clinical scenario. The interview scores were then correlated against student performance in an MCQ science for dentistry examination, an applied dental knowledge test, and the Graduate Australian Medical student aptitude test. The literature review revealed that sensitivity to others, professionalism, and ethical behaviour were deemed almost as important as academic and technical competency. Correlations of scores from an interview which sought to measure the attributes described in the literature with scores in scientific knowledge tests, aptitude tests and applied dental knowledge tests were low, and did not reach statistical significance. The results suggest that an interview process has been devised which measures the importance of characteristics not readily captured in more traditional selection strategies. Because the literature demonstrates that these characteristics are important to the public and the profession, this objective interview is a useful selection tool. PMID:20147933

  17. Dental therapists and dental hygienists educated for the New Zealand environment.

    PubMed

    Coates, Dawn E; Kardos, Thomas B; Moffat, Susan M; Kardos, Rosemary L

    2009-08-01

    New Zealand has a long history of dental care provided by school dental nurses, now known as dental therapists. The nature of their training courses, although delivered in different centers, had remained relatively constant until 1999 when educational responsibility was transferred to the universities. Dental hygienists were not trained in New Zealand until 1994, with the exception of the New Zealand Army hygienists. Since 2001, the education of both dental therapists and dental hygienists has been the responsibility of the universities. Significant and progressive changes in educational delivery have occurred since then, which have culminated in three-year degree qualifications for dual-trained oral health professionals. Factors influencing this change included increased professionalism associated with the new legislative requirements for registration, workforce shortages, and enhanced educational and clinical practice requirements. The Bachelor of Oral Health degree at the University of Otago has an added emphasis on social sciences and incorporates aspects of learning relating to New Zealand's cultural heritage. We explore in this article the rationale for the introduction of a Bachelor of Oral Health in New Zealand and how it is designed to equip graduates as professionals in oral health. PMID:19648571

  18. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more. PMID:27587574

  19. Mouthrinses and dental caries.

    PubMed

    2002-10-01

    Mouthrinsing for the prevention of dental caries in children and adolescents was established as a mass prophylactic method in the 1960s and has shown average efficacy of caries reduction between 20-50%. Commonly, weekly or twice monthly rinsing procedures using neutral 0.2% NaF solutions have been used in schools or institutions in areas with low fluoride concentrations in the drinking water. Today, when dental caries has declined substantially in the western countries, and relatively few individuals are suffering from caries, the efficiency of large scale mouthrinsing is questioned and more individual approaches of caries prevention strategies are needed. For this reason individual caries risk assessments are necessary, utilising diagnostic tools with the aim of explaining the main causes of the caries disease. Therefore in high risk patients, daily mouthrinses using 0.05% NaF can be recommended combined with other selective preventive measures such as sugar restriction, improved oral hygiene, antibacterial treatments, and so forth. Mouthrinsing solutions have therefore been combined with antiplaque agents like chlorhexidine and other agents which can improve the caries preventive effect not only in high caries risk patients, including those with dry mouth problems and root caries. Other agents than sodium fluoride have been used, such as stannous and amine fluoride with proven clinical effects. However, although a series of new formulas of mouthrinses containing fluoride combined with different antiplaque agents have shown promising antibacterial and antiplaque efficacy, their long-term clinical effects are sparsely documented. Acute and chronic side effects from established and recommended mouthrinsing routines are extremely rare but ethanol containing products should not be recommended to children for long-term use or to individuals with alcohol problems. Patients with dry mouth problems should avoid mouthrinses containing high concentration of detergent

  20. Five practices of efficient factories applied to dental education.

    PubMed

    Nalliah, Romesh P

    2015-05-01

    Efficient factories, such as dental school clinics (DSC), are trying to improve the quality of their product by reducing inefficiencies, error rates, and wastage. Dental education is an expensive business for the student and the institution. Dental materials and equipment are costly, and students are novice providers who work slowly and inefficiently compared to an experienced dentist; this is not a good business model. The objective of this article was to present and apply five practices of efficient factories that could be applied to the DSC setting. I propose that this will lead to improved educational outcomes and improved patient outcomes in DSC. PMID:25891379

  1. Dental Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

  2. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  3. Dental Assisting Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

  4. Parental perceptions of dental visits and access to dental care among disabled schoolchildren in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Shyama, M; Al-Mutawa, S A; Honkala, E; Honkala, S

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to describe dental visiting habits and access to dental care among the disabled schoolchildren in Kuwait. A total of 308 parents of children with a physical disability (n = 211), Down syndrome (n = 97) and teachers, who had normal children (n = 112) participated in the study. Less than one-fourth (21%) of the disabled children and 37% of the normal children had never visited a dentist (p = 0.003). Majority of Down syndrome (72%) and physically disabled children (59%) received curative dental care compared to 47% of normal children (p = 0.016). A bigger proportion of disabled children (42%) visited the dentist due to tooth ache than the normal ones (25%) (p < 0.01). Only 9.6% of Down syndrome children perceived no barriers to seek the dental care compared to 26.2% of physically disabled and 32.2% of normal children (p = 0.008). Difficulty to get an appointment was the most common perceived barrier to dental care by parents of Down syndrome children and the normal children (37.3%). Parents of disabled children considered difficulty in cooperation as a more important barrier to treatment (34.7%) than the parents of normal children (20.3%). Larger proportion of parents of normal children (82%) rated the present dental services as excellent/good compared to 52% of the parents of disabled children (p < 0.001). Toothache and curative treatment need were the main reasons for dental visits among disabled children. Regular dental check-ups and preventive oral health care should be encouraged for comprehensive coverage of the national school oral health program for the disabled in Kuwait. PMID:26058308

  5. Dental hygienists in The Netherlands: the past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Jongbloed-Zoet, C; Bol-van den Hil, E M; La Rivière-Ilsen, J; van der Sanden-Stoelinga, M S E

    2012-08-01

    Dental hygiene education in the Netherlands started in 1968 after a long political debate about roles, functions and the working domain. From a slow start with five students in a school based on the American model with a 2-year curriculum, dental hygiene education is now a 4-year, higher professional education with an admission of 300 students annually who pursue the degree of Bachelor of Health at a University of Applied Sciences. In the 45 years of its existence, the dental hygiene profession has undergone a tremendous change. In the beginning, dental hygienists worked under the supervision of a dentist, which changed in 1992 to their working 'under referral' from a dentist, and again in 2006, when dental hygienists became directly accessible. One-third of the working force of approximately 2700 dental hygienists (2010) is now working in their own independent practice. The focus of professional practice has changed from the prevention of caries via periodontology to the relationship between dental health and general health and well-being. The profession, the education and the Dutch Dental Hygienists' Association (Nederlandse Vereniging van Mondhygiënisten) have matured, and its members are now serious partners in oral health care. PMID:23046003

  6. Dental Fear Among University Employees: Implications for Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaakko, Tarja; Milgrom, Peter; Coldwell, Susan E.; Getz, Tracy; Weinstein, Philip; Ramsay, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 270 University of Washington permanent employees who were potential candidates for teaching clinics, found dental anxiety prevalent, correlating with poorer perceived dental health, longer intervals between dental appointments, higher frequency of past fear behaviors, more physical symptoms during last dental injection, and more…

  7. The future dental workforce?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J E; Wilson, N H F

    2009-02-28

    The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the time of writing this paper the momentous step of including dental care professionals (DCPs) on General Dental Council (GDC) registers in the United Kingdom has recently been completed. Second, the Scope of Practice of all dental professionals has been under consultation by the General Dental Council, and research evidence suggests that greater use should be made of skill-mix in the dental team. Third, within England, Lord Darzi has just published the 'Final Report of the NHS Next Stage Review', which emphasises 'quality care' and 'team-working' as key features of healthcare; this report was accompanied by an important document entitled 'A High Quality Workforce', in which plans for local workforce planning within the NHS are outlined, placing responsibilities at national, local and regional levels. Fourth, policy makers across the UK are wrestling with addressing oral health needs, promoting health and facilitating access to dental care, all of which have implications for the nature and shape of the dental workforce. Fifth, with the impact of globalisation and European policies we are net gainers of dentists as well as having more in training. Sixth, although there have been reviews and policy initiatives by regulatory, professional and other bodies in support of shaping the dental workforce, there has been little serious consideration of skill-mix and funding mechanisms to encourage team-working. Together, these events demand that we enter a fresh debate on the future dental workforce which should extend beyond professional and national boundaries and inform workforce planning. This debate is of great

  8. The Rural Dental Health Program: long-term impact of two dental delivery systems on children's oral health.

    PubMed

    Feldman, C A; Bentley, J M; Oler, J

    1988-01-01

    This paper addresses the long-term effect of two dental delivery systems established during the Rural Dental Health Program (RDHP) in 1975. At that time 725 children in grades K-2 were assigned randomly to an enriched dental health education program or regular health education program and to a SCHOOL- or COMMUNITY-based dental delivery system. Seven years after funding for RDHP ended, children originally assigned to the COMMUNITY group utilized more professional services and showed a higher level of dental knowledge than children assigned to the SCHOOL group. In addition, COMMUNITY-based children had, on average, twice as many sealed teeth. While the follow-up study did not reveal any statistically significant difference in the clinical oral health indices (DMFS, gingival index, calculus index, plaque index, periodontal probing depth, and orthodontic treatment priority index) the COMMUNITY-based children's higher level of professional dental service utilization, greater number of sealed teeth, and increased dental knowledge should lead to a higher level of oral health in the long run. PMID:3184026

  9. Commercialization of dental education: have we gone too far?

    PubMed

    Spalding, Peter M; Bradley, Richard E

    2006-01-01

    Early U.S. dental training involved a closer relationship between commercialism and education, which was strongly counteracted by university affiliations at the beginning of the twentieth century. With recent decreases in public support for higher education, schools have become increasingly dependent on private revenue sources, including corporate support. There are ethical risks as well as benefits from dental schools establishing business partnerships with corporations. In 2002, a private, for-profit company was responsible for the inception and direct funding of an orthodontic postgraduate program at a private U.S. university. In the last four years, this company has begun funding two additional orthodontic programs, both associated with U.S. public dental schools. Such partnerships with academic institutions represent unique corporate relationships with dental education that are fraught with ethical risks. The dental profession needs to preserve the appropriate autonomy of dental education from commercial influences in order to prevent erosion of academic and ethical standards that are critical to professional integrity and public trust. PMID:17477216

  10. Dental health services research utilizing comprehensive clinical databases and information technology.

    PubMed

    Hayden, W J

    1997-01-01

    Marketplace pressures for accountability in dentistry have made clear dental delivery systems' weaknesses in information generation, management, and analysis methods. Without this type of information, dentistry is unable to quantify and document the outcomes of the dental care services it provides. The Pew Health Professions Commission and the Institute of Medicine both suggest that dental schools should be among the leaders in the development and teaching of dental information capabilities, as well as the source of fundamental dental health services research. This paper argues that dental schools are the logical location for the development of valid, reliable, and acceptable health services research methods and databases. It describes the development of an insurance claims database to demonstrate the types of investigations possible, as well as the weaknesses and shortcomings of pure administrative data. PMID:9024342

  11. The Buffalo Approach to Changing the Basic Science Curriculum, or Toiling and Dreaming in the Vineyards of Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedesco, Lisa A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The State University of New York at Buffalo dental school's reform of basic science curriculum is discussed. The paper first outlines the curriculum review/development process, focusing on incorporation of specific competencies, computer-based curriculum analysis, and the role of a dental schools consortium. The paper then looks at future…

  12. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth" ("La Encia y…

  13. Innovation in dental education in Texas: The University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston.

    PubMed

    Valenza, John A; Walji, Muhammad F; Taylor, David; Estes, Kristine

    2009-08-01

    Innovation has been an integral part of The University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston and its approach to educating dentists since the school's origin in 1905. Its history is rich with examples, such as a modular, self-directed curriculum and a general practice-based patient care delivery system. Moving into the 21st century, the school has embraced new models for patient care and research upon which to build innovative programs for teaching and learning. Combined with a technological explosion across the world and in education, UTDB has been a leader on many fronts, such as electronic patient records, clinical simulation and research in informatics. As the school looks ahead to a new building by 2012, additional advances and innovations are planned to follow. This article takes a look at the past, present, and future contributions by UTDB to innovation in dental education. PMID:19774876

  14. Dental health in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Majid, Z A

    1984-12-01

    Three epidemiological surveys have been carried out in Malaysia since 1971. All showed a high level of caries prevalence. Ninety per cent of school children between the ages of 6 and 18 suffered from dental caries, with a DMFT of approximately 3 and a dft of approximately 2. Ninety-five per cent of the adult population had caries experience, with the mean DMFT being 13.2. Approximately 55 per cent of children showed the presence of gingivitis with the mean number of inflamed gingival units per child ranging from 1.9 to 2.8, while 72.4 per cent of adults had some form of periodontal disease with 29 per cent having pockets deeper than 3 mm. The OHI-S score for adults was 2.2 and 81 per cent used toothbrushes to clean their teeth. A further 5.1 per cent used twigs and fingers with powdered charcoal or salt. One-third of the child population needed orthodontic treatment, with 0.3 per cent examined in peninsular Malaysia having cleft lip or palate or both. In the adult population 10.4 per cent of those examined required some form of orthodontic treatment. Twenty per cent of the children in the survey were in need of dentures; 54.7 per cent of the adults were either in need of dentures or were wearing dentures. Of these 25 per cent had complete dentures. The smoking habit was most commonly associated with pre-cancerous/cancerous lesions with alcohol consumption a close competitor; 114 adults, that is 1.3 per cent of those examined, suffer from leukoplakia but only one case of oral cancer was detected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6597132

  15. Attitudes of dental professionals toward tobacco use

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Dipika Kalyan; Pawar, Sudarshana Devendrasing; Mandal, Anahita; Shah, Rohit Ajay; Rodrigues, Silvia Victor; Desai, Ankit Bharat; Pathare, Pragalbha Nandkumar; Shingnapurkar, Saurabh Hemant; Vijayakar, Harshad Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The habit of tobacco consumption has plagued all nations from time immemorial. While tobacco use is decreasing in many developed countries, it is increasing in developing countries like India. Health care professionals have a key role to play to motivate and advise tobacco users to quit. Aim: The aim was to assess the attitudes and practice of dental professionals in Mumbai and Navi Mumbai toward tobacco cessation and the potential barriers faced. Materials and Methods: Questionnaire-based survey was conducted with 500 dental surgeons in Mumbai and Navi Mumbai. The questionnaire contained close-ended questions and assessed the smoking status of the professional, whether they impart tobacco cessation advice to their patients, whether the professional is trained for basic intervention, whether they would be eager to undergo training and also the potential barriers encountered by the professional. Statistical Analysis Used: The SPSS version 17 was used. Frequencies and percentages were used to determine distributions of the responses for each of the variables. Chi-square test was used for analysis. Results: It was observed that the majority of dental clinicians do not use tobacco and although 93% believed that it is the role of the dental professional to offer advice, 21% do not. Potential barriers reported were: Little chance of success, lack of training, lack of time, lack of remuneration, and the possibility of losing patients. Conclusions: Dental professionals must expand their horizon and armamentarium to tobacco intervention strategies inclusive of their regular preventive and therapeutic treatment modalities. Furthermore, the dental institutions (schools) should include tobacco intervention in the curriculum, but it should not be just theoretical knowledge rather it must have a practical component. PMID:26229275

  16. Advances in dental materials.

    PubMed

    Vaderhobli, Ram M

    2011-07-01

    The use of materials to rehabilitate tooth structures is constantly changing. Over the past decade, newer material processing techniques and technologies have significantly improved the dependability and predictability of dental material for clinicians. The greatest obstacle, however, is in choosing the right combination for continued success. Finding predictable approaches for successful restorative procedures has been the goal of clinical and material scientists. This article provides a broad perspective on the advances made in various classes of dental restorative materials in terms of their functionality with respect to pit and fissure sealants, glass ionomers, and dental composites. PMID:21726695

  17. Dientes! Community dental clinic: dental care for low-income residents of Santa Cruz County.

    PubMed

    Balzer, J; Webb, C

    1998-05-01

    Dientes! is a private nonprofit community dental clinic that was established in 1994 to provide dental care for low-income residents of Santa Cruz County. Its founders were successful in securing support from a diverse group of community agencies, including city and county governments, philanthropic foundations, the dental community, and corporate and individual donors. Dientes! provides approximately 250 visits per month in a three-chair clinic in Santa Cruz; a school-based program in Watsonville began March 1998. The major challenge facing Dientes! is to establish a reliable financial base that will allow the program to better meet the needs of low-income county residents over the long term. PMID:10528572

  18. A longitudinal study of occlusal caries in Newark New Jersey school children: relationship between initial dental finding and the development of new lesions

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Kenneth; Fairlie, Karen; Ferrandiz, Javier; Nasri-Heir, Cibele

    2012-01-01

    Objective Dental caries is a significant public health problem especially amongst children from low-income backgrounds. This longitudinal study examined the development of new occlusal caries in 227 Newark, NJ children ages 10–18. The role of previous caries experience and the presence of occlusal white and dark lesions in predicting the development of new lesions were examined. Design At each visit, the patient’s teeth were given a visual-tactile examination and the subject’s decayed; missing and filled (DMFS) score was determined. Next, molars lacking probeable caries or restorations were examined using transillumination for occlusal white and dark spots. This examination was repeated periodically. A Cox proportional hazard was used to analyze data concerning the development of new occusal caries in molars. Results The longitudinal data indicates that patients who were caries free at visit-1 developed significantly fewer occlusal caries during the longitudinal study. The hazard ratio for subjects who had first-visit caries was 2.27 compared to caries free subjects. Intact molars with occlusal white or dark lesions had caries hazard ratios of 0.78 and 1.49 respectively, compared to molars lacking initial color changes. Conclusion Having a prior caries history places the subject at increased risk of developing future caries. Teeth with dark lesions but not white lesions are at significantly increased risk for developing decay. White lesions may represent remineralizing or slowly progressing lesions. The results of this study can help identify patients and tooth surfaces at risk for future occlusal decay. PMID:22841633

  19. Confidence in dental care and public health competency during rural practice among new dental graduates in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Wisaijohn, Thunthita; Suphanchaimat, Rapeepong; Topothai, Thitikorn; Seneerattanaprayul, Parinda; Pudpong, Nareerut; Putthasri, Weerasak

    2015-01-01

    Objective The dental profession has played an important role in the development of the health system in Thailand. However, it is not known if dental graduates’ standards of knowledge, skills, and capabilities are fulfilling the health needs of Thais. This study aimed to assess the level of confidence in dental public health competency among final-year dental students who graduated in 2013. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 571 new dental graduates who participated in an official meeting arranged by the Ministry of Public Health in 2013. Self-administered questionnaires were used for collecting data on their confidence levels in selected public-health competencies. Of the total graduates, 72.5% anonymously responded to the questionnaire. Descriptive and inferential statistics, factor analysis, and stepwise regression were applied for data analysis. Results The majority of respondents expressed confidence in their ability to care for patients, but less confidence in public-health and administration competencies. The results also show that there was no significant association between demographic and educational profiles of respondents and confidence in their clinical competency. However, significantly more students who graduated from schools located outside Bangkok and vicinity rated themselves as competent in public health (coefficient = 0.333, P=0.021). Conclusion New dentists who graduated from dental schools in Bangkok and vicinity had lower levels of confidence in their public-health competencies compared to those who graduated from dental schools outside Bangkok. Thus, working in rural areas after graduation could help new dentists gain more experience in rural practice, leading to higher confidence levels. The findings from this study could contribute to the improvement of the dental curriculum and contract-bonding policy to work in rural areas. PMID:25565912

  20. Access to Dental Care for Children in Rhode Island. Rhode Island Kids Count Issue Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Linda; Fontes, Janice; Ross, Maureen; Lawrence, Robin; Andrews, John; Kernan, Sharon; Leddy, Tricia; O'Bara, Joan; Young, John

    Dental disease restricts activities in school, work, and home, and often significantly diminishes the quality of life for many children and adults, especially those who are low income or uninsured. Noting that dental caries (tooth decay) is the most common preventable chronic childhood disease, this Kids Count issue brief considers the extent to…

  1. Long-Term Effects of a Course on Dental Care for Handicapped Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedi, Raman; O'Donnell, David

    1989-01-01

    A post-graduation study found that Hong Kong University dental school graduates who had taken a course in dental care for handicapped individuals continued to feel such individuals should have care in specialized centers, but provided more treatment to them than other local dentists. Communication barriers were seen as significant. (MSE)

  2. Dental mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Paul T

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian teeth harbour mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which contribute to tooth growth and repair. These dental MSCs possess many in vitro features of bone marrow-derived MSCs, including clonogenicity, expression of certain markers, and following stimulation, differentiation into cells that have the characteristics of osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Teeth and their support tissues provide not only an easily accessible source of MSCs but also a tractable model system to study their function and properties in vivo In addition, the accessibility of teeth together with their clinical relevance provides a valuable opportunity to test stem cell-based treatments for dental disorders. This Review outlines some recent discoveries in dental MSC function and behaviour and discusses how these and other advances are paving the way for the development of new biologically based dental therapies. PMID:27381225

  3. Glossary of Dental Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... geta poker friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental ... and shape of teeth performed by a general dentist | More Edentulous having lost most or all of ...

  4. American Dental Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health Topics ADVERTISEMENT Advocacy Advocacy Advocacy Issues Health Care Reform ADA Positions, Policies and Statements Legal Advocacy and ... Children's Dental Health Month ADA Seal of Acceptance Fluoride in Water Advocating for the Public Prevention Summit ...

  5. Dental care - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... dental exams, and getting necessary treatments such as fluoride, extractions, fillings, or braces and other orthodontics. ... provider if your infant needs to take oral fluoride . THE FIRST TRIP TO THE DENTIST Your child's ...

  6. Complications of dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Lillich, J D

    1998-08-01

    Both retrospective data and clinical experience indicate that complications of dental surgery are occasionally encountered and, to some extent, are inevitable. Many of the reported complications related to dental surgery such as incomplete removal of diseased teeth or removal of the wrong tooth can be avoided with sound preoperative planning and intraoperative technique. Diseased teeth should be properly identified prior to and during surgery. In addition, complete removal of the diseased tooth must be performed. Use of intraoperative radiographic examination to confirm the location of the diseased tooth and to document its removal cannot be overemphasized. Iatrogenic fracture of the maxillary or mandibular alveolar walls or palatine bone can be avoided by proper placement of the dental punch. The chances of developing incisional drainage or secondary sinusitis can be reduced by use of appropriate systemic antibiotics. These factors should guide the surgical approach to dental surgery to reduce the likelihood of developing common complications. PMID:9742671

  7. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Even though newborns and infants do not have teeth, care of the mouth and gums is important. ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which ...

  8. Dental care - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cantor A, Zakher B, et al. Preventing dental caries in children <5 years: systematic review updating USPSTF ... nih.gov/pubmed/15606059 . Ng MW. Early childhood caries: risk-based disease prevention and management. Dent Clin ...

  9. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for you and your baby and contain less sugar that can damage your teeth. Water or low-fat milk hydrates you and contains little or no sugar. For More Information American Dental Association: Pregnancy http : / / ...

  10. Portable Dental System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Portable dental system provides dental care in isolated communities. System includes a patient's chair and a dentist's stool, an X-ray machine and a power unit, all of which fold into compact packages. A large yellow "pumpkin" is a collapsible compressed air tank. Portable system has been used successfully in South America in out of the way communities with this back-packable system, and in American nursing homes. This product is no longer manufactured.

  11. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  12. Integrating photo-stimulable phosphor plates into dental and dental hygiene radiography curricula.

    PubMed

    Tax, Cara L; Robb, Christine L; Brillant, Martha G S; Doucette, Heather J

    2013-11-01

    It is not known whether the integration of photo-stimulable phosphor (PSP) plates into dental and dental hygiene curricula creates unique learning challenges for students. The purpose of this two-year study was to determine if dental hygiene students had more and/or different types of errors when using PSP plates compared to film and whether the PSP imaging plates had any particular characteristics that needed to be addressed in the learning process. Fifty-nine first-year dental hygiene students at one Canadian dental school were randomly assigned to two groups (PSP or film) before exposing their initial full mouth series on a teaching manikin using the parallel technique. The principal investigator determined the number and types of errors based on a specific set of performance criteria. The two groups (PSP vs. film) were compared for total number and type of errors made. Results of the study indicated the difference in the total number of errors made using PSP or film was not statistically significant; however, there was a difference in the types of errors made, with the PSP group having more horizontal errors than the film group. In addition, the study identified a number of unique characteristics of the PSP plates that required special consideration for teaching this technology. PMID:24192410

  13. Saliva and dental erosion

    PubMed Central

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  14. Access to care: leveraging dental education.

    PubMed

    Bertolami, Charles N; Berne, Robert

    2014-11-01

    If it is not a naïve expectation for dentists who have been beneficiaries of public generosity to share their good fortune with the public that made it possible, there may be a rational basis for enhancing the role of dental education in improving access to oral health care by promoting-but not requiring-a voluntary service commitment after graduation commensurate with the magnitude of the subsidy received. Such an approach would be in accordance with the Institute of Medicine's report Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations, but without the governmental coercion explicit in the report. A sustainable alternative proposal is made here, offering both greater options to students in the financing of their dental education and greater obligations for those students who accept state subsidies: providing tuition discounts for students of state-supported dental schools based not on past residency status but rather on a future commitment to public service. This arrangement could be good public policy that might also help to create a culture in which dental students are given authentic options as part of a profession-wide ideology of public service. The result could well contribute to improved oral health care for the underserved. PMID:25362688

  15. An Inter- and Intraprofessional Education Program in Which Dental Hygiene Students Instruct Medical and Dental Students.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hiromi; Kondo, Keiko; Ohara, Yuki; Yasuda, Masayo; Kishimoto, Natsuki; Sunaga, Masayo; Endo, Keiko; Arakawa, Shinichi; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Shinada, Kayoko

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, implement, and evaluate an inter- and intraprofessional education program with a peer support joint practice in which dental hygiene students teach medical and dental students about oral health care for older people requiring long-term care. In 2015 at Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 22 dental hygiene students in their third year at the School of Oral Health Care Sciences (OH3), 110 students in their third year at the School of Medicine (M3), and 52 students in their third year at the School of Dentistry (D3) participated in this program. The OH3 students practiced with a whole-body-type simulator to learn oral health care for older people and then taught the methods to the M3 and D3 students according to their self-designed teaching plan. All M3 and D3 students experienced being both practitioner and patient. The number of respondents and response rates on the questionnaires after the training were 22 (100%), 102 (92.7%), and 52 (100%) for the OH3, M3, and D3 students, respectively. Self-assessment by the OH3 students indicated that they could supervise other students sufficiently (77-86%), and 91% of them found the preclinical practice with the simulator efficient for the peer support joint practice. Almost all the M3 and D3 students reported that they gained understanding of the methods (99%), significance (100%), and important points of oral health care for older people (97%) in addition to the jobs and roles of dental hygienists (93%) because of this program. The M3 students understood the methods and significance of oral health care more deeply than did the D3 students (p<0.05). This study found that an interprofessional program with a peer support joint practice to cultivate practical clinical ability aided in increasing understanding and cooperation between medicine and dentistry. PMID:27587573

  16. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  17. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  18. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  19. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  20. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...