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Sample records for bay watersheds usa

  1. Nitrate export from forested watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Region, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, O.P.; Kuebler, A.; Rice, K.C.; Anderson, R.T.; Kennedy, M.M.

    1994-12-31

    Current levels of nitrogen inputs to the Chesapeake Bay exceed the ecological demand, resulting in eutrophication and algal blooms which degrade water quality. The Chesapeake Bay receives nitrogen compounds from a variety of sources. Previously, much attention had been focused on point source contributions such as sewage treatment plants and industrial discharges. More recently, however, inputs from atmospheric deposition and non-point sources have been considered. Land use practices vary widely within the Chesapeake Bay watershed, however, the largest portion is forested. Given that forested watersheds occupy a large area of the Chesapeake Bay drainage system, export of nitrogen from forested watersheds could potentially play an important role in the nitrogen balance. Here, examine the nitrate input/output budgets for eight forested headwater watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay drainage, several of which have a 10-year record of chemical data. The authors explore annual and seasonal input/output budgets for these watersheds and, at several sites, define the variability in nitrate export during episodic events Seasonal and episodic information on nitrate export may be useful to watershed managers in designing and applying techniques for minimizing nitrate export from these systems. Comparison of the behavior of nitrate in these systems, and with forested watersheds in other regions across a deposition gradient, will help to elucidate the factors that control nitrate export from forested watersheds. This information will better define the expected nitrate exports from forested watersheds and contribute to improving the confidence limits of models of nutrient loading to the Chesapeake Bay.

  2. Effects of forested floodplain soil properties on phosphorous concentrations in two Chesapeake Bay sub-watersheds, Virginia, USA.

    PubMed

    Odhiambo, B K; Ricker, M C; Le Blanc, L M; Moxey, K A

    2016-08-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are known to undergo fluctuations in nutrient levels as a result of both natural and anthropogenic processes. Changes in both extrinsic and intrinsic fluvial dynamics necessitate constant monitoring as anthropogenic alterations exert new pressures to previously stable river basins. In this study, we analyzed stream water and riparian zone soil phosphorous (P) dynamics in two third-order sub-watersheds of the lower Chesapeake Bay in Virginia, USA. The Ni River is predominantly forested (70 % forested), and Sugarland Run is a more human impacted (>45 % impervious surfaces) sub-watershed located in the suburbs of Washington D.C. Total stream P concentrations were measured during both high and low flows and Mehlich-3 methods were used to evaluate potential P fluxes in riparian soils. The results show total stream P concentrations in Sugarland Run ranged from 0.002 to 0.20 ppm, with an average of 0.054 ppm. In contrast, the forested Ni River had typical stream P concentrations <0.01 ppm. Total soil P was significantly higher in the more urbanized Sugarland Run basin (23.8 ± 2.1 ppm) compared to the Ni River basin (16 ± 3.7 ppm). Average stream bank erosion rates and corresponding cut-bank P flux rates were estimated to be 7.98 cm year(-1) and 361 kg P year(-1) for Ni River and 9.84 cm year(-1) and 11,600 kg P year(-1) for Sugarland Run, respectively. The significantly higher values of total P in the stream water and floodplain cut-banks of Sugarland Run suggests erosion and resuspension of previously deposited legacy sediments is an important processes in this human-impacted basin. PMID:27146543

  3. Contemporary Land Change Alters Fish Communities in a San Francisco Bay Watershed, California, U.S.A.

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Yoshida, Kristina; Leidy, Robert A.; Carlson, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Urbanization is one of the leading threats to freshwater biodiversity, and urban regions continue to expand globally. Here we examined the relationship between recent urbanization and shifts in stream fish communities. We sampled fishes at 32 sites in the Alameda Creek Watershed, near San Francisco, California, in 1993–1994 and again in 2009, and we quantified univariate and multivariate changes in fish communities between the sampling periods. Sampling sites were classified into those downstream of a rapidly urbanizing area (“urbanized sites”), and those found in less impacted areas (“low-impacted sites”). We calculated the change from non-urban to urban land cover between 1993 and 2009 at two scales for each site (the total watershed and a 3km buffer zone immediately upstream of each site). Neither the mean relative abundance of native fish nor nonnative species richness changed significantly between the survey periods. However, we observed significant changes in fish community composition (as measured by Bray-Curtis dissimilarity) and a decrease in native species richness between the sampling periods at urbanized sites, but not at low-impacted sites. Moreover, the relative abundance of one native cyprinid (Lavinia symmetricus) decreased at the urbanized sites but not at low-impacted sites. Increased urbanization was associated with changes in the fish community, and this relationship was strongest at the smaller (3km buffer) scale. Our results suggest that ongoing land change alters fish communities and that contemporary resurveys are an important tool for examining how freshwater taxa are responding to recent environmental change. PMID:26580560

  4. Chesapeake bay watershed land cover data series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irani, Frederick M.; Claggett, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand how the land is changing and to relate those changes to water quality trends, the USGS EGSC funded the production of a Chesapeake Bay Watershed Land Cover Data Series (CBLCD) representing four dates: 1984, 1992, 2001, and 2006. EGSC will publish land change forecasts based on observed trends in the CBLCD over the coming year. They are in the process of interpreting and publishing statistics on the extent, type and patterns of land cover change for 1984-2006 in the Bay watershed, major tributaries and counties.

  5. 75 FR 11837 - Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    .... Section 1240Q of the Food Security Act of 1985, as amended by the Food, ] Conservation, and Energy Act of... various natural resources conservation programs authorized under Subtitle D, Title XII of the Food Security Act of 1985, as amended. The Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative assistance in FY 2010 will...

  6. Short-term variability of 7Be atmospheric deposition and watershed response in a Pacific coastal stream, Monterey Bay, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conaway, Christopher H.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Draut, Amy E.; Swarzenski, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Beryllium-7 is a powerful and commonly used tracer for environmental processes such as watershed sediment provenance, soil erosion, fluvial and nearshore sediment cycling, and atmospheric fallout. However, few studies have quantified temporal or spatial variability of 7Be accumulation from atmospheric fallout, and parameters that would better define the uses and limitations of this geochemical tracer. We investigated the abundance and variability of 7Be in atmospheric deposition in both rain events and dry periods, and in stream surface-water samples collected over a ten-month interval at sites near northern Monterey Bay (37°N, 122°W) on the central California coast, a region characterized by a rainy winters, dry summers, and small mountainous streams with flashy hydrology. The range of 7Be activity in rainwater samples from the main sampling site was 1.3–4.4 Bq L−1, with a mean (±standard deviation) of 2.2 ± 0.9 Bq L−1, and a volume-weighted average of 2.0 Bq L−1. The range of wet atmospheric deposition was 18–188 Bq m−2 per rain event, with a mean of 72 ± 53 Bq m−2. Dry deposition fluxes of 7Be ranged from less than 0.01 up to 0.45 Bq m−2 d−1, with an estimated dry season deposition of 7 Bq m−2 month−1. Annualized 7Be atmospheric deposition was approximately 1900 Bq m−2 yr−1, with most deposition via rainwater (>95%) and little via dry deposition. Overall, these activities and deposition fluxes are similar to values found in other coastal locations with comparable latitude and Mediterranean-type climate. Particulate 7Be values in the surface water of the San Lorenzo River in Santa Cruz, California, ranged from −1 to 0.6 Bq g−1, with a median activity of 0.26 Bq g−1. A large storm event in January 2010 characterized by prolonged flooding resulted in the entrainment of 7Be-depleted sediment, presumably from substantial erosion in the watershed. There were too few particulate 7Be data over the storm to accurately model a 7Be load

  7. Modeling nitrogen cycling in forested watersheds of Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsaker, C.T.; Garten, C.T.; Mulholland, P.J.

    1995-03-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Agreement calls for a 40% reduction of controllable phosphorus and nitrogen to the tidal Bay by the year 2000. To accomplish this goal the Chesapeake Bay Program needs accurate estimates of nutrient loadings, including atmospheric deposition, from various land uses. The literature was reviewed on forest nitrogen pools and fluxes, and nitrogen data from research catchments in the Chesapeake Basin were identified. The structure of a nitrogen module for forests is recommended for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model along with the possible functional forms for fluxes.

  8. MOBILE BAY AND WATERSHED WATER QUALITY MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two major products will come out of this project. The first is a compilation of 2001 water quality data for the Mobile bay area. The second is to develop and run a water quality moded for the bay to assist with development of TMDLs for the Bay

  9. DEVELOP Chesapeake Bay Watershed Hydrology - UAV Sensor Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley, S. D.; Baruah, A.

    2008-12-01

    The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States, with a watershed extending through six states and the nation's capital. Urbanization and agriculture practices have led to an excess runoff of nutrients and sediment into the bay. Nutrients and sediment loading stimulate the growth of algal blooms associated with various problems including localized dissolved oxygen deficiencies, toxic algal blooms and death of marine life. The Chesapeake Bay Program, among other stakeholder organizations, contributes greatly to the restoration efforts of the Chesapeake Bay. These stakeholders contribute in many ways such as monitoring the water quality, leading clean-up projects, and actively restoring native habitats. The first stage of the DEVELOP Chesapeake Bay Coastal Management project, relating to water quality, contributed to the restoration efforts by introducing NASA satellite-based water quality data products to the stakeholders as a complement to their current monitoring methods. The second stage, to be initiated in the fall 2008 internship term, will focus on the impacts of land cover variability within the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Multiple student led discussions with members of the Land Cover team at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office in the DEVELOP GSFC 2008 summer term uncovered the need for remote sensing data for hydrological mapping in the watershed. The Chesapeake Bay Program expressed in repeated discussions on Land Cover mapping that significant portions of upper river areas, streams, and the land directly interfacing those waters are not accurately depicted in the watershed model. Without such hydrological mapping correlated with land cover data the model will not be useful in depicting source areas of nutrient loading which has an ecological and economic impact in and around the Chesapeake Bay. The fall 2008 DEVELOP team will examine the use of UAV flown sensors in connection with in-situ and Earth Observation satellite data. To maximize the

  10. Comparison of SWAT and AnnAGNPS Applications to a Sub-Watershed Within the Chesapeake Bay Watershed in Maryland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted under the USDA-CEAP program on the Choptank watershed which is located within the Chesapeake Bay watershed in the Eastern Shore region of Maryland. The watershed is nearly 400 square mile and is dominated by corn and soybean productions. Poultry manure is being used heavil...

  11. Elucidating terrestrial nutrient sources to a coastal lagoon, Chincoteague Bay, Maryland, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fertig, B.; O'Neil, J. M.; Beckert, K. A.; Cain, C. J.; Needham, D. M.; Carruthers, T. J. B.; Dennison, W. C.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term non-linear ecosystem-scale changes in water quality and biotic communities in coastal lagoons have been associated with intensification of anthropogenic pressures. In light of incipient changes in Johnson Bay (an embayment of Chincoteague Bay, Maryland-Virginia, USA), examination of nitrogen sources was conducted through synoptic water quality monitoring, stable nitrogen isotope signatures (δ15N) of in situ bioindicators, and denitrification estimates. These data were placed in the context of long-term and broader spatial analyses. Despite various watershed protection efforts, multiyear summer time studies (2004-2007) suggested that high levels of terrestrially derived nutrients still enter Johnson Bay. Total nitrogen concentrations in Johnson Bay were 132% the concentrations in the broader Chincoteague Bay during the late 1970s (mean 2004-2007 was 40.0 - 73.2 μM). Comparing total nitrogen concentrations in Johnson Bay to St. Martin River (consistently the most eutrophic region of these coastal bays), Johnson Bay has increased from 62.5% to 82.5% of the concentrations in St. Martin River during the late 1970s. Though specific sources of nitrogen inputs have not yet been definitively identified, the long-term increase in total nitrogen concentrations occurred despite increased and continued conservation and protection measures. We suggest that investigating nutrient sources can reveal potentially ineffective nutrient policies and that this knowledge can be applied towards other coastal lagoons.

  12. The Bear Brook Watershed, Maine (BBWM), USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, S.; Kahl, J.; Fernandez, I.; Haines, T.; Rustad, L.; Nodvin, S.; Scofield, J.; Strickland, T.; Erickson, H.; Wigington, P., Jr.; Lee, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Bear Brook Watershed Manipulation project in Maine is a paired calibrated watershed study funded by the U.S. EPA. The research program is evaluating whole ecosystem response to elevated inputs of acidifying chemicals. The consists of a 2.5 year calibration period (1987-1989), nine years of chemical additions of (NH4)2SO4 (15N- and 34S-enriched for several years) to West Bear watershed (1989-1998), followed by a recovery period. The other watershed, East Bear, serves as a reference. Dosing is in six equal treatments/yr of 1800 eq SO4 and NH4/ha/yr, a 200% increase over 1988 loading (wet plus dry) for SO4 300% for N (wet NO3 + NH4). The experimental and reference watersheds are forested with mixed hard- and softwoods, and have thin acidic soils, areas of 10.2 and 10.7 ha and relief of 210 m. Thin till of variable composition is underlain by metasedimentary pelitic rocks and calc-silicate gneiss intruded by granite dikes and sills. For the period 1987-1995, precipitation averaged 1.4 m/yr, had a mean pH of 4.5, with SO4, NO3, and NH4 concentrations of 26, 14, and 7 ??eq/L, respectively. The nearly perrenial streams draining each watershed have discharges ranging from 0 (East Bear stops flowing for one to two months per year) to 150 L/sec. Prior to manipulation, East Bear and West Bear had a volume weighted annual mean pH of approximately 5.4, alkalinity = 0 to 4 ??eq/L, total base cations = 184 ??eq/L (sea-salt corrected = 118 ??eq/L), and SO4 = 100 to 111 ??eq/L. Nitrate ranged from 0 to 30 ??eq/L with an annual mean of 6 to 25 ??eq/L; dissolved organic carbon (DOC) ranged from 1 to 7 mg/L but was typically less than 3. Episodic acidification occurred at high discharge and was caused by dilution of cations, slightly increased DOC, significantly higher NO3, and the sea-salt effect. Depressions in pH were accompanied by increases in inorganic Al. The West Bear catchment responded to the chemical additions with increased export of base cations, Al, SO4, NO3, and

  13. Retrospective Review of Watershed Characteristics and a Framework for Future Research in the Sarasota Bay Watershed, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kish, George R.; Harrison, Arnell S.; Alderson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Sarasota Bay Estuary Program conducted a retrospective review of characteristics of the Sarasota Bay watershed in west-central Florida. This report describes watershed characteristics, surface- and ground-water processes, and the environmental setting of the Sarasota Bay watershed. Population growth during the last 50 years is transforming the Sarasota Bay watershed from rural and agriculture to urban and suburban. The transition has resulted in land-use changes that influence surface- and ground-water processes in the watershed. Increased impervious cover decreases recharge to ground water and increases overland runoff and the pollutants carried in the runoff. Soil compaction resulting from agriculture, construction, and recreation activities also decreases recharge to ground water. Conventional approaches to stormwater runoff have involved conveyances and large storage areas. Low-impact development approaches, designed to provide recharge near the precipitation point-of-contact, are being used increasingly in the watershed. Simple pollutant loading models applied to the Sarasota Bay watershed have focused on large-scale processes and pollutant loads determined from empirical values and mean event concentrations. Complex watershed models and more intensive data-collection programs can provide the level of information needed to quantify (1) the effects of lot-scale land practices on runoff, storage, and ground-water recharge, (2) dry and wet season flux of nutrients through atmospheric deposition, (3) changes in partitioning of water and contaminants as urbanization alters predevelopment rainfall-runoff relations, and (4) linkages between watershed models and lot-scale models to evaluate the effect of small-scale changes over the entire Sarasota Bay watershed. As urbanization in the Sarasota Bay watershed continues, focused research on water-resources issues can provide information needed by water

  14. Water quality functions of riparian forest buffers in Chesapeake bay watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowrance, R.; Altier, L.S.; Newbold, J.D.; Schnabel, R.R.; Groffman, P.M.; Denver, J.M.; Correll, D.L.; Gilliam, J.W.; Robinson, J.L.; Brinsfield, R.B.; Staver, K.W.; Lucas, W.; Todd, A.H.

    1997-01-01

    Maryland, Virginia, and Pennsylvania, USA, have agreed to reduce nutrient loadings to Chesapeake Bay by 40% by the year 2000. This requires control of nonpoint sources of nutrients much of which comes from agriculture. Riparian forest buffer systems (RFBS) provide effective control of nonpoint source (NPS) pollution in some types of agricultural watersheds. Control of NPS pollution is dependent on the type of pollutant and the hydrologic connection between pollution sources, the RFBS, and the stream. Water quality improvements are most likely in areas of where most of the excess precipitation moves across, in, or near the root zone of the RFBS. In areas such as the Inner Coastal Plain and Piedmont watersheds with thin soils RFBS should retain 50%-90% of the total loading of nitrate in shallow groundwater sediment in surface runoff and total N in born surface runoff and groundwater. Retention of phosphorus is generally much less. In regions with deeper soils and/or greater regional groundwater recharge (such as parts of the Piedmont and the Valley and Ridge), RFBS water quality improvements are probably much less. The expected levels of pollutant control by RFBS are identified for each of nine physiographic provinces of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Issues related to of establishment sustainability, and management are also discussed.

  15. San Francisco and Bay Area, CA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Although clouds obscure part of the city of San Francisco and the mouth of the Bay (37.5N, 122.0W), many cultural and natural features in the immediate vicinity are obvious. The Bay Bridge which was damaged in the 1989 earthquake, Candlestick Park, San Mateo and Dumbarton Bridges as well as the various colored settling ponds rimming the south end of the Bay, the San Andreas and Calaveras faults and many of the major highways can be seen.

  16. Lessons from the Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment: Risks at the Interface of Salmon, People, and Mining

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to a petition from the Bristol Bay Native Corporation and several villages, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency performed an ecological risk assessment of potential porphyry copper mining in the 116,000 km2 Bristol Bay watershed, Alaska. This watershed includes t...

  17. San Francisco and Bay Area, CA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Although clouds obscure part of the city of San Francisco and the mouth of the Bay (37.5N, 122.0W), many cultural and natural features in the immediate vicinity are obvious. The Bay Bridge which was damaged in the 1989 earthquake, Candlestick Park, San Mateo and Dumbarton Bridges as well as the various colored settling ponds rimming the south end of the Bay, the San Andreas and Calaveras faults and many of the major highways can be seen. Color infrared photography is very useful for haze penetration and greater definition of the imagery as well as vegetation detection, depicted as shades of red.

  18. Chesapeake Bay Watershed - Protecting the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers through science, restoration, and partnership

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2012-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay, the Nation's largest estuary, has been degraded due to the impact of human-population increase, which has doubled since 1950, resulting in degraded water quality, loss of habitat, and declines in populations of biological communities. Since the mid-1980s, the Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP), a multi-agency partnership which includes the Department of Interior (DOI), has worked to restore the Bay ecosystem. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has the critical role of providing unbiased scientific information that is utilized to document and understand ecosystem change to help assess the effectiveness of restoration strategies in the Bay and its watershed. The USGS revised its Chesapeake Bay science plan for 2006-2011 to address the collective needs of the CBP, DOI, and USGS with a mission to provide integrated science for improved understanding and management of the Bay ecosystem. The USGS science themes for this mission are: Causes and consequences of land-use change; Impact of climate change and associated hazards; Factors affecting water quality and quantity; Ability of habitat to support fish and bird populations; and Synthesis and forecasting to improve ecosystem assessment, conservation, and restoration.

  19. A regional mass balance of methylmercury in San Francisco Bay, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Yee, Donald; McKee, Lester J; Oram, John J

    2011-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay (California, USA) is a water body listed as impaired because of Hg contamination in sport fish for human consumption, as well as possible effects on resident wildlife. A legacy of Hg mining in local watersheds and Hg used in Au mining in the Sierra Nevada (USA) has contributed to contamination seen in the bay, with additional more recent and ongoing inputs from various sources. Methylmercury is the species of Hg most directly responsible for contamination in biota, so better understanding of its sources, loads, and processes was sought to identify the best means to reduce impacts. A regional scale model of San Francisco Bay was developed to characterize major methylmercury inputs and processes. The model was used to evaluate the potential impact of uncertainties in estimates for methylmercury loading pathways and environmental processes, identify major data gaps, and explore management prospects for reducing methylmercury contamination. External loading pathways considered in the mass balance include methylmercury loads entering via atmospheric deposition to the bay surface, and discharges from the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta, local watersheds, municipal wastewater, and fringing wetlands. Internal processes considered include exchange between bed and suspended sediments and the water column, in situ production and demethylation, biological uptake, and losses via hydrologic transport to the ocean through the Golden Gate. In situ sediment methylation and demethylation were dominant sources and losses determining ambient steady-state concentrations in the model, with changes in external loads and export causing smaller changes. Better information on methylation and demethylation is thus most critical to improving understanding of methylmercury balances and management. PMID:20872899

  20. Microplastic contamination in the San Francisco Bay, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Rebecca; Mason, Sherri A; Stanek, Shavonne K; Willis-Norton, Ellen; Wren, Ian F; Box, Carolynn

    2016-08-15

    Despite widespread detection of microplastic pollution in marine environments, data describing microplastic abundance in urban estuaries and microplastic discharge via treated municipal wastewater are limited. This study presents information on abundance, distribution, and composition of microplastic at nine sites in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Also presented are characterizations of microplastic in final effluent from eight wastewater treatment plants, employing varying treatment technologies, that discharge to the Bay. With an average microplastic abundance of 700,000particles/km(2), Bay surface water appears to have higher microplastic levels than other urban waterbodies sampled in North America. Moreover, treated wastewater from facilities that discharge into the Bay contains considerable microplastic contamination. Facilities employing tertiary filtration did not show lower levels of contamination than those using secondary treatment. As textile-derived fibers were more abundant in wastewater, higher levels of fragments in surface water suggest additional pathways of microplastic pollution, such as stormwater runoff. PMID:27289280

  1. Identifying Watershed Sediment Sources In The Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellis, A. C.; Pavich, M. J.; Landwehr, J. M.; Banks, W. S.; Bierman, P. R.; Reuter, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    Attenuation of light by fine-grained suspended sediment is having an adverse affect on the living resources and habitat of the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed. Different approaches are being used to identify sediment sources at several scales for the Chesapeake Bay watershed. At the subbasin scale (1.0 to 70,200 km 2), U. S. Geological Survey suspended-sediment data from 1985 through 2001 for 35 stations with at least 3 years of record were used to determine subbasin sediment yields. In the Susquehanna River Basin results showed that four streams draining the Conestoga River Basin,(1,220 km 2) which is in the Piedmont, had the highest sediment yields (60.9 to 356 t/km 2/yr). Cosmogenic 10Be provides another method to measure erosion which can be compared to subbasin sediment yields. Two pathways of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be, atmospheric and in situ, were used to determine erosion rates in the Susquehanna River Basin (70,200 km 2). Atmospheric 10Be was used to generate erosion indices at 25 subbasins by taking a ratio of 10Be in fluvial sediment exported out of the subbasin against the net atmospheric delivery of 10Be (values >1 = erosion). Examining the relation of in situ10Be concentrations compared to subbasin sediment yield provided an independent method to assess instrumental vs. background erosion rates. Subbasins in equilibrium show a linear relation of instrumental sediment yield to in situ10Be concentrations. Subbasins that deviate from this relation show either export or storage of sediment. Subbasins of the Conestoga River Basin showed departure from this relation, indicating erosion. The Conestoga River Basin drains primarily agricultural land and this land use may be influencing erosion rates and sediment yields. Within Chesapeake Bay subbasins, sediment fingerprinting is being used to determine watershed sources of sediment. Sediment fingerprinting is a technique where potential sediment sources can be characterized using a number of diagnostic

  2. Remediation scenarios for selenium contamination, Blackfoot watershed, southeast Idaho, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Tom

    2013-05-01

    Extensive phosphate mining in the Blackfoot watershed of Idaho (USA) has substantially increased the selenium (Se) concentration in the river during both snowmelt and baseflow when groundwater discharge dominates. Phosphate mines create a linkage between Se-laden shale that occurs in the Phosphoria Formation and the underlying regional Wells Formation aquifer. Using a reconnaissance-level transport model, mines in the watershed were prioritized for remediation and for comparing the results of simulations of remediation scenarios with a baseline of no remediation, for which Se concentration in the river will exceed the aquatic standard along an extensive length. An accurate simulation of recharge distribution around the watershed and simulated flux to the river is essential. Remediation of mines north of the river will substantially decrease the size of the Se plume, although significant Se will continue to discharge to the river. Similarly, remediation of three mines south of the river would decrease the Se discharge to the river but allow substantial amounts to remain stored in the groundwater north and far south of the river. A lack of calibration data is not a reason to forgo remediation, but rather ongoing data collection can be used to fine-tune plans as they are implemented.

  3. San Francisco and Bay Area, CA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This cloud free color infrared view of San Francisco and Bay Area, CA (38.0N, 122.5W) is unusual because the city is normally concealed from view by clouds and fog. Gray tones represent urban areas and the red toned areas are vegetated. Within the city, parks easily stand out from the well-developed parts of the city as enclaves of color. The trace of the San Andreas fault shows as a straight valley running across the San Francisco peninsula.

  4. Modeling Land Use Change in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claire, J. A.; Goetz, S. J.; Bockstael, N.

    2003-12-01

    Low density, decentralized residential and commercial development is increasingly the dominant pattern of exurban land use in many developed countries, particularly the United States. The term "sprawl" is now commonly used to describe this form of development, the environmental and quality-of-life impacts of which are becoming central to debates over land use in urban and suburban areas. Continued poor health of the Chesapeake Bay, located in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, is due in part to disruptions in the hydrological system caused by urban and suburban development throughout the 167,000 square kilometer watershed. We present results of a spatial predictive model of land use change based on cellular automata (SLEUTH), which was calibrated using high resolution (30m cell size) maps of the built environment derived from Landsat ETM+ imagery for the period 1986-2000. The model was applied to a 23,740 square kilometer area centered on Washington DC - Baltimore MD, and predictions were made out to 2030 assuming three different policy scenarios (current trends, managed growth, and "sustainable"). Accuracy of the model was assessed at three scales (pixel, watershed and county) and overall strengths and weaknesses of the model are presented, particularly in comparison to other econometric modeling approaches.

  5. Cape Cod, Buzzard's Bay, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA (42.0N, 70.0W) is a national seashore recreation area with many fine resorts and summer estate homes. Geologically, the cape is a deposit of earth and stone called a terminal moraine, left by the great Pleistocene glaciers of about 20,000 years ago. The through canal at the base of the cape is a manmade feature for waterborne traffic and is part of the Intercoastal Canal network. The cape actually begins south of the canal.

  6. A Combined Modeling Approach to Evaluate Water Quality Benefits of Riparian Buffers in the Jobos Bay Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Jobos Bay Watershed, located in south-central Puerto Rico, is a tropical Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) Special Emphasis Watershed. The purpose of CEAP is to quantify environmental benefits of conservation practices and includes field and watershed modeling. In Jobos Bay, the goa...

  7. Monitoring wetland inundation dynamics in response to weather variability in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wetlands provide a broad range of ecosystem services, including flood control, water purification, groundwater replenishment, and biodiversity support. The provision of these services, which are especially valued in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, is largely controlled by varying levels of wetness. ...

  8. Reducing methylmercury accumulation in the food webs of San Francisco Bay and its local watersheds.

    PubMed

    Davis, J A; Looker, R E; Yee, D; Marvin-Di Pasquale, M; Grenier, J L; Austin, C M; McKee, L J; Greenfield, B K; Brodberg, R; Blum, J D

    2012-11-01

    San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads

  9. Reducing methylmercury accumulation in the food webs of San Francisco Bay and its local watersheds

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.A.; Looker, R.E.; Yee, D.; Marvin-Di Pasquale, M.; Austin, C.M.; McKee, L.J.; Greenfield, B.K.; Brodberg, R.; Blum, J.D.

    2012-11-15

    San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads

  10. Reducing Methylmercury Accumulation in the Food Webs of San Francisco Bay and Its Local Watersheds

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J.A.; Looker, R.E.; Yee, D.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Grenier, J.L.; Austin, C.M.; McKee, L.J.; Greenfield, B.K.; Brodberg, R.; Blum, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads

  11. Predicting thermal regimes of stream networks across the Chesapeake Bay Watershed: Natural and anthropogenic influences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal regimes are a critical factor in models predicting joint effects of watershed management activities and climate change on fish habitat suitability. We have compiled a database of lotic temperature time series across the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (725 station-year combinat...

  12. Watershed monitoring and modelling and USA regulatory compliance.

    PubMed

    Turner, B G; Boner, M C

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the Columbus program was to implement a comprehensive watershed monitoring-network including water chemistry, aquatic biology and alternative sensors to establish water environment health and methods for determining future restoration progress and early warning for protection of drinking water supplies. The program was implemented to comply with USA regulatory requirements including Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) rules of the Clean Water Act (CWA) and Source Water Assessment and Protection (SWAP) rules under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). The USEPA Office of Research and Development and the Water Environment Research Foundation provided quality assurance oversight. The results obtained demonstrated that significant wet weather data is necessary to establish relationships between land use, water chemistry, aquatic biology and sensor data. These measurements and relationships formed the basis for calibrating the US EPA BASINS Model, prioritizing watershed health and determination of compliance with water quality standards. Conclusions specify priorities of cost-effective drainage system controls that attenuate stormwater flows and capture flushed pollutants. A network of permanent long-term real-time monitoring using combination of continuous sensor measurements, water column sampling and aquatic biology surveys and a regional organization is prescribed to protect drinking water supplies and measure progress towards water quality targets. PMID:15685974

  13. Monitoring and modeling nitrate fate in subbasins within the Choptank River Watershed, Maryland, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation practices, such as post harvest planting of winter cover crops, are important for water quality improvement in agricultural watersheds. Throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed (CBW), winter cover crop use has been emphasized and federal and state cost-share programs are available for fa...

  14. Managing manure for sustainable livestock production in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manure presents one of the greatest challenges to livestock operations in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The Chesapeake Bay is threatened by excessive nutrient loadings and, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, manure is the source of 18% of the nitrogen and 27% of the phosphorus en...

  15. The distribution of phosphorus in Popes Creek, VA, and in the Pocomoke River, MD: Two watersheds with different land management practices in the Chesapeake Bay Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, N.S.; Bricker, O.P.; Newell, W.; McCoy, J.; Morawe, R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares phosphorus (P) concentrations in sediments from two watersheds, one with, and one without, intensive animal agriculture. The watersheds are in the coastal plain of the Chesapeake Bay and have similar physiographic characteristics. Agriculture in the Pocomoke River, MD, watershed supplied 2.7 percent of all broiler chickens produced in the USA in 1997. Poultry litter is an abundant, local source of manure for crops. Broiler chickens are not produced in the Popes Creek, VA, watershed and poultry manure is, therefore, not a major source of fertilizer. The largest concentrations of P in sediment samples are found in floodplain and main-stem bottom sediment in both watersheds. Concentrations of total P and P extracted with 1N HCl are significantly larger in main-stem bottom sediments from the Pocomoke River than in main-stem bottom sediments from Popes Creek. Larger concentrations of P are associated with what are potentially redox sensitive iron oxyhydroxides in sediment samples from the Pocomoke River watershed than are associated with what are potentially redox sensitive iron oxyhydroxides in sediment samples from the Popes Creek watershed. Data for P and iron (Fe) concentrations in sediments from the Popes Creek watershed provide a numerical framework (baseline) with which to compare P and Fe concentrations in sediment from the Pocomoke River watershed. ?? Springer 2005.

  16. Watershed nutrient inputs, phytoplankton accumulation, and C stocks in Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, T. R.; Boynton, W. R.; Hagy, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    Inputs of N and P to Chesapeake Bay have been enhanced by anthropogenic activities. Fertilizers, urbanization, N emissions, and industrial effluents contribute to point and diffuse sources currently 2-7X higher for P and 5-20X higher for N than those from undisturbed watersheds. Enhanced nutrient inputs cause phytoplankton blooms which obscure visibility, eliminate submerged grasses, and influence the distribution of C within the Bay. Accumulations of dissolved organic and particulate organic C lead to enhanced microbial respiration in isolated bottom waters, and dissolved oxygen is seasonally reduced to trace levels during summer. Cultural eutrophication is not unique to Chesapeake Bay. Although some estuaries such as the Delaware, Hudson, and San Francisco Bay also have high anthropogenic inputs, these estuaries have much shorter residence times, and much of the N and P may be exported to the coastal ocean. However, in Chesapeake Bay, with residence times >2 months, internal processing of watershed inputs results in local algal blooms within the estuary. Watershed restoration strategies for Chesapeake watersheds have had limited success to date. Groundwaters are enriched with nitrate, and the long residence times of groundwaters mean slow responses to watershed improvements. The few successes in the Chesapeake have been associated with point source reductions, although continued human population growth can easily override restoration efforts. Widespread improvement in water quality has yet to occur, but the limited successes show that the Bay responds to load changes.

  17. Contaminant exposure of birds nesting in Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, Thomas W.; Dummer, Paul M.; Custer, Christine M.; Franson, J. Christian; Jones, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In earlier studies, elevated concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) were reported in double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs and tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) eggs and nestlings collected from lower Green Bay (WI, USA) in 1994 and 1995 and black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) eggs collected in 1991. Comparable samples collected in 2010 and 2011 indicated that concentrations of PCBs were 35%, 62%, 70%, and 88% lower than in the early 1990s in tree swallow eggs, tree swallow nestlings, double-crested cormorant eggs, and black-crowned night-heron eggs, respectively; concentrations of DDE were 47%, 43%, 51%, and 80% lower, respectively. These declines are consistent with regional contaminant trends in other species. Concentrations of PCBs were higher in herring gull (Larus argentatus) than in black-crowned night-heron eggs collected from Green Bay in 2010; PCB concentrations in double-crested cormorant and tree swallow eggs were intermediate. The estimated toxicity of the PCB mixture in eggs of the insectivorous tree swallow was the equal to or greater than toxicity in the 3 piscivorous bird species. A multivariate analysis indicated that the composition percentage of lower-numbered PCB congeners was greater in eggs of the insectivorous tree swallow than in eggs of the 3 piscivorous species nesting in Green Bay. Dioxin and furan concentrations and the toxicity of these chemicals were also higher in tree swallows than these other waterbird species nesting in Green Bay.

  18. Contaminant exposure of birds nesting in Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA.

    PubMed

    Custer, Thomas W; Dummer, Paul M; Custer, Christine M; Franson, J Christian; Jones, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In earlier studies, elevated concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) were reported in double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs and tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) eggs and nestlings collected from lower Green Bay (WI, USA) in 1994 and 1995 and black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) eggs collected in 1991. Comparable samples collected in 2010 and 2011 indicated that concentrations of PCBs were 35%, 62%, 70%, and 88% lower than in the early 1990s in tree swallow eggs, tree swallow nestlings, double-crested cormorant eggs, and black-crowned night-heron eggs, respectively; concentrations of DDE were 47%, 43%, 51%, and 80% lower, respectively. These declines are consistent with regional contaminant trends in other species. Concentrations of PCBs were higher in herring gull (Larus argentatus) than in black-crowned night-heron eggs collected from Green Bay in 2010; PCB concentrations in double-crested cormorant and tree swallow eggs were intermediate. The estimated toxicity of the PCB mixture in eggs of the insectivorous tree swallow was the equal to or greater than toxicity in the 3 piscivorous bird species. A multivariate analysis indicated that the composition percentage of lower-numbered PCB congeners was greater in eggs of the insectivorous tree swallow than in eggs of the 3 piscivorous species nesting in Green Bay. Dioxin and furan concentrations and the toxicity of these chemicals were also higher in tree swallows than these other waterbird species nesting in Green Bay. PMID:24733712

  19. Temporal and spatial patterns in tumour prevalence in brown bullhead Ameiurus nebulosus (Lesueur) in the tidal Potomac River watershed (USA).

    PubMed

    Pinkney, A E; Harshbarger, J C; Rutter, M A

    2014-10-01

    For two decades, fish tumour surveys have been used to monitor habitat quality in the Chesapeake Bay (USA) watershed. Tributaries with sediments contaminated with polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), known to cause liver neoplasia, were frequently targeted. Here, we compare surveys in brown bullhead Ameiurus nebulosus conducted in 2009-2011 in the tidal Potomac River watershed (including the Anacostia River) with previous surveys. Using logistic regression, we identified length and sex as covariates for liver and skin tumours. We reported a statistically significant decrease in liver tumour probabilities for standardized 280 mm Anacostia bullheads between the 1996 and 2001 samplings (merged collections: female-77.5%, male-43.0%) and 2009-2011 (female-42.2%, male-13.6%). However, liver tumour prevalence in bullheads from the Anacostia, Potomac River (Washington, DC) and Piscataway Creek (17 km downriver) was significantly higher than that for Chesapeake Bay watershed reference locations. The causes of skin tumours in bullheads are uncertain, requiring further research. The similar liver tumour prevalence in these three locations suggests that the problem is regional rather than restricted to the Anacostia. To monitor habitat quality and the success of pollution control actions, we recommend conducting tumour surveys on a 5-year cycle coordinated with sediment chemistry analyses. PMID:24974857

  20. Goddard DEVELOP Students: Using NASA Remote Sensing Technology to Study the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The DEVELOP National Program is an Earth Science research internship, operating under NASA s Applied Sciences Program. Each spring, summer, and fall, DEVELOP interns form teams to investigate Earth Science related issues. Since the Fall of 2003, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been home to one of 10 national DEVELOP teams. In past terms, students completed a variety of projects related to the Applied Sciences Applications of National Priority, such as Public Health, Natural Disasters, Water Resources, and Ecological Forecasting. These projects have focused on areas all over the world, including the United States, Africa, and Asia. Recently, Goddard DEVELOP students have turned their attention to a local environment, the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The Chesapeake Bay Watershed is a complex and diverse ecosystem, spanning approximately 64,000 square miles. The watershed encompasses parts of six states: Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, as well as the District of Columbia. The Bay itself is the biggest estuary in the United States, with over 100,000 tributaries feeding into it. The ratio of fresh water to salt water varies throughout the Bay, allowing for a variety of habitats. The Bay s wetlands, marshes, forests, reefs, and rivers support more than 3,600 plant and animal species, including birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, fish, and crabs. The Bay is also commercially significant. It is ranked third in the nation in fishery catch, and supplies approximately 500 million pounds of seafood annually. In addition to its abundant flora and fauna, the Chesapeake Bay watershed is home to approximately 16.6 million people, who live and work throughout the watershed, and who use its diverse resources for recreational purposes. Over the past several decades, the population throughout the watershed has increased rapidly, resulting in land use changes, and ultimately decreasing the health of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Over the

  1. Comparison of sediment supply to San Francisco Bay from watersheds draining the Bay Area and the Central Valley of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, L.J.; Lewicki, M.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Ganju, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying suspended sediment loads is important for managing the world's estuaries in the context of navigation, pollutant transport, wetland restoration, and coastal erosion. To address these needs, a comprehensive analysis was completed on sediment supply to San Francisco Bay from fluvial sources. Suspended sediment, optical backscatter, velocity data near the head of the estuary, and discharge data obtained from the output of a water balance model were used to generate continuous suspended sediment concentration records and compute loads to the Bay from the large Central Valley watershed. Sediment loads from small tributary watersheds around the Bay were determined using 235 station-years of suspended sediment data from 38 watershed locations, regression analysis, and simple modeling. Over 16 years, net annual suspended sediment load to the head of the estuary from its 154,000 km2 Central Valley watershed varied from 0.13 to 2.58 (mean = 0.89) million metric t of suspended sediment, or an average yield of 11 metric t/km2/yr. Small tributaries, totaling 8145 km2, in the nine-county Bay Area discharged between 0.081 and 4.27 (mean = 1.39) million metric t with a mean yield of 212 metric t/km2/yr. The results indicate that the hundreds of urbanized and tectonically active tributaries adjacent to the Bay, which together account for just 5% of the total watershed area draining to the Bay and provide just 7% of the annual average fluvial flow, supply 61% of the suspended sediment. The small tributary loads are more variable (53-fold between years compared to 21-fold for the inland Central Valley rivers) and dominated fluvial sediment supply to the Bay during 10 out of 16 yr. If San Francisco Bay is typical of other estuaries in active tectonic or climatically variable coastal regimes, managers responsible for water quality, dredging and reusing sediment accumulating in shipping channels, or restoring wetlands in the world's estuaries may need to more carefully

  2. Ecosystem responses to long-term nutrient management in an urban estuary: Tampa Bay, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greening, H.; Janicki, A.; Sherwood, E. T.; Pribble, R.; Johansson, J. O. R.

    2014-12-01

    In subtropical Tampa Bay, Florida, USA, we evaluated restoration trajectories before and after nutrient management strategies were implemented using long-term trends in nutrient loading, water quality, primary production, and seagrass extent. Following citizen demands for action, reduction in wastewater nutrient loading of approximately 90% in the late 1970s lowered external total nitrogen (TN) loading by more than 50% within three years. Continuing nutrient management actions from public and private sectors were associated with a steadily declining TN load rate and with concomitant reduction in chlorophyll-a concentrations and ambient nutrient concentrations since the mid-1980s, despite an increase of more than 1 M people living within the Tampa Bay metropolitan area. Water quality (chlorophyll-a concentration, water clarity as indicated by Secchi disk depth, total nitrogen concentration and dissolved oxygen) and seagrass coverage are approaching conditions observed in the 1950s, before the large increases in human population in the watershed. Following recovery from an extreme weather event in 1997-1998, water clarity increased significantly and seagrass is expanding at a rate significantly different than before the event, suggesting a feedback mechanism as observed in other systems. Key elements supporting the nutrient management strategy and concomitant ecosystem recovery in Tampa Bay include: 1) active community involvement, including agreement about quantifiable restoration goals; 2) regulatory and voluntary reduction in nutrient loadings from point, atmospheric, and nonpoint sources; 3) long-term water quality and seagrass extent monitoring; and 4) a commitment from public and private sectors to work together to attain restoration goals. A shift from a turbid, phytoplankton-based system to a clear water, seagrass-based system that began in the 1980s following comprehensive nutrient loading reductions has resulted in a present-day Tampa Bay which looks and

  3. A summary report of sediment processes in Chesapeake Bay and watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langland, Michael, (Edited By); Cronin, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay, the Nation's largest estuary, has been degraded because of diminished water quality, loss of habitat, and over-harvesting of living resources. Consequently, the bay was listed as an impaired water body due to excess nutrients and sediment. The Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP), a multi-jurisdictional partnership, completed an agreement called ?Chesapeake 2000? that revises and establishes new restoration goals through 2010 in the bay and its watershed. The goal of this commitment is the removal of the bay from the list of impaired waterbodies by the year 2010. The CBP is committed to developing sediment and nutrient allocations for major basins within the bay watershed and to the process of examining new and innovative management plans in the estuary itself and along the coastal zones of the bay. However, additional information is required on the sources, transport, and deposition of sediment that affect water clarity. Because the information and data on sediment processes in the bay were not readily accessible to the CBP or to state, and local managers, a Sediment Workgroup (SWGP) was created in 2001. The primary objective of this report, therefore, is to provide a review of the literature on the sources, transport, and delivery of sediment in Chesapeake Bay and its watershed with discussion of potential implications for various management alternatives. The authors of the report have extracted, discussed, and summarized the important aspects of sediment and sedimentation that are most relevant to the CBP and other sediment related-issues with which resources managers are involved. This report summarizes the most relevant studies concerning sediment sources, transport and deposition in the watershed and estuary, sediments and relation to water clarity, and provides an extensive list of references for those wanting more information.

  4. Integrated analysis of ecosystem interactions with land use Change: The Chesapeake Bay watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Scott J.; Jantz, Claire A.; Prince, Stephen D.; Smith, Andrew J.; Varlyguin, Dmitry; Wright, Robb K.

    The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States, encompassed by a watershed extending 168,000 km2 over portions of six states and Washington, D.C. Restoration of the Bay has been the focus of a two-decade regional partnership of local, state and federal agencies, including a network of scientists, politicians and activists interacting through various committees, working groups, and advisory panels. The effectiveness of the restoration effort has been mixed, with both notable successes and failures. The overall health of the Bay has not declined since the restoration was initiated in 1983, but many of the advances have been offset by the pressure of increasing population and exurban sprawl across the watershed. The needs of the Chesapeake Bay Program are many, but the greatest is accurate information on land cover and land use change, primarily to assess the implications for water quality, examine various restoration scenarios, and calibrate spatial models of the urbanization process. We report here on a number of new land cover and land use data products, and associated applications to assist vulnerability assessment, integrated ecosystem analysis, and ultimately Bay restoration. We provide brief overviews of applications to model new residential development, assess losses and vulnerability of resource lands, and identify the factors that disrupt the health of streams in small watersheds. These data products and approaches are being applied by a number of agencies involved with the restoration effort, including the Chesapeake Bay Program's activities focused on living resources, water quality, and sound land use.

  5. Intensive survey of the bay creek watershed, July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Short, M.B.; Kelly, T.G.; Hefley, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    During July 1992, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency conducted an intensive survey of the Bay Creek basin, a fifth order tributary in the Mississippi River North Central Basin. Bay Creek drains approximately 176.4 square miles primarily in Pike and a small portion of Calhoun counties. Four stations were sampled on the Bay Creek main stem and one on Honey Creek. The survey focused on macroinvertebrate communities, fish populations, instream habitat, fish tissue, sediment and water chemistry, and land use as well as a review of ambient water quality data from IEPA station KCA-01 near Nebo, Illinois, as tools to document the biological and chemical status of Bay Creek.

  6. Biofuels for the Bay: Cellulosic Double Crops in the Chesapeake Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For over two decades, technical experts and policy makers have been encouraging the use of cover crops throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed as a way to reduce nutrient and soil losses and improve water quality. While such practices have been heavily adopted in some regions, the economic incentiv...

  7. Conservation Effects Assessment on the Jobos Bay Puerto Rico Coastal Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) began in 2003 as a multi-agency effort to quantify the environmental benefits of conservation practices used by private landowners participating in selected U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) conservation programs. The Jobos Bay Watershed in Sou...

  8. EVALUATING THE INTEGRITY OF SALT MARSHES IN NARRAGANSETT BAY SUB-ESTUARIES USING A WATERSHED APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A watershed approach to examine measures of structure and function in salt marshes of similar geomorphology and hydrology in Narragansett Bay is being used to develop a reference system for evaluating salt marsh integrity. We describe integrity as the capability of a salt marsh t...

  9. ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION OF PESTICIDES TO AN AGRICULTURAL WATERSHED OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Choptank River watershed, located on the Delmarva Peninsula of the Chesapeake Bay, is dominated by agricultural land use which makes it vulnerable to runoff and atmospheric deposition of pesticides. Agricultural and wildlife areas are in close proximity, and off-site losses of pesticides may co...

  10. 75 FR 78667 - Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative-Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ...The purpose of this request for proposals is to solicit proposals from potential partner applicants who seek to enter into partnership agreements with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) through the Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative-- Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CCPI-CBW) in order to provide assistance to producers enrolled in a conservation program. The NRCS is the......

  11. APPLICATION OF FECAL SOURCE TRACKING DATA TO TMDL DEVELOPMENT IN THE TILLAMOOK BAY WATERSHED

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Tillamook Bay Watershed, located in northwest Oregon, covers approximately 572 square miles and contains five major rivers. The Miami, Kilchis, Trask, Wilson and Tillamook Rivers originate in the coastal mountains and their drainages include significant amounts of forest and agricultural land. ...

  12. Linking Decisions to Stakeholder Values in the Guanica Bay Watershed, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation lays the foundation for the session by introducing the Structured Decision-Making (SDM) approach that is being used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the Guánica Bay watershed of southwestern Puerto Rico. EPA is working with other agencies i...

  13. Digital data used to relate nutrient inputs to water quality in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brakebill, John W.; Preston, Stephen D.

    1999-01-01

    Digital data sets were compiled by the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) and used as input for a collection of Spatially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes for the Chesapeake Bay region. These regressions relate streamwater loads to nutrient sources and the factors that affect the transport of these nutrients throughout the watershed. A digital segmented network based on watershed boundaries serves as the primary foundation for spatially referencing total nitrogen and total phosphorus source and land-surface characteristic data sets within a Geographic Information System. Digital data sets of atmospheric wet deposition of nitrate, point-source discharge locations, land cover, and agricultural sources such as fertilizer and manure were created and compiled from numerous sources and represent nitrogen and phosphorus inputs. Some land-surface characteristics representing factors that affect the transport of nutrients include land use, land cover, average annual precipitation and temperature, slope, and soil permeability. Nutrient input and land-surface characteristic data sets merged with the segmented watershed network provide the spatial detail by watershed segment required by the models. Nutrient stream loads were estimated for total nitrogen, total phosphorus, nitrate/nitrite, amonium, phosphate, and total suspended soilds at as many as 109 sites within the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The total nitrogen and total phosphorus load estimates are the dependent variables for the regressions and were used for model calibration. Other nutrient-load estimates may be used for calibration in future applications of the models.

  14. Ecological risk assessment of copper and cadmium in surface waters of Chesapeake Bay watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.W. Jr.; Scott, M.C.; Killen, W.D.

    1998-06-01

    This ecological risk assessment was designed to characterize risk of copper and cadmium exposure in the Chesapeake Bay watershed by comparing the probability distributions of environmental exposure concentrations with the probability distributions of species response data determined from laboratory studies. The overlap of these distributions was a measure of risk to aquatic life. Dissolved copper and cadmium exposure data were available from six primary data sources covering 102 stations in 18 basins in the Chesapeake Bay watershed from 1985 through 1996. Highest environmental concentrations of copper (based on 90th percentiles) were reported in the Chesapeake and Delaware (C and D) Canal, Choptank River, Middle River, and Potomac River; the lowest concentrations of copper were reported in the lower and middle mainstem Chesapeake Bay and Nanticoke River. Based on the calculation of 90th percentiles, cadmium concentrations were highest in the C and D Canal, Potomac River, Upper Chesapeake Bay, and West Chesapeake watershed. Lowest environmental concentrations of cadmium were reported in the lower and middle mainstem Chesapeake Bay and Susquehanna River. The ecological effects data used for this risk assessment were derived primarily from acute copper and cadmium laboratory toxicity tests conducted in both fresh water and salt water; chronic data were much more limited. The 10th percentile (concentration protecting 90% of the species) for all species derived from the freshwater acute copper toxicity database was 8.3 {micro}g/L. For acute saltwater copper data, the 10th percentile for all species was 6.3 {micro}g/L copper. The acute 10th percentile for all saltwater species was 31.7 {micro}g/L cadmium. Highest potential ecological risk from copper exposures was reported in the C and D Canal area of the northern Chesapeake Bay watershed.

  15. Quantitative Models for the Narragansett Bay Estuary, Rhode Island/Massachusetts, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple drivers, including nutrient loading and climate change, affect the Narragansett Bay ecosystem in Rhode Island/Massachusetts, USA. Managers are interested in understanding the timing and magnitude of these effects, and ecosystem responses to restoration actions. To provid...

  16. Understanding nutrients in the Chesapeake Bay watershed and implications for management and restoration: the Eastern Shore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ator, Scott W.; Denver, Judith M.

    2015-01-01

    The Eastern Shore includes only a small part of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, but contributes disproportionately large loads of the excess nitrogen and phosphorus that have contributed to ecological and economic degradation of the bay in recent decades. Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States and a vital ecological and economic resource. The bay and its tributaries have been degraded in recent decades by excessive nitrogen and phosphorus in the water column, however, which cause harmful algal blooms and decreased water clarity, submerged aquatic vegetation, and dissolved oxygen. The disproportionately large nitrogen and phosphorus yields from the Eastern Shore to Chesapeake Bay are attributable to human land-use practices as well as natural hydrogeologic and soil conditions. Applications of nitrogen and phosphorus compounds to the Eastern Shore from human activities are intensive. More than 90 percent of nitrogen and phosphorus reaching the land in the Eastern Shore is applied as part of inorganic fertilizers or manure, or (for nitrogen) fixed directly from the atmosphere in cropland. Also, hydrogeologic and soil conditions promote the movement of these compounds from application areas on the landscape to groundwater and (or) surface waters, and the proximity of much of the Eastern Shore to tidal waters limits opportunities for natural removal of these compounds in the landscape. The Eastern Shore only includes 7 percent of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, but receives nearly twice as much nitrogen and phosphorus applications (per area) as the remainder of the watershed and yields greater nitrogen and phosphorus, on average, to the bay. Nitrogen and phosphorus commonly occur in streams at concentrations that may adversely affect aquatic ecosystems and have increased in recent decades.

  17. Some challenges of an "upside down" nitrogen budget--science and management in Greenwich Bay, RI (USA).

    PubMed

    DiMilla, Peter A; Nixon, Scott W; Oczkowski, Autumn J; Altabet, Mark A; McKinney, Richard A

    2011-04-01

    When nutrients impact estuarine water quality, scientists and managers instinctively focus on quantifying and controlling land-based sources. However, in Greenwich Bay, RI, the estuary opens onto a larger and more intensively fertilized coastal water body (Narragansett Bay). Previous inventories of nitrogen (N) inputs to Greenwich Bay found that N inputs from Narragansett Bay exceeded those from the local watershed, suggesting that recent efforts to reduce local watershed N loads may have little effect on estuarine water quality. We used stable isotopes of N to characterize watershed and Narragansett Bay N sources as well as the composition of primary producers and consumers throughout Greenwich Bay. Results were consistent with previous assessments of the importance of N inputs to Greenwich Bay from Narragansett Bay. As multiple N sources contribute to estuarine water quality, effective management requires attention to individual sources commensurate with overall magnitude, regardless of the political complications that may entail. PMID:21353254

  18. Cytochrome P450 and organochlorine contaminants in black-crowned night-herons from the Chesapeake Bay region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J.; Rice, C.P.; Riley, W., Jr.; Eisemann, J.; Hines, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    Black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) offspring were collected from a relatively uncontaminated coastal reference site (next to Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, VA, USA) and two sites in the Chesapeake Bay watershed (Baltimore Harbor, MD and Rock Creek Park, Washington, D.C., USA). Hepatic microsomal activities of benzyloxyresorufin-O-dealkylase and ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase were significantly elevated (up to sixfold and ninefold induction, respectively) in pipping embryos from the Baltimore Harbor colony compared to the reference site, whereas values in embryos from the Rock Creek Park colony were intermediate. Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides and metabolites in pipping embryos from both sites in the Chesapeake watershed were greater than at the reference site, but below known threshold for reproductive impairment. However, concentrations of 10 arylhydrocarbon-receptor active PCB congeners and estimated toxic equivalents were up to 37-fold greater in embryos collected from these two sites in the Chesapeake Bay region, with values for toxic congeners 77 and 126 exceeding those observed in pipping heron embryos from the Great Lakes. Monooxygenase activity of pipping embryos was frequently associated with concentrations of organochlorine contaminants and toxic equivalents (r = 0.30 to 0.59), providing further evidence of the value of cytochrome P450 as a biomarker of organic contaminant exposure. Organochlorine contaminant levels were greater in 10-d-old nestlings from Baltimore Harbor than the reference site, but had no apparent effect on monooxygenase activity or growth. These findings demonstrate induction of cytochrome P450 in pipping black-crowned night-heron embryos in the Chesapeake Bay region, probably by exposure to PCB congeners of local origin, and the accumulation of organochlorine pesticides and metabolites in nestling herons from Baltimore Harbor.

  19. Sources, Transport, and Storage of Sediment at Selected Sites in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gellis, Allen C.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Pavich, Milan J.; Landwehr, Jurate M.; Banks, William S.L.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Langland, Michael J.; Ritchie, Jerry C.; Reuter, Joanna M.

    2009-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Watershed covers 165,800 square kilometers and is supplied with water and sediment from five major physiographic provinces: Appalachian Plateau, Blue Ridge, Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and the Valley and Ridge. Suspended-sediment loads measured in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed showed that the Piedmont Physiographic Province has the highest rates of modern (20th Century) sediment yields, measured at U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations, and the lowest rates of background or geologic rates of erosion (~10,000 years) measured with in situ beryllium-10. In the agricultural and urbanizing Little Conestoga Creek Watershed, a Piedmont watershed, sources of sediment using the 'sediment-fingerprinting' approach showed that streambanks were the most important source (63 percent), followed by cropland (37 percent). Cesium-137 inventories, which quantify erosion rates over a 40-year period, showed average cropland erosion of 19.39 megagrams per hectare per year in the Little Conestoga Creek Watershed. If this erosion rate is extrapolated to the 13 percent of the watershed that is in cropland, then cropland could contribute almost four times the measured suspended-sediment load transported out of the watershed (27,600 megagrams per hectare per year), indicating that much of the eroded sediment is being deposited in channel and upland storage. The Piedmont has had centuries of land-use change, from forest to agriculture, to suburban and urban areas, and in some areas, back to forest. These land-use changes mobilized a large percentage of sediment that was deposited in upland and channel storage, and behind thousands of mill dams. The effects of these land-use changes on erosion and sediment transport are still being observed today as stored sediment in streambanks is a source of sediment. Cropland is also an important source of sediment. The Coastal Plain Physiographic Province has had the lowest sediment yields in the 20th Century and with sandy

  20. Digital data used to relate nutrient input to water quality in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brakebill, John W.; Preston, Stephen D.; Martucci, Sarah K.

    2001-01-01

    Digital data sets compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey were used as input for a collection of Spatially Referenced Regressions On Watershed (SPARROW) attributes for the Chesapeake Bay region including parts of Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia. These regressions use a nonlinear statistical approach to relate nutrient sources and land-surface characteristics to nutrient loads of streams throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed. A digital segmented-watershed network serves as the primary framework for spatially referencing nutrient-source and land-surface characteristic data within a geographic information system. Flow direction and flow accumulation generated from a 30-meter cell-size Digital Elevation Model and attributes from 1:500,000-scale stream data were used to generate stream and watershed networks. Spatial data sets representing nutrient inputs of total nitrogen and total phosphorus from the early 1990's were created and compiled from numerous sources. Data include atmospheric deposition, septic systems, point-source locations, land use, land cover, and agricultural sources such as commercial fertilizer and manure. Some land-surface characteristic data sets representing factors that affect the transport of nutrients also were compiled. Data sets include land use, land cover, average-annual precipitation and temperature, slope, hydrogeomorphic regions, and soil permeability. Nutrient-input and land-surface characteristic data sets merged with the segmented-watershed network provide the spatial detail by watershed segment required by SPARROW. Stream-nutrient load estimates for 132 sampling sites representing the early 1990's (103 for total nitrogen and 121 for total phosphorus) serve as the dependent variables for the regressions. These estimates were used to calibrate models of total nitrogen and total phosphorus depicting 1992 land-surface conditions. Examples of model predictions consist of

  1. Predicting future, post-fire erosion and sedimentation with watershed models in the western USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, J. B.; Kreitler, J.; Hawbaker, T. J.; McVay, J.; Vaillant, N.; Lowe, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Increased sedimentation following wildland fire can negatively impact water supply and water quality. Understanding how future changes in fire frequency, extent, and location will affect watersheds and the ecosystem services they supply to communities is of great societal importance in the USA and throughout the world. In this work we predict variability in post-fire sediment yield at a watershed scale as a function of future wildfire conditions throughout the western USA through 2050. Our predictions are based on future fire probabilities, climate change scenarios, and differing GIS-based implementations of watershed sediment yield models. We assess the uncertainties of our predictions and compare predictions based on the GEOWEPP (Geo-spatial interface for the Water Erosion Prediction Project) model, the InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs) Sediment Retention model, and the InVEST Sediment Delivery Ratio model. We show that the models can be parameterized in a relatively simple fashion to predict post-fire sediment yield with accuracy at a watershed scale. Predictions indicate that sediment yield from post-fire hillslope erosion may increase dramatically in coming decades as a function of increased wildfire for many watersheds across the western USA.

  2. Collection and analysis of remotely sensed data from the Rhode River Estuary Watershed. [ecological parameters of Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    NASA chose the watershed of Rhode River, a small sub-estuary of the Bay, as a representative test area for intensive studies of remote sensing, the results of which could be extrapolated to other estuarine watersheds around the Bay. A broad program of ecological research was already underway within the watershed, conducted by the Smithsonian Institution's Chesapeake Bay Center for Environmental Studies (CBCES) and cooperating universities. This research program offered a unique opportunity to explore potential applications for remote sensing techniques. This led to a joint NASA-CBCES project with two basic objectives: to evaluate remote sensing data for the interpretation of ecological parameters, and to provide essential data for ongoing research at the CBCES. A third objective, dependent upon realization of the first two, was to extrapolate photointerpretive expertise gained at the Rhode River watershed to other portions of the Chesapeake Bay.

  3. The modified SWAT model for predicting fecal coliform in the Wachusett Reservoir Watershed, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fecal contamination has been an issue for water quality because fecal coliform bacteria are used as an indicator organism to detect pathogens in water. In order to assess fecal contamination in the Wachusett Reservoir Watershed in Massachusetts, USA, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a comm...

  4. USING BROAD-SCALE METRICS TO DEVELOP INDICATORS OF WATERSHED VULNERABILITY IN THE OZARK MOUNTAINS (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple broad-scale landscape metrics were tested as potential indicators of total phosphorus (TP) concentration, total ammonia (TA) concentration, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria count, among 244 sub-watersheds in the Ozark Mountains (USA). Indicator models were develop...

  5. Holocene paleoclimate records from a large California estuarine system and its watershed region: linking watershed climate and bay conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud-Roam, Frances P.; Lynn Ingram, B.; Hughes, Malcolm; Florsheim, Joan L.

    2006-07-01

    The San Francisco Bay-Delta system includes a watershed that covers a large area of California and provides water to two-thirds of the State's population. Climate over the estuary and its watershed in the dry summer months is controlled by the subtropical high which dominates and deflects storms from California. The subtropical high weakens and migrates south as the Aleutian Low strengthens, bringing wet winter storms to the region. Paleoclimatic records from the Bay and its greater watershed, spanning the Holocene, are reviewed here in order to better understand natural variations of precipitation and runoff and the linkages between those variations and the salinity and ecosystems of the estuary. To better understand regional-scale climate patterns, paleoclimate records from coastal California and the Great Basin are also considered. Large fluctuations in climate have occurred during the period of interest, and there is generally good agreement between the paleoclimate records from different regions. Early Holocene climate throughout California was marked by rising temperatures and reduced moisture as seen in fire records from the watershed. This warmth and aridity peaked about 5000-7000 years ago and was followed by a cooling trend, with variable moisture conditions. The Estuary formed relatively rapidly in response to a high rate of sea level rise that dominated the Holocene until about 6000 years ago, and the subsequent reduced rate of inundation allowed vast tidal marshes to form along the edges of the estuary, which have since been recording changes in environmental conditions. The impacts of changing regional climate patterns are experienced in the San Francisco Bay-Delta system, as altered fresh water flows result in altered estuary salinity. For example, approximately 3800 cal yr B.P., records from throughout the state indicate a cool, moist period, and Bay salinity was reduced; this period was followed by a general drying trend throughout California over

  6. Modeling selenium bioaccumulation through arthropod food webs in San Francisco Bay, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlekat, C.E.; Purkerson, D.G.; Luoma, S.N.

    2004-01-01

    Trophic transfer is the main process by which upper trophic level wildlife are exposed to selenium. Transfers through lower levels of a predator's food web thus can be instrumental in determining the threat of selenium in an ecosystem. Little is known about Se transfer through pelagic, zooplankton-based food webs in San Francisco Bay ([SFB], CA, USA), which serve as an energy source for important predators such as striped bass. A dynamic multipathway bioaccumulation model was used to model Se transfer from phytoplankton to pelagic copepods to carnivorous mysids (Neomysis mercedis). Uptake rates of dissolved Se, depuration rates, and assimilation efficiencies (AE) for the model were determined for copepods and mysids in the laboratory. Small (73-250 ??m) and large (250-500 ??m) herbivorous zooplankton collected from SFB (Oithona/Limnoithona and Acartia sp.) assimilated Se with similar efficiencies (41-52%) from phytoplankton. Mysids assimilated 73% of Se from small herbivorous zooplankton; Se AE was significantly lower (61%) than larger herbivorous zooplankton. Selenium depuration rates were high for both zooplankton and mysids (12-25% d-1), especially compared to bivalves (2-3% d-1). The model predicted steady state Se concentrations in mysids similar to those observed in the field. The predicted concentration range (1.5-5.4 ??g g -1) was lower than concentrations of 4.5 to 24 ??g g-1 observed in bivalves from the bay. Differences in efflux between mysids and bivalves were the best explanation for the differences in uptake. The results suggest that the risk of selenium toxicity to predators feeding on N. mercedis would be less than the risk to predators feeding on bivalves. Management of selenium contamination should include food webs analyses to focus on the most important exposure pathways identified for a given watershed.

  7. Land-use dynamics in a southern Illinois (USA) watershed.

    PubMed

    Lant, C; Loftus, T; Kraft, S; Bennett, D

    2001-09-01

    The Cache River of southernmost Illinois is used as a case study for developing and demonstrating an approach to quantitatively link (1) national agricultural policy and global agricultural markets, (2) landowner's decisions on land use, (3) spatial patterns of land use at a watershed scale, and (4) hydrologic impacts, thus providing a basis to predict, under a certain set of circumstances, the environmental consequences of economic and political decisions made at larger spatial scales. The heart of the analysis is an estimation, using logistic regression, of the affect of crop prices and Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) rental rates on farmland owner's decisions whether to reenroll in the CRP or return to crop production. This analysis shows that reasonable ranges for crop prices (80%-150% of 1985-1995 values) and CRP rental rates (0-125% of 1985-1995 rates) result in a range of 3%-92% of CRP lands being returned to crop production, with crop prices having a slightly greater effect than CRP rental rates. Four crop price/CRP rental rate scenarios are used to display resulting land-use patterns, and their effect on sediment loads, a critical environmental quality parameter in this case, using the agricultural non point source (AGNPS) model. These scenarios demonstrate the importance of spatial pattern of land uses on hydrological and ecological processes within watersheds. The approach developed can be adapted for use by local governments and watershed associations whose goals are to improve watershed resources and environmental quality. PMID:11531236

  8. Hydrochemical processes during snowmelt in a subalpine watershed, Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Leavesley, G.H.

    1995-01-01

    Snowmelt is the primary hydrologic event in the studied subalpine watershed, generating streamflow for 3 months from a 1-month snowmelt period which commenced in mid-April 1992 and mid-May 1993. The melting rate of the snowpack varied diurnally and was asymmetrical, increasing rapidly to a maximum at the onset of daily melt followed by an attenuated decrease. Streamflow varied diurnally, displaying a similar pattern to that of snowmelt, but variations were much less marked. Groundwater levels also varied diurnally, but were more attenuated than that of streamflow, and the time of daily maximum coincided with the streamflow maximum, whereas the snowmelt maximum preceded them. The major ions in meltwater were preferentially eluted from the snowpack, and meltwater was dominated by calcium, sulfate, and nitrate. The concentration decreases observed in snowmelt are partially reflected in stream water. Groundwater was dominated by calcium and generally bicarbonate. Concentrations of weathering products (silica, alkalinity, and base cations) increased down gradient, consistent with an increase in water residence time. A watershed mass balance for 1992 and 1993 indicates that (1) a major percentage of the primarily atmospherically derived N-species are retained by the watershed, (2) the watershed is the major source of base cations and silica, and (3) for the 2 year combined, atmospheric deposition balances stream water transport of sulfate and chloride.

  9. Eliciting stakeholder values for coral reef management tasks in the Guánica Bay watershed, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA is developing a valuation protocol for southwest Puerto Rico that will support the US Coral Reef Task Force’s (USCRTF) Partnership Initiative in the Guánica Bay/Rio Loco (GB/RL) Watershed. The GB/RL watershed is located in southwestern Puerto Rico and includes the urbaniz...

  10. 77 FR 11111 - Assessment of Potential Large-Scale Mining on the Bristol Bay Watershed of Alaska: Nomination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... AGENCY Assessment of Potential Large-Scale Mining on the Bristol Bay Watershed of Alaska: Nomination of... impacts associated with potential large-scale mining development in the Nushagak and Kvichak watersheds of... how large-scale mining activities might affect water quality and habitat. EPA will focus primarily...

  11. Management of Urban Stormwater Runoff in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hogan, Dianna M.

    2008-01-01

    Urban and suburban development is associated with elevated nutrients, sediment, and other pollutants in stormwater runoff, impacting the physical and environmental health of area streams and downstream water bodies such as the Chesapeake Bay. Stormwater management facilities, also known as Best Management Practices (BMPs), are increasingly being used in urban areas to replace functions, such as flood protection and water quality improvement, originally performed by wetlands and riparian areas. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have partnered with local, academic, and other Federal agency scientists to better understand the effectiveness of different stormwater management systems with respect to Chesapeake Bay health. Management of stormwater runoff is necessary in urban areas to address flooding and water quality concerns. Improving our understanding of what stormwater management actions may be best suited for different types of developed areas could help protect the environmental health of downstream water bodies that ultimately receive runoff from urban landscapes.

  12. The USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Mary; Nearing, Mark; Goodrich, Dave; Heilman, Phil

    2015-04-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has been supporting research and data collection at instrumented watershed throughout the country since the dust bowl era of the 1930's. In 1953, the USDA established the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in southeastern Arizona near Tombstone to conduct hydrologic and erosion research to quantify the unique rainfall-runoff characteristics of semiarid regions and to understand the downstream effects of conservation practices implemented in watershed uplands. Instrumentation and research on the WGEW has expanded to include meteorological and flux measurements, soil moisture, and ecosystem responses. In addition, the WGEW serves as a validation site for aircraft and satellite based remotely sensed instruments. Core measurements have been used to quantify semiarid rainfall, runoff, infiltration, and transmission losses; develop and validate simulation models, and support broader, regional, basin scale research. The long-term database is a critical resource for advancing the scientific understanding of semiarid ecohydrological processes. The WGEW, its history, significant contributions to instrumentation development, and the current WGEW data collection program in the context of contemporary research questions will be presented.

  13. Estimation of annual trace element deposition to the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.E.

    1997-12-31

    The mid-Atlantic region of the Chesapeake Bay watershed is subject to wet deposition of atmospherically released contaminants from mid-western US and comparable deposition from the southeastern region as well. Deposition from events originating in the mid-western sector are dominated by emissions strength while those originating in the southeastern sector are most strongly influenced by meteorology. Trace element concentrations precipitation and aerosol in weekly integrated samples at rural sites adjacent to Chesapeake Bay are highly variable in space and time. Influence of regional coal combustion appear to peak in aerosol samples during winter and mean concentrations of Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in precipitation samples were 50-100% higher at the southern site (Haven Beach, VA). Annual atmospheric loads of Al, Cd, Cr, Pb and Zn deposited to the surface of Chesapeake Bay are within 2-fold quantities of the dissolved fluvial loads delivered by the Susquehanna river. The atmospheric load of Cd, Pb, Cr, Zn and Cu directly to the Bay below the fall line is comparable in magnitude to point sources below the fall line and the contribution of erosion. Atmospheric deposition (wet + dry) of Fe, Al, Mn, Cr, Cu, Ni, Cd, Zn and Pb to the Susquehanna, Potomac and James sub-basins were calculated from existing data. The atmospheric load to the watershed for crustal elements (Fe, Al, Mn) was less than the fluvial export and up to 40x greater than fluvial export for non-crustal elements (Ni, Cd, Zn, Pb).

  14. Data Management Solutions for Tracking Restoration Progress in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, S. R.; Johnston, M.; Sweeney, J.

    2014-12-01

    The decline of the Chesapeake Bay estuarine ecosystem due to agricultural and industrial activities has been a great concern, where excess of dissolved nutrients combined with global climate change has lead to increased storm surges, habitat destruction, and low dissolved oxygen, reduced water clarity, and increased algal growth. In 2010 The US Environmental Protection Agency established the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), which seeks to protect the Bay's living resources by reducing nutrient and sediment runoff to its waters, and sets pollution reduction targets for sediment, nitrogen and phosphorus across 64000 sq. miles watershed that includes parts of six states - Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia — and the entire District of Columbia. The Chesapeake Bay Program and the US EPA have developed a number of tools to track the progress of restoration. In this study we describe data management solutions, which were used in the integration of data such as land use, nutrient applications, management practices, policies among the bay jurisdictions, and a summary of a suite of tools that were developed and are being used to collect, process, and report data at various spatial scales for tracking the progress made by the seven Bay jurisdictions in achieving reductions in nutrient and sediment runoff. The described integration strategy and data management solutions can be used in the development and application of similar regulatory local or regional scale environmental management tools.

  15. Terrigenous Sedimentation Patterns at Reefs Adjacent to the Guanica Bay Watershed, Southwest Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, C.; Whitall, D.

    2014-12-01

    Guanica Bay is an estuary on the southwest coast of Puerto Rico with numerous nearshore reefs located in adjacent coastal waters. As part of the multi-agency Guanica Bay Watershed Project, a study was undertaken to establish baseline levels of terrigenous sedimentation reaching reefs adjacent to the Guanica Bay watershed as well as establish spatial and temporal patterns in its delivery. To characterize and quantify sedimentation patterns, sediment traps were established at nine reef sites occurring along an ~ 14 km stretch of coastline centered on the outlet of the bay. Sites were located at shallow reefs within 2 km of the shore at depths of ~ 10 m. Two additional sites were located at the mouth of the Rio Loco where it empties into Guanica Bay and at the mouth of the bay where it opens into adjacent coastal waters. Traps were collected monthly from August 2009 through July 2012 to determine both the amount of sediment accumulation (mg cm-2 day-1) and its composition. Composition is expressed in terms of relative amounts of calcium carbonate (in situ production), organic material and terrigenous material. Average trap accumulation rates among the reef sites ranged from ~ 3 to 28 mg cm-2 day-1. Average percent terrigenous material within reef accumulation ranged from ~ 20% to 30%. While trap accumulation rates are highly variable on both spatial and temporal scales, the composition of sediments and relative amount of terrigenous material is fairly uniform. Similar temporal patterns in accumulation rates among the sites without corresponding changes in composition of sediments point to resuspension of bottom sediments by wave action as a primary driver of sedimentary dynamics at these reefs. Sites closest to Guanica Bay display the highest degree of terrigenous influence in terms of trap accumulation rates and percent terrigenous material, which is consistent with Guanica Bay serving as a local source of terrigenous material to coastal waters. However, the lack of

  16. Comparison of sediment supply to San Francisco Bay from Coastal and Sierra Nevada watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, L. J.

    2012-12-01

    Quantifying suspended sediment loads is of paramount importance for managing the world's estuaries. To address this information need, a comprehensive analysis was completed for the San Francisco Bay system by combining a number of formerly disparate data sets. Suspended sediment and optical backscatter measurements near the head of the estuary were used to generate a continuous suspended sediment concentration record. In addition, periodic measurements of velocity and suspended sediment variation in the cross-section were used to validate the use of point samples collected on the edge of the channel for generating loads. Suspended sediment loads were determined by combining daily averaged suspended sediment concentrations with daily flow estimates adjusting for dispersive loads. Sediment loads from 482 small drainages around the Bay were determined using 235 station years of suspended sediment data covering 38 watershed locations, regression analysis, and simple modeling. Over 16 years, net annual load to the head of the estuary from its 154000 km2 watershed varied from 0.13-2.58 (mean = 0.89) million metric t, or 5.8 t/km2/yr. Small drainages in the nine-county Bay Area discharged between 0.089 and 4.35 (mean = 1.43) million metric t with an average yield of 175 metric t/km2/yr. Our results indicate that external loads to the Bay are dominated by the many hundreds of urbanized and tectonically active tributaries that drain just 8145 km2 adjacent to the Bay and that during only 5 years did sediment loads from the Central Valley likely exceed loads from the sum of the local smaller drainages. If San Francisco Bay is typical of other estuaries in active tectonic or climatically variable coastal regimes, managers responsible for water quality, sediment accumulating in shipping channels, or restoring wetlands in the world's estuaries may need to more carefully account for proximal small urban drainages that may dominate allochthonous sediment supply.

  17. Cytochrome P450 and organochlorine contaminants in black-crowned night-herons from the Chesapeake Bay region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J.; Rice, C.P.; Riley, W.; Eisemann, J.; Hines, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    Black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) offspring were collected from a relatively uncontaminated coastal reference site (next to Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, VA, USA) and two sites in the Chesapeake Bay watershed (Baltimore Harbor, MD and Rock Creek Park, Washington, DC, USA). Hepatic microsomal activities of benzyloxyresorufin-O-dealkylase and ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase were significantly elevated (up to sixfold and ninefold induction, respectively) in pipping embryos from the Baltimore Harbor colony compared to the reference site, whereas values in embryos from the Rock Creek Park colony were intermediate. Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides and metabolites in pipping embryos from both sites in the Chesapeake watershed were greater than at the reference site but below the known threshold for reproductive impairment. However, concentrations of 10 arylhydrocarbon receptor-active polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and estimated toxic equivalents were up to 37-fold greater in embryos collected from these two sites in the Chesapeake Bay region, with values for toxic congeners 77 and 126 exceeding those observed in pipping heron embryos from the Great Lakes. Monooxygenase activity of pipping embryos was associated with concentrations of several organochlorine pesticides, total PCBs, arylhydrocarbon receptor-active PCB congeners, and toxic equivalents (r = 0.30-0.59), providing further evidence of the value of cytochrome P450 as a biomarker of organic contaminant exposure. Organochlorine contaminant levels were greater in 10-d-old nestlings from Baltimore Harbor than the reference site but had no apparent effect on monooxygenase activity or growth. These findings demonstrate induction of cytochrome P450 in pipping black-crowned night-heron embryos in the Chesapeake Bay region, probably by exposure to PCB congeners of local origin, and the accumulation of organochlorine pesticides and metabolites in nestling herons from Baltimore

  18. Effectiveness of Nitrogen Assimilation in the Non-Tidal Chesapeake Bay Watershed: Evaluations Based on Thirty Years of Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Wei, H.; Ha, D.; Ball, W. P.

    2014-12-01

    Control of watershed nutrient input has long been a priority of Chesapeake Bay watershed management for alleviating hypoxia in the Bay. Therefore, systematic evaluations of historical watershed nutrient inputs and responses of river water quality can help managers to assess the effectiveness of nutrient management across the Bay watershed. Toward that end, we conducted a comprehensive comparison of multi-decadal total nitrogen (TN) watershed input and riverine output for the nine major rivers in the non-tidal Bay watershed. Specifically, we (1) compiled available data regarding multi-decadal TN input from four major sources, (2) obtained updated estimates of TN flux at downstream (edge-of-tide) river locations ('output'), and (3) used these inputs and outputs to quantify the watersheds' land/river effectiveness (LRE) factors in regard to TN assimilation, including an investigation of relationships between LRE and TN input. Our compiled data for N sources confirmed known trends regarding the two largest of the four TN sources (atmospheric deposition and fertilizer loadings) - i.e., that the former has declined significantly in all river basins, whereas the latter has decreased in most of the river basins. For the other two sources, point sources have declined most dramatically in the Patuxent River but exhibited various trends in other basins, whereas manure sources have increased statistically significantly in most of the river basins. The riverine output results were observed to follow watershed inputs in a non-linear manner. Finally, the LRE of the various basins were observed to correlate inversely with the watersheds' input loadings, whereas temporal correlations within a given basin were less consistent. In addition, the Susquehanna sub-watersheds show lower LREs compared with other river basins, with riverine output similar to or even larger than input, implying that greater management effort at these locations could be especially fruitful for load reduction.

  19. Watershed Implications of Sediment and Nutrient Pollution in the Guánica Bay Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Coral Reef Task Force (USCRTF), a collaboration of federal, commonwealth, and non-government agencies, recently initiated a program to limit sediment runoff to the coral reefs outside Guánica Bay, Puerto Rico. Municipal and agricultural growth in the Guánic...

  20. Phosphorus reductions following riparian restoration in two agricultural watersheds in Vermont, USA.

    PubMed

    Meals, D W; Hopkins, R B

    2002-01-01

    Achievement of management goals for Lake Champlain (Vermont/New York, USA and Quebec, Canada) will require significant reductions of phosphorus (P) loads from agriculture, the dominant diffuse source in the basin. Cost-effective P reduction strategies must be based on reliable treatment techniques beyond basic erosion control and animal waste storage practices. The Lake Champlain Basin Agricultural Watersheds National Monitoring Program (NMP) Project evaluates the effectiveness of low-cost livestock exclusion, streambank protection, and riparian restoration practices in reducing concentrations and loads of diffuse-source pollutants from grazing land at the watershed level. Treatment and control watersheds in northwestern Vermont have been monitored since 1994 according to a paired-watershed design. Monitoring includes continuous stream discharge recording, flow-proportional sampling for total P and other pollutants, and documentation of land use and agricultural management activities. Strong statistical calibration between the control and treatment watersheds has been achieved. Landowner participation in the land treatment program was entirely voluntary and all treatments were 100% cost-shared by the project and cooperators. Installation of riparian fencing, alternative water supplies, protected stream crossings, and streambank bioengineering was completed in 1997 at a cost of less than US$40,000. The paired-watershed design was effective in controlling for the influence of extreme variations in precipitation and streamflow over six years of monitoring. Two years of post-treatment data have documented significant reductions in P concentrations and loads from both treated watersheds. Reductions of approximately 20% in mean total P concentration and approximately 20-50% in mean total P load have been observed, with greater reductions occurring in the watershed receiving more extensive treatment. The effectiveness of riparian zone restoration in P reduction tended to

  1. Links Between Watershed Activities and the Degradation of Coastal, Tidal Salt Marshes in Southern New England USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activities (e.g., land development, wastewater) in coastal watersheds in New England USA are linked with community- and system-level changes in tidal, organic-rich salt marshes. Significant relationships between various indicators of watershed activities and ecosystem stru...

  2. Holocene climates and connections between the San Francisco Bay Estuary and its watershed: A review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malamud-Roam, F.; Dettinger, M.; Ingram, B. Lynn; Hughes, Malcolm K.; Florsheim, Joan

    2007-01-01

    This review of paleoclimate records reveals a gradual warming and drying in California from about 10,000 years to about 4,000 years before present. During this period, the current Bay and Delta were inundated by rising sea level so that by 4,000 years ago the Bay and Delta had taken on much of their present shape and extent. Between about 4,000 and 2,000 years ago, cooler and wetter conditions prevailed in the watershed, lowering salinity in the Estuary and altering local ecosystems. Those wetter conditions gave way to increasing aridity during the past 2,000 years, a general trend punctuated by occasional prolonged and severe droughts and occasional unusually wet, cool periods. California’s climate since A.D. 1850 has been unusually stable and benign, compared to climate variations during the previous 2,000 or more years. Thus, climate variations in California’s future may be even more (perhaps much more) challenging than those of the past 100 years. To improve our understanding of these past examples of climate variability in California, and of the linkages between watershed climate and estuarine responses, greater emphases on paleoclimate records in and around the Estuary, improved temporal resolutions in several record types, and linked watershed-estuary paleo-modeling capabilities are needed. 

  3. Residence times and nitrate transport in ground water discharging to streams in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, Bruce D.; Phillips, Scott; Donnelly, Colleen A.; Speiran, Gary K.; Plummer, L. Niel; Bohlke, John-Karl; Focazio, Michael J.; Burton, William C.; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2003-01-01

    One of the major water-quality problems in the Chesapeake Bay is an overabundance of nutrients from the streams and rivers that discharge to the Bay. Some of these nutrients are from nonpoint sources such as atmospheric deposition, agricultural manure and fertilizer, and septic systems. The effects of efforts to control nonpoint sources, however, can be difficult to quantify because of the lag time between changes at the land surface and the response in the base-flow (ground water) component of streams. To help resource managers understand the lag time between implementation of management practices and subsequent response in the nutrient concentrations in the base-flow component of streamflow, a study of ground-water discharge, residence time, and nitrate transport in springs throughout the Chesapeake Bay Watershed and in four smaller watersheds in selected hydrogeomorphic regions (HGMRs) was conducted. The four watersheds were in the Coastal Plain Uplands, Piedmont crystalline, Valley and Ridge carbonate, and Valley and Ridge siliciclastic HGMRs. A study of springs to estimate an apparent age of the ground water was based on analyses for concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons in water samples collected from 48 springs in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Results of the analysis indicate that median age for all the samples was 10 years, with the 25th percentile having an age of 7 years and the 75th percentile having an age of 13 years. Although the number of samples collected in each HGMR was limited, there did not appear to be distinct differences in the ages between the HGMRs. The ranges were similar between the major HGMRs above the Fall Line (modern to about 50 years), with only two HGMRs of small geographic extent (Piedmont carbonate and Mesozoic Lowland) having ranges of modern to about 10 years. The median values of all the HGMRs ranged from 7 to 11 years. Not enough samples were collected in the Coastal Plain for comparison. Spring samples showed slightly

  4. Water quality response to riparian restoration in an agricultural watershed in Vermont, USA.

    PubMed

    Meals, D W

    2001-01-01

    Achievement of management goals for Lake Champlain (Vermont/New York, USA and Quebec, Canada) will require reduction of agricultural phosphorus loads, the dominant nonpoint source in the Basin. Cost-effective phosphorus reduction strategies need reliable treatment techniques beyond basic cropland and waste management practices. The Lake Champlain Basin Agricultural Watersheds National Monitoring Program (NMP) Project evaluates the effectiveness of livestock exclusion, streambank protection, and riparian restoration practices in reducing concentrations and loads of nutrients, sediment, and bacteria in surface waters. Treatment and control watersheds in northwestern Vermont have been monitored since 1994 according to a paired-watershed design. Monitoring consists of continuous stream discharge recording, flow-proportional sampling for total P, total Kjeldahl N, and total suspended solids, grab sampling for indicator bacterial, and land use/agricultural monitoring. Strong statistical calibration between the control and treatment watersheds has been achieved. Installation of riparian fencing, protected stream crossings, and streambank bioengineering was completed in 1997. Early post-treatment data suggest significant reduction in P concentrations and loads and in bacteria counts in the treated watershed. Monitoring is scheduled to continue through 2000. PMID:11379130

  5. BENTHIC MACROFAUNA-HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS IN WILLAPA BAY, WASHINGTON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuary-wide benthic macrofauna-habitat associations in Willapa Bay, Washington, United States, were determined for 4 habitats (eelgrass [Zostera marina], Atlantic cordgrass [Spartina alterniflora], mud shrimp [Upogebia pugettensis], ghost shrimp [Neotrypaea californiensis]) in 1...

  6. Subsurface transport of orthophosphate in five agricultural watersheds, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, Joseph L.; Johnson, Henry M.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved orthophosphate (ortho P) in the unsaturated zone, groundwater, tile drains, and groundwater/stream water interfaces were assessed in five agricultural watersheds to determine the potential for subsurface transport. Concentrations of iron oxides were measured in the aquifer material and adsorption of ortho P on oxide surfaces was assessed by geochemical modeling. Attenuation of ortho P in these aquifers was attributed primarily to sorption onto iron oxides, and in one location onto clay minerals. Only one location showed a clear indication of phosphorus transport to a stream from groundwater discharge, although groundwater did contribute to the stream load elsewhere. Subsurface ortho P movement at a site in California resulted in a plume down gradient from orchards, which was attenuated by a 200 m thick riparian zone with natural vegetation. Iron oxides had an effect on phosphorus movement and concentrations at all locations, and groundwater chemistry, especially pH, exerted a major control on the amount of phosphorus adsorbed. Groundwater pH at a site in Maryland was below 5 and that resulted in complete sequestration of phosphorus and no movement toward the stream. Geochemical modeling indicated that as the surfaces approached saturation, groundwater concentrations of ortho P rise rapidly.

  7. Land Use and Climate Alter Carbon Dynamics in Watersheds of Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, S.; Duan, S.; Grese, M.; Pennino, M. J.; Belt, K. T.; Findlay, S.; Groffman, P. M.; Mayer, P. M.; Murthy, S.; Blomquist, J.

    2011-12-01

    There have been long-term changes in the quantity of organic carbon in streams and rivers globally. Shifts in the quality of organic carbon due to environmental changes may also impact downstream ecosystem metabolism and fate and transport of contaminants. We investigated long-term impacts of land use and hydrologic variability on organic carbon transport in watersheds of the Baltimore Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site and large rivers of the Chesapeake Bay. In small and medium-sized watersheds of the Baltimore LTER site, urban land use increased organic carbon concentrations in streams several-fold compared to forest and agricultural watersheds. Enzymatic activities of stream microbes were significantly altered across watershed land use during a record wet year. During the wet year, short-term bioassays showed that bioavailable dissolved organic carbon varied seasonally, but comprised a substantial proportion of the dissolved organic carbon pool. Similarly, measurements of biochemical oxygen demand across hydrologic variability suggest that reactive organic carbon export from small and medium-sized urban watersheds during storms can be substantial. At a larger regional scale, major tributaries such as the Potomac, Susquehanna, Patuxent, and Choptank rivers also showed similar variability as smaller watersheds in quantity and quality of organic carbon based on land use and climate. There were distinct isotopic values of d13C of particulate organic matter and fluorescence excitation emission matrices for rivers influenced by different land uses. Stable isotopic values of d13C of particulate organic matter and fluorescence excitation emission matrices showed marked seasonal changes in organic matter quality during spring floods in the Potomac River at Washington D.C. Across watershed size, there appeared to be differences in seasonal cycles of organic carbon quality and this may have been based on the degree of hydrologic connectivity between watersheds and

  8. Late Holocene Environmental History of the Los Osos Watershed, Morro Bay, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadman, E.; Reidy, L. M.; Wahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive understanding of past changes in wetland ecosystems is integral for creating policies for modern land use practices. The Morro Bay salt marsh is home to a large wetland that has experienced significant environmental impacts in the last few centuries. In this study, sediment cores from the Morro Bay salt marsh were analyzed to discern changes in environment since the time of European contact, which occurred in 1772. The marsh is fed by two creeks (Chorro and Los Osos) and their associated watersheds. Sediment cores taken from a portion of the marsh fed by Los Osos creek were analyzed and the results compared to those from previous studies on cores taken from the Chorro and Los Osos portions of the marsh. Magnetic susceptibility, loss on ignition, pollen, radiocarbon, and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses were conducted. An age-depth model was established for the Los Osos cores using two radiocarbon dates, as well as Erodium cicutarium as a chronological marker. Preliminary pollen analysis from Chorro marsh cores indicates vegetation shifts at the time of contact, when the salt marsh formed. Magnetic susceptibility and XRF data indicate dramatically increased rates of erosion from the time of contact consistently until the present. Influx of non-carbonate inorganic material also indicates a rapid increase in sedimentation in the marsh starting at the time of contact. Comparison of sedimentation rates between the two creeks suggests that differences in watershed geomorphology and land use practices have had pronounced impacts on erosional processes. Over the last decade, the Morro Bay National Estuary Program (MBNEP) has taken more measures to reduce erosion and sedimentation rates in the Chorro watershed, as is reflected by reduced sedimentation rates in MBNEP data collected within the last few years. Our study helps to elucidate the impacts of anthropogenic land use change on wetland systems, and provides much needed data to policy makers seeking to

  9. Evaluation of CALPUFF nitrogen deposition modeling in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Area using NADP data

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, M.; Mayes, P.; Sherwell, J.

    1998-12-31

    The CALMET/CALPUFF modeling system has been used to estimate nitrogen deposition in an area surrounding Baltimore and the northern portion of the Chesapeake Bay. Comprehensive NO{sub x} emissions inventories and meteorological data bases have been developed to conduct the modeling. This paper discusses the results of an evaluation of predicted nitrogen wet deposition rates compared to measured rates at two NADP/NTN sites in Maryland, Wye and White Rock. Underprediction of wet deposition rates is investigated through the use of sensitivity and diagnostic evaluations of model performance. A suggested change to the calculation of NO{sub x} transformation rates involving an alternative specification of minimum NO{sub x} concentrations was made to CALPUFF and the performance evaluation was re-done. Results of the new evaluation show significantly improved model performance, and therefore the modification is tentatively proposed for use in further applications of CALPUFF to the assessment of nitrogen deposition in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

  10. Use of a metolachlor metabolite (MESA) to assess agricultural nitrate-n fate and transport in choptank river watershed, Maryland USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A majority of streams in the Chesapeake Bay watershed have been rated as poor or very poor based on biological assessments. The Choptank River estuary, a Bay tributary on the eastern shore, is an example, where crop production in upland areas of the watershed contribute significant loads of nutrien...

  11. Water storage at the Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2011-01-01

    Storage is a major component of a catchment water balance particularly when the water balance components are evaluated on short time scales, that is, less than annual. We propose a method of determining the storage-discharge relation using an exponential function and daily precipitation, potential evapotranspiration (PET) and baseflow during the dormant season when evapotranspiration (ET) is low. The method was applied to the 22-year data series of the 0.41-ha forested Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia. The relation of cumulative daily precipitation minus daily runoff and PET versus baseflow was highly significant (r2=0.92, p<0.0001), but the initial storage for each year varied markedly. For the 22-year study period, annual precipitation and runoff averaged 1240 and 380mm, respectively, whereas the absolute catchment storage range was ~400mm, averaging 219mm annually, which is attributed to contributions of soil water and groundwater. The soil moisture of a catchment average 1-m soil depth was evaluated and suggests that there was an active (changes in soil storage during stormflow) and passive (a longer-term seasonal cycle) soil water storage with ranges of 40-70 and 100-120mm, respectively. The active soil water storage was short term on the order of days during and immediately after rainstorms, and the passive or seasonal soil storage was highest during winter when ET was lowest and lowest during summer when ET was highest. An estimate of ET from daily changes in soil moisture (ETSM) during recessions was comparable with PET during the dormant season (1.5mmday-1) but was much lower during the growing season (June through August); monthly average SMET and PET ranged from 2.8 to 4.0mmday-1 and from 4.5 to 5.5mmday-1, respectively. The growing season difference is attributed to the overestimation of PET. ETSM estimates were comparable with those derived from hillslope water balances during sprinkling experiments. Master recession curves derived from the

  12. Understanding Urban Watersheds through Digital Interactive Maps, San Francisco Bay Area, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, J. M.; Ticci, M. G.; Mulvey, P.

    2014-12-01

    Dense urbanization has resulted in the "disappearance" of many local creeks in urbanized areas surrounding the San Francisco Bay. Long reaches of creeks now flow in underground pipes. Municipalities and water agencies trying to reduce non-point-source pollution are faced with a public that cannot see and therefore does not understand the interconnected nature of the drainage system or its ultimate discharge to the bay. Since 1993, we have collaborated with the Oakland Museum, the San Francisco Estuary Institute, public agencies, and municipalities to create creek and watershed maps to address the need for public understanding of watershed concepts. Fifteen paper maps are now published (www.museumca.org/creeks), which have become a standard reference for educators and anyone working on local creek-related issues. We now present digital interactive creek and watershed maps in Google Earth. Four maps are completed covering urbanized areas of Santa Clara and Alameda Counties. The maps provide a 3D visualization of the watersheds, with cartography draped over the landscape in transparent colors. Each mapped area includes both Present and Past (circa 1800s) layers which can be clicked on or off by the user. The Present layers include the modern drainage network, watershed boundaries, and reservoirs. The Past layers include the 1800s-era creek systems, tidal marshes, lagoons, and other habitats. All data are developed in ArcGIS software and converted to Google Earth format. To ensure the maps are interesting and engaging, clickable icons pop-up provide information on places to visit, restoration projects, history, plants, and animals. Maps of Santa Clara Valley are available at http://www.valleywater.org/WOW.aspx. Maps of western Alameda County will soon be available at http://acfloodcontrol.org/. Digital interactive maps provide several advantages over paper maps. They are seamless within each map area, and the user can zoom in or out, and tilt, and fly over to explore

  13. IMPACT OF STORM-WATER OUTFALLS ON SEDIMENT QUALITY IN CORPUS CHRISTI BAY, TEXAS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the quality of sediments and extent of contaminant impacts, a Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) study was conducted at 36 sites in the Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, USA, system. Fifteen of the 36 sites were located near storm-water outfalls, but 13 other sites (i.e., industr...

  14. BACTERIOPLANKTON DYNAMICS IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL, USA: ROLE OF PHYTOPLANKTON AND DETRIAL CARBON SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterioplankton Dynamics in Pensacola Bay, FL, USA: Role of Phytoplankton and Detrital Carbon Sources (Abstract). To be presented at the16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. 1 p. (ER...

  15. Silver concentrations in Colorado, USA, watersheds using improved methodology.

    PubMed

    Wen, Liang-Saw; Santschi, Peter H; Gill, Gary A; Tang, Degui

    2002-10-01

    River water samples were collected at five sites in the state of Colorado, USA, to assess the impact of municipal and industrial discharges on Ag concentrations and speciation in surface waters. Samples were collected and analyzed for total (unfiltered collections), filtered (0.1 and 0.4 microm), particulate (> or = 0.45 microm), and colloidal Ag (3 kDa-0.1 m) using ultraclean protocols. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted to assess bias from sample storage, digestion, and preconcentration protocols. In general, upstream unfiltered and particulate Ag concentrations fell within a fairly narrow range, 3.1 to 21 ng/L and 0.2 to 1.7 microg/g, respectively. Downstream unfiltered and particulate Ag concentrations showed a more broad range, 2.8 to 1,110 ng/L and 0.5 to 104 microg/g, respectively, and reflected attenuated impacts of Ag-laden discharge effluents. However, Ag concentrations in the 0.1-microm filter-passing fraction 0.8 to 1.2 km downstream from major treatment plant effluents were all below the chronic silver criteria. On average, more than 60% of the 0.1-microm filter-passing Ag was associated with colloidal macromolecular organic matter. Silver concentrations in colloids (microg/g) were, on average, the same as those in suspended particulate matter. The percentage abundance of colloidal Ag was similar to that of dissolved organic carbon, suggesting that strong Ag binding ligands exist in both the colloidal and the particle size fractions, as these macromolecular ligands likely play a major role in Ag speciation. PMID:12371479

  16. A cross-site comparison of factors influencing soil nitrification rates in northeastern USA forested watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.; Wemple, B.C.; Jamison, A.E.; Fredriksen, G.; Shanley, J.B.; Lawrence, G.B.; Bailey, S.W.; Campbell, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated N deposition is continuing on many forested landscapes around the world and our understanding of ecosystem response is incomplete. Soil processes, especially nitrification, are critical. Many studies of soil N transformations have focused on identifying relationships within a single watershed but these results are often not transferable. We studied 10 small forested research watersheds in the northeastern USA to determine if there were common factors related to soil ammonification and nitrification. Vegetation varied between mixed northern hardwoods and mixed conifers. Watershed surface soils (Oa or A horizons) were sampled at grid or transect points and analyzed for a suite of chemical characteristics. At each sampling point, vegetation and topographic metrics (field and GIS-based) were also obtained. Results were examined by watershed averages (n = 10), seasonal/watershed averages (n = 28), and individual sampling points (n = 608). Using both linear and tree regression techniques, the proportion of conifer species was the single best predictor of nitrification rates, with lower rates at higher conifer dominance. Similar to other studies, the soil C/N ratio was also a good predictor and was well correlated with conifer dominance. Unlike other studies, the presence of Acer saccharum was not by itself a strong predictor, but was when combined with the presence of Betula alleghaniensis. Topographic metrics (slope, aspect, relative elevation, and the topographic index) were not related to N transformation rates across the watersheds. Although found to be significant in other studies, neither soil pH, Ca nor Al was related to nitrification. Results showed a strong relationship between dominant vegetation, soil C, and soil C/N. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  17. Watershed factors affecting stream acidification in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Scott W.; Hornbeck, James W.; Martin, C. Wayne; Buso, Donald C.

    1987-01-01

    The streams tributary to acidic Cone Pond, pH 4.5 4.8, and circumneutral Black Pond, pH 5.3 6.4, in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, USA, were monitored for a year. The watersheds of these two ponds were characterized in terms of geology and stream hydrology. Chemical gradients and patterns in rock weathering and groundwater discharge explain many of the differences in mineral content and acidity of the streams. The rocks of Black watershed produced an average of ten times the equivalent of basic cations as rocks from Cone watershed. This is on the same order as the difference in acidity of the two streams. Down-stream changes in stream chemistry follow differing patterns, but reflect the same principle of residence time and water path length controlling chemical evolution of streamwater. Watershed and aquatic managers may use these parameters in an inexpensive and simple assessment of the susceptibility of individual streams and ponds to acidification. A method is recommended to determine quickly the potential influence of bedrock type to aquatic chemistry.

  18. Tumor prevalence and biomarkers of exposure in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the tidal Potomac River, USA, watershed.

    PubMed

    Pinkney, A E; Harshbarger, J C; May, E B; Melancon, M J

    2001-06-01

    Associations between contaminant exposure and liver and skin tumor prevalence were evaluated in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the tidal Potomac River, USA, watershed. Thirty bullheads (> or = age 3) were collected from Quantico embayment, near a Superfund site that released organochlorine contaminants; Neabsco Creek, a tributary with petroleum inputs from runoff and marinas; and Anacostia River (spring and fall), an urban tributary designated as a Chesapeake Bay region of concern, that was contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and organochlorine pesticides. Fish were collected from the Tuckahoe River, as a reference. Cytochrome P450 activity, bile PAH metabolites, and muscle organochlorine pesticide and PCB concentrations were measured in randomly selected individuals and sediment contaminants were analyzed. We found statistically significant differences in liver tumor prevalences: Anacostia (spring), 50%; Anacostia (fall), 60%; Neabsco, 17%; Quantico, 7%; and Tuckahoe, 10%. Skin tumor prevalences were significantly different: Anacostia (spring), 37%; Anacostia (fall), 10%; Neabsco, 3%; Quantico, 3%; and Tuckahoe, 0%. Tumor prevalence in Anacostia bullheads warrants concern and was similar to those at highly contaminated sites in the Great Lakes. Evidence was found of higher PAH exposure in Anacostia fish but a cause-effect linkage could not be established. Fish tumor surveys, with histopathologic examination of internal and external organs, are recommended for monitoring the status of regions of concern. PMID:11392129

  19. Tumor prevalence and biomarkers of exposure in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the tidal Potomac River, USA, watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pinkney, A.E.; Harshbarger, J.C.; May, E.B.; Melancon, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Associations between contaminant exposure and liver and skin tumor prevalence were evaluated in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the tidal Potomac River, USA, watershed. Thirty bullheads (>age 3) were collected from Quantico embayment near a Superfund site that released organochlorine contaminants; Neabsco Creek, a tributary with petroleum inputs from runoff and marinas; and Anacostia River (spring and fall), an urban tributary designated as a Chesapeake Bay region of concern, that was contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and organochlorine pesticides. Fish were collected from the Tuckahoe River, as a reference. Cytochrome P450 activity, bile PAH metabolites, and muscle organochlorine pesticide and PCB concentrations were measured in randomly selected individuals and sediment contaminants were analyzed. We found statistically significant differences in liver tumor prevalences: Anacostia (spring), 50%, Anacostia (fall), 60%, Neabsco, 17%, Quantico, 7%, and Tuckahoe, 10%. Skin tumor prevalences were significantly different: Anacostia (spring), 37%, Anacostia (fall), 10%, Neabsco, 3%, Quantico, 3%, and Tuckahoe, 0%. Tumor prevalences in Anacostia bullheads warrants concern and was similar to those as highly contaminated sites in the Great Lakes. Evidence was found of higher PAH exposure in Anacostia fish but a cause-effect linkage could not be established. Fish tumor surveys, with histopathologic examination of internal and external organs are recommended for monitoring the status of regions of concern.

  20. Assessments of urban growth in the Tampa Bay watershed using remote sensing data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.; Crane, M.

    2005-01-01

    Urban development has expanded rapidly in the Tampa Bay area of west-central Florida over the past century. A major effect associated with this population trend is transformation of the landscape from natural cover types to increasingly impervious urban land. This research utilizes an innovative approach for mapping urban extent and its changes through determining impervious surfaces from Landsat satellite remote sensing data. By 2002, areas with subpixel impervious surface greater than 10% accounted for approximately 1800 km2, or 27 percent of the total watershed area. The impervious surface area increases approximately three-fold from 1991 to 2002. The resulting imperviousness data are used with a defined suite of geospatial data sets to simulate historical urban development and predict future urban and suburban extent, density, and growth patterns using SLEUTH model. Also examined is the increasingly important influence that urbanization and its associated imperviousness extent have on the individual drainage basins of the Tampa Bay watershed. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sources of nitrogen in three watersheds of northern Florida, USA: Mainly atmospheric deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Ji-Meng; Winchester, J.W. )

    1994-03-01

    Atmospheric deposition is estimated to be the principal source of N in water that flows to the Apalachicola river from the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers (ACF) as well as in two nearby small rivers, Ochlockonee (Och) and Sopchoppy (Sop), that drain watersheds with different land use characteristics. By mass balance and descriptive statistics of hundreds of rainfall and river water samples from monitoring programs since the 1960s, the average nitrate and ammonium deposition flux from the atmosphere is sufficient to account for N that flows toward Apalachicola Bay, an estuary in which N may be a limiting nutrient. Urban and agricultural sources of N in the three watersheds ACF, Och, and Sop appear to be relatively smaller. The work was based on long-term data bases from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) rain chemistry monitoring network and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) water monitoring program. Average atmospheric N depositions to the three river watersheds are nearly the same as river fluxes of N in all forms monitored. Nitrogen is not likely to be a limiting nutrient in the three watersheds, since river water N:P exceeds the Redfield ratio. An estimate of largest possible input of urban sewage is several times lower than the atmospheric flux of N to the ACF watershed. And N from N-fertilizer, comparable to the atmospheric deposition flux of N, is likely to be smaller if mostly retained in crops or farmland before it reaches the estuary. Annual nitrogen export from the Apalachicola River to the estuary, 1.22 x 10[sup 9] moles N yr[sup [minus]1], consists of organic nitrogen 60%, nitrate 34%, and NH[sup +][sub 4]6%. Atmospheric nitrate and sulfate depositions are highly correlated, both being principally from fossil fuel combustion. Hydrologic conditions, which exhibit variations on seasonal and longer time scales, play an important role in the transport of nutrients and other species in the rivers.

  2. Sources of nitrogen in three watersheds of northern Florida, USA: Mainly atmospheric deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ji-Meng; Winchester, John W.

    1994-03-01

    Atmospheric deposition is estimated to be the principal source of N in water that flows to the Apalachicola River from the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers (ACF) as well as in two nearby small rivers, Ochlockonee (Och) and Sopchoppy (Sop), that drain watersheds with different land use characteristics. By mass balance and descriptive statistics of hundreds of rainfall and river water samples from monitoring programs since the 1960s, the average nitrate and ammonium deposition flux from the atmosphere is sufficient to account for N that flows toward Apalachicola Bay, an estuary in which N may be a limiting nutrient. Urban and agricultural sources of N in the three watersheds ACF, Och and Sop appear to be relatively smaller. The work was based on long-term data bases from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) rain chemistry monitoring network and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) water monitoring program. Average atmospheric N depositions to the three river watersheds are nearly the same as river fluxes of N in all forms monitored. Nitrogen is not likely to be a limiting nutrient in the three watersheds, since river water N:P exceeds the Redfield ratio. An estimate of largest possible input of urban sewage is several times lower than the atmospheric flux of N to the ACF watershed. And N from N-fertilizer, comparable to the atmospheric deposition flux of N, is likely to be smaller if mostly retained in crops or farmland before it reaches the estuary. Annual nitrogen export from the Apalachicola River to the estuary, 1.22 × 10 9 moles N yr -1, consists of organic nitrogen 60%, nitrate 34% and NH 4+ 6%. Atmospheric nitrate and sulfate depositions are highly correlated, both being principally from fossil fuel combustion. Hydrologie conditions, which exhibit variations on seasonal and longer time scales, play an important role in the transport of nutrients and other species in the rivers.

  3. Earliest record of the invasive Foraminifera Trochammina hadai in San Francisco Bay, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGann, Mary

    2014-01-01

    In 1995, Trochammina hadai, a benthic Foraminifera prevalent in Japanese estuaries, was found in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Subsequent field investigations determined that the species was also present in nearly all of the major ports and estuaries along the western United States. Because of its widespread colonization, it is of interest to determine when T. hadai first appeared as an invasive in the coastal regions of the North Pacific. In San Francisco Bay, the species was not found in 404 surface samples collected between 1930 and 1981. In 1983, however, a grab sediment sample from one of four sites in the southern portion of the bay contained T. hadai. This site was the most northern of the four and contained 12 specimens of the invasive, comprising 1.5% of the assemblage. This is the earliest appearance on record of T. hadai in San Francisco Bay.

  4. Mobile data buoy system. [water quality measurements in watersheds and Mobile Bay, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Mobile Data Buoy System was conceived to serve the users requirement for obtaining water quality parameters from two separate watershed systems. In view of the cost constraints of the ERTS program it was obvious that the network of 10 sampling stations required could not be of the fixed installation type; therefore, it was decided to go to a system of battery powered buoys of a size that could be used in one watershed system for a period of time and then moved to another by use of a relatively small 6.7 m (22 foot) boat. The basic idea of the water quality measurement program was to establish the water quality pattern of change from the headwaters of the watersheds to and through the Mobile Bay. This would allow the investigator to develop a good picture of the state's major water resources and the pressures from pollution that are being imposed. At this point in deployment of this mobile system of buoys, it is too early to put a quantitative value on the system, however it appears less expensive than known fixed installations as to first cost. It has a basic advantage in that it can be moved, at very little expense, to alternate sites where it is desired to obtain water quality data. It is to be noted this buoy system which covers a 80 Km (50 mile) stretch of the Black Warrior River and then skips down 483 Km (300 miles) to Mobile Bay for the next measurements would not be feasible unless there is a satellite to collect and relay the data.

  5. Digital data used to relate nutrient inputs to water quality in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, version 3.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brakebill, John W.; Preston, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    Chesapeake Bay restoration efforts are focused on improving water quality, living resources, and ecological habitats by 2010. One aspect of the water-quality restoration is the refinement of strategies designed to implement nutrient-reduction practices within the Bay watershed. These strategies are being refined and implemented by resource managers of the Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP), a partnership comprised of various Federal, State, and local agencies that includes jurisdictions within Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), an active member of the CBP, provides necessary water-quality information for these Chesapeake Bay nutrient-reduction strategy revisions and evaluations. The formulation and revision of effective nutrient-reduction strategies requires detailed scientific information and an analytical understanding of the sources, transport, and delivery of nutrients to the Chesapeake Bay. The USGS is supporting these strategies by providing scientific information to resource managers that can help them evaluate and understand these processes. One statistical model available to resource managers is a collection of SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed (SPARROW) attributes, which uses a nonlinear regression approach to spatially relate nutrient sources and watershed characteristics to nutrient loads of streams throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Developed by the USGS, information generated by SPARROW can help resource managers determine the geographical distribution and relative contribution of nutrient sources and the factors that affect their transport to the Bay. Nutrient source information representing the late 1990s time period was obtained from several agencies and used to create and compile digital spatial datasets of total nitrogen and total phosphorus contributions that served as input sources to the SPARROW models. These data represent

  6. Polychlorinated biphenyl source attribution in Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA, using multivariate similarity among congener profiles in sediment samples.

    PubMed

    Cacela, Dave; Beltman, Douglas J; Lipton, Joshua

    2002-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener concentrations measured in 1,189 sediment samples from Green Bay (MI/WI, USA), Lake Michigan (MI/WI, USA), and the Fox River (WI, USA) were analyzed statistically to evaluate whether PCB congener profiles in outer Green Bay are more similar to those observed in inner Green Bay or Lake Michigan. Similarities among PCB profiles were assessed with complementary multivariate analysis techniques: Principal component analysis (PCA), cluster analysis, and classification trees. The PCA indicated that profiles in outer Green Bay are distinct from those of inner Green Bay or Lake Michigan but are more similar to those of inner Green Bay. The outer bay profiles are dissimilar to profiles that would result from a simple process of mixing contaminated sediments from the inner bay with Lake Michigan sediments and, therefore, support the conclusion that contaminants in outer Green Bay come from discharges of the Fox River. Several classification trees based on small sets of congener proportions defined simple rules that consistently distinguished the regional profiles. Application of these rules to classify the outer bay samples suggests that the profiles of less than 7% of outer bay samples are similar to Lake Michigan profiles. These results are interpreted with respect to physical transport and chemical weathering processes that may account for the observed differences. PMID:12152758

  7. Streamflow variability and hydroclimatic change at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM), USA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Suk; Jain, Shaleen; Norton, Stephen A

    2010-12-01

    Seasonal variations in streamflow and the associated hydrologic extremes impart significant temporal structure to watershed-scale chemical fluxes. Consequently, a careful characterization of the episodic-to-seasonal and longer-term streamflow variations is a first step toward developing a comprehensive view of the temporal dynamics of watershed processes in a changing climate. Here we analyze a nearly two-decade-long streamflow record for the East Bear subwatershed within the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM) (USA) to understand the envelope of streamflow variability by season, with a particular focus on the high flow events that have a disproportionately large impact on the biogeochemical processes and fluxes. Interannual and longer-term variations in a number of derived statistical metrics of hydrologic variability are examined. Our analysis shows substantial interannual and longer-term variability in seasonal flow volumes and peak flows. Furthermore, a long, unimpaired streamflow record for the Narraguagus River (a proximate watershed to the BBWM) is examined with a view to understand the relative coherence in hydrologic variability, as well as quantifying the decadal and longer-term hydrologic variations in this region. We find that the streamflow variability in the two watersheds shows similarity in all seasons. A moving window analysis to assess the changing flood potential over time indicates upward trends in the recent decades. Spring season (March-May) flood estimates show a near-monotonic trend over the 1949-2008 record. Finally, empirical relationships between streamflow and large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns highlight the regional and global climatic drivers of hydrologic extremes in this region, including impacts from remnants of Atlantic hurricanes. PMID:20577798

  8. Using Remote Sensing Data to Evaluate Habitat Loss in the Mobile, Galveston, and Tampa Bay Watersheds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Morgan; Estes, Maurice G.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico has experienced dramatic wetland habitat area losses over the last two centuries. These losses not only damage species diversity, but contribute to water quality, flood control, and aspects of the Gulf coast economy. Overall wetland losses since the 1950s were examined using land cover/land use (LCLU) change analysis in three Gulf coast watershed regions: Mobile Bay, Galveston Bay, and Tampa Bay. Two primary causes of this loss, LCLU change and climate change, were then assessed using LCLU maps, U.S. census population data, and available current and historical climate data from NOAA. Sea level rise, precipitation, and temperature effects were addressed, with emphasis on analysis of the effects of sea level rise on salt marsh degradation. Ecological impacts of wetland loss, including fishery depletion, eutrophication, and hypoxia were addressed using existing literature and data available from NOAA. These ecological consequences in turn have had an affect on the Gulf coast economy, which was analyzed using fishery data and addressing public health impacts of changes in the environment caused by wetland habitat loss. While recent federal and state efforts to reduce wetland habitat loss have been relatively successful, this study implies a need for more aggressive action in the Gulf coast area, as the effects of wetland loss reach far beyond individual wetland systems themselves to the Gulf of Mexico as a whole.

  9. Determining the influence of land-use on urea sources and transport within the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urea, a form of organic nitrogen found in fertilizers, manures and septic waste, has increasingly been discovered in surface waters throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed and similar coastal systems. This nutrient is gaining recognition as a driver for the development of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)...

  10. Monitoring of atrazine in the mainstream, major tributaries and streams of the Chesapeake Bay watershed: Ecological significance

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.W. Jr.; Anderson, R.D.

    1996-10-01

    The goal of this study was to provide exposure data for the atrazine in the mainstream tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. In 1995, ten stations were sampled four times per year. Atrazine was also measured at 4 hour intervals for 72 hours at all stream sites during one rain event during the spring. Results are described.

  11. WAQUOIT BAY WATERSHED ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT: THE EFFECT OF LAND-DERIVED NITROGEN LOADS ON ESTUARINE EUTROPHICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A watershed ecological risk assessment of Waquoit Bay, located on the south coast of Cape Cod, MA, was performed for managers to better understand the environmental impacts of human activities. An interdisciplinary and interagency workgroup identified all the stressors of concer...

  12. USING THE REGIONAL ACID DEPOSITION MODEL TO DETERMINE THE NITROGEN DEPOSITION AIRSHED OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Regional Acid Deposition Model, RADM, an advanced Eulerian model, is used to develop an estimate of the primary airshed of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions that is contributing nitrogen deposition to the Chesapeake Bay watershed. rief description of RADM together with a summary...

  13. Development of a web-based runoff forecasting tool to guide fertilizer and manure application in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Managing the land application of fertilizers and manures is critical to protecting water quality in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. While modern nutrient management tools are designed to help farmers with their long-term field management planning, they do not support daily decisions such as when to a...

  14. Web-based decision support and visualization tools for water quality management in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullinix, C.; Hearn, P.; Zhang, H.; Aguinaldo, J.

    2009-01-01

    Federal, State, and local water quality managers charged with restoring the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem require tools to maximize the impact of their limited resources. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP) are developing a suite of Web-based tools called the Chesapeake Online Assessment Support Toolkit (COAST). The goal of COAST is to help CBP partners identify geographic areas where restoration activities would have the greatest effect, select the appropriate management strategies, and improve coordination and prioritization among partners. As part of the COAST suite of tools focused on environmental restoration, a water quality management visualization component called the Nutrient Yields Mapper (NYM) tool is being developed by USGS. The NYM tool is a web application that uses watershed yield estimates from USGS SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed (SPARROW) attributes model (Schwarz et al., 2006) [6] to allow water quality managers to identify important sources of nitrogen and phosphorous within the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The NYM tool utilizes new open source technologies that have become popular in geospatial web development, including components such as OpenLayers and GeoServer. This paper presents examples of water quality data analysis based on nutrient type, source, yield, and area of interest using the NYM tool for the Chesapeake Bay watershed. In addition, we describe examples of map-based techniques for identifying high and low nutrient yield areas; web map engines; and data visualization and data management techniques.

  15. Application of a Structured Decision Process for Informing Watershed Management Options in Guánica Bay, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Guánica Bay watershed has been a priority for research, assessment and management since the 1970s, and since 2008, has been the focus of a U.S. Coral Reef Task Force (USCRTF) research initiative involving multiple agencies assembled to address the effect of land management de...

  16. Atmospheric deposition of pesticides to an agricultural watershed of the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Zhihua; McConnell, Laura L; Torrents, Alba; Meritt, Donald; Tobash, Stephanie

    2003-01-01

    The Choptank River watershed, located on the Delmarva Peninsula of the Chesapeake Bay, is dominated by agricultural land use, which makes it vulnerable to runoff and atmospheric deposition of pesticides. Agricultural and wildlife areas are in close proximity and off-site losses of pesticides may contribute to toxic effects on sensitive species of plants and animals. High-volume air samples (n = 31) and event-based rain samples (n = 71) were collected from a single location in the watershed representing regional background conditions. Surface water samples were collected from eight stations in the tidal portion of the river on five occasions during 2000. Chlorothalonil, metolachlor, atrazine, simazine, endosulfan, and chlorpyrifos were frequently detected in the air and rain, with maximal concentrations during the period when local or regional crops were planted. The wet deposition load to the watershed was estimated at 150 +/- 16, 61 +/- 7, and 51 +/- 6 kg yr(-1) for chlorothalonil, metolachlor, and atrazine, respectively. The high wet deposition load compared with the estimated annual usage for chlorothalonil (13%) and endosulfan (14-90%) suggests an atmospheric source from outside the watershed. Net air-water gas exchange fluxes for metolachlor varied from -44 +/- 19 to 9.3 +/- 4.1 ng m(-2) d(-1) with negative values indicating net deposition. Wet deposition accounted for 3 to 20% of the total metolachlor mass in the Choptank River and was a more important source to the river than gas exchange. Estimates of herbicide flux presented here are probably a low estimate and actual rates may be significantly higher in areas closer to pesticide application. PMID:14535301

  17. Watershed land use is strongly linked to PCBs in white perch in Chesapeake Bay subestuaries.

    PubMed

    King, Ryan S; Beaman, Joseph R; Whigham, Dennis F; Hines, Anson H; Baker, Matthew E; Weller, Donald E

    2004-12-15

    We related total PCBs (t-PCBs) in white perch (Morone americana), an abundant estuarine resident that supports a valuable recreational and commercial fishery in the mid-Atlantic region, to the amount and spatial arrangement of developed land in watersheds that discharge into 14 subestuaries of Chesapeake Bay. We considered the intensity of development in watersheds using four developed land-use measures (% impervious surface, % total developed land, % high-intensity residential + commercial [%high-res/comm], and % commercial) to represent potential source areas of PCBs to the subestuaries. We further evaluated the importance of source proximity by calculating three inverse-distance weighted (IDW) metrics of development, an approach that weighted developed land near the shoreline more heavily than developed land farther away. Unweighted percentages of each of the four measures of developed land explained 51-69% of the variance in t-PCBs. However, IDWs markedly improved the relationships between % developed land measures and t-PCBs. Percent commercial land, weighted by its simple inverse distance, explained 99% of the variance in t-PCBs, whereas the other three measures explained as much as 93-97%. PCBs historically produced or used in commercial and residential areas are apparently persisting in the environment atthe scale of the watersheds and subestuaries examined in this study, and developed land close to the subestuary has the greatest unit effect on t-PCBs in fish. These findings provide compelling evidence for a strikingly strong linkage between watershed land use and t-PCBs in white perch, and this relationship may prove useful for identifying unsampled subestuaries with a high risk of PCB contamination. PMID:15669311

  18. Application of spatially referenced regression modeling for the evaluation of total nitrogen loading in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Preston, Stephen D.; Brakebill, John W.

    1999-01-01

    The reduction of stream nutrient loads is an important part of current efforts to improve water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. To design programs that will effectively reduce stream nutrient loading, resource managers need spatially detailed information that describes the location of nutrient sources and the watershed factors that affect delivery of nutrients to the Bay. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey has developed a set of spatially referenced regression models for the evaluation of nutrient loading in the watershed. The technique applied for this purpose is referred to as ?SPARROW? (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes), which is a statistical modeling approach that retains spatial referencing for illustrating predictions, and for relating upstream nutrient sources to downstream nutrient loads. SPARROW is based on a digital stream-network data set that is composed of stream segments (reaches) that are attributed with traveltime and connectivity information. Drainage-basin boundaries are defined for each stream reach in the network data set through the use of a digital elevation model. For the Chesapeake Bay watershed, the spatial network was developed using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s River Reach File 1 digital stream network, and is composed of 1,408 stream reaches and watershed segments. To develop a SPARROW model for total nitrogen in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, data sets for sources and basin characteristics were incorporated into the spatial network and related to stream-loading information by using a nonlinear regression model approach. Total nitrogen source variables that were statistically significant in the model include point sources, urban area, fertilizer application, manure generation and atmospheric deposition. Total nitrogen loss variables that were significant in the model include soil permeability and instream-loss rates for four stream-reach classes. Applications of SPARROW for evaluating

  19. A hydrologic network supporting spatially referenced regression modeling in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brakebill, J.W.; Preston, S.D.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a methodology for statistically relating nutrient sources and land-surface characteristics to nutrient loads of streams. The methodology is referred to as SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes (SPARROW), and relates measured stream nutrient loads to nutrient sources using nonlinear statistical regression models. A spatially detailed digital hydrologic network of stream reaches, stream-reach characteristics such as mean streamflow, water velocity, reach length, and travel time, and their associated watersheds supports the regression models. This network serves as the primary framework for spatially referencing potential nutrient source information such as atmospheric deposition, septic systems, point-sources, land use, land cover, and agricultural sources and land-surface characteristics such as land use, land cover, average-annual precipitation and temperature, slope, and soil permeability. In the Chesapeake Bay watershed that covers parts of Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington D.C., SPARROW was used to generate models estimating loads of total nitrogen and total phosphorus representing 1987 and 1992 land-surface conditions. The 1987 models used a hydrologic network derived from an enhanced version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's digital River Reach File, and course resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). A new hydrologic network was created to support the 1992 models by generating stream reaches representing surface-water pathways defined by flow direction and flow accumulation algorithms from higher resolution DEMs. On a reach-by-reach basis, stream reach characteristics essential to the modeling were transferred to the newly generated pathways or reaches from the enhanced River Reach File used to support the 1987 models. To complete the new network, watersheds for each reach were generated using the direction of surface-water flow derived

  20. USDA-ARS Riesel Watersheds, Riesel, Texas, USA: Water quality research database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmel, R. Daren; Haney, Richard L.; Smith, Douglas R.; White, Michael; King, Kevin W.

    2014-10-01

    The 75 year legacy database including discharge, sediment loss, land management, and meteorological data for the USDA-ARS Riesel Watersheds, Riesel, TX, USA has been available on the web for more than a decade (www.ars.usda.gov/spa/hydro-data) and used in numerous studies and publications; however, only recently have these data been added to the Sustaining the Earth's Watersheds, Agricultural Research Data System (STEWARDS) database (www.nrrig.mwa.ars.usda.gov/stewards/stewards.html). In addition, water quality data including dissolved inorganic N and P compounds measured from more than 1000 storm runoff events, 1300 base flow sampling events (lateral subsurface return flow or seepage flow), and 157 precipitation events through 2012 were added. The objectives of this manuscript are to present relevant background information on these data, summarize the data collection and analysis methodology, present the measured data along with cursory analyses, and convey the commitment of the USDA-ARS Riesel Watersheds to long-term data accessibility and database enhancement for water quality data and research.

  1. Pyrethroid and organophosphate pesticide-associated toxicity in two coastal watersheds (California, USA).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bryn M; Anderson, Brian S; Hunt, John W; Siegler, Katie; Voorhees, Jennifer P; Tjeerdema, Ron S; McNeill, Katie

    2012-07-01

    Portions of the Santa Maria River and Oso Flaco Creek watersheds in central California, USA, are listed as impaired under section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act and require development of total maximum daily load (TMDL) allocations. These listings are for general pesticide contamination, but are largely based on historic monitoring of sediment and fish tissue samples that showed contamination by organochlorine pesticides. Recent studies have shown that toxicity in these watersheds is caused by organophosphate pesticides (water and sediment) and pyrethroid pesticides (sediment). The present study was designed to provide information on the temporal and spatial variability of toxicity associated with these pesticides to better inform the TMDL process. Ten stations were sampled in four study areas, one with urban influences, and the remaining in agriculture production areas. Water toxicity was assessed with the water flea Ceriodaphnia dubia, and sediment toxicity was assessed with the amphipod Hyalella azteca. Stations in the lower Santa Maria River had the highest incidence of toxicity, followed by stations influenced by urban inputs. Toxicity identification evaluations and chemical analysis demonstrated that the majority of the observed water toxicity was attributed to organophosphate pesticides, particularly chlorpyrifos, and that sediment toxicity was caused by mixtures of pyrethroid pesticides. The results demonstrate that both agriculture and urban land uses are contributing toxic concentrations of these pesticides to adjacent watersheds, and regional water quality regulators are now using this information to develop management objectives. PMID:22549911

  2. Factors affecting herbicide yields in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, June 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hainly, R.A.; Kahn, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Median concentrations and instantaneous yields of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and simazine were generally highest at sites in the Lower Susquehanna River Basin and in agricultural subbasins. Instantaneous herbicide yields are related to land use, hydrogeologic setting, streamflow yield, and agricultural row cropping practices. The significance of these relations may be affected by the interdependence of the factors. The percentage of basin area planted in corn is the most influential factor in the prediction of herbicide yield. Instantaneous yields of all five herbicides measured in June 1994 related poorly to averaged 199094 herbicide use. Annually averaged herbicide-use data are too general to use as a predictor for short-term herbicide yields. An evaluation of factors affecting herbicide yields could be refined with more-current land use and land cover information and a more accurate estimate of the percentage of basin area planted in corn. Factors related to herbicide yields can be used to predict herbicide yields in other basins within the Chesapeake Bay watershed and to develop an estimate of herbicide loads to Chesapeake Bay.Median concentrations and instantaneous yields of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and simazine were generally highest at sites in the Lower Susquehanna River Basin and in agricultural subbasins. Instantaneous herbicide yields are related to land use, hydrogeologic setting, streamflow yield, and agricultural row cropping practices. The significance of these relations may be affected by the interdependence of the factors. The percentage of basin area planted in corn is the most influential factor in the prediction of herbicide yield. Instantaneous yields of all five herbicides measured in June 1994 related poorly to averaged 1990-94 herbicide use. Annually averaged herbicide-use data are too general to use as a predictor for short-term herbicide yields. An evaluation of factors affecting herbicide yields could

  3. Water quality mapping of Laguna de Bay and its watershed, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Nakano, T.; Shin, K.; Maruyama, S.; Miyakawa, C.; Yaota, K.; Kada, R.

    2011-12-01

    Laguna de Bay (or Laguna Lake) is the largest lake in the Philippines, with a surface area of 900 km2 and its watershed area of 2920 km2 (Santos-Borja, 2005). It is located on the southwest part of the Luzon Island and its watershed contains 5 provinces, 49 municipalities and 12 cities, including parts of Metropolitan Manila. The water quality in Laguna de Bay has significantly deteriorated due to pollution from soil erosion, effluents from chemical industries, and household discharges. In this study, we performed multiple element analysis of water samples in the lake and its watersheds for chemical mapping, which allows us to evaluate the regional distribution of elements including toxic heavy metals such as Cd, Pb and As. We collected water samples from 24 locations in Laguna de Bay and 160 locations from rivers in the watersheds. The sampling sites of river are mainly downstreams around the lake, which covers from urbanized areas to rural areas. We also collected well water samples from 17 locations, spring water samples from 10 locations, and tap water samples from 21 locations in order to compare their data with the river and lake samples and to assess the quality of household use waters. The samples were collected in dry season of the study area (March 13 - 17 and May 2 - 9, 2011). The analysis was performed at the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN), Japan. The concentrations of the major components (Cl, NO3, SO4, Ca, Mg, Na, and K) dissolved in the samples were determined with ion chromatograph (Dionex Corporation ICS-3000). We also analyzed major and trace elements (Li, B, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn Ga, Ge, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, W, Pb and U) with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, Agilent Technologies 7500cx). The element concentrations of rivers are characterized by remarkable regional variations. For

  4. Benthic macrofauna habitat associations in Willapa Bay, Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Steven P.; Cole, Faith A.

    2007-02-01

    Estuary-wide benthic macrofauna-habitat associations in Willapa Bay, Washington, United States, were determined for 4 habitats (eelgrass [ Zostera marina], Atlantic cordgrass [ Spartina alterniflora], mud shrimp [ Upogebia pugettensis], ghost shrimp [ Neotrypaea californiensis]) in 1996 and 7 habitats (eelgrass, Atlantic cordgrass, mud shrimp, ghost shrimp, oyster [ Crassostrea gigas], bare mud/sand, subtidal) in 1998. Most benthic macrofaunal species inhabited multiple habitats; however, 2 dominants, a fanworm, Manayunkia aestuarina, in Spartina, and a sand dollar, Dendraster excentricus, in subtidal, were rare or absent in all other habitats. Benthic macrofaunal Bray-Curtis similarity varied among all habitats except eelgrass and oyster. There were significant differences among habitats within- and between-years on several of the following ecological indicators: mean number of species ( S), abundance ( A), biomass ( B), abundance of deposit (AD), suspension (AS), and facultative (AF) feeders, Swartz's index (SI), Brillouin's index ( H), and jackknife estimates of habitat species richness (HSR). In the 4 habitats sampled in both years, A was about 2.5× greater in 1996 (a La Niña year) than 1998 (a strong El Niño year) yet relative values of S, A, B, AD, AS, SI, and H among the habitats were not significantly different, indicating strong benthic macrofauna-habitat associations despite considerable climatic and environmental variability. In general, the rank order of habitats on indicators associated with high diversity and productivity (high S, A, B, SI, H, HSR) was eelgrass = oyster ≥ Atlantic cordgrass ≥ mud shrimp ≥ bare mud/sand ≥ ghost shrimp = subtidal. Vegetation, burrowing shrimp, and oyster density and sediment %silt + clay and %total organic carbon were generally poor, temporally inconsistent predictors of ecological indicator variability within habitats. The benthic macrofauna-habitat associations in this study can be used to help identify

  5. Using GIS to Quantify Riparian Buffer Bypassing on Agricultural Fields in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funkhouser, L.; Hancock, G. S.; Kaste, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Forested riparian buffers are intended to reduce the sediment and nutrient loads to streams delivered by agricultural runoff. Within the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, buffers are mandated to be 100' wide along agricultural fields bordered by perennial streams. When flow into buffers is widely disseminated buffers have the potential to significantly reduce pollutant levels entering streams. However, several studies show that flow across buffers is often concentrated, producing channelized flow that bypasses the buffer and presumably reduces buffer effectiveness. Previous studies have relied on field observations in relatively few locations, however, and the extent of bypassing is not well constrained. We hypothesize that buffer bypassing and the associated reduction in buffer effectiveness is a widespread phenomenon. Here we use GIS to determine flow patterns on agricultural fields and to identify locations of concentrated flow through buffers in the Virginia Coastal Plain within the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Using DEMs with ≤10m resolution, we determine flow accumulation along field margins and identify points with flow accumulation sufficient to generate concentrated flow into buffers. Preliminary data from ~20 fields has been obtained by creating a field outline attached to flow accumulation points generated in ArcMap. We find that 66% to 91% of the total area draining to the field margins pass through discrete points representing <5% of the field margin length. On-field observations show evidence for surface flow and channelization at approximately 90% of the discrete drainage points identified in our hydrologic analysis using GIS. Our preliminary observations suggest buffer bypassing is widespread in this region of relatively low relief. We will present GIS and field analysis from a total of ~50 fields and attempt to identify the area/slope relationship necessary to generate channelization and bypassing at field margins.

  6. Sediment budgets and source determinations using fallout Cesium-137 in a semiarid rangeland watershed, Arizona, USA.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Jerry C; Nearing, Mark A; Rhoton, Fred E

    2009-08-01

    Analysis of soil redistribution and sediment sources in semiarid and arid watersheds provides information for implementing management practices to improve rangeland conditions and reduce sediment loads to streams. The purpose of this research was to develop sediment budgets and identify potential sediment sources using (137)Cs and other soil properties in a series of small semiarid subwatersheds on the USDA ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed near Tombstone, Arizona, USA. Soils were sampled in a grid pattern on two small subwatersheds and along transects associated with soils and geomorphology on six larger subwatersheds. Soil samples were analyzed for (137)Cs and selected physical and chemical properties (i.e., bulk density, rocks, particle size, soil organic carbon). Suspended sediment samples collected at measuring flume sites on the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed were also analyzed for these properties. Soil redistribution measured using (137)Cs inventories for a small shrub-dominated subwatershed and a small grass-dominated subwatershed found eroding areas in these subwatersheds were losing -5.6 and -3.2tha(-1)yr(-1), respectively; however, a sediment budget for each of these subwatersheds, including depositional areas, found net soil loss to be -4.3tha(-1)yr(-1) from the shrub-dominated subwatershed and -0.1tha(-1)yr(-1) from the grass-dominated subwatershed. Generally, the suspended sediment collected at the flumes of the six other subwatersheds was enriched in silt and clay. Using a mixing model to determine sediment source indicated that shrub-dominated subwatersheds were contributing most of the suspended sediment that was measured at the outlet flume of the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed. The two methodologies (sediment budgets and sediment source analyses) indicate that shrub-dominated systems provide more suspended sediment to the stream systems. The sediment budget studies also suggest that sediment yields measured at the outlet of a

  7. [Variations of annual load of TN and TP in the deep bay watershed, Shenzhen].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen-Chen; Zhang, Shi-Yan; Mao, Xian-Zhong

    2014-11-01

    The empirical coefficient of sewage disposal, export coefficient model and mean concentration method were respectively used to estimate variations of annual load TN and TP from Shenzhen and Hong Kong areas in the Deep Bay Watershed from 1986 to 2011. The results showed that, the annual average loads of TN and TP were 10 388.2 t, 10 727.9 t, 10 937.3 t, and 2 694.5 t, 1 929.2 t, 1388.7 t, respectively in the whole watershed during three periods, 80s, 90s and years after 2000. With the rapid development of society, economy and the urbanization, annual pollution loading of TN and TP in Shenzhen area showed an obviously increase, 4373.6 t and 195.9 t, by 261.0% and 64.2% for point source, and 1067.2 t and 151.0 t, by 63.4% and 84.9% for non-point source, respectively. Non-point source with high pollution load was mainly caused by the expanding of land for construction and roads. The contribution ratios of TN and TP from Shenzhen area increased from 42.4% and 27.0% to 85.1% and 75.2%. Annual loads of TN and TP in Hong Kong area decreased 3 028.5 t and 1 031.5 t, by 66.3% and 79.0% reduced. PMID:25639083

  8. An analysis of urban development and its environmental impact on the Tampa Bay watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xian, G.; Crane, M.; Su, J.

    2007-01-01

    Urbanization has transformed natural landscapes into anthropogenic impervious surfaces. Urban land use has become a major driving force for land cover and land use change in the Tampa Bay watershed of west-central Florida. This study investigates urban land use change and its impact on the watershed. The spatial and temporal changes, as well as the development density of urban land use are determined by analyzing the impervious surface distribution using Landsat satellite imagery. Population distribution and density are extracted from the 2000 census data. Non-point source pollution parameters used for measuring water quality are analyzed for the sub-drainage basins of Hillsborough County. The relationships between 2002 urban land use, population distribution and their environmental influences are explored using regression analysis against various non-point source pollutant loadings in these sub-drainage basins. The results suggest that strong associations existed between most pollutant loadings and the extent of impervious surface within each sub-drainage basin in 2002. Population density also exhibits apparent correlations with loading rates of several pollutants. Spatial variations of selected non-point source pollutant loadings are also assessed. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Proceedings of the workshop on alternative futures—Accounting for growth in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claggett, Peter, (Edited By); Thompson, Renee

    2012-01-01

    This workshop provided a forum for identifying and discussing policies and assumptions for use in creating regionally consistent alternative future land-use scenarios. The alternative scenarios will help to inform how planning can potentially be used as a primary Best Management Practice by identifying land-use policies and other planning actions that can be taken to minimize future increases in nutrients and sediments associated with the spatial pattern and intensity of land development. The Chesapeake Bay Program Office will run these scenarios through the watershed model to quantify the differences in loadings achieved through implementation of land-use policies and to help assess the uncertainty associated with the current trend forecast. In addition, the outcomes of this workshop can assist jurisdictions in planning for growth with respect to minimizing future increases in nutrient and sediment associated with land development. Ultimately, this workshop was intended to provide jurisdictions with information that can be used to better account for refinement of their Watershed Implementation Plans.

  10. Urbanization, Forest Vulnerability and Resource Land Loss in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantz, C.; Goetz, S. J.; Jantz, P.

    2004-12-01

    The contemporary pattern of urban development in industrialized countries is increasingly taking the form of low density, decentralized residential and commercial development. In the Chesapeake Bay watershed, which is located within the mid-Atlantic region of the United States, dispersed development patterns have been linked to habitat fragmentation and declining water quality. Our objectives were to document how this urbanization process has expanded throughout the watershed and to explore how lands comprising the natural resource base, particularly forests, have been replaced by a matrix of the built environment. We accomplished this by mapping impervious surface cover (houses, roads, etc) across the ~168,000 km2 area using a time series of satellite imagery. We calculated metrics of land use change and used these to estimate the loss of resource lands across the region. We conservatively estimate that 334 km2 of forest, 888 km2 of agriculture and 2 km2 of wetlands have been converted to impervious surfaces between 1990 and 2000. We also used the time series to calibrate a spatial model of urban land use change, and forecasted future development patterns in Maryland out to 2030 under different policy scenarios. Using Maryland Department of Natural Resources' (DNR) Strategic Forest Lands Assessment (SFLA), which evaluates forest resources in terms of their economic and ecologic value, and Maryland's Green Infrastructure, which identifies ecologically valuable patches of contiguous forests and wetlands, we evaluated the vulnerability of natural resources in Maryland. Threats associated with loss and fragmentation were identified.

  11. Development of Land Segmentation, Stream-Reach Network, and Watersheds in Support of Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF) Modeling, Chesapeake Bay Watershed, and Adjacent Parts of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martucci, Sarah K.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Raffensperger, Jeff P.; Hopkins, Katherine J.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Chesapeake Bay Program Office, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin, Maryland Department of the Environment, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are collaborating on the Chesapeake Bay Regional Watershed Model, using Hydrological Simulation Program - FORTRAN to simulate streamflow and concentrations and loads of nutrients and sediment to Chesapeake Bay. The model will be used to provide information for resource managers. In order to establish a framework for model simulation, digital spatial datasets were created defining the discretization of the model region (including the Chesapeake Bay watershed, as well as the adjacent parts of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia outside the watershed) into land segments, a stream-reach network, and associated watersheds. Land segmentation was based on county boundaries represented by a 1:100,000-scale digital dataset. Fifty of the 254 counties and incorporated cities in the model region were divided on the basis of physiography and topography, producing a total of 309 land segments. The stream-reach network for the Chesapeake Bay watershed part of the model region was based on the U.S. Geological Survey Chesapeake Bay SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) model stream-reach network. Because that network was created only for the Chesapeake Bay watershed, the rest of the model region uses a 1:500,000-scale stream-reach network. Streams with mean annual streamflow of less than 100 cubic feet per second were excluded based on attributes from the dataset. Additional changes were made to enhance the data and to allow for inclusion of stream reaches with monitoring data that were not part of the original network. Thirty-meter-resolution Digital Elevation Model data were used to delineate watersheds for each

  12. Contaminants in sediment, food-chain biota, and bird eggs from the Newport Bay watershed, Orange County, California.

    PubMed

    Santolo, Gary M; Byron, Earl R; Ohlendorf, Harry M

    2016-02-01

    Groundwater-related discharges in the San Diego Creek/Newport Bay watershed in Orange County, California have the potential to adversely affect the surface waters within the watershed and would likely not comply with the established total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) for the watershed. In 2004 and 2005, we studied the concentrations of contaminants of TMDL concern (particularly selenium [Se]) in birds that are at risk of exposure to contaminated food items because they feed and nest in the Newport Bay watershed. Most bioaccumulation is from elevated Se in groundwater downstream of a historic terminal swamp. Se bioaccumulation was observed in all biota tested, and DDE was found in fish and bird egg samples. Effects of contaminants on fish and birds are inconclusive due to the management disturbances in the watershed (e.g., flood control) and lack of bird nesting habitat. Although a significant relationship was observed between DDE concentrations and eggshell thinning in American avocet (Recurvirostra americana) eggs, the shell thinning in avocet and other species examined was not enough to result in hatching failure. Further focused monitoring efforts will be needed to characterize the exposure and risk levels. PMID:26803663

  13. Summary of Optical-Backscatter and Suspended-Sediment Data, Tomales Bay Watershed, California, Water Years 2004, 2005, and 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Point Reyes National Seashore, is studying suspended-sediment transport dynamics in the two primary tributaries to Tomales Bay, Lagunitas Creek and Walker Creek. Suspended-sediment samples and continuous optical backscatter (turbidity) data were collected at three locations during water years 2004?06 (October 1, 2003?September 30, 2006): at two sites in the Lagunitas Creek watershed and at one site in the Walker Creek watershed. Sediment samples were analyzed for suspended-sediment concentration, grain size, and turbidity. Data were used to estimate mean daily and annual seasonal suspended-sediment discharge, which were published in U.S. Geological Survey Annual Water-Data Reports. Data were utilized further in this report to develop field-based optical-backscatter calibration equations, which then were used to derive a continuous time series (15-minute interval) of suspended-sediment concentrations. Sensor fouling and aggradation of the channel bed occurred periodically throughout the project period, resulting in data loss. Although periods of data loss occurred, collection of optical sensor data improved our understanding of suspended-sediment dynamics in the Lagunitas Creek and Walker Creek watersheds by providing continuous time-series storm event data that were analyzed to determine durations of elevated sediment concentrations (periods of time when suspended-sediment concentration was greater than 100 mg/L). Data derived from this project contributed baseline suspended-sediment transport information that will be used to develop and implement sediment total maximum daily loads for Tomales Bay and its tributary watersheds, and provides supporting information for additional total maximum daily loads (pathogens, nutrients, and mercury) and restoration efforts for four federally listed aquatic species that are affected directly by sediment loading in the Tomales Bay watershed. In addition, this project provided an

  14. A COMPARISON OF THE SALINITY REGIME ALONG THE TEXAS COAST WITH TERRESTRIAL VEGETATION GREENNESS AND WATER USE IN THE GALVESTON BAY WATERSHED USING REMOTING SENSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variability in vegetation greenness was determined for the Galveston Bay watershed using biweekly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (A VHRR) flown on NOAA satellites. NDVI variability was compared with reg...

  15. CLASSIFICATION OF HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION, HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING IMAGERY OF THE LITTLE MIAMI RIVER WATERSHED IN SOUTHWEST OHIO, USA (FINAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document and associated land use/land cover (LULC) coverage, entitled Classification of High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery of the Little Miami River Watershed in Southwest Ohio, USA, is the result of a collaborative effort among an interdisci...

  16. DIAGNOSING CAUSES OF NATIVE FISH AND MUSSEL SPECIES DECLINE IN THE CLINCH AND POWELL RIVER WATERSHED, VIRGINIA, USA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The free-flowing Clinch and Powell watershed in Virginia, USA harbors a high number of endemic mussel and fish species but they are declining or going extinct at an alarming rate. In order to prioritize resource management strategies with respect to these fauna, a Graphical Info...

  17. Downscaling future climate projections to the watershed scale: a north San Francisco Bay estuary case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Micheli, Elisabeth; Flint, Lorraine; Flint, Alan; Weiss, Stuart; Kennedy, Morgan

    2012-01-01

    We modeled the hydrology of basins draining into the northern portion of the San Francisco Bay Estuary (North San Pablo Bay) using a regional water balance model (Basin Characterization Model; BCM) to estimate potential effects of climate change at the watershed scale. The BCM calculates water balance components, including runoff, recharge, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and stream flow, based on climate, topography, soils and underlying geology, and the solar-driven energy balance. We downscaled historical and projected precipitation and air temperature values derived from weather stations and global General Circulation Models (GCMs) to a spatial scale of 270 m. We then used the BCM to estimate hydrologic response to climate change for four scenarios spanning this century (2000–2100). Historical climate patterns show that Marin’s coastal regions are typically on the order of 2 °C cooler and receive five percent more precipitation compared to the inland valleys of Sonoma and Napa because of marine influences and local topography. By the last 30 years of this century, North Bay scenarios project average minimum temperatures to increase by 1.0 °C to 3.1 °C and average maximum temperatures to increase by 2.1 °C to 3.4 °C (in comparison to conditions experienced over the last 30 years, 1981–2010). Precipitation projections for the 21st century vary between GCMs (ranging from 2 to 15% wetter than the 20th-century average). Temperature forcing increases the variability of modeled runoff, recharge, and stream discharge, and shifts hydrologic cycle timing. For both high- and low-rainfall scenarios, by the close of this century warming is projected to amplify late-season climatic water deficit (a measure of drought stress on soils) by 8% to 21%. Hydrologic variability within a single river basin demonstrated at the scale of subwatersheds may prove an important consideration for water managers in the face of climate change. Our results suggest that in arid

  18. Watershed and Hydrodynamic Modeling for Evaluating the Impact of Land Use Change on Submerged Aquatic Vegetation and Seagrasses in Mobile Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Maurice G.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammed; Thom, Ron; Quattrochi, Dale; Woodruff, Dana; Judd, Chaeli; Ellism Jean; Watson, Brian; Rodriguez, Hugo; Johnson, Hoyt

    2009-01-01

    There is a continued need to understand how human activities along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast are impacting the natural ecosystems. The gulf coast is experiencing rapid population growth and associated land cover/land use change. Mobile Bay, AL is a designated pilot region of the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) and is the focus area of many current NASA and NOAA studies, for example. This is a critical region, both ecologically and economically to the entire United States because it has the fourth largest freshwater inflow in the continental USA, is a vital nursery habitat for commercially and recreational important fisheries, and houses a working waterfront and port that is expanding. Watershed and hydrodynamic modeling has been performed for Mobile Bay to evaluate the impact of land use change in Mobile and Baldwin counties on the aquatic ecosystem. Watershed modeling using the Loading Simulation Package in C++ (LSPC) was performed for all watersheds contiguous to Mobile Bay for land use Scenarios in 1948, 1992, 2001, and 2030. The Prescott Spatial Growth Model was used to project the 2030 land use scenario based on observed trends. All land use scenarios were developed to a common land classification system developed by merging the 1992 and 2001 National Land Cover Data (NLCD). The LSPC model output provides changes in flow, temperature, sediments and general water quality for 22 discharge points into the Bay. These results were inputted in the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Computer Code (EFDC) hydrodynamic model to generate data on changes in temperature, salinity, and sediment concentrations on a grid with four vertical profiles throughout the Bay s aquatic ecosystems. The models were calibrated using in-situ data collected at sampling stations in and around Mobile bay. This phase of the project has focused on sediment modeling because of its significant influence on light attenuation which is a critical factor in the health of submerged aquatic

  19. Development, calibration, and analysis of a hydrologic and water-quality model of the Delaware Inland Bays watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutierrez-Magness, Angelica L.; Raffensperger, Jeffrey Peter

    2003-01-01

    Excessive nutrients and sediment are among the most significant environmental stressors in the Delaware Inland Bays (Rehoboth, Indian River, and Little Assawoman Bays). Sources of nutrients, sediment, and other contaminants within the Inland Bays watershed include point-source discharges from industries and wastewater-treatment plants, runoff and infiltration to ground water from agricultural fields and poultry operations, effluent from on-site wastewater disposal systems, and atmospheric deposition. To determine the most effective restoration methods for the Inland Bays, it is necessary to understand the relative distribution and contribution of each of the possible sources of nutrients, sediment, and other contaminants. A cooperative study involving the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, the Delaware Geological Survey, and the U.S. Geological Survey was initiated in 2000 to develop a hydrologic and water-quality model of the Delaware Inland Bays watershed that can be used as a water-resources planning and management tool. The model code Hydrological Simulation Program - FORTRAN (HSPF) was used. The 719-square-kilometer watershed was divided into 45 model segments, and the model was calibrated using streamflow and water-quality data for January 1999 through April 2000 from six U.S. Geological Survey stream-gaging stations within the watershed. Calibration for some parameters was accomplished using PEST, a model-independent parameter estimator. Model parameters were adjusted systematically so that the discrepancies between the simulated values and the corresponding observations were minimized. Modeling results indicate that soil and aquifer permeability, ditching, dominant land-use class, and land-use practices affect the amount of runoff, the mechanism or flow path (surface flow, interflow, or base flow), and the loads of sediment and nutrients. In general, the edge-of-stream total suspended solids yields in the Inland Bays

  20. Shifts in Cyanobacterial Strain Dominance during the Onset of Harmful Algal Blooms in Florida Bay, USA.

    PubMed

    Berry, Dianna L; Goleski, Jennifer A; Koch, Florian; Wall, Charles C; Peterson, Bradley J; Anderson, O Roger; Gobler, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    Cyanobacteria are fundamental components of aquatic phytoplankton communities and some taxa can cause harmful blooms in coastal ecosystems. Harmful cyanobacterial blooms are typically comprised of multiple strains of a single genus or species that cannot be resolved microscopically. Florida Bay, USA, has experienced harmful cyanobacterial blooms that have been associated with the loss of eelgrass, spiny lobsters, and general food web disruption for more than two decades. To identify the strain or strains of cyanobacteria forming blooms in Florida Bay, samples were collected across the system over an annual cycle and analyzed via DNA sequencing using cyanobacterial-specific 16S rRNA gene primers, flow cytometry, and scanning electron microscopy. Analyses demonstrated that the onset of blooms in Florida Bay was coincident with a transformation of the cyanobacterial populations. When blooms were absent, the cyanobacterial population in Florida Bay was dominated by phycoerythrin-containing Synechococcus cells that were most similar to strains within Clade III. As blooms developed, the cyanobacterial community transitioned to dominance by phycocyanin-containing Synechococcus cells that were coated with mucilage, chain-forming, and genetically most similar to the coastal strains within Clade VIII. Clade VIII strains of Synechococcus are known to grow rapidly, utilize organic nutrients, and resist top-down control by protozoan grazers and viruses, all characteristics consistent with observations of cyanobacterial blooms in Florida Bay. Further, the strains of Synechococcus blooming in this system are genetically distinct from the species previously thought to cause blooms in Florida Bay, Synechococcus elongatus. Collectively, this study identified the causative organism of harmful cyanobacterial blooms in Florida Bay, demonstrates the dynamic nature of cyanobacterial stains within genera in an estuary, and affirms factors promoting Synechococcus blooms. PMID:25661475

  1. Islands at bay: Rising seas, eroding islands, and waterbird habitat loss in Chesapeake Bay (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.; Brinker, D.F.; Watts, B.D.; Costanzo, G.R.; Morton, D.D.

    2011-01-01

    Like many resources in the Chesapeake Bay region of the U. S., many waterbird nesting populations have suffered over the past three to four decades. In this study, historic information for the entire Bay and recent results from the Tangier Sound region were evaluated to illustrate patterns of island erosion and habitat loss for 19 breeding species of waterbirds. Aerial imagery and field data collected in the nesting season were the primary sources of data. From 1993/1994 to 2007/2008, a group of 15 islands in Tangier Sound, Virginia were reduced by 21% in area, as most of their small dunes and associated vegetation and forest cover were lost to increased washovers. Concurrently, nesting American black ducks (Anas rubripes) declined by 66%, wading birds (herons-egrets) by 51%, gulls by 72%, common terns (Sterna hirundo) by 96% and black skimmers (Rynchops niger) by about 70% in this complex. The declines noted at the larger Bay-wide scale suggest that this study area maybe symptomatic of a systemic limitation of nesting habitat for these species. The island losses noted in the Chesapeake have also been noted in other Atlantic U. S. coastal states. Stabilization and/or restoration of at least some of the rapidly eroding islands at key coastal areas are critical to help sustain waterbird communities. ?? 2010 US Government.

  2. Reconstructing the natural hydrology of the San Francisco Bay-Delta watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, P.; Hutton, P. H.; Howes, D. J.; Draper, A. J.; Sears, L.

    2015-04-01

    The San Francisco Estuary, composed of San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, is the largest estuary along the Pacific coast of the United States. The tributary watersheds of California's Central Valley are the principal sources of freshwater flow into the San Francisco Bay-Delta estuary. The Delta serves as one of the principal hubs of California's water system, which delivers 45% of the water used statewide to 25 million residents and 16 000 km2 of farmland. The development of California, from small-scale human settlements that co-existed with an environment rich in native vegetation to the eighth largest economy in the world was facilitated by reconfiguring the state's water resources to serve new uses: agriculture, industry, and a burgeoning population. The redistribution of water from native vegetation to other uses was accompanied by significant declines in native aquatic species that rely on the San Francisco Bay-Delta system. These declines have been attributed to a variety of causes, including reduction in the amount of freshwater reaching the San Francisco Bay-Delta watershed (Delta outflow); decreased sediment loads; increased nutrient loads; changes in nutrient stoichiometry; contaminants; introduced species; habitat degradation and loss; and shifts in the ocean-atmosphere system, among others. Among these stressors, only the volume of Delta outflow has been regulated in an effort to address the decline in aquatic species. As native species evolved under natural landscape conditions, prior to European settlement in the mid-18th century, we evaluated the impact of landscape changes on the amount of Delta outflow. We reconstructed the natural landscape and used water balances to estimate the long-term annual average Delta outflow that would have occurred under natural landscape conditions if the climate from 1922 to 2009 were to repeat. These outflows are referred to as "natural" Delta outflows and are the first reported estimate of

  3. The contribution of wetlands to stream nitrogen load in the Loch Vale Watershed, Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jian-hui, Huang; Baron, Jill; Binkley, Dan

    1996-01-01

    We explored the difference between the concentrations of different N forms and other chemical properties between stream water and riparian zone wetland soil water in the Loch Vale Watershed which is located on the eastern slope of the Continental Divide in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA. The nitrate N concentration in stream water were significantly higher than in soil water of the three wetlands, while no significant difference appeared in ammonium N. The pH values were higher and conductivity values were lower in stream water than in wetland soil water. However, significant difference also appeared between nitrate N concentrations, pH and conductivity values in the water sampled from different positions of streams. The stream tributary water had higher nitrate N concentrations, higher pH and higher conducitity values. We also conducted experiments to compare the difference between the productivity, total N concentrations in biomass and soil of upper layers. At the end, we concluded that the wetlands distributed along the streams in Loch Vale Watershed had little effect on the nitrogen load of the stream water there.

  4. Characterization of the shallow groundwater system in an alpine watershed: Handcart Gulch, Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kahn, K.G.; Ge, S.; Caine, J.S.; Manning, A.

    2008-01-01

    Water-table elevation measurements and aquifer parameter estimates are rare in alpine settings because few wells exist in these environments. Alpine groundwater systems may be a primary source of recharge to regional groundwater flow systems. Handcart Gulch is an alpine watershed in Colorado, USA comprised of highly fractured Proterozoic metamorphic and igneous rocks with wells completed to various depths. Primary study objectives include determining hydrologic properties of shallow bedrock and surficial materials, developing a watershed water budget, and testing the consistency of measured hydrologic properties and water budget by constructing a simple model incorporating groundwater and surface water for water year 2005. Water enters the study area as precipitation and exits as discharge in the trunk stream or potential recharge for the deeper aquifer. Surficial infiltration rates ranged from 0.1-6.2??0-5 m/s. Discharge was estimated at 1.28??10-3 km3. Numerical modeling analysis of single-well aquifer tests predicted lower specific storage in crystalline bedrock than in ferricrete and colluvial material (6.7??10-5-2.10??0-3 l/m). Hydraulic conductivity in crystalline bedrock was significantly lower than in colluvial and alluvial material (4.3??10-9 -2.0??10-4 m/s). Water budget results suggest that during normal precipitation and temperatures water is available to recharge the deeper groundwater flow system. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  5. Sources, fate, and transport of nitrogen and phosphorus in the Chesapeake Bay watershed-An empirical model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ator, Scott W.; Brakebill, John W.; Blomquist, Joel D.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient fate and transport through the Chesapeake Bay watershed to the bay reflect the diferent physical and chemical properties of nitrogen and phosphorus compounds. Groundwater is an important pathway for nitrogen transport (as nitrate), and TN flux is greatest in areas with greater groundwater flow and in areas of the Piedmont underlain by carbonate rocks. TN flux decreases with increasing vegetative growth (likely indicative of plant uptake) and soil available water capacity (likely indicative of reducing conditions). Phosphorus transport to streams, conversely, is greatest in areas most likely to generate overland runoff and related erosion, including those with less permeable and more erodible soils and greater precipitation. Phosphorus transport also is greater in the Coastal Plain than in other areas, possibly due to saturation of soils with historical phosphorus applications. Both nitrogen and phosphorus are lost within watershed impoundments (lakes, ponds, or reservoirs), and nitrogen is also lost significantly along flowing reaches, particularly in small streams and in larger streams in warmer areas.

  6. Land-Use Data Used to Relate Nutrient Sources to Water Quality in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakebill, J. W.; Preston, S. D.

    2001-05-01

    Land use, land cover, and water-quality data were used in a statistical model to help determine the distribution and relative importance of nutrient sources to Chesapeake Bay. Nutrient enrichment, one of the more serious issues facing the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries, can be attributed directly or indirectly to the varying land uses within the 64,000-square-mile watershed that covers parts of Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, D.C. Potential contributions of nutrients from agricultural sources can be estimated by using State and county agricultural census information, but this data typically lacks spatial detail. The use of such census data in conjunction with digital land-use imagery, however, can improve the spatial detail required to evaluate nutrient sources at larger scales. Several digital data sets that represent the spatial variability of land uses and their potential for nutrient contributions to the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries have been generated. Estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus loading for manure and commercial fertilizer sources based on county statistics and agricultural application rates were used with digital land-use and land-cover data derived from satellite imagery to further distribute the estimated nutrient loading within agricultural areas. Septic systems, urban runoff, atmospheric deposition, and other point and nonpoint sources are also represented by spatial data sets. Utilizing the spatial detail provided by these data sets, the U.S. Geological Survey has developed a set of spatially referenced regression models that statistically relate water-quality measurements to nutrient sources. Referred to as SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes (SPARROW), these models produce detailed estimates of the relative importance of each nutrient source and their spatial variability within the watershed. These estimates provide resource managers with a spatial tool that

  7. Evaluating changes in water quality with respect to nonpoint source nutrient management strategies in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keisman, J.; Sekellick, A.; Blomquist, J.; Devereux, O. H.; Hively, W. D.; Johnston, M.; Moyer, D.; Sweeney, J.

    2014-12-01

    Chesapeake Bay is a eutrophic ecosystem with periodic hypoxia and anoxia, algal blooms, diminished submerged aquatic vegetation, and degraded stocks of marine life. Knowledge of the effectiveness of actions taken across the watershed to reduce nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loads to the bay (i.e. "best management practices" or BMPs) is essential to its restoration. While nutrient inputs from point sources (e.g. wastewater treatment plants and other industrial and municipal operations) are tracked, inputs from nonpoint sources, including atmospheric deposition, farms, lawns, septic systems, and stormwater, are difficult to measure. Estimating reductions in nonpoint source inputs attributable to BMPs requires compilation and comparison of data on water quality, climate, land use, point source discharges, and BMP implementation. To explore the relation of changes in nonpoint source inputs and BMP implementation to changes in water quality, a subset of small watersheds (those containing at least 10 years of water quality monitoring data) within the Chesapeake Watershed were selected for study. For these watersheds, data were compiled on geomorphology, demographics, land use, point source discharges, atmospheric deposition, and agricultural practices such as livestock populations, crop acres, and manure and fertilizer application. In addition, data on BMP implementation for 1985-2012 were provided by the Environmental Protection Agency Chesapeake Bay Program Office (CBPO) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. A spatially referenced nonlinear regression model (SPARROW) provided estimates attributing N and P loads associated with receiving waters to different nutrient sources. A recently developed multiple regression technique ("Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge and Season" or WRTDS) provided an enhanced understanding of long-term trends in N and P loads and concentrations. A suite of deterministic models developed by the CBPO was used to estimate expected

  8. DINOFLAGELLATE CYST RECORDS AND HUMAN DISTURBANCE IN TWO NEIGHBORING ESTUARIES, NEW BEDFORD HARBOR AND APPONAGANSETT BAY, MASSACHUSETTS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dinoflagellate cyst records in sediments from New Bedford Harbor and Apponagansett Bay demonstrate sensitivity to environmental change caused by human activity in the watersheds over the last 500 years. Changes in the species richness, as well as absolute and relative abundan...

  9. Persistent organochlorine pollutants in eggs of colonial waterbirds from Galveston Bay and East Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Frank, D S; Mora, M A; Sericano, J L; Blankenship, A L; Kannan, K; Giesy, J P

    2001-03-01

    Eggs of neotropic cormorants (Phalacrocorax brasilianus), black-crowned night herons (Nycticorax nycticorax), and great egrets (Ardea alba) nesting on several locations in Galveston Bay (TX, USA) and at two control sites outside the bay were collected during April-May 1996 and analyzed for chlorinated pesticides, PCBs, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and polychlorinated dibenzofurans. Additionally, concentrations of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQs) were determined by use of relative potency factors (TEQs) or the H4IIE-luc bioassay TCDD-EQs. Concentrations of 1,1,-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE) were greater in eggs of neotropic cormorants from Alexander Island (mean = 1,040 ng/g wet wt) in the Houston Ship Channel (Houston, TX, USA) and in those from Telfair Island (mean = 1,460 ng/g wet wt), a reference location outside the bay, than in most locations inside the bay (mean range = 119-453 ng/g wet wt). Mean PCB concentrations were greater in eggs of neotropic cormorants from Alexander Island (mean = 5,720 ng/g wet wt) than in eggs of cormorants from areas farther away from the ship channel, including two reference sites outside the bay (mean range = 404-3,140 ng/g wet wt). The TCDD was the main dioxin congener detected in eggs from all locations within Galveston Bay. Instrumental TEQs in eggs ranged from 67 pg/g wet weight at control sites to 452 pg/g wet weight at Alexander Island. Concentrations of TCDD-EQs determined in the H4IIE assay were correlated with instrumental TEQs and were greater in eggs of cormorants from islands within the bay, although these were farther away from the ship channel. Overall, concentrations of DDE, PCBs, TCDD, and TCDD-EQs were less than the threshold levels known to affect reproduction. However, some eggs contained concentrations of total PCBs or DDE greater than what would elicit adverse effects on birds. No identifiable deformities or abnormalities were detected in embryos collected from

  10. Persistent organochlorine pollutants in eggs of colonial waterbirds from Galveston Bay and East Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, D.S.; Mora, M.A.; Sericano, J.L.; Blankenship, Alan L.; Kannan, K.; Giesy, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Eggs of neotropic cormorants (Phalacrocorax brasilianus), black-crowned night herons (Nycticorax nycticorax), and great egrets (Ardea alba) nesting on several locations in Galveston Bay (TX, USA) and at two control sites outside the bay were collected during April-May 1996 and analyzed for chlorinated pesticides, PCBs, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and polychlorinated dibenzofurans. Additionally, concentrations of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQs) were determined by use of relative potency factors (TEQs) or the H4IIE-luc bioassay TCDD-EQs. Concentrations of 1,1,-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE) were greater in eggs of neotropic cormorants from Alexander Island (mean = 1,040 ng/g wet wt) in the Houston Ship Channel (Houston, TX, USA) and in those from Telfair Island (mean = 1,460 ng/g wet wt), a reference location outside the bay, than in most locations inside the bay (mean range = 119-453 ng/g wet wt). Mean PCB concentrations were greater in eggs of neotropic cormorants from Alexander Island (mean = 5,720 ng/g wet wt) than in eggs of cormorants from areas farther away from the ship channel, including two reference sites outside the bay (mean range = 404-3,140 ng/g wet wt). The TCDD was the main dioxin congener detected in eggs from all locations within Galveston Bay. Instrumental TEQs in eggs ranged from 67 pg/g wet weight at control sites to 452 pg/g wet weight at Alexander Island. Concentrations of TCDD-EQs determined in the H4IIE assay were correlated with instrumental TEQs and were greater in eggs of cormorants from islands within the bay, although these were farther away from the ship channel. Overall, concentrations of DDE, PCBs, TCDD, and TCDD-EQs were less than the threshold levels known to affect reproduction. However, some eggs contained concentrations of total PCBs or DDE greater than what would elicit adverse effects on birds. No identifiable deformities or abnormalities were detected in embryos collected from

  11. Spatiotemporal variations in the abundance and composition of bulk and chromophoric dissolved organic matter in seasonally hypoxia-influenced Green Bay, Lake Michigan, USA.

    PubMed

    DeVilbiss, Stephen E; Zhou, Zhengzhen; Klump, J Val; Guo, Laodong

    2016-09-15

    Green Bay, Lake Michigan, USA, is the largest freshwater estuary in the Laurentian Great Lakes and receives disproportional terrestrial inputs as a result of a high watershed to bay surface area ratio. While seasonal hypoxia and the formation of "dead zones" in Green Bay have received increasing attention, there are no systematic studies on the dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its linkage to the development of hypoxia. During summer 2014, bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) analysis, UV-vis spectroscopy, and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) coupled with PARAFAC analysis were used to quantify the abundance, composition and source of DOM and their spatiotemporal variations in Green Bay, Lake Michigan. Concentrations of DOC ranged from 202 to 571μM-C (average=361±73μM-C) in June and from 279 to 610μM-C (average=349±64μM-C) in August. In both months, absorption coefficient at 254nm (a254) was strongly correlated to bulk DOC and was most abundant in the Fox River, attesting a dominant terrestrial input. Non-chromophoric DOC comprised, on average, ~32% of bulk DOC in June with higher terrestrial DOM and ~47% in August with higher aquagenic DOM, indicating that autochthonous and more degraded DOM is of lower optical activity. PARAFAC modeling on EEM data resulted in four major fluorescent DOM components, including two terrestrial humic-like, one aquagenic humic-like, and one protein-like component. Variations in the abundance of DOM components further supported changes in DOM sources. Mixing behavior of DOM components also indicated that while bulk DOM behaved quasi-conservatively, significant compositional changes occurred during transport from the Fox River to the open bay. PMID:27243792

  12. Estimation of regional hydrogeological properties for use in a hydrologic model of the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seck, A.; Welty, C.

    2012-12-01

    Characterization of subsurface hydrogeologic properties in three dimensions and at large scales for use in groundwater flow models can remain a challenge owing to the lack of regional data sets and scatter in coverage, type, and format of existing small-scale data sets. This is the case for the Chesapeake Bay watershed, where numerous studies have been carried out to quantify groundwater processes at small scales but limited information is available on subsurface characteristics and groundwater fluxes at regional scales. One goal of this work is to synthesize disparate information on subsurface properties for the Chesapeake Bay watershed for use in a 3D integrated ParFlow model over an area of 400,000 km2 with a horizontal resolution of 1 km and a vertical resolution of 5 m. We combined different types of data at various scales to characterize hydrostratigraphy and hydrogeological properties. The conceptual hydrogeologic model of the study area is composed of two major regions. One region extends from the Valley and Ridge physiographic province south of New York to the Piedmont physiographic province in Maryland and Virginia. This region is generally characterized by fractured rock overlain by a mantle of regolith. Soil thickness and hydraulic conductivity values were obtained from the U.S. General Soil Map (STATSGO2). Saprolite thickness was evaluated using casing depth information from well completion reports from four state agencies. Geostatistical methods were used to generalize point data to the model extent and resolution. A three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity field for fractured bedrock was estimated using a published national map of permeability and depth- varying functions from literature. The Coastal Plain of Maryland, Virginia, Delaware and New Jersey constitutes the second region and is characterized by layered sediments. In this region, the geometry of 20 aquifers and confining units was constructed using interpolation of published contour maps of

  13. Temporal and spatial patterns of phytoplankton production in Tomales Bay, California, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    Primary productivity in the water column was measured 14 times between April 1985 and April 1986 at three sites in Tomales Bay, California, USA The conditions at these three stations encompassed the range of hydrographic conditions, phytoplankton biomass, phytoplankton community composition, and turbidity typical of this coastal embayment. Linear regression of the measured daily carbon uptake against the composite parameter B Zp Io (where B is the average phytoplankton biomass in the photic zone; Zp is the photic depth; and Io is the daily surface insolation) indicates that 90% of the variability in primary productivity is explained by variations in phytoplankton biomass and light availability. The linear function derived using Tomales Bay data is essentially the same as that which explains more than 80% of the variation in productivity in four other estuarine systems. Using the linear function and measured values for B, Zp, and Io, the daily photic-zone productivity was estimated for 10 sites at monthly intervals over the annual period. The average daily photic-zone productivity for the 10 sites ranged from 0??2 to 2??2 g C m-2. The bay-wide average annual primary productivity in the water column was 400 g C m-2, with most of the uptake occuring in spring and early summer. Spatial and temporal variations in primary productivity were similar to variations in phytoplankton biomass. Productivity was highest in the seaward and central regions of the bay and lowest in the shallow landward region. ?? 1989.

  14. Long-term Watershed Database for the Ridge and Valley Physiographic Province: Mahantango Creek Watershed, Pennsylvania, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding agricultural effects on water quality in rivers and estuaries requires understanding of hydrometeorology and geochemical cycling at various scales over time. The USDA-ARS initiated a hydrologic research program at the Mahantango Creek Watershed (MCW) in 1968, a research watershed at t...

  15. Improving lakebed sediment quality in an urban estuary, Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foyle, A. M.; Norton, K. P.

    2007-12-01

    Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie, is a microtidal freshwater estuary on the North American Great Lakes. It is one of 40 remaining environmental Areas of Concern (AoCs) on the Great Lakes that have one or more water, habitat, or sediment quality impairments as defined by the International Joint Commission. In-situ natural capping using sediment from to-be-remediated watersheds and other sources is being considered as the most feasible means of remediating contaminated sediments in the estuary. A multi-decade sediment budget shows that, when localized anthropogenic effects are accounted for, the estuary net-accumulated sediment over time from three major sources: the Lake Erie littoral system (20%), streams (25%), and bank erosion and bluff recession (41%). The non-stream sources supply environmentally clean sediment from ancient coastal deposits along the shoreline, and from the modern littoral system. However, organic and metallic contaminants are supplied by streams and run-off and remain a remediation challenge. From a geological perspective, natural capping of contaminated sediment over the next several decades is a viable solution for the majority of the bay. The mechanism may not work effectively in all areas because approximately 25% of the bay floor is moderately net- erosional or accumulates sediments very slowly.

  16. Effects of contaminants on Double-crested Cormorant reproduction in Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Stromborg, K.L.; Melancon, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    In 1994 and 1995, Double-crested Cormorants Phalacrocorax auritus were monitored from egg-laying through 12 days of age at Cat Island, Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA. Sample eggs at hatching were analysed for organochlorines (including total PCBs, PCB congeners, and DDE), hepatic microsomal ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) activity in livers of embryos, and eggshell thickness. The number of eggs per nest that hatched and survived to i 2 days of age was estimated to be 2.2 in 1994 and 2.0 in 1995. Hatching success of eggs was not correlated with PCBs, the toxicity of PCBs based on congeners, or EROD activity. Hatching success was correlated with eggshell thickness and negatively correlated with DDE concentrations. Even though the insecticide DDT was banned in the early 1970s, we suggest that DDE concentrations in cormorant eggs in Green Bay are still having an affect on reproduction in this species.

  17. Effects of contaminants on Double-crested Cormorant reproduction in Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Stromborg, K.L.; Melancon, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994 and 1995, Double-crested Cormorants Phalacrocorax auritus were monitored from egg-laying through 12 days of age at Cat Island, Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA. Sample eggs at hatching were analysed for organochlorines (including total PCBs, PCB congeners, and DDE), hepatic microsomal ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) activity in livers of embryos, and eggshell thickness. The number of eggs per nest that hatched and survived to i 2 days of age was estimated to be 2.2 in 1994 and 2.0 in 1995. Hatching success of eggs was not correlated with PCBs, the toxicity of PCBs based on congeners, or EROD activity. Hatching success was correlated with eggshell thickness and negatively correlated with DDE concentrations. Even though the insecticide DDT was banned in the early 1970s, we suggest that DDE concentrations in cormorant eggs in Green Bay are still having an affect on reproduction in this species.

  18. Tracking Nonpoint Source Nitrogen and Carbon in Watersheds of Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, S.; Pennino, M. J.; Duan, S.; Blomquist, J.

    2012-12-01

    Humans have altered nitrogen and carbon cycles in rivers regionally with important impacts on coastal ecosystems. Nonpoint source nitrogen pollution is a leading contributor to coastal eutrophication and hypoxia. Shifts in sources of carbon impact downstream ecosystem metabolism and fate and transport of contaminants in coastal zones. We used a combination of stable isotopes and optical tracers to investigate fate and transport of nitrogen and carbon sources in tributaries of the largest estuary in the U.S., the Chesapeake Bay. We analyzed isotopic composition of water samples from major tributaries including the Potomac River, Susquehanna River, Patuxent River, and Choptank River during routine and storm event sampling over multiple years. A positive correlation between δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3- in the Potomac River above Washington D.C. suggested denitrification or biological uptake in the watershed was removing agriculturally-derived N during summer months. In contrast, the Patuxent River in Maryland showed elevated δ15N-NO3- (5 - 12 per mil) with no relationship to δ18O-NO3- suggesting the importance of wastewater sources. From the perspective of carbon sources, there were distinct isotopic values of the δ13C-POM of particulate organic matter and fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMS) for rivers influenced by their dominant watershed land use. EEMS showed that there were increases in the humic and fulvic fractions of dissolved organic matter during spring floods, particularly in the Potomac River. Stable isotopic values of δ13C-POM also showed rapid depletion suggesting terrestrial carbon "pulses" in the Potomac River each spring. The δ15N-POM peaked to 10 - 15 per mil each spring suggested a potential manure source or result of biological processing within the watershed. Overall, there were considerable changes in sources and transformations of nitrogen and carbon that varied across rivers and that contribute to nitrogen and carbon loads

  19. Stream Community Structure: An Analysis of Riparian Forest Buffer Restoration in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzetti, L. L.; Jones, R. C.

    2005-05-01

    Forested riparian buffer zones have been proposed as an important aid in curtailing upland sources of pollution before they reach stream surface waters, and enhancing habitat for stream organisms. Our objective was to test the efficacy of restored forest riparian buffers along streams in the Chesapeake Bay watershed by examining the stream macrobenthic community structure. To test our hypothesis, we collected riffle benthic and water samples, and performed habitat evaluations at 30 stream sites in the mid-Atlantic Piedmont, ranging in buffer age from 0 to greater than 50 years of age. Results showed that habitat, water quality, and benthic macroinvertebrate metrics improved with age of restored buffer. Habitat scores were driven mostly by instream substrate availability and width and age of riparian buffer zones. Water quality parameters varied within buffer age groups depending age of surrounding forest vegetation. Benthic invertebrate taxa richness, % EPT, % Plecoptera, % Ephemeroptera, and the FBI all improved with age of buffer zone. Instream habitat quality was the greatest driver of benthic macroinvertebrate community diversity and health, and appeared to plateau within 10-15 years of restoration with noticeable improvements occurring within 5-10 years post restoration.

  20. Selenium bioaccumulation and body condition in shorebirds and terns breeding in San Francisco Bay, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Joshua T; Eagles-Smith, Collin A

    2009-10-01

    The present study evaluated Se bioaccumulation in four waterbird species (n=206 birds) that breed within San Francisco Bay, California, U.S.A.: American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri), and Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia). Selenium concentrations were variable and influenced by several factors, including species, region, reproductive stage, age, and sex. Adult Se concentrations (microg/g dry wt) in livers ranged from 3.07 to 48.70 in avocets (geometric mean +/- standard error, 7.92 +/- 0.64), 2.28 to 41.10 in stilts (5.29 +/- 0.38), 3.73 to 14.50 in Forster's terns (7.13 _ 0.38), and 4.77 to 14.40 in Caspian terns (6.73 +/- 0.78). Avocets had higher Se concentrations in the North Bay compared to the South Bay, whereas stilt Se concentrations were similar between these regions and Forster's terns had lower Se concentrations in the North Bay compared to the South Bay. Female avocets had higher Se concentrations than male avocets, but this was not the case for stilts and Forster's terns. Of the factors assessed, reproductive stage had the most consistent effect among species. Prebreeding birds tended to have higher liver Se concentrations than breeding birds, but this trend was statistically significant only for Forster's terns. Forster's tern chicks had lower Se concentrations than Forster's tern adults, whereas avocet and stilt adults and chicks were similar. Additionally, body condition was negatively related to liver Se concentrations in Forster's tern adults but not in avocet, stilt, or Caspian tern adults and chicks. These variable results illustrate the complexity of Se bioaccumulation and highlight the need to sample multiple species and examine several factors to assess the impact of Se on wildlife. PMID:19459720

  1. Sedimentary Evidence for Land Use Change in the Narragansett Bay Watershed: Late Woodland period (~500 AD) to the present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salacup, J. M.; Altabet, M. A.; Herbert, T.; Prell, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    In the U.S., the last ~300 years have been a period of progressive and widespread resource exploitation, ecosystem degradation, and habitat destruction. In southern New England, the European Colonists thrived on the spread of slave-based plantation farming, which peaked ~1750 in RI. They produced commodities such as livestock, apples, onions, flax, and dairy. Trees felled to produce the necessary pasture- and farm-land were quickly used as lumber for boards, planks, timber, and barrels. In 1793, Slater Mill, located on the Blackstone River at the head of Narragansett Bay, was the first mill in the U.S to spin yarn using water power, making it the birthplace of the U.S Industrial Revolution. The ensuing urbanization drove the human population of the watershed up from ~50,000 in 1790 to more than 2 million by the year 2000. More recently, the Bay has experienced episodic hypoxic events [1]. These events correlate well with spatial and temporal patterns of nutrients and productivity [2] suggesting that human-induced increases in nutrient nitrogen and phosphorus are responsible for eutrophication-induced oxygen depletion [3]. However, these post-Colonial land use changes have yet to be characterized within the longer context of Native American land use practices, mainly due to the lack of historical records for the period. Additionally, the impact of this ecosystem disturbance on the Bay has not been fully described. Here we present results based on sedimentary profiles of biomarkers diagnostic for soil delivery to marine systems, branched glycerol dialykl glycerol tetraethers, and pollen for disturbance taxa, that suggest land use change began in the Bay's watershed 300 years before European contact. This contradicts long standing ideas regarding the land use practices of local tribes but agrees with new archaeological findings suggesting large semi-permanent settlements and widespread horticulture of maize may have been the norm at this time. We also show results of

  2. Polyphosphate Accumulation in Benthic Biofilms in an Agricultural Watershed (Pennsylvania, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient loading has contributed to eutrophication in rivers and downstream systems throughout the mid-Atlantic region, USA. It is known that biofilms can be assessed to determine the amount of phosphorus (P) pollution in a system and the agricultural impacts it has on stream health. Polyphosphates are a storage system in algal cells and can be used to reflect the degree of nutrient loading to stream ecosystems. An ISES (in situ enrichment system) experiment was deployed in four flumes of a USDA maintained stream watershed for a 12-day period. In July-August of 2014, experimental vials of agar were enriched with six levels of P loading from 0.0 to 1,540.8 μg PO4-3/day under consistently N enriched conditions. At the end of this period natural growing biofilms were scraped off tiles established in each site and analyzed for chlorophyll, total P, and polyphosphate. While there were no significant differences found in biomass growth between each treatment (two-way ANOVA; F= 3.387, p>0.042), there were significant increases in P storage with increased P provided (F= 148.853, p<0.001). We measured consistent uptake patterns throughout the watershed, suggesting that uptake was a consistent feature of biofilms throughout the landscape (F= 4.172, p>0.05). A large percentage of total P was also stored as polyphosphate in the treatments with added P in relation to the ambient tiles collected. Given these findings, we propose that polyphosphate storage in stream biofilms are an important, early warning indicator for changing trophic status in streams compared with biomass metrics (e.g., chlorophyll); therefore, P storage in stream algae reflects loading from throughout the terrestrial landscape.

  3. Impact of flood control reservoirs and pollution influx on the Sandy Creek Watershed, Mercer County, Pennsylvania, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Fred J.; Kanour, William; Weston, Bruce; Valerio, Gerald; Grayburn, Kenneth R.

    1986-03-01

    A study of the impact of two flood control reservoirs and pollution influx was conducted on two streams within the Sandy Creek Watershed, Mercer County, Pennsylvania, USA. Fecal coliforms were significantly reduced in the outflows without affecting water chemistry, thereby improving the overall water quality. The size and composition of the aquatic communities as well as stream metabolism varied seasonably among the different sampling stations. Pollution influx primarily from communities and agricultural drainage had a greater impact on the stream ecosystem than did impounding of the streams. Natural wetlands and riparian vegetation were important factors in reducing the pollution load in these streams. The reestablishment and maintenance of riparian vegetation should therefore be an integral part of the land-use plan for watersheds in order to improve water quality and wildlife habitats. In the future, the maintenance of riparian vegetation should be given prime consideration in the development of watershed projects.

  4. Mercury concentrations and loads in a large river system tributary to San Francisco Bay, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    David, N.; McKee, L.J.; Black, F.J.; Flegal, A.R.; Conaway, C.H.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Ganju, N.K.

    2009-01-01

    In order to estimate total mercury (HgT) loads entering San Francisco Bay, USA, via the Sacramento-San Joaquin River system, unfiltered water samples were collected between January 2002 and January 2006 during high flow events and analyzed for HgT. Unfiltered HgT concentrations ranged from 3.2 to 75 ng/L and showed a strong correlation (r2 = 0.8, p < 0.001, n = 78) to suspended sediment concentrations (SSC). During infrequent large floods, HgT concentrations relative to SSC were approximately twice as high as observed during smaller floods. This difference indicates the transport of more Hg-contaminated particles during high discharge events. Daily HgT loads in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River at Mallard Island ranged from below the limit of detection to 35 kg. Annual HgT loads varied from 61 ?? 22 kg (n = 5) in water year (WY) 2002 to 470 ?? 170 kg (n = 25) in WY 2006. The data collected will assist in understanding the long-term recovery of San Francisco Bay from Hg contamination and in implementing the Hg total maximum daily load, the long-term cleanup plan for Hg in the Bay. ?? 2009 SETAC.

  5. Hydrological and biogeochemical investigation of an agricultural watershed, southeast New Hampshire, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. M.; McDowell, W. H.; Campbell, J. E.; Hristov, A. N.

    2010-12-01

    Developing sustainable agricultural practices and policies requires an understanding of the hydrological and biological processes that control nutrient fluxes and how those processes are manifested in nutrient loading of surface water bodies. Groundwater and surface water from the UNH Organic Research Dairy, located in southeast New Hampshire, flow into the Lamprey River and then into the Great Bay, New Hampshire; both are experiencing increasing nutrient loads. The farm hosts approximately 80 Jersey cows (40 milking) and is located on relatively thin (<10m) glacial deposits that include sandy glacial till moraines, an ice-contact delta, and marine silt and clay overlying fractured calcareous quartzite. Recharge of precipitation is the dominant mode through which nutrients are introduced into the hydrologic system. Intensive meteorological, hydrological, and biogeochemical monitoring of a 35 hectare watershed that includes the main farm operation buildings and several pastures has been underway since June 2009. A three-dimensional transient unsaturated-saturated groundwater flow model was developed using LIDAR topography and detailed field mapping. The transient model was calibrated to observed water level and streamflow observations. Model results suggest that summer recharge rates vary considerably across the site and depth to the water table is the dominant control on the recharge flux. Areas having depth to water of 1-2 m experience the greatest recharge (up to 60% of precipitation). Areas with deeper water tables experience greater evapotranspiration from the vadose zone, and shallower water tables experience greater runoff. Water budget calculations suggest that the hydrologic fluxes occur predominately in the shallow groundwater, wetlands, and small surface streams draining the watershed. High dissolved nitrogen (N) concentrations (up to an average concentration of 35 mg N/L) are observed in groundwater immediately downgradient from the main farm operation

  6. A Regionalized Flow Duration Curve Method to Predict Streamflow for Ungauaged Basins: A Case Study of the Rappahannock Watershed in Virginia, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method to predict streamflow for ungauged basins of the Mid-Atlantic Region, USA was applied to the Rappahannock watershed in Virginia, USA. The method separates streamflow time series into magnitude and time sequence components. It uses the regionalized flow duration curve (RF...

  7. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF BENTHIC MACROFAUNAL FEEDING GUILDS AND EXOTISM AMONG HABITATS IN WILLAPA BAY, WASHINGTON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative benthic macrofaunal ( 0.5 mm) samples were collected at 8-15 random stations in Willapa Bay, WA, USA in each of four habitats (Zostera, Spartina, Upogebia, Neotrypaea) in 1996 and in each of seven habitats (Zostera, Spartina, Upogebia, Neotrypaea, oyster, mud/sand, s...

  8. Bioenergetics modeling to investigate habitat use by the non-indigenous crab, Carcinus maenas, in Willapa Bay, Washington, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A bioenergetics model was developed and applied to questions of habitat use and migration behavior of non-indigenous European green crab (Carcinus maenas) in Willapa Bay, Washington, USA. The model was parameterized using existing data from published studies on the ecology and physiology of C. maena...

  9. Mercury and organic carbon dynamics during runoff episodes from a northeastern USA watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, P.F.; Shanley, J.B.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.; Roth, D.A.; Taylor, H.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; DeWild, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Mercury and organic carbon concentrations vary dynamically in streamwater at the Sleepers River Research Watershed in Vermont, USA. Total mercury (THg) concentrations ranged from 0.53 to 93.8 ng/L during a 3-year period of study. The highest mercury (Hg) concentrations occurred slightly before peak flows and were associated with the highest organic carbon (OC) concentrations. Dissolved Hg (DHg) was the dominant form in the upland catchments; particulate Hg (PHg) dominated in the lowland catchments. The concentration of hydrophobic acid (HPOA), the major component of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), explained 41-98% of the variability of DHg concentration while DOC flux explained 68-85% of the variability in DHg flux, indicating both quality and quantity of the DOC substantially influenced the transport and fate of DHg. Particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations explained 50% of the PHg variability, indicating that POC is an important transport mechanism for PHg. Despite available sources of DHg and wetlands in the upland catchments, dissolved methylmercury (DmeHg) concentrations in streamwaters were below detection limit (0.04 ng/L). PHg and particulate methylmercury (PmeHg) had a strong positive correlation (r 2 = 0.84, p < 0.0001), suggesting a common source; likely in-stream or near-stream POC eroded or re-suspended during spring snowmelt and summer storms. Ratios of PmeHg to THg were low and fairly constant despite an apparent higher methylmercury (meHg) production potential in the summer. Methylmercury production in soils and stream sediments was below detection during snowmelt in April and highest in stream sediments (compared to forest and wetland soils) sampled in July. Using the watershed approach, the correlation of the percent of wetland cover to TmeHg concentrations in streamwater indicates that poorly drained wetland soils are a source of meHg and the relatively high concentrations found in stream surface sediments in July indicate these zones are

  10. Soil Erosion and Sediment Losses from the Ridge Watersheds in the Guánica Bay, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yongping; Taguas, Encarnación; Hu, Wenhui

    2014-05-01

    Puerto Rico faces considerable challenges regarding sustainable land use and effects of land use on adjacent coastal ecosystems and the services they provide. One primary concern is increased sediment loading to reservoirs and ultimately to Guánica Bay and reef areas outside the Bay. Studies by scientists in Puerto Rico have suggested that nutrient and sediment contaminants have increased 5 to 10 fold since pre-colonial levels and an additional 2 to 3 fold in the last 40-50 years (Sturm et al., 2012). Sediment deposition has significantly reduced the storage capacity of several reservoirs, and the associated contaminants and nutrients within the terrestrial soil particles of sediment can stress corals and negatively impact reef health. Sedimentation can also reduce photosynthetic activity of aquatic plants and algae, and increase water-treatment costs for domestic and industrial uses (Estades Hernández, 1997). Therefore, it is important to understand soil erosion and sediment transport processes. In this study, we analyze sediment losses from ridge watersheds of the Guánica Bay and try to understand the main factors causing soil erosion and sediment in those ridge watersheds. Our specific objectives were: 1) to quantify sediment contributions to Guánica Bay and identify sediment sources; 2) seek factors that impact the sediment loss and explore alternative strategies to reduce soil erosion and sediment loading to the reservoirs, Guánica Bay and the coastal zone. It was found that sediment loss in those ridge watersheds was mainly caused by interaction of heavy rainfall (especially the hurricanes) and steep mountainous slopes. Coffee planting increased the risk of soil erosion, which the loss of protective canopy for sun-grown coffee exacerbated. In addition, rainy seasons (February to May and August to November) contributed more than 80% of annual sediment loss. Exploration of different land use scenarios found that coffee land use yielded more sediment per

  11. Exploiting the Free Landsat Archive for Operational Monitoring of Ecosystem Condition and Change Across the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    BrowndeColstoun, Eric

    2010-01-01

    For the first time, all imagery acquired by the Landsat series of satellites is being made available by the USGS to users at no cost. This represents a key opportunity to use Landsat in a truly operational monitoring framework: large regions of the U.S. such as the Chesapeake Bay Watershed can now be analyzed using "wall-to-wall" imagery at timescales from approximately 1 month to several years. With the future launch of the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) and Decadal Survey missions such as the hyperspectral HyspIRI, it is imperative to develop robust processing systems to perform annual ecosystem assessments over large regions such as the Chesapeake Bay. We have been working at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to develop an integrative framework for inserting 30m, annual, Landsat based data and derived products into the existing decision support system for the Bay, with a particular focus on ecosystem condition and changes over the entire watershed. The basic goal is to use a 'stack' of Landsat imagery with 40% or less cloud cover to produce multi-date (2005-2009 period), cloud/shadow/gap-free composited surface reflectance products that will support the creation of watershed scale land cover/ use products and the monitoring of ecosystem change across the Bay. Our scientific focus extends beyond the conventional definition of land cover (i.e. a classification of vegetation type) as we propose to monitor both changes in surface type (e.g. forest to urban), vegetation structure (e.g. forest disturbance due to logging or insect damage), as well as winter crop cover. These processes represent a continuum from large, interannual changes in land cover type, to subtler, intra-annual changes associated with short-term disturbance. The free Landsat data are being processed to surface reflectance and composited using the existing Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System here at NASA/ GSFC, and land cover products (type, tree cover

  12. Climate Change and the Evolution and Fate of the Tangier Islands of Chesapeake Bay, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, David M.; Dridge, Karin M.; Hudgins, Mark H.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change and associated sea level rise (SLR) are already impacting low-lying coastal areas, including islands, throughout the world. Many of these areas are inhabited, many will need to be abandoned in coming decades as SLR continues. We examine the evolution (1850-2013) of the last inhabited offshore island in Virginia waters of Chesapeake Bay USA, the Tangier Islands. Three SLR scenarios, a low, mid, and high, were considered. Since 1850, 66.75% of the islands landmass has been lost. Under the mid-range SLR scenario, much of the remaining landmass is expected to be lost in the next 50 years and the Town will likely need to be abandoned. The high SLR scenario will accelerate the land loss and subsidence, such that the Town may need to be abandoned in as few as 25 years. We propose a conceptual plan that would significantly extend the lifespan of the islands and Town.

  13. Climate Change and the Evolution and Fate of the Tangier Islands of Chesapeake Bay, USA

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, David M.; Dridge, Karin M.; Hudgins, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and associated sea level rise (SLR) are already impacting low-lying coastal areas, including islands, throughout the world. Many of these areas are inhabited, many will need to be abandoned in coming decades as SLR continues. We examine the evolution (1850-2013) of the last inhabited offshore island in Virginia waters of Chesapeake Bay USA, the Tangier Islands. Three SLR scenarios, a low, mid, and high, were considered. Since 1850, 66.75% of the islands landmass has been lost. Under the mid-range SLR scenario, much of the remaining landmass is expected to be lost in the next 50 years and the Town will likely need to be abandoned. The high SLR scenario will accelerate the land loss and subsidence, such that the Town may need to be abandoned in as few as 25 years. We propose a conceptual plan that would significantly extend the lifespan of the islands and Town. PMID:26657975

  14. Climate Change and the Evolution and Fate of the Tangier Islands of Chesapeake Bay, USA.

    PubMed

    Schulte, David M; Dridge, Karin M; Hudgins, Mark H

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and associated sea level rise (SLR) are already impacting low-lying coastal areas, including islands, throughout the world. Many of these areas are inhabited, many will need to be abandoned in coming decades as SLR continues. We examine the evolution (1850-2013) of the last inhabited offshore island in Virginia waters of Chesapeake Bay USA, the Tangier Islands. Three SLR scenarios, a low, mid, and high, were considered. Since 1850, 66.75% of the islands landmass has been lost. Under the mid-range SLR scenario, much of the remaining landmass is expected to be lost in the next 50 years and the Town will likely need to be abandoned. The high SLR scenario will accelerate the land loss and subsidence, such that the Town may need to be abandoned in as few as 25 years. We propose a conceptual plan that would significantly extend the lifespan of the islands and Town. PMID:26657975

  15. Metals in horseshoe crab eggs from Delaware Bay, USA: temporal patterns from 1993 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Tsipoura, Nellie

    2014-10-01

    The health of horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) eggs is important not only to maintain horseshoe crab populations, but because they are a resource for higher trophic levels, such as fish and shorebirds. We examined the concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury, and selenium in the eggs of horseshoe crabs from Delaware Bay (between New Jersey and Delaware, USA) in 1993, 1994, 1995, 1999, 2000, and 2012 to determine if there were significant temporal changes and if levels appear to pose a health risk to the crabs themselves, or to predators that consume them. All metal levels declined in horseshoe crab eggs between 1994 and 2012, although the declines were much less consistent for lead and chromium than that for mercury and cadmium. Levels of contaminants found in these eggs are well below those known to cause adverse effects in the crabs themselves or to organisms that consume them, such as migrating shorebirds. PMID:25015345

  16. Sources and distribution of organic matter in a river-dominated estuary (Winyah Bay, SC, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goñi, Miguel A.; Teixeira, Maria J.; Perkey, David W.

    2003-08-01

    The sources and distribution of organic matter (OM) in surface waters and sediments from Winyah Bay (South Carolina, USA) were investigated using a variety of analytical techniques, including elemental, stable isotope and organic biomarker analyses. Several locations along the estuary salinity gradient were sampled during four different periods of contrasting river discharge and tidal range. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of surface waters ranged from 7 mg l -1 in the lower bay stations closest to the ocean to 20 mg l -1 in the river and upper bay samples. There was a general linear relationship between DOC concentrations and salinity in three of the four sampling periods. In contrast, particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations were significantly lower (0.1-3 mg l -1) and showed no relationship with salinity. The high molecular weight dissolved OM (HMW DOM) isolated from selected water samples collected along the bay displayed atomic carbon:nitrogen ratios ([C/N]a) and stable carbon isotopic compositions of organic carbon ( δ13C OC) that ranged from 10 to 30 and from -28 to -25‰, respectively. Combined, such compositions indicate that in most HMW DOM samples, the majority of the OM originates from terrigenous sources, with smaller contributions from riverine and estuarine phytoplankton. In contrast, the [C/N]a ratios of particulate OM (POM) samples varied significantly among the collection periods, ranging from low values of ˜5 to high values of >20. Overall, the trends in [C/N]a ratios indicated that algal sources of POM were most important during the early and late summer, whereas terrigenous sources dominated in the winter and early spring. In Winyah Bay bottom sediments, the concentrations of the mineral-associated OM were positively correlated with sediment surface area. The [C/N]a ratios and δ13C OC compositions of the bulk sedimentary OM ranged from 5 to 45 and from -28 to -23‰, respectively. These compositions were consistent

  17. Suspended sediment transport at the instantaneous and event time scales in semiarid watersheds of southeastern Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Nearing, Mark A.; Commons, Michael

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the high variability of suspended sediment transport in 16 watersheds of Walnut Gulch, southeastern Arizona, USA that were distinguished at three spatial scales: the plot (ca. 0.001-0.01 km2), unit-source (ca. 0.01-0.1 km2), and large (ca. 1-150 km2) scales. Event-based data of water discharge and suspended sediment concentration were compiled in variable periods between the 1960s and 2010s. By subjectively distinguishing five different intraevent transport patterns that may be ascribed to a combination of various hydrological and sediment-transport processes, we showed that no single sediment rating curve could be developed for these data. However, at the event temporal scale, event specific sediment yield (SSYe, t/km2) was significantly correlated to event runoff depth (h, mm) for all transport patterns of the watersheds, suggesting that the complexity of suspended sediment transport at the intraevent scale is effectively reduced at the event scale regardless of watershed sizes. Further regression analysis indicated that the SSYe-h relationship can be generally characterized by a proportional model, SSYe = nh where n, is conceptually equivalent to the volume-weighted event mean sediment concentration and is mainly determined by large events. For watersheds dominated by shrub cover, the change of the n value with watershed area was limited and thus may be reasonably regarded as a constant, implying that despite the highly variable suspended sediment concentrations during individual storm events in variable-sized watersheds, the synoptic effect of suspended sediment transport was similar and may be determined by a single value.

  18. Using ecological risk assessment to identify the major anthropogenic stressor in the Waquoit Bay Watershed, Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Serveiss, Victor B; Bowen, Jennifer L; Dow, David; Valiela, Ivan

    2004-05-01

    The Waquoit Bay Watershed ecological risk assessment was performed by an interdisciplinary and interagency workgroup. This paper focuses on the steps taken to formulate the analysis plan for this watershed assessment. The workgroup initially conducted a series of meetings with the general public and local and state managers to determine environmental management objectives for the watershed. The workgroup then decided that more information was needed on the impacts of six stressors: nutrient enrichment, physical alteration of habitat, altered freshwater flow, toxic chemicals, pathogens, and fisheries harvesting. Assessment endpoints were selected to establish the link between environmental management objectives, impacts of stressors, and scientifically measurable endpoints. The following assessment end-points were selected: estuarine eelgrass cover, scallop abundance, finfish diversity and abundance, wetland bird distribution and abundance, piping plover distribution and abundance, tissue contaminant levels, and brook trout distribution and abundance in streams. A conceptual model was developed to show the pathways between human activities, stressors, and ecological effects. The workgroup analyzed comparative risks, by first ranking stressors in terms of their potential risk to biotic resources in the watershed. Then stressors were evaluated by considering the components of stressors (e.g., the stressor chemical pollution included both heavy metals and chlorinated solvents components) in terms of intensity and extensiveness. The workgroup identified nutrient enrichment as the major stressor. Nutrient enrichment comprised both phosphorus enrichment in freshwater ponds and nitrogen enrichment within estuaries. Because phosphorus impacts were being analyzed and mitigated by the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, this assessment focused on nitrogen. The process followed to identify the predominant stressor and focus the analyses on nitrogen impacts on

  19. Impact of storm-water outfalls on sediment quality in Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.S.; Montagna, P.A.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Kalke, R.; Kennicutt, M.C.; Hooten, R.; Cripe, G.

    2000-03-01

    To determine the quality of sediments and extent of contaminant impacts, a Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) study was conducted at 36 sites in the Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, USA, system. Fifteen of the 36 sites were located near storm-water outfalls, but 13 other sites (i.e., industrial and domestic outfalls, oil field-produced water discharges, and dredging activity) and eight reference sites were also evaluated. Sediment samples were collected and analyzed for physical-chemical characteristics, contaminant concentrations (metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs], polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], and pesticides), toxicity, and a benthic index of biotic integrity (BIBI) composed of 10 independent metrics calculated for each site. This large data matrix was reduced using multivariate analysis to create new variables for each component representing overall means and containing most of the variance in the larger data set. The new variables were used to conduct the correlation analysis. Toxicity was significantly correlated with both chemistry and ecological responses, whereas no correlations between the benthic metrics and sediment chemistry were observed. Using the combined information from the SQT, four of the five most degraded sites were storm-water outfall sites. Although estuaries are naturally stressful environments because of salinity and temperature fluctuations, this ecosystem appears to have been compromised by anthropogenic influences similar to what has been observed for other heavily urbanized bay systems along the Texas and Gulf coast.

  20. Organochlorine contaminants and reproductive success of double-crested cormorants from Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Hines, R.K.; Gutreuter, S.; Stromborg, K.L.; Allen, P.D.; Melancon, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994 and 1995, nesting success of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) was measured at Cat Island, in southern Green Bay, Lake Michigan, Wisconsin, USA. Sample eggs at pipping and unhatched eggs were collected and analyzed for organochlorines (including total polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs] and DDE), hepatic microsomal ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) activity in embryos, and eggshell thickness. Of 1,570 eggs laid, 32% did not hatch and 0.4% had deformed embryos. Of 632 chicks monitored from hatching to 12 d of age, 9% were missing or found dead; no deformities were observed. The PCB concentrations in sample eggs from clutches with deformed embryos (mean = 10.2 I?g/g wet weight) and dead embryos (11.4 I?g/g) were not significantly higher than concentrations in sample eggs from nests where all eggs hatched (12.1 I?g/g). A logistic regression of hatching success versus DDE, dieldrin, and PCB concentrations in sibling eggs identified DDE and not dieldrin or PCBs as a significant risk factor. A logistic regression of hatching success versus DDE and eggshell thickness implicated DDE and not eggshell thickness as a significant risk factor. Even though the insecticide DDT was banned in the early 1970s, we suggest that DDE concentrations in double-crested cormorant eggs in Green Bay are still having an effect on reproduction in this species.

  1. Organochlorine contaminants and reproductive success of Double-crested Cormorants from Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Hines, R.K.; Gutreuter, S.; Stromborg, K.L.; Allen, P.D.; Melancon, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994 and 1995, nesting success of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) was measured at Cat Island, in southern Green Bay, Lake Michigan, Wisconsin, USA. Sample eggs at pipping and unhatched eggs were collected and analyzed for organochlorines (including total polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs] and DDE), hepatic microsomal ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) activity in embryos, and eggshell thickness. Of 1,570 eggs laid, 32% did not hatch and 0.4% had deformed embryos. Of 632 chicks monitored from hatching to 12 d of age, 9% were missing or found dead; no deformities were observed. The PCB concentrations in sample eggs from clutches with deformed embryos (mean = 10.2 ?g/g wet weight) and dead embryos (11.4 ?g/g) were not significantly higher than concentrations in sample eggs from nests where all eggs hatched (12.1 ?g/g). A logistic regression of hatching success versus DDE, dieldrin, and PCB concentrations in sibling eggs identified DDE and not dieldrin or PCBs as a significant risk factor. A logistic regression of hatching success versus DDE and eggshell thickness implicated DDE and not eggshell thickness as a significant risk factor. Even though the insecticide DDT was banned in the early 1970s, we suggest that DDE concentrations in double-crested cormorant eggs in Green Bay are still having an effect on reproduction in this species.

  2. Temporal and spatial change in coastal ecosystems using remote sensing: Example with Florida Bay, USA, emphasizing AVHRR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Stumpf, R.P.; Frayer, M.L.

    1997-06-01

    Florida Bay, at the southern tip of Florida, USA, has undergone dramatic changes in recent years. Following seagrass dieoffs starting in the late 1980`s, both algal blooms and high turbidity (the latter from resuspended sediments) have been reported as more common in the Bay. Remotely sensed data, particularly from the AVHRR (advanced very high resolution radiometer), can provide information on conditions prior to the start of monitoring programs as well as provide additional spatial detail on water clarity and particulate loads in this estuary . The AVHRR record currently available to us consists of over 600 usable scenes from December, 1989. Comparisons with field data have provided relationships with light attenuation, total suspended solids, and other turbidity measures. The imagery shows the seasonal change in turbidity resulting from high winds associated with winter cold fronts. Over the seven-year record, areas of clear water have decreased in the north-central Bay, while expanding in the southwestern Bay.

  3. Tracing Nitrate Contributions to Streams During Varying Flow Regimes at the Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestyen, S. D.; Shanley, J. B.; Boyer, E. W.; Ohte, N.; Doctor, D. H.; Kendall, C.

    2003-12-01

    Quantifying sources and transformations of nitrate in headwater catchments is fundamental to understanding the movement of nitrogen to streams. At the Sleepers River Research Watershed in northeastern Vermont (USA), we are using multiple chemical tracer and mixing model approaches to quantify sources and transport of nitrate to streams under varying flow regimes. We sampled streams, lysimeters, and wells at nested locations from the headwaters to the outlet of the 41 ha W-9 watershed under the entire range of flow regimes observed throughout 2002-2003, including baseflow and multiple events (stormflow and snowmelt). Our results suggest that nitrogen sources, and consequently stream nitrate concentrations, are rapidly regenerated during several weeks of baseflow and nitrogen is flushed from the watershed by stormflow events that follow baseflow periods. Both basic chemistry data (anions, cations, & dissolved organic carbon) and isotopic data (nitrate, dissolved organic carbon, and dissolved inorganic carbon) indicate that nitrogen source contributions vary depending upon the extent of saturation in the watershed, the initiation of shallow subsurface water inputs, and other hydrological processes. Stream nitrate concentrations typically peak with discharge and are higher on the falling than the rising limb of the hydrograph. Our data also indicate the importance of terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemical processes, in addition to hydrological connectivity in controlling how nitrate moves from the terrestrial landscape to streams. Our detailed sampling data from multiple flow regimes are helping to identify and quantify the "hot spots" and "hot moments" of biogeochemical and hydrological processes that control nitrogen fluxes in streams.

  4. Spatial and temporal relationships among watershed mining, water quality, and freshwater mussel status in an eastern USA river.

    PubMed

    Zipper, Carl E; Donovan, Patricia F; Jones, Jess W; Li, Jing; Price, Jennifer E; Stewart, Roger E

    2016-01-15

    The Powell River of southwestern Virginia and northeastern Tennessee, USA, drains a watershed with extensive coal surface mining, and it hosts exceptional biological richness, including at-risk species of freshwater mussels, downstream of mining-disturbed watershed areas. We investigated spatial and temporal patterns of watershed mining disturbance; their relationship to water quality change in the section of the river that connects mining areas to mussel habitat; and relationships of mining-related water constituents to measures of recent and past mussel status. Freshwater mussels in the Powell River have experienced significant declines over the past 3.5 decades. Over that same period, surface coal mining has influenced the watershed. Water-monitoring data collected by state and federal agencies demonstrate that dissolved solids and associated constituents that are commonly influenced by Appalachian mining (specific conductance, pH, hardness and sulfates) have experienced increasing temporal trends from the 1960s through ~2008; but, of those constituents, only dissolved solids concentrations are available widely within the Powell River since ~2008. Dissolved solids concentrations have stabilized in recent years. Dissolved solids, specific conductance, pH, and sulfates also exhibited spatial patterns that are consistent with dilution of mining influence with increasing distance from mined areas. Freshwater mussel status indicators are correlated negatively with dissolved solids concentrations, spatially and temporally, but the direct causal mechanisms responsible for mussel declines remain unknown. PMID:26437340

  5. Spatial Predictive Modeling and Remote Sensing of Land Use Change in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Scott J.; Bockstael, Nancy E.; Jantz, Claire A.

    2005-01-01

    This project was focused on modeling the processes by which increasing demand for developed land uses, brought about by changes in the regional economy and the socio-demographics of the region, are translated into a changing spatial pattern of land use. Our study focused on a portion of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed where the spatial patterns of sprawl represent a set of conditions generally prevalent in much of the U.S. Working in the region permitted us access to (i) a time-series of multi-scale and multi-temporal (including historical) satellite imagery and (ii) an established network of collaborating partners and agencies willing to share resources and to utilize developed techniques and model results. In addition, a unique parcel-level tax assessment database and linked parcel boundary maps exists for two counties in the Maryland portion of this region that made it possible to establish a historical cross-section time-series database of parcel level development decisions. Scenario analyses of future land use dynamics provided critical quantitative insight into the impact of alternative land management and policy decisions. These also have been specifically aimed at addressing growth control policies aimed at curbing exurban (sprawl) development. Our initial technical approach included three components: (i) spatial econometric modeling of the development decision, (ii) remote sensing of suburban change and residential land use density, including comparisons of past change from Landsat analyses and more traditional sources, and (iii) linkages between the two through variable initialization and supplementation of parcel level data. To these we added a fourth component, (iv) cellular automata modeling of urbanization, which proved to be a valuable addition to the project. This project has generated both remote sensing and spatially explicit socio-economic data to estimate and calibrate the parameters for two different types of land use change models and has

  6. Factors controlling floc settling velocity within San Francisco Bay, USA and comparisons with parameterisation approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Andrew; Schoellhamer, David

    2014-05-01

    Much of the sediment within San Francisco Bay (SFB) is cohesive and can therefore act as transport mechanism for pollutants which adsorb to clay minerals. Furthermore, muddy sediment can flocculate when resuspended; this significantly alters their transport characteristics, which poses a serious complication to the modelling of sediment pathways. The aim of this research was to determine the factors that affect floc settling velocity along a longitudinal transect in an estuary. We collected and analysed data on flocs and on potential controlling factors along a 147 km transect the length of San Francisco Bay, USA, on June 17th, 2008. The INSSEV-LF video system, which includes the novel video-based LabSFLOC instrument (developed by Manning) was used to measure floc diameters and settling velocities at 30 stations at a height of 0.7 m above the estuary bed. Floc sizes (D) ranged from 22 microns to 639 microns settling velocities (Ws) ranged between 0.04 mm/s to 15.8 mm/s during the longitudinal transect. Nearbed turbulent shear stresses throughout the transect duration were within the 0.2-0.5 Pa range which typically stimulates flocculation growth. Individual D-Ws-floc density plots suggest the suspended sediments encountered throughout SFB were composed of both mud and mixed sediment flocs. The macroflocs and microflocs (demarcation at 160 microns) sub-populations demonstrated parameterised settling velocities which spanned nearly double the range of the sample mean settling velocities (Ws_mean spanned 0.6-6 mm/s). The macroflocs tended to dominate the suspended mass (up to 77% of the ambient suspended solids concentration; SSC) from San Pablo Bay through to Carquinez Strait (the vicinity of the turbidity maximum zone). Microfloc mass was particularly significant (typically 60-100% of the SSC) in the northern section of South Bay and most of Central Bay. During slack tide, larger and faster settling flocs deposited, accounting for most of the longitudinal

  7. Response of aquatic macrophytes to human land use perturbations in the watersheds of Wisconsin lakes, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, Laura L.; Bozek, Michael A.; Hauxwell, Jennifer A.; Wagner, Kelly; Knight, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Aquatic macrophyte communities were assessed in 53 lakes in Wisconsin, U.S.A. along environmental and land use development gradients to determine effects human land use perturbations have on aquatic macrophytes at the watershed and riparian development scales. Species richness and relative frequency were surveyed in lakes from two ecoregions: the Northern Lakes and Forests Ecoregion and the Southeastern Wisconsin Till Plain Ecoregion. Lakes were selected along a gradient of watershed development ranging from undeveloped (i.e., forested), to agricultural to urban development. Land uses occurring in the watershed and in perimeters of different width (0–100, 0–200, 0–500, and 0–1000 m from shore, in the watershed) were used to assess effects on macrophyte communities. Snorkel and SCUBA were used to survey aquatic macrophyte species in 18 quadrats of 0.25 m2 along 14 transects placed perpendicular to shore in each lake. Effects of watershed development (e.g., agriculture and/or urban) were tested at whole-lake (entire littoral zone) and near-shore (within 7 m of shore) scales using canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and linear regression. Overall, species richness was negatively related to watershed development, while frequencies of individual species and groups differed in level of response to different land use perturbations. Effects of land use in the perimeters on macrophytes, with a few exceptions, did not provide higher correlations compared to land use at the watershed scale. In lakes with higher total watershed development levels, introduced species, particularly Myriophyllumspicatum, increased in abundance and native species, especially potamids, isoetids, and floating-leaved plants, declined in abundance. Correlations within the northern and southeastern ecoregions separately were not significant. Multivariate analyses suggested species composition is driven by environmental responses as well as human development pressures. Both water

  8. Geochemical fine-sediment tracers in San Francisco Bay and its outer coast: the role of local watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takesue, R. K.; Barnard, P. L.

    2012-12-01

    Sediment enters San Francisco Bay (SFB) through the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, the Golden Gate, and local watersheds. Inputs from local watersheds have become increasingly important since the 1940s when large-scale impoundments began upstream of the Delta. The goals of this study are to determine whether fine sediment from local watersheds have distinct geochemical signatures, and if these can be used to determine whether locally-derived sediment accumulates in SFB. Retention of fine sediment is essential if accretion of shallow and intertidal habitats is to keep pace with sea level rise. Total contents of chromium (Cr), lanthanum (La), thorium (Th), zirconium (Zr), rare earth elements (REE), and twenty five other elements were determined by ICP-MS in the fine or "mud" fraction (<63 μm) of river, tributary, bay, and outer coast bed sediment. SFB and outer coast sediment was collected in January 2012 after a 5-day storm. River and tributary sediment was collected between 2010-2012. REE contents were normalized to a shale composite (NASC). In comparison to granitic material from the Sierra Nevada, local watersheds contain ultramafic Franciscan rocks in the Coast Range, volcanic deposits near Napa and Sonoma, and ancient marine sedimentary rocks. Fine sediment from the Sacramento River was enriched in heavy REE (HREENASC) and Cr, while that from the San Joaquin River was enriched in light REE (LREENASC) and Th. Petaluma River and Sonoma Creek fine sediments were distinguished by middle REE (MREENASC) enrichments and low Cr contents consistent with felsic volcanic rocks. In contrast, fine sediments in Napa River and Wildcat Creek had relatively flat REENASC patterns and intermediate to high Cr contents that suggest a Franciscan influence. The same was true for fine sediment in Marin creeks (Arroyo del Presidio and Corte Madera) and two South Bay tributaries (Guadelupe River and San Francisquito Creek). San Francisquito Creek fine sediment was uniquely

  9. Linking watershed nitrogen sources with nitrogen dynamics in rivers of western Oregon, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We found a wide range of riverine N yields from the study basins, ranging from one to 70 kg N/ha/yr. Across the study basins, N export was more strongly correlated to fertilizer application rates than percent of agricultural area in the watershed. Low watershed N yields reflect...

  10. A sediment budget for a small semiarid watershed in southeastern Arizona, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A sediment budget was developed for a 47 ha watershed based on hydrologic, geomorphic, erosion, and sediment data collected from 1963 through 2006 on the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in the southwestern US. Although the channel network is well developed and incising in the upper end ...

  11. Long-term carbon dioxide and water flux database, Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, Arizona, USA 1850

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present the carbon dioxide and water flux data along with associated meteorological data collected by USDA Agricultural Research Service, Southwest Watershed Research Center, on the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) from 1997 through 2006. Measurements were collected from a shrub and gr...

  12. Impacts of Watershed Characteristics and Crop Rotations on Winter Cover Crop Nitrate-Nitrogen Uptake Capacity within Agricultural Watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Region

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangchul; Yeo, In-Young; Sadeghi, Ali M.; McCarty, Gregory W.; Hively, W. Dean; Lang, Megan W.

    2016-01-01

    The adoption rate of winter cover crops (WCCs) as an effective conservation management practice to help reduce agricultural nutrient loads in the Chesapeake Bay (CB) is increasing. However, the WCC potential for water quality improvement has not been fully realized at the watershed scale. This study was conducted to evaluate the long-term impact of WCCs on hydrology and NO3-N loads in two adjacent watersheds and to identify key management factors that affect the effectiveness of WCCs using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and statistical methods. Simulation results indicated that WCCs are effective for reducing NO3-N loads and their performance varied based on planting date, species, soil characteristics, and crop rotations. Early-planted WCCs outperformed late-planted WCCs on the reduction of NO3-N loads and early-planted rye (RE) reduced NO3-N loads by ~49.3% compared to the baseline (no WCC). The WCCs were more effective in a watershed dominated by well-drained soils with increased reductions in NO3-N fluxes of ~2.5 kg N·ha-1 delivered to streams and ~10.1 kg N·ha-1 leached into groundwater compared to poorly-drained soils. Well-drained agricultural lands had higher transport of NO3-N in the soil profile and groundwater due to increased N leaching. Poorly-drained agricultural lands had lower NO3-N due to extensive drainage ditches and anaerobic soil conditions promoting denitrification. The performance of WCCs varied by crop rotations (i.e., continuous corn and corn-soybean), with increased N uptake following soybean crops due to the increased soil mineral N availability by mineralization of soybean residue compared to corn residue. The WCCs can reduce N leaching where baseline NO3-N loads are high in well-drained soils and/or when residual and mineralized N availability is high due to the cropping practices. The findings suggested that WCC implementation plans should be established in watersheds according to local edaphic and agronomic

  13. Impacts of Watershed Characteristics and Crop Rotations on Winter Cover Crop Nitrate-Nitrogen Uptake Capacity within Agricultural Watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Region.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangchul; Yeo, In-Young; Sadeghi, Ali M; McCarty, Gregory W; Hively, W Dean; Lang, Megan W

    2016-01-01

    The adoption rate of winter cover crops (WCCs) as an effective conservation management practice to help reduce agricultural nutrient loads in the Chesapeake Bay (CB) is increasing. However, the WCC potential for water quality improvement has not been fully realized at the watershed scale. This study was conducted to evaluate the long-term impact of WCCs on hydrology and NO3-N loads in two adjacent watersheds and to identify key management factors that affect the effectiveness of WCCs using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and statistical methods. Simulation results indicated that WCCs are effective for reducing NO3-N loads and their performance varied based on planting date, species, soil characteristics, and crop rotations. Early-planted WCCs outperformed late-planted WCCs on the reduction of NO3-N loads and early-planted rye (RE) reduced NO3-N loads by ~49.3% compared to the baseline (no WCC). The WCCs were more effective in a watershed dominated by well-drained soils with increased reductions in NO3-N fluxes of ~2.5 kg N·ha-1 delivered to streams and ~10.1 kg N·ha-1 leached into groundwater compared to poorly-drained soils. Well-drained agricultural lands had higher transport of NO3-N in the soil profile and groundwater due to increased N leaching. Poorly-drained agricultural lands had lower NO3-N due to extensive drainage ditches and anaerobic soil conditions promoting denitrification. The performance of WCCs varied by crop rotations (i.e., continuous corn and corn-soybean), with increased N uptake following soybean crops due to the increased soil mineral N availability by mineralization of soybean residue compared to corn residue. The WCCs can reduce N leaching where baseline NO3-N loads are high in well-drained soils and/or when residual and mineralized N availability is high due to the cropping practices. The findings suggested that WCC implementation plans should be established in watersheds according to local edaphic and agronomic

  14. Hydrology and water quality of a field and riparian buffer adjacent to a mangrove wetland in Jobos Bay Watershed, Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Models that estimate the effects of agricultural conservation practices on water quantity and quality have become increasingly important tools for short- and long-term assessments. In this study, we simulated the water quality and hydrology of a portion of the Jobos Bay watershed, Puerto Rico using...

  15. Best management practices for reducing nutrient loads in a sub-watershed of Chesapeake Bay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water quality improvement in the Chesapeake Bay is a grave concern. An initiative to reduce the nutrient loads to stream has been undertaken to attain a target total maximum daily load (TMDL) at Chesapeake Bay. A general guideline with a set of best management practices (BMPs) has been in place for ...

  16. Best management practices for reducing nutrient loads in a sub-watershed of Chesapeake Bay area

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water quality improvement in the Chesapeake Bay is a grave concern. An initiative to reduce the nutrient loads to stream has been undertaken to attain a target total maximum daily load (TMDL) at Chesapeake Bay. A general guideline with a set of best management practices (BMPs) has been in place for ...

  17. 75 FR 27552 - Guidance for Federal Land Management in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... Information Executive Order 13508, Chesapeake Bay Protection and Restoration, dated May 12, 2009 (74 FR 23099... 24, 2010 (75 FR 91294, March 24). This final guidance incorporates revisions resulting from public... water pollution'' that are appropriate to restore and protect the Chesapeake Bay. Assuming that...

  18. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) and Polybrominated Diphenol Ethers (PBDEs) in Current and Historical Samples of Avian Eggs from Nesting Sites in Buzzards Bay, MA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We measured concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in eggs from breeding colonies in Buzzards Bay, MA, USA. Eggs from two piscivorous bird species, common (Sterna hirundo) and roseate (Sterna dougallii) terns, were collected...

  19. Advancing the Guánica Bay (Puerto Rico) Watershed Management Plan

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consideration of stakeholder values in watershed planning and management is a necessity, but sufficiently eliciting, understanding, and organizing those values can be daunting. Many studies have demonstrated the usefulness of formal decision analysis to integrate expert knowledge...

  20. Factors Influencing Watershed Average Erosion Rates Calculated from Reservoir Sedimentation in Eastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamed, A.; Snyder, N. P.; David, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Reservoir Sedimentation Database (ResSed), a catalogue of reservoirs and depositional data that has recently become publically available, allows for rapid calculation of sedimentation rates and rates of capacity loss over short (annual to decadal) timescales. This study is a statistical investigation of factors controlling watershed average erosion rates (E) in eastern United States watersheds. We develop an ArcGIS-based model that delineates watersheds upstream of ResSed dams and calculate drainage areas to determine E for 191 eastern US watersheds. Geomorphic, geologic, regional, climatic, and land use variables are quantified within study watersheds using GIS. Erosion rates exhibit a large amount of scatter, ranging from 0.001 to 1.25 mm/yr. A weak inverse power law relationship between drainage area (A) and E (R2 = 0.09) is evident, similar to other studies (e.g. Milliman and Syvitski, 1992; Koppes and Montgomery, 2009). Linear regressions reveal no relationship between mean watershed slope (S) and E, possibly due to the relatively low relief of the region (mean S for all watersheds is 6°). Analysis of Variance shows that watersheds in formerly glaciated regions exhibit a statistically significant lower mean E (0.06 mm/year) than watersheds in unglaciated regions (0.12 mm/year), but that watersheds with different dam purposes show no significant differences in mean E. Linear regressions reveal no relationships between E and land use parameters like percent agricultural land and percent impervious surfaces (I), but classification and regression trees indicate that watersheds in highly developed regions (I > 34%) exhibit mean E (0.36 mm/year) that is four times higher than watersheds in less developed (I < 34%) regions (0.09 mm/year). Further, interactions between land use variables emerge in formerly glaciated regions, where increased agricultural land results in higher rates of annual capacity loss in reservoirs (R2 = 0.56). Plots of E versus timescale of

  1. Concurrent exposure of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) to multiple algal toxins in Sarasota Bay, Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Twiner, Michael J; Fire, Spencer; Schwacke, Lori; Davidson, Leigh; Wang, Zhihong; Morton, Steve; Roth, Stephen; Balmer, Brian; Rowles, Teresa K; Wells, Randall S

    2011-01-01

    Sentinel species such as bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) can be impacted by large-scale mortality events due to exposure to marine algal toxins. In the Sarasota Bay region (Gulf of Mexico, Florida, USA), the bottlenose dolphin population is frequently exposed to harmful algal blooms (HABs) of Karenia brevis and the neurotoxic brevetoxins (PbTx; BTX) produced by this dinoflagellate. Live dolphins sampled during capture-release health assessments performed in this region tested positive for two HAB toxins; brevetoxin and domoic acid (DA). Over a ten-year study period (2000-2009) we have determined that bottlenose dolphins are exposed to brevetoxin and/or DA on a nearly annual basis (i.e., DA: 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009; brevetoxin: 2000, 2004, 2005, 2008, 2009) with 36% of all animals testing positive for brevetoxin (n = 118) and 53% positive for DA (n = 83) with several individuals (14%) testing positive for both neurotoxins in at least one tissue/fluid. To date there have been no previously published reports of DA in southwestern Florida marine mammals, however the May 2008 health assessment coincided with a Pseudo-nitzschia pseudodelicatissima bloom that was the likely source of DA observed in seawater and live dolphin samples. Concurrently, both DA and brevetoxin were observed in common prey fish. Although no Pseudo-nitzschia bloom was identified the following year, DA was identified in seawater, fish, sediment, snails, and dolphins. DA concentrations in feces were positively correlated with hematologic parameters including an increase in total white blood cell (p = 0.001) and eosinophil (p<0.001) counts. Our findings demonstrate that dolphins within Sarasota Bay are commonly exposed to two algal toxins, and provide the impetus to further explore the potential long-term impacts on bottlenose dolphin health. PMID:21423740

  2. Molecular and morphological diversity of Narragansett Bay (RI, USA) Ulva (Ulvales, Chlorophyta) populations.

    PubMed

    Guidone, Michele; Thornber, Carol; Wysor, Brian; O'Kelly, Charles J

    2013-10-01

    Macroalgal bloom-forming species occur in coastal systems worldwide. However, due to overlapping morphologies in some taxa, accurate taxonomic assessment and classification of these species can be quite challenging. We investigated the molecular and morphological characteristics of 153 specimens of bloom-forming Ulva located in and around Narragansett Bay, RI, USA. We analyzed sequences of the nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 region (ITS1) and the chloroplast-encoded rbcL; based on the ITS1 data, we grouped the specimens into nine operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Eight of these OTUs have been previously reported to exist, while one is novel. Of the eight OTUs, all shared sequence identity with previously published sequences or differed by less than 1.5% sequence divergence for two molecular markers. Previously, 10 species names were reported for Ulva in Rhode Island (one blade and nine tube-forming species) based upon morphological classification alone. Of our nine OTUs, three contained blade-forming specimens (U. lactuca, U. compressa, U. rigida), one OTU had a blade with a tubular stipe, and six contained unbranched and/or branched tubular morphologies (one of these six, U. compressa, had both a blade and a tube morphology). While the three blade-forming OTUs in Narragansett Bay can frequently be distinguished by careful observations of morphological characteristics, and spatial/temporal distribution, it is much more difficult to distinguish among the tube-forming specimens based upon morphology or distribution alone. Our data support the molecular species concept for Ulva, and indicate that molecular-based classifications of Ulva species are critical for proper species identification, and subsequent ecological assessment or mitigation of Ulva blooms. PMID:27007320

  3. Concurrent Exposure of Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) to Multiple Algal Toxins in Sarasota Bay, Florida, USA

    PubMed Central

    Twiner, Michael J.; Fire, Spencer; Schwacke, Lori; Davidson, Leigh; Wang, Zhihong; Morton, Steve; Roth, Stephen; Balmer, Brian; Rowles, Teresa K.; Wells, Randall S.

    2011-01-01

    Sentinel species such as bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) can be impacted by large-scale mortality events due to exposure to marine algal toxins. In the Sarasota Bay region (Gulf of Mexico, Florida, USA), the bottlenose dolphin population is frequently exposed to harmful algal blooms (HABs) of Karenia brevis and the neurotoxic brevetoxins (PbTx; BTX) produced by this dinoflagellate. Live dolphins sampled during capture-release health assessments performed in this region tested positive for two HAB toxins; brevetoxin and domoic acid (DA). Over a ten-year study period (2000–2009) we have determined that bottlenose dolphins are exposed to brevetoxin and/or DA on a nearly annual basis (i.e., DA: 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009; brevetoxin: 2000, 2004, 2005, 2008, 2009) with 36% of all animals testing positive for brevetoxin (n = 118) and 53% positive for DA (n = 83) with several individuals (14%) testing positive for both neurotoxins in at least one tissue/fluid. To date there have been no previously published reports of DA in southwestern Florida marine mammals, however the May 2008 health assessment coincided with a Pseudo-nitzschia pseudodelicatissima bloom that was the likely source of DA observed in seawater and live dolphin samples. Concurrently, both DA and brevetoxin were observed in common prey fish. Although no Pseudo-nitzschia bloom was identified the following year, DA was identified in seawater, fish, sediment, snails, and dolphins. DA concentrations in feces were positively correlated with hematologic parameters including an increase in total white blood cell (p = 0.001) and eosinophil (p<0.001) counts. Our findings demonstrate that dolphins within Sarasota Bay are commonly exposed to two algal toxins, and provide the impetus to further explore the potential long-term impacts on bottlenose dolphin health. PMID:21423740

  4. Bed composition generation for morphodynamic modeling: Case study of San Pablo Bay in California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van der Wegen, M.; Dastgheib, A.; Jaffe, B.E.; Roelvink, D.

    2011-01-01

    Applications of process-based morphodynamic models are often constrained by limited availability of data on bed composition, which may have a considerable impact on the modeled morphodynamic development. One may even distinguish a period of "morphodynamic spin-up" in which the model generates the bed level according to some ill-defined initial bed composition rather than describing the realistic behavior of the system. The present paper proposes a methodology to generate bed composition of multiple sand and/or mud fractions that can act as the initial condition for the process-based numerical model Delft3D. The bed composition generation (BCG) run does not include bed level changes, but does permit the redistribution of multiple sediment fractions over the modeled domain. The model applies the concept of an active layer that may differ in sediment composition above an underlayer with fixed composition. In the case of a BCG run, the bed level is kept constant, whereas the bed composition can change. The approach is applied to San Pablo Bay in California, USA. Model results show that the BCG run reallocates sand and mud fractions over the model domain. Initially, a major sediment reallocation takes place, but development rates decrease in the longer term. Runs that take the outcome of a BCG run as a starting point lead to more gradual morphodynamic development. Sensitivity analysis shows the impact of variations in the morphological factor, the active layer thickness, and wind waves. An important but difficult to characterize criterion for a successful application of a BCG run is that it should not lead to a bed composition that fixes the bed so that it dominates the "natural" morphodynamic development of the system. Future research will focus on a decadal morphodynamic hindcast and comparison with measured bathymetries in San Pablo Bay so that the proposed methodology can be tested and optimized. ?? 2010 The Author(s).

  5. Modeling the impact of watershed management policies on marine ecosystem services with application to Hood Canal, WA, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, D. A.; Kim, C.; Marsik, M.; Spiridonov, G.; Toft, J.; Ruckelshaus, M.; Guerry, A.; Plummer, M.

    2011-12-01

    Humans obtain numerous benefits from marine ecosystems, including fish to eat; mitigation of storm damage; nutrient and water cycling and primary production; and cultural, aesthetic and recreational values. However, managing these benefits, or ecosystem services, in the marine world relies on an integrated approach that accounts for both marine and watershed activities. Here we present the results of a set of simple, physically-based, and spatially-explicit models that quantify the effects of terrestrial activities on marine ecosystem services. Specifically, we model the circulation and water quality of Hood Canal, WA, USA, a fjord system in Puget Sound where multiple human uses of the nearshore ecosystem (e.g., shellfish aquaculture, recreational Dungeness crab and shellfish harvest) can be compromised when water quality is poor (e.g., hypoxia, excessive non-point source pollution). Linked to the estuarine water quality model is a terrestrial hydrology model that simulates streamflow and nutrient loading, so land cover and climate changes in watersheds can be reflected in the marine environment. In addition, a shellfish aquaculture model is linked to the water quality model to test the sensitivity of the ecosystem service and its value to both terrestrial and marine activities. The modeling framework is general and will be publicly available, allowing easy comparisons of watershed impacts on marine ecosystem services across multiple scales and regions.

  6. Feasibility Study of Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed of Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Andy Lacatell; David Shoch; Bill Stanley; Zoe Kant

    2007-03-01

    The Chesapeake Rivers conservation area encompasses approximately 2,000 square miles of agricultural and forest lands in four Virginia watersheds that drain to the Chesapeake Bay. Consulting a time series of classified Landsat imagery for the Chesapeake Rivers conservation area, the project team developed a GIS-based protocol for identifying agricultural lands that could be reforested, specifically agricultural lands that had been without forest since 1990. Subsequent filters were applied to the initial candidate reforestation sites, including individual sites > 100 acres and sites falling within TNC priority conservation areas. The same data were also used to produce an analysis of baseline changes in forest cover within the study period. The Nature Conservancy and the Virginia Department of Forestry identified three reforestation/management models: (1) hardwood planting to establish old-growth forest, (2) loblolly pine planting to establish working forest buffer with hardwood planting to establish an old-growth core, and (3) loblolly pine planting to establish a working forest. To assess the relative carbon sequestration potential of these different strategies, an accounting of carbon and total project costs was completed for each model. Reforestation/management models produced from 151 to 171 tons carbon dioxide equivalent per acre over 100 years, with present value costs of from $2.61 to $13.28 per ton carbon dioxide equivalent. The outcome of the financial analysis was especially sensitive to the land acquisition/conservation easement cost, which represented the most significant, and also most highly variable, single cost involved. The reforestation/management models explored all require a substantial upfront investment prior to the generation of carbon benefits. Specifically, high land values represent a significant barrier to reforestation projects in the study area, and it is precisely these economic constraints that demonstrate the economic additionality

  7. Thin layers and species-specific characterization of the phytoplankton community in Monterey Bay, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rines, J. E. B.; McFarland, M. N.; Donaghay, P. L.; Sullivan, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    During the summers of 2005 and 2006, experiments designed to understand the properties of densely concentrated, thin layers of plankton and the processes governing their dynamics were conducted in Monterey Bay, California, USA. Our goal was to elucidate the role that species-specific properties of phytoplankton play in thin layer dynamics. Using adaptive sampling, we collected water samples from inside and outside bio-optical features of the water column. Characterization of the phytoplankton was compiled from live and preserved samples, and analyzed within a framework of physical, optical, chemical and acoustical data. In both years, Monterey Bay was home to an extraordinarily diverse assemblage of phytoplankton and other protists. Bioluminescent dinoflagellates, and Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) taxa were common. In 2005, community assemblages were widespread, thus advection of water through the experimental mooring array did not result in floristic changes. In 2006 phytoplankton were very patchy in horizontal distribution, and advection of water through the array was at times accompanied by dramatic shifts in community composition. Individual taxa often exhibited disparate patterns of vertical distribution, with some found throughout the water column, whereas others were restricted to narrow depth intervals. Thin layers were observed in both years. In 2005, the dinoflagellate Akashiwo sanguinea formed intense thin layers near the pycnocline at night, and migrated to near surface waters at dawn. In 2006, layer composition was more complex, and related to the water mass present at the time of sampling. Optically detected thin layers of phytoplankton can be studied from the perspective of the impact their high biomass has on both ecological processes, and ocean optics. But thin layers can also be studied from the species-specific perspective of each organism, its role within the thin layer habitat, and the impact that life within a thin layer has on its life history

  8. Importance of Watershed Land Use in Predicting Benthic Invertebrate Condition in the Virginian Biogeographic Province, USA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries are dynamic transition zones linking freshwater and oceanic habitats. These productive ecosystems are threatened by a variety of stressors including human modification of coastal watersheds. In this study we examined potential linkages between estuarine condition and...

  9. Mercury correlations among six tissues for four waterbird species breeding in San Francisco Bay, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eagles-Smith, C. A.; Ackerman, J.T.; Adelsbach, T.L.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Miles, A.K.; Keister, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Despite a large body of research concerning mercury (Hg) in birds, no single tissue has been used consistently to assess Hg exposure, and this has hampered comparisons across studies. We evaluated the relationships of Hg concentrations among tissues in four species of waterbirds (American avocets [Recurvirostra americana], black-necked stilts [Himantopus mexicanus], Caspian terns [Hydroprogne caspia; formerly Sterna caspia], and Forster's terns [Sterna forsteri]) and across three life stages (prebreeding adults, breeding adults, and chicks) in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Across species and life stages, Hg concentrations (least square mean ?? standard error) were highest in head feathers (6.45 ?? 0.31 ??g/g dry wt) and breast feathers (5.76 ?? 0.28 ??g/g dry wt), followed by kidney (4.54 ?? 0.22 ??g/g dry wt), liver (4.43 ?? 0.21 ??g/g dry wt), blood (3.10 ?? 0.15 ??g/g dry wt), and muscle (1.67 ?? 0.08 ??g/g dry wt). Relative Hg distribution among tissues, however, differed by species and life stage. Mercury concentrations were highly correlated among internal tissues (r 2 ??? 0.89). Conversely, the relationships between Hg in feathers and internal tissues were substantially weaker (r2 ??? 0.42). Regression slopes sometimes differed among species and life stages, indicating that care must be used when predicting Hg concentrations in one tissue based on those in another. However, we found good agreement between predictions made using a general tissue-prediction equation and more specific equations developed for each species and life stage. Finally, our results suggest that blood is an excellent, nonlethal predictor of Hg concentrations in internal tissues but that feathers are relatively poor indicators of Hg concentrations in internal tissues. ?? 2008 SETAC Printed in the USA.

  10. A simulation of groundwater discharge and nitrate delivery to chesapeake bay from the lowermost delmarva peninsula, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, W.E.; Pope, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    A groundwater model has been developed for the lowermost Delmarva Peninsula, USA, that simulates saltwater intrusion into local confined aquifers and nitrate delivery to the Chesapeake Bay from the surficial aquifer. A flow path and groundwater-age analysis was performed using the model to estimate the timing of nitrate delivery to the bay over the next several decades. The simulated mean and median residence times of groundwater in the lowermost peninsula are 30 and 15 years, respectively. Current and future nitrate concentrations in coastal groundwater discharge were simulated based on local well data that include nitrate concentrations and groundwater age. A simulated future-trends analysis indicates that nitrate that has been applied to agricultural regions over the last few decades will continue to discharge into the bay for several decades to come. This study highlights the importance of considering the groundwater lag time that affects the mean transport time from diffuse contamination sources.

  11. Soil chemical and physical properties at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine, USA.

    PubMed

    SanClements, Michael D; Fernandez, Ivan J; Norton, Stephen A

    2010-12-01

    Acidic deposition leads to the acidification of waters and accelerated leaching and depletion of soil base cations. The Bear Brook Watershed in Maine has used whole-watershed chemical manipulations to study the effects of elevated N and S on forest ecosystem function on a decadal time scale. The objectives of this study were to define the chemical and physical characteristics of soils in both the reference and treated watersheds after 17 years of treatment and assess evidence of change in soil chemistry by comparing soil studies in 1998 and 2006. Results from 1998 confirmed depletion of soil base cation pools and decreased pH due to elevated N and S within the treated watershed. However, between 1998 and 2006, during a period of declining SO4(2-) deposition and continued whole-watershed experimental acidification on the treated watershed, there was little evidence of continued soil exchangeable base cation concentration depletion or recovery. The addition of a pulse of litterfall and accelerating mineralization from a severe ice storm in 1998 may have had significant effects on forest floor nutrient pools and cycling between 1998 and 2006. Our findings suggest that mineralization of additional litter inputs from the ice storm may have obscured temporal trends in soil chemistry. The physical data presented also demonstrate the importance of coarse fragments in the architecture of these soils. This study underscores the importance of long-term, quantitative soil monitoring in determining the trajectories of change in forest soils and ecosystem processes over time. PMID:20559716

  12. Evaluation of land use and water quality in an agricultural watershed in the USA indicates multiple sources of bacterial impairment.

    PubMed

    Wittman, Jacob; Weckwerth, Andrew; Weiss, Chelsea; Heyer, Sharon; Seibert, Jacob; Kuennen, Ben; Ingels, Chad; Seigley, Lynette; Larsen, Kirk; Enos-Berlage, Jodi

    2013-12-01

    Pathogens are the number one cause of impairments of assessed rivers and streams in the USA and pose a significant human health hazard. The Dry Run Creek Watershed in Northeast Iowa has been designated as impaired by the State of Iowa because of high levels of Escherichia coli bacteria. To investigate the nature of this impairment, land use and stream bank assessments were coupled with comprehensive water quality monitoring. Physical, chemical, and biological parameters were measured at 13 different sites in the watershed, including pH, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, ammonia-N, nitrate + nitrite-N, total phosphorus, and E. coli. In addition, benthic macroinvertebrate communities were analyzed at seven sites, and optical brightener tests were performed late in the season. Results identified segments of the watershed that were more prominent contributors of E. coli, and correlations were observed between levels of E. coli and several chemical parameters, including ammonia-N, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, and total phosphorus. Interestingly, distinct sites emerged as more prominent contributors of these elements during rain vs. non-rain events, suggesting different types of sources. Both the amount of rainfall and the time elapsed between the rain event and the sampling influenced E. coli levels during wet weather conditions. Nitrate + nitrite-N displayed a unique response to rain events compared with the other parameters, suggesting a different delivery route. Analyses of benthic macroinvertebrate communities were consistent with pollution trends. Collectively, these data suggest distinct agriculturally related E. coli contributions, as well as specific areas and practices for water quality improvement strategies. This study can serve as a resource for evaluating agricultural watersheds that are impaired for bacteria. PMID:23873513

  13. Assessment of NEXRAD and Rain Gauge Precipitation Data for Hydrological Response Predictions in the St Joseph River Watershed, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heathman, G.; Larose, M.; Huang, C.

    2009-04-01

    Precipitation is a major driving force variable behind all hydrologic processes needed for watershed modeling studies. The use of point-scale rain gauge data in watershed hydrologic models may not effectively capture the spatial distribution of rainfall; thereby, directly affecting the water balance and introducing large uncertainty in the modeling outcome. Rain gauges typically measure the depth of precipitation within a 100 cm2 sampling area (i.e., tipping bucket). Although they usually provide high quality data, a dense rain gauge network must be established to capture the spatial variability of precipitation in an area. Spatially distributed precipitation, such as radar precipitation products from the Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) of the U.S. National Weather Service, should provide better estimates of the rainfall distribution over large watershed areas. However, NEXRAD estimates may introduce errors due to drop size distributions of rainfall and properties inherent in the radar measurement system. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate NEXRAD Stage III precipitation data against rain gauge precipitation data that are not included in the processing algorithm, as they become available before being used in hydrologic studies. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine the possible sources of error in the Stage III product through radar-gauge intercomparisons using a 3-yr record (2005-2007) of precipitation data from the Agricultural Research Service, National Soil Erosion Laboratory in northeastern Indiana, USA. The results show that the Stage III system estimated an average of 1035.5 mm of precipitation over the rain gauge network area while rain gauges recorded an average of 955.1 mm. The differences in total precipitation depth and percent bias between the Stage III and rain gauge data were 80.4 mm and 8.4 percent, respectively. Stage III overestimation was observed at four out the five rain gauges. Modeling results of watershed hydrologic

  14. Monitoring dissolved copper concentrations in Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Hall, W S; Bushong, S J; Hall, L W; Lenkevich, M J; Pinkney, A E

    1988-07-01

    Dissolved copper and selected water chemistry parameters were monitored for 11 months in Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A. Dissolved copper concentrations in four recreational marinas, a large harbor, two major river systems, and a heavily used shipping canal ranged from below detectable levels to 80 μg L(-1) (\\-X=11.7 μg L(-1)). Dissolved copper was detected >91% of the time at five locations. Lowest copper concentrations were found in Potomac River, Baltimore Harbor, Pier One Marina, and C & D Canal (\\-X=6-10 μg L(-1); slightly higher levels of dissolved copper were found in Choptank River (\\-X=12 μg L(-1)). Highest levels of copper were detected in Port Annapolis, Hartge, and Piney Narrows Marinas (\\-X=13-18 μg L(-1)), with the highest values observed in the study (70 and 80 μg L(-1)) found in two of these marinas. Copper in the three marinas with highest dissolved copper levels could have been toxic to some of the more sensitive aquatic species. Intensive study of one marina indicated that a likely source of dissolved copper was the recreational boats housed in the marina. PMID:24248797

  15. Anatomy of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure revealed by seismic imaging, Delmarva Peninsula, Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Powars, D.S.; Gohn, G.S.; Horton, J.W., Jr.; Goldman, M.R.; Hole, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    A 30-km-long, radial seismic reflection and refraction survey completed across the northern part of the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure (CBIS) on the Delmarva Peninsula, Virginia, USA, confirms that the CBIS is a complex central-peak crater. We used a tomographic P wave velocity model and low-fold reflection images, constrained by data from two deep boreholes located on the profile, to interpret the structure and composition of the upper 5 km of crust. The seismic images exhibit well-defined structural features, including (with increasing radial distance) a collapsed central uplift, a breccia-filled moat, and a collapsed transient-crater margin (which collectively constitute a ???40-km-wide collapsed transient crater), and a shallowly deformed annular trough. These seismic images are the first to resolve the deep structure of the crater (>1 km) and the boundaries between the central uplift, moat, and annular trough. Several distinct seismic signatures distinguish breccia units from each other and from more coherent crystalline rocks below the central uplift, moat, and annular trough. Within the moat, breccia extends to a minimum depth of 1.5 km or a maximum of 3.5 km, depending upon the interpretation of the deepest layered materials. The images show ???350 to 500 m of postimpact sediments above the impactites. The imaged structure of the CBIS indicates a complex sequence of event during the cratering process that will provide new constraints for numerical modeling. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Automated feature extraction and spatial organization of seafloor pockmarks, Belfast Bay, Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, B.D.; Brothers, L.L.; Barnhardt, W.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seafloor pockmarks occur worldwide and may represent millions of m3 of continental shelf erosion, but few numerical analyses of their morphology and spatial distribution of pockmarks exist. We introduce a quantitative definition of pockmark morphology and, based on this definition, propose a three-step geomorphometric method to identify and extract pockmarks from high-resolution swath bathymetry. We apply this GIS-implemented approach to 25km2 of bathymetry collected in the Belfast Bay, Maine USA pockmark field. Our model extracted 1767 pockmarks and found a linear pockmark depth-to-diameter ratio for pockmarks field-wide. Mean pockmark depth is 7.6m and mean diameter is 84.8m. Pockmark distribution is non-random, and nearly half of the field's pockmarks occur in chains. The most prominent chains are oriented semi-normal to the steepest gradient in Holocene sediment thickness. A descriptive model yields field-wide spatial statistics indicating that pockmarks are distributed in non-random clusters. Results enable quantitative comparison of pockmarks in fields worldwide as well as similar concave features, such as impact craters, dolines, or salt pools. ?? 2010.

  17. Delineation of capture zones for municipal wells in fractured dolomite, Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayne, Todd W.; Bradbury, Kenneth R.; Muldoon, Maureen A.

    2001-10-01

    A wellhead protection study for the city of Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, USA, demonstrates the necessity of combining detailed hydrostratigraphic analysis with groundwater modeling to delineate zones of contribution for municipal wells in a fractured dolomite aquifer. A numerical model (MODFLOW) was combined with a particle tracking code (MODPATH) to simulate the regional groundwater system and to delineate capture zones for municipal wells. The hydrostratigraphic model included vertical and horizontal fractures and high-permeability zones. Correlating stratigraphic interpretations with field data such as geophysical logs, packer tests, and fracture mapping resulted in the construction of a numerical model with five high-permeability zones related to bedding planes or facies changes. These zones serve as major conduits for horizontal groundwater flow. Dipping fracture zones were simulated as thin high-permeability layers. The locations of exposed bedrock and surficial karst features were used to identify areas of enhanced recharge. Model results show the vulnerability of the municipal wells to pollution. Capture zones for the wells extend several kilometers north and south from the city. Travel times from recharge areas to all wells were generally less than one year. The high seasonal variability of recharge in the study area made the use of a transient model necessary.

  18. Cytochrome P450 and organochlorine contaminants in black-crowned night-herons from the Chesapeake Bay region, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J.; Rice, C.P.; Riley, W. Jr.; Eisemann, J.; Hines, R.K.

    1997-11-01

    Black-crowned night-heron offspring were collected from a relatively uncontaminated coastal reference site and two sites in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Hepatic microsomal activities of benzyloxyresorufin-O-dealkylase and ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase were elevated in pipping embryos from the Baltimore Harbor colony compared to the reference site, whereas values in embryos from the Rock Creek Park colony were intermediate. Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides and metabolites in pipping embryos from both sites in the Chesapeake watershed were greater than at the reference site but below the known threshold for reproductive impairment. However, concentrations of 10 arylhydrocarbon receptor-active polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and estimated toxic equivalents were up to 37-fold greater in embryos collected from these two sites in the Chesapeake Bay region, with values for toxic congeners 77 and 126 exceeding those observed in pipping heron embryos from the Great Lakes. Monooxygenase activity of pipping embryos was associated with concentrations of several organochlorine pesticides, total PCBs, arylhydrocarbon receptor-active PCB congeners, and toxic equivalents, providing further evidence of the value of cytochrome P450 as a biomarker of organic contaminant exposure. Organochlorine contaminant levels were greater in 10-d-old nestlings from Baltimore Harbor than the reference site but had no apparent effect on monooxygenase activity or growth. These findings demonstrate induction of cytochrome P450 in pipping black-crowned night-heron embryos in the Chesapeake Bay region, probably by exposure to PCB congeners of local origin, and the accumulation of organochlorine pesticides and metabolites in nestling herons from Baltimore Harbor. Biomonitoring and additional waterbird species that appear to be more sensitive to PCBs than black-crowned night-herons is recommended to document health of waterbirds and remediation of the Chesapeake Bay.

  19. Assessing development pressure in the Chesapeake Bay watershed: An evaluation of two land-use change models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claggett, P.R.; Jantz, C.A.; Goetz, S.J.; Bisland, C.

    2004-01-01

    Natural resource lands in the Chesapeake Bay watershed are increasingly susceptible to conversion into developed land uses, particularly as the demand for residential development grows. We assessed development pressure in the Baltimore-Washington, DC region, one of the major urban and suburban centers in the watershed. We explored the utility of two modeling approaches for forecasting future development trends and patterns by comparing results from a cellular automata model, SLEUTH (slope, land use, excluded land, urban extent, transportation), and a supply/demand/allocation model, the Western Futures Model. SLEUTH can be classified as a land-cover change model and produces projections on the basis of historic trends of changes in the extent and patterns of developed land and future land protection scenarios. The Western Futures Model derives forecasts from historic trends in housing units, a U.S. Census variable, and exogenously supplied future population projections. Each approach has strengths and weaknesses, and combining the two has advantages and limitations. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  20. A sediment budget for a small semiarid watershed in southeastern Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, M. H.; Nearing, M. A.; Polyakov, V. O.; Stone, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    A sediment budget was developed for a 43.7 ha and a nested 3.7 ha semiarid, shrub dominated watershed based on hydrologic, geomorphic, erosion, and sediment data collected from 1963 through 2006 on the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in the southwestern US. Sediment budgets based on such extensive and intensive field campaigns over several decades are rare. The sediment budget was balanced with a high degree of confidence because the study watershed is controlled by an earth dam at the outlet. Although the channel network is well developed and incising in the steeper reaches of the watershed, hillslopes are the dominant source of sediment, contributing 85% of the overall total sediment yield. Erosion and sediment redistribution were driven by highly variable rainfall and runoff during July, August, and September. Sediment transfers are influenced by channel abstractions and the presence of the outlet dam, which created conditions for deposition in the pond approach reach. Although earth dams are ubiquitous throughout the southwestern US, and they can provide a measure of outlet sediment yield, these outlet measurements may be insufficient to interpret temporal and spatial variability in watershed sediment dynamics. Identification of dominant processes and sediment sources is critical for determining management actions that will improve rangeland conditions.

  1. Spatial Statistical Network Models for Stream and River Temperature in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regional temperature models are needed for characterizing and mapping stream thermal regimes, establishing reference conditions, predicting future impacts and identifying critical thermal refugia. Spatial statistical models have been developed to improve regression modeling techn...

  2. Effects of contaminant exposure on reproductive success of ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) nesting in Delaware River and Bay, USA.

    PubMed

    Toschik, Pamela C; Rattner, Barnett A; McGowan, Peter C; Christman, Mary C; Carter, David B; Hale, Robert C; Matson, Cole W; Ottinger, Mary Ann

    2005-03-01

    Despite serious water-quality problems and pollutant loading and retention, Delaware River and Bay (USA) provide important wildlife habitat. In 2002, we conducted a comprehensive evaluation of contaminant exposure and reproduction of ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) breeding in Delaware River and Bay. Sample eggs were collected from 39 nests and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and mercury; a subset of 15 eggs was analyzed for perfluorinated compounds and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The fate of each nest was monitored weekly. Concentrations of 10 organochlorine pesticides or metabolites, total PCBs, and several toxic PCB congeners were greater (p < 0.05) in eggs collected between the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal (C and D Canal) and Trenton (Delaware River and northern Bay) compared to other sites. Concentrations of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE; 0.785-3.84 microg/g wet wt) and total PCBs (5.50-14.5 microg/g wet wt) in eggs collected between the C and D Canal and Trenton were similar to levels recently found in the Chesapeake Bay. In all study segments, at least one young fledged from 66 to 75% of nests. Productivity for Delaware Inland Bays (reference area) and southern Delaware Bay was 1.17 and 1.42 fledglings/active nest, respectively; north of the C and D Canal, productivity was 1.00 fledgling/active nest, which is marginally adequate to maintain the population. Using these data, a logistic regression model found that contaminant concentrations (p,p'-DDE, heptachlor epoxide, chlordane and metabolites, and total PCBs) were predictive of hatching success. Several perfluorinated compounds and PBDEs were detected in eggs at concentrations approaching 1 microg/g wet weight. These findings provide evidence that contaminants continue to be a significant stressor on osprey productivity in the northern Delaware River and Bay. PMID:15779762

  3. Effects of contaminant exposure on reproductive success of ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) nesting in Delaware River and Bay, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toschik, P.C.; Rattner, B.A.; McGowan, P.C.; Christman, M.C.; Carter, Daniel B.; Hale, R.C.; Matson, C.W.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Despite serious water-quality problems and pollutant loading and retention, Delaware River and Bay (USA) provide important wildlife habitat. In 2002, we conducted a comprehensive evaluation of contaminant exposure and reproduction of ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) breeding in Delaware River and Bay. Sample eggs were collected from 39 nests and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and mercury; a subset of 15 eggs was analyzed for perfluorinated compounds and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The fate of each nest was monitored weekly. Concentrations of 10 organochlorine pesticides or metabolites, total PCBs, and several toxic PCB congeners were greater (p < 0.05) in eggs collected between the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal (C and D Canal) and Trenton (Delaware River and northern Bay) compared to other sites. Concentrations of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE; 0.785-3.84 mug/g wet wt) and total PCBs (5.50-14.5 mug/g wet wt) in eggs collected between the C and D Canal and Trenton were similar to levels recently found in the Chesapeake Bay. In all study segments, at least one young fledged from 66 to 75% of nests. Productivity for Delaware Inland Bays (reference area) and southern Delaware Bay was 1.17 and 1.42 fledglings/active nest, respectively; north of the C and D Canal, productivity was 1.00 fledgling/active nest, which is marginally adequate to maintain the population. Using these data, a logistic regression model found that contaminant concentrations (p,p'-DDE, heptachlor epoxide, chlordane and metabolites, and total PCBs) were predictive of hatching success. Several perfluorinated compounds and PBDEs were detected in eggs at concentrations approaching 1 mug/g wet weight. These findings provide evidence that contaminants continue to be a significant stressor on osprey productivity in the northern Delaware River and Bay.

  4. Ecosystem Services Approaches to Restoring a Sustainable Chesapeake Bay and its Tributary Watersheds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within this set of reports and papers, the authors developed an optimization framework to examine how incorporating selected co-benefits (carbon sequestration, recreation/hunting, air quality) of nutrient reductions alters their optimal distribution in the watershed. They used th...

  5. Managing Saginaw Bay nutrient loading by surrounding watersheds through near real time hydrologic resource sheds

    EPA Science Inventory

    We can quantify source areas contributing material to a location during various time periods as resource sheds. Various kinds of resource sheds and their source material distributions are defined. For watershed hydrology, we compute resource sheds and their source material distri...

  6. Linking Ecosystem Services Supply to Stakeholder Values in Guanica Bay Watershed, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Policies to protect coastal resources will be more effective when they account for the social and economic concerns of stakeholders in the coastal zone and watershed, and are responsive to potential tradeoffs between benefits offered by both land and sea. We focus on the Gu&aacu...

  7. Relationships between clay mineralogy, hydrothermal metamorphism, and topography in a Western Cascades watershed, Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambers, Rebecca K. R.

    2001-05-01

    This study investigates variation in clay mineralogy and its relation to hydrothermal metamorphism, hillslope processes, and topography in the western Cascade Mountains. The study area is the drainage basin of Dorena Lake, a medium-sized (686 km 2) watershed located near Cottage Grove, OR. The Bohemia Mining District is on the southeastern rim of the watershed in a hydrothermally metamorphosed region associated with a set of granodiorite plutons. To characterize large-scale patterns of clay mineral distribution within the watershed, suspended sediments were collected from 43 stream locations. Samples of several metamorphosed and unaffected volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks were collected to help clarify metamorphic reaction processes. One active earthflow was also sampled. X-ray diffraction methods were used to determine the mineralogy of the clay-sized (<2 μm) fraction of the samples. Clay mineralogy varies systematically across the watershed, and the three major stream tributaries carry sediment with distinct mineralogical signatures. Discrete minerals include kaolinite, smectite, chlorite, and illite. Interstratified kaolinite-smectite and chlorite-vermiculite (CV) are also present. The active earthflow and unmetamorphosed rock samples primarily contain smectite. In contrast, metamorphosed rock samples are composed of some combination of illite, interstratified illite-smectite, CV, and chlorite. Examination of clay mineral distribution reveals the effects of hydrothermal metamorphism in the mining district on clay mineralogy, hillslope processes, and landscape development. Compared with most of the watershed, the mining district has steeper slopes and higher elevations and lacks smectite almost entirely. Analyses of metamorphosed bedrock units indicate that smectite originally present in the rocks was converted to nonexpandable clay minerals during metamorphism. Induration of bedrock and loss of expandable clays resulted in thin soils and steep topography

  8. Geomorphic controls on mercury accumulation in soils from a historically mined watershed, Central California Coast Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holloway, J.M.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Morrison, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Historic Hg mining in the Cache Creek watershed in the Central California Coast Range has contributed to the downstream transport of Hg to the San Francisco Bay-Delta. Different aspects of Hg mobilization in soils, including pedogenesis, fluvial redistribution of sediment, volatilization and eolian transport were considered. The greatest soil concentrations (>30 mg Hg kg-1) in Cache Creek are associated with mineralized serpentinite, the host rock for Hg deposits. Upland soils with non-mineralized serpentine and sedimentary parent material also had elevated concentrations (0.9-3.7 mg Hg kg-1) relative to the average concentration in the region and throughout the conterminous United States (0.06 mg kg-1). Erosion of soil and destabilized rock and mobilization of tailings and calcines into surrounding streams have contributed to Hg-rich alluvial soil forming in wetlands and floodplains. The concentration of Hg in floodplain sediment shows sediment dispersion from low-order catchments (5.6-9.6 mg Hg kg-1 in Sulphur Creek; 0.5-61 mg Hg kg-1 in Davis Creek) to Cache Creek (0.1-0.4 mg Hg kg-1). These sediments, deposited onto the floodplain during high-flow storm events, yield elevated Hg concentrations (0.2-55 mg Hg kg-1) in alluvial soils in upland watersheds. Alluvial soils within the Cache Creek watershed accumulate Hg from upstream mining areas, with concentrations between 0.06 and 0.22 mg Hg kg-1 measured in soils ~90 km downstream from Hg mining areas. Alluvial soils have accumulated Hg released through historic mining activities, remobilizing this Hg to streams as the soils erode.

  9. Pesticides in shallow ground water in the forested wetland riparian area of the Beasley Lake Watershed, Mississippi, USA, 2001-2005

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the movement of pesticides into shallow ground water in a Mississippi Delta forested natural wetland riparian area in the Beasley Lake watershed (Sunflower County, Mississippi, USA). Four well sites were established, each with depths of 0.6, 1.5, 3.0, and 4.6 m (2’, 5’, 10’, and 15’, re...

  10. ACIDIFICATION TRENDS AND THE EVOLUTION OF NEUTRALIZATION MECHANISMS THROUGH TIME AT THE BEAR BROOK WATERSHED IN MAINE (BBWM), U.S.A.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paired catchment study at the forested Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM) U.S.A. documents interactions among short- to long-term processes of acidification. In 1987-1989, runoff from the two catchments was nearly identical in quality and quantity. Ammonium sulfate has been...

  11. Evaluating relative sensitivity of SWAT-simulated nitrogen discharge to projected climate and land cover changes for two watersheds in North Carolina, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated how projected changes in land cover and climate affected simulated nitrate (NO3−) and organic nitrogen (ORGN) discharge for two watersheds within the Neuse River Basin North Carolina, USA for years 2010 to 2070. We applied the Soil and Water Assessment Tool ...

  12. Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study: Watershed and Estuary Mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Tampa Bay, Florida, and its environs have experienced phenomenal urban growth and significant changes in land-use practices over the past 50 years. This trend is expected to continue, with human activity intensifying and affecting a wider geographic region. Urbanization creates impervious surfaces, which increase stormwater runoff and contribute to greater amounts of chemicals flowing into coastal waters. Man-made structures including bridges, a gas pipeline, desalination plant, ports, navigation channels, and extensive sea walls have been built and will continue to be maintained and modified. This task of the Tampa Bay Study aims to provide a better understanding of these and other man-made impacts on the Tampa Bay region.

  13. Validation of MODIS FLH and In Situ Chlorophyll a from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Andrew; MorenoMadrinan, Max J.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite observation of phytoplankton concentration or chlorophyll-a (chla) is an important characteristic, critically integral to monitoring coastal water quality. However, the optical properties of estuarine and coastal waters are highly variable and complex and pose a great challenge for accurate analysis. Constituents such as suspended solids and dissolved organic matter and the overlapping and uncorrelated absorptions in the blue region of the spectrum renders the blue-green ratio algorithms for estimating chl-a inaccurate. Measurement of suninduced chlorophyll fluorescence, on the other hand, which utilizes the near infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum may, provide a better estimate of phytoplankton concentrations. While modelling and laboratory studies have illustrated both the utility and limitations of satellite algorithms based on the sun induced chlorophyll fluorescence signal, few have examined the empirical validity of these algorithms or compared their accuracy against bluegreen ratio algorithms . In an unprecedented analysis using a long term (2003-2011) in situ monitoring data set from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA), we assess the validity of the FLH product from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer against a suite of water quality parameters taken in a variety of conditions throughout this large optically complex estuarine system. . Overall, the results show a 106% increase in the validity of chla concentration estimation using FLH over the standard chla estimate from the blue-green OC3M algorithm. Additionally, a systematic analysis of sampling sites throughout the bay is undertaken to understand how the FLH product responds to varying conditions in the estuary and correlations are conducted to see how the relationships between satellite FLH and in situ chlorophyll-a change with depth, distance from shore, from structures like bridges, and nutrient concentrations and turbidity. Such analysis illustrates that the correlations between

  14. Unusually abundant and large ciliate xenomas in oysters, Crassostrea virginica, from Great Bay, New Hampshire, USA.

    PubMed

    McGurk, Emily Scarpa; Ford, Susan; Bushek, David

    2016-06-01

    During routine histological examination of oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from Great Bay, New Hampshire, USA, a high prevalence and intensity of ciliate xenomas has been noted since sampling began in 1997. Xenomas are hypertrophic lesions on the gills of bivalve molluscs caused by intracellular ciliates, likely Sphenophrya sp. Although not known to cause mortality in oysters, xenomas have not previously been reported at this high abundance. The objectives of this study were to characterize the xenomas, describe the ciliates, and gather baseline epizootiological data with correlations to environmental and biological parameters. Upon gross examination, xenomas appeared as white nodules, up to 3mm in diameter, located in the gill tissue and occasionally fusing into large masses along the gill filaments. Light microscopy of histological sections revealed xenomas located in the gill water tubes, which they often completely blocked. Higher magnification revealed dual nuclei, eight kineties, and conjugation of the ciliates. Transmission electron microscopy revealed dual nuclei that varied in density, a maximum of twenty cilia in each kinety radiating from the oral apparatus to the posterior, and a 9+2 axoneme structure within the cilia. These traits place the ciliates into the Order Rhynchodida, but insufficient molecular data exist to confirm classification of this ciliate to the Genus Sphenophrya. Since 1997, xenoma prevalence has fluctuated with peaks in 2000, 2004, and 2011. Infected oysters generally contained <30 xenomas, but 2.1% contained >100, sharply contrasting the rare prevalence and low intensity reported elsewhere. Prevalence increased with oyster size, leveling off near 50% in oysters >60mm. Infection intensity peaked in 70-90mm oysters and declined in larger oysters. Individual oyster condition was not associated with xenoma intensity, but sites with oysters in higher condition generally had a greater prevalence and intensity of xenoma infections

  15. Analysis of survey data on the chemistry of twenty-three streams in the Chesapeake Bay watershed: some implications of the impact of acid deposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Janicki, A.; Cummins, R.

    1983-12-01

    A survey of the chemistry of 23 streams within the Chesapeake Bay watershed was conducted in the spring of 1983 to determine whether a potential for changes in water chemistry due to atmospheric inputs of acidic materials exists in any of these streams. Sampling was conducted weekly through the months of March and April. Three streams were identified as being likely affected by acid inputs due to relatively high H(+) and SO4(-2) concentrations and low alkalinities: Stockett's Run, Lyons Creek, and Muddy Creek. Elevated dissolved aluminum concentrations were observed in some Eastern Shore streams and are likely related to the predominance of clay soils in their watersheds.

  16. Investigating the Sources and Dynamics of Dissolved Organic Matter in an Agricultural Watershed in California (U.S.A.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyda, R. Y.; Hernes, P. J.; Spencer, R. G.; Ingrum, T. D.; Pellerin, B. A.; Bergamaschi, B. A.

    2007-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is ubiquitous and plays critical roles in nutrient cycling, aquatic food webs and numerous other biogeochemical processes. Furthermore, various factors control the quality and quantity of DOM, including land use, soil composition, in situ production, microbial uptake and assimilation and hydrology. As a component of DOM, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) has been recently identified as a drinking water constituent of concern due to its propensity to form EPA-regulated carcinogenic compounds when disinfected for drinking water purposes. Therefore, understanding the sources, cycling and modification of DOC across various landscapes is of direct relevance to a wide range of studies. The Willow Slough watershed is located in the Central Valley of California (U.S.A.) and is characterized by both diverse geomorphology as well as land use. The watershed drains approximately 425 km2 and is bordered by Cache and Putah Creeks to the north and south. The study area in the watershed includes the eastern portion of the foothills of the inner Coast Range and the alluvial plain and encompasses diverse land uses, including orchards, viticulture, dairy, pasture and natural grasslands. The Willow Slough watershed represents a unique opportunity to examine DOC dynamics through multiple land uses and hydrologic flow paths that are common throughout California. Preliminary data show that DOC concentrations at the watershed mouth peak during winter storms and also increase gradually throughout the summer months during the agricultural irrigation season. The increasing DOC concentrations during the summer months may result from agricultural runoff and/or primary production in channel. In addition, initial results using the chromophoric DOM (CDOM) absorption coefficient and spectral slope parameters indicate seasonal differences in the composition of the DOM. Spectral slopes decreased during both the summer irrigation season and winter storms relative to winter

  17. Bed coarsening, riffle shortening, and channel enlargement in urbanizing watersheds, northern Kentucky, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Robert J.; MacMannis, Katherine R.; Wooten, Matthew S.

    2013-11-01

    Stream systems naturally respond to watershed land use dynamics, particularly in urban developments with unmanaged impervious areas. Such urban-provoked alterations to channel morphology cause water quality impairments, have adverse effects on aquatic biota, and pose risks to adjacent public infrastructure. Over the past four years we have collected detailed hydrogeomorphic data at 40 unique stream locations throughout northern Kentucky, with at least two rounds of annually repeated surveys at 70% of the sites and three rounds of surveys at 50% of the sites. Analysis of this time-series data encompassed measured rates of instability across three distinct dimensions including (1) channel cross sections, (2) longitudinal profiles, and (3) bed material particle composition. Regression analyses between geomorphic change and 2011 watershed imperviousness indicated stream cross sections in urban/suburban watersheds tend to be getting larger-their overall shape is both deepening and widening. Additionally, stream riffle lengths are shrinking and their pools are becoming both longer and deeper; and finally, their bed material composition is coarsening, particularly in streams in the early stages of watershed development. By documenting fluvial geomorphologic dynamics in such detail, this study highlights the process by which unmitigated urbanization homogenizes stream habitat and degrades aquatic ecosystems. This improved, process-based understanding of the urban-induced channel response sequence has clear implications to both stormwater management and stream/ecosystem restoration, particularly in stream systems where headcut migration is a primary driver of channel instability.

  18. APPARENT 85KRYPTON AGES OF GROUNDWATER WITHIN THE ROYAL WATERSHED, MAINE, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    85Kr activities were determined in 264 domestic and municipal wells from 2002-2004 in the Royal watershed (361 km2), Maine. Gas extraction for 85Kr from wells was effected directly via a well-head methodology permitting efficient widespread analys...

  19. IMPACTS OF MARINE AEROSOLS ON SURFACE WATER CHEMISTRY AT BEAR BROOK WATERSHED, MAINE USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The East Bear catchment at Bear Brook Watershed, Maine receives moderate (for the eastern U.S.) amounts of Cl- in wet and dry deposition. In 1989, Cl- in precipitation ranged from 2 to 55 eq/L. Dry, occult, and wet deposition plus evapotranspiration resulted in stream Cl- averagi...

  20. Soil Net Nitrification Rates and Exchangeable Calcium in Ten Small Upland Watersheds of the Northeastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, D.; Bailey, S.; Shanley, J.; Fredriksen, G.; Jamison, A.

    2004-05-01

    Possible links have been suggested between soil nitrification rates, soil calcium concentrations and tree species composition (e.g. sugar maple). We are measuring soil nitrification rates and stream nitrate export in ten watersheds in Vermont, New Hampshire and New York. These include relatively Ca-poor sites at Cone Pond NH and Ca-rich sites at Sleepers River, VT. Our objectives are to determine the relationship between nitrification rates and watershed characteristics (e.g. vegetation, soils, topography), and to explore the link between these rates and watershed nitrate export. Net nitrification rates are highly variable both within and among the eight sites and are related to the soil C/N ratio and vegetation characteristics at some, but not all, sites. Our preliminary results show distinct differences in exchangeable Ca concentrations among watersheds. Although some locations are enriched in Ca and high in sugar maple density, we have not found a good overall relationship between Ca and net nitrification rates. High rates can be found in Ca-enriched sites that are also relatively high in pH.

  1. RANDOMIZED INTERVENTION ANALYSIS OF THE BEHAVIOR OF BEAR BROOK WATERSHED, MAINE, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Aquatic Effects Research Program (AERP) within the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), the U.S. federal plan for effects research for acidic deposition, funded the EPA Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM) project. he major objectives of BBWM were to 1) ide...

  2. A Preliminary Watershed Scale Soil Quality Assessment in North Central Iowa USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil quality assessment has been recognized as an important step toward understanding the long-term effects of tillage, cropping system, landscape position, and conservation practices within agricultural watersheds. Our objective is to provide an initial assessment of various soil quality indicators...

  3. USDA-ARS Riesel Watersheds, Riesel, Texas, USA: Water quality research database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 75 year legacy database including discharge, sediment loss, land management, and meteorological data for the USDA-ARS Riesel Watersheds has been available on the web for more than a decade (www.ars.usda.gov/spa/hydro-data); however, only recently have additional water quality data been added. T...

  4. A method for spatially explicit representation of sub-watershed sediment yield, Southern California, USA.

    PubMed

    Booth, Derek B; Leverich, Glen; Downs, Peter W; Dusterhoff, Scott; Araya, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    We present here a method to integrate geologic, topographic, and land-cover data in a geographic information system to provide a fine-scale, spatially explicit prediction of sediment yield to support management applications. The method is fundamentally qualitative but can be quantified using preexisting sediment-yield data, where available, to verify predictions using other independent data sets. In the 674-km(2) Sespe Creek watershed of southern California, 30 unique "geomorphic landscape units" (GLUs, defined by relatively homogenous areas of geology, hillslope gradient, and land cover) provide a framework for discriminating relative rates of sediment yield across this landscape. Field observations define three broad groupings of GLUs that are well-associated with types, relative magnitudes, and rates of erosion processes. These relative rates were then quantified using sediment-removal data from nearby debris basins, which allow relatively low-precision but robust calculations of both local and whole-watershed sediment yields, based on the key assumption that minimal sediment storage throughout most of the watershed supports near-equivalency of long-term rates of hillslope sediment production and watershed sediment yield. The accuracy of these calculations can be independently assessed using geologically inferred uplift rates and integrated suspended sediment measurements from mainstem Sespe Creek, which indicate watershed-averaged erosion rates between about 0.6-1.0 mm year(-1) and corresponding sediment yields of about 2 × 10(3) t km(-2) year(-1). A spatially explicit representation of sediment production is particularly useful in a region where wildfires, rapid urban development, and the downstream delivery of upstream sediment loads are critical drivers of both geomorphic processes and land-use management. PMID:24567071

  5. Mercury correlations among six tissues for four waterbird species breeding in San Francisco Bay, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Ackerman, Joshua T; Adelsbach, Terrence L; Takekawa, John Y; Miles, A Keith; Keister, Robin A

    2008-10-01

    Despite a large body of research concerning mercury (Hg) in birds, no single tissue has been used consistently to assess Hg exposure, and this has hampered comparisons across studies. We evaluated the relationships of Hg concentrations among tissues in four species of waterbirds (American avocets [Recurvirostra americana], black-necked stilts [Himantopus mexicanus], Caspian terns [Hydroprogne caspia; formerly Sterna caspia], and Forster's terns [Sterna forsteri]) and across three life stages (prebreeding adults, breeding adults, and chicks) in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Across species and life stages, Hg concentrations (least square mean +/- standard error) were highest in head feathers (6.45 +/- 0.31 microg/g dry wt) and breast feathers (5.76 +/- 0.28 microg/g dry wt), followed by kidney (4.54 +/- 0.22 microg/g dry wt), liver (4.43 +/- 0.21 microg/g dry wt), blood (3.10 +/- 0.15 microg/g dry wt), and muscle (1.67 +/- 0.08 microg/g dry wt). Relative Hg distribution among tissues, however, differed by species and life stage. Mercury concentrations were highly correlated among internal tissues (r2 > or = 0.89). Conversely, the relationships between Hg in feathers and internal tissues were substantially weaker (r2 < or = 0.42). Regression slopes sometimes differed among species and life stages, indicating that care must be used when predicting Hg concentrations in one tissue based on those in another. However, we found good agreement between predictions made using a general tissue-prediction equation and more specific equations developed for each species and life stage. Finally, our results suggest that blood is an excellent, nonlethal predictor of Hg concentrations in internal tissues but that feathers are relatively poor indicators of Hg concentrations in internal tissues. PMID:18444697

  6. Relation of lead exposure to sediment ingestion in mute swans on the Chesapeake Bay, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, W.N.; Day, D.; Morton, A.; Pachepsky, Y.

    1998-11-01

    Although wildlife risk assessments are generally based on the accumulation of environmental contaminants through food chains, wildlife may also ingest contaminants incidentally with sediment. Forty-two mute swans (Cygnus olor) were collected from unpolluted portions of central Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, USA, in spring 1995, and their intestinal digesta were analyzed for 13 metals (aluminum [Al], boron, barium, cadmium, copper [Cu], iron, magnesium, manganese, nickel, lead [Pb], strontium, vanadium, and zinc) and for acid-insoluble ash, a marker of sediment. Swan livers and sediment samples also were analyzed for the same metals. Group method of data handling demonstrated that the digesta Al, which is associated with clays, was the best predictor of digesta Pb. Adding concentrations of other metals as predictors did not improve the accuracy of the estimates of Pb concentrations from Al concentrations. The r{sup 2} of the equation relating the log of digesta Pb to the log of digesta Al was 0.86, whereas the r{sup 2} of the equation relating the log of digesta Pb to the log of digesta acid-insoluble ash was 0.50. Accounting for the sediment ingested was critical to determining the exposure of mute swans to Pb, as well as to some of the other metals, and sediment ingestion should be considered in ecotoxicological risk assessments of waterfowl. The mean of 7.4% acid-insoluble ash in the digesta corresponded to an estimated 3.2% sediment in the diet. The Pb concentrations in the digesta were two to three times the concentration that would have been predicted from sediment Pb concentrations; presumably, the swans had ingested clays high in Pb that had settled on the vegetation. The swans were probably not exposed to high Cu concentrations but nevertheless had hepatic Cu concentrations that would be considered very high if found in other species.

  7. Trend analysis of stressors and ecological responses, particularly nutrients, in the Narragansett Bay Watershed.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current and historic impacts of nitrogen on water quality were evaluated and relationships between nutrients and ecosystem structure and function were developed for Narragansett Bay, RI. Land use land cover change analysis from 1985 thru 2005 resulted in a 7% increase in urban la...

  8. Groundwater flow and its effect on salt dissolution in Gypsum Canyon watershed, Paradox Basin, southeast Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitman, Nadine G.; Ge, Shemin; Mueller, Karl

    2014-09-01

    Groundwater flow is an important control on subsurface evaporite (salt) dissolution. Salt dissolution can drive faulting and associated subsidence on the land surface and increase salinity in groundwater. This study aims to understand the groundwater flow system of Gypsum Canyon watershed in the Paradox Basin, Utah, USA, and whether or not groundwater-driven dissolution affects surface deformation. The work characterizes the groundwater flow and solute transport systems of the watershed using a three-dimensional (3D) finite element flow and transport model, SUTRA. Spring samples were analyzed for stable isotopes of water and total dissolved solids. Spring water and hydraulic conductivity data provide constraints for model parameters. Model results indicate that regional groundwater flow is to the northwest towards the Colorado River, and shallow flow systems are influenced by topography. The low permeability obtained from laboratory tests is inconsistent with field observed discharges, supporting the notion that fracture permeability plays a significant role in controlling groundwater flow. Model output implies that groundwater-driven dissolution is small on average, and cannot account for volume changes in the evaporite deposits that could cause surface deformation, but it is speculated that dissolution may be highly localized and/or weaken evaporite deposits, and could lead to surface deformation over time.

  9. Changes in Streamflow and Water Quality in Selected Nontidal Basins in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, 1985-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langland, Michael J.; Raffensperger, Jeff P.; Moyer, Douglas; Landwehr, Jurate M.; Schwarz, Gregory E.

    2006-01-01

    As part of an annual evaluation of water-quality conditions by the Chesapeake Bay Program, water-quality and streamflow data from 32 sites in nontidal parts of the Chesapeake Bay watershed were analyzed to document annual nutrient and sediment trends for 1985 through 2004. This study also formalized different trend tests and methodologies used in assessing the effectiveness of man-agement actions in reducing nutrients and sediments to the Chesapeake Bay. Trends in streamflow were tested at multiple time scales (daily, seasonal, and annual), resulting in only one significant trend (annual-mean streamflow for the Choptank River near Greensboro, Md.). Total freshwater flow entering the bay for the July-August-September 'summer' season 2004 was the highest ever estimated for that 3-month period (1937-2004). Observed (unbiased) concentration summaries indi-cate higher ranges in total-nitrogen concentrations in the northern major river basins, those in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and northern Virginia, compared to the more southern basins in Virginia. Almost half of the monitoring sites in the northern basins exhibited significant downward trends in total nitrogen with time. Comparisons with total phosphorus and sediment showed similar results to total nitrogen. Monthly and annual loads were available for the River Input Monitoring Program sites from the U.S. Geological Survey. Although loads were significantly reduced from 2003, in 2004, the combined estimated total nitrogen loads were the third highest since 1990, whereas total phosphorus and sediment loads were the fifth highest. A flow-weighted concentration (FWC) is useful in evaluating changes through time. Combined annual mean total nitrogen FWC from the 9 River Input Monitoring Program sites indicated a downward tendency from 1985 through 1998 and an upward tendency since 2001. From 1990 to 2004, the mean concentrations of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and sediment were 1.58, 0.085, and 51 milligrams per liter

  10. Contrasting residence times and fluxes of water and sulfate in two small forested watersheds in Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Michel, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Watershed mass balances for solutes of atmospheric origin may be complicated by the residence times of water and solutes at various time scales. In two small forested headwater catchments in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia, USA, mean annual export rates of SO4= differ by a factor of 2, and seasonal variations in SO4= concentrations in atmospheric deposition and stream water are out of phase. These features were investigated by comparing 3H, 35S, ??34S, ??2H, ??18O, ??3He, CFC-12, SF6, and chemical analyses of open deposition, throughfall, stream water, and spring water. The concentrations of SO4= and radioactive 35S were about twice as high in throughfall as in open deposition, but the weighted composite values of 35S/S (11.1 and 12.1 ?? 10- 15) and ??34S (+ 3.8 and + 4.1???) were similar. In both streams (Shelter Run, Mill Run), 3H concentrations and ??34S values during high flow were similar to those of modern deposition, ??2H and ??18O values exhibited damped seasonal variations, and 35S/S ratios (0-3 ?? 10- 15) were low throughout the year, indicating inter-seasonal to inter-annual storage and release of atmospheric SO4= in both watersheds. In the Mill Run watershed, 3H concentrations in stream base flow (10-13??TU) were consistent with relatively young groundwater discharge, most ??34S values were approximately the same as the modern atmospheric deposition values, and the annual export rate of SO4= was equal to or slightly greater than the modern deposition rate. In the Shelter Run watershed, 3H concentrations in stream base flow (1-3??TU) indicate that much of the discharging ground water had been deposited prior to the onset of atmospheric nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s, base flow ??34S values (+ 1.6???) were significantly lower than the modern deposition values, and the annual export rate of SO4= was less than the modern deposition rate. Concentrations of 3H and 35S in Shelter Run base flow, and of 3H, 3He, CFC-12, SF6, and 35S in a spring